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Sample records for splenic hematopoietic cell

  1. The effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplant on splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm-associated myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Marco; Gergis, Usama; Chaviano, Felicia; Orazi, Attilio

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is the only curative treatment for myeloproliferative neoplasm-associated myelofibrosis (MPN-MF). The main clinical manifestation of MPN-MF is splenomegaly secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). The effects of HSCT on splenic EMH and associated vascular and stromal changes are unknown. This study compares the findings seen in spleens following HSCT with those of nontransplanted patients, normal controls, and matched bone marrow (BM) samples. This study included three transplanted MPN-MF spleens, three nontransplanted MPN-MF spleens, and three normal controls. Spleens were assessed for: (a) presence/extent of EMH; (b) presence of Gamna-Gandy bodies; (c) splenic fibrosis; (d) CD34-positive microvessel density; (e) CD8-positive sinusoids; (f) frequency of smooth muscle actin-positive myoid cells; and (g) nerve growth factor receptor-positive adventitial reticulum cells. In two cases, matched BM samples were assessed for cellularity, presence of atypical megakaryocytes, and fibrosis. Compared with normal controls, all MPN-MF spleens were larger in size, had EMH, red pulp fibrosis, higher CD34-positive microvessel density, and decreased CD8-positive sinusoids. Compared with nontransplanted cases, post-HSCT spleens showed disappearance or reduction of EMH. Gamna-Gandy bodies were increased; no differences in the remaining parameters were found. A reduction of splenic EMH was associated with normalization of BM cellularity and megakaryopoiesis. HSCT reduces/abrogates splenic EMH and is associated with an increased number of Gamna-Gandy bodies, which may suggest vascular damage. The lack of stromal changes in spleens removed shortly after transplant is in line with similar observations in the BM, where a longer interval is often necessary for resolution of fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Splenic irradiation for hairy cell leukaemia

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    Al-Moundhri, A.; Graham, P.H. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW, (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1997-11-01

    Splenic irradiation in the management of hairy cell leukaemia is previously unreported. A case is presented here to illustrate that splenic irradiation may be a useful addition to systemic therapies. It achieved local splenic and blood picture response and remission similar to splenectomy without any significant toxicity. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Hatzimichael

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eleftheria Hatzimichael1, Mark Tuthill21Department of Haematology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College National Health Service Trust, London, UKAbstract: More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications.Keywords: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complications

  4. Hematopoietic cell crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (I) suppression, (II) recovery, (III) accommodation, and (IV) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistence by hematopoietic pregenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event 'sets the stage' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase I to II. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the 'immortalization' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictages governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. (author)

  5. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; Metcalf, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO s...

  6. Hematopoietic stem cells under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganuza, Miguel; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors are tasked with maintaining hematopoietic homeostasis in the face of numerous insults and challenges, including infection, inflammation, and exsanguination. HSCs possess the remarkable ability to reconstitute the entire hematopoietic system of an organism whose own hematopoietic system has been ablated. This ability is exploited routinely in the clinic via HSC transplantation (HSCT). Here, we focus on the physiological and molecular bottlenecks overcome by HSCs during transplantation. During transplantation, HSCs encounter a damaged bone marrow niche, characterized molecularly by increases in oxygen concentrations and an altered cytokine milieu. New mechanisms and pathways have been recently implicated during HSCT, including transplanted HSC-dependent secretion of conditioning molecules that facilitate engraftment and pathways that protect HSCs from perturbed organelle homeostasis. Better understanding the molecular processes HSCs employ to withstand the stress of transplant will illuminate novel targets for further improving conditioning regimens and engraftment during HSCT.

  7. Hematopoietic stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Roi; Weissman, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2008-10-01

    The etiology of the age-associated pathophysiological changes of the hematopoietic system including the onset of anemia, diminished adaptive immune competence, and myelogenous disease development are underwritten by the loss of normal homeostatic control. As tissue and organ homeostasis in adults is primarily mediated by the activity of stem and progenitor cells, it has been suggested that the imbalances accompanying aging of the hematopoietic system may stem from alterations in the prevalence and/or functional capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors. In this review, we examine evidence implicating a role for stem cells in the aging of the hematopoietic system, and focus on the mechanisms suggested to contribute to stem cell aging.

  8. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Carolyn A

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO signaling associated with bone marrow failure and thrombocytopenia. Recent studies have shown that constitutive activation mutations in Mpl contribute to myeloproliferative disease. In this review, we will discuss TPO signaling pathways, regulation of TPO levels and the role of TPO in normal hematopoiesis and during myeloproliferative disease. PMID:21478671

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion : challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald; Kanz, L; Fibbe, WE; Lengerke, C; Dick, JE

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to improve hematopoietic reconstitution and engraftment potential of ex vivo-expanded hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful due to the inability to generate sufficient stem cell numbers and to excessive differentiation of the starting cell

  10. Modulation of cytokine production profiles in splenic dendritic cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the role of splenic dendritic cells in immune response to Toxoplasma gondii infection in SAG1 (P30+) transgenic mice by investigating the kinetics of intracellular cytokines expression of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γ by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) using flow cytometry, and compared the results to those of ...

  11. The biochemistry of hematopoietic stem cell development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); M. Crisan (Mihaela); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The cornerstone of the adult hematopoietic system and clinical treatments for blood-related disease is the cohort of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that is harbored in the adult bone marrow microenvironment. Interestingly, this cohort of HSCs is generated only during a short

  12. Stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Isabel; Maloney, William J; Weissmann, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2010-08-01

    Advancing age is accompanied by a number of clinically significant conditions arising in the hematopoietic system that include: diminution and decreased competence of the adaptive immune system, elevated incidence of certain autoimmune diseases, increased hematological malignancies, and elevated incidence of age-associated anemia. As with most tissues, the aged hematopoietic system also exhibits a reduced capacity to regenerate and return to normal homeostasis after injury or stress. Evidence suggests age-dependent functional alterations within the hematopoietic stem cell compartment significantly contribute to many of these pathophysiologies. Recent developments have shed light on how aging of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment contributes to hematopoietic decline through diverse mechanisms. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thrombopoietin expands hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Norma; Priestley, Greg; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that thrombopoietin (TPO) contributes to the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), supporting their survival and proliferation in vitro. To determine whether TPO supports the impressive expansion of HSC observed following transplantation, we transplanted normal marrow cells into lethally irradiated Tpo–/– and Tpo+/+ mice and quantified HSC self-renewal and expansion and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing. Although essentially identical numbers of...

  14. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  15. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Approaches to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Jennifer E; Kubek, Sara P; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2017-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are unique in their ability to self-renew and generate all blood lineages for the entire life. HSC modification affects red blood cells, platelets, lymphocytes, and myeloid cells. Chemotherapy can result in myelosuppression, limiting effective chemotherapy administration. For diseases like glioblastoma, high expression of methlylguanine methyltransferase can inactivate alkylating agent chemotherapy. Here we discuss how HSCs can be modified to overcome this resistance, permitting sensitization of tumors to chemotherapy while simultaneously protecting the hematopoietic system. We also discuss how HSCs can be harnessed to produce powerful tumor killing T cells, potentially benefitting and complementing T-cell-based immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CT imaging of splenic sequestration in sickle cell disease

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    Sheth, S.; Piomelli, S. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Berdon, W.E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Div. of Pediatric Radiology

    2000-12-01

    Pooling of blood in the spleen is a frequent occurrence in children with sickle cell diseases, particularly in the first few years of life, resulting in what is termed ''splenic sequestration crisis.'' The spectrum of severity in this syndrome is wide, ranging from mild splenomegaly to massive enlargement, circulatory collapse, and even death. The diagnosis is usually clinical, based on the enlargement of the spleen with a drop in hemoglobin level by >2 g/dl, and it is rare that imaging studies are ordered. However, in the patient who presents to the emergency department with non-specific findings of an acute abdomen, it is important to recognize the appearance of sequestration on imaging studies. We studied seven patients utilizing contrast-enhanced CT scans and found two distinct patterns - multiple, peripheral, non-enhancing low-density areas or large, diffuse areas of low density in the majority of the splenic tissue. Although radiological imaging is not always necessary to diagnose splenic sequestration, in those situations where this diagnosis is not immediately obvious, it makes an important clarifying contribution. (orig.)

  17. CT imaging of splenic sequestration in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheth, S.; Piomelli, S.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Berdon, W.E.

    2000-01-01

    Pooling of blood in the spleen is a frequent occurrence in children with sickle cell diseases, particularly in the first few years of life, resulting in what is termed ''splenic sequestration crisis.'' The spectrum of severity in this syndrome is wide, ranging from mild splenomegaly to massive enlargement, circulatory collapse, and even death. The diagnosis is usually clinical, based on the enlargement of the spleen with a drop in hemoglobin level by >2 g/dl, and it is rare that imaging studies are ordered. However, in the patient who presents to the emergency department with non-specific findings of an acute abdomen, it is important to recognize the appearance of sequestration on imaging studies. We studied seven patients utilizing contrast-enhanced CT scans and found two distinct patterns - multiple, peripheral, non-enhancing low-density areas or large, diffuse areas of low density in the majority of the splenic tissue. Although radiological imaging is not always necessary to diagnose splenic sequestration, in those situations where this diagnosis is not immediately obvious, it makes an important clarifying contribution. (orig.)

  18. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  19. Ex vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a complex cellular differentiation process resulting in the formation of all blood cell types. In this process, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside at the top of the hematopoiesis hierarchy and have the capacity to differentiate into all blood cell lineages

  20. Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is recruited to CD22 following B cell antigen receptor ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Schijndel, G. M.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages. Motheaten mice, which are devoid of (functional) hematopoietic cell phosphatase, have severe disturbances in the regulation of B cell activation and

  1. In Utero Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tippi C. Mackenzie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application.

  2. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  3. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... in the context of stem cell tracking in vivo. This review concludes with a section on the unexpected potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells to contribute to the repair of damaged tissues. The contribution of cell fusion to explain the latter phenomenon is discussed. SUMMARY: Because of exciting discoveries...... made recently in the field of stem cell biology, researchers now have improved tools to define novel populations of stem cells, examine them ex vivo using conditions that promote self-renewal, track them into recipients, and determine whether they can contribute to the repair of damaged tissues...

  4. Cellular memory and, hematopoietic stem cell aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Leonie M.; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance self-renewal and differentiation in order to sustain lifelong blood production and simultaneously maintain the HSC pool. However, there is clear evidence that HSCs are subject to quantitative and qualitative exhaustion. In this review, we briefly discuss

  5. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem....../progenitor cells (HSPCs, Lin(neg)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) or myeloid committed precursors (Lin(neg)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5,000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical...

  6. Observations on the contributions of environmental restraints and innate stem cell ability to hematopoietic regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke-Cohan, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    A competitive repopulation assay utilizing chromosome markers was used to assay the reconstituting potential of hematopoietic populations. The test populations consisted of tibial murine marrow locally irradiated with doses ranging from 1.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy and of marrow generated from either murine splenic or marrow stem cells. The purpose of this assay was to assess the innate proliferative potential and microenvironmental influences on the ability to repopulate. Regardless of origin, spleen repopulating ability consistently agreed with spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-s) content. Doses of radiation from 5 Gy to 8.5 Gy diminished, by a factor of 2, the ability to repopulate marrow despite maintenance of CFU-s levels. Marrow generated from splenic stem cells had one-fifth the repopulating ability of marrow derived from marrow stem cells, even though CFU-s levels were equivalent. The results imply that the splenic environment can only maintain stem cells at the level of the CFU-s, even if the stem cells were originally of higher quality, and that their original potential cannot be regained in a marrow environment. Nevertheless, the marrow can maintain more primitive stem cells, but this reserve is drained to support CFU-s levels

  7. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury via regulation of cellular MAPK/phosphatase levels and increasing hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, R S; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K

    2014-03-01

    Here we describe a novel strategy for mitigation of ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by suppressing the activity of MKP3, resulting in ERK activation and enhanced abundance of hematopoietic stem cells, using the antioxidant flavonoid baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone). It offered complete protection to mouse splenic lymphocytes against radiation-induced cell death. Inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 could significantly abrogate baicalein-mediated radioprotection in lymphocytes. Baicalein inhibited phosphatase MKP3 and thereby enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and its downstream proteins such as Elk and Nrf-2. It also increased the nuclear levels of Nrf-2 and the mRNA levels of its dependent genes. Importantly, baicalein administration to mice before radiation exposure led to significant recovery of loss of bone marrow cellularity and also inhibited cell death. Administration of baicalein increased the hematopoietic stem cell frequency as measured by side-population assay and also by antibody staining. Further, baicalein offered significant protection against whole-body irradiation (WBI; 7.5Gy)-induced mortality in mice. Interestingly, we found that baicalein works by activating the same target molecules ERK and Nrf-2 both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, administration of all-trans-retinoic acid (inhibitor of Nrf-2) significantly abrogated baicalein-mediated protection against WBI-induced mortality in mice. Thus, in contrast to the generalized conception of antioxidants acting as radioprotectors, we provide a rationale that antioxidants exhibit pleiotropic effects through the activation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prostaglandin E2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingying; Zhou Daohong; Meng Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a bioactive lipid molecule produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays an important role on hematopoiesis. While it can block differentiation of myeloid progenitors but enhance proliferation of erythroid progenitors. Recent research found that PGE2 have the effects on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function and these effects were independent from effects on progenitor cells. Exposure of HSC cells to PGE2 in vitro can increase homing efficiency of HSC to the murine bone marrow compartment and decrease HSC apoptosis, meanwhile increase long-term stem cell engraftment. In-vivo treatment with PGE2 expands short-term HSC and engraftment in murine bone marrow but not long-term HSC.In addition, PGE2 increases HSC survival after radiation injury and enhance hematopoietic recovery, resulting maintains hematopoietic homeostasis. PGE2 regulates HSC homeostasis by reactive oxygen species and Wnt pathway. Clinical beneficial of 16, 16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 treatment to enhance engraftment of umbilical cord blood suggest important improvements to therapeutic strategies. (authors)

  9. Predictors of splenic function preservation in children with sickle cell anemia treated with hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottage, Kerri A; Ware, Russell E; Winter, Bryan; Smeltzer, Matthew; Wang, Winfred C; Hankins, Jane S; Dertinger, Stephen D; Shulkin, Barry; Aygun, Banu

    2014-11-01

    More than 90% of children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) lose splenic function by the age of 2 yrs. Splenic function may improve with hydroxyurea, but previous studies are conflicting. We prospectively evaluated the effect of hydroxyurea on splenic filtrative function. Children with SCA enrolled in the Hydroxyurea Study of Long-Term Effects (HUSTLE-NCT00305175) underwent clinical evaluations including Tc(99) m liver-spleen (LS) scans before hydroxyurea initiation and after 3 yrs of treatment to maximum tolerated dose (MTD). LS scans were classified as follows: no uptake, Hydroxyurea at MTD is associated with preserved or improved splenic filtrative function, with 33% demonstrating LS scan uptake after 3 yrs. Younger age, higher %HbF, and baseline splenic function are associated with a favorable outcome. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hematopoietic specification from human pluripotent stem cells: current advances and challenges toward de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2013-12-12

    Significant advances in cellular reprogramming technologies and hematopoietic differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have already enabled the routine production of multiple lineages of blood cells in vitro and opened novel opportunities to study hematopoietic development, model genetic blood diseases, and manufacture immunologically matched cells for transfusion and cancer immunotherapy. However, the generation of hematopoietic cells with robust and sustained multilineage engraftment has not been achieved. Here, we highlight the recent advances in understanding the molecular and cellular pathways leading to blood development from hPSCs and discuss potential approaches that can be taken to facilitate the development of technologies for de novo production of hematopoietic stem cells.

  11. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizer J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery.

  16. The aging hematopoietic stem cell niche: Phenotypic and functional changes and mechanisms that contribute to hematopoietic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchney, Sarah E; Calvi, Laura M

    2017-01-01

    The hematopoietic system has the remarkable ability to provide a lifelong supply of mature cells that make up the entire blood and immune system. However, similar to other adult stem cell niches, the hematopoietic system is vulnerable to the detrimental effects of aging. This is a substantial health concern as the trend for population aging continues to increase. Identifying mechanisms that underlie hematopoietic aging is vital for understanding hematopoietic-related diseases. In this review, we first discuss the cellular hierarchy of the hematopoietic system and the components that make up the surrounding hematopoietic niche. We then provide an overview of the major phenotypes associated with hematopoietic aging and discuss recent research investigating cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic mechanisms of hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) aging. We end by discussing the exciting new concept of possibly reversing the HSC aging process along with outstanding questions that remain to be answered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerman, Isabel; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging

  18. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...... for 3 years post-transplant. Magnetic resonance revealed the capacity of autologous HSCT to suppress or markedly reduce gadolinium-enhancing lesions. The progression of brain atrophy declined after two years post-HSCT. The profound immunological changes following autologous HSCT may result...

  20. Complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Karim; Patel, Nihar; Jain, Maneesh; El-Amm, Joelle; Amro, Farah; Tabbara, Imad A

    2014-08-01

    Infection, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and to a lesser extent sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) represent the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). During the last decade, progress in prevention and treatment of these complications led to improvement in the outcome of these patients. Despite the fact that nonmyeloablative regimens have been increasingly used in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities, the nonrelapse related mortality remains a challenge and long-term follow-up is required. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an updated concise review of the complications of AHSCT and of the available treatment interventions.

  1. Mechanism of hematopoietic stem cell homing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fuquan

    2000-01-01

    The clinical transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) originating from many sources such as bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood has been widely applied in recent years. At the same time, the development of the study on the mechanism of HSC homing which involves multi-procedures has been achieved. And a lot of molecular and cytokines on the surface or in the microenvironment of HSC are functioning in homing. The purpose of is to review those molecular and cytokines on which more studies have been focused in the past

  2. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Frenkel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/- retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/- and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/- C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136 but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144 prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei

  3. Inflammatory signals regulate hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Megan T; King, Katherine Y; Goodell, Margaret A

    2011-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the progenitors of all blood and immune cells, yet their role in immunity is not well understood. Most studies have focused on the ability of committed lymphoid and myeloid precursors to replenish immune cells during infection. Recent studies, however, have indicated that HSCs also proliferate in response to systemic infection and replenish effector immune cells. Inflammatory signaling molecules including interferons, tumor necrosis factor-α and Toll-like receptors are essential to the HSC response. Observing the biology of HSCs through the lens of infection and inflammation has led to the discovery of an array of immune-mediators that serve crucial roles in HSC regulation and function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mismatch repair deficient hematopoietic stem cells are preleukemic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Qing

    Full Text Available Whereas transformation events in hematopoietic malignancies may occur at different developmental stages, the initial mutation originates in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, creating a preleukemic stem cell (PLSC. Subsequent mutations at either stem cell or progenitor cell levels transform the PLSC into lymphoma/leukemia initiating cells (LIC. Thymic lymphomas have been thought to develop from developing thymocytes. T cell progenitors are generated from HSCs in the bone marrow (BM, but maturation and proliferation of T cells as well as T-lymphomagenesis depends on both regulatory mechanisms and microenvironment within the thymus. We studied PLSC linked to thymic lymphomas. In this study, we use MSH2-/- mice as a model to investigate the existence of PLSC and the evolution of PLSC to LIC. Following BM transplantation, we found that MSH2-/- BM cells from young mice are able to fully reconstitute multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated wild-type recipients. However, all recipients developed thymic lymphomas within three and four months post transplantation. Transplantation of different fractions of BM cells or thymocytes from young health MSH2-/- mice showed that an HSC enriched fraction always reconstituted hematopoiesis followed by lymphoma development. In addition, lymphomas did not occur in thymectomized recipients of MSH2-/- BM. These results suggest that HSCs with DNA repair defects such as MSH2-/- are PLSCs because they retain hematopoietic function, but also carry an obligate lymphomagenic potential within their T-cell progeny that is dependent on the thymic microenvironment.

  5. Hematopoietic Niche - Exploring Biomimetic Cues to Improve the Functionality of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marta H G; de Soure, António M; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo; da Silva, Cláudia L

    2018-02-01

    The adult bone marrow (BM) niche is a complex entity where a homeostatic hematopoietic system is maintained through a dynamic crosstalk between different cellular and non-cellular players. Signaling mechanisms triggered by cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix (ECM), cell-cytokine interactions, and local microenvironment parameters are involved in controlling quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, and migration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). A promising strategy to more efficiently expand HSPC numbers and tune their properties ex vivo is to mimic the hematopoietic niche through integration of adjuvant stromal cells, soluble cues, and/or biomaterial-based approaches in HSPC culture systems. Particularly, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC), through their paracrine activity or direct contact with HSPC, are thought to be a relevant niche player, positioning HSPC-MSC co-culture as a valuable platform to support the ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitors. To improve the clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), namely when the available HSPC are present in a limited number such is the case of HSPC collected from umbilical cord blood (UCB), ex vivo expansion of HSPC is required without eliminating the long-term repopulating capacity of more primitive HSC. Here, we will focus on depicting the characteristics of co-culture systems, as well as other bioengineering approaches to improve the functionality of HSPC ex vivo. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Hematopoietic (stem) cell development - how divergent are the roads taken?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauts, Mari-Liis; Vink, Chris S; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-11-01

    The development of the hematopoietic system during early embryonic stages occurs in spatially and temporally distinct waves. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the most potent and self-renewing cells of this system, are produced in the final 'definitive' wave of hematopoietic cell generation. In contrast to HSCs in the adult, which differentiate via intermediate progenitor populations to produce functional blood cells, the generation of hematopoietic cells in the embryo prior to HSC generation occurs in the early waves by producing blood cells without intermediate progenitors (such as the 'primitive' hematopoietic cells). The lineage relationship between the early hematopoietic cells and the cells giving rise to HSCs, the genetic networks controlling their emergence, and the precise temporal determination of HSC fate remain topics of intense research and debate. This Review article discusses the current knowledge on the step-wise embryonic establishment of the adult hematopoietic system, examines the roles of pivotal intrinsic regulators in this process, and raises questions concerning the temporal onset of HSC fate determination. © 2016 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    mouse hematopoietic stem cells ex vivo by reprogramming cellular metabolism. Blood. 2015;125(10):1562-1565. 54. Nath N, Khan M, Paintlia MK, Singh I...Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0297 TITLE: Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Raymond J...Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells Stem Cells ’ 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 5b

  8. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1 F22-24/F22-24 ) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1 BRCA1/BRCA1 ) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1 F22-24/5382insC ) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Mgbemena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1F22–24/F22–24 developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1BRCA1/BRCA1 were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1F22–24/5382insC had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  10. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong; Zhou, Zhigang; Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli; Sun, Hanying

    2009-01-01

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  11. [Hematopoietic reconstitution and prognosis of different types of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wu, Depei; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Song; Wang, Xiuli; Miao, Miao; Chen, Jia; Han, Yue; Tang, Xiaowen; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Jin, Zhengming; Fu, Chengcheng; Ma, Xiao; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    To compare the differences between hematopoietic reconstitution and longterm prognosis of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) after HLA- matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(MSD-HSCT), Haploidentical HSCT(Haplo-HSCT), unrelated donor allogeneic HSCT(UD-HSCT)and umbilical cord blood HSCT(UCB-HSCT). In this retrospective study, 63 patients with SAA who received HSCT in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between May 2008 and December 2013 were enrolled. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the transplantation types. The hematopoietic reconstitution, the incidence of acute graft-versushost disease(aGVHD)and 5- year survival rate after transplantation were compared. All 53 subjects who received MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. Of them, the recovery of neutrophil and platelet were not significantly different(P0.05). MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT had no statistically significance in terms of hematopoietic reconstitution or prognosis. Although hematopoietic reconstitution of UCB-HSCT was lower than other transplantation types, but no significant difference in overall prognosis. So if HLA-matched sibling donor is not available, SAA patients can choose Haplo- HSCT, UD - HSCT or UCB- HSCT with comparable efficacy to MSD- HSCT, as an alternative therapy.

  12. Mouse ES cell-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Future stem cell-based therapies will benefit from the new discoveries being made on pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells. Understanding the genes regulating pluripotency has opened new opportunities to generate patient-tailored therapies. However, protocols for deriving progenitor cells of therapeutic grade from these pluripotent stem cells are not yet worked out. In particular the potential of these cells in treating diseases when compared to their adult progenitor counterparts is unknown. This is crucial work that needs to be studied in detail because we will need to determine engraftment potential of these cells and their ability for multi-lineage engraftment in the in vivo setting before any clinical applications. The ability of these cells to engraft is dependent on their expression of cell surface markers which guide their homing patterns. In this review, I discuss murine hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from mouse ES cells. Stem cells in the bone marrow are found in the bone marrow niches. Our knowledge of the bone marrow niches is growing and will ultimately lead to improved clinical transplantation of bone marrow cells. We are, however, a long way in appreciating how hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate and populate lymphoid tissues. One of the variables in generating hematopoietic progenitor cells is that different labs use different approaches in generating progenitor cells. In some cases, the ES cell lines used show some variability as well. The cell culture media used by the different investigators highly influence the maturation level of the cells and their homing patterns. Here, mouse ES cell-derived progenitor cells are discussed.

  13. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for people with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oringanje, Chioma; Nemecek, Eneida; Oniyangi, Oluseyi

    2016-05-19

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder involving a defect in the red blood cells due to its sickled hemoglobin. The main therapeutic interventions include preventive and supportive measures. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantations are carried out with the aim of replacing the defective cells and their progenitors (hematopoietic (i.e. blood forming) stem cells) in order to correct the disorder. This is an update of a previously published review. To determine whether stem cell transplantation can improve survival and prevent symptoms and complications associated with sickle cell disease. To examine the risks of stem cell transplantation against the potential long-term gain for people with sickle cell disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register complied from electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (updated each new issue of The Cochrane Library) and quarterly searches of MEDLINE.Unpublished work was identified by searching the abstract books of major conference proceedings and we conducted a search of the website: www.ClinicalTrials.gov.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 06 October 2015. Randomized controlled and quasi-randomized studies that compared any method of stem cell transplantation with either each other or with any of the preventive or supportive interventions (e.g. periodic blood transfusion, use of hydroxyurea, antibiotics, pain relievers, supplemental oxygen) in people with sickle cell disease irrespective of the type of sickle cell disease, gender and setting. No relevant trials were identified. Ten trials were identified by the initial search and none for the update. None of these trials were suitable for inclusion in this review. Reports on the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation improving survival and preventing symptoms and complications associated with sickle cell

  15. The clinical significance of T-cells, sIL-2R and TNF in evaluating patients with splenic autotransplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haowei; Wu Haorong; Li Juncheng; Wu Jingchang

    2002-01-01

    To study the immunological effects of splenic autotransplantation, forty patients with splenic trauma were divided into two groups equally. One group underwent splenic autotransplantation and another underwent splenectomy. Control group included ten cases. Splenic autotransplantation and splenectomy group were compared with the control group. In the group of splenic autotransplantation, CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + , CD4 + /CD8 + dropped and sIL-2R, TNF rose after a week of operation. Then CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + , CD4 + /CD8 + rose and sIL-2R, TNF dropped three months later. In the group of splenectomy, CD 3+ , CD4 + , CD8 + and CD4 + /CD8 + dropped persistently, while sIL-2R and TNF rose postoperatively. Result showed splenic autotransplantation can help body to maintain T-cells level and improve the anti-infective ability

  16. The location of splenic NKT cells favours their rapid activation by blood-borne antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Patricia; Sánchez-Niño, María Dolores; van Rooijen, Nico; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D

    2012-05-16

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play an important role in mounting protective responses to blood-borne infections. However, though the spleen is the largest blood filter in the body, the distribution and dynamics of NKT cells within this organ are not well characterized. Here we show that the majority of NKT cells patrol around the marginal zone (MZ) and red pulp (RP) of the spleen. In response to lipid antigen, these NKT cells become arrested and rapidly produce cytokines, while the small proportion of NKT cells located in the white pulp (WP) exhibit limited activation. Importantly, disruption of the splenic MZ by chemical or genetic approaches results in a severe reduction in NKT cell activation indicating the need of cooperation between both MZ macrophages and dendritic cells for efficient NKT cell responses. Thus, the location of splenic NKT cells in the MZ and RP facilitates their access to blood-borne antigen and enables the rapid initiation of protective immune responses.

  17. Isolated Splenic Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.G. Moir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the case of a 70-year-old woman with a previous history of a left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC, who developed general malaise and fatigue. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated an enhancing 6 × 7 cm necrotic lesion in the lower pole of the spleen suggestive of a metastasis. Given the highly suspicious nature of the lesion we proceeded to splenectomy. The tumour did not breach the splenic capsule, and there was no local diaphragmatic involvement. The mass was concluded to be a true metastasis of the original RCC rather than local recurrence of the disease. The causes of isolated solid splenic lesions are wide and varied, however a past or present history of malignancy should lead to a high index of suspicion for a splenic metastasis. We report an extremely unusual case of spread from a RCC.

  18. Microbial contamination of hematopoietic progenitor cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdaroğlu, Sinem; Tekgündüz, Emre; Bozdağ, Sinem Civriz; Durgun, Gamze; Sarıca, Abdurrahman; Demiriz, Itır Şirinoğlu; Koçubaba, Serife; Iskender, Gülşen; Kayıkçı, Omür; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2013-06-01

    Microbial screening for contamination is a part of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) collection and infusion procedure. We aimed to find out our microbial contamination rates during collection, processing and infusion steps of HPC products. We also evaluated the clinical course of patients who received contaminated HPC products. We retrospectively analyzed microbial contamination records of HPC grafts between 2010 and 2012. HPC products of autologous donors were evaluated for contamination at three steps: at the end of mobilization, following processing with DMSO and just before stem cell infusion. Grafts of allogeneic donors were assessed only before HPC transplantation (HCT). Microbiological analysis of HPC samples were performed with an automated system (BacT/Alert®). During the study period a total of 492 mobilization procedures were performed on 329 (214 autologous and 115 allogeneic) donors. Bacterial contamination has been detected in 103 of 1630 samples (6%). Ninety-seven out of 1162 blood samples (8%) from 265 patients who were treated with HCT were contaminated. Forty-six patients (41 autologous and 5 allogeneic) were transplanted with contaminated HPC products. During HCT 42 patients experienced febrile neutropenic attack and 34 of them had positive blood culture results. In none of these 34 patients the isolated pathogens were the same organisms with those found in the final contaminated stem cell product before stem cell infusion. None of the patients who received contaminated products died because of sepsis within the posttransplant 30days. There was no significant difference between patients who received contaminated and non-contaminated products in terms of the first day of fever, duration of fever, engraftment kinetics and duration of hospitalization. Our results suggest that microbial contamination of HPC products is an issue to be prevented, although it may not have a major impact on the general success of HCT. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  19. Single-Cell Analysis Identifies Distinct Stages of Human Endothelial-to-Hematopoietic Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Guibentif

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available During development, hematopoietic cells originate from endothelium in a process known as endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT. To study human EHT, we coupled flow cytometry and single-cell transcriptional analyses of human pluripotent stem cell-derived CD34+ cells. The resulting transcriptional hierarchy showed a continuum of endothelial and hematopoietic signatures. At the interface of these two signatures, a unique group of cells displayed both an endothelial signature and high levels of key hematopoietic stem cell-associated genes. This interphase group was validated via sort and subculture as an immediate precursor to hematopoietic cells. Differential expression analyses further divided this population into subgroups, which, upon subculture, showed distinct hematopoietic lineage differentiation potentials. We therefore propose that immediate precursors to hematopoietic cells already have their hematopoietic lineage restrictions defined prior to complete downregulation of the endothelial signature. These findings increase our understanding of the processes of de novo hematopoietic cell generation in the human developmental context.

  20. Intratracheal administration of fullerene nanoparticles activates splenic CD11b{sup +} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Ning [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Kunugita, Naoki [Department of Environmental Health, National Institute of Public Health, 2-3-6, Minami, Wako 351-0197 (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi [Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita 870-1201 (Japan); Song, Yuan [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Yokoyama, Mitsuru [Bio-information Research Center, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Arashidani, Keiichi [School of Health Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Yasuhiro, E-mail: freude@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} Fullerene administration triggered splenic responses. {yields} Splenic responses occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. {yields} CD11b{sup +} cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene. - Abstract: Fullerene nanoparticles ('Fullerenes'), which are now widely used materials in daily life, have been demonstrated to induce elevated pulmonary inflammation in several animal models; however, the effects of fullerenes on the immune system are not fully understood. In the present study, mice received fullerenes intratracheally and were sacrificed at days 1, 6 and 42. Mice that received fullerenes exhibited increased proliferation of splenocytes and increased splenic production of IL-2 and TNF-{alpha}. Changes in the spleen in response to fullerene treatment occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. Furthermore, fullerenes induced CDK2 expression and activated NF-{kappa}B and NFAT in splenocytes at 6 days post-administration. Finally, CD11b{sup +} cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene administration in the splenic inflammatory process. Taken together, in addition to the effects on pulmonary responses, fullerenes also modulate the immune system.

  1. Intratracheal administration of fullerene nanoparticles activates splenic CD11b+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Ning; Kunugita, Naoki; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yokoyama, Mitsuru; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fullerene administration triggered splenic responses. → Splenic responses occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. → CD11b + cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene. - Abstract: Fullerene nanoparticles ('Fullerenes'), which are now widely used materials in daily life, have been demonstrated to induce elevated pulmonary inflammation in several animal models; however, the effects of fullerenes on the immune system are not fully understood. In the present study, mice received fullerenes intratracheally and were sacrificed at days 1, 6 and 42. Mice that received fullerenes exhibited increased proliferation of splenocytes and increased splenic production of IL-2 and TNF-α. Changes in the spleen in response to fullerene treatment occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. Furthermore, fullerenes induced CDK2 expression and activated NF-κB and NFAT in splenocytes at 6 days post-administration. Finally, CD11b + cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene administration in the splenic inflammatory process. Taken together, in addition to the effects on pulmonary responses, fullerenes also modulate the immune system.

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Kfoury, Youmna; Scadden, David T

    2016-05-23

    Regulation of stem cells in adult tissues is a key determinant of how well an organism can respond to the stresses of physiological challenge and disease. This is particularly true of the hematopoietic system, where demands on host defenses can call for an acute increase in cell production. Hematopoietic stem cells receive the regulatory signals for cell production in adult mammals in the bone marrow, a tissue with higher-order architectural and functional organization than previously appreciated. Here, we review the data defining particular structural components and heterologous cells in the bone marrow that participate in hematopoietic stem cell function. Further, we explore the case for stromal-hematopoietic cell interactions contributing to neoplastic myeloid disease. As the hematopoietic regulatory networks in the bone marrow are revealed, it is anticipated that strategies will emerge for how to enhance or inhibit production of specific blood cells. In that way, the control of hematopoiesis will enter the domain of therapies to modulate broad aspects of hematopoiesis, both normal and malignant.

  3. Generation of hematopoietic lineage cells from embryonic like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Khamisipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cells into embryonic stem cells has attracted much attention, because of the potential for stem cell transplantation and compatibility with recipient. However, the therapeutic application of either nuclear transfer or nuclear fusion of somatic cell has been hindered by technical complications as well as ethical objections. Recently, a new method is reported whereby ectopic expression of embryonic specific transcription factors was shown to induce fibroblasts to become embryonic like SCs (induced pluripotent stem cells. A major limitation of this method is the use of potentially harmful genome integrating viruses such as reto- or lentivirus. The main aim of this investigation was generation of human hematopoietic stem cells from induced fibroblasts by safe adenovectors carrying embryonically active genes. Material and Methods: Isolated fibroblasts from foreskin were expanded and recombinant adenoviruses carrying human Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, cMyc genes were added to culture. After formation of embryonic like colonies and cell expansion, they were transferred to embryonic media without bFGF, and embryoid bodies were cultured on stromal and non-stromal differentiation media for 14 days. Results: Expression of CD34 gene and antigenic markers, CD34, CD38 & CD133 in stromal culture showed significant difference with non-differentiation and non-stromal media. Conclusion: These findings show high hematopoietic differentiation rate of Adeno-iPS cells in stromal culture and no need to use growth factors. While, there was no difference between non-differentiation and non-stromal media.

  4. Complexity of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Noboru; Takeishi, Shoichiro; Frenette, Paul S

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that produce a variety of hematopoietic lineage cells throughout the life reside in specialized microenvironment called "niche" in the bone marrow (BM) where they are tightly regulated. With the recent advances in experimental technologies enabling the selective deletion of molecules, various types of cells in the BM have been proposed to contribute to HSC niche activity. Among these are stromal cells closely associated with the vasculature. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in HSC niche research, and focus on the studies describing the functional roles of perivascular cells for HSC maintenance and mobilization. Not only for physiologic state, we also discuss the recent evidences suggesting the importance of microenvironment for emergence of malignant hematopoietic diseases.

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekadja, Mohamed Amine; Brahimi, Mohamed; Osmani, Soufi; Yafour, Nabil; Krim, Amina; Serradj, Faiza; Talhi, Souad; Amani, Kamila; Bouhass, Rachid Amar

    2017-12-01

    Algeria is a country of 40.4 million inhabitants and half of which is under 30years. In Algeria, Health-care insurance covered, 90% of the population. Health care is free and it is supported by the Ministry of Health. 16 university hospitals exist in Algeria and only two (Algiers and Oran) practicing bone marrow transplant. Adult hematologic malignancies account for 10% (about 4000 new cases/year) of the malignancy affecting in most cases young patients under 65years of age. In 2016, 270 transplants were performed in total (Algiers+Oran), including 149 allografts (related donor transplants: 99%) and 121 autografts. 98% of transplants are done in adults and only 2% in children with cord blood transplants. In summary for the two transplant centers, the predominant types of transplantation performed are allogeneic transplant in 55% and autologous transplant in 45%. The particularity of EHU1st November in Oran, is the use of non-cryopreserved stem cells. Stem cell was mobilized using G-CSF alone and the grafts were kept in a conventional blood bank refrigerator at +4°C until reinfusion on day 0. The outcome with non-cryopreserved stem cells are the same as those with cryopreserved stem cells and we conclude that autologous transplant with non cryopreserved hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is a simple, effective and safe method and the cryopreservation is not necessary in our work conditions in developing countries. The projects are achieving the autograft in all University Hospitals with non cryopreserved HSC, achieving a center allograft in the east of the country and the development of bone marrow transplantation in children. Currently in Algeria, the number of transplantation is insufficient and the development of new transplant centers is essential. In the future, we hope to implement the National Society of Bone Marrow transplant and also the National recipient registry and Donor registry in Algeria. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research

  6. ES-cell derived hematopoietic cells induce transplantation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow cells induce stable mixed chimerism under appropriate conditioning of the host, mediating the induction of transplantation tolerance. However, their strong immunogenicity precludes routine use in clinical transplantation due to the need for harsh preconditioning and the requirement for toxic immunosuppression to prevent rejection and graft-versus-host disease. Alternatively, embryonic stem (ES cells have emerged as a potential source of less immunogenic hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs. Up till now, however, it has been difficult to generate stable hematopoietic cells from ES cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we derived CD45(+ HPCs from HOXB4-transduced ES cells and showed that they poorly express MHC antigens. This property allowed their long-term engraftment in sublethally irradiated recipients across MHC barriers without the need for immunosuppressive agents. Although donor cells declined in peripheral blood over 2 months, low level chimerism was maintained in the bone marrow of these mice over 100 days. More importantly, chimeric animals were protected from rejection of donor-type cardiac allografts. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show, for the first time, the efficacy of ES-derived CD45(+ HPCs to engraft in allogenic recipients without the use of immunosuppressive agents, there by protecting cardiac allografts from rejection.

  7. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the

  8. Bone marrow transplantations to study gene function in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winther, Menno P. J.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Immune cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. Experimental replacement of bone marrow offers the unique possibility to replace immune cells, to study gene function in mouse models of disease. Over the past decades, this technique has been used extensively to study, for

  9. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  10. Central muscarinic cholinergic activation alters interaction between splenic dendritic cell and CD4+CD25- T cells in experimental colitis.

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    Peris Munyaka

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP is based on vagus nerve (VN activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs and sequential CD4+/CD25-T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis.The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25-T cell co-culture were determined.McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25-T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy.Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orchard, Paul J.; Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer L.; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; OBrien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from

  12. Plerixafor (a CXCR4 antagonist following myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation enhances hematopoietic recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. B. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of CXCR4 with its ligand (stromal-derived factor-1 maintains hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs in a quiescent state. We hypothesized that blocking CXCR4/SDF-1 interaction after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT promotes hematopoiesis by inducing HSC proliferation. Methods We conducted a phase I/II trial of plerixafor on hematopoietic cell recovery following myeloablative allogeneic HSCT. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving myeloablative conditioning were enrolled. Plerixafor 240 μg/kg was administered subcutaneously every other day beginning day +2 until day +21 or until neutrophil recovery. The primary efficacy endpoints of the study were time to absolute neutrophil count >500/μl and platelet count >20,000/μl. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil and platelet engraftment of the study cohort was compared to that of a cohort of 95 allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients treated during the same period of time and who received similar conditioning and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Results Thirty patients received plerixafor following peripheral blood stem cell (n = 28 (PBSC or bone marrow (n = 2 transplantation. Adverse events attributable to plerixafor were mild and indistinguishable from effects of conditioning. The kinetics of neutrophil and platelet engraftment, as demonstrated by cumulative incidence, from the 28 study subjects receiving PBSC showed faster neutrophil (p = 0.04 and platelet recovery >20 K (p = 0.04 compared to the controls. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that plerixafor can be given safely following myeloablative HSCT. It provides proof of principle that blocking CXCR4 after HSCT enhances hematopoietic recovery. Larger, confirmatory studies in other settings are warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01280955

  13. Therapeutic approaches of hematopoietic syndrome after serious accidental global irradiation. Ex vivo expansion interest of hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, D.

    1994-01-01

    Aplasia is one of the main syndrome, appearing after one global accidental irradiation by one ionizing radiation source. The hematopoietic syndrome is characterized by a peripheric blood cell number fall; the cell marrow is reduced too

  14. The Genetic Landscape of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Frequency in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior efforts to identify regulators of hematopoietic stem cell physiology have relied mainly on candidate gene approaches with genetically modified mice. Here we used a genome-wide association study (GWAS strategy with the hybrid mouse diversity panel to identify the genetic determinants of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC frequency. Among 108 strains, we observed ∼120- to 300-fold variation in three HSPC populations. A GWAS analysis identified several loci that were significantly associated with HSPC frequency, including a locus on chromosome 5 harboring the homeodomain-only protein gene (Hopx. Hopx previously had been implicated in cardiac development but was not known to influence HSPC biology. Analysis of the HSPC pool in Hopx−/− mice demonstrated significantly reduced cell frequencies and impaired engraftment in competitive repopulation assays, thus providing functional validation of this positional candidate gene. These results demonstrate the power of GWAS in mice to identify genetic determinants of the hematopoietic system.

  15. Paraneoplastic Pemphigus and Bronchiolitis Obliterans in a Patient with Splenic B-cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiou-Han Wang

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP, also called paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome, is a rare disorder associated with underlying neoplasia. The common underlying neoplasms include non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and Castleman's disease. Though B-cell lymphoma is the most common underlying malignancy, only one case associated with splenic B-cell lymphoma has been recognized. The prognosis of PNP is very poor, and PNP-associated bronchiolitis obliterans (BO is not uncommon. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who initially presented with multiple oral ulcers, conjunctivitis, and numerous cutaneous blisters. Serial workup established the diagnosis of PNP and revealed an underlying splenic B-cell lymphoma. Although the mucocutaneous lesions gradually healed after splenectomy and chemotherapy, deteriorating respiratory function developed 7 months later with pathologically proven BO. She finally succumbed to respiratory failure 12 months after presentation despite intensive respiratory care.

  16. Acute splenic sequestration in a pregnant woman with homozygous sickle-cell anemia

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    Carolina Bastos Maia

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Homozygous (SS sickle-cell anemia complicated by acute splenic sequestration in adults is a rare event, and it has never been reported during pregnancy. CASE REPORT A 25-year-old woman with homozygous (SS sickle-cell disease was hospitalized at 32 weeks' of gestation presenting weakness, abdominal pain, fever and hemoglobin of 2.4 g/dl. Abnormal fetal heart rate was detected by means of cardiotocography, and 5 units of packed red cells were transfused. Cesarean was performed at 37 weeks. Both mother and baby were discharged in a good general condition. CONCLUSION This case report demonstrates the importance of immediate blood transfusion for treatment of fetal distress in cases of splenic sequestration during pregnancy. This treatment is essential for avoiding maternal and fetal complications.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant candidate and designated proxy distress levels prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Katharine E; Forti, Allison M; Russell, Gregory B; Naik, Seema; Hurd, David D; McQuellon, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is associated with a high risk of morbidity, making advance care planning (ACP) essential. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare proxy and HCT candidate distress levels (Distress Thermometer) before (T1) and after (T2) ACP question completion. 79 participants (40 HCT candidates, 39 proxies) rated their distress. The T1, T2 mean distress scores (SD) for HCT candidates were 3.13(2.27), 2.96(2.10); 43% and 38% endorsed clinically significant distress (≥4). Proxies reported 4.21(2.48), 4.33 (2.46); 62% endorsed significant distress at T1, T2. The majority of proxies endorsed distress levels that were clinically significant and comparatively higher (T1 (p = 0.047) and T2 (p = 0.009)) than their paired HCT recipients. Responding to questions about ACP did not increase overall distress ratings. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozkan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only curative therapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases. Early diagnosis, including prenatally, and early transplantation improve HSCT outcomes. Survival rates improve with advances in the methods of preparing hosts and donor cells, and in supportive and conditioning regimes.

  19. Dynamic changes in mouse hematopoietic stem cell numbers during aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G; Van Zant, G

    1999-01-01

    To address the fundamental question of whether or not stem cell populations age, we performed quantitative measurements of the cycling status and frequency of hematopoietic stem cells in long-lived C57BL/6 (B6) and short-lived DBA/2 (DBA) mice at different developmental and aging stages. The

  20. Tritium contamination of hematopoietic stem cells alters long-term hematopoietic reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giacomo, F.; Barroca, V.; Laurent, D.; Lewandowski, D.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Granotier, Ch.; Boussin, F.D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In vivo effects of tritium contamination are poorly documented. Here, we study the effects of tritiated Thymidine ([ 3 H] Thymidine) or tritiated water (HTO) contamination on the biological properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Materials and methods: Mouse HSC were contaminated with concentrations of [ 3 H] Thymidine ranging from 0.37-37.03 kBq/ml or of HTO ranging from 5-50 kBq/ml. The biological properties of contaminated HSC were studied in vitro after HTO contamination and in vitro and in vivo after [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. Results: Proliferation, viability and double-strand breaks were dependent on [ 3 H] Thymidine or HTO concentrations used for contamination but in vitro myeloid differentiation of HSC was not affected by [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. [ 3 H] Thymidine contaminated HSC showed a compromised long-term capacity of hematopoietic reconstitution and competition experiments showed an up to two-fold decreased capacity of contaminated HSC to reconstitute hematopoiesis. These defects were not due to impaired homing in bone marrow but to an initial decreased proliferation rate of HSC. Conclusion: These results indicate that contaminations of HSC with doses of tritium that do not result in cell death, induce short-term effects on proliferation and cell cycle and long-term effects on hematopoietic reconstitution capacity of contaminated HSC. (authors)

  1. Primary splenic angiosarcoma with liver metastasis: A rare neoplasm diagnosed on fine-needle aspiration cytology and cell block immunocytochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saniya Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary splenic angiosarcoma is a rare malignant vascular neoplasm of mesenchymal origin. The tumor is highly aggressive and has a high metastatic potential. It is usually diagnosed on histopathological examination of splenectomy specimen. Only few cases of angiosarcoma diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration (FNA cytology alone have been reported in the literature. The cytologic features of angiosarcoma are heterogeneous, however, diagnosis can be suggested by FNA when vasoformative features are present. A 55-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and hepatosplenomegaly. Computed tomography scan revealed a heterogeneous splenic lesion with liver metastases. FNA from the splenic and liver lesions showed moderately pleomorphic tumor cells closely associated with anastomosing vascular channels. Cell block immunocytochemistry (ICC showed tumor cells positive for CD31, CD34, CD68 as well as for CD99. FNA supplemented by cell block ICC can render a definite diagnosis of primary splenic angiosarcoma with liver metastasis.

  2. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2015-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several trans...

  3. Lack of autophagy in the hematopoietic system leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell function and dysregulated myeloid proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Monika; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2011-09-01

    The regulated lysosomal degradation pathway of autophagy prevents cellular damage and thus protects from malignant transformation. Autophagy is also required for the maturation of various hematopoietic lineages, namely the erythroid and lymphoid ones, yet its role in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remained unexplored. While normal HSCs sustain life-long hematopoiesis, malignant transformation of HSCs or early progenitors leads to leukemia. Mechanisms protecting HSCs from cellular damage are therefore essential to prevent hematopoietic malignancies. By conditionally deleting the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in the hematopoietic system, we found that autophagy is required for the maintenance of true HSCs and therefore also of downstream hematopoietic progenitors. Loss of autophagy in HSCs leads to the expansion of a progenitor cell population in the bone marrow, giving rise to a severe, invasive myeloproliferation, which strongly resembles human acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  4. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

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    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Hematopoietic (stem) cell development — how divergent are the roads taken?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Kauts (Mari-Liis); C.S. Vink (Chris); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe development of the hematopoietic system during early embryonic stages occurs in spatially and temporally distinct waves. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the most potent and self-renewing cells of this system, are produced in the final ‘definitive’ wave of hematopoietic cell

  7. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells towards hematopoietic cells: progress and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinghui; Kaufman, Dan S

    2008-07-01

    Hematopoietic development from embryonic stem cells has been one of the most productive areas of stem cell biology. Recent studies have progressed from work with mouse to human embryonic stem cells. Strategies to produce defined blood cell populations can be used to better understand normal and abnormal hematopoiesis, as well as potentially improve the generation of hematopoietic cells with therapeutic potential. Molecular profiling, phenotypic and functional analyses have all been utilized to demonstrate that hematopoietic cells derived from embryonic stem cells most closely represent a stage of hematopoiesis that occurs at embryonic/fetal developmental stages. Generation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells comparable to hematopoietic stem cells found in the adult sources, such as bone marrow and cord blood, still remains challenging. However, genetic manipulation of intrinsic factors during hematopoietic differentiation has proven a suitable approach to induce adult definitive hematopoiesis from embryonic stem cells. Concrete evidence has shown that embryonic stem cells provide a powerful approach to study the early stage of hematopoiesis. Multiple hematopoietic lineages can be generated from embryonic stem cells, although most of the evidence suggests that hematopoietic development from embryonic stem cells mimics an embryonic/fetal stage of hematopoiesis.

  8. Immunomodulatory Effects of CP-25 on Splenic T Cells of Rats with Adjuvant Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Han, Chen-Chen; Cui, Dongqian; Luo, Ting-Ting; Li, Yifan; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Yang; Wei, Wei

    2018-02-23

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which T cells play an important role. Paeoniflorin-6-oxy-benzenesulfonate (CP-25) shows a strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effect in the joint of adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats, but the role of the spleen function is still unclear. The aim of this study was to research how CP-25 regulated spleen function of AA rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with CP-25 (50 mg/kg) orally from day 17 to 29 after immunization. The spleen histopathological changes were analyzed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and prostaglandin receptor subtypes (EPs) were screened by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The co-expression of GRK2 and EP2 as well as GRK2 and EP4 was measured by immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation. The expression of GRK2 and EP4 in splenic T cells was further detected by immunofluorescence. CP-25 was found to relieve the secondary paw swelling, attenuate histopathologic changes, and downregulate GRK2, EP2 and EP4 expression in AA rats. Additionally, CP-25 not only downregulated the co-expression of GRK2 and EP4 but also downregulated GRK2, EP4 expression in splenic T cells of AA rats. From these results, we can infer that CP-25 play an anti-inflammatory and immune function by affecting the function of the splenic T cells.

  9. Early Loss of Splenic Tfh Cells in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félicien Moukambi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Follicular T helper cells (Tfh, a subset of CD4 T lymphocytes, provide crucial help to B cells in the production of antigen-specific antibodies. Although several studies have analyzed the dynamics of Tfh cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes (LNs during Aids, none has yet addressed the impact of SIV infection on the dynamics of Tfh cells in the spleen, the primary organ of B cell activation. We show here a significant decrease in splenic Tfh cells in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques (RMs during the acute phase of infection, which persists thereafter. This profound loss is associated with lack of sustained expression of the Tfh-defining transcription factors, Bcl-6 and c-Maf but with higher expression of the repressors KLF2 and Foxo1. In this context of Tfh abortive differentiation and loss, we found decreased percentages of memory B cell subsets and lower titers of SIV-specific IgG. We further demonstrate a drastic remodeling of the lymphoid architecture of the spleen and LNs, which disrupts the crucial cell-cell interactions necessary to maintain memory B cells and Tfh cells. Finally, our data demonstrated the early infection of Tfh cells. Paradoxically, the frequencies of SIV DNA were higher in splenic Tfh cells of RMs progressing more slowly suggesting sanctuaries for SIV in the spleen. Our findings provide important information regarding the impact of HIV/SIV infection on Tfh cells, and provide new clues for future vaccine strategies.

  10. Deficiency of GRP94 in the hematopoietic system alters proliferation regulators in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Biquan; Tseng, Chun-Chih; Adams, Gregor B; Lee, Amy S

    2013-12-01

    We have previously reported that acute inducible knockout of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP94 led to an expansion of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell pool. Here, we investigated the effectors and mechanisms for this phenomenon. We observed an increase in AKT activation in freshly isolated GRP94-null HSC-enriched Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells, corresponding with higher production of PI(3,4,5)P3, indicative of PI3K activation. Treatment of GRP94-null LSK cells with the AKT inhibitor MK2206 compromised cell expansion, suggesting a causal relationship between elevated AKT activation and increased proliferation in GRP94-null HSCs. Microarray analysis demonstrated a 97% reduction in the expression of the hematopoietic cell cycle regulator Ms4a3 in the GRP94-null LSK cells, and real-time quantitative PCR confirmed this down-regulation in the LSK cells but not in the total bone marrow (BM). A further examination comparing freshly isolated BM LSK cells with spleen LSK cells, as well as BM LSK cells cultured in vitro, revealed specific down-regulation of Ms4a3 in freshly isolated BM GRP94-null LSK cells. On examining cell surface proteins that are known to regulate stem cell proliferation, we observed a reduced expression of cell surface connexin 32 (Cx32) plaques in GRP94-null LSK cells. However, suppression of Cx32 hemichannel activity in wild-type LSK cells through mimetic peptides did not lead to increased LSK cell proliferation in vitro. Two other important cell surface proteins that mediate HSC-niche interactions, specifically Tie2 and CXCR4, were not impaired by Grp94 deletion. Collectively, our study uncovers novel and unique roles of GRP94 in regulating HSC proliferation.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

  12. Long-term leukocyte reconstitution in NSG mice transplanted with human cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigé, Annette; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Li, Duo; Ivic, Sandra; Fahrny, Audrey; Muller, Christina K S; Gers-Huber, Gustavo; Myburgh, Renier; Bredl, Simon; Schlaepfer, Erika; Scherrer, Alexandra U; Kuster, Stefan P; Speck, Roberto F

    2017-05-30

    Humanized mice (hu mice) are based on the transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into immunodeficient mice and have become important pre-clinical models for biomedical research. However, data about their hematopoiesis over time are scarce. We therefore characterized leukocyte reconstitution in NSG mice, which were sublethally irradiated and transplanted with human cord blood-derived CD34+ cells at newborn age, longitudinally in peripheral blood and, for more detailed analyses, cross-sectionally in peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow at different time points. Human cell chimerism and absolute human cell count decreased between week 16 and 24 in the peripheral blood of hu mice, but were stable thereafter as assessed up to 32 weeks. Human cell chimerism in spleen and bone marrow was maintained over time. Notably, human cell chimerism in peripheral blood and spleen as well as bone marrow positively correlated with each other. Percentage of B cells decreased between week 16 and 24, whereas percentage of T cells increased; subsequently, they levelled off with T cells clearly predominating at week 32. Natural killer cells, monocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) as well as CD1c + and CD141+ myeloid DCs were all present in hu mice. Proliferative responses of splenic T cells to stimulation were preserved over time. Importantly, the percentage of more primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in bone marrow was maintained over time. Overall, leukocyte reconstitution was maintained up to 32 weeks post-transplantation in our hu NSG model, possibly explained by the maintenance of HSCs in the bone marrow. Notably, we observed great variation in multi-lineage hematopoietic reconstitution in hu mice that needs to be taken into account for the experimental design with hu mice.

  13. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, A.; Passweg, J.R.; Bocelli-Tyndall, C.; Fassas, A.; Laar, J.M. van; Farge, D.; Andolina, M.; Arnold, R.; Carreras, E.; Finke, J.; Kotter, I.; Kozak, T.; Lisukov, I.; Lowenberg, B.; Marmont, A.; Moore, J.; Saccardi, R.; Snowden, J.A.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Wulffraat, N.M.; Zhao, X.; Tyndall, A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data and early phase I/II studies suggest that high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can arrest progression of severe autoimmune diseases. We have evaluated the toxicity and disease response in 473 patients with severe autoimmune

  14. Longitudinal assessment of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and hyposalivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laaksonen, M.; Ramseier, A. M.; Rovó, A.; Jensen, S. B.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Zitzmann, N. U.; Waltimo, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hyposalivation is a common adverse effect of anti-neoplastic therapy of head and neck cancer, causing impaired quality of life and predisposition to oral infections. However, data on the effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on salivary secretion are scarce. The present study

  15. Nephrotic Syndrome After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: Outcomes in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddadi, Fereshteh; Alidadi, Ali; Hakemi, Monir; Bahar, Babak

    2017-02-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant have an elevated incidence of acute renal failure. However, the incidence of nephritic syndrome due to graft-versus-host disease is growing and is independently associated with chronic renal disease after this procedure. We conducted a prospective study to examine the risk of chronic kidney disease in glomerulopathy patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplant with a follow-up of 10 years. In our follow-up of 14 patients (4 men and 10 women) who were diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplant, in 10 patients (71%), biopsy showed membranous nephropathy associated with graft-versus-host disease. The remaining 4 patients had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, or minimal change disease. All patients were treated with angiotensin receptor blockers, cyclosporine (Neoral), and prednisolone. During follow-up, 6 patients (43%) had heavy proteinuria and a rise in serum creatinine, and 1 patient (7%) needed hemodialysis. Eleven patients (79%) achieved complete remission of nephrotic syndrome, 5 (36%) remained hypertensive, and 3 (21%) did not respond to therapy.. The early diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome should be considered after hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and therapeutic outcome measures should be in place in advance. If this is done, we found that patients' response to treatment can be optimal, and their renal function and overall survival can improve.

  16. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs...

  17. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many

  18. Lifelong dietary intervention does not affect hematopoietic stem cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazare, Seka; Ausema, Albertina; Reijne, Aaffien C; van Dijk, Gertjan; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a profound functional decline during normal aging. Because caloric or dietary restriction has been shown to delay multiple aspects of the aging process in many species, we explored the consequences of lifelong caloric restriction, or conversely, lifelong

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell aging and self-renewal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dykstra, Brad; de Haan, Gerald

    A functional decline of the immune system occurs during organismal aging that is attributable, in large part, to changes in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. In the mouse, several hallmark age-dependent changes in the HSC compartment have been identified, including an increase in HSC

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  20. Transplantation Dose Alters the Differentiation Program of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Casey; Chu, Elizabeth; Chin, Mike; Lu, Rong

    2016-05-24

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the most prevalent stem cell therapy, but it remains a risky procedure. To improve this treatment, it is important to understand how transplanted stem cells rebuild the blood and immune systems and how this process is impacted by transplantation variables such as the HSC dose. Here, we find that, in the long term following transplantation, 70%-80% of donor-HSC-derived clones do not produce all measured blood cell types. High HSC doses lead to more clones that exhibit balanced lymphocyte production, whereas low doses produce more T-cell-specialized clones. High HSC doses also produce significantly higher proportions of early-differentiating clones compared to low doses. These complex differentiation behaviors uncover the clonal-level regeneration dynamics of hematopoietic regeneration and suggest that transplantation dose can be exploited to improve stem cell therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Symptoms after hospital discharge following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Oguz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purposes of this study were to assess the symptoms of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after hospital discharge, and to determine the needs of transplant patients for symptom management. Materials and Methods: The study adopted a descriptive design. The study sample comprised of 66 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. The study was conducted in Istanbul. Data were collected using Patient Information Form and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS. Results: The frequency of psychological symptoms in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after discharge period (PSYCH subscale score 2.11 (standard deviation (SD = 0.69, range: 0.93-3.80 was higher in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients than frequency of physical symptoms (PHYS subscale score: 1.59 (SD = 0.49, range: 1.00-3.38. Symptom distress caused by psychological and physical symptoms were at moderate level (Mean = 1.91, SD = 0.60, range: 0.95-3.63 and most distressing symptoms were problems with sexual interest or activity, difficulty sleeping, and diarrhea. Patients who did not have an additional chronic disease obtained higher MSAS scores. University graduates obtained higher Global Distress Index (GDI subscale and total MSAS scores with comparison to primary school graduates. Total MSAS, MSAS-PHYS subscale, and MSAS-PSYCH subscale scores were higher in patients with low level of income (P < 0.05. The patients (98.5% reported to receive education about symptom management after hospital discharge. Conclusions: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients continue to experience many distressing physical or psychological symptoms after discharge and need to be supported and educated for the symptom management.

  2. The location of splenic NKT cells favours their rapid activation by blood-borne antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Patricia; Sánchez-Niño, María Dolores; van Rooijen, Nico; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play an important role in mounting protective responses to blood-borne infections. However, though the spleen is the largest blood filter in the body, the distribution and dynamics of NKT cells within this organ are not well characterized. Here we show that the majority of NKT cells patrol around the marginal zone (MZ) and red pulp (RP) of the spleen. In response to lipid antigen, these NKT cells become arrested and rapidly produce cytokines, while the small proportion of NKT cells located in the white pulp (WP) exhibit limited activation. Importantly, disruption of the splenic MZ by chemical or genetic approaches results in a severe reduction in NKT cell activation indicating the need of cooperation between both MZ macrophages and dendritic cells for efficient NKT cell responses. Thus, the location of splenic NKT cells in the MZ and RP facilitates their access to blood-borne antigen and enables the rapid initiation of protective immune responses. PMID:22505026

  3. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, A.; Zhou, D.; Geiger, H.; Zant, G.V.

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study was to determine if ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in hematopoietic stem (HSC) and progenitor cells. Lin-cells were isolated from mouse bone marrow (BM) and pretreated with vehicle or 100 μM z-VAD 1 h prior to exposure to 4 Gy IR. The apoptotic and/or necrotic responses of these cells to IR were analyzed by measuring the annexin V and/or 7-AAD staining in HSC and progenitor populations using flow cytometry, and hematopoietic function of these cells was determined by CAFC assay. Exposure of Lin-cells to IR selectively decreased the numbers of HSC and progenitors in association with an increase in apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment of Lin- cells with z-VAD significantly inhibited IR-induced apoptosis and the decrease in the numbers of HSC and progenitors. However, IR alone or in combination with z-VAD did not lead to a significant increase in necrotic cell death in either HSC or progenitors. In addition, pretreatment of BM cells with z-VAD significantly attenuated IR-induced reduction in the frequencies of day-7, -28 and -35 CAFC. Exposure of HSC and progenitors to IR induces apoptosis. The induction of HSC and progenitor apoptosis contributes to IR-induced suppression of their hematopoietic function

  4. The many faces of hematopoietic stem cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-12-15

    Not all hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are alike. They differ in their physical characteristics such as cell cycle status and cell surface marker phenotype, they respond to different extrinsic signals, and they have different lineage outputs following transplantation. The growing body of evidence that supports heterogeneity within HSCs, which constitute the most robust cell fraction at the foundation of the adult hematopoietic system, is currently of great interest and raises questions as to why HSC subtypes exist, how they are generated and whether HSC heterogeneity affects leukemogenesis or treatment options. This Review provides a developmental overview of HSC subtypes during embryonic, fetal and adult stages of hematopoiesis and discusses the possible origins and consequences of HSC heterogeneity. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. The many faces of hematopoietic stem cell heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Not all hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are alike. They differ in their physical characteristics such as cell cycle status and cell surface marker phenotype, they respond to different extrinsic signals, and they have different lineage outputs following transplantation. The growing body of evidence that supports heterogeneity within HSCs, which constitute the most robust cell fraction at the foundation of the adult hematopoietic system, is currently of great interest and raises questions as to why HSC subtypes exist, how they are generated and whether HSC heterogeneity affects leukemogenesis or treatment options. This Review provides a developmental overview of HSC subtypes during embryonic, fetal and adult stages of hematopoiesis and discusses the possible origins and consequences of HSC heterogeneity. PMID:27965438

  6. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  7. Aging, Clonality and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and increased production of reactive oxygen species have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as clonal selection of HSCs upon aging provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. PMID:27380967

  8. Red cell deformability, splenic function and anaemia in thalassaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dondorp, A. M.; Chotivanich, K. T.; Fucharoen, S.; Silamut, K.; Vreeken, J.; Kager, P. A.; White, N. J.

    1999-01-01

    Red cell deformability (RCD) was measured in 38 patients with alpha-thalassaemia and 48 patients with beta-thalassaemia, of whom 13 had undergone splenectomy. All splenectomized patients, but none of those with intact spleens, had very rigid erythrocytes with an elongation index <0.45 at a high

  9. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Unique Cause of Intestinal and Splenic Infarction in a Sickle Cell Trait Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofya H. Asfaw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle-cell trait is a common genetic abnormality in the African American population. A sickle-cell crisis in a patient with sickle-cell trait is uncommon at best. Abdominal painful crises are typical of patients with sickle cell anemia. The treatment for an abdominal painful crisis is usually medical and rarely surgical. We present the case of a cocaine-induced sickle-cell crisis in a sickle-cell trait patient that resulted in splenic, intestinal, and cerebral infarctions and multisystem organ failure necessitating a splenectomy, subtotal colectomy, and small bowel resection. This case highlights the diagnostic dilemma that abdominal pain can present in the sickle-cell population and illustrates the importance of recognizing the potential for traditionally medically managed illnesses to become surgical emergencies.

  11. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  12. Reduced hematopoietic stem cell frequency predicts outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Stiehl, Thomas; Raffel, Simon; Hoang, Van T.; Hoffmann, Isabel; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Saeed, Borhan R.; Blume, Rachel; Manta, Linda; Eckstein, Volker; Bochtler, Tilmann; Wuchter, Patrick; Essers, Marieke; Jauch, Anna; Trumpp, Andreas; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Ho, Anthony D.; Lutz, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In patients with acute myeloid leukemia and low percentages of aldehyde-dehydrogenase-positive cells, non-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells can be separated from leukemic cells. By relating hematopoietic stem cell frequencies to outcome we detected poor overall- and disease-free survival of patients with low hematopoietic stem cell frequencies. Serial analysis of matched diagnostic and follow-up samples further demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells increased after chemotherapy in patients who achieved durable remissions. However, in patients who eventually relapsed, hematopoietic stem cell numbers decreased dramatically at the time of molecular relapse demonstrating that hematopoietic stem cell levels represent an indirect marker of minimal residual disease, which heralds leukemic relapse. Upon transplantation in immune-deficient mice cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells of our cohort gave rise to leukemic or no engraftment, whereas cases with normal hematopoietic stem cell levels mostly resulted in multi-lineage engraftment. Based on our experimental data, we propose that leukemic stem cells have increased niche affinity in cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells. To validate this hypothesis, we developed new mathematical models describing the dynamics of healthy and leukemic cells under different regulatory scenarios. These models suggest that the mechanism leading to decreases in hematopoietic stem cell frequencies before leukemic relapse must be based on expansion of leukemic stem cells with high niche affinity and the ability to dislodge hematopoietic stem cells. Thus, our data suggest that decreasing numbers of hematopoietic stem cells indicate leukemic stem cell persistence and the emergence of leukemic relapse. PMID:28550184

  13. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  14. Mitophagy in hematopoietic stem cells: the case for exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aashish; Kundu, Mondira

    2013-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are inherently quiescent and self-renewing, yet can differentiate and commit to multiple blood cell types. Intracellular mitochondrial content is dynamic, and there is an increase in mitochondrial content during differentiation and lineage commitment in HSCs. HSCs reside in a hypoxic niche within the bone marrow and rely heavily on glycolysis, while differentiated and committed progenitors rely on oxidative phosphorylation. Increased oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation and commitment is not only due to increased mitochondrial content but also due to changes in mitochondrial cytosolic distribution and efficiency. These changes in the intracellular mitochondrial landscape contribute signals toward regulating differentiation and commitment. Thus, a functional relationship exists between the mitochondria in HSCs and the state of the HSCs (i.e., stemness vs. differentiated). This review focuses on how autophagy-mediated mitochondrial clearance (i.e., mitophagy) may affect HSC mitochondrial content, thereby influencing the fate of HSCs and maintenance of hematopoietic homeostasis.

  15. FIFTY YEARS OF MELPHALAN USE IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Ulas D.; Bashir, Qaiser; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2015-01-01

    Melphalan remains the most widely used agent in preparative regimens for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. From its initial discovery more than 50 years ago, it has been gradually incorporated in the conditioning regimens for both autologous and allogeneic transplantation due to its myeloablative properties and broad antitumor effects as a DNA alkylating agent. Melphalan remains the mainstay conditioning for multiple myeloma and lymphomas; and has been used successfully in preparative regimens of a variety of other hematological and non-hematological malignancies. The addition of newer agents to conditioning like bortezomib or lenalidomide for myeloma, or clofarabine for myeloid malignancies, may improve antitumor effects for transplantation, while in combination with alemtuzumab may represent a backbone for future cellular therapy due to reliable engraftment and low toxicity profile. This review summarizes the development and the current use of this remarkable drug in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. PMID:22922522

  16. Ion Channels in Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Pillozzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs reside in bone marrow niches and give rise to hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs. These have more restricted lineage potential and eventually differentiate into specific blood cell types. Bone marrow also contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, which present multilineage differentiation potential toward mesodermal cell types. In bone marrow niches, stem cell interaction with the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrin receptors. Ion channels regulate cell proliferation and differentiation by controlling intracellular Ca2+, cell volume, release of growth factors, and so forth. Although little evidence is available about the ion channel roles in true HSCs, increasing information is available about HPCs and MSCs, which present a complex pattern of K+ channel expression. K+ channels cooperate with Ca2+ and Cl− channels in regulating calcium entry and cell volume during mitosis. Other K+ channels modulate the integrin-dependent interaction between leukemic progenitor cells and the niche stroma. These channels can also regulate leukemia cell interaction with MSCs, which also involves integrin receptors and affects the MSC-mediated protection from chemotherapy. Ligand-gated channels are also implicated in these processes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate cell proliferation and migration in HSCs and MSCs and may be implicated in the harmful effects of smoking.

  17. Mitigation of radiation induced hematopoietic injury via regulation of Nrf-2 and increasing hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwardhan, R.S.; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Santosh Kumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation (IR) that can be delivered to tumors are restricted due to radiation induced damage to surrounding normal tissues thereby limiting the effectiveness of radiotherapy. Strategies to develop agents that selectively protect normal cells yielded limited success in the past. There is pressing need to develop safe, syndrome specific and effective radiation countermeasures to prevent or mitigate the harmful consequences of radiation exposure. Survival of bone marrow stem cells (HSCs) play a key role in protecting against IR induced hematopoietic injury. Many studies have shown manipulation of HSC frequency and/or survival as principal mechanism of radioprotection. It is known that, Nrf-2 plays crucial role in HSC survival and maintenance under oxidative stress conditions. In the present study, we have investigated the radioprotective ability of a flavonoid baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal plant traditionally used in Oriental medicine. There are numerous reports showing anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-microbial, anti-mutagenic and neuroprotective properties of baicalein. Based on these reports, we have investigated the ability of baicalein to protect against radiation induced hematopoietic injury. Baicalein administration to mice protected against WBI induced mortality. Interestingly, the stem cell frequency increased in bone marrow cells obtained from baicalein administered mice as compared to vehicle treated mice. Baicalein treatment led to increased phospho-Nrf-2 levels in lineage negative BM-MNC. Administration of mice with Nrf-2 inhibitor prior to baicalein treatment led to significant abrogation of radioprotective ability of baicalein. This result suggests that, Nrf-2 may be playing a key role in baicalein mediated radioprotection. Here, we have shown that baicalein administration augments stem cell frequency, induces

  18. Haploidentical hematopoietic SCT increases graft-versus-tumor effect against renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak-Alpdogan, T; Sauter, C T; Bailey, C P; Biswas, C S; Panis, M M; Civriz, S; Flomenberg, N; Alpdogan, O

    2013-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) has been shown to be an effective treatment option for advanced renal cell cancer (RCC). However, tumor resistance/relapse remains as the main post transplant issue. Therefore, enhancing graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity without increasing GVHD is critical for improving the outcome of HSCT. We explored the GVT effect of haploidentical-SCT (haplo-SCT) against RCC in murine models. Lethally irradiated CB6F1 (H2K(b/d)) recipients were transplanted with T-cell-depleted BM cells from B6CBAF1 (H2K(b/k)) mice. Haplo-SCT combined with a low-dose haploidentical (HI) T-cell infusion (1 × 10(5)) successfully provided GVT activity without incurring GVHD. This effect elicited murine RCC growth control and consequently displayed a comparative survival advantage of haplo-SCT recipients when compared with MHC-matched (B6D2F1CB6F1) and parent-F1 (B6CB6F1) transplant recipients. Recipients of haplo-SCT had an increase in donor-derived splenic T-cell numbers, T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ-secreting donor-derived T-cells, a critical aspect for anti-tumor activity. The splenocytes from B6CBAF1 mice had a higher cytotoxicity against RENCA cells than the splenocytes from B6 and B6D2F1 donors after tumor challenge. These findings suggest that haplo-SCT might be an innovative immunotherapeutic platform for solid tumors, particularly for renal cell carcinoma.

  19. Nursing care in a hematopoietic stem cells transplantation unit

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Kaoana; Bernardino,Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation units, nursing care is different from other services. The objective in this descriptive study with a qualitative approach was to identify the care activities of nurses at a transplantation unit, classified according to the framework of nurses' functions. The data were collected through systematic observation and treated through content analysis. Three functions were identified for nurses: clinical nurse, management nurse and visit nurse, the first ha...

  20. Cardiovascular disease in survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Armenian, Saro H.; Chow, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is increasingly offered as a curative option for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Improvements in HCT strategies and supportive care have resulted in a growing number of long-term survivors. However, these survivors are at increased risk of developing long-term debilitating chronic health conditions, including premature cardiovascular disease. These complications are more common than in the general population, and there are well-described a...

  1. SCA-1 Expression Level Identifies Quiescent Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morcos, Mina N.F.; Schoedel, Kristina B.; Hoppe, Anja; Behrendt, Rayk; Basak, Onur; Clevers, Hans C.; Roers, Axel; Gerbaulet, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Blood cell generation depends on continuous cellular output by the sequential hierarchy of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and progenitor populations that all contain quiescent and actively cycling cells. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) express the surface molecule Stem cell antigen 1

  2. Osteoblastic activation in the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvi, Laura M

    2006-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are rare primitive cells capable of reconstituting all blood cell lineages throughout the life of an individual. The microenvironment in which stem cells reside is essential for their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation. This microenvironment, or HSC niche, has been difficult to define in bone and bone marrow, but recent studies from our laboratory and others have shown that osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, are an essential regulatory component of this complex cellular network. We established that parathyroid hormone (PTH), through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R) in osteoblastic cells, could alter the HSC niche resulting in HSC expansion in vivo and in vitro and improving dramatically the survival of mice receiving bone marrow transplants. These findings are of great clinical appeal, because they suggest that a strategy aimed at modifying supportive cells in a stem cell niche can expand HSC. While a number of molecules have been found to be important for hematopoietic/osteoblastic interactions, we have focused on the Jagged1/Notch signaling pathway, which was necessary for the PTH-dependent HSC expansion. Since the Jagged1/Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in the microenvironmental control of stem cell self-renewal in several organ systems, definition of Jagged1 modulation, which is currently poorly understood, should provide additional molecular targets for stem cell regulation and advance the understanding of stem cell-microenvironmental interactions.

  3. A method to enrich mouse hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, J.E.; McFarland, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells form colonies in the spleens of lethally irradiated mice. The number of colonies is indicative of the number of stem cells present in the inoculum. In this article, a technique is presented for effecting a seven-fold enrichment of spleen colony-forming cells. Bone marrow cells are first segregated into ''red'' and ''white'' cell populations by centrifugation on Ficoll-Paque. Centrifugation of the ''white'' cell fraction in 75% Percoll concentrates the colony-forming cells in the top one-third of the gradient. The ability of these cells to repopulate and to cure the anemia of WBB6F1-W/Wv mice indicates that long-term functional pluripotent stem cells have not been destroyed or lost during the fractionation procedures. The segregation procedures enrich the colony-forming cell population from thalassemic as well as from normal mice

  4. Localization of splenic cells with antigen-transporting capability in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Cacho, E; Gallego, M; Arnal, C; Bascuas, J A

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the migration pattern of the splenic dendritic cell of the chicken named the ellipsoid-associated cell (EAC) from the site of initial location at the periphery of the ellipsoid to the splenic T- and B-dependent areas. Bovine serum albumin bound to biotin and conjugated to gold particles was used as a histochemically identifiable antigen detected as a peroxidase reaction. The antigen was intravenously injected, and subsequently its pattern of distribution in a time sequence and within the tissue was examined at the light and electron microscopy levels. In addition, an hour prior to sacrifice, the chickens received a single injection of the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, in order to quantify the number of DNA synthesizing cells and to establish a relationship between the migrating EAC and the rate of mitosis in the white pulp. The observations showed that between 12 hours and 3 days after the second antigen administration the labeled EAC, which was first located around the ellipsoid, progressively reached further areas with time towards the periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths, where newly formed germinal centers appeared. Furthermore, the rate of cell proliferation within the white pulp was associated with the arrival of the antigen-transporting EAC. The results suggest that migrating EAC have a role as both antigen-transporting cell and antigen-presenting cell in the T- and B-dependent areas, as a result of which migrating EAC is transiently found in periellipsoidal white pulp, then periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths, and finally germinal centers, where it may function as an interdigitating cell or as a follicular dendritic cell, depending on its location. Thus, we conclude that the EACs are precursors of both interdigitating and follicular dendritic cells.

  5. Oxidative stress in normal hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Azin; Kalantari, Heybatullah; Lorestani, Marzieh Zeinvand; Shirzad, Reza; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-04-01

    Leukemia is developed following the abnormal proliferation of immature hematopoietic cells in the blood when hematopoietic stem cells lose the ability to turn into mature cells at different stages of maturation and differentiation. Leukemia initiating cells are specifically dependent upon the suppression of oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow (BM) environment to be able to start their activities. Relevant literature was identified by a PubMed search (2000-2017) of English-language literature using the terms 'oxidative stress,' 'reactive oxygen species,' 'hematopoietic stem cell,' and 'leukemia.' The generation and degradation of free radicals is a main component of the metabolism in aerobic organisms. A certain level of ROS is required for proper cellular function, but values outside this range will result in oxidative stress (OS). Long-term overactivity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has harmful effects on the function of cells and their vital macromolecules, including the transformation of proteins into autoantigens and increased degradation of protein/DNA, which eventually leads to the change in pathways involved in the development of cancer and several other disorders. According to the metabolic disorders of cancer, the relationship between OS changes, the viability of cancer cells, and their response to chemotherapeutic agents affecting this pathway are undeniable. Recently, studies have been conducted to determine the effect of herbal agents and cancer chemotherapy drugs on oxidative stress pathways. By emphasizing the role of oxidative stress on stem cells in the incidence of leukemia, this paper attempts to state and summarize this subject. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Separation and Further Characterization of Hematopoietic Cell Populations Based on Phenotypic and Biophysical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Dykes, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are multipotent and possess self-renewal capacity. Thus, they can sustain a life-long hematopoiesis and are also capable of restoring the hematopoietic system when transplanted to a patient. In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), a potent graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect must be balanced against the concomitant risk of severe immunological response to non-malignant host cells; graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). In case of recipient-donor ...

  7. Splenic diffuse red-pulp small B-cell lymphoma associated with hepatitis B virus: a report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Kerbauy, Mariana Nassif; Fernandes, Carolina Melo; Bezerra, Evandro Dantas; Lage, Luis Alberto de Padua Covas; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho; Pereira, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Splenic diffuse red-pulp small B-cell lymphoma is a rare disease, representing less than 1% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). This entity is characterized by involvement of bone marrow sinusoids and peripheral blood. The majority of cases are at an advanced stage when diagnosed. Its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. CASE REPORTS: We report on two patients with chronic non-replicating hepatitis B virus (HBV) who developed splenic diffuse red-pulp small B-cell lym...

  8. Scintigraphic follow-up of the effects of therapy with hydroxyurea on splenic function in patients with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Allan [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil); Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital das Clinicas da UNICAMP, Campina (Brazil); Pinheiro, Vitoria; Anjos, Ana Claudia; Brandalise, Silvia [Centro Infantil Domingos A. Boldrini, Campinas (Brazil); Fahel, Fernanda; Lima, Mariana; Etchebehere, Elba; Ramos, Celso; Camargo, Edwaldo E. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil)

    2002-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) may develop functional asplenia as a chronic complication, secondary to repeated episodes of polymerisation of haemoglobin S. It is known that increased plasma concentrations of fetal haemoglobin (HbF) reduce the polymerisation of haemoglobin S. Hydroxyurea is a chemotherapeutic agent capable of increasing HbF levels in the red blood cells and its use has recently been proposed in the treatment of SCD. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term therapy with hydroxyurea on recovery of splenic function. Twenty-one patients (aged 3-22 years; 14 with SS haemoglobinopathy, 7 with S{beta}{sup 0} haemoglobinopathy) were studied with liver/spleen scintigraphy before and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. All studies were submitted to visual inspection and semi-quantitative analyses using spleen/liver ratios. Imaging prior to treatment demonstrated functional asplenia in nine SS patients and one S{beta}{sup 0} patient and impaired splenic function in five SS patients and six S{beta}{sup 0} patients. After treatment, splenic function improved in ten patients, remained unchanged in eight and worsened in three. Using liver/spleen imaging, it was possible to demonstrate that hydroxyurea is capable of improving splenic function in some SCD patients. Improvement is not always possible and frequently does not lead to a normal splenic function even after 1 year of treatment. (orig.)

  9. In vivo single cell analysis reveals Gata2 dynamics in cells transitioning to hematopoietic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, Christina; Arlt, Jochen; Vink, Chris S; Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Mariani, Samanta A; van der Linden, Reinier; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2018-01-02

    Cell fate is established through coordinated gene expression programs in individual cells. Regulatory networks that include the Gata2 transcription factor play central roles in hematopoietic fate establishment. Although Gata2 is essential to the embryonic development and function of hematopoietic stem cells that form the adult hierarchy, little is known about the in vivo expression dynamics of Gata2 in single cells. Here, we examine Gata2 expression in single aortic cells as they establish hematopoietic fate in Gata2Venus mouse embryos. Time-lapse imaging reveals rapid pulsatile level changes in Gata2 reporter expression in cells undergoing endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. Moreover, Gata2 reporter pulsatile expression is dramatically altered in Gata2 +/- aortic cells, which undergo fewer transitions and are reduced in hematopoietic potential. Our novel finding of dynamic pulsatile expression of Gata2 suggests a highly unstable genetic state in single cells concomitant with their transition to hematopoietic fate. This reinforces the notion that threshold levels of Gata2 influence fate establishment and has implications for transcription factor-related hematologic dysfunctions. © 2018 Eich et al.

  10. Blood on the tracks: hematopoietic stem cell-endothelial cell interactions in homing and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Julie R; Sporrij, Audrey; Zon, Leonard I

    2017-08-01

    Cells of the hematopoietic system undergo rapid turnover. Each day, humans require the production of about one hundred billion new blood cells for proper function. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare cells that reside in specialized niches and are required throughout life to produce specific progenitor cells that will replenish all blood lineages. There is, however, an incomplete understanding of the molecular and physical properties that regulate HSC migration, homing, engraftment, and maintenance in the niche. Endothelial cells (ECs) are intimately associated with HSCs throughout the life of the stem cell, from the specialized endothelial cells that give rise to HSCs, to the perivascular niche endothelial cells that regulate HSC homeostasis. Recent studies have dissected the unique molecular and physical properties of the endothelial cells in the HSC vascular niche and their role in HSC biology, which may be manipulated to enhance hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapies.

  11. TET2 deficiency inhibits mesoderm and hematopoietic differentiation in human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langlois, Thierry; da Costa Reis Monte Mor, Barbara; Lenglet, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    . Here, we show that TET2 expression is low in human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines and increases during hematopoietic differentiation. ShRNA-mediated TET2 knockdown had no effect on the pluripotency of various ES cells. However, it skewed their differentiation into neuroectoderm at the expense...... profile, including abnormal expression of neuronal genes. Intriguingly, when TET2 was knockdown in hematopoietic cells, it increased hematopoietic development. In conclusion, our work suggests that TET2 is involved in different stages of human embryonic development, including induction of the mesoderm...... and hematopoietic differentiation. Stem Cells 2014....

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) marks hematopoietic stem cells in human embryonic, fetal, and adult hematopoietic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokubaitis, Vanta J.; Sinka, Lidia; Driessen, Rebecca; Whitty, Genevieve; Haylock, David N.; Bertoncello, Ivan; Smith, Ian; Peault, Bruno; Tavian, Manuela; Simmons, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that mAb BB9 reacts with a subset of CD34(+) human BM cells with hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) characteristics. Here we map B89 expression throughout hernatopoietic development and show that the earliest definitive HSCs that arise at the ventral wall of the aorta and

  13. Age-associated changes in human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wendy W; Schrier, Stanley L; Weissman, Irving L

    2017-01-01

    Aging has a broad impact on the function of the human hematopoietic system. This review will focus primarily on the effect of aging on the human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) population. With age, even though human HSCs increase in number, they have decreased self-renewal capacity and reconstitution potential upon transplantation. As a population, human HSCs become more myeloid-biased in their differentiation potential. This is likely due to the human HSC population becoming more clonal with age, selecting for myeloid-biased HSC clones. The HSC clones that come to predominate with age may also contain disease-causing genetic and epigenetic changes that confer an increased risk of developing into an age-associated clonal hematopoietic disease, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloproliferative disorders, or leukemia. The selection of these aged human HSC clones may be in part due to changes in the aging bone marrow microenvironment. While there have been significant advances in the understanding of the effect of aging on mouse hematopoiesis and mouse HSCs, we have comparatively less detailed analyses of the effect of aging on human HSCs. Continued evaluation of human HSCs in the context of aging will be important to determine how applicable the findings in mice and other model organisms are to the human clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stereotyped patterns of B-cell receptor in splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    KAUST Repository

    Zibellini, S.

    2010-05-29

    Antigen stimulation may be important for splenic marginal zone lymphoma pathogenesis. To address this hypothesis, the occurrence of stereotyped B-cell receptors was investigated in 133 SMZL (26 HCV+) compared with 4,414 HCDR3 sequences from public databases. Sixteen SMZL (12%) showed stereotyped BCR; 7 of 86 (8%) SMZL sequences retrieved from public databases also belonged to stereotyped HCDR3 subsets. Three categories of subsets were identified: i) SMZL-specific subsets (n=5), composed only of 12 SMZL (9 HCV- from our series); ii) Non-Hodgkin\\'s lymphoma-like subsets (n=5), comprising 5 SMZL (4 from our series) clustering with other indolent lymphomas; iii) "CLL-like subsets" (n=6), comprising 6 SMZL (3 from our series) that belonged to known CLL subsets (n=4) or clustered with public CLL sequences. Immunoglobulin 3D modeling of 3 subsets revealed similarities in antigen binding regions not limited to HCDR3. Overall, data suggest that the pathogenesis of splenic marginal zone lymphoma may involve also HCV unrelated epitopes or an antigenic trigger common to other indolent lymphomas. ©2010 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  15. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  16. Tissue-resident natural killer (NK) cells are cell lineages distinct from thymic and conventional splenic NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Yang, Liping; Pak-Wittel, Melissa A; Artyomov, Maxim N; Ivanova, Yulia; Zhong, Chao; Chase, Julie M; Rothman, Paul B; Yu, Jenny; Riley, Joan K; Zhu, Jinfang; Tian, Zhigang; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system; they can control virus infections and developing tumors by cytotoxicity and producing inflammatory cytokines. Most studies of mouse NK cells, however, have focused on conventional NK (cNK) cells in the spleen. Recently, we described two populations of liver NK cells, tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells and those resembling splenic cNK cells. However, their lineage relationship was unclear; trNK cells could be developing cNK cells, related to thymic NK cells, or a lineage distinct from both cNK and thymic NK cells. Herein we used detailed transcriptomic, flow cytometric, and functional analysis and transcription factor-deficient mice to determine that liver trNK cells form a distinct lineage from cNK and thymic NK cells. Taken together with analysis of trNK cells in other tissues, there are at least four distinct lineages of NK cells: cNK, thymic, liver (and skin) trNK, and uterine trNK cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01659.001 PMID:24714492

  17. Alefacept and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic-granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Fanconi Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia

  18. Imaging of complications from hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Tarun; Maximin, Suresh; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplant has been the focus of clinical research for a long time given its potential to treat several incurable diseases like hematological malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-degenerative disorders like Parkinson disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the oldest and most widely used technique of stem cell transplant. HSCT has not only been used to treat hematological disorders including hematological malignancies, but has also been found useful in treamtent of genetic, immunological, and solid tumors like neuroblastoma, lymphoma, and germ cell tumors. In spite of the rapid advances in stem cell technology, success rate with this technique has not been universal and many complications have also been seen with this form of therapy. The key to a successful HSCT therapy lies in early diagnosis and effective management of complications associated with this treatment. Our article aims to review the role of imaging in diagnosis and management of stem cell transplant complications associated with HSCT

  19. Imaging of complications from hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplant has been the focus of clinical research for a long time given its potential to treat several incurable diseases like hematological malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-degenerative disorders like Parkinson disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the oldest and most widely used technique of stem cell transplant. HSCT has not only been used to treat hematological disorders including hematological malignancies, but has also been found useful in treamtent of genetic, immunological, and solid tumors like neuroblastoma, lymphoma, and germ cell tumors. In spite of the rapid advances in stem cell technology, success rate with this technique has not been universal and many complications have also been seen with this form of therapy. The key to a successful HSCT therapy lies in early diagnosis and effective management of complications associated with this treatment. Our article aims to review the role of imaging in diagnosis and management of stem cell transplant complications associated with HSCT.

  20. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  1. Autologous hematopoietic stem cells for refractory Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNicola, C A; Zand, A; Hommes, D W

    2017-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cells are gaining ground as an effective and safe treatment for treating severe refractory Crohn's disease (CD). Autologous hematopoietic stem cell therapy (AHSCT) induces resetting of the immune system by de novo regeneration of T-cell repertoire and repopulation of epithelial cells by bone-marrow derived cells to help patients achieve clinical and endoscopic remission. Areas covered: Herein, the authors discuss the use of AHSCT in treating patients with CD. Improvements in disease activity have been seen in patients with severe autoimmune disease and patients with severe CD who underwent AHSCT for a concomitant malignant hematological disease. Clinical and endoscopic remission has been achieved in patients treated with AHSCT for CD. The only randomized trial published to date, the ASTIC Trial, did not support further use of AHSCT to treat CD. Yet, critics of this trial have deemed AHSCT as a promising treatment for severe refractory CD. Expert opinion: Even with the promising evidence presented for HSCT for refractory CD, protocols need to be refined through the collaboration of GI and hemato-oncology professionals. The goal is to incorporate safe AHSCT and restore tolerance by delivering an effective immune 'cease fire' as a treatment option for severe refractory CD.

  2. A rare case of splenic littoral cell angioma in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Bedir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Littoral cell angioma (LCA is a rare, benign primary vascular neoplasm of the spleen. The tumor originates from the littoral cells lining the sinuses of the red pulp of the spleen. Preoperative distinction of this tumor from other benign or malign splenic lesions is difficult. Radiologically most cases present as multiple nodules. Definitive diagnosis can only be made histopathologically and immunohistochemically following splenectomy. This clinical situation can coexist with various malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Even though, it is mostly benign, since it has the potential to become malignant after splenectomy, long-term follow-up is required. We present an LCA case, which appeared as a solitary mass in the spleen of an 11-year-old girl with abdominal pain admitted to our hospital.

  3. Postsplenectomy splenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orda, R; Barak, J; Baron, J; Spirer, Z; Wiznitzer, T

    1981-01-01

    Evidence of recurring activity of splenic tissue was investigated in patients who had undergone splenectomies. Methods included technetium 99m sulfur colloid scan, serum tuftsin assay, serum immunoglobulin concentration, blood cell counts, and search for Howell-Jolly bodies. Positive scans were observed together with normal levels of tuftsin in 54% of the patients. In 46% of the patients, no splenic activity was detected by scanning and low levels of tuftsin were noticed. The difference in tuftsin levels between the two groups was statistically significant. Howell-Jolly bodies and decreased serum levels of IgM featured all patients. The possible application of combined splenic scan and tuftsin assessment for screening recurring splenic activity in the postsplenectomy population at great risk is suggested. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7305494

  4. Visualizing early splenic memory CD8+ T cells reactivation against intracellular bacteria in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Bajénoff

    Full Text Available Memory CD8(+ T cells represent an important effector arm of the immune response in maintaining long-lived protective immunity against viruses and some intracellular bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes (L.m. Memory CD8(+ T cells are endowed with enhanced antimicrobial effector functions that perfectly tail them to rapidly eradicate invading pathogens. It is largely accepted that these functions are sufficient to explain how memory CD8(+ T cells can mediate rapid protection. However, it is important to point out that such improved functional features would be useless if memory cells were unable to rapidly find the pathogen loaded/infected cells within the infected organ. Growing evidences suggest that the anatomy of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs fosters the cellular interactions required to initiate naive adaptive immune responses. However, very little is known on how the SLOs structures regulate memory immune responses. Using Listeria monocytogenes (L.m as a murine infection model and imaging techniques, we have investigated if and how the architecture of the spleen plays a role in the reactivation of memory CD8(+ T cells and the subsequent control of L.m growth. We observed that in the mouse, memory CD8(+ T cells start to control L.m burden 6 hours after the challenge infection. At this very early time point, L.m-specific and non-specific memory CD8(+ T cells localize in the splenic red pulp and form clusters around L.m infected cells while naïve CD8(+ T cells remain in the white pulp. Within these clusters that only last few hours, memory CD8(+ T produce inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma and CCL3 nearby infected myeloid cells known to be crucial for L.m killing. Altogether, we describe how memory CD8(+ T cells trafficking properties and the splenic micro-anatomy conjugate to create a spatio-temporal window during which memory CD8(+ T cells provide a local response by secreting effector molecules around infected cells.

  5. Comparison of chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: Chemotherapy is frequently used as a conditioning regimen to destroy malignant marrow cells before transplantation. Xerostomia, dysphagia, altered taste perception, mucositis, soft‑tissue ulceration, and infection are common adverse oral effects of chemotherapy. The study was aimed to compare decayed, missing, ...

  6. Biomarkers of splenic function in infants with sickle cell anemia: baseline data from the BABY HUG Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Winfred C.; Luo, Zhaoyu; Iyer, Rathi V.; Shalaby-Rana, Eglal; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Shulkin, Barry L.; Miller, John H.; Files, Bea; Lane, Peter A.; Thompson, Bruce W.; Miller, Scott T.; Ware, Russell E.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated spleen function in 193 children with sickle cell anemia 8 to 18 months of age by 99mTc sulfur-colloid liver-spleen scan and correlated results with clinical and laboratory parameters, including 2 splenic biomarkers: pitted cell counts (PIT) and quantitative Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB) enumerated by flow cytometry. Loss of splenic function began before 12 months of age in 86% of infants in association with lower total or fetal hemoglobin and higher white blood cell or reticulocyte counts, reinforcing the need for early diagnosis and diligent preventive care. PIT and HJB correlated well with each other and liver-spleen scan results. Previously described biomarker threshold values did define patients with abnormal splenic function, but our data suggest that normal spleen function is better predicted by PIT of ≤ 1.2% or HJB ≤ 55/106 red blood cells and absent function by PIT ≥ 4.5% or HJB ≥ 665/106. HJB is methodologically advantageous compared with PIT, but both are valid biomarkers of splenic function. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00006400. PMID:21217080

  7. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso José Pereira Cortez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. RESULTS: The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. CONCLUSION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not

  8. Functional evaluation indicates physical losses after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Vasconcellos de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a function evaluation of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: From November 2008 to November 2010, 29 female (58% and 21 male patients (42% with median age of 48 years (range: 24-67 were enrolled in this study. Data collection was performed before and after autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Evaluation instruments included the 2-minute walking test to evaluate gait performance with assessment of the oxygen saturation, heart rate and Borg Scale before and after the test; grip strength for strength evaluation, Schober Test for spine mobility testing and maximum and adapted activity scores of the Human Activity Profile questionnaire to test functionality in daily activities. RESULTS: Fifty patients were evaluated at baseline; six did not undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (three died, one refused and two were excluded. Thus 44/50 (88% - 21 allogeneic and 23 autologous transplantations were performed. Only 33 of the 44 patients (75% performed evaluations after transplantation (nine died and two were excluded. Of the patients who performed both evaluations, significantly lower values were found in the evaluation after transplantation for the 2-minute walking test (p-value = 0.004, grip strength of both right and left hands (p-value = 0.004 and p-value < 0.0001, respectively, the Schober Test, and maximum and adapted activity scores (p-value < 0.0001. The heart rate was higher (p-value = 0.01 before the 2-minute walking test and oxygen saturation was higher (p-value = 0.02 after. CONCLUSION: Statistical differences indicate functional impairment after transplantation showing physical losses in this population.

  9. Tumor-Induced Generation of Splenic Erythroblast-like Ter-Cells Promotes Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanmei; Liu, Qiuyan; Hou, Jin; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhubo; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Weiping; Qiu, Shuangjian; Zhang, Yonghong; Dong, Tao; Li, Ning; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhu, Ha; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wang, Qingqing; Yu, Yizhi; Li, Nan; Cao, Xuetao

    2018-04-19

    Identifying tumor-induced leukocyte subsets and their derived circulating factors has been instrumental in understanding cancer as a systemic disease. Nevertheless, how primary tumor-induced non-leukocyte populations in distal organs contribute to systemic spread remains poorly defined. Here, we report one population of tumor-inducible, erythroblast-like cells (Ter-cells) deriving from megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor cells with a unique Ter-119 + CD45 - CD71 + phenotype. Ter-cells are enriched in the enlarged spleen of hosts bearing advanced tumors and facilitate tumor progression by secreting neurotrophic factor artemin into the blood. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and Smad3 activation are important in Ter-cell generation. In vivo blockade of Ter-cell-derived artemin inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth, and artemin deficiency abolishes Ter-cells' tumor-promoting ability. We confirm the presence of splenic artemin-positive Ter-cells in human HCC patients and show that significantly elevated serum artemin correlates with poor prognosis. We propose that Ter-cells and the secreted artemin play important roles in cancer progression with prognostic and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Depression and anxiety following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuba, K; Esser, P; Mehnert, A

    2017-01-01

    In this prospective multicenter study, we investigated the course of depression and anxiety during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) until 5 years after transplantation adjusting for medical information. Patients were consulted before HSCT (n=239), at 3 months (n=150), 12 months (n=102......) and 5 years (n=45) after HSCT. Depression and anxiety were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Detailed medical and demographic information was collected. Prevalence rates were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group drawn from a large representative sample (n...

  11. Lung function after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Larsen Bang, Cæcilie; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    Reduction in pulmonary function (PF) has been reported in up to 85% of pediatric patients during the first year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our understanding of the etiology for this decrease in lung function is, however, sparse. The aim of this study was to describe PF......-versus-host disease (GvHD). Other factors associated with PF decline were malignant diagnosis, busulfan-based conditioning, patient and donor age, female donor to male recipient, as well as chronic GvHD. Mild to moderate decline in PF is frequent and appears associated with acute GvHD and other parameters...

  12. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Majhail, NS; Flowers, ME; Ness, KK; Jagasia, M; Carpenter, PA; Arora, M; Arai, S; Johnston, L; Martin, PJ; Baker, KS; Lee, SJ; Burns, LJ

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, among 86 adults who had allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplant (HCT) as compared with 258 age- and gender-matched US population controls selected from the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database. The median age at study enrollment was 50 years (range, 21–71), and patients were at a median of 3 years (range, 1–...

  13. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  14. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Scott G; Bennett, Michael; Galić, Zoran; Kim, Joanne; Xu, Qing; Young, Alan; Lieberman, Alexis; Joseph, Aviva; Goldstein, Harris; Ng, Hwee; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2009-12-07

    There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR). Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  15. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  16. Administration of interleukin-6 stimulates multilineage hematopoiesis and accelerates recovery from radiation-induced hematopoietic depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Williams, J.L.; Schwartz, G.N.; Souza, L.M. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Hematopoietic depression and subsequent susceptibility to potentially lethal opportunistic infections are well-documented phenomena following radiotherapy. Methods to therapeutically mitigate radiation-induced myelosuppression could offer great clinical value. In vivo studies have demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulates pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (CFU-s), granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC), and erythroid progenitor cell (CFU-e) proliferation in normal mice. Based on these results, the ability of IL-6 to stimulate hematopoietic regeneration following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury was also evaluated. C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy 60Co radiation and subcutaneously administered either saline or IL-6 on days 1 through 3 or 1 through 6 postexposure. On days 7, 10, 14, 17, and 22, femoral and splenic CFU-s, GM-CFC, and CFU-e contents and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet counts were determined. Compared with saline treatment, both 3-day and 6-day IL-6 treatments accelerated hematopoietic recovery; 6-day treatment produced the greater effects. For example, compared with normal control values (N), femoral and splenic CFU-s numbers in IL-6-treated mice 17 days postirradiation were 27% N and 136% N versus 2% N and 10% N in saline-treated mice. At the same time, bone marrow and splenic GM-CFC values were 58% N and 473% N versus 6% N and 196% N in saline-treated mice; bone marrow and splenic CFU-e numbers were 91% N and 250% N versus 31% N and 130% N in saline-treated mice; and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet values were 210% N, 60% N, and 24% N versus 18% N, 39% N, and 7% N in saline-treated mice. These studies demonstrate that therapeutically administered IL-6 can effectively accelerate multilineage hematopoietic recovery following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury.

  17. Periarteriolar Glioblastoma Stem Cell Niches Express Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, Vashendriya V. V.; Wormer, Jill R.; Kakar, Hala; Breznik, Barbara; van der Swaan, Britt; Hulsbos, Renske; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Tonar, Zbynek; Khurshed, Mohammed; Molenaar, Remco J.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2018-01-01

    In glioblastoma, a fraction of malignant cells consists of therapy-resistant glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) residing in protective niches that recapitulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in bone marrow. We have previously shown that HSC niche proteins stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α),

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell-specific GFP-expressing transgenic mice generated by genetic excision of a pan-hematopoietic reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Boyer, Scott W; Landon, Mark; Forsberg, E Camilla

    2016-08-01

    Selective labeling of specific cell types by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) within the hematopoietic system would have great utility in identifying, localizing, and tracking different cell populations in flow cytometry, microscopy, lineage tracing, and transplantation assays. In this report, we describe the generation and characterization of a new transgenic mouse line with specific GFP labeling of all nucleated hematopoietic cells and platelets. This new "Vav-GFP" mouse line labels the vast majority of hematopoietic cells with GFP during both embryonic development and adulthood, with particularly high expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). With the exception of transient labeling of fetal endothelial cells, GFP expression is highly selective for hematopoietic cells and persists in donor-derived progeny after transplantation of HSPCs. Finally, we also demonstrate that the loxP-flanked reporter allows for specific GFP labeling of different hematopoietic cell subsets when crossed to various Cre reporter lines. By crossing Vav-GFP mice to Flk2-Cre mice, we obtained robust and highly selective GFP expression in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These data describe a new mouse model capable of directing GFP labeling exclusively of hematopoietic cells or exclusively of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of leukaemic sera & cell-extracts on splenic colony counts (CFU-S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Sood, S K

    1991-08-01

    Sera and leukaemic cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemia were evaluated for their effect on the repopulating ability of the pluripotent stem cells and erythroid differentiation by an in vivo splenic colony count (CFU-S) technique. Normal donor marrow cells of mice were treated with sera and cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemic and healthy controls and injected in the recipient mice. The CFU-S performed on the seventh day to assess repopulating ability of the stem cell showed consistently lower CFU-S counts in the test groups, with leukaemic sera (P less than 0.01) as well as leukaemic cell-extracts (P less than 0.001). The erythroid differentiation assessed by 59Fe uptake by the spleens also showed significantly reduced counts in the two test groups (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.001 respectively). The results indicate that both leukaemic sera and cell-extracts exert a significant suppressive effect on the repopulating ability of the stem cells and on their erythroid differentiation.

  20. Hepatic natural killer cells exclusively kill splenic/blood natural killer-resistant tumor cells by the perforin/granzyme pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermijlen, David; Luo, Dianzhong; Froelich, Christopher J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Kummer, Jean Alain; Willems, Erik; Braet, Filip; Wisse, Eddie

    2002-01-01

    Hepatic natural killer (NK) cells are located in the liver sinusoids adherent to the endothelium. Human and rat hepatic NK cells induce cytolysis in tumor cells that are resistant to splenic or blood NK cells. To investigate the mechanism of cell death, we examined the capacity of isolated, pure

  1. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Haddad Barrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression.OBJECTIVE: To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS: A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged > 18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients; B (autologous transplant, 31 patients. A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1, one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2, and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3. In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks.RESULTS: The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression.CONCLUSION: Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications.

  2. [Effect of electroacupuncture on differentiation and proliferation of hippocampal nerve stem cells in splenic asthenia pedo-rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Zhuo-xin; Wu, Jia-man

    2011-10-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on the differentiation and proliferation of nerve stem cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) in splenic asthenia pedo-rats so as to study its central mechanism. A total of 72 SD male rats were randomly assigned to normal control group (n=24), model group (n=24) and EA group (n=24) which were further divided into 7 d, 14 d, 28 d and 49 d time-points (n=6). Splenic asthenia model was established by intraperitoneal injection of reserpine and gavage of Dahuang (Radix et Rhizoma Rhei) fluid. EA was applied to bilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36) and "Sanyinjiao" (SP 6) for 20 min, once daily for 7, 14, 28 and 49 days respectively. Brdu, Nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) expression in the DG of hippocampus were detected by immunohistochemistry double staining. Compared with the normal control group, the numbers of Brdu, Brdu/GFAP, Brdu/NSE Immunoreactive (IR) positive cells in the DG of hippocampus on day 7 and 14, and that of Brdu/Nestin IR-positive cells on day 7 were decreased considerably in the model group (P 0.05). EA of ST 36 and SP 6 can effectively suppress splenic asthenia syndrome-induced decrease of the numbers of Brdu, Brdu/GFAP, Brdu/Nestin and Brdu/NSE IR-positive cells in the DG of hippocampus at the early stage in the splenic asthenia rats, which may contribute to its effect in improving splenic asthenia symptoms in clinic by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of some nerve stem cells in the hippocampus.

  3. CD97 is differentially expressed on murine hematopoietic stem-and progenitor-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, Melissa; Hagoort, Henny; Hamann, Jörg; Fibbe, Willem E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD97 is a member of the epidermal growth factor-seven transmembrane (EGF-TM7) family of adhesion receptors and is broadly expressed on hematopoietic cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of CD97 on hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells (HSC/HPC). DESIGN AND

  4. Analysis and manipulation of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells from murine embryonic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Medvinsky (Alexander); S. Taoudi (Samir); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic development begins in several locations in the mammalian embryo: yolk sac, aorta-gonad-mesonephros region (AGM), and the chorio-allantoic placenta. Generation of the most potent cells, adult definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), occurs within the body of the mouse

  5. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, M; van Os, R; Velders, GA; Hagoort, H; Heegaard, PMH; Lindley, IJD; Willemze, R; Fibbe, WE

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory

  6. Pharmacoeconomics of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization : An Overview of Current Evidence and Gaps in the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaughnessy, Paul; Chao, Nelson; Shapiro, Jamie; Walters, Kent; McCarty, John; Abhyankar, Sunil; Shayani, Sepideh; Helmons, Pieter; Leather, Helen; Pazzalia, Amy; Pickard, Simon

    Adequate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization and collection is required prior to proceeding with high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Cytokines such as G-CSF, GM-CSF, and peg-filgrastim, alone or in combination with plerixafor, and after chemotherapy have

  7. A Transient Developmental Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gives Rise to Innate-like B and T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Anna E; Boyer, Scott W; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Hernandez, Gloria E; Derderian, S Christopher; Jujjavarapu, Chethan; Aaserude, Eric; MacKenzie, Tippi; Forsberg, E Camilla

    2016-12-01

    The generation of distinct hematopoietic cell types, including tissue-resident immune cells, distinguishes fetal from adult hematopoiesis. However, the mechanisms underlying differential cell production to generate a layered immune system during hematopoietic development are unclear. Using an irreversible lineage-tracing model, we identify a definitive hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) that supports long-term multilineage reconstitution upon transplantation into adult recipients but does not persist into adulthood in situ. These HSCs are fully multipotent, yet they display both higher lymphoid cell production and greater capacity to generate innate-like B and T lymphocytes as compared to coexisting fetal HSCs and adult HSCs. Thus, these developmentally restricted HSCs (drHSCs) define the origin and generation of early lymphoid cells that play essential roles in establishing self-recognition and tolerance, with important implications for understanding autoimmune disease, allergy, and rejection of transplanted organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for indolent lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izutsu, Koji

    2008-01-01

    Described are the review of the transplantation in the title (SCT), and the possible impact on its application and outcome of radio-immunotherapy (RIT) by new antibody drugs like ibritumomab tiuxetan (Ibr) and tositumomab (Tos), and of chemotherapy by purine analogs. Various regimens for the combination of auto-SCT, allo-SCT, chemotherapy and total body irradiation (TBI) have been used to treat the recurrent and progressive indolent lymphoma including follicular lymphoma (FL); however, their outcomes are still controversial. Introduction of new drugs like rituximab (Rit), Ibr and Tos has made it possible to extend the options of the regimen. For instance, in auto-SCT in FL, a high dose Rit therapy is used for in vivo purging to reduce tumor cell contamination of the graft instead of the exhausting, high-cost pretreatment for the in vitro purging with cyclophosphamide (CY)/TBI hitherto. In addition, RIT by Tos at the absorbed dose of 20-27 Gy in the critical organs with CY/VP16 combination is reportedly superior to CY/VP16/TBI. In allo-SCT where recurrence frequency is known low despite high mortality due to various complications, many regimens involving fludarabine/TBI have been also reported. Thus there has been neither clear standard for SCT in the lymphoma nor yet its prognosis after the therapy with new drugs described and the accumulation of their findings hereafter is important for future SCT application. (R.T.)

  9. Studies on hematopoietic cell apoptosis and the relative gene expression in irradiated mouse bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ruiyun; Wang Dewen; Xiong Chengqi; Gao Yabing; Yang Hong; Cui Yufang; Wang Baozhen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study apoptosis and expressions bcl-2 and p53 in irradiated mouse bone marrow. Methods: LACA mice were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays. By means of in situ terminal labelling, in situ hybridization and image analysis, the authors studied radiation-induced apoptosis of hematopoietic cells and the expressions of bcl-2 and p53. Results: The characteristics of apoptosis appeared in hematopoietic cells at 6 hrs after irradiation. The expression of bcl-2 was obviously decreased when apoptosis of hematopoietic cells occurred, whereas it increased in the early recovery phase; p53 protein increased during both apoptosis of hematopoietic cells and the recovery phase, and mutant type p53 DNA was positive only in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Radiation may induced apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in a dose-dependent manner; Both bcl-2 and p53 genes play an important role in apoptosis and recovery phase

  10. Overexpression of TSC-22 (transforming growth factor-β-stimulated clone-22) causes marked obesity, splenic abnormality and B cell lymphoma in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horiuchi, Hideki; Furihata, Tadashi; Tachibana, Masatsugu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice, which overexpressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22), and investigate the functional role of TSC-22 on their development and pathogenesis. We obtained 13 Tg-founders (two mice from C57BL6/J and 11 mice from BDF1). Three of 13 Tg-founders were sterile, and the remaining Tg-founders also could generate only a limited number of the F1 generation. We obtained 32 Tg-F1 mice. Most of the Tg-mice showed marked obesity. Histopathological examination could be performed on 31 Tg-mice; seventeen mice died by some disease in their entire life and 14 mice were killed for examination. Most of the Tg-mice examined showed splenic abnormality, in which marked increase of the megakaryocytes, unclearness of the margin of the red pulp and the white pulp, and the enlargement of the white pulp was observed. B cell lymphoma was developed in 10 (71%) of 14 disease-died F1 mice. These results indicate that constitutive over-expression of TSC-22 might disturb the normal embryogenesis and the normal lipid metabolism, and induce the oncogenic differentiation of hematopoietic cells. PMID:26872059

  11. Overexpression of TSC-22 (transforming growth factor- β-stimulated clone-22) causes marked obesity, splenic abnormality and B cell lymphoma in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Daisuke; Kawamata, Hitoshi; Omotehara, Fumie; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horiuchi, Hideki; Furihata, Tadashi; Tachibana, Masatsugu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2016-03-22

    In this study, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice, which overexpressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22), and investigate the functional role of TSC-22 on their development and pathogenesis. We obtained 13 Tg-founders (two mice from C57BL6/J and 11 mice from BDF1). Three of 13 Tg-founders were sterile, and the remaining Tg-founders also could generate only a limited number of the F1 generation. We obtained 32 Tg-F1 mice. Most of the Tg-mice showed marked obesity. Histopathological examination could be performed on 31 Tg-mice; seventeen mice died by some disease in their entire life and 14 mice were killed for examination. Most of the Tg-mice examined showed splenic abnormality, in which marked increase of the megakaryocytes, unclearness of the margin of the red pulp and the white pulp, and the enlargement of the white pulp was observed. B cell lymphoma was developed in 10 (71%) of 14 disease-died F1 mice. These results indicate that constitutive over-expression of TSC-22 might disturb the normal embryogenesis and the normal lipid metabolism, and induce the oncogenic differentiation of hematopoietic cells.

  12. Splenic abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hajjar, Nadim; Graur, Florin; Hassan, Aboul B; Molnár, Geza

    2002-03-01

    Splenic abscesses are rare entities (autopsy incidence between 0.14-0.7%). The most frequent etiology is the septic emboli seeding from bacterial endocarditis (about 20% of cases) or other septic foci (typhoid fever, malaria, urinary tract infections, osteomielitis, otitis). The treatment of splenic abscesses was until recently splenectomy with antibiotherapy. The actual trends are more conservative (mini invasive or non-invasive) because the immunologic role of the spleen has been better understood over the last year

  13. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. Herpes zoster after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Borges dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: The autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedure involves immunosuppression of the patient. Thus, the patient has an elevated risk for several diseases, such as infections with the varicella-zoster virus. Prevention protocols have been proposed based on the use of acyclovir from the first day of conditioning, and maintaining this drug for 30-100 days after the procedure or for as much as one year. The objective of this work was to evaluate the incidence of herpes zoster after autologous transplantations related to the early suspension of acyclovir. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out based on the collection of data from 231 medical records of transplant patients in the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit of the teaching hospital of the Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora in the period between 2004 and 2014. Results: Fourteen (6.1% patients had herpes zoster in the post-transplant period on average within six months of the procedure. Patients with multiple myeloma (64.3% were the most affected. There was a statistically significant difference in the age of the patients, with older individuals having a greater chance of developing the infection (p-value = 0.002. There were no significant differences for the other variables analyzed. Conclusion: The early suspension of acyclovir can be safe in patients who receive autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplants. However some groups may benefit from extended prophylaxis with acyclovir, particularly older patients and patients with multiple myeloma.

  14. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  15. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells for autologous transportation: consensus recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Barroso Duarte

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Selected patients with certain hematological malignancies and solid tumors have the potential to achieve long-term survival with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant. The collection of these cells in peripheral blood avoids multiple bone marrow aspirations, results in faster engraftment and allows treatment of patients with infection, fibrosis, or bone marrow hypocellularity. However, for the procedure to be successful, it is essential to mobilize a sufficient number of progenitor cells from the bone marrow into the blood circulation. Therefore, a group of Brazilian experts met in order to develop recommendations for mobilization strategies adapted to the reality of the Brazilian national health system, which could help minimize the risk of failure, reduce toxicity and improve the allocation of financial resources.

  16. ABO blood group mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekgündüz, Sibel Akpınar; Özbek, Namık

    2016-02-01

    Apart from solid organ transplantations, use of ABO-blood group mismatched (ABO-mismatched) donors is acceptable in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. About 20-40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients will receive grafts from ABO-mismatched donors. ABO incompatible HSCT procedures are associated with immediate and late consequences, including but not restricted to acute or delayed hemolytic reactions, delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and graft-versus-host disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge about consequences of ABO-mismatched HSCT in terms of associated complications and will evaluate its impact on important outcome parameters of HSCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  18. Unusual Presentation of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma With Splenic Infarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man presented with a 3-day history of abdominal pain, fever, and significant weight loss over 2 months. Physical examination revealed left upper quadrant tenderness, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, and bilateral pitting edema but peripheral lymphadenopathy was absent. Laboratory tests showed anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated prothrombin time (PT, partial thromboplastin time (PTT, and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. PTT was corrected completely in mixing study. Further workup for the cause of coagulopathy revealed decreased levels of all clotting factors except factor VIII and increase fibrinogen levels, which ruled out disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Flow cytometry of peripheral blood was normal. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT revealed splenomegaly with multiple splenic infarcts without any mediastinal or intraabdominal lymphadenopathy. Further investigations for infective endocarditis (blood cultures and transthoracic echocardiography and autoimmune disorders (ANA, dsDNA, RA factors were negative. The patient received treatment for sepsis empirically without any significant clinical improvement. The diagnosis remained unclear despite extensive workup and liver biopsy was conducted due to high suspicion of granulomatous diseases. However, the liver biopsy revealed high-grade diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Unfortunately, patient died shortly after the diagnosis. Here we report a case of high-grade DLBCL with hepatosplenomegaly and splenic infarcts in the absence of any lymphadenopathy or focal lesions. This case highlights the fact that unusually lymphoma can present in the absence of lymphadenopathy or mass lesion mimicking autoimmune and granulomatous disorders. The diagnosis in these cases can only be made on histology, and hence the threshold for biopsy should be low in patients with unclear presentations and multiorgan involvement.

  19. Low antigenicity of hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from human ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eun-Mi Kim1, Nicholas Zavazava1,21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; 2Immunology Graduate Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USAAbstract: Human embryonic stem (hES cells are essential for improved understanding of diseases and our ability to probe new therapies for use in humans. Currently, bone marrow cells and cord blood cells are used for transplantation into patients with hematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiencies and in some cases for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, due to the high immunogenicity of these hematopoietic cells, toxic regimens of drugs are required for preconditioning and prevention of rejection. Here, we investigated the efficiency of deriving hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs from the hES cell line H13, after co-culturing with the murine stromal cell line OP9. We show that HPCs derived from the H13 ES cells poorly express major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and no detectable class II antigens (HLA-DR. These characteristics make hES cell-derived hematopoietic cells (HPCs ideal candidates for transplantation across MHC barriers under minimal immunosuppression.Keywords: human embryonic stem cells, H13, hematopoiesis, OP9 stromal cells, immunogenicity

  20. Novel therapeutic strategies to target leukemic cells that hijack compartmentalized continuous hematopoietic stem cell niches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, Vashendriya V. V.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Molenaar, Remco J.

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells hijack hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in the bone marrow and become leukemic stem cells (LSCs) at the expense of normal HSCs. LSCs are quiescent and resistant to chemotherapy and can cause relapse of the disease. HSCs in niches are

  1. Isolated Splenic Metastasis from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Mitsimponas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spleen are rare but have been reported for different tumor entities, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, and melanoma. As an isolated event, splenic metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is exceedingly rare. Until now, only 28 cases have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with NSCLC (adenocarcinoma who presented with a synchronous, isolated splenic metastasis. Operative removal of both primary tumor and metastasis was not possible due to multiple comorbidities. Therefore, treatment was limited to combined systemic chemotherapy and simultaneous radiation of the primary tumor, which led to partial remission of the disease. Isolated metastasis to the spleen in NSCLC has been reported only 28 times in the medical literature, most often in male patients with right-sided lung tumors, most of which were adenocarcinomas. The majority of patients were asymptomatic with respect to splenic metastasis. About half of the reported cases were isolated metachronous splenic metastases. Splenectomy seems to confer a survival advantage. We review the pertinent medical literature.

  2. Antibody response to a T-cell-independent antigen is preserved after splenic artery embolization for trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthof, D C; Lammers, A J J; van Leeuwen, E M M; Hoekstra, J B L; ten Berge, I J M; Goslings, J C

    2014-11-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is increasingly being used as a nonoperative management strategy for patients with blunt splenic injury following trauma. The aim of this study was to assess the splenic function of patients who were embolized. A clinical study was performed, with splenic function assessed by examining the antibody response to polysaccharide antigens (pneumococcal 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine), B-cell subsets, and the presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB). The data were compared to those obtained from splenectomized patients and healthy controls (HC) who had been included in a previously conducted study. A total of 30 patients were studied: 5 who had proximal SAE, 7 who had distal SAE, 8 who had a splenectomy, and 10 HC. The median vaccine-specific antibody response of the SAE patients (fold increase, 3.97) did not differ significantly from that of the HC (5.29; P = 0.90); however, the median response of the splenectomized patients (2.30) did differ (P = 0.003). In 2 of the proximally embolized patients and none of the distally embolized patients, the ratio of the IgG antibody level postvaccination compared to that prevaccination was <2. There were no significant differences in the absolute numbers of lymphocytes or B-cell subsets between the SAE patients and the HC. HJB were not observed in the SAE patients. The splenic immune function of embolized patients was preserved, and therefore routine vaccination appears not to be indicated. Although the median antibody responses did not differ between the patients who underwent proximal SAE and those who underwent distal SAE, 2 of the 5 proximally embolized patients had insufficient responses to vaccination, whereas none of the distally embolized patients exhibited an insufficient response. Further research should be done to confirm this finding. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  4. Role of HLA in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerim Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT donors includes a rigorous assessment of the availability and human leukocyte antigen (HLA match status of donors. HLA plays a critical role in HSCT, but its involvement in HSCT is constantly in flux because of changing technologies and variations in clinical transplantation results. The increased availability of HSCT through the use of HLA-mismatched related and unrelated donors is feasible with a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR genes in HSCT. The influence of nongenetic factors on the tolerability of HLA mismatching has recently become evident, demonstrating a need for the integration of both genetic and nongenetic variables in donor selection.

  5. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonek, Justyna; Kralj Juric, Mateja; Ghimire, Sakhila; Varanasi, Pavankumar Reddy; Holler, Ernst; Greinix, Hildegard; Weissinger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The timely reconstitution and regain of function of a donor-derived immune system is of utmost importance for the recovery and long-term survival of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of note, new developments such as umbilical cord blood or haploidentical grafts were associated with prolonged immunodeficiency due to delayed immune reconstitution, raising the need for better understanding and enhancing the process of immune reconstitution and finding strategies to further optimize these transplant procedures. Immune reconstitution post-HSCT occurs in several phases, innate immunity being the first to regain function. The slow T cell reconstitution is regarded as primarily responsible for deleterious infections with latent viruses or fungi, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and relapse. Here we aim to summarize the major steps of the adaptive immune reconstitution and will discuss the importance of immune balance in patients after HSCT. PMID:27909435

  6. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Ramsahai, Shweta; Kim, Bak C.; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2004-02-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological and cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, including muscle, bone, skin, liver, and neuronal cells, we advanced a hypothesis that some of the space-caused disorders might be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia (β-thalassemia) and spaceflight (hindlimb suspension unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, the β-thalassemic mice were successfully transplanted with isologous HSCs, resulting in chimerism of hemoglobin species and alleviation of the hemoglobinopathy. In the case of HSCT for muscle loss, β-galactosidase-marked HSCs, which were prepared from β-galactosidase-transgenic mice, were detected by the X-gal wholemount staining procedure in the hindlimbs of unloaded mice following transplantation. Histochemical and physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. To investigate HSCT for immunodeficiency, β-galactosidase-transformed Escherichia coli was used as the reporter bacteria, and infected to control and the hindlimb suspended mice. Results of the X-gal stained tissues indicated that the HSCT could help eliminate the E. coli infection. In an effort to facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs has been optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  7. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  8. Definitive hematopoietic stem cells first develop within the major arterial regions of the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.T.R. de Bruijn (Marella); N.A. Speck; M.C. Peeters (Marian); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is a potent hematopoietic site within the mammalian embryo body, and the first place from which hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge. Within the complex embryonic vascular, excretory and reproductive tissues of the

  9. Bulk protein biosynthesis of the spleen and some splenic cell populations after induction of splenomegaly by application of Bordetella pertussis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krammenschneider, D.

    1980-01-01

    Autoradiographic studies and liquid scintillation counting were carried out in female NMRI mice just reaching maturity. All animals had received a single injection, either of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or of pertussis organism (PO) or BSA + PO. The animals were sacrificed 4 d and 10 d after this pretreatment. 2 h before decapitation, a single dose of 3 H-l phenyl alamine was applied intraperitoneally. The following results were obtained: The splenic index (splenic weight in mg/mouse weight in g) increased as a result of splenomegaly caused by PO. Morphometric data suggested an enlarged cell and nuclear area with enhanced cellular amino acid turnover and migration of RNP-containing matter into the nucleus, especially in the megakaryocytes and in lymphocytoid blastic cells. Incorporation of 3 H-l-phenylalanine per unit of dry weight of the spleen is slowed down during the experiment while amiro acid incorporation by the total spleen increases with PO-induced splenomegaly. Incorporation of amino acid per unit of dry weight is constant in all experimental and control animals. The increased amino acid incorporation in lymphocytoid blastic cells is probably caused by the immunological situations during the experiment. An explanation of total cell increase and cell increase of megakaryocytic splenic cells is attempted. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Activation of the canonical Wnt pathway leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell repopulation and multilineage differentiation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Anderson, Kristina; Porse, Bo T

    2006-01-01

    Wnt signaling increases hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and is activated in both myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, indicating involvement in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. We report here activated canonical Wnt signaling in the hematopoietic system through conditional expression...

  11. Restricted intra-embryonic origin of bona fide hematopoietic stem cells in the chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yvernogeau, Laurent; Robin, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are responsible for blood cell production, are generated during embryonic development. Human and chicken embryos share features that position the chicken as a reliable and accessible alternative model to study developmental hematopoiesis. However, the existence

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibition regulates inflammation and enhances Tregs after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, S.W.; Gatza, E.; Hou, G.; Sun, Y; Whitfield, J.; Song, Y.; Oravecz-Wilson, K.; Tawara, I.; Dinarello, C.A.; Reddy, P.

    2015-01-01

    We examined immunological responses in patients receiving histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition (vorinostat) for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. Vorinostat treatment increased histone acetylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from

  13. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells mm9 Input control Blood Hematopoietic Ste...hive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells mm9 Input control Blood Hematopoietic Ste...hive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells mm9 Input control Blood Hematopoietic Ste...hive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  16. ESAM is a novel human hematopoietic stem cell marker associated with a subset of human leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Ichii, Michiko; Sudo, Takao; Satoh, Yusuke; Doi, Yukiko; Ueda, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Akira; Hamanaka, Yuri; Ezoe, Sachiko; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Reliable markers are essential to increase our understanding of the biological features of human hematopoietic stem cells and to facilitate the application of hematopoietic stem cells in the field of transplantation and regenerative medicine. We previously identified endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) as a novel functional marker of hematopoietic stem cells in mice. Here, we found that ESAM can also be used to purify human hematopoietic stem cells from all the currently available sources (adult bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and cord blood). Multipotent colony-forming units and long-term hematopoietic-reconstituting cells in immunodeficient mice were found exclusively in the ESAM(High) fraction of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) fraction of cord blood and collagenase-treated bone marrow contained cells exhibiting extremely high expression of ESAM; these cells are likely to be related to the endothelial lineage. Leukemia cell lines of erythroid and megakaryocyte origin, but not those of myeloid or lymphoid descent, were ESAM positive. However, high ESAM expression was observed in some primary acute myeloid leukemia cells. Furthermore, KG-1a myeloid leukemia cells switched from ESAM negative to ESAM positive with repeated leukemia reconstitution in vivo. Thus, ESAM is a useful marker for studying both human hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia cells. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and embryonic AGM stromal cells on hematopoietic reconstitution in mice after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Si; Sun Hanying; Liu Wenli

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and stromal cells derived from aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region on hematopoietic reconstitution in mice after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Methods: The typical mice model of syngeneic BMT was established and the mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group, the BMT group, the group of cotransplantation of HSC with AGM stromal cells (the cotransplantation group) and the ligustrazine group (the LT group). On days 3, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 after BMT, the peripheral blood cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were counted, and histology changes of bone marrow were detected. Results: The levels of peripheral WBC, RBC, platelet, and BMMNC in the contransplantation group were significantly higher than those in the single BMT group and the LT group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Cotransplantation with AGM stromal cells could significantly promote hematopoietic reconstruction in mice after BMT. (authors)

  18. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Celalettin; Reiter, Andreas; Scott, Bart L; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Damaj, Gandhi; Kreil, Sebastian; Shanley, Ryan; Hogan, William J; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Shore, Tsiporah; Baurmann, Herrad; Stuart, Robert; Gruhn, Bernd; Doubek, Michael; Hsu, Jack W; Tholouli, Eleni; Gromke, Tanja; Godley, Lucy A; Pagano, Livio; Gilman, Andrew; Wagner, Eva Maria; Shwayder, Tor; Bornhäuser, Martin; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B; Böhm, Alexandra; Vercellotti, Gregory; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Schmid, Christoph; Rabitsch, Werner; Pullarkat, Vinod; Legrand, Faezeh; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Saber, Wael; Barrett, John; Hermine, Olivier; Hagglund, Hans; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Popat, Uday; Alyea, Edwin P; Devine, Steven; Deeg, H Joachim; Weisdorf, Daniel; Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter

    2014-10-10

    Advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM), a fatal hematopoietic malignancy characterized by drug resistance, has no standard therapy. The effectiveness of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHCT) in SM remains unknown. In a global effort to define the value of HCT in SM, 57 patients with the following subtypes of SM were evaluated: SM associated with clonal hematologic non-mast cell disorders (SM-AHNMD; n = 38), mast cell leukemia (MCL; n = 12), and aggressive SM (ASM; n = 7). Median age of patients was 46 years (range, 11 to 67 years). Donors were HLA-identical (n = 34), unrelated (n = 17), umbilical cord blood (n = 2), HLA-haploidentical (n = 1), or unknown (n = 3). Thirty-six patients received myeloablative conditioning (MAC), and 21 patients received reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). Responses in SM were observed in 40 patients (70%), with complete remission in 16 patients (28%). Twelve patients (21%) had stable disease, and five patients (9%) had primary refractory disease. Overall survival (OS) at 3 years was 57% for all patients, 74% for patients with SM-AHNMD, 43% for those with ASM, and 17% for those with MCL. The strongest risk factor for poor OS was MCL. Survival was also lower in patients receiving RIC compared with MAC and in patients having progression compared with patients having stable disease or response. AlloHCT was associated with long-term survival in patients with advanced SM. Although alloHCT may be considered as a viable and potentially curative therapeutic option for advanced SM in the meantime, given that this is a retrospective analysis with no control group, the definitive role of alloHCT will need to be determined by a prospective trial. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Primary Immunodeficiency Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldıran, Alişan; Çeliksoy, Mehmet Halil; Borte, Stephan; Güner, Şükrü Nail; Elli, Murat; Fışgın, Tunç; Özyürek, Emel; Sancak, Recep; Oğur, Gönül

    2017-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a promising curative therapy for many combined primary immunodeficiencies and phagocytic disorders. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric cases of patients diagnosed with primary immunodeficiencies and scheduled for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 22 patients (median age, 6 months; age range, 1 month to 10 years) with various diagnoses who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient diagnoses included severe combined immunodeficiency (n=11), Chediak-Higashi syndrome (n=2), leukocyte adhesion deficiency (n=2), MHC class 2 deficiency (n=2), chronic granulomatous syndrome (n=2), hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (n=1), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (n=1), and Omenn syndrome (n=1). Of the 22 patients, 7 received human leukocyte antigen-matched related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, 12 received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 2 received matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The results showed that 5 patients had graft failure. Fourteen patients survived, yielding an overall survival rate of 67%. Screening newborn infants for primary immunodeficiency diseases may result in timely administration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  20. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Primary Immunodeficiency Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alişan Yıldıran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a promising curative therapy for many combined primary immunodeficiencies and phagocytic disorders. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric cases of patients diagnosed with primary immunodeficiencies and scheduled for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 22 patients (median age, 6 months; age range, 1 month to 10 years with various diagnoses who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient diagnoses included severe combined immunodeficiency (n=11, Chediak-Higashi syndrome (n=2, leukocyte adhesion deficiency (n=2, MHC class 2 deficiency (n=2, chronic granulomatous syndrome (n=2, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (n=1, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (n=1, and Omenn syndrome (n=1. Of the 22 patients, 7 received human leukocyte antigen-matched related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, 12 received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 2 received matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The results showed that 5 patients had graft failure. Fourteen patients survived, yielding an overall survival rate of 67%. Screening newborn infants for primary immunodeficiency diseases may result in timely administration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  1. Potential Cellular Signatures of Viral Infections in Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mikovits

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression profiling of cellular genes was performed using a 10,000 cDNA human gene array in order to identify expression changes following chronic infection of human hematopoietic cells with Kapsosi’s Sarcoma -associated Virus (KSHV also known as Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 and Human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1. We performed cell-free {\\it in vitro} infection of primary bone marrow derived CD34+ cells using semi-purified HHV8 and a mature IL-2 dependent T cell line, KIT 225, using highly concentrated viral stocks prepared from an infectious molecular clone of HTLV-1. Thirty days post infection, mRNA was isolated from infected cultures and uninfected controls and submitted for microarray analysis. More than 400 genes were differentially expressed more than two-fold following HHV8 infection of primary bone marrow derived CD34+ cells. Of these 400, interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4, cyclin B2, TBP-associated factor, eukaryotic elongation factor and pim 2 were up-regulated more than 3.5 fold. In contrast, less than 100 genes were differentially expressed more than two-fold following chronic infection of a mature T cell line with HTLV-1. Of these, only cdc7 was up-regulated more than 3.5 fold. These data may provide insight into cellular signatures of infection useful for diagnosis of infection as well as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Astray or on the Path?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Albrecht M; Huppertz, Sascha; Henschler, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the best characterized adult stem cells and the only stem cell type in routine clinical use. The concept of stem cell transplantation laid the foundations for the development of novel cell therapies within, and even outside, the hematopoietic system. Here, we report on the history of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and of HSC isolation, we briefly summarize the capabilities of HSCs to reconstitute the entire hemato/lymphoid cell system, and we assess current indications for HCT. We aim to draw the lines between areas where HCT has been firmly established, areas where HCT can in the future be expected to be of clinical benefit using their regenerative functions, and areas where doubts persist. We further review clinical trials for diverse approaches that are based on HCT. Finally, we highlight the advent of genome editing in HSCs and critically view the use of HSCs in non-hematopoietic tissue regeneration.

  3. Interleukin-21 promotes thymopoiesis recovery following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Aurélie Tormo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired T cell reconstitution remains a major deterrent in the field of bone marrow (BM transplantation (BMT due to pre-conditioning-induced damages inflicted to the thymi of recipient hosts. Given the previously reported thymo-stimulatory property of interleukin (IL-21, we reasoned that its use post-BMT could have a profound effect on de novo T cell development. Methods To evaluate the effect of IL-21 on de novo T cell development in vivo, BM derived from RAG2p-GFP mice was transplanted into LP/J mice. Lymphocyte reconstitution was first assessed using a hematological analyzer and a flow cytometer on collected blood samples. Detailed flow cytometry analysis was then performed on the BM, thymus, and spleen of transplanted animals. Finally, the effect of human IL-21 on thymopoiesis was validated in humanized mice. Results Using a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-matched allogeneic BMT model, we found that IL-21 administration improves immune reconstitution by triggering the proliferation of BM Lin−Sca1+c-kit+ (LSK subsets. The pharmacological effect of IL-21 also culminates in the recovery of both hematopoietic (thymocytes and non-hematopoietic (stromal cells within the thymi of IL-21-treated recipient animals. Although T cells derived from all transplanted groups proliferate, secrete various cytokines, and express granzyme B similarly in response to T cell receptor (TCR stimulation, full regeneration of peripheral naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and normal TCRvβ distribution could only be detected in IL-21-treated recipient mice. Astonishingly, none of the recipient mice who underwent IL-21 treatment developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in the MHC-matched allogeneic setting while the graft-versus-tumor (GVT effect was strongly retained. Inhibition of GVHD onset could also be attributed to the enhanced generation of regulatory B cells (B10 observed in the IL-21, but not PBS, recipient mice. We also tested the

  4. A synthetic three-dimensional niche system facilitates generation of functional hematopoietic cells from human-induced pluripotent stem cells

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    Yulin Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficient generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs holds great promise in personalized transplantation therapies. However, the derivation of functional and transplantable HSCs from iPSCs has had very limited success thus far. Methods We developed a synthetic 3D hematopoietic niche system comprising nanofibers seeded with bone marrow (BM-derived stromal cells and growth factors to induce functional hematopoietic cells from human iPSCs in vitro. Results Approximately 70 % of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells accompanied with CD43+ progenitor cells could be derived from this 3D induction system. Colony-forming-unit (CFU assay showed that iPSC-derived CD34+ cells formed all types of hematopoietic colonies including CFU-GEMM. TAL-1 and MIXL1, critical transcription factors associated with hematopoietic development, were expressed during the differentiation process. Furthermore, iPSC-derived hematopoietic cells gave rise to both lymphoid and myeloid lineages in the recipient NOD/SCID mice after transplantation. Conclusions Our study underscores the importance of a synthetic 3D niche system for the derivation of transplantable hematopoietic cells from human iPSCs in vitro thereby establishing a foundation towards utilization of human iPSC-derived HSCs for transplantation therapies in the clinic.

  5. COST OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN INDIA

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    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the definite cure for many hematological diseases. With the increasing indications for HSCT and its relatively low cost in Indian subcontinent, an increasing number of patients are opting for this procedure. We retrospectively analyzed the cost of one hundred sixty two HSCTs done at our center in the last three years. The median cost of autologous transplant was INR 7,52,294 (USD, $ 12,500 (range INR 6,19,850-14,17,212 and the median cost of allogenic transplant was INR 10,74,881 ($18,000 (range INR 6,49,944-23,82,227. The cost of HSCT is cheaper here compared to that in developed countries and success rates are nearly equivalent. The major factors contributing to the cost are related to the complications post-transplant mainly infections and graft versus host disease, which are also the reasons for the increased stay in the hospital.

  6. Bone Marrow Vascular Niche: Home for Hematopoietic Stem Cells

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    Ningning He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though discovered later than osteoblastic niche, vascular niche has been regarded as an alternative indispensable niche operating regulation on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. As significant progresses gained on this type niche, it is gradually clear that the main work of vascular niche is undertaking to support hematopoiesis. However, compared to what have been defined in the mechanisms through which the osteoblastic niche regulates hematopoiesis, we know less in vascular niche. In this review, based on research data hitherto we will focus on component foundation and various functions of vascular niche that guarantee the normal hematopoiesis process within bone marrow microenvironments. And the possible pathways raised by various research results through which this environment undergoes its function will be discussed as well.

  7. Analysis of the motivation for hematopoietic stem cell donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurelio, M T; Aniasi, A; Haworth, S E; Colombo, M B; Dimonopoli, T; Mocellin, M C; Poli, F; Torelli, R; Crespiatico, L; Serafini, M; Scalamogna, M

    2011-05-01

    The Italian Bone Marrow Donor Register is the institutional organization for management of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. The law requires only a donor's clinical history, but not a psychosocial profile for registration. We have studied the donor's motivation for enlistment on the donor registry and the medical staff's need for this information to interact correctly with the donor. For this purpose we distributed a questionnaire to new donors at the 20 centers in the Lombardy Region over a period of 1 year. The analysis of the responses revealed a prevalence of extrinsic motivations that would not ensure continued registration for donation. Therefore, it is necessary that the donor be well informed and better educated about all aspects of donation, in order to produce a shift to an intrinsic motivation. This objective can be facilitated via professional training of health workers in communication. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic Engineering and Manufacturing of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

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    Xiuyan Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The marketing approval of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs as the first-line therapy for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID is a tribute to the substantial progress that has been made regarding HSC engineering in the past decade. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade, genetically engineered HSCs is the foundation for broadening the application of this technology. Herein, the current state-of-the-art manufacturing platforms to genetically engineer HSCs as well as the challenges pertaining to production standardization and product characterization are addressed in the context of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs and other monogenic disorders.

  9. Twitter Use in the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar S; Majhail, Navneet S

    2018-02-01

    Social media has revolutionized the access and exchange of information in healthcare. The microblogging platform Twitter has been used by blood and marrow transplant physicians over the last several years with increasing enthusiasm. We review the adoption of Twitter in the transplant community and its implications on clinical care, education, and research. Twitter allows instantaneous access to the latest research publications, developments at national and international meetings, networking with colleagues, participation in advocacy, and promoting available clinical trials. Additionally, Twitter serves as a gateway for resources dedicated to education and support for patients undergoing transplantation. We demonstrate the utilization and various applications in using Twitter among hematopoietic cell transplant healthcare professionals, patients, and other affiliated stakeholders. Professionalism concerns with clinician use of such social media platforms, however, also exist. Overall, Twitter has enhanced and increased the opportunities for engagement in the transplant community.

  10. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells as Effectors in Innate Immunity

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    Jennifer L. Granick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shed light on novel functions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC. While they are critical for maintenance and replenishment of blood cells in the bone marrow, these cells are not limited to the bone marrow compartment and function beyond their role in hematopoiesis. HSPC can leave bone marrow and circulate in peripheral blood and lymph, a process often manipulated therapeutically for the purpose of transplantation. Additionally, these cells preferentially home to extramedullary sites of inflammation where they can differentiate to more mature effector cells. HSPC are susceptible to various pathogens, though they may participate in the innate immune response without being directly infected. They express pattern recognition receptors for detection of endogenous and exogenous danger-associated molecular patterns and respond not only by the formation of daughter cells but can themselves secrete powerful cytokines. This paper summarizes the functional and phenotypic characterization of HSPC, their niche within and outside of the bone marrow, and what is known regarding their role in the innate immune response.

  11. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

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    Christian Kosan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function.

  12. Response of hematopoietic stem cells to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonnet, A.

    2008-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood and immune system throughout life and restore them after hematological injuries. Exposure of an organism to ionizing radiation (IR) causes rapid and acute myelosuppression and challenges the replenishment capacity of HSCs. Yet, the precise damages that are generated remain largely unexplored. To better understand these effects, phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartments of sublethally irradiated mice were monitored over a ten week period after radiation exposure. We report that shortly after sublethal IR-exposure, HSCs, defined by their repopulating ability, still segregate in the Hoechst dye excluding side population (SP); yet, their Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels are increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SP SK cells positive for established indicators of HSC presence: CD150 + and CD105 + . A great proportion of HSCs quickly but transiently enter the cell cycle to replenish the bone marrow of myelo-ablated mice. Ten weeks after, whereas bone marrow cellularity has recovered and hematopoietic homeostasis is restored, major phenotypic modifications can be observed within the Lin -/low Sca-1 + c-Kit + (LSK) stem/progenitor compartment: CD150 + /Flk2 - and CD150 - /Flk2 + LSK cell frequencies are increased and dramatically reduced, respectively. CD150 + LSK cells also show impaired reconstitution capacity, accrued number of γ-H2AX foci and increased tendency to apoptosis. This demonstrates that the LSK compartment is not properly restored 10 weeks after sublethal exposure, and that long-term IR-induced injury to the bone marrow proceeds, at least partially, through direct damage to the stem cell pool. Thrombopoietin (TPO) has been shown to promote the survival of lethally irradiated mice when administrated quickly after exposure. We investigated the mechanisms underlying this effect, and found in a competitive transplant

  13. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

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    Olivier Féraud

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process.

  14. DNA damage: a sensible mediator of the differentiation decision in hematopoietic stem cells and in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Cary N; Ito, Keisuke

    2015-03-17

    In the adult, the source of functionally diverse, mature blood cells are hematopoietic stem cells, a rare population of quiescent cells that reside in the bone marrow niche. Like stem cells in other tissues, hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew, in order to maintain the stem cell population for the lifetime of the organism, and to differentiate, in order to give rise to the multiple lineages of the hematopoietic system. In recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a role for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in the decision for hematopoietic stem cells to exit quiescence and to differentiate. In this review, we will examine recent work supporting the idea that detection of cell stressors, such as oxidative and genetic damage, is an important mediator of cell fate decisions in hematopoietic stem cells. We will explore the benefits of such a system in avoiding the development and progression of malignancies, and in avoiding tissue exhaustion and failure. Additionally, we will discuss new work that examines the accumulation of DNA damage and replication stress in aging hematopoietic stem cells and causes us to rethink ideas of genoprotection in the bone marrow niche.

  15. Studies of hematopoietic stem cells spared by 5-fluorouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zant, G.

    1984-01-01

    Mouse marrow cells were exposed to 5-fluorouracil (FU) either in vivo or in vitro and the effects on the hematopoietic stem cell compartment were studied. The drug was highly toxic to bone marrow cells including the spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) population. The small population of stem cells surviving FU, however, caused a different pattern of spleen colony growth when injected into lethally irradiated mice. Whereas numbers of spleen colonies caused by normal marrow cells remained constant during an 8-14 d period after transplantation, spleen colonies derived from FU-treated marrow cells increased by as much as 100-fold during this time. This effect on stem cells was dose dependent both in vitro and in vivo. When FU was given in vivo, the day 14/day 8 ratio of colonies was greatest 1 d after injection and, over the next 7 d, returned to a near-normal value, that is, unity. A number of studies have shown that the stem cell compartment is heterogeneous with respect to self-replicative capacity and developmental potential. An age structure for the stem cell compartment has been proposed wherein cells with a short mitotic history are more likely to self-replicate than they are to differentiate; hence they are more primitive. I propose that the delayed spleen colony appearance in normal hosts is the result of developmental maturation of the primitive stem cell compartment that survives FU and is responsible for spleen colonies arising around day 14. This maturation, at least initially, occurs in the marrow and leads to the replenishment of the more differentiated CFU-S subsets ablated by FU, which are normally responsible for spleen colonies appearing earlier after transplantation

  16. l-Arginine is a Radioprotector for Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Linda L.; Zheng, Xichen; Martinez-Bosch, Sandra; Kerr, Patrick P.; Khlangwiset, Pornsri; Epperly, Michael W.; Fink, Mitchell P.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Peterson, Jim

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine is shown to protect hematopoietic progenitor (32D cl 3) cells from death due to exposure to γ radiation (137Cs). Some of the other intermediates in the urea cycle, namely ornithine and citrulline, plus urea itself, were not found to have any significant impact on cell survival after irradiation. Intriguingly, supplementation of irradiated cells with l-arginine results in decreased production of peroxynitrite, suggesting that suppression of superoxide generation by nitric oxide synthase in one or more microenvironments is an important factor in the observed radioprotection. The absence of any radioprotective effect of l-arginine in cells at 3% oxygen also confirms the involvement of one or more oxygen-derived species. Knockdown experiments with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) siRNAs in cells and NOS knockout animals confirm that the observed radioprotection is associated with nNOS (NOS-1). l-Arginine also ameliorates the transient inhibition of the electron-transport chain complex I that occurs within 30 min of completing the dose (10 Gy) and that appears to be a functional marker for postirradiation mitochondrial oxidant production. PMID:22175298

  17. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells regulate the regeneration of their niche by secreting Angiopoietin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo O; Ding, Lei; Morrison, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained by a perivascular niche in bone marrow but it is unclear whether the niche is reciprocally regulated by HSCs. Here, we systematically assessed the expression and function of Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) in bone marrow. Angpt1 was not expressed by osteoblasts. Angpt1 was most highly expressed by HSCs, and at lower levels by c-kit+ hematopoietic progenitors, megakaryocytes, and Leptin Receptor+ (LepR+) stromal cells. Global conditional deletion of Angpt1, or deletion from osteoblasts, LepR+ cells, Nes-cre-expressing cells, megakaryocytes, endothelial cells or hematopoietic cells in normal mice did not affect hematopoiesis, HSC maintenance, or HSC quiescence. Deletion of Angpt1 from hematopoietic cells and LepR+ cells had little effect on vasculature or HSC frequency under steady-state conditions but accelerated vascular and hematopoietic recovery after irradiation while increasing vascular leakiness. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and LepR+ stromal cells regulate niche regeneration by secreting Angpt1, reducing vascular leakiness but slowing niche recovery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05521.001 PMID:25821987

  18. Progress toward curing HIV infection with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petz LD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lawrence D Petz,1 John C Burnett,2 Haitang Li,3 Shirley Li,3 Richard Tonai,1 Milena Bakalinskaya,4 Elizabeth J Shpall,5 Sue Armitage,6 Joanne Kurtzberg,7 Donna M Regan,8 Pamela Clark,9 Sergio Querol,10 Jonathan A Gutman,11 Stephen R Spellman,12 Loren Gragert,13 John J Rossi2 1StemCyte International Cord Blood Center, Baldwin Park, CA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Irell and Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences, 3Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USA; 4CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 Research Department, StemCyte International Cord Blood Center, Baldwin Park, CA, USA; 5Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 6MD Anderson Cord Blood Bank, Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 7Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 8St Louis Cord Blood Bank, SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, St Louis, MO, USA; 9Enhance Quality Consulting Inc., Oviedo, FL, USA; 10Cell Therapy Service and Cord Blood Bank, Banc de Sang i Teixits, Barcelona, Spain; 11BMT/Hematologic Malignancies, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 12Immunobiology and Observational Research, CIBMTR, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 13National Marrow Donor Program/Be The Match, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: HIV-1 infection afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide, according to 2014 estimates from the World Health Organization. For those individuals who have access to antiretroviral therapy, these drugs can effectively suppress, but not cure, HIV-1 infection. Indeed, the only documented case for an HIV/AIDS cure was a patient with HIV-1 and acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT from a graft that carried the HIV-resistant CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 mutation. Other attempts to establish a cure for HIV

  19. Antibody response to a T-cell-independent antigen is preserved after splenic artery embolization for trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, D. C.; Lammers, A. J. J.; van Leeuwen, E. M. M.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; ten Berge, I. J. M.; Goslings, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is increasingly being used as a nonoperative management strategy for patients with blunt splenic injury following trauma. The aim of this study was to assess the splenic function of patients who were embolized. A clinical study was performed, with splenic function

  20. Fever and neutropenia in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, C A; Nair, J; Sandesh, S; Chan, K W

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify patterns of fever and neutropenia in pediatric patients undergoing initial hospitalization for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A retrospective review of 75 HSCTs over a 4-year period at a single institution was performed, of which 68% were allogeneic and 32% were autologous. Stem cell sources included bone marrow (29%), PBSC (52%) and umbilical cord blood (16%). Fever occurred in 74 (98%) of the episodes. Unexplained fever (FUO) occurred in 43%. Bacteremia without an anatomic focus occurred in 29%, while CVC associated infections occurred in 17%. In 49% of transplants at least one blood culture was positive. The incidence of bacteremia was higher in allogeneic HSCTs (58%) than in autologous transplants (29%). Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 71% of the isolates. Lower rates of bacteremia were observed in patients receiving oral fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. The median duration of fever was 12.5 days and time to engraftment 14 days. Regression analysis demonstrated that duration of fever was strongly associated with time to engraftment, and that time to engraftment was associated with source of cells and number of CD34+ cells/kg administered. Recipients of autologous PBSC had the shortest durations of fever and time to engraftment, while recipients of allogeneic umbilical cord blood had the longest. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 59-65.

  1. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT.

  2. Tolerance associated gene expression following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Pidala

    Full Text Available Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10 for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL. These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted.

  3. HSC-explorer: a curated database for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrone, Corinna; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Loeffler, Dirk; Lechner, Martin; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Schroeder, Timm; Ruepp, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    HSC-Explorer (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/HSC/) is a publicly available, integrative database containing detailed information about the early steps of hematopoiesis. The resource aims at providing fast and easy access to relevant information, in particular to the complex network of interacting cell types and molecules, from the wealth of publications in the field through visualization interfaces. It provides structured information on more than 7000 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors. Information is manually derived by critical reading of the scientific literature from expert annotators. Hematopoiesis-relevant interactions are accompanied with context information such as model organisms and experimental methods for enabling assessment of reliability and relevance of experimental results. Usage of established vocabularies facilitates downstream bioinformatics applications and to convert the results into complex networks. Several predefined datasets (Selected topics) offer insights into stem cell behavior, the stem cell niche and signaling processes supporting hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. HSC-Explorer provides a versatile web-based resource for scientists entering the field of hematopoiesis enabling users to inspect the associated biological processes through interactive graphical presentation.

  4. HSC-explorer: a curated database for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Montrone

    Full Text Available HSC-Explorer (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/HSC/ is a publicly available, integrative database containing detailed information about the early steps of hematopoiesis. The resource aims at providing fast and easy access to relevant information, in particular to the complex network of interacting cell types and molecules, from the wealth of publications in the field through visualization interfaces. It provides structured information on more than 7000 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors. Information is manually derived by critical reading of the scientific literature from expert annotators. Hematopoiesis-relevant interactions are accompanied with context information such as model organisms and experimental methods for enabling assessment of reliability and relevance of experimental results. Usage of established vocabularies facilitates downstream bioinformatics applications and to convert the results into complex networks. Several predefined datasets (Selected topics offer insights into stem cell behavior, the stem cell niche and signaling processes supporting hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. HSC-Explorer provides a versatile web-based resource for scientists entering the field of hematopoiesis enabling users to inspect the associated biological processes through interactive graphical presentation.

  5. An In Vitro Study of Differentiation of Hematopoietic Cells to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Ru Wang

    2011-01-01

    medium (ECCM. BM-EPCs were characterized in terms of phenotype, lineage potential, and their functional properties. Endothelial cell colonies derived from BM-EPC were cultured with ECCM for 3 months. Cultured EPC colony cells expressed endothelial cell markers and formed the capillary-like network in vitro. EPC colony cells expressed differential proliferative capacity; some of the colonies exhibited a high proliferative potential (HPP capacity up to 20 population doublings. More importantly, these HPP-EPCs expressed hematopoietic marker CD45, exhibited endocytic activities, and preserved some of the myeloid cell activity. In addition, the HPP-EPCs secrete various growth factors including VEGF and GM-CSF into the culture medium. The results demonstrate that these EPCs were primarily derived from hematopoietic origin of early precursor cells and maintained high proliferative potential capacity, a feature with a significant potential in the application of cell therapy in ischemic diseases.

  6. Oral complications in hematopoietic stem cell recipients: the role of inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverman, T. M.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Rademacher, W. M. H.; Vokurka, S.; Epstein, J. B.; Huisman, C.; Hazenberg, M. D.; de Soet, J. J.; de Lange, J.; Rozema, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used as a potentially curative treatment for patients with various hematological malignancies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and congenital immune deficiencies. The prevalence of oral complications in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT

  7. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice reconstituted with retrovirus-transduced hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.M.; Danos, O.; Grossman, M.; Raulet, D.H.; Mulligan, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses encoding human adenosine deaminase have been used to infect murine hematopoietic stem cells. In bone marrow transplant recipients reconstituted with the genetically modified cells, human ADA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the recipients for at least 6 months after transplantation. In animals analyzed in detail 4 months after transplantation, human ADA and proviral sequences were detected in all hematopoietic lineages; in several cases, human ADA activity exceeded the endogenous activity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a functional human ADA gene into hematopoietic stem cells and obtaining expression in multiple hematopoietic lineages long after transplantation. This approach should be helpful in designing effective gene therapies for severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes in humans

  8. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2010-09-01

    Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function.

  9. Parametric Response Mapping as an Indicator of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galban, Craig J.; Boes, Jennifer L.; Bule, Maria; Kitko, Carrie L.; Couriel, Daniel R.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Lama, Vihba; Telenga, Eef D.; van den Berge, Maarten; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Ponkowski, Michael J.; Ross, Brian D.; Yanik, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after hematopoietic cell transplantation presents many challenges, both diagnostically and therapeutically. We developed a computed tomography (CT) voxel-wise methodology termed parametric response mapping (PRM) that quantifies normal

  10. Double Negative (CD3+4-8-) TCRalphaBeta Splenic Cells from Young NOD Mice Provide Long-Lasting Protection against Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    delineate a new T regulatory component in autoimmune diabetes apart from that of NKT and CD4+CD25high Foxp3+T-regulatory cells . DNCD3 splenic cells ...DNCD3 splenic cells from young NOD mice. These cells displayed a TCR Vb13-biased usage apart from that of canonical NKT cells , and lacked expression of...body of evidence demonstrating that the number and function of NK and NKT cells in the NOD mice are deficient. Adoptive transfer of NK cells in some

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  12. Engineering the hematopoietic stem cell niche: Frontiers in biomaterial science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Sun; Mahadik, Bhushan P.; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) play a crucial role in the generation of the body’s blood and immune cells. This process takes place primarily in the bone marrow in specialized ‘niche’ microenvironments, which provide signals responsible for maintaining a balance between HSC quiescence, self-renewal, and lineage specification required for life-long hematopoiesis. While our understanding of these signaling mechanisms continues to improve, our ability to engineer them in vitro for the expansion of clinically relevant HSC populations is still lacking. In this review, we focus on development of biomaterials-based culture platforms for in vitro study of interactions between HSCs and their local microenvironment. The tools and techniques used for both examining HSC-niche interactions as well as applying these findings towards controlled HSC expansion or directed differentiation in 2D and 3D platforms are discussed. These novel techniques hold the potential to push the existing boundaries of HSC cultures towards high-throughput, real-time, and single-cell level biomimetic approaches that enable a more nuanced understanding of HSC regulation and function. Their application in conjunction with innovative biomaterial platforms can pave the way for engineering artificial bone marrow niches for clinical applications as well as elucidating the pathology of blood-related cancers and disorders. PMID:26356030

  13. Clonal dominance and transplantation dynamics in hematopoietic stem cell compartments.

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    Peter Ashcroft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells in mammals are known to reside mostly in the bone marrow, but also transitively passage in small numbers in the blood. Experimental findings have suggested that they exist in a dynamic equilibrium, continuously migrating between these two compartments. Here we construct an individual-based mathematical model of this process, which is parametrised using existing empirical findings from mice. This approach allows us to quantify the amount of migration between the bone marrow niches and the peripheral blood. We use this model to investigate clonal hematopoiesis, which is a significant risk factor for hematologic cancers. We also analyse the engraftment of donor stem cells into non-conditioned and conditioned hosts, quantifying the impact of different treatment scenarios. The simplicity of the model permits a thorough mathematical analysis, providing deeper insights into the dynamics of both the model and of the real-world system. We predict the time taken for mutant clones to expand within a host, as well as chimerism levels that can be expected following transplantation therapy, and the probability that a preconditioned host is reconstituted by donor cells.

  14. Characterization of Selectin Ligands on Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Hanan

    2013-05-18

    Successful bone marrow (BM) transplantation requires the homing of the transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow niche, where they undergo differentiation to form mature cells that are eventually released into the peripheral blood. However, the survival rate of patients receiving BM transplants is poor since many of the transplanted HSPCs do not make it to their BM niches in the recipient’s body. Since the availability of HSPCs from traditional sources is limited, transplanting more number of HSPCs is not a solution to this problem. This study aims to characterize the adhesion molecules mediating cell migration in order to better understand the adhesion mechanisms of HSCs with the bone marrow endothelium. This will aid in developing future tools to improve the clinical transplantation of HSPCs. This study also aims to understand the factors that influence HSPC proliferation in the bone marrow niche. E-selectin plays an important role in the process of homing; however, its ligands on HSPCs are not well characterized. We used western blotting and immunoprecipitation to show that endomucin is expressed on HSPCs and plays a role in the binding of HSPCs to E-selectin. We also studied the effect of recombinant E-selectin on the expression of a newly characterized E-selectin ligand in our lab, CD34, in HSPCs. This will provide us insight into novel roles for endomucin and E-selectin and help us to understand the factors influencing HSPC migration to BM endothelium.

  15. IP-10-mediated T cell homing promotes cerebral inflammation over splenic immunity to malaria infection.

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    Catherine Q Nie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria causes 660 million clinical cases with over 2 million deaths each year. Acquired host immunity limits the clinical impact of malaria infection and provides protection against parasite replication. Experimental evidence indicates that cell-mediated immune responses also result in detrimental inflammation and contribute to severe disease induction. In both humans and mice, the spleen is a crucial organ involved in blood stage malaria clearance, while organ-specific disease appears to be associated with sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vascular beds and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes. Using a rodent model of cerebral malaria, we have previously found that the majority of T lymphocytes in intravascular infiltrates of cerebral malaria-affected mice express the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Here we investigated the effect of IP-10 blockade in the development of experimental cerebral malaria and the induction of splenic anti-parasite immunity. We found that specific neutralization of IP-10 over the course of infection and genetic deletion of this chemokine in knockout mice reduces cerebral intravascular inflammation and is sufficient to protect P. berghei ANKA-infected mice from fatality. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that lack of IP-10 during infection significantly reduces peripheral parasitemia. The increased resistance to infection observed in the absence of IP-10-mediated cell trafficking was associated with retention and subsequent expansion of parasite-specific T cells in spleens of infected animals, which appears to be advantageous for the control of parasite burden. Thus, our results demonstrate that modulating homing of cellular immune responses to malaria is critical for reaching a balance between protective immunity and immunopathogenesis.

  16. IP-10-mediated T cell homing promotes cerebral inflammation over splenic immunity to malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Catherine Q; Bernard, Nicholas J; Norman, M Ursula; Amante, Fiona H; Lundie, Rachel J; Crabb, Brendan S; Heath, William R; Engwerda, Christian R; Hickey, Michael J; Schofield, Louis; Hansen, Diana S

    2009-04-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria causes 660 million clinical cases with over 2 million deaths each year. Acquired host immunity limits the clinical impact of malaria infection and provides protection against parasite replication. Experimental evidence indicates that cell-mediated immune responses also result in detrimental inflammation and contribute to severe disease induction. In both humans and mice, the spleen is a crucial organ involved in blood stage malaria clearance, while organ-specific disease appears to be associated with sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vascular beds and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes. Using a rodent model of cerebral malaria, we have previously found that the majority of T lymphocytes in intravascular infiltrates of cerebral malaria-affected mice express the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Here we investigated the effect of IP-10 blockade in the development of experimental cerebral malaria and the induction of splenic anti-parasite immunity. We found that specific neutralization of IP-10 over the course of infection and genetic deletion of this chemokine in knockout mice reduces cerebral intravascular inflammation and is sufficient to protect P. berghei ANKA-infected mice from fatality. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that lack of IP-10 during infection significantly reduces peripheral parasitemia. The increased resistance to infection observed in the absence of IP-10-mediated cell trafficking was associated with retention and subsequent expansion of parasite-specific T cells in spleens of infected animals, which appears to be advantageous for the control of parasite burden. Thus, our results demonstrate that modulating homing of cellular immune responses to malaria is critical for reaching a balance between protective immunity and immunopathogenesis.

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Styczyński, Jan; Dębski, Robert; Krenska, Anna; Czyżewski, Krzysztof; Dembna, Ewa; Irga, Ninela; Szalewska, Magdalena; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Płonowski, Marcin; Leszczyńska, Elżbieta; Krawczuk-Rybak, Maryna; Żyromska, Agnieszka; Drzewiecka, Barbara; Majewska, Karolina; Windorbska, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    Background. ALL is the most common indication for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo- HSCT) in children. Objective. The analysis of results of therapy in children and adolescents treated for ALL with allo-HSCT. Patients and methods. A total number of 41 patients undergoing allo-HSCT due to ALL between 2003 and 2012. In 17 patients HSCT was performed from related donor and in 24 from unrelated donor. A source of hematopoietic stem cells was peripheral blood in 21 patients...

  18. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eCoste

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  19. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  20. Splenic microenvironment and self recognition as factors in allograft rejection in rats. A study using indium-111-labeled cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollak, R.; Blanchard, J.M.; Lazda, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Splenectomy facilitates organ allograft survival in some rat strains, and in weak donor-recipient histoincompatible pairs. We have found using a heart spleen twin graft model, using ACI rats as recipients and Lewis rats as donors, that the transplanted heart will survive in most recipients after delayed host splenectomy. The presence of a viable mass of splenic tissue will allow rejection to proceed only when the transplanted spleen is of host origin, and not when it comes from the donor (i.e., when it is allogeneic). The use of 111In-labeled cells has allowed us to show that lymphocyte traffic and trapping is markedly altered in the transplanted allogeneic spleens, when compared with control transplanted syngeneic spleens. Thus, despite the presence of the splenic ''microenvironment,'' cardiac allograft rejection does not occur in the absence of syngeneic splenic tissue. We conclude that the role of the spleen in the immune response is to facilitate the recognition of self and the acquisition of alloreactivity in weak responder rat strains and donor-recipient pairs

  1. Replication stress in hematopoietic stem cells in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Johanna; Milyavsky, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Life-long blood regeneration relies on a rare population of self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These cells' nearly unlimited self-renewal potential and lifetime persistence in the body signifies the need for tight control of their genome integrity. Their quiescent state, tightly linked with low metabolic activity, is one of the main strategies employed by HSCs to preserve an intact genome. On the other hand, HSCs need to be able to quickly respond to increased blood demands and rapidly increase their cellular output in order to fight infection-associated inflammation or extensive blood loss. This increase in proliferation rate, however, comes at the price of exposing HSCs to DNA damage inevitably associated with the process of DNA replication. Any interference with normal replication fork progression leads to a specialized molecular response termed replication stress (RS). Importantly, increased levels of RS are a hallmark feature of aged HSCs, where an accumulating body of evidence points to causative relationships between RS and the aging-associated impairment of the blood system's functional capacity. In this review, we present an overview of RS in HSCs focusing on its causes and consequences for the blood system of mice and men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stem cell factor induces phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase-dependent Lyn/Tec/Dok-1 complex formation in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. van Dijk (Thamar); M. Parren-Van Amelsvoort (Martine); H. Mano; M.M. von Lindern (Marieke); B. Löwenberg (Bob); E. van den Akker (Emile)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractStem cell factor (SCF) has an important role in the proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration of hematopoietic cells. SCF exerts its effects by binding to cKit, a receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Activation of

  3. Loss of aryl hydrocarbon receptor promotes gene changes associated with premature hematopoietic stem cell exhaustion and development of a myeloproliferative disorder in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kameshwar P; Bennett, John A; Casado, Fanny L; Walrath, Jason L; Welle, Stephen L; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2014-01-15

    Loss of immune function and increased hematopoietic disease are among the most clinically significant consequences of aging. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from mice lacking aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) have high rates of cell division. Studies were designed to test the hypothesis that aging AhR-null allele (AhR-KO) mice develop premature HSC exhaustion, and changes leading to hematological disease. Compared to wild-type, aging AhR-KO mice showed a decreased survival rate, splenomegaly, increased circulating white blood cells, hematopoietic cell accumulation in tissues, and anemia. Analysis of bone marrow indicated increased numbers of stem/progenitor and lineage-committed cells, but decreased erythroid progenitors. There was also decreased self-renewal capacity of HSCs determined by competitive repopulation and serial transplantation. HSCs also showed increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ki-67, and γ-H2A.X, but decreased p16(Ink4a). Splenic cells from aging KO mice had abnormal expression of genes, including Gata-1, Sh2d3c, Gfi-1, p21, and c-myc, involved in trafficking and associated with leukemia. HSCs from AhR-KO mice had gene changes related to HSC maintenance and consistent with phenotype observed. The most prominent gene changes (overexpression of Srpk2, Creb1, Hes1, mtor, pdp1) have been associated with HSC hyperproliferation, leukemia, and accelerated aging. Pathway analyses also indicated an enrichment of genes associated with oxidative stress, acute myelogenous leukemia, aging, and heat shock response, and the β-catenin/Wnt pathways. These data indicate that loss of AhR and associated changes in multiple signaling pathways promote premature HSC exhaustion and development of a myeloproliferative disorder. They also implicate a critical role of the AhR in the regulation of HSCs.

  4. The Past, Present, and Future of NK Cells in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and Adoptive Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Frank; Verneris, Michael R; Cooley, Sarah; Bachanova, Veronika; Brunstein, Claudio G; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John; Schlums, Heinrich; Bryceson, Yenan T; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used as a part of cancer therapy for over half a decade. Beyond the necessity for donor-derived cells to reconstitute hematopoiesis after radiation and chemotherapy, immunologic reconstitution from allogeneic cells is important for the elimination of residual tumor cells. Natural killer (NK) cells are first among lymphocytes to reconstitute post-transplant and protect against cancer relapse. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the role of NK cells in cancer control in the transplant setting and focus on current research aimed at improving NK cell responses for therapeutic benefit.

  5. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  6. Murine Splenic Natural Killer Cells Do Not Develop Immunological Memory after Re-Encounter with Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Mamoru; Hasegawa, Nozomi; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have recently suggested that natural killer (NK) cells develop immunological memory against viral infections. However, there is no apparent evidence that NK cells acquire specific memory against Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette—Guérin (BCG), the only currently licensed vaccine for preventing tuberculosis. In the present study, we investigated whether murine splenic NK cells can be activated by BCG in a dendritic cell (DC)-independent or -dependent manner, and furthermore examined whether these NK cells acquire specific memory following BCG vaccination. NK cells isolated from spleens of BCG-immunized mice produced interferon (IFN)γ through direct BCG stimulation in the absence of antigen-presenting cells; however, NK cells from control animals similarly directly responded to BCG, and the response level was not statistically significant between the immunized and the naïve NK cells. When purified NK cells that had been exposed to BCG were cocultured with RAW murine macrophages infected with BCG, the antibacterial activity of the macrophages was strongly enhanced; however, its level was similar to that by naïve NK cells, which had not been exposed to BCG. When splenocytes harvested from BCG-immunized mice were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD) derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a specific IFNγ response was clearly observed, mainly attributed to NK cells and memory CD4+ T cells. To investigate whether these NK cells as well as the T cells are activated by cell−cell interaction with DCs presenting mycobacterial antigens, NK cells isolated from BCG-immunized mice were cocultured with splenocytes harvested from naïve mice in the presence of PPD stimulation. However, no IFNγ response was found in the NK cells. These results suggest that murine splenic NK cells do not develop BCG-specific immunological memory in either a DC-independent or -dependent manner. PMID:26999357

  7. IMMUNITY TO INFECTIONS AFTER HAPLOIDENTICAL HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Aversa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The advantage of using a Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-mismatched related donor is that almost every patient who does not have a HLA-identical donor or who urgently needs hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT has at least one family member with whom shares one haplotype (haploidentical and who is promptly available as a donor. The major challenge of haplo-HSCT is intense bi-directional alloreactivity leading to high incidences of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Advances in graft processing and in pharmacologic prophylaxis of GVHD have reduced these risks and have made haplo-HSCT a viable alternative for patients lacking a matched donor. Indeed, the haplo-HSCT  has spread to centers worldwide even though some centers have preferred an approach based on T cell depletion of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs, others have focused on new strategies for GvHD prevention, such as G-CSF priming of bone marrow and robust post-transplant immune suppression or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCY. Today, the graft can be a megadose of T-cell depleted PBPCs or standard dose of unmanipulated bone marrow and/or PBPCs.  Although haplo-HSCT modalities are based mainly on high intensity conditioning regimens, recently introduced reduced intensity regimens (RIC   showed promise in decreasing early transplant-related mortality (TRM, and extending the opportunity of HSCT to an elderly population with more comorbidities. Infections are still mostly responsible for toxicity and non-relapse mortality due to prolonged immunosuppression related, or not, to GVHD. Future challenges lie in determining the safest preparative conditioning regimen, minimizing GvHD and promoting rapid and more robust immune reconstitution.

  8. OP9-Lhx2 stromal cells facilitate derivation of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating engraftable hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is an ideal approach for obtaining induced HSCs for cell therapy. However, the path from PSCs to robustly induced HSCs (iHSCs in vitro remains elusive. We hypothesize that the modification of hematopoietic niche cells by transcription factors facilitates the derivation of induced HSCs from PSCs. The Lhx2 transcription factor is expressed in fetal liver stromal cells but not in fetal blood cells. Knocking out Lhx2 leads to a fetal hematopoietic defect in a cell non-autonomous role. In this study, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of Lhx2 in OP9 cells (OP9-Lhx2 accelerates the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. OP9-Lhx2 significantly increased the yields of hematopoietic progenitor cells via co-culture with PSCs in vitro. Interestingly, the co-injection of OP9-Lhx2 and PSCs into immune deficient mice also increased the proportion of hematopoietic progenitors via the formation of teratomas. The transplantation of phenotypic HSCs from OP9-Lhx2 teratomas but not from the OP9 control supported a transient repopulating capability. The upregulation of Apln gene by Lhx2 is correlated to the hematopoietic commitment property of OP9-Lhx2. Furthermore, the enforced expression of Apln in OP9 cells significantly increased the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. These results indicate that OP9-Lhx2 is a good cell line for regeneration of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. IP3 3-kinase B controls hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and prevents lethal hematopoietic failure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegemund, Sabine; Rigaud, Stephanie; Conche, Claire; Broaten, Blake; Schaffer, Lana; Westernberg, Luise; Head, Steven Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis ensures lifelong hematopoiesis and prevents blood cancers. The mechanisms balancing HSC quiescence with expansion and differentiation into hematopoietic progenitors are incompletely understood. Here, we identify Inositol-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (Itpkb) as an essential regulator of HSC homeostasis. Young Itpkb−/− mice accumulated phenotypic HSC, which were less quiescent and proliferated more than wild-type (WT) controls. Itpkb−/− HSC downregulated quiescence and stemness associated, but upregulated activation, oxidative metabolism, protein synthesis, and lineage associated messenger RNAs. Although they had normal-to-elevated viability and no significant homing defects, Itpkb−/− HSC had a severely reduced competitive long-term repopulating potential. Aging Itpkb−/− mice lost hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and died with severe anemia. WT HSC normally repopulated Itpkb−/− hosts, indicating an HSC-intrinsic Itpkb requirement. Itpkb−/− HSC showed reduced colony-forming activity and increased stem-cell-factor activation of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) effectors Akt/mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This was reversed by treatment with the Itpkb product and PI3K/Akt antagonist IP4. Transcriptome changes and biochemistry support mTOR hyperactivity in Itpkb−/− HSC. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor rapamycin reversed the excessive mTOR signaling and hyperproliferation of Itpkb−/− HSC without rescuing colony forming activity. Thus, we propose that Itpkb ensures HSC quiescence and function through limiting cytokine-induced PI3K/mTOR signaling and other mechanisms. PMID:25788703

  10. The incidence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell recipients post first and second hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Teruya, Jun; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Krance, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The reported incidence of post allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was between 4.4% and 6% following a single transplant. Cord blood transplantation, T-cell depletion and chronic GvHD are significantly associated with post-transplant AIHA. During an 11 year period, data for 500 pediatric HSCT recipients were eligible for evaluation of the incidence of AIHA post first and second transplants. Demographic, transplant, and post-transplant related variables were analyzed. Twelve/500 (2.4%) recipients at a median of 273 days and 7/72 (9.7%) recipients at a median of 157 days developed AIHA post first and second HSCT respectively. Post first HSCT, none of the matched related donor recipients developed AIHA (0/175 MRD vs. 12/325 other donors, p=0.04). Four/12 required a second HSCT to control the AIHA. Post the second HSCT, matched unrelated donor was significantly associated with the development of AIHA. No other variables were associated with the post-second transplant AIHA. The incidence of AIHA post first and second HSCT was less than reported. The increased incidence of AIHA among recipients of second HSCT is most likely due to the profound immune dysregulation. A much larger, prospective study would be needed to evaluate the incidence, complications and management of post-transplant AIHA. PMID:25809012

  11. Massage for Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Qualitative Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Sara L.; Lown, E. Anne; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Dunn, Elizabeth A.; Abrams, Donald I.; Horn, Biljana N.; Degelman, Marcia; Cowan, Morton J.; Mehling, Wolf E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. No in-depth qualitative research exists about the effects of therapeutic massage with children hospitalized to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The objective of this study is to describe parent caregivers' experience of the effects of massage/acupressure for their children undergoing HCT. Methods. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews with 15 parents of children in the intervention arm of a massage/acupressure trial. Children received both practitioner and parent-provided massage/acupressure. Results. Parents reported that their child experienced relief from pain and nausea, relaxation, and greater ease falling asleep. They also reported increased caregiver competence and closeness with their child as a result of learning and performing massage/acupressure. Parents supported a semistandardized massage protocol. Conclusion. Massage/acupressure may support symptom relief and promote relaxation and sleep among pediatric HCT patients if administered with attention to individual patients' needs and hospital routines and may relieve stress among parents, improve caregiver competence, and enhance the sense of connection between parent and child. PMID:22474526

  12. Systematic Nutritional Support in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Einsele, Hermann; Savani, Bipin N; Kapp, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established treatment modality for various hematological diseases. However, in allogeneic HSCT, patients often suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications caused by the conditioning regimen and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease, which requires support by multidisciplinary nutritional support teams (NST). In addition, pretransplantation nutritional status can affect the clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Therefore, it is important to refer the patient to a NST when becoming aware of nutritional problems before allogeneic HSCT. It is also important to follow nutritional status over the long term, as patients often suffer from various nutritional problems, such as malnutrition and metabolic syndrome, even late after allogeneic HSCT. In summary, NST can contribute to the improvement of nutritional status and possibly prognosis at every stage before and after allogeneic HSCT. Here, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about nutritional support in allogeneic HSCT and try to provoke a constructive discussion to stimulate further investigation. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR OLDER PATIENTS WITH MDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Shadman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of myeloid malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS increases with age. While several therapeutic modalities have been developed, for most of these patients the only treatment with curative potential is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. The development of reduced/low intensity transplant conditioning regimens allows to successfully transplant patients in their ‘60s and even ‘70s, although comorbidities may determine who does come to transplantation and who does not. Also, as many as half of the patients will develop graft versus host disease (GVHD, even with HLA matched  donors, requiring therapy for extended periods of time,  and GVHD and treatment  with glucocorticoids is likely to impact the quality  of life. Nevertheless, dependent upon disease stage at HCT, the presence of comorbidities and the regimen used, 30% to 50% of patients  60 years of age or older, may survive long-term cured of their disease. Future studies should focus on the incorporation of non-transplant modalities into the overall transplant approach, the prevention of GVHD, and the utilization of immunotherapy to reduce the incidence of relapse and GVHD and further improve overall transplant success.

  14. Trimming the fat: obesity and hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B M; Vogl, D T; Berger, N A; Stadtmauer, E A; Lazarus, H M

    2013-09-01

    Obesity, increasing worldwide, is common in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This complex physiological state may alter the outcome of cancer therapies by many mechanisms including direct effects on pathogenesis, host responses to disease and altered pharmacology of chemotherapy. Obesity has been associated with multiple adverse health outcomes. Reports of obese patients undergoing HCT are challenging to interpret because of the heterogeneity of obesity definitions, underlying diseases, graft sources and chemotherapy regimens employed. Compared with normal-weight patients, it appears that obese patients undergoing allogeneic HCT have a higher risk of non-relapse mortality and inferior survival whereas those receiving autologous HCT appear to have equivalent outcomes. These findings are also difficult to interpret because there is no consistent standard for calculating chemotherapy dose in this group and future studies on specific regimens in this population are urgently needed. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery may be at risk for unexpected events because of impaired nutritional state and altered pharmacokinetics of oral drugs. We recommend that future studies utilize more consistent and biologically relevant definitions of obesity and that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of specific conditioning regimens be studied. Until more evidence is available, a rationale is presented for dosing based on adjusted body weight. Moreover, recommendations are provided to guide future research efforts based on more definitive measurements of body fat and its distribution available through modern quantitative imaging techniques using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or magnetic resonance imaging scanning.

  15. Central nervous system infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanajiri, Ryo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watakabe, Kyoko; Murata, Yutaka; Hagino, Takeshi; Seno, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Igarashi, Aiko; Doki, Noriko; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2017-03-01

    Here, we described the clinical characteristics and outcomes of central nervous system (CNS) infections occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in a single institution over the previous 6 years. Charts of 353 consecutive allogeneic transplant recipients were retrospectively reviewed for CNS infection. A total of 17 cases of CNS infection were identified at a median of 38 days (range, 10-1028 days) after allo-HSCT. Causative pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (n=6), enterococcus (n=2), staphylococcus (n=2), streptococcus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=1), cytomegalovirus (n=1), John Cunningham virus (n=1), adenovirus (n=1), and Toxoplasma gondii (n=1). The cumulative incidence of CNS infection was 4.1% at 1 year and 5.5% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that high-risk disease status was a risk factor for developing CNS infection (p=.02), and that overall survival at 3 years after allo-HSCT was 33% in patients with CNS infection and 53% in those without CNS infection (p=.04). Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-02-10

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients' functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients' functional status at the time of critical illness.

  17. [Sirolimus associated pneumonitis in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Estefanía; Buenasmañanas, Diana; Martín, Carmen; Rojas, Rafael

    2015-07-06

    Sirolimus (SR) is a lipophilic macrocytic lactone with immunosuppressive properties (mTOR inhibitor) commonly used in solid organ transplantation and recently introduced in the prophylaxis and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Its numerous side effects include: hyperlipidemia, arthralgias, noncardiac peripheral edema, thrombotic microangiopathy and interstitial pneumonitis. SR-associated pneumonitis is a rare but potentially serious complication due to its increasing utilization in transplant patients. We report the case of a patient undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with severe respiratory distress and SR therapy. Microbiological tests were all negative and other complications related to transplantation were discarded. The chest computed tomography of high-resolution showed pneumonitis. The SR therapy was interrupted and treatment was started with steroids with resolution of symptoms. SR associated pneumonitis is a potentially fatal side effect. In patients treated with SR and respiratory failure, we must suspect this complication because early recognition along with drug discontinuation and steroid treatment is essential to reverse this complication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley M; Jim, Heather S L; Small, Brent J; Nishihori, Taiga; Gonzalez, Brian D; Cessna, Julie M; Hyland, Kelly A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2018-03-01

    Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6-18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p valuesdisruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population.

  19. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  20. Experimental study on relationship between expression of SDF-1 and homing of hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Suping; Cai Jianming; Xiang Yingsong; Zhao Fang; Huang Dingde; Gao Jianguo; Yang Rujun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of chemo-attractant SDF-1 in of homing hematopoietic cells. Methods: A mouse allogeneic bone marrow transplantation model and double staining of immunohistochemistry were used in this study. Relationship between expression of chemo-attractant SDF-1 and of homing hematopoietic cells was observed. Results: In bone marrow, SDF-1 was mainly expressed at sites near endosteum, in microvessel endothelium, osteocytes and around donor cells. Contrast to non-irradiation group, SDF-1 was significantly expressed by osteocytes, and at sites near endosteum in the irradiation group, suggesting that pretreatment with irradiation might enhance secretion of SDF-1 by bone marrow stromal cells and SDF-1 could have a close relation with homing cells. Conclusion: Pretreatment with irradiation might be one of the stimulating factors significantly increasing the level of SDF-1 produced by bone marrow stromal cells and the chemo-attractant SDF-1 could play an important role in homing of hematopoietic cells

  1. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Jiang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo.To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo.Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  2. Cigarette Smoke Alters the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

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    Robert W. Siggins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of tobacco smoke on hematologic derangements have received little attention. This study employed a mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure to explore the effects on bone marrow niche function. While lung cancer is the most widely studied consequence of tobacco smoke exposure, other malignancies, including leukemia, are associated with tobacco smoke exposure. Animals received cigarette smoke exposure for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 9 months. Results reveal that the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC pool size is reduced by cigarette smoke exposure. We next examined the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on one supporting cell type of the niche, the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Smoke exposure decreased the number of MSCs. Transplantation of naïve HSPCs into irradiated mice with cigarette smoke exposure yielded fewer numbers of engrafted HSPCs. This result suggests that smoke-exposed mice possess dysfunctional niches, resulting in abnormal hematopoiesis. Co-culture experiments using MSCs isolated from control or cigarette smoke-exposed mice with naïve HSPCs in vitro showed that MSCs from cigarette smoke-exposed mice generated marked expansion of naïve HSPCs. These data show that cigarette smoke exposure decreases in vivo MSC and HSC number and also increases pro-proliferative gene expression by cigarette smoke-exposed MSCs, which may stimulate HSPC expansion. These results of this investigation are clinically relevant to both bone marrow donors with a history of smoking and bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients with a history of smoking.

  3. Human CD8 T cells generated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells are functionally mature

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    Zúñiga-Pflücker Juan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell development occurs within the highly specialized thymus. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells are critical in adaptive immunity by targeting virally infected or tumor cells. In this study, we addressed whether functional CD8 T cells can be generated fully in vitro using human umbilical cord blood (UCB hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in coculture with OP9-DL1 cells. Results HSC/OP9-DL1 cocultures supported the differentiation of CD8 T cells, which were TCR/CD3hi CD27hi CD1aneg and thus phenotypically resembled mature functional CD8 single positive thymocytes. These in vitro-generated T cells also appeared to be conventional CD8 cells, as they expressed high levels of Eomes and low levels of Plzf, albeit not identical to ex vivo UCB CD8 T cells. Consistent with the phenotypic and molecular characterization, upon TCR-stimulation, in vitro-generated CD8 T cells proliferated, expressed activation markers (MHC-II, CD25, CD38, secreted IFN-γ and expressed Granzyme B, a cytotoxic T-cell effector molecule. Conclusion Taken together, the ability to direct human hematopoietic stem cell or T-progenitor cells towards a mature functional phenotype raises the possibility of establishing cell-based treatments for T-immunodeficiencies by rapidly restoring CD8 effector function, thereby mitigating the risks associated with opportunistic infections.

  4. Aggressive natural killer-cell leukemia with jaundice and spontaneous splenic rupture: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-min; Liu, Wei-ping; Yang, Qun-pei; Li, Hui-fang; Chen, Jun-jie; Tang, Yuan; Zou, Yan; Liao, Dian-Ying; Liu, Yan-mei; Zhao, Sha

    2013-03-11

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia/lymphoma (ANKL) is a rare aggressive form of NK-cell neoplasm. We report an uncommon case of 36-year-old male who showed jaundice and spontaneous splenic rupture. The diagnosis was established by the biopsy of liver and spleen. The monomorphous medium-size neoplastic cells infiltrated into portal areas and sinus of liver as well as the cords and sinus of the spleen. Necrosis, mitotic figures and significant apoptosis could be seen easily. These neoplastic cells demonstrated a typical immunophenotype of CD3ε+, CD56+, CD16+, Granzyme B+, TIA-1+. T-cell receptor γ (TCR-γ) gene rearrangement analysis showed germline configuration and the result of in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA (EBER-ISH) was positive. The patient has undergone an aggressive clinical course and died of multi-organ function failure 14 days later after admission. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of ANKL with spontaneous splenic rupture, and we should pay more attention to recognize it. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2048154883890867.

  5. TIMP-3 recruits quiescent hematopoietic stem cells into active cell cycle and expands multipotent progenitor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Ito, Miyuki; Smookler, David S; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Morikawa, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Arai, Fumio; Suda, Toshio; Khokha, Rama; Kitamura, Toshio

    2010-11-25

    Regulating transition of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) between quiescent and cycling states is critical for maintaining homeostasis of blood cell production. The cycling states of HSCs are regulated by the extracellular factors such as cytokines and extracellular matrix; however, the molecular circuitry for such regulation remains elusive. Here we show that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3), an endogenous regulator of metalloproteinases, stimulates HSC proliferation by recruiting quiescent HSCs into the cell cycle. Myelosuppression induced TIMP-3 in the bone marrow before hematopoietic recovery. Interestingly, TIMP-3 enhanced proliferation of HSCs and promoted expansion of multipotent progenitors, which was achieved by stimulating cell-cycle entry of quiescent HSCs without compensating their long-term repopulating activity. Surprisingly, this effect did not require metalloproteinase inhibitory activity of TIMP-3 and was possibly mediated through a direct inhibition of angiopoietin-1 signaling, a critical mediator for HSC quiescence. Furthermore, bone marrow recovery from myelosuppression was accelerated by over-expression of TIMP-3, and in turn, impaired in TIMP-3-deficient animals. These results suggest that TIMP-3 may act as a molecular cue in response to myelosuppression for recruiting dormant HSCs into active cell cycle and may be clinically useful for facilitating hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy or ex vivo expansion of HSCs.

  6. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Luevano

    Full Text Available Adoptive natural killer (NK cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+ being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+ and frozen PBCD34(+ to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+ cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+ cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+ and PBCD34(+ expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+ for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+, without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  7. Osteoclasts Are Required for Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Mobilization but Not for Stress Erythropoiesis in Plasmodium chabaudi adami Murine Malaria

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    Hugo Roméro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anemia and inflammation concurrent with blood stage malaria trigger stress haematopoiesis and erythropoiesis. The activity of osteoclasts seems required for the mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC from the bone marrow to the periphery. Knowing that BALB/c mice with acute Plasmodium chabaudi adami malaria have profound alterations in bone remodelling cells, we evaluated the extent to which osteoclasts influence their hematopoietic response to infection. For this, mice were treated with osteoclast inhibiting hormone calcitonin prior to parasite inoculation, and infection as well as hematological parameters was studied. In agreement with osteoclast-dependent HSPC mobilization, administration of calcitonin led to milder splenomegaly, reduced numbers of HSPC in the spleen, and their retention in the bone marrow. Although C-terminal telopeptide (CTX levels, indicative of bone resorption, were lower in calcitonin-treated infected mice, they remained comparable in naive and control infected mice. Calcitonin-treated infected mice conveniently responded to anemia but generated less numbers of splenic macrophages and suffered from exacerbated infection; interestingly, calcitonin also decreased the number of macrophages generated in vitro. Globally, our results indicate that although osteoclast-dependent HSC mobilization from bone marrow to spleen is triggered in murine blood stage malaria, this activity is not essential for stress erythropoiesis.

  8. Ocular findings after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Al-Mohareb, Fahad; Ayas, Mouhab; Chaudhri, Naeem; Al-Sharif, Fahad; Al-Zahrani, Hazzaa; Mohammed, Said Y; Nassar, Amr; Aljurf, Mahmoud

    2009-09-01

    To study the incidence, causes, and outcome of major ocular complications in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Retrospective, noncomparative, observational clinical study. The study included a total of 620 patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT in the period from 1997 to 2007 at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Allogeneic HSCT. Patients with ocular complications were referred to the ophthalmology division for complete ophthalmologic examination, including visual acuity, tonometry, Schirmer test, biomicroscopy, and dilated ophthalmoscopy. Laboratory investigations were performed whenever indicated. The incidence and causes of major ocular complications after allogeneic HSCT were determined. Visual acuity at 1 year after allogeneic HSCT was recorded. Major ocular complications occurred in 80 (13%) of 620 patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT. There were 36 male patients (45%) and 44 female patients (55%) with a mean age of 29 years and an age range of 9 to 65 years. Prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) consisted of cyclosporine and methotrexate in 69 patients, and cyclosporine, methotrexate and corticosteroids, or mycophenolate mofetil in 11 patients. The most frequently encountered ocular complications were chronic GVHD, dry eye syndrome without GVHD, corneal ulcers, cataract, glaucoma, cytomegalovirus retinitis, fungal endophthalmitis, and acquisition of allergic conjunctivitis from atopic donors. There was no correlation between the pattern of ocular complications and the transplanted stem cell source. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 1 year after transplantation was less than 20/200 in 13 patients (16%), less than 20/50 in 17 patients (21%), and better than 20/50 in 50 patients (63%). Ocular complications are common in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Early recognition and prompt treatment are important. The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial

  9. Distinct Molecular Signature of Murine Fetal Liver and Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells Identify Novel Regulators of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesia, Javed K; Franch, Monica; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Nogales-Cadenas, Ruben; Vanwelden, Thomas; Van Den Bosch, Elisa; Xu, Zhuofei; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Khurana, Satish; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2017-04-15

    During ontogeny, fetal liver (FL) acts as a major site for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) maturation and expansion, whereas HSCs in the adult bone marrow (ABM) are largely quiescent. HSCs in the FL possess faster repopulation capacity as compared with ABM HSCs. However, the molecular mechanism regulating the greater self-renewal potential of FL HSCs has not yet extensively been assessed. Recently, we published RNA sequencing-based gene expression analysis on FL HSCs from 14.5-day mouse embryo (E14.5) in comparison to the ABM HSCs. We reanalyzed these data to identify key transcriptional regulators that play important roles in the expansion of HSCs during development. The comparison of FL E14.5 with ABM HSCs identified more than 1,400 differentially expressed genes. More than 200 genes were shortlisted based on the gene ontology (GO) annotation term "transcription." By morpholino-based knockdown studies in zebrafish, we assessed the function of 18 of these regulators, previously not associated with HSC proliferation. Our studies identified a previously unknown role for tdg, uhrf1, uchl5, and ncoa1 in the emergence of definitive hematopoiesis in zebrafish. In conclusion, we demonstrate that identification of genes involved in transcriptional regulation differentially expressed between expanding FL HSCs and quiescent ABM HSCs, uncovers novel regulators of HSC function.

  10. Splenic uptake of both technetium-99m diphosphonate and technetium-99m sulfur colloid in sickle cell beta degrees thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, L.L.; Brittin, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    A 19-year-old black woman with sickle cell beta degrees thalassemia had experienced more than 100 hospital admissions for sickle cell crisis and aseptic necrosis of both femoral heads. Her spleen was enlarged threefold and accumulated both radiocolloid and bone-seeking agent on two occasions, demonstrating an exception to the rule in sickle cell anemia that spleens that take up bone-seeking agents demonstrate functional asplenia. In the context of fever, left upper quadrant pain, and splenomegaly, the pattern of calcification in the patient's spleen as revealed in ultrasound and CT studies suggested possible abscess and led to unnecessary splenectomy. The nuclear medicine studies did not support this diagnosis. Nuclear medicine physicians should not be misled by splenic findings of sickle cell thalassemia (and possibly of other heterozygous sickle cell disorders) that differ from those of the more familiar homozygous sickle cell anemia

  11. Converting cell fates: generating hematopoietic stem cells de novo via transcription factor reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michael G; Lemischka, Ihor R; Moore, Kateri

    2016-04-01

    Even though all paradigms of stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine emerged from the study of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the inability to generate these cells de novo or expand them in vitro persists. Initial efforts to obtain these cells began with the use of embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technologies, but these strategies have yet to yield fully functional cells. Subsequently, more recent approaches involve transcription factor (TF) overexpression to reprogram PSCs and various somatic cells. The induction of pluripotency with just four TFs by Yamanaka informs our ability to convert cell fates and demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing terminally differentiated cells to generate cells with multilineage potential. In this review, we discuss the recent efforts undertaken using TF-based reprogramming strategies to convert several cell types into HSCs. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Secreted protein Del-1 regulates myelopoiesis in the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroulis, Ioannis; Chen, Lan-Sun; Singh, Rashim Pal; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Economopoulou, Matina; Kajikawa, Tetsuhiro; Troullinaki, Maria; Ziogas, Athanasios; Ruppova, Klara; Hosur, Kavita; Maekawa, Tomoki; Wang, Baomei; Subramanian, Pallavi; Tonn, Torsten; Verginis, Panayotis; von Bonin, Malte; Wobus, Manja; Bornhäuser, Martin; Grinenko, Tatyana; Di Scala, Marianna; Hidalgo, Andres; Wielockx, Ben; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2017-10-02

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remain mostly quiescent under steady-state conditions but switch to a proliferative state following hematopoietic stress, e.g., bone marrow (BM) injury, transplantation, or systemic infection and inflammation. The homeostatic balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation of HSCs is strongly dependent on their interactions with cells that constitute a specialized microanatomical environment in the BM known as the HSC niche. Here, we identified the secreted extracellular matrix protein Del-1 as a component and regulator of the HSC niche. Specifically, we found that Del-1 was expressed by several cellular components of the HSC niche, including arteriolar endothelial cells, CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, and cells of the osteoblastic lineage. Del-1 promoted critical functions of the HSC niche, as it regulated long-term HSC (LT-HSC) proliferation and differentiation toward the myeloid lineage. Del-1 deficiency in mice resulted in reduced LT-HSC proliferation and infringed preferentially upon myelopoiesis under both steady-state and stressful conditions, such as hematopoietic cell transplantation and G-CSF- or inflammation-induced stress myelopoiesis. Del-1-induced HSC proliferation and myeloid lineage commitment were mediated by β3 integrin on hematopoietic progenitors. This hitherto unknown Del-1 function in the HSC niche represents a juxtacrine homeostatic adaptation of the hematopoietic system in stress myelopoiesis.

  13. Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Gene Therapy for Cerebral Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Florian; Duncan, Christine; Musolino, Patricia L; Orchard, Paul J; De Oliveira, Satiro; Thrasher, Adrian J; Armant, Myriam; Dansereau, Colleen; Lund, Troy C; Miller, Weston P; Raymond, Gerald V; Sankar, Raman; Shah, Ami J; Sevin, Caroline; Gaspar, H Bobby; Gissen, Paul; Amartino, Hernan; Bratkovic, Drago; Smith, Nicholas J C; Paker, Asif M; Shamir, Esther; O'Meara, Tara; Davidson, David; Aubourg, Patrick; Williams, David A

    2017-10-26

    In X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, mutations in ABCD1 lead to loss of function of the ALD protein. Cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy is characterized by demyelination and neurodegeneration. Disease progression, which leads to loss of neurologic function and death, can be halted only with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. We enrolled boys with cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy in a single-group, open-label, phase 2-3 safety and efficacy study. Patients were required to have early-stage disease and gadolinium enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at screening. The investigational therapy involved infusion of autologous CD34+ cells transduced with the elivaldogene tavalentivec (Lenti-D) lentiviral vector. In this interim analysis, patients were assessed for the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, death, and major functional disabilities, as well as changes in neurologic function and in the extent of lesions on MRI. The primary end point was being alive and having no major functional disability at 24 months after infusion. A total of 17 boys received Lenti-D gene therapy. At the time of the interim analysis, the median follow-up was 29.4 months (range, 21.6 to 42.0). All the patients had gene-marked cells after engraftment, with no evidence of preferential integration near known oncogenes or clonal outgrowth. Measurable ALD protein was observed in all the patients. No treatment-related death or graft-versus-host disease had been reported; 15 of the 17 patients (88%) were alive and free of major functional disability, with minimal clinical symptoms. One patient, who had had rapid neurologic deterioration, had died from disease progression. Another patient, who had had evidence of disease progression on MRI, had withdrawn from the study to undergo allogeneic stem-cell transplantation and later died from transplantation-related complications. Early results of this study suggest that Lenti-D gene therapy may be a safe and effective alternative to

  14. Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Chao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is becoming an effective therapeutic modality for a variety of diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be used to enhance hematopoietic engraftment, accelerate lymphocyte recovery, reduce the risk of graft failure, prevent and treat graft-versus-host disease, and repair tissue damage in patients receiving HSCT. Till now, most MSCs for human clinical application have been derived from bone marrow. However, acquiring bone-marrow-derived MSCs involves an invasive procedure. Umbilical cord is rich with MSCs. Compared to bone-marrow-derived MSCs, umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UCMSCs are easier to obtain without harm to the donor and can proliferate faster. No severe adverse effects were noted in our previous clinical application of UCMSCs in HSCT. Accordingly, application of UCMSCs in humans appears to be feasible and safe. Further studies are warranted.

  15. In vivo generation of transplantable human hematopoietic cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Giovanni; Welner, Robert S; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Ye, Min; Kocher, Olivier; Neuberg, Donna S; Khrapko, Konstantin; Silberstein, Leslie E; Tenen, Daniel G

    2013-02-21

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through overexpression of 4 transcription factors. iPS cells are similar to human embryonic stem (hES) cells and have the same ability to generate all the cells of the human body, including blood cells. However, this process is extremely inefficient and to date has been unsuccessful at differentiating iPS into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We hypothesized that iPS cells, injected into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ immunocompromised (NSG) mice could give rise to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during teratoma formation. Here, we report a novel in vivo system in which human iPS cells differentiate within teratomas to derive functional myeloid and lymphoid cells. Similarly, HSPCs can be isolated from teratoma parenchyma and reconstitute a human immune system when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our data provide evidence that in vivo generation of patient customized cells is feasible, providing materials that could be useful for transplantation, human antibody generation, and drug screening applications.

  16. Bone marrow transplantation in mice as a tool for studying the role of hematopoietic cells in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; de Haan, Gerald; Hofker, Marten H.

    2010-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have been established as major players in cardiovascular disease, with an important role in the etiology of atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, hematopoietic cells, and in particular the cells of monocyte and macrophage lineages, have recently been unmasked as one of the main

  17. Cord blood hematopoietic cells from preterm infants display altered DNA methylation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goede, Olivia M; Lavoie, Pascal M; Robinson, Wendy P

    2017-01-01

    Premature infants are highly vulnerable to infection. This is partly attributable to the preterm immune system, which differs from that of the term neonate in cell composition and function. Multiple studies have found differential DNA methylation (DNAm) between preterm and term infants' cord blood; however, interpretation of these studies is limited by the confounding factor of blood cell composition. This study evaluates the epigenetic impact of preterm birth in isolated hematopoietic cell populations, reducing the concern of cell composition differences. Genome-wide DNAm was measured using the Illumina 450K array in T cells, monocytes, granulocytes, and nucleated red blood cells (nRBCs) isolated from cord blood of 5 term and 5 preterm (blood cells (nRBCs) showed the most extensive changes in DNAm, with 9258 differentially methylated (DM) sites (FDR  0.10) discovered between preterm and term infants compared to the blood cell populations. The direction of DNAm change with gestational age at these prematurity-DM sites followed known patterns of hematopoietic differentiation, suggesting that term hematopoietic cell populations are more epigenetically mature than their preterm counterparts. Consistent shifts in DNAm between preterm and term cells were observed at 25 CpG sites, with many of these sites located in genes involved in growth and proliferation, hematopoietic lineage commitment, and the cytoskeleton. DNAm in preterm and term hematopoietic cells conformed to previously identified DNAm signatures of fetal liver and bone marrow, respectively. This study presents the first genome-wide mapping of epigenetic differences in hematopoietic cells across the late gestational period. DNAm differences in hematopoietic cells between term and <31 weeks were consistent with the hematopoietic origin of these cells during ontogeny, reflecting an important role of DNAm in their regulation. Due to the limited sample size and the high coincidence of prematurity and

  18. The GOD of Hematopoietic Stem Cells: A Clonal Diversity Model of the Stem Cell Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Muller-Sieburg, C.E.; Sieburg, H.B.

    2006-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) show heterogeneous behavior even when isolated as phenotypically homogeneous populations. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control the generation of diversity (GOD) in the HSC compartment are not well understood, but have been the focus of much debate. There is increasing evidence that the most important HSC functions, self-renewal and differentiation, are epigenetically preprogrammed and therefore predictable. Indeed, recent data show that the adult H...

  19. Nucleofection, an efficient nonviral method to transfer genes into human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levetzow, G. von; Spanholtz, J.; Beckmann, J.; Fischer, J.; Kogler, G.; Wernet, P.; Punzel, M.; Giebel, B.

    2006-01-01

    The targeted manipulation of the genetic program of single cells as well as of complete organisms has strongly enhanced our understanding of cellular and developmental processes and should also help to increase our knowledge of primary human stem cells, e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), within

  20. The combination of valproic acid and lithium delays hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; Bystrykh, Leonid; van den Boom, Vincent; Olthof, Sandra; Ausema, Albertina; Ritsema, Martha; Huls, Gerwin; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge on the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) self-renewal and differentiation, in vitro control of stem cell fate decisions has been difficult. The ability to inhibit HSPC commitment in culture may be of benefit to cell therapy protocols. Small

  1. Interferon-gamma impairs proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Alexander M.; Demirel, Özlem; Hooibrink, Berend; Brandts, Christian H.; Nolte, Martijn A.

    2013-01-01

    Balancing the processes of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation and self-renewal is critical for maintaining a lifelong supply of blood cells. The bone marrow (BM) produces a stable output of newly generated cells, but immunologic stress conditions inducing leukopenia increase the demand

  2. Development of model for analysing respective collections of intended hematopoietic stem cells and harvests of unintended mature cells in apheresis for autologous hematopoietic stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hequet, O; Le, Q H; Rodriguez, J; Dubost, P; Revesz, D; Clerc, A; Rigal, D; Salles, G; Coiffier, B

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) required to perform peripheral hematopoietic autologous stem cell transplantation (APBSCT) can be collected by processing several blood volumes (BVs) in leukapheresis sessions. However, this may cause granulocyte harvest in graft and decrease in patient's platelet blood level. Both consequences may induce disturbances in patient. One apheresis team's current purpose is to improve HSC collection by increasing HSC collection and prevent increase in granulocyte and platelet harvests. Before improving HSC collection it seemed important to know more about the way to harvest these types of cells. The purpose of our study was to develop a simple model for analysing respective collections of intended CD34+ cells among HSC (designated here as HSC) and harvests of unintended platelets or granulocytes among mature cells (designated here as mature cells) considering the number of BVs processed and factors likely to influence cell collection or harvest. For this, we processed 1, 2 and 3 BVs in 59 leukapheresis sessions and analysed corresponding collections and harvests with a referent device (COBE Spectra). First we analysed the amounts of HSC collected and mature cells harvested and second the evolution of the respective shares of HSC and mature cells collected or harvested throughout the BV processes. HSC collections and mature cell harvests increased globally (pcells and platelets) influenced both cell collections and harvests (CD34+cells and platelets) (pHSC collections and mature unintended cells harvests (pHSC collections or unintended mature cell harvests were pre-leukapheresis blood cell levels. Our model was meant to assist apheresis teams in analysing shares of HSC collected and mature cells harvested with new devices or with new types of HSC mobilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Financial burden in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Nandita; Chang, Yu-hui; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Slack, James; Beebe, Timothy; Roy, Vivek; Noel, Pierre; Fauble, Veena; Sproat, Lisa; Tilburt, Jon; Leis, Jose F; Mikhael, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an expensive treatment for hematological disorders, little is known about the financial consequences for the patients who undergo this procedure. We analyzed factors associated with its financial burden and its impact on health behaviors of allogeneic HCT recipients. A questionnaire was retrospectively mailed to 482 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT from January 2006 to June 2012 at the Mayo Clinic, to collect information regarding current financial concerns, household income, employment, insurance, out-of-pocket expenses, and health and functional status. A multivariable logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with financial burden and treatment nonadherence. Of the 268 respondents (56% response rate), 73% reported that their sickness had hurt them financially. All patients for whom the insurance information was available (missing, n = 13) were insured. Forty-seven percent of respondents experienced financial burden, such as household income decreased by >50%, selling/mortgaging home, or withdrawing money from retirement accounts. Three percent declared bankruptcy. Younger age and poor current mental and physical functioning increased the likelihood of financial burden. Thirty-five percent of patients reported deleterious health behaviors because of financial constraints. These patients were likely to be younger, have lower education, and with a longer time since HCT. Being employed decreased the likelihood of experiencing financial burden and treatment nonadherence due to concern about costs. A significant proportion of allogeneic HCT survivors experience financial hardship despite insurance coverage. Future research should investigate potential interventions to help at-risk patients and prevent adverse financial outcomes after this life-saving procedure. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hematopoietic Support Capacity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Orduña, Guadalupe R; Mayani, Héctor; Montesinos, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in the physiology and homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. Because MSCs generate most of the stromal cells present in the bone marrow (BM), form part of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche, and produce various molecules regulating hematopoiesis, their hematopoiesis-supporting capacity has been demonstrated. In the last decade, BM-MSCs have been proposed to be useful in some ex vivo protocols for HSC expansion, with the aim of expanding their numbers for transplant purposes (HSC transplant, HSCT). Furthermore, application of MSCs has been proposed as an adjuvant cellular therapy for promoting rapid hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Although the MSCs used in preliminary clinical trials have come from the BM, isolation of MSCs from far more accessible sources such as neonatal tissues has now been achieved, and these cells have been found to possess similar biological characteristics to those isolated from the BM. Therefore, such tissues are now considered as a potential alternative source of MSCs for clinical applications. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the biological characteristics of MSCs as related to their capacity to support the formation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We also describe MSC manipulation for ex vivo HSC expansion protocols used for transplants and their clinical relevance for hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of proliferation and DNA damage on hematopoietic stem cell function determine aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Satish

    2016-07-01

    In most of the mammalian tissues, homeostasis as well as injury repair depend upon a small number of resident adult stem cells. The decline in tissue/organ function in aged organisms has been directly linked with poorly functioning stem cells. Altered function of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is at the center of an aging hematopoietic system, a tissue with high cellular turnover. Poorly engrafting, myeloid-biased HSCs with higher levels of DNA damage accumulation are the hallmark features of an aged hematopoietic system. These cells show a higher proliferation rate than their younger counterparts. It was proposed that quiescence of these cells over long period of time leads to accumulation of DNA damage, eventually resulting in poor function/pathological conditions in hematopoietic system. However, various mouse models with premature aging phenotype also show highly proliferative HSCs. This review examines the evidence that links proliferation of HSCs with aging, which leads to functional changes in the hematopoietic system. Developmental Dynamics 245:739-750, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Retrospective analysis of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simondsen, Katherine A; Reed, Michael P; Mably, Mary S; Zhang, Yang; Longo, Walter L

    2013-12-01

    Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant are at a high risk for infection-related mortality in the immediate post-transplantation phase. Prophylaxis with a fluoroquinolone is now recommended to reduce this risk with the stipulation that surveillance for increased fluoroquinolone resistance Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea be conducted. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 48 patients who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and received a fluoroquinolone for prophylaxis and 48 patients who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant who did not receive a fluoroquinolone for prophylaxis. All patients received the same standard antifungal, antiviral and anti-pneumocystis prophylaxis. Patients receiving fluoroquinolone prophylaxis had a lower incidence of febrile neutropenia than those not receiving prophylaxis, though the difference was not found to be statistically significant (83% vs. 67%, p = 0.098). Similar non-significant improvements in the number of positive cultures recovered during an episode of febrile neutropenia and antimicrobial days were noted. No significant increase in fluoroquinolone resistance, Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea, or in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections were noted. Our single institution experience with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients supports continuation of this practice. Expansion to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients may be appropriate based on guideline recommendations and our institution-specific experience with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

  8. Loss of Folliculin Disrupts Hematopoietic Stem Cell Quiescence and Homeostasis Resulting in Bone Marrow Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Masaya; Toyama, Hirofumi; Sun, Lei; Takubo, Keiyo; Suh, Hyung-Chan; Hasumi, Hisashi; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Hasumi, Yukiko; Klarmann, Kimberly D; Nakagata, Naomi; Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston; Suda, Toshio; Keller, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Folliculin (FLCN) is an autosomal dominant tumor suppressor gene that modulates diverse signaling pathways required for growth, proliferation, metabolism, survival, motility, and adhesion. FLCN is an essential protein required for murine embryonic development, embryonic stem cell (ESC) commitment, and Drosophila germline stem cell maintenance, suggesting that Flcn may be required for adult stem cell homeostasis. Conditional inactivation of Flcn in adult hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) drives hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) into proliferative exhaustion resulting in the rapid depletion of HSPC, loss of all hematopoietic cell lineages, acute bone marrow (BM) failure, and mortality after 40 days. HSC that lack Flcn fail to reconstitute the hematopoietic compartment in recipient mice, demonstrating a cell-autonomous requirement for Flcn in HSC maintenance. BM cells showed increased phosphorylation of Akt and mTorc1, and extramedullary hematopoiesis was significantly reduced by treating mice with rapamycin in vivo, suggesting that the mTorc1 pathway was activated by loss of Flcn expression in hematopoietic cells in vivo. Tfe3 was activated and preferentially localized to the nucleus of Flcn knockout (KO) HSPCs. Tfe3 overexpression in HSPCs impaired long-term hematopoietic reconstitution in vivo, recapitulating the Flcn KO phenotype, and supporting the notion that abnormal activation of Tfe3 contributes to the Flcn KO phenotype. Flcn KO mice develop an acute histiocytic hyperplasia in multiple organs, suggesting a novel function for Flcn in macrophage development. Thus, Flcn is intrinsically required to maintain adult HSC quiescence and homeostasis, and Flcn loss leads to BM failure and mortality in mice. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: Intrinsic changes or micro-environmental effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolthuis, Carolien M; de Haan, Gerald; Huls, Gerwin

    2011-08-01

    During development hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) expand in number and persist throughout life by undergoing self-renewing divisions. Nevertheless, the hematopoietic system does not escape the negative effects of aging, suggesting that self-renewal is not complete. A fundamental issue in stem cell biology relates to such age-dependent loss of stem cell activity. Both stem cell intrinsic factors and extrinsic factors associated with an aging micro-environment could contribute to aging of the hematopoietic system. Recently, changes in the clonal composition of the HSC compartment during aging have been put forward as a key factor. Here, we discuss these recent developments and speculate how they may be of clinical relevance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential of bursa-immigrated hematopoietic precursor cells to differentiate to functional B and T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.T.; Alexander, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of hematopoietic precursor cells, recently immigrated into the 13- and 14-day-old embryonic bursa, to migrate to the thymus and to differentiate to functional T cells was investigated. Chromosomally marked cell populations obtained from 13- and 14-day-old embryonic bursas were transferred i.v. to 780 R γ-irradiated chick embryos of equivalent age. When appropriate chimeras were examined at 4 to 12 weeks after cell transfer, donor cells were found to proliferate primarily in the bursa. Significant donor cell influx into the thymus was not detected. In correlation with these findings, Con A- and PHA-responsive T cells in thymus and spleen cell cultures of recipients remained of host origin whereas the number of anti-CIg responsive B cells of donor type increased gradually in the spleens of recipients. An initial lag period preceded the accumulation of functional donor B cells in the spleens of recipients, despite the predominant presence of dividing donor cells in the bursa. This suggests that the transferred bursal cell population required substantially longer to mature and emigrate from the bursa as functional B cells than the host cell population remaining in the irradiated bursas at time of cell transfer. The failure to detect significant influx of donor cells into the thymus and their failure to differentiate to functional T cells suggest that the recently bursa-immigrated hematopoietic stem cells of 13- and 14-day-old embryos may not be pluripotential cells, but rather cells already committed to the B cell line of differentiation

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell development requires transient Wnt/β-catenin activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Guiu, Jordi; D'Altri, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. We show here that β-catenin is nuclear and active in few endothelial nonhematopoietic cells closely associated with the emerging hematopoietic clusters of the embryonic aorta during mouse development. Importantly, Wnt/β-catenin activity is transiently required...... of mutant cells toward the hematopoietic lineage; however, these mutant cells still contribute to the adult endothelium. Together, those findings indicate that Wnt/β-catenin activity is needed for the emergence but not the maintenance of HSCs in mouse embryos....

  12. PRDM11 is dispensable for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoren, Lina A; Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC)(1) supply organisms with life-long output of mature blood cells. To do so, the HSC pool size has to be maintained by HSC self-renewing divisions. PRDM3 and PRDM16 have been documented to regulate HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function. We found Prdm11 to have...... similar expression patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) compartments as Prdm3 and Prdm16. Therefore, we undertook experiments to test if PRDM11 regulates HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function by investigating the Prdm11(-/-) mice. Our data shows that phenotypic HSPCs...

  13. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of adequacy of hematopoietic stem cell collection for autologous transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combariza, Juan F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to carry out an autologous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells should be mobilized to peripheral blood and later collected by apheresis. The CD34+ cell count is a tool to establish the optimal time to begin the apheresis procedure. Objective: To evaluate the association between peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Materials and methods: A predictive test evaluation study was carried out to establish the usefulness of peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of successful stem cell collection in patients that will receive an autologous transplantation. Results: 77 patients were included (median age: 49 years; range: 5-66. The predominant baseline diagnosis was lymphoma (53.2 %. The percentage of patients with successful harvest of hematopoietic stem cells was proportional to the number of CD34+cells in peripheral blood at the end of the mobilization procedure. We propose that more than 15 CD34+cells/μL must be present in order to achieve an adequate collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Conclusion: Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count is a useful tool to predict the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells.

  14. Tachykinins and hematopoietic stem cell functions: implications in clinical disorders and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Raghav G; Reddy, Bobby Y; Ruggiero, Jaclyn E; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2007-05-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process by which a limited number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain a functioning blood and immune system. In adults, hematopoiesis occurs in bone marrow and is supported by the microenvironment. The tachykinin family of peptides regulates hematopoiesis. Tachykinins can be released in bone marrow as neurotransmitters from innervating fibers, and from resident bone marrow cells. The hematopoietic effects by tachykinins involve four tachykinin genes, Tac1-Tac4. The latter is the most recently discovered member and encodes hemokinin-1, endokinin A, endokinin B, and two orphan peptides, endokinin C, and endokinin D. The alteration of normal hematopoietic functions by the tachykinins may result in the development of various pathologies. For example, Tac1 is involved in myelofibrosis and in leukemia, both of which are dysfunction of hematopoietic stem cells. A comprehensive understanding of dysfunctions caused by the tachykinins requires further research since other cells, such as stromal cells and factors including cytokines, chemokines, and endopeptidases, are involved in a network in which the tachykinins have critical roles. Studies into the properties and functions of tachykinins, the biology of their receptors, and related molecules would provide insights into the development of aging disorders, hematopoiesis, other dysfunction, and may also lead to the discovery of novel and effective clinical therapies. Controversies on applications for hematopoietic stem cells in regenerative medicine are discussed. Despite these controversies, a detailed understanding on how the bone marrow microenvironment maintains pluripotency of hematopoietic stem cells would be useful to manipulate the system to acquire specialized cells for tissue repair.

  15. Dendritic cells derived from HOXB4-immortalized hematopoietic bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baru, Abdul Mannan; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Rathinasamy, Anchana; Scherr, Michaela; Eder, Matthias; Behrens, Georg M N

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the generation and modulation of cell-mediated adaptive immunity against infections. DC-based vaccination involves transplantation of ex vivo-generated DCs loaded with antigen in vitro, but remains limited by the number of autologous or allogeneic cells. While in vitro expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into DCs seems to be the most viable alternative to overcome this problem, the complexity of HSC expansion in vitro has posed significant limitations for clinical application. We immortalized lineage-depleted murine hematopoietic bone marrow (lin(-)BM) cells with HOXB4, and differentiated them into CD11c(+)MHCII(+) DCs. These cells showed the typical DC phenotype and upregulated surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules on stimulation with various toll-like receptor ligands. These DCs efficiently presented exogenous antigen to T-cells via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I and II and viral antigen on infection. Finally, they showed migratory capacity and were able to generate antigen-specific primed T-cells in vivo. In summary, we provide evidence that HOXB4-transduced lin(-)BM cells can serve as a viable means of generating fully functional DCs for scientific and therapeutic applications.

  16. Nutraceutical augmentation of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells in human subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minev Boris

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The medical significance of circulating endothelial or hematopoietic progenitors is becoming increasing recognized. While therapeutic augmentation of circulating progenitor cells using G-CSF has resulted in promising preclinical and early clinical data for several degenerative conditions, this approach is limited by cost and inability to perform chronic administration. Stem-Kine is a food supplement that was previously reported to augment circulating EPC in a pilot study. Here we report a trial in 18 healthy volunteers administered Stem-Kine twice daily for a 2 week period. Significant increases in circulating CD133 and CD34 cells were observed at days 1, 2, 7, and 14 subsequent to initiation of administration, which correlated with increased hematopoietic progenitors as detected by the HALO assay. Augmentation of EPC numbers in circulation was detected by KDR-1/CD34 staining and colony forming assays. These data suggest Stem-Kine supplementation may be useful as a stimulator of reparative processes associated with mobilization of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors.

  17. Intrasplenic masses of ``preserved`` functioning splenic tissue in sickle cell disease: correlation of imaging findings (CT, ultrasound, MRI, and nuclear scintigraphy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Haller, J.O. [Department of Radiology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Hurlet-Jenson, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, New York (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Purpose. We studied six patients with sickle cell disease (SSD), five homozygous for sickle cell anemia and one with sickle beta-thalassemia, in whom rounded intrasplenic masses proved to be preserved functioning splenic tissue. Materials and methods. Available images including computed tomography, ultrasonography, bone scans (Tc-99m MDP), liver spleen scans (Tc-99m sulfur colloid), and MRI were evaluated. Results. The masses were low density on CT (in an otherwise calcified spleen), hypoechoic relative to the echogenic spleen on US, and had the imaging characteristics of normal spleen on MRI. They failed to accumulate Tc-99m MDP but did demonstrate uptake of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Conclusion. In a patient with SSD and intrasplenic masses, proper correlation of multiple imaging modalities will establish the diagnosis of functioning splenic tissue and avoid mistaken diagnosis of splenic abscess or infarction. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Intrasplenic masses of ''preserved'' functioning splenic tissue in sickle cell disease: correlation of imaging findings (CT, ultrasound, MRI, and nuclear scintigraphy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, T.L.; Berdon, W.E.; Haller, J.O.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Hurlet-Jenson, A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose. We studied six patients with sickle cell disease (SSD), five homozygous for sickle cell anemia and one with sickle beta-thalassemia, in whom rounded intrasplenic masses proved to be preserved functioning splenic tissue. Materials and methods. Available images including computed tomography, ultrasonography, bone scans (Tc-99m MDP), liver spleen scans (Tc-99m sulfur colloid), and MRI were evaluated. Results. The masses were low density on CT (in an otherwise calcified spleen), hypoechoic relative to the echogenic spleen on US, and had the imaging characteristics of normal spleen on MRI. They failed to accumulate Tc-99m MDP but did demonstrate uptake of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Conclusion. In a patient with SSD and intrasplenic masses, proper correlation of multiple imaging modalities will establish the diagnosis of functioning splenic tissue and avoid mistaken diagnosis of splenic abscess or infarction. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Long-term outcomes among older patients following nonmyeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for advanced hematologic malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E

    2011-01-01

    A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions.......A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions....

  20. File list: NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells hg19 No description Blood CD34 Hematopoi...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Age- and stage-specific regulation patterns in the hematopoietic stem cell hierarchy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiger, H; True, JM; de Haan, G; Van Zant, G

    2001-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation of very primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo are still poorly understood. Despite the clinical relevance, even less is known about the mechanisms that regulate these cells in old animals. In a forward

  17. A genetic and genomic analysis identifies a cluster of genes associated with hematopoietic cell turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G; Bystrykh, LV; Weersing, E; Dontje, B; Geiger, H; Ivanova, N; Lemischka, IR; Vellenga, E; Van Zant, G

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells from different strains of mice vary widely with respect to their cell cycle activity. In the present study we used complementary genetic and genomic approaches to identify molecular pathways affecting this complex trait. We identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL)

  18. Progressive maturation toward hematopoietic stem cells in the mouse embryo aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boisset, Jean-Charles; Clapes, Thomas; Klaus, Anna; Papazian, Natalie; Onderwater, Jos; Mommaas-Kienhuis, Mieke; Cupedo, Tom; Robin, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of cells attached to the endothelium of the main embryonic arteries were first observed a century ago. Present in most vertebrate species, such clusters, or intraaortic hematopoietic clusters (IAHCs), derive from specialized hemogenic endothelial cells and contain the first few

  19. Correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Megan D; Cost, Gregory J; Mendel, Matthew C; Romero, Zulema; Kaufman, Michael L; Joglekar, Alok V; Ho, Michelle; Lumaquin, Dianne; Gray, David; Lill, Georgia R; Cooper, Aaron R; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Senadheera, Shantha; Zhu, Allen; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Wilber, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Reik, Andreas; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-04-23

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by a single point mutation in the seventh codon of the β-globin gene. Site-specific correction of the sickle mutation in hematopoietic stem cells would allow for permanent production of normal red blood cells. Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to flank the sickle mutation, we demonstrate efficient targeted cleavage at the β-globin locus with minimal off-target modification. By co-delivering a homologous donor template (either an integrase-defective lentiviral vector or a DNA oligonucleotide), high levels of gene modification were achieved in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Modified cells maintained their ability to engraft NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) mice and to produce cells from multiple lineages, although with a reduction in the modification levels relative to the in vitro samples. Importantly, ZFN-driven gene correction in CD34(+) cells from the bone marrow of patients with SCD resulted in the production of wild-type hemoglobin tetramers. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Vitamin D deficiency in children and adolescents submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Johnsson Campos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sub-optimal levels of vitamin D have been found to be highly prevalent in all age groups, with epidemiologic studies demonstrating a link between vitamin D deficiency and disease susceptibility, such as infection and cancer, and mortality rates. In adult transplant patients, it has been suggested that the immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D may have an important role in the prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of children and adolescents submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 66 patients, aged 4-20 years, were assessed at three stages: before hospitalization for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and at 30 and 180 days after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The control group consisted of 25 healthy children. Results: At the pre-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation stage, patients had lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D compared to controls (25.7 ± 12.3 ng/mL vs. 31.9 ± 9.9 ng/mL; p-value = 0.01, and a higher prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency (32% vs. 8%; p-value = 0.01. Prevalence increased significantly after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (p-value = 0.01 with half of the patients having vitamin D deficiency at 180 days after transplantation. At this stage, mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were 20.9 ± 10.9 ng/mL, a significant decline in relation to baseline (p-value = 0.01. No correlation was found between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vitamin D intake, graft-versus-host disease, corticoid use or survival rates. Conclusion: Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were detected even before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and were significantly lower at 180 days after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thus recommending vitamin D supplementation for children and adolescents submitted to hematopoietic stem

  1. Indications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations and therapeutic strategies of accidental irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Produced by a group of experts, this document first discusses the issue of accidental irradiations in terms of medical management. They notably outline the peculiar characteristics of these irradiations with respect to therapeutic irradiations. They agreed on general principles regarding casualty sorting criteria and process, and their medical treatment (systematic hematopoiesis stimulation, allogeneic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells). They discuss some practical aspects of these issues: casualty sorting within a therapeutic perspective (actions to be performed within 48 hours), therapeutic strategies (support therapy, use of cytokines, and therapy by hematopoietic stem cell transplant). They state a set of recommendations regarding the taking into care and diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, research perspectives, and teaching

  2. An Analysis of MicroRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    predisposition for the development of MDS. 15. SUBJECT TERMS MicroRNAs, the myelodysplastic syndromes, hematopoietic stem cells...hematopoietic  stem  cells  (HSCs),  demonstrating   the  presence  of  disease  associated  cytogenetic  and  molecular   genetic ...hematopoiesis   in   the   context   of   aging   and   its   likely   implication   in   the   age-­‐related   predisposition

  3. Circulating hematopoietic progenitors and CD34+ cells predicted successful hematopoietic stem cell harvest in myeloma and lymphoma patients: experiences from a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu JT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jui-Ting Yu,1,2,* Shao-Bin Cheng,3,* Youngsen Yang,1 Kuang-Hsi Chang,4 Wen-Li Hwang,1 Chieh-Lin Jerry Teng,1,5,6 1Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Tungs' Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, 3Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, 4Department of Medical Research and Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 5Department of Life Science, Tunghai University, 6School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have shown that the numbers of both circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC and CD34+ cell are positively correlated with CD34+ cell harvest yield. However, the minimal numbers of both circulating HPCs and CD34+ cells required for performing an efficient hematopoietic stem cell (HSC harvest in lymphoma and myeloma patients have not been defined in our institution. Patients and methods: Medical records of 50 lymphoma and myeloma patients undergoing peripheral blood HSC harvest in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The minimal and optimal HSC harvest yield required for the treatment was considered to be ≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg and ≥5×106 CD34+ cells/kg, respectively. Results: The minimally required or optimal HSC yield obtained was not influenced by age (≥60 years, sex, underlying malignancies, disease status, multiple rounds of chemotherapy, or history of radiotherapy. The numbers of both circulating HPC and CD34+ cell were higher in patients with minimally required HSC yields (P=0.000 for HPC and P=0.000 for CD34+ cell and also in patients with optimal HSC yields (P=0.011 for HPC and P=0.006 for CD34+ cell. The cell count cutoff for obtaining minimally required HSC harvest was determined to be 20/mm3 for HPCs and 10/mm3 for CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the cell count cutoff for obtaining

  4. Retroviral transduction of murine and human hematopoietic progenitors and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuculescu, Marioara F; Brendel, Christian; Harris, Chad E; Williams, David A

    2014-01-01

    Genetic modification of cells using retroviral vectors is the method of choice when the cell population is difficult to transfect and/or requires persistent transgene expression in progeny cells. There are innumerable potential applications for these procedures in laboratory research and clinical therapeutic interventions. One paradigmatic example is the genetic modification of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). These are rare nucleated cells which reside in a specialized microenvironment within the bone marrow, and have the potential to self-renew and/or differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages. Due to their enormous regenerative capacity in steady state or under stress conditions these cells are routinely used in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients with metabolic, inflammatory, malignant, and other hematologic disorders. For patients lacking a matched bone marrow donor, gene therapy of autologous hematopoietic stem cells has proven to be an alternative as highlighted recently by several successful gene therapy trials. Genetic modification of HSPCs using retrovirus vectors requires ex vivo manipulation to efficiently introduce the new genetic material into cells (transduction). Optimal culture conditions are essential to facilitate this process while preserving the stemness of the cells. The most frequently used retroviral vector systems for the genetic modifications of HSPCs are derived either from Moloney murine leukemia-virus (Mo-MLV) or the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and are generally termed according to their genus gamma-retroviral (γ-RV) or lentiviral vectors (LV), respectively. This chapter describes in a step-by-step fashion some techniques used to produce research grade vector supernatants and to obtain purified murine or human hematopoietic stem cells for transduction, as well as follow-up methods for analysis of transduced cell populations.

  5. [Pathogenesis and therapy of hydronephrosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu-ping; Xu, Tao; Huang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2014-08-18

    To investigate the pathogenesis and therapy of hydronephrosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). From March 2004 to March 2014, 23 patients with hydronephrosis after HSCT were identified. With these data, the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis after HSCT were analyzed. According to the surgical intervention of hydronephrosis and ureteral dialation of ureteral stricture, the patients were divided into two groups, rank-sum test and exact probability test were used to evaluate whether there were significant differences in the time of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) occurred, ureteritis and viremia. HC, ureteritis, ureteral stenosis were all the causes of hydronephrosis after HSCT. In this study, 69.6% (16/23) of the patients suffered from HSCT were cured by conservative treatment, 30.4% (7/23) by surgical intervention, and 13.0% (3/23) by insertion DJ stent or nephrostomy.Of the patients [17.4% (4/23)] who suffered ureteral stenosis, 2 were cured after the balloon dialation of ureter, 1 needed DJ tube long-term insertion, and 1 was still followed-up. rank-sum test and exact probability test results showed that the patients who needed surgical intervention might suffer from HC later than other patients, and their incidences of viremia and ureteritis were higher, but the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.524, P = 0.169, and P = 0.124, respectively). The results also showed that the ureteritis incidences of the patients who suffered from ureteral stricture and needed ureteral dialation were higher than that of the other patients, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.024). The patients who needed ureteral dialation suffered from HC later and their incidences of viremia was higher, but the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.73 and P = 0.27). HC, ureteritis and ureteral stenosis may cause hydronephrosis after HSCT. Patients may treated by

  6. Letermovir Prophylaxis for Cytomegalovirus in Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Francisco M; Ljungman, Per; Chemaly, Roy F; Maertens, Johan; Dadwal, Sanjeet S; Duarte, Rafael F; Haider, Shariq; Ullmann, Andrew J; Katayama, Yuta; Brown, Janice; Mullane, Kathleen M; Boeckh, Michael; Blumberg, Emily A; Einsele, Hermann; Snydman, David R; Kanda, Yoshinobu; DiNubile, Mark J; Teal, Valerie L; Wan, Hong; Murata, Yoshihiko; Kartsonis, Nicholas A; Leavitt, Randi Y; Badshah, Cyrus

    2017-12-21

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a common complication after allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation. Letermovir is an antiviral drug that inhibits the CMV-terminase complex. In this phase 3, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned CMV-seropositive transplant recipients, 18 years of age or older, in a 2:1 ratio to receive letermovir or placebo, administered orally or intravenously, through week 14 after transplantation; randomization was stratified according to trial site and CMV disease risk. Letermovir was administered at a dose of 480 mg per day (or 240 mg per day in patients taking cyclosporine). Patients in whom clinically significant CMV infection (CMV disease or CMV viremia leading to preemptive treatment) developed discontinued the trial regimen and received anti-CMV treatment. The primary end point was the proportion of patients, among patients without detectable CMV DNA at randomization, who had clinically significant CMV infection through week 24 after transplantation. Patients who discontinued the trial or had missing end-point data at week 24 were imputed as having a primary end-point event. Patients were followed through week 48 after transplantation. From June 2014 to March 2016, a total of 565 patients underwent randomization and received letermovir or placebo beginning a median of 9 days after transplantation. Among 495 patients with undetectable CMV DNA at randomization, fewer patients in the letermovir group than in the placebo group had clinically significant CMV infection or were imputed as having a primary end-point event by week 24 after transplantation (122 of 325 patients [37.5%] vs. 103 of 170 [60.6%], P<0.001). The frequency and severity of adverse events were similar in the two groups overall. Vomiting was reported in 18.5% of the patients who received letermovir and in 13.5% of those who received placebo; edema in 14.5% and 9.4%, respectively; and atrial fibrillation or flutter in 4.6% and 1.0%, respectively. The rates of

  7. Kaposi Sarcoma After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Rare Complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzi, Mani; Vojdani, Reza; Haghighinejad, Hourvash

    2018-01-02

    Kaposi sarcoma is a multicentric angioproliferative neoplasm of lymphatic endothelium-derived cells. Although this malignancy is relatively frequent after solid-organ transplant, it is extremely rare after bone marrow transplantation. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is associated with severe prolonged immunosuppression; however, a few cases of Kaposi sarcoma after hematopoietic stem cell transplant were previously reported. Here, we report a case of Kaposi sarcoma after haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The patient was a known case of acute myelogenous leukemia and underwent transplant after relapse. Four months posttransplant, she presented with 3 dark blue or purplish small nodules on her face above the upper lip. Histopathologic study confirmed Kaposi sarcoma. Serum antibody against human herpes virus type 8 was positive. After discontinuation of immunosuppressive medication and cryotherapy for local control, Kaposi sarcoma skin nodules healed with residual pigmented skin lesions. The patient is currently in complete remission for Kaposi sarcoma and cured from acute myelogenous leukemia 36 months after stem cell transplant. Only 14 cases of Kaposi sarcoma after hematopoietic cell transplant have been previously reported in the literature (11 after allogeneic and 3 after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant). According to our knowledge from literature review, this case is the first report of Kaposi sarcoma after a haploidentical HLA match transplant.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a specific ABC transporter gene expression profile clearly distinct from other stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, L.; Bergevoet, S.M.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Jansen, J.H.; Reijden, B.A. van der; Raymakers, R.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters protect cells against unrelated (toxic) substances by pumping them across cell membranes. Earlier we showed that many ABC transporters are highly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compared to more committed progenitor cells. The ABC

  9. Nuclear adaptor Ldb1 regulates a transcriptional program essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, LiQi; Jothi, Raja; Cui, Kairong; Lee, Jan Y; Cohen, Tsadok; Gorivodsky, Marat; Tzchori, Itai; Zhao, Yangu; Hayes, Sandra M; Bresnick, Emery H; Zhao, Keji; Westphal, Heiner; Love, Paul E

    2011-02-01

    The nuclear adaptor Ldb1 functions as a core component of multiprotein transcription complexes that regulate differentiation in diverse cell types. In the hematopoietic lineage, Ldb1 forms a complex with the non-DNA-binding adaptor Lmo2 and the transcription factors E2A, Scl and GATA-1 (or GATA-2). Here we demonstrate a critical and continuous requirement for Ldb1 in the maintenance of both fetal and adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Deletion of Ldb1 in hematopoietic progenitors resulted in the downregulation of many transcripts required for HSC maintenance. Genome-wide profiling by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified Ldb1 complex-binding sites at highly conserved regions in the promoters of genes involved in HSC maintenance. Our results identify a central role for Ldb1 in regulating the transcriptional program responsible for the maintenance of HSCs.

  10. A small-molecule/cytokine combination enhances hematopoietic stem cell proliferation via inhibition of cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Guan, Xin; Wang, Huihui; Shen, Bin; Zhang, Yu; Ren, Zhihua; Ma, Yupo; Ding, Xinxin; Jiang, Yongping

    2017-07-18

    Accumulated evidence supports the potent stimulating effects of multiple small molecules on the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which are important for the therapy of various hematological disorders. Here, we report a novel, optimized formula, named the SC cocktail, which contains a combination of three such small molecules and four cytokines. Small-molecule candidates were individually screened and then combined at their optimal concentration with the presence of cytokines to achieve maximum capacity for stimulating the human CD34 + cell expansion ex vivo. The extent of cell expansion and the immunophenotype of expanded cells were assessed through flow cytometry. The functional preservation of HSC stemness was confirmed by additional cell and molecular assays in vitro. Subsequently, the expanded cells were transplanted into sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice for the assessment of human cell viability and engraftment potential in vivo. Furthermore, the expression of several genes in the cell proliferation and differentiation pathways was analyzed through quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) during the process of CD34 + cell expansion. The SC cocktail supported the retention of the immunophenotype of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells remarkably well, by yielding purities of 86.6 ± 11.2% for CD34 + cells and 76.2 ± 10.5% for CD34 + CD38 - cells, respectively, for a 7-day culture. On day 7, the enhancement of expansion of CD34 + cells and CD34 + CD38 - cells reached a maxima of 28.0 ± 5.5-fold and 27.9 ± 4.3-fold, respectively. The SC cocktail-expanded CD34 + cells preserved the characteristics of HSCs by effectively inhibiting their differentiation in vitro and retained the multilineage differentiation potential in primary and secondary in vivo murine xenotransplantation trials. Further gene expression analysis suggested that the small-molecule combination strengthened the ability of the cytokines to enhance the Notch

  11. Single-cell qPCR facilitates the optimization of hematopoietic differentiation in hPSCs/OP9 coculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haide; Jiang, Mengmeng; Xiao, Lei; Huang, He

    2018-03-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs)/OP9 coculture system is a widely used hematopoietic differentiation approach. The limited understanding of this process leads to its low efficiency. Thus, we used single-cell qPCR to reveal the gene expression profiles of individual CD34+ cells from different stages of differentiation. According to the dynamic gene expression of hematopoietic transcription factors, we overexpressed specific hematopoietic transcription factors (Gata2, Lmo2, Etv2, ERG, and SCL) at an early stage of hematopoietic differentiation. After overexpression, we generated more CD34+ cells with normal expression level of CD43 and CD31, which are used to define various hematopoietic progenitors. Furthermore, these CD34+ cells possessed normal differentiation potency in colony-forming unit assays and normal gene expression profiles. In this study, we demonstrated that single-cell qPCR can provide guidance for optimization of hematopoietic differentiation and transient overexpression of selected hematopoietic transcription factors can enhance hematopoietic differentiation.

  12. Flotillins are involved in the polarization of primitive and mature hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Rajendran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration of mature and immature leukocytes in response to chemokines is not only essential during inflammation and host defense, but also during development of the hematopoietic system. Many molecules implicated in migratory polarity show uniform cellular distribution under non-activated conditions, but acquire a polarized localization upon exposure to migratory cues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present evidence that raft-associated endocytic proteins (flotillins are pre-assembled in lymphoid, myeloid and primitive hematopoietic cells and accumulate in the uropod during migration. Furthermore, flotillins display a polarized distribution during immunological synapse formation. Employing the membrane lipid-order sensitive probe Laurdan, we show that flotillin accumulation in the immunological synapse is concomittant with membrane ordering in these regions. CONCLUSIONS: Together with the observation that flotillin polarization does not occur in other polarized cell types such as polarized epithelial cells, our results suggest a specific role for flotillins in hematopoietic cell polarization. Based on our results, we propose that in hematopoietic cells, flotillins provide intrinsic cues that govern segregation of certain microdomain-associated molecules during immune cell polarization.

  13. Definitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells manifest distinct differentiation output in the zebrafish VDA and PBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hao; Sood, Raman; Xu, Jin; Zhen, Fenghua; English, Milton A; Liu, P Paul; Wen, Zilong

    2009-02-01

    One unique feature of vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis is the ontogenic switching of hematopoietic stem cells from one anatomical compartment or niche to another. In mice, hematopoietic stem cells are believed to originate in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM), subsequently migrate to the fetal liver (FL) and finally colonize the bone marrow (BM). Yet, the differentiation potential of hematopoietic stem cells within early niches such as the AGM and FL remains incompletely defined. Here, we present in vivo analysis to delineate the differentiation potential of definitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the zebrafish AGM and FL analogies, namely the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA) and the posterior blood island (PBI), respectively. Cell fate mapping and analysis of zebrafish runx1(w84x) and vlad tepes (vlt(m651)) mutants revealed that HSPCs in the PBI gave rise to both erythroid and myeloid lineages. However, we surprisingly found that HSPCs in the VDA were not quiescent but were uniquely adapted to generate myeloid but not erythroid lineage cells. We further showed that such distinct differentiation output of HSPCs was, at least in part, ascribed to the different micro-environments present in these two niches. Our results highlight the importance of niche in shaping the differentiation output of developing HSPCs.

  14. In vitro effects of recombinant human stem cell factor on hematopoietic cells from patients with acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chuansheng; Cheng Tao; Xu Yanqun

    1994-01-01

    The effects of rhSCF, rhPIXY 321, rhGM-CSF and rhIL-3 on clonal proliferation of hematopoietic cells from five cases of acute radiation sickness were studied. The results showed that rhSCF could stimulate clonal proliferation of normal hematopoietic cells and the best results were obtained when the concentration of rhSCF was 5 x 10 4 ng/L. Clonal proliferation of hematopoietic cells from four cases of acute radiation sickness was stimulated while that from one case was inhibited. Moreover, the responsiveness of cells to rhSCF was correlated with the doses of radiation. Analysis of cell surface antigen, cell morphology and histochemistry revealed that rhSCF promoted predominantly the proliferation of granulocyte-macrophage lineage. rhSCF in combination with other three factors could further enhance the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic cells. The effects of rhPIXY 321, a fusion protein of GM-CSF and IL-3, were also analysed and found it to be a novel valuable hematopoietic growth factor

  15. Activated H-Ras regulates hematopoietic cell survival by modulating Survivin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Seiji; Pelus, Louis M.

    2004-01-01

    Survivin expression and Ras activation are regulated by hematopoietic growth factors. We investigated whether activated Ras could circumvent growth factor-regulated Survivin expression and if a Ras/Survivin axis mediates growth factor independent survival and proliferation in hematopoietic cells. Survivin expression is up-regulated by IL-3 in Ba/F3 and CD34 + cells and inhibited by the Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid. Over-expression of constitutively activated H-Ras (CA-Ras) in Ba/F3 cells blocked down-modulation of Survivin expression, G 0 /G 1 arrest, and apoptosis induced by IL-3 withdrawal, while dominant-negative (DN) H-Ras down-regulated Survivin. Survivin disruption by DN T34A Survivin blocked CA-Ras-induced IL-3-independent cell survival and proliferation; however, it did not affect CA-Ras-mediated enhancement of S-phase, indicating that the anti-apoptotic activity of CA-Ras is Survivin dependent while its S-phase enhancing effect is not. These results indicate that CA-Ras modulates Survivin expression independent of hematopoietic growth factors and that a CA-Ras/Survivin axis regulates survival and proliferation of transformed hematopoietic cells

  16. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin.

  17. Lipofectamine and related cationic lipids strongly improve adenoviral infection efficiency of primitive human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, T; Haddada, H; Vainchenker, W; Louache, F

    1998-11-20

    Adenoviral vectors have the potential to infect a large number of cell types including quiescent cells. Their use in hematopoietic cells is limited by the episomal form of their DNA, leading to transgene loss in the progeny cells. However, the use of this vector may be interesting for short-term in vitro modifications of primitive human hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we have investigated the ability of adenovirus to transduce cord blood CD34+ cells. Several promoters were tested using the lacZ reporter gene. The PGK and CMV promoters induced transgene expression in 18-25% of the cells, whereas the HTLV-I and especially the RSV promoter were almost inactive. To improve infection efficiency, adenovirus was complexed with cationic lipids. Lipofectamine, Cellfectin, and RPR120535b, but not Lipofectin, Lipofectace, or DOTAP, markedly improved transgene expression in CD34+ cells (from 19 to 35%). Lipofectamine strongly enhanced infection efficiency of the poorly infectable primitive CD34+CD38low cells (from 11 to 28%) whereas the more mature CD34+CD38+ cells were only slightly affected (from 24 to 31%). Lipofectamine tripled the infection of CFU-GMs and LTC-ICs derived from the CD34+CD38low cell fraction (from 4 to 12% and from 5 to 16%, respectively) and doubled that of BFU-Es (from 13 to 26%). We conclude that cationic lipids can markedly increase the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primitive hematopoietic cells.

  18. Hematopoietic stem cells: ex-vivo expansion and therapeutic potential for myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Lu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jingwei Lu, Vincent J Pompili, Hiranmoy DasCardiovascular Stem Cell Research Laboratory, The Dorothy M Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USAAbstract: Despite recent advances in cardiovascular medicine, ischemic heart disease remains the major cause of death in the United States and abroad. Cell-based therapy for degenerative diseases like myocardial ischemia using stem cells is currently under serious investigation. Various types of stem cells are being considered to be candidates for cell transplantation in cell-based therapy. Hematopoietic stem cells are one of the most promising cell types as several studies demonstrated their ability to improve ischemic cardiac functions by enhancing neovascularization and by reducing the total size of scar tissue. However, in order to procure sufficient numbers of functional stem cells, ex-vivo expansion technology became critically important. In this review, we focus on the state-of-the-art ex-vivo technology for the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, and the underlying mechanisms regulating stem cell self-renewal as well as differentiation.Keywords: ischemic heart disease, ex-vivo expansion, hematopoietic stem cells, cytokines, nanofibers

  19. [Results of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in hemoglobinopathies: thalassemia major and sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladun, R; Elorza, I; Olivé, T; Dapena, J L; Llort, A; Sánchez de Toledo, J; Díaz de Heredia, C

    2013-08-01

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in Spain is increasing as a result of immigration. Thalassemia major presents with chronic hemolytic anemia that requires regular red blood cell transfusions within the first year of life. Patients with sickle cell disease suffer from chronic anemia, vasculopathy and progressive damage in almost any organ. There is decreased life expectancy in both conditions. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation represents the only potentially curative option. Seventeen patients (fourteen thalassemia major, and three sickle cell disease) underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. In the thalassemia group, nine donors were HLA-geno-identical siblings, two were partially matched related donors (one HLA allele mismatch), and three unrelated donors. All three patients with sickle cell disease were transplanted from HLA-geno-identical siblings. The source of stem cells was bone marrow in sixteen cases. Median patient age at transplant was six years (range: 1-16) in the thalassemia group, and twelve years (range: 8-15) in the sickle cell disease group. The graft was successful in all patients. Secondary graft rejection was observed in two thalassemia patients rendering them dependent on blood transfusions. Complete chimerism was observed in thirteen patients and, although mixed chimerism occurred in two, with all of them showing normal hemoglobin levels after transplantation and not requiring further transfusion support. Patients affected by sickle cell disease did not present with new vaso-occlusive crises, and stabilization of pulmonary and neurological function was observed. Chronic graft-versus-host disease was detected in three patients affected by thalassemia, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in five patients. We conclude that for thalassemia major and sickle cell disease, allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from HLA-geno-identical siblings offers a high probability of complication-free survival

  20. Epigenetic Memory Underlies Cell-Autonomous Heterogeneous Behavior of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Vionnie W C; Yusuf, Rushdia Z; Oki, Toshihiko; Wu, Juwell; Saez, Borja; Wang, Xin; Cook, Colleen; Baryawno, Ninib; Ziller, Michael J; Lee, Eunjung; Gu, Hongcang; Meissner, Alexander; Lin, Charles P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Scadden, David T

    2016-11-17

    Stem cells determine homeostasis and repair of many tissues and are increasingly recognized as functionally heterogeneous. To define the extent of-and molecular basis for-heterogeneity, we overlaid functional, transcriptional, and epigenetic attributes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) at a clonal level using endogenous fluorescent tagging. Endogenous HSC had clone-specific functional attributes over time in vivo. The intra-clonal behaviors were highly stereotypic, conserved under the stress of transplantation, inflammation, and genotoxic injury, and associated with distinctive transcriptional, DNA methylation, and chromatin accessibility patterns. Further, HSC function corresponded to epigenetic configuration but not always to transcriptional state. Therefore, hematopoiesis under homeostatic and stress conditions represents the integrated action of highly heterogeneous clones of HSC with epigenetically scripted behaviors. This high degree of epigenetically driven cell autonomy among HSCs implies that refinement of the concepts of stem cell plasticity and of the stem cell niche is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation of Pancreatic Progenitor Cells with the Surface Marker of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxia Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To isolate pancreatic progenitor cells with the surface markers of hematopoietic stem cells, the expression of stem cell antigen (Sca-1 and c-Kit and the coexpression of them with pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1, neurogenin 3 (Ngn3, and insulin were examined in murine embryonic pancreas. Then different pancreatic cell subpopulations were isolated by magnet-activated cell sorting. Isolated cells were cultured overnight in hanging drops. When cells formed spheres, they were laid on floating filters at the air/medium interface. With this new culture system, pancreatic progenitor cells were induced to differentiate to endocrine and exocrine cells. It was shown that c-Kit and Sca-1 were expressed differently in embryonic pancreas at 12.5, 15.5, and 17.5 days of gestation. The expression of c-Kit and Sca-1 was the highest at 15.5 days of gestation. c-Kit rather than Sca-1 coexpressed with PDX-1, Ngn3, and insulin. Cells differentiated from c-Kit-positive cells contained more insulin-producing cells and secreted more insulin in response to glucose stimulation than that from c-Kit-negative cells. These results suggested that c-Kit could be used to isolate pancreatic progenitor cells and our new culture system permitted pancreatic progenitor cells to differentiate to mature endocrine cells.

  2. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28360916

  3. [Protective effects of amifostine on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells against chemotherapeutic damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-An; Li, Cui-Ping; Zhou, Min; Gao, Chong; Ding, Jia-Hua

    2004-12-01

    The aim was to study the protective effects of amifostine (AMF) on normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells against the chemotherapeutic damage from etoposide (VP-16). The cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNC), fresh and frozen peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC), and HL-60 cells were divided into AMF, AMF + VP-16, VP-16 and control groups, each group cell viability was determined by using trypan blue exclusion test, the CFU-GM culture was used to count cells, the apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. The results showed that in CBMNC, fresh and frozen PBSC samples, cell viability and the number of CFU-GM in AMF + VP-16 group were all significantly higher than those in VP-16 group (P GFU-GM life in AMF + VP-16 group was also longer than that of latter, in CBMNC samples, the number of CFU-GM in AMF groups was higher than that in control group, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups (P > 0.05), in HL-60 cell apoptotic rate in AMF + VP-16 group was little higher than that in VP-16 group, but no statistical significance between these two groups (P > 0.05). It is concluded that AMF can significantly protect normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells against the damage from VP-16. Moreover, AMF does not affect cytotoxity of VP-16 on HL-60 cells, and can not stimulate the growth and differentiation of cord hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells directly.

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies: Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Kerbauy, Fabio Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Andreza Alice Feitosa; Kutner, Jose Mauro; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Stape, Adalberto; Troster, Eduardo Juan; Zamperlini-Netto, Gabriele; Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini de; Carvalho, Bruna; Dorna, Mayra de Barros; Vilela, Marluce Dos Santos; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Cunha, Jose Marcos; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda Maria; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2011-06-01

    To report the experience of a tertiary care hospital with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies. Seven pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiencies (severe combined immunodeficiency: n = 2; combined immunodeficiency: n = 1; chronic granulomatous disease: n = 1; hyper-IgM syndrome: n = 2; and IPEX syndrome: n = 1) who underwent eight hematopoietic stem cell transplants in a single center, from 2007 to 2010, were studied. Two patients received transplants from HLA-identical siblings; the other six transplants were done with unrelated donors (bone marrow: n = 1; cord blood: n = 5). All patients had pre-existing infections before hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One patient received only anti-thymocyte globulin prior to transplant, three transplants were done with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and four transplants were done after myeloablative therapy. Two patients were not evaluated for engraftment due to early death. Three patients engrafted, two had primary graft failure and one received a second transplant with posterior engraftment. Two patients died of regimen related toxicity (hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome); one patient died of progressive respiratory failure due to Parainfluenza infection present prior to transplant. Four patients are alive and well from 60 days to 14 months after transplant. Patients' status prior to transplant is the most important risk factor on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplants in the treatment of these diseases. Early diagnosis and the possibility of a faster referral of these patients for treatment in reference centers may substantially improve their survival and quality of life.

  5. Long-term adverse effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on dental development in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pas-van Voskuilen, I. G. M.; Veerkamp, J. S. J.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Bresters, D.; van Wijk, A. J.; Barasch, A.; McNeal, S.; Gortzak, R. A. Th

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess late effects of cytotoxic therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) on dental development in survivors of childhood cancer. Forty children who underwent allogeneic HCT for a variety of hematological malignancies were evaluated at a minimum of

  6. Long-term adverse effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on dental development in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pas-Voskuilen, I.G.M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Bresters, D.; van Wijk, A.J.; Barasch, A.; McNeal, S.; Gortzak, R.A.T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess late effects of cytotoxic therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) on dental development in survivors of childhood cancer. Materials and methods: Forty children who underwent allogeneic HCT for a variety of hematological malignancies

  7. Epigenetic control of hematopoietic stem cell aging - The case of Ezh2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Gerald; Gerrits, Alice; Kanz, L; Weisel, KC; Dick, JE; Fibbe, WE

    2007-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells have potent, but not unlimited, selfrenewal potential. The mechanisms that restrict selfrenewal are likely to play a role during aging. Recent data suggest that the regulation of histone modifications by Polycomb group genes may be of crucial relevance to balance selfrenewal

  8. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as immunotherapy : B lymphocytes versus leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, M.A.

    2018-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on the role of B lymphocytes in graft versus leukemia responses following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high-risk

  9. Effectiveness of Partner Social Support Predicts Enduring Psychological Distress after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Christine; Redd, William H.; Austin, Jane; Mosher, Catherine E.; Meschian, Yeraz Markarian; Isola, Luis; Scigliano, Eileen; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza; Labay, Larissa E.; Rowley, Scott; Burkhalter, Jack E.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; DuHamel, Katherine N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors who are 1 to 3 years posttransplant are challenged by the need to resume valued social roles and activities--a task that may be complicated by enduring transplant-related psychological distress common in this patient population. The present study investigated whether transplant…

  10. Oral cyclosporine A treatment is feasible after myeloablative conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, M; Hovgaard, D; Schjødt, I M

    2015-01-01

    underwent myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Twenty-one patients (44%) tolerated CsA orally throughout the transplantation period without increased incidence of acute graft versus host disease(aGVHD). Low concentration of CsA in week 2 was associated with increased incidence of a...

  11. The prognostic value of YKL-40 concentrations in nonmyeloablative conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Anne Mette; Kornblit, Brian; Johansen, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    and plasma YKL-40 concentrations as prognostic biomarkers in a cohort of 149 patients treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies. Recipients with pretransplant YKL-40 concentrations above the age-adjusted 95th percentile (high) had...

  12. Graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storb, Rainer; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storer, Barry E

    2013-01-01

    We designed a minimal-intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies unable to tolerate high-intensity regimens because of age, serious comorbidities, or previous high-dose HCT. The regimen allows the purest...

  13. Bacterial meningitis in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: a population-based prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K. E. B.; Brouwer, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; van de Beek, D.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a nationwide prospective cohort study on the epidemiology and clinical features of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Patients with a medical history of autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were identified from the cohort performed from March

  14. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immune-r...

  15. Oral bacteria and yeasts in relationship to oral ulcerations in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.; von dem Borne, P.A.; Kuijper, E.J.; Kraneveld, E.A.; van Loveren, C.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral mucositis is a serious and debilitating side effect of conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Through HSCT, the homeostasis in the oral cavity is disrupted. The contribution of the oral microflora to mucositis remains to be clarified. The aim of our

  16. Oral bacteria and yeasts in relationship to oral ulcerations in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, Alexa M. G. A.; de Soet, Johannes J.; von dem Borne, Peter A.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Kraneveld, Eefje A.; van Loveren, Cor; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a serious and debilitating side effect of conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Through HSCT, the homeostasis in the oral cavity is disrupted. The contribution of the oral microflora to mucositis remains to be clarified. The aim of our study was to

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies: Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Folloni Fernandes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the experience of a tertiary care hospital withallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children withprimary immunodeficiencies. Methods: Seven patients with primaryimmunodeficiencies (severe combined immunodeficiency: n = 2;combined immunodeficiency: n = 1; chronic granulomatous disease:n = 1; hyper-IgM syndrome: n = 2; and IPEX syndrome: n = 1who underwent eight hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTin a single center, from 2007 to 2010, were studied. Results: Twopatients received transplants from HLA-identical siblings; the othersix transplants were done with unrelated donors (bone marrow: n= 1; cord blood: n = 5. All patients had pre-existing infectionsbefore hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One patient receivedonly anti-thymocyte globulin prior to transplant, three transplantswere done with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and fourtransplants were done after myeloablative therapy. Two patientswere not evaluable for engraftment due to early death. Three patientsengrafted, two had primary graft failure and one received a secondtransplant with posterior engraftment. Two patients died of regimenrelated toxicity (hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome; one patient died of progressive respiratory failure due to Parainfluenza infection diagnosed prior to transplant. Four patients are alive and well from 60 days to 14 months after transplant. Conclusion: Patients’ status prior to transplant is the most important risk factor on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplants in the treatment of these diseases. Early diagnosis and the possibility of a faster referral of these patients for treatment in reference centers may substantially improve their survival and quality of life.

  18. Risk Factors for Subsequent Central Nervous System Tumors in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Melissa; Shaw, Bronwen E; Brazauskas, Ruta

    2017-01-01

    Survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are at risk of subsequent solid tumors, including central nervous system (CNS) tumors. The risk of CNS tumors after HCT in pediatric HCT recipients is not known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CNS tumors in pediatric recipients...

  19. Apoptosis-Related Gene Expression Profiling in Hematopoietic Cell Fractions of MDS Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MC Langemeijer, Saskia; Mariani, Niccolo; Knops, Ruth; Gilissen, Christian; Woestenenk, Rob; de Witte, Theo; Huls, Gerwin; van der Reijden, Bert A.; Jansen, Joop H.

    2016-01-01

    Although the vast majority of patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) suffer from cytopenias, the bone marrow is usually normocellular or hypercellular. Apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow has been implicated in this phenomenon. However, in MDS it remains only partially

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Europe 2014 : more than 40 000 transplants annually

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passweg, J. R.; Baldomero, H.; Bader, P.; Bonini, C.; Cesaro, S.; Dreger, P.; Duarte, R. F.; Dufour, C.; Kuball, J.; Farge-Bancel, D.; Gennery, A.; Kröger, N.; Lanza, F.; Nagler, A.; Sureda, A.; Mohty, M.

    2016-01-01

    A record number of 40 829 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 36 469 patients (15 765 allogeneic (43%), 20 704 autologous (57%)) were reported by 656 centers in 47 countries to the 2014 survey. Trends include: continued growth in transplant activity, more so in Eastern European

  1. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina; Pontoppidan, Peter; Uhlving, Hilde Hylland

    2017-01-01

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immun...

  2. The incidence, mortality and timing of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia after hematopoietic cell transplantation : A CIBMTR analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, K. M.; Ahn, K. W.; Chen, M.; Aljurf, M. D.; Agwu, A. L.; Chen, A. R.; Walsh, T. J.; Szabolcs, P.; Boeckh, M. J.; Auletta, J. J.; Lindemans, C. A.; Zanis-Neto, J.; Malvezzi, M.; Lister, J.; De Toledo Codina, J. S.; Sackey, K.; Chakrabarty, J. L H; Ljungman, P.; Wingard, J. R.; Seftel, M. D.; Seo, S.; Hale, G. A.; Wirk, B.; Smith, M S; Savani, B. N.; Lazarus, H. M.; Marks, D. I.; Ustun, C.; Abdel-Azim, H.; Dvorak, C. C.; Szer, J.; Storek, J.; Yong, A.; Riches, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP) is associated with high morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Little is known about PJP infections after HSCT because of the rarity of disease given routine prophylaxis. We report the results of a Center for International

  3. Pericarditis mediated by respiratory syncytial virus in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubach, M P; Pavlisko, E N; Perfect, J R

    2013-08-01

    We describe a case of pericarditis and large pericardial effusion in a 63-year-old African-American man undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma. Pericardial tissue biopsy demonstrated fibrinous pericarditis, and immunohistochemistry stains were positive for respiratory syncytial virus. The patient improved with oral ribavirin and intravenous immune globulin infusions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. The Effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles on Hematopoietic Stem Cells Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamze Timari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are multipotent stem cells, with self-renewal ability as well as ability to generate all blood cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells, with self-renewal ability, and capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types. MSCs have supporting effects on hematopoiesis; through direct intercellular communications as well as secreting cytokines, chemokines, and extracellular vesicles (EVs. Recent investigations demonstrated that some biological functions and effects of MSCs are mediated by their EVs. MSC-EVs are the cell membrane and endosomal membrane compartments, which are important mediators in the intercellular communications. MSC-EVs contain some of the molecules such as proteins, mRNA, siRNA, and miRNA from their parental cells. MSC-EVs are able to inhibit tumor, repair damaged tissue, and modulate immune system responses. MSC-EVs compared to their parental cells, may have the specific safety advantages such as the lower potential to trigger immune system responses and limited side effects. Recently some studies demonstrated the effect of MSC-EVs on the expansion, differentiation, and clinical applications of HSCs such as improvement of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and inhibition of graft versus host disease (GVHD. HSCT may be the only therapeutic choice for patients who suffer from malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders. However, there are several severe side effects such GVHD that restricts the successfulness of HSCT. In this review, we will discuss the most important effects of MSCs and MSC-EVs on the improvement of HSCT, inhibition and treatment of GVHD, as well as, on the expansion of HSCs.

  5. Comparison of immunological characteristics of peripheral, splenic and tonsilar naïve B cells by differential gene expression meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokeshai-u-saha, Kaj; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Grieco, Luca; Nguyen, Catherine; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2012-12-01

    Naïve B cells isolated from peripheral blood, spleen and tonsil are commonly used in human B cell studies. However, little has been written about their possible variations in immunological properties. This study compared differential gene expression in human naive B subsets by meta-analysis using expression data available in Gene Expression Onimbus (GEO). Gene expression files of the Affymetrix Human Genome U133A Array (Affymetrix) were downloaded to collect 21 total array data samples of peripheral naïve B cells (n=10), splenic naïve B cells (n=2), tonsilar naïve B cells (n=3), peripheral memory B cells (n=4) and splenic memory B cells (n=2). Prior to differential gene expression analyses, data were normalized in order to reduce non-biological variation among the datasets. Comparisons of peripheral naive B cells with their splenic and tonsilar counterparts showed remarkable differences in terms of gene expression (29 and 202 genes, respectively). However, only minor differences were detected between splenic and tonsilar naive B cells (10 genes), consistent with the clustering results classifying both of them as lymphoid naive B cells. Differential gene expression results also implied higher stimulating states of lymphoid naive B cells when compared with peripheral blood naive B cells. These included enhanced expressions of CD27, CR2, EGR1, GADD45B, ICAM1, ICOSLG, IGHA, IL6, MMP9, SAMSN1, SMAD7, TNFAIP3, but reduced HLA-DOB expression. Our findings suggest that results generated from peripheral naive B cells may not always be applicable to the biological activities of other lymphoid naïve B cells. Nonetheless, further biological study is warranted.

  6. Splenic Marginal Zone Granulocytes Acquire an Accentuated Neutrophil B-Cell Helper Phenotype in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

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    Gätjen, Marcel; Brand, Franziska; Grau, Michael; Gerlach, Kerstin; Kettritz, Ralph; Westermann, Jörg; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Lenz, Peter; Lenz, Georg; Höpken, Uta E; Rehm, Armin

    2016-09-15

    Recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and neutrophils (TAM and TAN) to solid tumors contributes to immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment; however, their contributions to lymphoid neoplasms are less clear. In human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), tumor B cells lodge in lymph nodes where interactions with the microenvironment occur. Tumor cell homing stimulates proliferation, such that engagement of the B-cell receptor is important for malignant progression. In the Eμ-Tcl1 murine model of CLL, we identified gene expression signatures indicative of a skewed polarization in the phenotype of monocytes and neutrophils. Selective ablation of either of these cell populations in mice delayed leukemia growth. Despite tumor infiltration of these immune cells, a systemic inflammation was not detected. Notably, in progressive CLL, splenic neutrophils were observed to differentiate toward a B-cell helper phenotype, a process promoted by the induction of leukemia-associated IL10 and TGFβ. Our results suggest that targeting aberrant neutrophil differentiation and restoring myeloid cell homeostasis could limit the formation of survival niches for CLL cells. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5253-65. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

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    Jiaming Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR. All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM observation, forced swim test (FST, the open field test (OFT, the chromosome aberration (CA, the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA, the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT, and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR.

  8. The kinetic alteration of hematopoietic stem cells irradiated by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junya; Ojima, Mitsuaki; Kai, Michiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) brings oxidative stress, and can cause damages not only on DNA but also proteins and lipids in mammalian cells, and increases the mitochondria-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the subsequent induction of cell death, cell cycle arrest, and stress related responses. It is well known that IR induces acute myeloid leukemia that originates in hematopoietic cells. However, the mechanisms of leukemogenesis following IR remain unclear. To clarify these mechanisms, it is necessary to quantify the several biological events induced by IR in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we focus and summarize several recent findings, especially survival/clonogenic potential, cell cycle distribution, generation of ROS, DNA damage/repair, chromosomal abbreviation, and senescence. (author)

  9. Functional analysis of human hematopoietic stem cell gene expression using zebrafish.

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    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Although several reports have characterized the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transcriptome, the roles of HSC-specific genes in hematopoiesis remain elusive. To identify candidate regulators of HSC fate decisions, we compared the transcriptome of human umbilical cord blood and bone marrow (CD34+(CD33-(CD38-Rho(lo(c-kit+ cells, enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with (CD34+(CD33-(CD38-Rho(hi cells, enriched in committed progenitors. We identified 277 differentially expressed transcripts conserved in these ontogenically distinct cell sources. We next performed a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO-based functional screen in zebrafish to determine the hematopoietic function of 61 genes that had no previously known function in HSC biology and for which a likely zebrafish ortholog could be identified. MO knock down of 14/61 (23% of the differentially expressed transcripts resulted in hematopoietic defects in developing zebrafish embryos, as demonstrated by altered levels of circulating blood cells at 30 and 48 h postfertilization and subsequently confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for erythroid-specific hbae1 and myeloid-specific lcp1 transcripts. Recapitulating the knockdown phenotype using a second MO of independent sequence, absence of the phenotype using a mismatched MO sequence, and rescue of the phenotype by cDNA-based overexpression of the targeted transcript for zebrafish spry4 confirmed the specificity of MO targeting in this system. Further characterization of the spry4-deficient zebrafish embryos demonstrated that hematopoietic defects were not due to more widespread defects in the mesodermal development, and therefore represented primary defects in HSC specification, proliferation, and/or differentiation. Overall, this high-throughput screen for the functional validation of differentially expressed genes using a zebrafish model of hematopoiesis represents a major step toward obtaining meaningful information from global

  10. Chasing the precursor of functional hematopoietic stem cells at the single cell levels in mouse embryos.

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    Wang, Xiaochen; Gong, Yuemin; Ema, Hideo

    2016-07-22

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the ideal system for regenerative research, were isolated at single cell levels decades ago, whereas studies on embryonic HSCs are much more difficult. Zhou et al identified a new pre-HSC cell surface marker, CD201, by which they isolated pre-HSCs at single cell levels for further analyses. The novel expression pattern of HSC development is revealed, including the fundamental role of mammalian targets of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in HSCs emergence, and the repopulation potential of S/G2/M phase pre-HSCs. Deeper understandings of the cellular origin and developmental regulatory network of HSCs are essential to develop new strategies of generating HSCs in vitro for clinical application.

  11. Bone marrow laminins influence hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell cycling and homing to the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susek, Katharina Helene; Korpos, Eva; Huppert, Jula; Wu, Chuan; Savelyeva, Irina; Rosenbauer, Frank; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Koschmieder, Steffen; Sorokin, Lydia

    2018-01-31

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) functions are regulated by a specialized microenvironment in the bone marrow - the hematopoietic stem cell niche - of which the extracellular matrix (ECM) is an integral component. We describe here the localization of ECM molecules, in particular the laminin α4, α3 and α5 containing isoforms in the bone marrow. Laminin 421 (composed of laminin α4, β2, γ1 chains) is identified as a major component of the bone marrow ECM, occurring abundantly surrounding venous sinuses and in a specialized reticular fiber network of the intersinusoidal spaces of murine bone marrow (BM) in close association with HSPC. Bone marrow from Lama4 -/- mice is significantly less efficient in reconstituting the hematopoietic system of irradiated wildtype (WT) recipients in competitive bone marrow transplantation assays and shows reduced colony formation in vitro. This is partially due to retention of Lin - c-kit + Sca-1 + CD48 - long-term and short-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSC/ST-HSC) in the G0 phase of the cell cycle in Lama4 -/- bone marrow and hence a more quiescent phenotype. In addition, the extravasation of WT BM cells into Lama4 -/- bone marrow is impaired, influencing the recirculation of HSPC. Our data suggest that these effects are mediated by a compensatory expression of laminin α5 containing isoforms (laminin 521/522) in Lama4 -/- bone marrow. Collectively, these intrinsic and extrinsic effects lead to reduced HSPC numbers in Lama4 -/- bone marrow and reduced hematopoietic potential. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute adrenergic stress inhibits proliferation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells via p38/MAPK signaling.

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    Schraml, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Robert; Kotzbeck, Petra; Grillari, Johannes; Schauenstein, Konrad

    2009-03-01

    Acute adrenergic stress is a cause of hematopoietic failure that accompanies severe injury. Although the communication between neuronal and immune system is well documented and catecholamines are known as important regulators of homeostasis, the molecular mechanisms of hematopoietic failure are not well understood. To study the influence of adrenergic stress on hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), which recently have been found to express adrenergic receptors, Lin(-),Sca(+), cells were isolated and treated with alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists in vitro. Indeed, this stimulation resulted in significantly decreased colony formation capacity using granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming unit assays. This decline was dependent on the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of the p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, since the addition of antioxidants or a p38 inhibitor restored CFU formation. DNA damage by adrenergically induced ROS, however, does not seem to account for the reduction of colonies. Thus, catecholamine/p38/MAPK is identified as a key signal transduction pathway in HPCs besides those dependent on Wnt, Notch, and sonic hedgehog. Furthermore, a well-known target of p38 signaling, p16 is transcriptionally activated after adrenergic stimulation, suggesting that cell cycle arrest might importantly contribute to hematopoietic failure and immune dysfunctions after severe injury. Since increased levels of catecholamines are also observed in other conditions, such as during aging which is linked with decline of immune functions, adrenergic stress might as well contribute to the lowered immune defence in the elderly.

  13. Endothelium and NOTCH specify and amplify aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Hadland, Brandon K; Varnum-Finney, Barbara; Poulos, Michael G; Moon, Randall T; Butler, Jason M; Rafii, Shahin; Bernstein, Irwin D

    2015-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) first emerge during embryonic development within vessels such as the dorsal aorta of the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, suggesting that signals from the vascular microenvironment are critical for HSC development. Here, we demonstrated that AGM-derived endothelial cells (ECs) engineered to constitutively express AKT (AGM AKT-ECs) can provide an in vitro niche that recapitulates embryonic HSC specification and amplification. Specifically, nonengrafting embryonic precursors, including the VE-cadherin-expressing population that lacks hematopoietic surface markers, cocultured with AGM AKT-ECs specified into long-term, adult-engrafting HSCs, establishing that a vascular niche is sufficient to induce the endothelial-to-HSC transition in vitro. Subsequent to hematopoietic induction, coculture with AGM AKT-ECs also substantially increased the numbers of HSCs derived from VE-cadherin⁺CD45⁺ AGM hematopoietic cells, consistent with a role in supporting further HSC maturation and self-renewal. We also identified conditions that included NOTCH activation with an immobilized NOTCH ligand that were sufficient to amplify AGM-derived HSCs following their specification in the absence of AGM AKT-ECs. Together, these studies begin to define the critical niche components and resident signals required for HSC induction and self-renewal ex vivo, and thus provide insight for development of defined in vitro systems targeted toward HSC generation for therapeutic applications.

  14. In vivo suppression of HIV by antigen specific T cells derived from engineered hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available The HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response is a critical component in controlling viral replication in vivo, but ultimately fails in its ability to eradicate the virus. Our intent in these studies is to develop ways to enhance and restore the HIV-specific CTL response to allow long-term viral suppression or viral clearance. In our approach, we sought to genetically manipulate human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs such that they differentiate into mature CTL that will kill HIV infected cells. To perform this, we molecularly cloned an HIV-specific T cell receptor (TCR from CD8+ T cells that specifically targets an epitope of the HIV-1 Gag protein. This TCR was then used to genetically transduce HSCs. These HSCs were then introduced into a humanized mouse containing human fetal liver, fetal thymus, and hematopoietic progenitor cells, and were allowed to differentiate into mature human CD8+ CTL. We found human, HIV-specific CTL in multiple tissues in the mouse. Thus, genetic modification of human HSCs with a cloned TCR allows proper differentiation of the cells to occur in vivo, and these cells migrate to multiple anatomic sites, mimicking what is seen in humans. To determine if the presence of the transgenic, HIV-specific TCR has an effect on suppressing HIV replication, we infected with HIV-1 mice expressing the transgenic HIV-specific TCR and, separately, mice expressing a non-specific control TCR. We observed significant suppression of HIV replication in multiple organs in the mice expressing the HIV-specific TCR as compared to control, indicating that the presence of genetically modified HIV-specific CTL can form a functional antiviral response in vivo. These results strongly suggest that stem cell based gene therapy may be a feasible approach in the treatment of chronic viral infections and provide a foundation towards the development of this type of strategy.

  15. Nucleofection, an efficient nonviral method to transfer genes into human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Levetzow, Gregor; Spanholtz, Jan; Beckmann, Julia; Fischer, Johannes; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Punzel, Michael; Giebel, Bernd

    2006-04-01

    The targeted manipulation of the genetic program of single cells as well as of complete organisms has strongly enhanced our understanding of cellular and developmental processes and should also help to increase our knowledge of primary human stem cells, e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), within the next few years. An essential requirement for such genetic approaches is the existence of a reliable and efficient method to introduce genetic elements into living cells. Retro- and lentiviral techniques are efficient in transducing primary human HSCs, but remain labor and time consuming and require special safety conditions, which do not exist in many laboratories. In our study, we have optimized the nucleofection technology, a modified electroporation strategy, to introduce plasmid DNA into freshly isolated human HSC-enriched CD34(+) cells. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-encoding plasmids, we obtained transfection efficiencies of approximately 80% and a mean survival rate of 50%. Performing functional assays using GFU-GEMM and long-term culture initiating cells (LTC-IC), we demonstrate that apart from a reduction in the survival rate the nucleofection method itself does not recognizably change the short- or long-term cell fate of primitive hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we conclude, the nucleofection method is a reliable and efficient method to manipulate primitive hematopoietic cells genetically.

  16. Combined influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on maintenance and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramia, David; Müller, Eike; Müller, Katrin; Atallah, Passant; Tsurkan, Mikhail; Freudenberg, Uwe; Bornhäuser, Martin; Werner, Carsten

    2017-09-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) is controlled by a combination of biochemical and biophysical environmental cues in the bone marrow (BM) niche, where a tight balance of quiescence and proliferation of HSPC is maintained. Specifically, alongside soluble factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, spatial confinement and ECM stiffness have been recognized to be critical for regulation of HSPC fate. Here we employ a modular, glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-based biohybrid hydrogel system to balance proliferation of human HSPC and maintenance of quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) through simultaneous regulation of exogenous biochemical and biophysical cues. Our results demonstrate that HSPC respond to increased spatial confinement with lowered proliferation and cell cycling, which results in higher frequency of quiescent LTC-IC (long-term culture initiating cells), while GAG-rich 3D environments further support maintenance of the cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Circulating hematopoietic progenitors and CD34(+) cells predicted successful hematopoietic stem cell harvest in myeloma and lymphoma patients: experiences from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jui-Ting; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Yang, Youngsen; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Hwang, Wen-Li; Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the numbers of both circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) and CD34(+) cell are positively correlated with CD34(+) cell harvest yield. However, the minimal numbers of both circulating HPCs and CD34(+) cells required for performing an efficient hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) harvest in lymphoma and myeloma patients have not been defined in our institution. Medical records of 50 lymphoma and myeloma patients undergoing peripheral blood HSC harvest in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The minimal and optimal HSC harvest yield required for the treatment was considered to be ≥2×10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg and ≥5×10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg, respectively. The minimally required or optimal HSC yield obtained was not influenced by age (≥60 years), sex, underlying malignancies, disease status, multiple rounds of chemotherapy, or history of radiotherapy. The numbers of both circulating HPC and CD34(+) cell were higher in patients with minimally required HSC yields (P=0.000 for HPC and P=0.000 for CD34(+) cell) and also in patients with optimal HSC yields (P=0.011 for HPC and P=0.006 for CD34(+) cell). The cell count cutoff for obtaining minimally required HSC harvest was determined to be 20/mm(3) for HPCs and 10/mm(3) for CD34(+) cells. Furthermore, the cell count cutoff for obtaining optimal HSC harvest was determined to be 60/mm(3) for HPCs and 35/mm(3) for CD34(+) cells. A total of 60/mm(3) of HPCs and 35/mm(3) of CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood predicted optimal HSC harvest in lymphoma and myeloma patients.

  18. Intrathymic injection of hematopoietic progenitor cells establishes functional T cell development in a mouse model of severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, Andrea Z; Thornton, Raymond H; O'Reilly, Richard J; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Zakrzewski, Johannes L

    2017-05-16

    Even though hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be curative in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency, there is a need for additional strategies boosting T cell immunity in individuals suffering from genetic disorders of lymphoid development. Here we show that image-guided intrathymic injection of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in NOD-scid IL2rγ null mice is feasible and facilitates the generation of functional T cells conferring protective immunity. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy C57BL/6 mice (wild-type, Luciferase + , CD45.1 + ) and injected intravenously or intrathymically into both male and female, young or aged NOD-scid IL2rγ null recipients. The in vivo fate of injected cells was analyzed by bioluminescence imaging and flow cytometry of thymus- and spleen-derived T cell populations. In addition to T cell reconstitution, we evaluated mice for evidence of immune dysregulation based on diabetes development and graft-versus-host disease. T cell immunity following intrathymic injection of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in NOD-scid IL2rγ null mice was assessed in a B cell lymphoma model. Despite the small size of the thymic remnant in NOD-scid IL2rγ null mice, we were able to accomplish precise intrathymic delivery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells by ultrasound-guided injection. Thymic reconstitution following intrathymic injection of healthy allogeneic hematopoietic cells was most effective in young male recipients, indicating that even in the setting of severe immunodeficiency, sex and age are important variables for thymic function. Allogeneic T cells generated in intrathymically injected NOD-scid IL2rγ null mice displayed anti-lymphoma activity in vivo, but we found no evidence for severe auto/alloreactivity in T cell-producing NOD-scid IL2rγ null mice, suggesting that immune dysregulation is not a major concern. Our findings suggest that intrathymic

  19. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

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    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  20. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells In Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

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    Young-Ho Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg require activation through the T cell receptor for function. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells are believed to be key players of the immune tolerance network and control the induction and effector phase of the immune system. Although these cells require antigen-specific activation, they are generally able to suppress bystander T cell responses once activated. This raises the possibility that antigen-specific Treg may be useful therapeutically by localizing generalized suppressive activity to tissues expressing select target antigens. Treg can exert a potent suppressive effect on immune effector cells reactive to host antigens and prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Here, we observed that co-transfer of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells derived from donor type along with the donor bone marrow cells could control GVHD-like reactions by suppressing effectors cells of host responding to the donor hematopoietic compartment, and resulted in prevention of autoimmunity and rejection. We further demonstrate that CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells can control immune-based morbidity after allogeneic BMT by suppressing the development of granulocytes cells and increasing the level of B cell expression.

  1. The biology of NK cells and their receptors affects clinical outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Bree; Felices, Martin; Cichocki, Frank; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were first identified for their capacity to reject bone marrow allografts in lethally irradiated mice without prior sensitization. Subsequently, human NK cells were detected and defined by their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity toward transformed or virally infected target cells. Karre et al. later proposed 'the missing self hypothesis' to explain the mechanism by which self-tolerant cells could kill targets that had lost self MHC class I. Subsequently, the receptors that recognize MHC class I to mediate tolerance in the host were identified on NK cells. These class I-recognizing receptors contribute to the acquisition of function by a dynamic process known as NK cell education or licensing. In the past, NK cells were assumed to be short lived, but more recently NK cells have been shown to mediate immunologic memory to secondary exposures to cytomegalovirus infection. Because of their ability to lyse tumors with aberrant MHC class I expression and to produce cytokines and chemokines upon activation, NK cells may be primed by many stimuli, including viruses and inflammation, to contribute to a graft-versus-tumor effect. In addition, interactions with other immune cells support the therapeutic potential of NK cells to eradicate tumor and to enhance outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Psychological and cytokine changes in children and adolescents undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munitz-Shenkar, Dafna; Krulik, Tamar; Peretz, Chava; Shiloh, Roni; Elhasid, Ronit; Toren, Amos; Weizman, Abraham

    2007-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic option of a large variety of diseases. It involves several physiological and psychological changes. Investigations of mood changes in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are common. There are no studies however, on the relationship between changes in mood and physiological changes in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and adolescents. We investigated the correlation between anxiety, depression and serum Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2 and IL-6. Participants, 11 boys and 12 girls, aged 6-18 years, were administered the Children Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory for Children (SAIC), at four different points in time: at conditioning time when treatment is initiated (time 1 = T1), on the day of hematopoietic transplantation (T2), on the day of engraftment (T3) and a week after the engraftment (T4). At each of those times serum samples for cytokines determination were collected as well. Up to the time of engraftment depression and anxiety were relatively high but resolved subsequently. Globally, there was a significant time effect for anxiety (p = 0.0082). Namely, scores differ between times. Depression showed a similar trend, though this trend did not reach significance (p = 0.1394). Negative correlation was found between serum IL-1beta, IL-2 and IL-6 levels and anxiety (IL-2 and IL-6) and depression scores (IL-1beta and IL-2) at T4. The complex interaction between cytokines, depression and anxiety in children and adolescents undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation merits further long-term studies under natural conditions and on laboratory models.

  3. T. brucei infection reduces B lymphopoiesis in bone marrow and truncates compensatory splenic lymphopoiesis through transitional B-cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viki Bockstal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extracellular protozoan parasites that cause the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis in humans and contribute to the animal counterpart, Nagana. Trypanosome clearance from the bloodstream is mediated by antibodies specific for their Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG coat antigens. However, T. brucei infection induces polyclonal B cell activation, B cell clonal exhaustion, sustained depletion of mature splenic Marginal Zone B (MZB and Follicular B (FoB cells, and destruction of the B-cell memory compartment. To determine how trypanosome infection compromises the humoral immune defense system we used a C57BL/6 T. brucei AnTat 1.1 mouse model and multicolor flow cytometry to document B cell development and maturation during infection. Our results show a more than 95% reduction in B cell precursor numbers from the CLP, pre-pro-B, pro-B, pre-B and immature B cell stages in the bone marrow. In the spleen, T. brucei induces extramedullary B lymphopoiesis as evidenced by significant increases in HSC-LMPP, CLP, pre-pro-B, pro-B and pre-B cell populations. However, final B cell maturation is abrogated by infection-induced apoptosis of transitional B cells of both the T1 and T2 populations which is not uniquely dependent on TNF-, Fas-, or prostaglandin-dependent death pathways. Results obtained from ex vivo co-cultures of living bloodstream form trypanosomes and splenocytes demonstrate that trypanosome surface coat-dependent contact with T1/2 B cells triggers their deletion. We conclude that infection-induced and possibly parasite-contact dependent deletion of transitional B cells prevents replenishment of mature B cell compartments during infection thus contributing to a loss of the host's capacity to sustain antibody responses against recurring parasitemic waves.

  4. Meningoencephalitis, pancytopenia, pulmonary insufficiency and splenic abscess in a patient with brucellosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cokca, F.; Yilmaz-Bozkurt, G.; Azap, A.; Memikoglu, O.; Takeli, E.

    2006-01-01

    A complicated case of brucellosis with some rare features is reported. Brucellosis is a multisystematic disease. However, disseminated brucellosis with cerebral, pulmonary, hematopoietic and splenic involvement in an otherwise healthy patient is a rare event. In this article, we report a case of disseminated brucellosis who was initially diagnosed as myeldoplastic syndrome (MDS) and meningoencephalitis, pulmonary symptoms, and splenic abscess formation occurred thereafter. (author)

  5. Relationship between Mixed Donor–Recipient Chimerism and Disease Recurrence after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, Allistair; Hsieh, Matthew; Eapen, Mary; Fitzhugh, Courtney; Carreras, Jeanette; Keesler, Daniel; Guilcher, Gregory; Kamani, Naynesh; Walters, Mark C.; Boelens, Jaap J.; Tisdale, John; Shenoy, Shalini

    2017-01-01

    Mixed donor chimerism after hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease (SCD) can result in resolution of disease symptoms, but symptoms recur when donor chimerism is critically low. The relationship between chimerism, hemoglobin S (HbS) level, and symptomatic disease was correlated

  6. Stem cell factor induces phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase-dependent Lyn/Tec/Dok-1 complex formation in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T. B.; van den Akker, E.; Amelsvoort, M. P.; Mano, H.; Löwenberg, B.; von Lindern, M.

    2000-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) has an important role in the proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration of hematopoietic cells. SCF exerts its effects by binding to cKit, a receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-K) by cKit was

  7. Clinical Relevance of Natural Killer Cells Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M Palmer, Kamalakannan Rajasekaran, Monica S Thakar, Subramaniam Malarkannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are one of the first cells to recover following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and are believed to play an important role in facilitating engraftment or preventing post-transplant infection and tumor recurrence. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the mechanisms by which NK cells mediate these highly clinically relevant immunological functions. In particular, the ability of NK cells to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD and increase the graft versus leukemia effect (GVL in the setting of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical HSCT highlights their clinical potentials. NK cells also mediate anti-viral protection, in particular against cytomegalovirus (CMV, an infection that causes significant morbidity and mortality following transplant. Another crucial function of NK cells is providing protection against bacterial infections at the mucosal barriers. NK cells achieve this by promoting anti-microbial defenses and regeneration of epithelial cells. These recent exciting findings provide a strong basis for the formulation of novel NK cell-based immunotherapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances related to the mechanisms, functions, and future clinical prospects of NK cells that can impact post-transplant outcomes.

  8. Novel therapeutic strategies to target leukemic cells that hijack compartmentalized continuous hematopoietic stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Vashendriya V V; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Carraway, Hetty E; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Molenaar, Remco J

    2017-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells hijack hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in the bone marrow and become leukemic stem cells (LSCs) at the expense of normal HSCs. LSCs are quiescent and resistant to chemotherapy and can cause relapse of the disease. HSCs in niches are needed to generate blood cell precursors that are committed to unilineage differentiation and eventually production of mature blood cells, including red blood cells, megakaryocytes, myeloid cells and lymphocytes. Thus far, three types of HSC niches are recognized: endosteal, reticular and perivascular niches. However, we argue here that there is only one type of HSC niche, which consists of a periarteriolar compartment and a perisinusoidal compartment. In the periarteriolar compartment, hypoxia and low levels of reactive oxygen species preserve the HSC pool. In the perisinusoidal compartment, hypoxia in combination with higher levels of reactive oxygen species enables proliferation of progenitor cells and their mobilization into the circulation. Because HSC niches offer protection to LSCs against chemotherapy, we review novel therapeutic strategies to inhibit homing of LSCs in niches for the prevention of dedifferentiation of leukemic cells into LSCs and to stimulate migration of leukemic cells out of niches. These strategies enhance differentiation and proliferation and thus sensitize leukemic cells to chemotherapy. Finally, we list clinical trials of therapies that tackle LSCs in HSC niches to circumvent their protection against chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  10. [Adjunctive reflections on history of hematopoietic stem cell study--editorial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pei-Xian

    2005-10-01

    The article reviews concisely around the history of hematopoietic stem cell research, basic and clinical, since its very beginning after the nuclear explosions at the end of the Second World War, that explains why the stem cell study in the world began with the hematopoietic stem cells and the existence of non-hematopoietic stem cell in vivo had been left out of account for many decades till 21st century. During 50-60s of the last century, it was known from the animal experiments that there must be hematopoietic stem cells existing in vivo and believed that the effective bone marrow transplant is actually the stem cell transplantation. It is reviewed how the basic studies of stem cell interacted with the clinical stem cell transplantation and how great the contribution was given to strongly push forward the development of contemporary stem cell biology and modern hematology from the basic studies especially in the immunological and molecular biological fields, for instance, the applications of HLA technology and monoclonal antibody produced, flow cytometry, and genetic recombinant cytokines, the novel technique for gene cloning, genomics, proteomics, and iRNA as well as bioinformatics. It has lead to the pluralistic cell therapy as a novel trend in stem cell transplantation as to combine immunotherapy and mesenchymal stem cells with the conventional stem cell transplants. This paper looks back in the past several decades, however, on every achievement of stem cell study that were usually accompanied with some idealistic one-sidedness or even errors in design and conclusion of some experiments. Usually it took a period of 2 or even 4 decades to clarify some basic idea, that seemed normal in the science development, for examples, the dividing line between the hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cells, possibility to expand or clone the real stem cell ex vivo, and whether the majority of leukemias are originated from stem cell level, etc. Towards the end of 20th

  11. Donor-Derived Smoldering Multiple Myeloma following a Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Fakhri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD is one of the most common malignancies complicating solid organ transplantation. In contrast, PTLD accounts for a minority of secondary cancers following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. Here we report on a 61-year-old woman who received an ABO-mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation from a presumably healthy donor for a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Eighteen months following her transplant, she developed a monoclonal gammopathy. Bone marrow studies revealed 10% plasma cells, but the patient lacked clinical defining features of multiple myeloma (MM; thus a diagnosis of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM was established. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of the bone marrow confirmed the plasma cells were donor-derived. The donor lacks a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, SMM, or MM.

  12. Donor-Derived Smoldering Multiple Myeloma following a Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Bita; Fiala, Mark; Slade, Michael; Westervelt, Peter; Ghobadi, Armin

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) is one of the most common malignancies complicating solid organ transplantation. In contrast, PTLD accounts for a minority of secondary cancers following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Here we report on a 61-year-old woman who received an ABO-mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation from a presumably healthy donor for a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighteen months following her transplant, she developed a monoclonal gammopathy. Bone marrow studies revealed 10% plasma cells, but the patient lacked clinical defining features of multiple myeloma (MM); thus a diagnosis of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) was established. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of the bone marrow confirmed the plasma cells were donor-derived. The donor lacks a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, SMM, or MM.

  13. Different Motile Behaviors of Human Hematopoietic Stem versus Progenitor Cells at the Osteoblastic Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Foster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in our understanding of interactions between mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and their niche, little is known about communication between human HSCs and the microenvironment. Using a xenotransplantation model and intravital imaging, we demonstrate that human HSCs display distinct motile behaviors to their hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC counterparts, and the same pattern can be found between mouse HSCs and HPCs. HSCs become significantly less motile after transplantation, while progenitor cells remain motile. We show that human HSCs take longer to find their niche than previously expected and suggest that the niche be defined as the position where HSCs stop moving. Intravital imaging is the only technique to determine where in the bone marrow stem cells stop moving, and future analyses should focus on the environment surrounding the HSC at this point.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cells are acutely sensitive to Acd shelterin gene inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Morgan; Osawa, Gail; Regal, Joshua A; Weinberg, Daniel N; Taggart, James; Kocak, Hande; Friedman, Ann; Ferguson, David O; Keegan, Catherine E; Maillard, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The shelterin complex plays dual functions in telomere homeostasis by recruiting telomerase and preventing the activation of a DNA damage response at telomeric ends. Somatic stem cells require telomerase activity, as evidenced by progressive stem cell loss leading to bone marrow failure in hereditary dyskeratosis congenita. Recent work demonstrates that dyskeratosis congenita can also arise from mutations in specific shelterin genes, although little is known about shelterin functions in somatic stem cells. We found that mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are acutely sensitive to inactivation of the shelterin gene Acd, encoding TPP1. Homozygosity for a hypomorphic acd allele preserved the emergence and expansion of fetal HSCs but led to profoundly defective function in transplantation assays. Upon complete Acd inactivation, HSCs expressed p53 target genes, underwent cell cycle arrest, and were severely depleted within days, leading to hematopoietic failure. TPP1 loss induced increased telomeric fusion events in bone marrow progenitors. However, unlike in epidermal stem cells, p53 deficiency did not rescue TPP1-deficient HSCs, indicating that shelterin dysfunction has unique effects in different stem cell populations. Because the consequences of telomere shortening are progressive and unsynchronized, acute loss of shelterin function represents an attractive alternative for studying telomere crisis in hematopoietic progenitors.

  15. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data

    OpenAIRE

    Khorshed, Reema?A.; Hawkins, Edwin?D.; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark?K.; Akinduro, Olufolake?A.; Rashidi, Narges?M.; Spitaler, Martin; Lo?Celso, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is ...

  16. Notch and Wnt signaling in the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigas, Anna; Guiu, Jordi; Gama-Norton, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which reside in the marrow of adult mammals and sustain hematopoiesis for the lifetime of the organism, are specified and generated during embryonic development. We are just beginning to understand how HSC develop from more primitive cells and the complexity of the...... of the signaling pathways involved. In this work, we review the role of two crucial pathways, Notch and Wnt, in the specification and development of HSC and their nascent microenvironment, the arterial vessels....

  17. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mawatari, Momoko; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kei; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential Reponses of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells to mTOR Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway has been observed in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, targeting of the mTOR pathway is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment and several mTOR inhibitors, including AZD8055 (AZD, a novel dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor, are currently in clinical trials. Although bone marrow (BM suppression is one of the primary side effects of anticancer drugs, it is not known if pharmacological inhibition of dual mTORC1/2 affects BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs function and plasticity. Here we report that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 by AZD or its analogue (KU-63794 depletes mouse BM Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ cells in cultures via the induction of apoptotic cell death. Subsequent colony-forming unit (CFU assays revealed that inhibition of mTORC1/2 suppresses the clonogenic function of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, we found that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 markedly inhibits the growth of day-14 cobblestone area-forming cells (CAFCs but enhances the generation of day-35 CAFCs. Given the fact that day-14 and day-35 CAFCs are functional surrogates of HPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, respectively, these results suggest that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 may have distinct effects on HPCs versus HSCs.

  20. The human and murine hematopoietic stem cell niches: are they comparable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pel, Melissa; Fibbe, Willem E; Schepers, Koen

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in specific niches that provide various instructive cues that regulate HSC self-renewal and their development into all mature cells of the peripheral blood. Progress in this research field has largely been guided by mouse studies. However, parallel studies with human subjects, tissues, and cells, in combination with xenotransplantation experiments in immunodeficient mice, have contributed to our increased understanding of the human HSC niche. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the various specialized subsets of both stromal and hematopoietic cells that support HSCs through cell-cell interactions and secreted factors, and the many parallels between the murine and human HSC niches. Furthermore, we discuss recent technological advances that are likely to improve our understanding of the human HSC niche, a better understanding of which may allow further identification of unique molecular and cellular pathways in the HSC niche. This information may help to further improve the outcome of HSC transplantation and refine the treatment of hematopoietic diseases. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Treatment of splenic marginal zone lymphoma of the CNS with high-dose therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busemann Christoph

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapy of indolent lymphomas with involvement of the central nervous system (CNS has not been standardized so far. A 42-year old male patient presented with neurological signs because of leukemic splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL manifested in bone marrow, lymph nodes and CNS. Due to the aggressiveness of the disease and the young age of the patient, an intensive immunochemotherapy followed by high-dose therapy with busulfan, thiotepa and fludarabine and subsequent unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT was performed. The haemopoietic stem cells engrafted in time and the patient is doing well (ECOG 0 without evidence for active lymphoma three years after transplantation. Highly sensitive tests by specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for presence of lymphoma cells in blood and bone marrow indicated also a molecular remission. The reported case shows the feasibility of high-dose therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in high-risk patients with CNS-involvement of indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. In addition, the case supports the hypothesis that the graft-versus lymphoma effect after alloSCT is also active within the CNS.

  2. MOZ (KAT6A) is essential for the maintenance of classically defined adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Bilal N; Yang, Yuqing; Schreuder, Jaring; Nilsson, Susan K; Bilardi, Rebecca; Carotta, Sebastian; McRae, Helen M; Metcalf, Donald; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim

    2016-11-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are conventionally thought to be at the apex of a hierarchy that produces all mature cells of the blood. The quintessential property of these cells is their ability to reconstitute the entire hematopoietic system of hemoablated recipients. This characteristic has enabled HSCs to be used to replenish the hematopoietic system of patients after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Here, we use deletion of the monocytic leukemia zinc finger gene (Moz/Kat6a/Myst3) to examine the effects of removing HSCs. Loss of MOZ in adult mice leads to the rapid loss of HSCs as defined by transplantation. This is accompanied by a reduction of the LSK-CD48 - CD150 + and LSK-CD34 - Flt3 - populations in the bone marrow and a reduction in quiescent cells in G 0 Surprisingly, the loss of classically defined HSCs did not affect mouse viability, and there was no recovery of the LSK-CD48 - CD150 + and LSK-CD34 - Flt3 - populations 15 to 18 months after Moz deletion. Clonal analysis of myeloid progenitors, which produce short-lived granulocytes, demonstrate that these are derived from cells that had undergone recombination at the Moz locus up to 2 years earlier, suggesting that early progenitors have acquired extended self-renewal. Our results establish that there are essential differences in HSC requirement for steady-state blood cell production compared with the artificial situation of reconstitution after transplantation into a hemoablated host. A better understanding of steady-state hematopoiesis may facilitate the development of novel therapies engaging hematopoietic cell populations with previously unrecognized traits, as well as characterizing potential vulnerability to oncogenic transformation. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Latexin Inactivation Enhances Survival and Long-Term Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Expands the Entire Hematopoietic System in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Natural genetic diversity offers an important yet largely untapped resource to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. Latexin (Lxn is a negative stem cell regulatory gene identified on the basis of genetic diversity. By using an Lxn knockout mouse model, we found that Lxn inactivation in vivo led to the physiological expansion of the entire hematopoietic hierarchy. Loss of Lxn enhanced the competitive repopulation capacity and survival of HSCs in a cell-intrinsic manner. Gene profiling of Lxn-null HSCs showed altered expression of genes enriched in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1 was a potential downstream target with a dramatic downregulation in Lxn-null HSCs. Enforced expression of Thbs1 restored the Lxn inactivation-mediated HSC phenotypes. This study reveals that Lxn plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostatic hematopoiesis, and it may lead to development of safe and effective approaches to manipulate HSCs for clinical benefit. : In this article, Liang and colleagues show that loss of latexin in vivo expands the HSC population and increases their survival and engraftment. Latexin regulates HSC function and hematopoiesis via the Thbs1 signaling pathway. Keywords: latexin, hematopoietic stem cell, repopulating advantage, expansion, survival, thrombospondin 1

  4. Immune suppressor factor confers stromal cell line with enhanced supporting activity for hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Ito, Miyuki; Urano, Atsushi; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    Immune suppressor factor (ISF) is a subunit of the vacuolar ATPase proton pump. We earlier identified a short form of ISF (ShIF) as a stroma-derived factor that supports cytokine-independent growth of mutant Ba/F3 cells. Here, we report that ISF/ShIF supports self-renewal and expansion of primary hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Co-culture of murine bone marrow cells with a stromal cell line overexpressing ISF or ShIF (MS10/ISF or MS10/ShIF) not only enhanced their colony-forming activity and the numbers of long-term culture initiating cells, but also maintained the competitive repopulating activity of HSC. This stem cell supporting activity depended on the proton-transfer function of ISF/ShIF. Gene expression analysis of ISF/ShIF-transfected cell lines revealed down-regulation of secreted frizzled-related protein-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, and the restoration of their expressions in MS10/ISF cells partially reversed its enhanced LTC-IC supporting activity to a normal level. These results suggest that ISF/ShIF confers stromal cells with enhanced supporting activities for HSCs by modulating Wnt-activity and the extracellular matrix

  5. Role of Geminin in cell fate determination of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Ohno, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Naoto; Zhang, Bo; Suzuki-Takedachi, Kyoko; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Geminin exerts two distinct molecular roles. Geminin negatively regulates DNA replication licensing through the direct interaction with Cdt1 to prevent re-replication in proliferating cells. Geminin also regulates chromatin remodeling through the direct interaction with Brahma/Brg1 to maintain undifferentiated states of stem cells. We previously uncovered that Polycomb-group complex 1 and Hoxb4/Hoxa9, well-known intrinsic factors that are essential for maintaining the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity, alternatively act as ubiquitin-proteasome systems for Geminin protein to reduce the protein expression level, and sustain the HSC activity. Thus, Geminin is presumed to play an important role in determining cell fate, i.e., turning on and off cellular quiescence and proliferation/differentiation, in HSCs. We recently generated recombinant cell-penetrating Geminin (CP-Geminin), enabling rapid incorporation and withdraw of Geminin protein in cells. CP-Geminin may be useful in regulating the cell cycle and chromatin configuration. In this article, we summarize current information on the molecular functions of Geminin and the regulatory system for Geminin protein expression, and argue for the molecular role of Geminin in cell fate determination of HSCs, and future perspective of a new technology for manipulating the activities of HSCs and cancer stem cells (CSCs).

  6. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, P. T.; Kavnoudias, H.; Cameron, P. U.; Czarnecki, C.; Paul, E.; Lyon, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function

  7. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, P. T., E-mail: pfoley@doctors.org.uk [The Canberra Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (Australia); Kavnoudias, H., E-mail: h.kavnoudias@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Radiology Department (Australia); Cameron, P. U., E-mail: paul.cameron@unimelb.edu.au [The Alfred Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit (Australia); Czarnecki, C., E-mail: caroline.czarnecki@gmail.com [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Radiology Department (Australia); Paul, E., E-mail: eldho.paul@monash.edu [Monash University, Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital (Australia); Lyon, S. M., E-mail: lyonsey@optusnet.com.au [Melbourne Endovascular (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  8. Sirt1 Protects Stressed Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune system relies on a stable pool of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to respond properly to injury or stress. Maintaining genomic integrity and appropriate gene expression is essential for HSPC homeostasis, and dysregulation can result in myeloproliferative disorders or loss of immune function. Sirt1 is a histone deacetylase that can protect embryonic stem (ES) cells from accumulating DNA damage and has been linked to hematopoietic differentiation of ES cells. Satyendra Singh, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow working with Philipp Oberdoerffer, Ph.D., in CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and their colleagues set out to determine whether Sirt1 could play a similar protective role in adult HSPCs.

  9. The effect of carbon beam on the survival of hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Atsushi; Kojima, Eiichi; Tanaka, Kaoru

    1993-01-01

    The new cyclotron for heavy ion radiotherapy will be completed in the very near future at NIRS. High LET radiations having different qualities are known to produce differences in biological effectiveness. It is necessary to determine the biological effectiveness of this new radiation source in both normal and tumor tissues. In this paper, the effects of 200 kVp x-rays and a 135 MeV/u carbon 12 beam on hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S and GM-CFC) are described. The rationale for this experimental approach is that the sensitivity of hematopoietic stem cells and the committed stem cells to radiation is often the treatment limiting-factor for radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells as a therapy for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Patrick; Kowalski, John; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-28

    The combination of genetic modification and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation may provide the necessary means to develop an alternative treatment option to conventional antiretroviral therapy. As HSCs give rise to all hematopoietic cell types susceptible to HIV infection, modification of HSCs is an ideal strategy for the development of infection-resistant immune cell populations. Although promising results have been obtained in multiple animal models, additional evidence is needed to convincingly demonstrate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Here, we review the potential of HSC transplantation and the recently identified limitations of this approach. Using the Berlin Patient as a model for a functional cure, we contrast the confines of autologous versus allogeneic transplantation. Finally, we suggest that although autologous, gene-modified HSC-transplantation may significantly reduce plasma viremia, reaching the lower detection limits currently obtainable through daily HAART will remain a challenging endeavor that will require innovative combinatorial therapies.

  11. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-07-01

    Gene therapy nowadays constitutes a safe and efficient treatment for a number of monogenic diseases affecting the hematopoietic system. Risks of insertional mutagenesis derived from the use of integrative vectors cannot, however, be completely excluded. Therefore, gene targeting has been proposed as a safer alternative, since the insertion of the herapeutic gene is driven to a specific locus in the genome. Gene targeting approaches are based on the use of specific nucleases which generate double strand breaks (DSBs) in a specific site of the genome,markedly enhancing the efficacy of homologous recombination (HR) with donor constructs harboring the gene of interest flanked by the corresponding homology arms. In this study we have optimized the conditions to target human lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from healthy donors, with the final aim of correcting by gene editing the hematopoietic progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia subtype A (FA-A) patients. In particular, we have established a robust method to target both LCLs and HSCs in a safe harbor site in the genome, the AAVS1 locus. Our approach is based on the transduction of these cells with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors carrying a donor with the gene of interest, followed by the nucleofection of these cells with zinc finger nucleases used as mRNA. Using a control donor vector carrying the GFP reporter gene we have obtained, on average, 9.43% gene targeting efficiency in cord blood CD34+ cells from healthy donors. Moreover, we confirmed that gene targeting was also efficient in HSCs with long term and multipotent repopulation capacity, as demonstrated by transplants into immunodeficient mice. To improve the gene targeting efficiency, we investigated the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles, which were shown to improve the transduction efficiency of integrase-defective and competent lentiviral vectors in HSCs. This increment, however, did not lead to a higher gene

  12. Hormone Use for Therapeutic Amenorrhea and Contraception During Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Katherine; Merideth, Melissa A.; Stratton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing population of women who have or will undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant for a variety of malignant and benign conditions. Gynecologists play an important role in addressing the gynecologic and reproductive health concerns for these women throughout the transplant process. As women undergo cell transplantation, they should avoid becoming pregnant and are at risk of uterine bleeding. Thus, counseling about and implementing hormonal treatments such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, combined hormonal contraceptives, and progestin-only methods help to achieve therapeutic amenorrhea and can serve as contraception during the peritransplant period. In this commentary, we summarize the timing, risks and benefits of the hormonal options just prior, during and for the year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26348182

  13. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy nowadays constitutes a safe and efficient treatment for a number of monogenic diseases affecting the hematopoietic system. Risks of insertional mutagenesis derived from the use of integrative vectors cannot, however, be completely excluded. Therefore, gene targeting has been proposed as a safer alternative, since the insertion of the herapeutic gene is driven to a specific locus in the genome. Gene targeting approaches are based on the use of specific nucleases which generate double strand breaks (DSBs) in a specific site of the genome,markedly enhancing the efficacy of homologous recombination (HR) with donor constructs harboring the gene of interest flanked by the corresponding homology arms. In this study we have optimized the conditions to target human lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from healthy donors, with the final aim of correcting by gene editing the hematopoietic progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia subtype A (FA-A) patients. In particular, we have established a robust method to target both LCLs and HSCs in a safe harbor site in the genome, the AAVS1 locus. Our approach is based on the transduction of these cells with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors carrying a donor with the gene of interest, followed by the nucleofection of these cells with zinc finger nucleases used as mRNA. Using a control donor vector carrying the GFP reporter gene we have obtained, on average, 9.43% gene targeting efficiency in cord blood CD34+ cells from healthy donors. Moreover, we confirmed that gene targeting was also efficient in HSCs with long term and multipotent repopulation capacity, as demonstrated by transplants into immunodeficient mice. To improve the gene targeting efficiency, we investigated the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles, which were shown to improve the transduction efficiency of integrase-defective and competent lentiviral vectors in HSCs. This increment, however, did not lead to a higher gene

  14. Genetic Modification of Hematopoietic Stem Cells as a Therapy for HIV/AIDS

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    Patrick Younan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The combination of genetic modification and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation may provide the necessary means to develop an alternative treatment option to conventional antiretroviral therapy. As HSCs give rise to all hematopoietic cell types susceptible to HIV infection, modification of HSCs is an ideal strategy for the development of infection-resistant immune cell populations. Although promising results have been obtained in multiple animal models, additional evidence is needed to convincingly demonstrate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Here, we review the potential of HSC transplantation and the recently identified limitations of this approach. Using the Berlin Patient as a model for a functional cure, we contrast the confines of autologous versus allogeneic transplantation. Finally, we suggest that although autologous, gene-modified HSC-transplantation may significantly reduce plasma viremia, reaching the lower detection limits currently obtainable through daily HAART will remain a challenging endeavor that will require innovative combinatorial therapies.

  15. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  16. HIF1α is a regulator of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell development in hypoxic sites of the mouse embryo

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    Parisa Imanirad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia affects many physiologic processes during early stages of mammalian ontogeny, particularly placental and vascular development. In the adult, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment plays a role in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. HSCs are generated from the major vasculature of the embryo, but whether the hypoxic response affects the generation of these HSCs is as yet unknown. Here we examined whether Hypoxia Inducible Factor1-alpha (HIF1α, a key modulator of the response to hypoxia, is essential for HSC development. We found hypoxic cells in embryonic tissues that generate and expand hematopoietic cells (aorta, placenta and fetal liver, and specifically aortic endothelial and hematopoietic cluster cells. A Cre/loxP conditional knockout (cKO approach was taken to delete HIF1α in Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin expressing endothelial cells, the precursors to definitive hematopoietic cells. Functional assays show that HSC and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs are significantly reduced in cKO aorta and placenta. Moreover, decreases in phenotypic aortic hematopoietic cluster cells in cKO embryos indicate that HIF1α is necessary for generation and/or expansion of HPCs and HSCs. cKO adult BM HSCs are also affected under transplantation conditions. Thus, HIF1α is a regulator of HSC generation and function beginning at the earliest embryonic stages.

  17. Reconstruction of hematopoietic inductive microenvironment after transplantation of VCAM-1-modified human umbilical cord blood stromal cells.

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    Yao Liu

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic inductive microenvironment (HIM is where hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells grow and develop. Hematopoietic stromal cells were the key components of the HIM. In our previous study, we had successfully cultured and isolated human cord blood-derived stromal cells (HUCBSCs and demonstrated that they could secret hemopoietic growth factors such as GM-CSF, TPO, and SCF. However, it is still controversial whether HUCBSCs can be used for reconstruction of HIM. In this study, we first established a co-culture system of HUCBSCs and cord blood CD34(+ cells and then determined that using HUCBSCs as the adherent layer had significantly more newly formed colonies of each hematopoietic lineage than the control group, indicating that HUCBSCs had the ability to promote the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells. Furthermore, the number of colonies was significantly higher in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs, suggesting that the ability of HUCBSCs in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells was further enhanced after having been modified with VCAM-1. Next, HUCBSCs were infused into a radiation-damaged animal model, in which the recovery of hematopoiesis was observed. The results demonstrate that the transplanted HUCBSCs were "homed in" to bone marrow and played roles in promoting the recovery of irradiation-induced hematopoietic damage and repairing HIM. Compared with the control group, the HUCBSC group had significantly superior effectiveness in terms of the recovery time for hemogram and myelogram, CFU-F, CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Meg. Such differences were even more significant in VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs group. We suggest that HUCBSCs are able to restore the functions of HIM and promote the recovery of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. VCAM-1 plays an important role in supporting the repair of HIM damage.

  18. GSTA1 diplotypes affect busulfan clearance and toxicity in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation : A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, Marc; Curtis, Patricia Huezo Diaz; Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao S.; Rezgui, Mohammed Aziz; Nava, Tiago; Mlakar, Vid; Lesne, Laurence; Théoret, Yves; Chalandon, Yves; Dupuis, Lee L.; Schechter, Tao; Bartelink, Imke H.; Boelens, Jaap J.; Bredius, Robbert; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Azarnoush, Saba; Sedlacek, Petr; Lewis, Victor A.; Champagne, Martin A.; Peters, Christina; Bittencourt, Henrique; Krajinovic, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Busulfan (BU) dose adjustment following therapeutic drug monitoring contributes to better outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Further improvement could be achieved through genotype-guided BU dose adjustments. To investigate this aspect, polymorphism within glutathione S

  19. Clinical analysis of hematopoiesis reconstruction after total body irradiation in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Tong; Gao Hong; Sun Baojing; Chen Li

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcome of total body irradiation in hematopoiesis reconstruction after autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods: 35 patients received autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT group) and 35 patients received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT group) were enrolled in this study. And their hematopoiesis reconstruction were observed and analyzed. Results: The recovery time of ANC were 14 and 16 d, respectively, and the recovery time of PLT were 23 and 27 d, respectively, the difference were not significant (P>0.05) in ASCT group and Allo-HSCT group. But for both group, hematopoiesis reconstruction were faster in peripheral blood stem cell transplant than those in bone marrow transplant (P<0.05). The recovery time of PLT with the patients of total body irradiation dose ≥ 10 Gy were longer than those of < 10 Gy. Conclusions: At the same doses, the clinical outcome of hematopoiesis reconstruction of ASCT is similar to that of Allo-HSCT. But the recovery time in peripheral blood stem cell transplantation is faster than that in bone marrow transplant. The recovery time of PLT has relation with the irradiation dose. (authors)

  20. The role of osteoblasts in regulating hematopoietic stem cell activity and tumor metastasis

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    Neiva K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells are critical regulators of hematopoiesis. Osteoblasts are part of the stromal cell support system in bone marrow and may be derived from a common precursor. Several studies suggested that osteoblasts regulate hematopoiesis, yet the entire mechanism is not understood. It is clear, however, that both hematopoietic precursors and osteoblasts interact for the production of osteoclasts and the activation of resorption. We observed that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs regulate osteoblastic secretion of various growth factors, and that osteoblasts express some soluble factors exclusively in the presence of HSCs. Osteoblasts and hematopoietic cells are closely associated with each other in the bone marrow, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between them to develop the HSC niche. One critical component regulating the niche is stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 which regulates stem cell homing and, as we have recently demonstrated, plays a crucial role in facilitating those tumors which metastasize to bone. Osteoblasts produce abundant amounts of SDF-1 and therefore osteoblasts play an important role in metastasis. These findings are discussed in the context of the role of osteoblasts in marrow function in health and disease.

  1. Long-term hematopoietic stem cell damage after external irradiation with X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, M.T.; Varas, F.; Bueren, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the functionality of the lympho-hematopoietic stem cells long-term (9 months) after the irradiation (X rays) of mice at different stages of development, by means of a competitive bone marrow repopulation assay. Our data revealed that a dose of 1 Gy was only capable of inducing significant long-term failures in the functionality of the primitive repopulating cells in mice irradiated at the young-adult stage (12 week-old), but not in mice irradiated at the late stages of foetus development (17 day-old fetuses) nor at the early development of the embryo (4 day-old embryos). The differential generation of long-term stem cell defects as a function of the age was confirmed in mice irradiated with 3 Gy. While no significant effects in the long-term repopulating cells were observed in 4 day-old embryos, significant repopulation deficiencies were observed in this population when mice were irradiated at the 17 day of foetus development, and more markedly at the adult stage of growth. These data offer new evidence about the influence of the developmental stage of the animal on the generation of residual hematopoietic dysfunctions by external irradiation, with particular relevance to the very primitive lympho-hematopoietic stem cells. (author)

  2. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  3. Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Leukemia

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    Anne M. Dickinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT lies with the ability of the engrafting immune system to remove residual leukemia cells via a graft-versus-leukemia effect (GvL, caused either spontaneously post-HSCT or via donor lymphocyte infusion. GvL effects can also be initiated by allogenic mismatched natural killer cells, antigen-specific T cells, and activated dendritic cells of leukemic origin. The history and further application of this GvL effect and the main mechanisms will be discussed and reviewed in this chapter.

  4. Functionality testing of stem cell grafts to predict infectious complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J; Granrot, I; Mattsson, J; Omazic, B; Uhlin, M; Thunberg, S

    2017-07-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a routine clinical procedure performed to treat patients with haematological malignancies, primary immune deficiencies or metabolic disorders. Infections during lymphopenia after allogeneic HSCT are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Typical infectious agents are Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus and fungi. The study aim was to evaluate whether measurement of the responses of antigen-specific T-cells, recognizing infectious pathogens would correlate to protective functions in the stem cell recipient post-transplant. Twenty-one grafts were analysed by flow cytometry and cells were stimulated in vitro with relevant infectious antigens, followed by evaluation of T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. Results were compared to the recipients' clinical records 1-year post-transplantation. We show that an extensive repertoire of transferred antigen-specific T-cells from allogeneic donor grafts against infectious agents, involved in post-transplant infections, are linked to an absence of infectious complications for the recipient up-to 1-year post-transplant. The protective effect was associated with antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and IL-1β secretion. Our results suggest that assaying T-cell function before HSCT could determine individual risks for infectious complications and thus aid in clinical decision-making regarding prophylactic and pre-emptive anti-infective therapy. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Single-cell analyses identify bioengineered niches for enhanced maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Aline; Giger, Sonja; Girotra, Mukul; Campos, Vasco; Vannini, Nicola; Naveiras, Olaia; Gobaa, Samy; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2017-08-09

    The in vitro expansion of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains a substantial challenge, largely because of our limited understanding of the mechanisms that control HSC fate choices. Using single-cell multigene expression analysis and time-lapse microscopy, here we define gene expression signatures and cell cycle hallmarks of murine HSCs and the earliest multipotent progenitors (MPPs), and analyze systematically single HSC fate choices in culture. Our analysis revealed twelve differentially expressed genes marking the quiescent HSC state, including four genes encoding cell-cell interaction signals in the niche. Under basal culture conditions, most HSCs rapidly commit to become early MPPs. In contrast, when we present ligands of the identified niche components such as JamC or Esam within artificial niches, HSC cycling is reduced and long-term multipotency in vivo is maintained. Our approach to bioengineer artificial niches should be useful in other stem cell systems.Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal is not sufficiently understood to recapitulate in vitro. Here, the authors generate gene signature and cell cycle hallmarks of single murine HSCs, and use identified endothelial receptors Esam and JamC as substrates to enhance HSC growth in engineered niches.

  6. Steady state peripheral blood provides cells with functional and metabolic characteristics of real hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Antonin; Avalon, Maryse; Lapostolle, Véronique; Ismail, Sadek; Mombled, Margaux; Debeissat, Christelle; Guérinet, Marianne; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski-Lafarge, Marija; Villacreces, Arnaud; Praloran, Vincent; Ivanovic, Zoran; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are located in the bone marrow, also circulate in cord and peripheral blood. Despite high availability, HSCs from steady state peripheral blood (SSPB) are little known and not used for research or cell therapy. We thus aimed to characterize and select HSCs from SSPB by a direct approach with a view to delineating their main functional and metabolic properties and the mechanisms responsible for their maintenance. We chose to work on Side Population (SP) cells which are highly enriched in HSCs in mouse, human bone marrow, and cord blood. However, no SP cells from SSBP have as yet been characterized. Here we showed that SP cells from SSPB exhibited a higher proliferative capacity and generated more clonogenic progenitors than non-SP cells in vitro. Furthermore, xenotransplantation studies on immunodeficient mice demonstrated that SP cells are up to 45 times more enriched in cells with engraftment capacity than non-SP cells. From a cell regulation point of view, we showed that SP activity depended on O 2 concentrations close to those found in HSC niches, an effect which is dependent on both hypoxia-induced factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Moreover SP cells displayed a reduced mitochondrial mass and, in particular, a lower mitochondrial activity compared to non-SP cells, while they exhibited a similar level of glucose incorporation. These results provided evidence that SP cells from SSPB displayed properties of very primitive cells and HSC, thus rendering them an interesting model for research and cell therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Expression profiling of CD34+ hematopoietic stem/ progenitor cells reveals distinct subtypes of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Zhijian; Fernald, Anthony A.; Godley, Lucy A.; Larson, Richard A.; Le Beau, Michelle M.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cytotoxic cancer therapy is the development of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML), a neoplastic disorder arising from a multipotential hematopoietic stem cell. To gain insights into the molecular basis of this disease, we performed gene expression profiling of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from t-AML patients. Our analysis revealed that there are distinct subtypes of t-AML that have a characteristic gene expression pattern. Common to ...

  8. Effect of radiation dose-rate on hematopoietic cell engraftment in adult zebrafish.

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    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Although exceptionally high radiation dose-rates are currently attaining clinical feasibility, there have been relatively few studies reporting the biological consequences of these dose-rates in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT. In zebrafish models of HCT, preconditioning before transplant is typically achieved through radiation alone. We report the comparison of outcomes in adult zebrafish irradiated with 20 Gy at either 25 or 800 cGy/min in the context of experimental HCT. In non-transplanted irradiated fish we observed no substantial differences between dose-rate groups as assessed by fish mortality, cell death in the kidney, endogenous hematopoietic reconstitution, or gene expression levels of p53 and ddb2 (damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 in the kidney. However, following HCT, recipients conditioned with the higher dose rate showed significantly improved donor-derived engraftment at 9 days post transplant (p ≤ 0.0001, and improved engraftment persisted at 31 days post transplant. Analysis for sdf-1a expression, as well as transplant of hematopoietic cells from cxcr4b -/- zebrafish, (odysseus, cumulatively suggest that the sdf-1a/cxcr4b axis is not required of donor-derived cells for the observed dose-rate effect on engraftment. Overall, the adult zebrafish model of HCT indicates that exceptionally high radiation dose-rates can impact HCT outcome, and offers a new system for radiobiological and mechanistic interrogation of this phenomenon. Key words: Radiation dose rate, Total Marrow Irradiation (TMI, Total body irradiation (TBI, SDF-1, Zebrafish, hematopoietic cell transplant.

  9. Nicaraven attenuates radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in mice.

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    Miho Kawakatsu

    Full Text Available Nicaraven, a chemically synthesized hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger, has been demonstrated to protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organs. We investigated whether nicaraven can attenuate radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is the conmen complication of radiotherapy and one of the major causes of death in sub-acute phase after accidental exposure to high dose radiation. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 1 Gy γ-ray radiation daily for 5 days in succession (a total of 5 Gy, and given nicaraven or a placebo after each exposure. The mice were sacrificed 2 days after the last radiation treatment, and the protective effects and relevant mechanisms of nicaraven in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with radiation-induced damage were investigated by ex vivo examination. We found that post-radiation administration of nicaraven significantly increased the number, improved the colony-forming capacity, and decreased the DNA damage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The urinary levels of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of DNA oxidation, were significantly lower in mice that were given nicaraven compared with those that received a placebo treatment, although the levels of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the bone marrow cells did not differ significantly between the two groups. Interestingly, compared with the placebo treatment, the administration of nicaraven significantly decreased the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma of mice. Our data suggest that nicaraven effectively diminished the effects of radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is likely associated with the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of this compound.

  10. Long-term in vivo provision of antigen-specific T cell immunity by programming hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2005-03-01

    A method to genetically program mouse hematopoietic stem cells to develop into functional CD8 or CD4 T cells of defined specificity in vivo is described. For this purpose, a bicistronic retroviral vector was engineered that efficiently delivers genes for both and chains of T cell receptor (TCR) to hematopoietic stem cells. When modified cell populations were used to reconstruct the hematopoietic lineages of recipient mice, significant percentages of antigen-specific CD8 or CD4 T cells were observed. These cells expressed normal surface markers and responded to peptide antigen stimulation by proliferation and cytokine production. Moreover, they could mature into memory cells after peptide stimulation. Using TCRs specific for a model tumor antigen, we found that the recipient mice were able to partially resist a challenge with tumor cells carrying the antigen. By combining cells modified with CD8- and CD4-specific TCRs, and boosting with dendritic cells pulsed with cognate peptides, complete suppression of tumor could be achieved and even tumors that had become established would regress and be eliminated after dendritic cell/peptide immunization. This methodology of "instructive immunotherapy" could be developed for controlling the growth of human tumors and attacking established pathogens.

  11. PDGFRα and CD51 mark human nestin+ sphere-forming mesenchymal stem cells capable of hematopoietic progenitor cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Sandra; Lacombe, Julie; Hanoun, Maher; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Bruns, Ingmar; Kunisaki, Yuya; Frenette, Paul S

    2013-07-01

    The intermediate filament protein Nestin labels populations of stem/progenitor cells, including self-renewing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a major constituent of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche. However, the intracellular location of Nestin prevents its use for prospective live cell isolation. Hence it is important to find surface markers specific for Nestin⁺ cells. In this study, we show that the expression of PDGFRα and CD51 among CD45⁻ Ter119⁻ CD31⁻ mouse bone marrow (BM) stromal cells characterizes a large fraction of Nestin⁺ cells, containing most fibroblastic CFUs, mesenspheres, and self-renewal capacity after transplantation. The PDGFRα⁺ CD51 ⁺subset of Nestin⁺ cells is also enriched in major HSC maintenance genes, supporting the notion that niche activity co-segregates with MSC activity. Furthermore, we show that PDGFRα⁺ CD51⁺ cells in the human fetal BM represent a small subset of CD146⁺ cells expressing Nestin and enriched for MSC and HSC niche activities. Importantly, cultured human PDGFRα⁺ CD51⁺ nonadherent mesenspheres can significantly expand multipotent hematopoietic progenitors able to engraft immunodeficient mice. These results thus indicate that the HSC niche is conserved between the murine and human species and suggest that highly purified nonadherent cultures of niche cells may represent a useful novel technology to culture human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

  12. IMMUNE STATE IN PATIENTS WITH HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AT LATE TERMS AFTER AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

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    N. V. Minaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT is one of the most effective methods for treatment of patients with various forms of hemoblastoses, both in adults and children. However, high-dose chemotherapy protocols used in this procedure are characterized by pronounced myeloand immunotoxicity. Appropriate data concerning immune state at long terms after high-dose chemotherapy and auto-HSCT are sparse and controversial, and there is no consensus on time dynamics of immune system reconstitution. The aim of this study was a comprehensive evaluation of immunity in recipients of auto-HSCT at longer terms. Clinical and immunological testing was performed in ninety-eight patients with hematological malignancies before starting a high-dose chemotherapy, and at late post-transplant period. The state of cellular immunity was assessed as expression of surface CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocyte antigens. Humoral immunity was evaluated by serum IgG, IgA, and IgM levels. The studies have revealed disorders of cellular and humoral immunity, as well as nonspecific immune resistance factors in recipients of autologous hematopoietic stem cells at late terms post-transplant. Immune reconstitution in patients receiving highdose consolidation treatment followed by auto-HSCT takes longer time than in patients who did not receive autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Severity of these disturbances and immune reconstitution rates depend on the type of conditioning regimen, and the source of haematopoietic stem cells used for transplantation.

  13. The histone demethylase Jarid1b is required for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Morag H; Albert, Mareike; Sroczynska, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    Jarid1b/KDM5b is a histone demethylase that regulates self-renewal and differentiation in stem cells and cancer, however its function in hematopoiesis is unclear. Here, we find that Jarid1b is highly expressed in primitive hematopoietic compartments and is overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias...... compromises hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal capacity and suggest that Jarid1b is a positive regulator of HSC potential.......Jarid1b/KDM5b is a histone demethylase that regulates self-renewal and differentiation in stem cells and cancer, however its function in hematopoiesis is unclear. Here, we find that Jarid1b is highly expressed in primitive hematopoietic compartments and is overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias....... Constitutive genetic deletion of Jarid1b did not impact steady-state hematopoiesis. In contrast, acute deletion of Jarid1b from bone marrow increased peripheral blood T cells and, following secondary transplantation, resulted in loss of bone marrow reconstitution. Our results reveal that deletion of Jarid1b...

  14. Pre-Transplantation Blockade of TNF-α-Mediated Oxygen Species Accumulation Protects Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Sachie; Lai, Chen-Yi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nojima, Masanori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Higashihara, Masaaki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Otsu, Makoto

    2017-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) for malignancy requires toxic pre-conditioning to maximize anti-tumor effects and donor-HSC engraftment. While this induces bone marrow (BM)-localized inflammation, how this BM environmental change affects transplanted HSCs in vivo remains largely unknown. We here report that, depending on interval between irradiation and HSCT, residence within lethally irradiated recipient BM compromises donor-HSC reconstitution ability. Both in vivo and in vitro we demonstrate that, among inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α plays a role in HSC damage: TNF-α stimulation leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in highly purified hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs/HSPCs). Transplantation of flow-cytometry-sorted murine HSCs reveals damaging effects of accumulated ROS on HSCs. Short-term incubation either with an specific inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling or an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevents TNF-α-mediated ROS accumulation in HSCs. Importantly, pre-transplantation exposure to NAC successfully demonstrats protective effects in inflammatory BM on graft-HSCs, exhibiting better reconstitution capability than that of nonprotected control grafts. We thus suggest that in vivo protection of graft-HSCs from BM inflammation is a feasible and attractive approach, which may lead to improved hematopoietic reconstitution kinetics in transplantation with myeloablative conditioning that inevitably causes inflammation in recipient BM. Stem Cells 2017;35:989-1002. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adolescents: 3 case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Jin Jeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS is a rare disease characterized by a extracellular volume depletion and hyponatremia induced by marked natriuresis. It is mainly reported in patients who experience a central nervous system insult, such as cerebral hemorrhage or encephalitis. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is a main cause of severe hyponatremia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, whereas CSWS is rarely reported. We report 3 patients with childhood acute leukemia who developed CSWS with central nervous system complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The diagnosis of CSW was made on the basis of severe hyponatremia accompanied by increased urine output with clinical signs of dehydration. All patients showed elevated natriuretic peptide and normal antidiuretic hormone. Aggressive water and sodium replacement treatment was instituted in all 3 patients and 2 of them were effectively recovered, the other one was required to add fludrocortisone administration.

  16. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Pel, M.; van Os, R.; Velders, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases...... are regulatory mediators in cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization, we considered a possible role for protease inhibitors in the induction of HSC/HPC mobilization. Bone marrow (BM) extracellular extracts that were obtained from murine femurs after 0.5 Gy of TBI contained an inhibitor of elastase. Also, after low...... of Serpina1 in HSC/HPC mobilization, we administered Serpina1 before IL-8 injection. This administration resulted in an almost complete inhibition of HSC/HPC mobilization, whereas heat-inactivated Serpina1 had no effect. These results indicate that low-dose TBI inhibits cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization...

  17. Metabolic regulation of hematopoietic and leukemic stem/progenitor cells under homeostatic and stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karigane, Daiki; Takubo, Keiyo

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit multilineage differentiation and self-renewal activities that maintain the entire hematopoietic system during an organism's lifetime. These abilities are sustained by intrinsic transcriptional programs and extrinsic cues from the microenvironment or niche. Recent studies using metabolomics technologies reveal that metabolic regulation plays an essential role in HSC maintenance. Metabolic pathways provide energy and building blocks for other factors functioning at steady state and in stress. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of metabolic regulation in HSCs relevant to cell cycle quiescence, symmetric/asymmetric division, and proliferation following stress and lineage commitment, and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic factors or pathways to treat hematological malignancies.

  18. Early determinants of long-term T-cell reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, José A.; Bredius, Robbert G.; Hazenberg, Mette D.; Roelofs, Helene; Jol-van der Zijde, Els C.; Heidt, Jeroen; Otto, Sigrid A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Vossen, Jaak M.; Miedema, Frank; van Tol, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    The immune system of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) reconstitutes to a large extent during the first years after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It was suggested, however, that accelerated loss of thymus output may cause impaired immune function at the long

  19. Ex Vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Improve Engraftment in Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kap-Hyoun; Nordon, Robert; O'Brien, Tracey A; Symonds, Geoff; Dolnikov, Alla

    2017-01-01

    The efficient use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation is often limited by the relatively low numbers of HSC collected. The ex vivo expansion of HSC for clinical use is a potentially valuable and safe approach to increase HSC numbers thereby increasing engraftment and reducing the risk of morbidity from infection. Here, we describe a protocol for the robust ex vivo expansion of human CD34(+) HSC isolated from umbilical cord blood. The protocol described can efficiently generate large numbers of HSC. We also describe a flow cytometry-based method using high-resolution division tracking to characterize the kinetics of HSC growth and differentiation. Utilizing the guidelines discussed, it is possible for investigators to use this protocol as presented or to modify it for their specific needs.

  20. Rifampin-sirolimus-voriconazole interaction in a hematopoietic cell transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Justin A; Westholder, James S; Jacobson, Pamala A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation are treated with multiple medications, potentially complicated by drug-drug interactions. Drug interactions with sirolimus, voriconazole, and rifampin are particularly difficult because of the complex and simultaneous enzyme inhibition and induction mechanisms. We report a hematopoietic cell transplantation patient receiving sirolimus and voriconazole who was given rifampin while being treated for presumed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. Summary A 31 year-old female received a nonmyeloablative allogeneic umbilical cord hematopoietic cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome transformed to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Her graft versus host disease and antifungal prophylaxis included sirolimus and voriconazole, respectively. Therapeutic drug monitoring prior to admission revealed a stable outpatient sirolimus regimen of 0.4 mg orally daily (trough goal 3-12 mcg/L). She was admitted to the inpatient hematopoietic cell transplantation service and diagnosed with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and presumed bacterial meningitis 217 days after transplant. Intravenous rifampin and vancomycin were initiated and voriconazole was changed to micafungin. Sirolimus trough concentrations were undetectable two days after starting rifampin. Therapeutic sirolimus concentrations were achieved four days later, at a sirolimus dose of 16-18 mg orally daily. Rifampin was discontinued after nine days and the sirolimus dose was adjusted accordingly, maintaining therapeutic levels throughout follow-up. The patient suffered a flare of chronic skin graft versus host disease requiring etanercept, high-dose systemic steroids, and topical steroids. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the management of sirolimus during the transition from voriconazole inhibition to rifampin induction. Clinicians should be aware of potential drug