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Sample records for splendens extract-loaded nanoparticles

  1. Formation of enriched black tea extract loaded chitosan nanoparticles via electrospraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Samuel James

    Creating nanoparticles of beneficial nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals has had a large surge of research due to the enhancement of absorption and bioavailability by decreasing their size. One of these ways is by electrohydrodynamic atomization, also known as electrospraying. In general, this novel process is done by forcing a liquid through a capillary nozzle and which is subjected to an electrical field. While there are different ways to create nanoparticles, the novel method of electrospraying can be beneficial over other types of nanoparticle formation. Reasons include high control over particle size and distribution by altering electrospray parameters (voltage, flow rate, distance, and time), higher encapsulation efficiency than other methods, and also it is a one step process without exposure to extreme conditions (Gomez-Estaca et. al. 2012, Jaworek and Sobcyzk 2008). The current study aimed to create a chitosan encapsulated theaflavin-2 enriched black tea extract (BTE) nanoparticles via electrospraying. The first step of this process was to create the smallest chitosan nanoparticles possible by altering the electrospray parameters and the chitosan-acetic acid solution parameters. The solution properties altered include chitosan molecular weight, acetic acid concentration, and chitosan concentration. Specifically, the electrospray parameters such as voltage, flow rate and distance from syringe to collector are the most important in determining particle size. After creating the smallest chitosan particles, the TF-2 enriched black tea extract was added to the chitosan-acetic acid solution to be electrosprayed. The particles were assessed with the following procedures: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for particle morphology and size, and loading efficiency with ultraviolet--visible spectrophotometer (UV-VIS). Chitosan-BTE nanoparticles were successfully created in a one step process. Diameter of the particles on average

  2. Pomegranate extract-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: design, optimization, and in vitro cytotoxicity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badawi NM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Noha M Badawi,1 Mahmoud H Teaima,2 Khalid M El-Say,3 Dalia A Attia,1 Mohamed A El-Nabarawi,2 Mohey M Elmazar4 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, The British University in Egypt, Cairo, Egypt; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, The British University in Egypt, Cairo, Egypt Background: Pomegranate extract (PE is a natural product with potent antioxidant and anticancer activity because of its polyphenols content. The main purpose of this study was to maximize the PE chemotherapeutic efficacy by loading it in an optimized solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs formula.Materials and methods: The influence of independent variables, which were lipid concentration (X1, surfactant concentration (X2 and cosurfactant concentration (X3, on dependent ones, which were particle size (Y1, polydispersity index (Y2, zeta potential (Y3, entrapment efficiency (Y4 and cumulative % drug release (Y5, were studied and optimized using the Box–Behnken design. Fifteen formulations of PE-SLNs were prepared using hot homogenization followed by ultra-sonication technique. Response surface plots, Pareto charts and mathematical equations were produced to study the impact of independent variables on the dependent quality parameters. The anti-proliferative activity of the optimized formula was then evaluated in three different cancer cell lines, namely, MCF-7, PC-3 and HepG-2, in addition to one normal cell line, HFB-4.Results: The results demonstrated that the particle sizes ranged from 407.5 to 651.9 nm and the entrapment efficiencies ranged from 56.02 to 65.23%. Interestingly, the 50% inhibitory concentration of the optimized formula had more than a 40-fold improved effect on the cell growth inhibition in comparison with its free counterpart. Furthermore, it was more selective against

  3. Development of Houttuynia cordata Extract-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles for Oral Delivery: High Drug Loading Efficiency and Controlled Release

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    Ju-Heon Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Houttuynia cordata (H. cordata has been used for diuresis and detoxification in folk medicine as well as a herbal medicine with antiviral and antibacterial activities. H. cordata extract-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (H-SLNs were prepared with various concentration of poloxamer 188 or poloxamer 407 by a hot homogenization and ultrasonication method. H-SLNs dispersion was freeze-dried with or without trehalose as a cryoprotectant. The physicochemical characteristics of H-SLNs were evaluated by dynamic laser scattering (DLS, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Additionally, the in vitro release and in vitro cytotoxicity of H-SLNs were measured. Encapsulation efficiencies of H-SLNs (as quercitrin were 92.9–95.9%. The SEM images of H-SLNs showed that H-SLNs have a spherical morphology. DSC and FT-IR showed that there were no interactions between ingredients. The increased extent of particle size of freeze-dried H-SLNs with trehalose was significantly lower than that of H-SLNs without trehalose. H-SLNs provided sustained release of quercitrin from H. cordata extracts. Cell viability of Caco-2 cells was over 70% according to the concentration of various formulation. Therefore, it was suggested that SLNs could be good carrier for administering H. cordata extracts.

  4. Biosynthesis, characterization, and acute toxicity of Berberis tinctoria-fabricated silver nanoparticles against the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and the mosquito predators Toxorhynchites splendens and Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Amerasan, Duraisamy; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Nicoletti, Marcello; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Wei, Hui; Kalimuthu, Kandasamy; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Lo Iacono, Annalisa; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Aedes albopictus is an important arbovirus vector, including dengue. Currently, there is no specific treatment for dengue. Its prevention solely depends on effective vector control measures. In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biosynthesized using a cheap leaf extract of Berberis tinctoria as reducing and stabilizing agent and tested against Ae. albopictus and two mosquito natural enemies. AgNPs were characterized by using UV–vis spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. In laboratory conditions, the toxicity of AgNPs was evaluated on larvae and pupae of Ae. albopictus. Suitability Index/Predator Safety Factor was assessed on Toxorhynchites splendens and Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides. The leaf extract of B. tinctoria was toxic against larval instars (I–IV) and pupae of Ae. albopictus; LC50 was 182.72 ppm (I instar), 230.99 ppm (II), 269.65 ppm (III), 321.75 ppm (IV), and 359.71 ppm (pupa). B. tinctoria-synthesized AgNPs were highly effective, with LC50 of 4.97 ppm (I instar), 5.97 ppm (II), 7.60 ppm (III), 9.65 ppm (IV), and 14.87 ppm (pupa). Both the leaf extract and AgNPs showed reduced toxicity against the mosquito natural enemies M. thermocyclopoides and T. splendens. Overall, this study firstly shed light on effectiveness of B. tinctoria-synthesized AgNPs as an eco-friendly nanopesticide, highlighting the concrete possibility to employ this newer and safer tool in arbovirus vector control programs.

  5. Melilotoside Derivatives from Artemisia splendens (Asteraceae

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    Fariba H. Afshar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of solid-phase-extraction (SPE and reversed-phase preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (prep-HPLC of the methanolic extract of the aerial parts of Artemisia splendens (common name: “Asia Minor Wormwood”, an endemic Iranian species, afforded Z- and E-melilotosides (1 and 2, Z- and E-4-methoxy-melilotosides (3 and 4, and a new dimer, bis-ortho-Z-melilotoside (5, named: splendenoside. Whilst the structures of these compounds (1-5 were elucidated unequivocally by spectroscopic means, the in vitro free-radical-scavenging property of 1-5 was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay. This is the first report on the occurrence of any melilotoside derivatives in the genus Artemisia. Artemisia splendens, Asteraceae, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, free-radical scavenger, melilotoside, splendenoside

  6. Interspecific aggression and character displacement in the damselfly Calopteryx splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkkynen, K; Rantala, M J; Suhonen, J

    2004-07-01

    Problems in species recognition are thought to affect the evolution of secondary sexual characters mainly through avoidance of maladaptive hybridization. Another, but much less studied avenue for the evolution of sexual characters due to species recognition problems is through interspecific aggression. In the damselfly, Calopteryx splendens, males have pigmented wing spots as a sexual character. Large-spotted males resemble males of another species, Calopteryx virgo, causing potential problems in species recognition. In this study, we investigate whether there is character displacement in wing spot size and whether interspecific aggression could cause this pattern. We found first that wing spot size of C. splendens in populations decreased with increasing relative abundance of C. virgo. Secondly, C. virgo males were more aggressive towards large- than small-spotted C. splendens males. Thirdly, in interspecific contests C. virgo males had better territory holding ability than C. splendens males. These results suggest that interspecific aggression may have caused character displacement in wing spot size of C. splendens, because the intensity of aggression towards large-spotted males is likely to increase with relative abundance of C. virgo males. Thus, interspecific aggression may be an evolutionarily significant force that is able to cause divergence in secondary sexual characters. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  7. Clerodendrum splendens: a potential source of antimicrobials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaib, M.; Boota, F.

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial status of the bark and leaves of Clerodendrum splendens was evaluated.The inquisition had provided that the leaf and bark of the plant had exhibited maximum antimicrobial potential. The antibacterial activity was significant against S. aureus with the maximum effectiveness of 71 ± 0.6 mm displayed by the petroleum ether extracts of bark. Moreover, all the petroleum ether extracts exhibited maximum inhibitory effects against all the bacterial strains. The Gram negative strains, i.e. K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa and E. coli had provided good to satisfactory results within the range of 20 ± 0.8 mm to 69 ± 0.9 mm. Excellent activities were exhibited by leaf and bark extracts against the fungal pathogens with the maximum potential displayed by the petroleum ether extracts of leaf i.e. 57 ± 0.5 mm against A. oryzae. The MIC assays were carried out to further authenticate the results obtained by zones of inhibitions. The MIC potential exhibited by Gram negative bacteria for K. pneumoniae was evaluated to be > 0.032 mg/mL while for the S. aureus was roughly evaluated to be > 0.088. Moreover, the MIC activity displayed against other Gram negative bacterial strains was reported > 0.112 ± 0.7 mg/mL for E. coli and > 0.059 ± 1.0 mg/mL for P. aeruginosa. The MIC effectiveness for the fungal strain of A. niger and A. oryzae was evaluated to be 0.118 ± 0.7 mg/mL. (author)

  8. Nest success of the Indian House Crow Corvus splendens : An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nest success of the Indian House Crow Corvus splendens was studied in the urban area of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in late March to early May 2011. The study investigated nest success of the Indian House Crow in different tree species with varying canopy covers and heights. Fifty-five active nests and 38 inactive nests ...

  9. Multiple phosphoglucomutase alleles in Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, H S; Chan, K L; Dhaliwal, S S; Burton, J J; Cheong, W H; Mak, J W

    1980-09-15

    Multiple phosphoglucomutase (E.C. 2.7.5.1) alleles are found in the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens. The sample studied reveals 3 Pgm alleles whose frequencies are in good accord with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The most frequent allele is that controlling a phenotype with an intermediate electrophoretic mobility. Each Pgm allele determines a two-band electrophoretic pattern.

  10. Semi-automated tracking of behaviour of Betta splendens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durey, Maëlle; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Matessi, Giuliano

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel software system for animal behaviour tracking is described. It is used for tracking fish filmed in aquariums using a low quality acquisition system. The tracking is based on a multiscale template matching technique that finds both the position and the orientation...... of the tracked fish. The template is matched in the background subtracted frames, where the background is estimated using a median based approach. The system is very stable and has been used in a large behavioural study design to the use of the behavioural pattern known as mate choice copying in Betta splendens....

  11. Cannibalism and carnivory in Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, D D; Das, P K

    1992-09-01

    Laboratory reared larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens, which were previously starved for 24 hours, cannibalized eggs of their own kind or preyed upon the eggs of other species (Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi) present on the surface of water in small containers. Second and third instars consumed eggs faster than first and fourth instars. The first instar consumed larvae of its own kind faster than the other instars, in the absence of other prey. However, when prey larvae were provided, there was a significant fall in the rate of cannibalism.

  12. Lead tolerance and cellular distribution in Elsholtzia splendens using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tian, Shengke [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, Indian River Research and Education Center, Fort Pierce, FL 34945 (United States); Lu, Lingli; Shohag, M.J.I.; Liao, Haibing [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Xiaoe, E-mail: xyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elsholtzia splendens had a good ability of lead tolerance and accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb was mostly restricted to the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb and Ca shared most similar distribution patterns in E. splendens. - Abstract: Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the tolerance and spatial distribution of lead (Pb) in Elsholtzia splendens-a copper (Cu) accumulator plant using synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence. According to chlorophyll concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, E. splendens displayed certain tolerance at 100 {mu}M Pb treatment. Lead concentration in roots, stems and leaves of E. splendens reached 45,183.6, 1657.6, and 380.9 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. Pb was mostly accumulated in the roots, and there were also high concentrations of Pb been transported into stems and leaves. Micro-XRF analysis of the stem and leaf cross section revealed that Pb was mostly restricted in the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues of both stem and leaf of E. splendens. The correlation between distribution of K, Ca, Zn and Pb were analyzed. There were significant positive correlations (P < 0.01) among Pb and Ca, K, Zn distribution both in stem and leaf of E. splendens. However, among the three elements, Ca shared the most similar distribution pattern and the highest correlation coefficients with Pb in both stem and leaf cross section of E. splendens. This suggests that Ca may play an important role in Pb accumulation in stem and leaf of E. splendens.

  13. The House Crow (Corvus splendens: A Threat to New Zealand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Fraser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The house crow (Corvus splendens, a native of the Indian subcontinent, has shown a rapid expansion of habitat range across Eastern Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe and Asia. It is an adaptable, gregarious commensal bird which is regarded globally as an important pest species due to its impacts on livestock, agricultural and horticultural crops and indigenous fauna and as a fecal contaminator of human environments and water resources. Two Maxent (v3.3.3k models (A with presence data in Australia and (B with simulated entry data locations in New Zealand and a third ArcGIS model (C with environmental and social layers are used to determine an overall suitability index and establish a niche-based model of the potential spatial distribution for C. splendens within New Zealand. The results show that New Zealand, particularly the northern regions of North Island, has suitable environments for the establishment of the house crow. In order of suitability Model B showed highest potential land area suitability (31.84% followed by Model A (13.79% and Model C (10.89%. The potential for further expansion of this bird’s invasive range is high and, if New Zealand is invaded, impacts are likely to be significant.

  14. Novo hospedeiro e habitat para Neralsia splendens (Borgmeier, 1935 (Hymenoptera: Figitidade no Brasil New host and habitat for Neralsia splendens (Borgmeier, 1935 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae in Brazil

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Os Figitinae são parasitóides primários de larvas de dípteros. Na região Neotropical, poucos estudos têm sido realizados com esse grupo. Neste trabalho é relatado o novo hospedeiro e o habitat de Neralsia splendens (Borgmeier, 1935 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae coletadas em Oxysarcodexia thornax (Walker, 1849 (Diptera: Sarcophagidae, utilizando armadilhas com iscas de fezes humanas na Fazenda do Curso de Agronomia, em Itumbiara, Goiás, Brasil, em fevereiro de 2005. Foram coletados 9 espécimens do parasitóide N. splendens que emergiram de 50 pupas de O. thornax. A taxa de parasitismo obtida foi de 18,0%.The Figitinae are the primary parasitoids of dipterous larvae. Few studies have been done on this group in Neotropical region. This paper reports a new host and habitat of Neralsia splendens (Borgmeier, 1935 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae. The parasitoid was collected from Oxysarcodexia thornax (Walker, 1849 (Diptera: Sarcophagidae on traps containing feces humans baits, in Itumbiara, Goias, Brazil, at February 2005. A total of 9 specimens of the parasitoid N. splendens emerged from 50 pupae of O. thornax was collected. The parasitism rate was 18.0 %. This is a new record of the host (O. thornax and habitat (feces humans for N. splendens in Brazil.

  15. Time to death from starvation and compulsive killing by the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, D D; Das, P K

    1994-11-01

    Time to death from starvation and compulsive killing without eating of the prey by larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens were studied in the laboratory. The first and second instars survived without food for 3 days while third and fourth instars survived for 7.8 and 14 days, respectively. When the corresponding instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi or Culex quinquefasciatus were offered, the number of prey killed but not eaten ranged from 0 to 15 per 40 prey larvae. Compulsive killing of Ae. aegypti was mainly at its third instar by 9- and 10-day old T. splendens. Compulsive killing of An. stephensi was mainly at its second and third instars by young and older ages of T. splendens but older T. splendens also killed fourth instar of An. stephensi. Compulsive killing of Cx. quinquefasciatus was of all its instars and mainly by young T. splendens. There was a significant negative correlation between the amount of food eaten per predator and the number of prey killed compulsively. The number of larvae killed and eaten were much larger than number killed compulsively, except in the case of third instar Ae. aegypti and 9-10-day old T. splendens.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae) for predation of Aedes albopictus mosquito larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, T; Miyagi, I

    1992-07-01

    Biology of the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens (Wiedemann) was studied in the laboratory to provide baseline data for using the predatory larvae of this species against those of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in a biological control programme. The mean incubation time of Tx.splendens eggs was 43.8 h and the time required for newly-hatched larvae to initiate predation was 2.5 h. Mean numbers of prey larvae consumed and killed by each Tx.splendens larva totalled 389 and 345 respectively. The larval period of Tx.splendens was not significantly different for rearing individually or in groups of nine, with equal prey density, and duration of larval development was proportional to prey density. In mass rearing, larval cannibalism was usually observed during days 1-3 post-eclosion. The incidence of cannibalism decreased sharply on the fourth day after hatching when some larvae became fourth-instar. Adult female Tx.splendens usually commenced oviposition on day 4 after emergence. The number of eggs laid daily increased on day 7 and the peak oviposition of 6.3 eggs/female/day occurred on day 11. When oviposition containers were provided only intermittently, gravid females of Tx.splendens scattered most of their eggs on the dry floor of the cage. Viability of eggs laid by females aged 4-14 days was high (60-90%) but decreased to less than 40% as the females aged.

  17. The HYLOCOMIUM SPLENDENS use for research of Ignalina NPP vicinity contamination by Cs 137 and Co 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiponas, D.; Marchiulenene, D.

    2002-01-01

    The superficial distribution of Cs 137 and Co 60 and specific activity of these radionuclides in Hylocomium splendens in Ignalina NPP vicinity was investigated. The increase of Cs 137 and Co 60 specific activity in Hylocomium splendens was linked with increasing of these radionuclides activity in atmospheric deposits

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi facilitate rapid adaptation of Elsholtzia splendens to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Liang, Huijuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Luxi; Zhang, Huating; Liu, Jie; Wang, Suizi; Jin, Zexin

    2017-12-01

    Closely associated microbes have been shown to drive local adaptation of plants. However, few studies provide direct evidence, disclosing the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) in their rapid adaptation of plants toward heavy metal tolerance. Elsholtzia splendens is a Cu-tolerant plant that was used as a model plant to study seed morphological traits as well as traits related to seed germination and seedling growth. This was achieved after acclimation for two generations with 1000mg/kg CuSO 4 in either absence or presence of AMF. In the absence of AMF, acclimation to Cu for two generations significantly decreased surface area, perimeter length, and perimeter width of E. splendens seeds, as well as seedling survival rate and fresh weight of the radicle of seedlings. However, in the presence of AMF, both the germination rate and the germination index of E. splendens seeds as well as the fresh weights of hypocotyl and radicle significantly increased. These results revealed that after Cu acclimation treatment, seeds and seedlings that had been inoculated with AMF outperformed those without AMF inoculation under Cu addition, indicating that AMF can facilitate rapid adaptation of E. splendens to Cu stress. In addition, two generations of Cu acclimation under AMF absence significantly increased radicle length, while amplitude increased under AMF presence, indicating that the direct adaptive plasticity response of radicle length to Cu stress helps with the Cu stress adaptation of E. splendens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Feed of Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, (Regan, 1910 in open pond: live and formulated diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Sipaúba-Tavares

    Full Text Available Abstract The growth rate and percent survival of Betta splendens when submitted to formulated diet and live food treatments are evaluated. The three different diets were used and designated as: formulated diet (basal diet; live food diet (plankton and mixed diet (formulated diet with plankton. The live food diet contained plankton belonging to an open pond. High mortality was reported with live food (plankton treatment whereas higher percent survival occurred with formulated diet. Highest specific growth rate, weight gain and final weight were reported in the mixed diet treatment and were significantly different (p<0.01 from those in formulated diet and live food treatments. The gut contents of B. splendens in mixed diet and live food treatments comprised, Rotifera and Bacillariophyceae species in high percentages or rather, over 78% of total organisms. Lecane sp. was the most ingested zooplankton species by B. splendens in both treatments (mixed diet and live food, with the phytoplankton species Asterionella sp. and Melosira sp. respectively in mixed diet and in live food, respectively. Results indicated that the formulated diet influenced the water parameters dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids, total dissolved solids and pH. The live food in the open pond was not enough to improve the growth rate and percent survival of B. splendens. The growth performance of B. splendens; had the best results with mixed diet which was capable of maintaining species’s survival (82% and development in artificial conditions, benefiting the culture management of ornamental fish.

  20. Development of Betta splendens embryos and larvae reveals variation in pigmentation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Alexis N; Lyvers, Benjamin H; Ferrill, Rachel N; Johnson, Rachel L; Dumaine, Anne Marie; Sly, Belinda J

    2016-06-01

    Vertebrate pigmentation provides an ideal system for studying the intersections between evolution, genetics, and developmental biology. Teleost fish, with their accessible developmental stages and intense and diverse colours produced by chromatophores, are an ideal group for study. We set out to test whether Betta splendens is a good model organism for studying the evolution and development of diverse pigmentation. Our results demonstrate that B. splendens can be bred to produce large numbers of offspring with easily visualized pigment cells. Depending on the colour of the parents, there was variation in larval pigmentation patterns both within and between breeding events. In juveniles the developing adult pigmentation patterns showed even greater variation. These results suggest that B. splendens has great potential as a model organism for pigmentation studies.

  1. Characterization of the surface and interfacial properties of the lamina splendens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexwinkle, Joe T.; Hunt, Heather K.; Pfeiffer, Ferris M.

    2017-06-01

    Joint disease affects approximately 52.5 million patients in the United States alone, costing 80.8 billion USD in direct healthcare costs. The development of treatment programs for joint disease and trauma requires accurate assessment of articular cartilage degradation. The articular cartilage is the interfacial tissue between articulating surfaces, such as bones, and acts as low-friction interfaces. Damage to the lamina splendens, which is the articular cartilage's topmost layer, is an early indicator of joint degradation caused by injury or disease. By gaining comprehensive knowledge on the lamina splendens, particularly its structure and interfacial properties, researchers could enhance the accuracy of human and animal biomechanical models, as well as develop appropriate biomimetic materials for replacing damaged articular cartilage, thereby leading to rational treatment programs for joint disease and injury. Previous studies that utilize light, electron, and force microscopy techniques have found that the lamina splendens is composed of collagen fibers oriented parallel to the cartilage surface and encased in a proteoglycan matrix. Such orientation maximizes wear resistance and proteoglycan retention while promoting the passage of nutrients and synovial fluid. Although the structure of the lamina splendens has been explored in the literature, the low-friction interface of this tissue remains only partially characterized. Various functional models are currently available for the interface, such as pure boundary lubrication, thin films exuded under pressure, and sheets of trapped proteins. Recent studies suggest that each of these lubrication models has certain advantages over one another. Further research is needed to fully model the interface of this tissue. In this review, we summarize the methods for characterizing the lamina splendens and the results of each method. This paper aims to serve as a resource for existing studies to date and a roadmap of the

  2. Laboratory observations on Toxorhynchites splendens Wiedemann in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanadisai, L; Benjaphong, N; Phanthumachinda, B

    1984-09-01

    The biology of Toxorhynchites splendens predaceous larvae which breed in domestic containers like Aedes aegypti was studied. Egg stage lasts 52.64 +/- 0.13 hours. There are four larval instars lasting 2.38 +/- 0.04, 1.24 +/- 0.26, 8.09 +/- 1.6 and 28.78 +/- 5.39 days respectively. Pupal development lasts 5.18 +/- 1.06 days. The adult life span is 29.55 +/- 8.06 days. Growth increment was by measuring the size of head capsule. Number of second instar prey larvae consumed by 1 to 4 instars predaceous larvae were 9.32 +/- 1.77, 5.94 +/- 1.11, 37.03 +/- 7.05 and 273.06 +/- 50.69 respectively. The fourth instar was very aggressive especially 2-3 days before pupation when it killed without eating them. The construction of biological life table indicated net reproductive of increase (R0) of 16.3, capacity for increase (rc) of 0.094, finite rate of increase (lambda) of 1.08 and mean duration of a generation (Tc) of 44.445 days. The mortality at the first and second larval instar was high and the calculated population index (I) was 14.81.

  3. Susceptibility of first instar Toxorhynchites splendens to malathion, naled and resmethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, N S; Schreiber, E T; Hester, P G; Hallmon, C F; Olson, M A; Shaffer, K R

    1993-03-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to measure the response of first instar Toxorhynchites splendens to commonly used mosquito adulticides: malathion, naled and resmethrin. The concentrations of pesticide causing 50% mortality (LC50) after 24 h was 2.87, 69.1 and 623 ppb for resmethrin, malathion and naled, respectively. Naled was determined to be the least toxic of the 3 compounds tested for integrated use with Tx. splendens. The latter assessments were based on comparisons between laboratory-derived dose-response curves and maximum concentrations reached in standing water calculated using standard application rates.

  4. A new mutant, White larva, of the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens: genetics and cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, M; Tsukamoto, M; Miyagi, I

    1990-09-01

    A strain of a new body-color mutant, white larva (wl), was established from a field-collected wild-type strain of Toxorhynchites splendens. The mutant can be distinguished from the wild type in both the larval and pupal stages, but not in the adult. Crossing experiments confirmed its mode of inheritance to be a single recessive system. This is the first visible mutant found in Tx. splendens. Larvae of the wl phenotype seem to be recognized as prey by other individuals in mass larvae rearing.

  5. Toxicity of insecticides to Toxorhynchites splendens and three vector mosquitos and their sublethal effect on biocontrol potential of the predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, D D; Das, P K

    1996-03-01

    Toxicity of six larvicides ie fenthion, temephos, malathion, deltamethrin, alphamethrin (Fendona), OMS 3031 and five adulticides ie malathion, fenitrothion, propoxur, deltamethrin, permethrin to Aedes aegypti, Culex quiquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi and the predator, Toxorhynchites splendens was studied for evaluating safety margin. Concentrations of alphamethrin that killed 50% larvae of T. splendens were 53 and 12 times more than that which killed Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti. In case of deltamethrin, concentrations required to kill 50% larvae of T. splendens were 14 and 5 times more than that required against other two species. Other larvicides tested were equally toxic to both T. splendens and vector mosquitos. There was no significant difference in the toxicity of larvicides to T. splendens and An. stephensi. Deltamethrin was 25-132 times less toxic to adults of T. splendens in comparison to vector mosquitos. For other adulticides the range was 1-10. Immature developmental time of T. splendens was not affected by any of the insecticides tested. However, predation rate was lowered when larvae of Ae. aegypti previously exposed to fenthion and temephos were offered. Whereas, alphamethrin and OMS 3031 did not affect the feeding rate of the predator. There was a significant reduction in the pupal weight and pupation as a result of the predator feeding on the insecticide treated prey. There was a significant negative relationship between rate of pupation and dosage. The present study indicates that synthetic pyrethroids owing to their higher safety margin can be used in an integrated vector management program.

  6. [Isolation and biodiversity of copper-resistant bacteria from rhizosphere soil of Elsholtzia splendens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Leni; He, Linyan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Wenhui; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xiafang

    2009-10-01

    Isolation and characterization of rhizosphere copper-resistant bacteria from a copper accumulator plant Elsholtzia splendens were investigated. Cultivable Cu-resistant bacteria were isolated by plating and screening from rhizosphere soils of Elsholtzia splendens growing on a copper mine tailing. Bacteria were characterized regarding characteristics that may be relevant for a beneficial plant-microbe interaction--Cu tolerance, phosphate-solubilizing, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, siderophore and indoleacetic acid production, and further classified by restriction analysis of 16S rDNA (ARDRA). Strains that produced ACC deaminase were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Twenty-seven Cu-resistant strains were isolated from rhizosphere soil of Elsholtzia splendens and classified by ARDRA in 7 different taxonomic groups at the similarity level of 60% . All strains produced IAA or their derivatives, 44.4% of the strains produced a very high level of siderophores, and five strains were able to grow on ACC as the sole nitrogen source. Strains 2EBS12, 2EBS13, 2EBS15 and 3EBS11 were identified as Acinetobacter, strain 2EBS14 was essentially consistent Alcaligenes. Cu-resistant rhizobacteria isolated from Elsholtzia splendens have abundant characteristics relative to promoting plant growth and genetic diversity, rhizobacteria Acinetobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. contained ACC deaminase activity.

  7. Risky behaviors: effects of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae) predator on the behavior of three mosquito species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Fadzly, Nik; Yusof, Nur Aishah; Dieng, Hamady

    2015-01-01

    Viable biocontrol agents for mosquito control are quite rare, therefore improving the efficacy of existing biological agents is an important study. We need to have a better understanding of the predation-risk behavioral responses toward prey. This research examined prey choices by Toxorhynchites splendens by monitoring the behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Anopheles sinensis larvae when exposed to the predator. The results show that Tx. splendens prefers to consume Ae. aegypti larvae. The larvae exhibited different behavioral responses when Tx. splendens was present which suggest vulnerability in the presence of predators. "Thrashing" and "browsing" activities were greater in Ae. aegypti larvae. Such active and risky movements could cause vulnerability for the Ae. aegypti larvae due to increasing of water disturbance. In contrast, Ae. albopictus and An. sinensis larvae exhibited passive, low-risk behaviors, spending most of the time on the "wall" position near the edges of the container. We postulated that Ae. aegypti has less ability to perceive cues from predation and could not successfully alter its behavior to reduce risk of predation risk compared with Ae. albopictus and An. sinensis. Our results suggest that Tx. splendens is a suitable biocontrol agent in controlling dengue hemorrhagic vector, Ae. aegypti. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  8. Survival Rate and Growth of Fighting Fish Larvae (Betta splendens Regan Fed on Various Live Foods

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    T. Budiardi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Larval of fighting fish (Betta splendens Regan requires precise live foods for its growth and survival. In this experiment, fish larvae were fed on either Paramecium + Artemia, Paramecium + Artemia + Tubifex, Paramecium + Moina, or Paramecium + Moina + Tubifex. The fish were fed Paramecium from day-2 till day-7 after hatching. There after, the live food was changed according to the treatments till day-28.  Results showed that fish fed on Paramecium + Artemia significantly had the highest total length (12.63 mm than other treatments (11.86 mm. On the other hand, survival rate of fish had no significant affected by the treatments. Keywords: fighting fish, Betta splendens, Paramecium, Moina, Artemia, Tubifex, larvae   ABSTRAK Larva ikan betta (Betta splendens Regan membutuhkan jenis pakan alami yang tepat bagi kelangsungan hidup dan pertumbuhannya. Pada penelitian ini, larva ikan diberi pakan berupa Paramecium + Artemia, Paramecium + Artemia + Tubifex, Paramecium + Moina, atau Paramecium + Moina + Tubifex.  Ikan diberi pakan pakan berupa Paramecium dari hari ke-2 hingga hari ke-7. Setelah itu, pemberian pakan alami diubah berdasarkan masing-masing perlakuan hingga hari ke-28.  Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa ikan yang diberi pakan Paramecium + Artemia memiliki tubuh secara signifikan lebih panjang (12,63 mm dibandingkan perlakuan lainnya (11,86 mm.  Sementara itu, kelangsungan hidup tidak dipengatuhi oleh perlakuan. Kata kunci: ikan betta, Betta splendens, Paramecium, Moina, Artemia, Tubifex, larva

  9. Growth of alfonsino Beryx splendens Lowe 1834 in the South-West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age and growth of alfonsino Beryx splendens from South-West Indian Ocean seamounts were studied based on whole otolith readings. Ages of the fish under study ranged between one year and 14 years (15.5–43.5cm fork length). Age distribution was related to depth. The von Bertalanffy growth parameters for males were ...

  10. Symplasmic and apoplasmic transport inside feather moss stems of Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska, K; Turzanska, M; Nilsson, M-C

    2017-11-10

    The ubiquitous feather mosses Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens form a thick, continuous boundary layer between the soil and the atmosphere, and play important roles in hydrology and nutrient cycling in tundra and boreal ecosystems. The water fluxes among these mosses and environmental factors controlling them are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether feather mosses are capable of internal transport and to provide a better understanding of species-specific morphological traits underlying this function. The impacts of environmental conditions on their internal transport rates were also investigated. Cells involved in water and food conduction in P. schreberi and H. splendens were identified by transmission electron microscopy. Symplasmic and apoplasmic fluorescent tracers were applied to the moss stems to determine the routes of internal short- and long-distance transport and the impact of air humidity on the transport rates. Symplasmic transport over short distances occurs via food-conducting cells in both mosses. Pleurozium schreberi is also capable of apoplasmic internal long-distance transport via a central strand of hydroids. These are absent in H. splendens. Reduced air humidity significantly increased the internal transport of both species, and the increase was significantly faster for P. schreberi than for H. splendens. Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens are capable of internal transport but the pathway and conductivity differ due to differences in stem anatomy. These results help explain their varying desiccation tolerance and possibly their differing physiology and autecology and, ultimately, their impact on ecosystem functioning. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Field observation on the efficacy of Toxorhynchites splendens (Wiedemann) as a biocontrol agent against Aedes albopictus (Skuse) larvae in a cemetery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamah, M A; Sulaiman, S; Omar, B

    2011-08-01

    This study explored the efficacy of Toxorhynchites splendens, predator of Aedes albopictus as a biocontrol agent. There was a negative correlation between Ae. albopictus larval population and Tx. splendens larval population in ovitraps (r=-0.287, R²=0.0821). The correlation is higher between the mean number of Ae. albopictus larvae per ovitrap and the number of Tx. splendens larvae in an ovitrap (r=-0.987, R²=0.9737). Larvae of Tx. splendens were observed to co-exist with larvae of Ae. albopictus and Culex fuscocephala in the ovitraps placed in the study area. The existence of Tx. splendens larvae in the study area coincides with their habit, preferring to breed in bamboo stumps. A total of 480 ovitraps were inspected for 30-week study period and 281 ovitraps were positive with Ae. albopictus larvae respectively. There was a significant difference between numbers of ovitrap positive for Ae. albopictus larvae with number of Tx. splendens larvae in the ovitraps (ANOVA, F((4,475)) 2.655, p<0.05). Of 281 ovitraps positive with Ae. albopictus larvae, 255 ovitraps contained only one Tx. splendens larva each. Only one ovitrap contained four, the most number of Tx. splendens larvae (p< 0.05). Thus, Tx. splendens could be utilised as an alternative for dengue vector control programme.

  12. Ultimate costs of sporophyte production in the clonal moss Hylocomium splendens

    OpenAIRE

    Rydgren, Knut; Økland, Rune H.

    2002-01-01

    A richly sporophyte-producing population of the dioecious perennial clonal moss Hylocomium splendens was followed for five years in order to investigate the longterm costs of sporophyte production. Female mature segments were divided into two subpopulations: sporophyte producing and reference without sporophytes. Ultimate (long-term) population growth rates of l 5 1.091 and 1.258, respectively, were found for the two subpopulations by building separate deterministic transition ...

  13. Influence of container design on predation rate of potential biocontrol agent, Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae) against dengue vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, N; Zuharah, W F

    2014-03-01

    Toxorhynchites splendens larvae are a natural predator of dengue vector mosquito larvae, Aedes albopictus. This study was carried out to evaluate the predation rate of Tx. splendens third instar larvae on Ae. albopictus larvae in 24 h. Each predator was offered prey at a density between 10 to 50 individuals. Predation rate of Tx. splendens were also tested with two manipulated factors; various types of container and different water volumes. The experiment was evaluated in man-made containers (tin cans, plastic drinking glasses and rubber tires) and natural container (bamboo stumps) which were filled with different water volumes (full, half full, 1/4 full, and 1/8 full). The prey density and the characteristics of the container were found as significant factors which influence the predation rate of Tx. splendens. The predator consumed significantly more prey at higher prey densities (40 and 50 preys) compared to the lowest density (10 preys) (F=3.935, df=4, p=0.008). The results showed significantly higher consumption in horizontal shaped container of rubber tire than in vertical shape of bamboo stumps (F=3.100, df=3, p=0.029). However, the water volume had no significant effect on predation rate of Tx. splendens (F=1.736, df=3, p=0.162). We generally suggest that Tx. splendens is best to be released in discarded tires or any other containers with horizontal shape design with wide opening since Tx. splendens can become more effective in searching prey in this type of container design. This predator is also a suitable biocontrol candidates to be introduced either in wet and dry seasons in Malaysia.

  14. A new densovirus isolated from the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanakitsakul, Sa-Nga; Boonnak, Kobporn; Auethavornanan, Kusuma; Jairungsri, Aroonroong; Duangjinda, Thaneeya; Puttatesk, Punjaporn; Thongrungkiat, Supatra; Malasit, Prida

    2007-03-01

    A new densovirus was isolated and characterized in laboratory strains of Toxorhynchites splendens. The virus was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from mosquitoes reared in our laboratory. PCR fragments from each mosquito were compared by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and found to be indistinguishable. Thus, it is likely the densoviruses from these mosquitoes contain homologous nucleotide sequences. The PCR fragment corresponding to a 451 bp densovirus structural gene segment from each of 5 mosquitoes had 100% identical nucleotide sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the structural gene sequence suggests the newly isolated densovirus is more closely related to Aedes aegypti densovirus (AaeDNV) than to Aedes albopictus densovirus (AalDNV). Analysis of offspring and predated larvae suggests that vertical and horizontal transmission are responsible for chronic infections in this laboratory strain of Toxorhynchites splendens. The virion DNA is 4.2 kb in size, is closely related to, but distinct from, known densoviruses in the genera Brevidensovirus and Contravirus. Thevirus is tentatively named Toxorhynchites splendens densovirus (TsDNV).

  15. Salivary gland of Toxorhynchites splendens Wiedemann (Diptera: Culicidae): ultrastructural morphology and electrophoretic protein profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyapan, Narissara; Choochote, Wej; Jitpakdi, Atchariya; Bates, Paul A

    2004-07-01

    The salivary glands of male and female Toxorhynchites splendens have the same morphology, and they are paired organs lying on either side of the esophagus. Each gland is composed of two identical tubular lobes, joined together at the end of the proximal region. In the gland, a salivary duct extends through the length of each lobe. The general cellular architecture of the salivary gland of this mosquito is unique. No secretory cavity was found in any cell, and the salivary materials are secreted from long microvilli and collect in a periductal space surrounding the duct. In addition, a number of mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a very large nucleus were observed, suggesting a high energy requirement for producing the salivary proteins involved in sugar feeding. The size of the gland is approximately 50 microm in diameter and 1.5 mm in length. These dimensions correlate with high protein content of these salivary glands (2.88+/-0.14 microg/gland pair). Sodium dodecyl sulfatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed that the electrophoretic protein profiles of the male and female salivary glands were identical. No dominant major proteins were found. Compared with Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes, the protein profile of T. splendens was similar to that observed in the males of these other species but different to that shown by the females, thus making T. splendens an excellent organism for studying the biochemistry of sugar feeding in mosquitoes.

  16. Phytochemical Composition and Biological Activities of Uvaria chamae and Clerodendoron splendens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatus Ebere Okwu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Uvaria chamae P. Beauv and Clerodendron splendens A Cheval are known to have various medicinal and therapeutic properties. Their anti-inflammatory and oxytocic properties were assessed in this study. The extracts and aspirin were found to inhibit carrageenan-induced paw oedema on albino rats and mice with a strong activity in aspirin having (80.43 % inhibition while U. chamae and C. splendens have 69.57% and 47.83% inhibition respectively. The plants extract exhibition and uterine contraction activity on guinea pig. Phytochemical studies on the plants revealed the presence of bioactive components comprising flavonoids (0.70 – 5.70 mg. 100 g-1, alkaloids (0.81-5.40 mg. 100 g-1, tannins (0.40 – 3.60 mg. 100 g-1, saponins (0.38 – 2.10 mg. 100 g-1 and phenols (0.08 – 0.10 mg. 100 g-1. These bioactive compounds may be responsible for the medicinal properties of U. chaemae and C. splendens that form the basis of their use in herbal medicine in Nigeria.

  17. GROWTH AND COLOUR PERFORMANCE OF THE CROSSBREED MARBLE STRAIN Betta splendens AND Betta imbellis

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    Eni Kusrini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Betta ornamental fish of marble strain is a strain which is prefered by the hobbyists, because of its unique color, expensive price, and difficult to obtain the fish color strains. Therefore strain marble betta fish is still dominant for export quality for national and international contests. The aim of this study was to observe the growth and color performance of the crossedbreed marble strains of wild betta, Betta imbellis crossed with Betta splendens. The hybrids of B. imbellis (f x B. splendens (m (D had a specific length and weight rate, (1,113 ± 0.04%/day; 2,531 ± 0.14%/day; 26.61 ± 2.02 mm which was better than that of the hybrids B. imbellis (m x B. splendens (f (C (1,099 ± 0.02%/day; 2,244 ± 0.13%/day; 25.97 ± 1.33 mm; and 0.0027 ± 0.0003 mm. However, the survival rate of the C hybrids (42.19 ± 11.42% was higher than those of D (33.67%-17.08%. Based on the obtained results of the color identification the hybrids had as many as 15 characters of color, homozygous strains of marble which became the target of as much as 1%.

  18. Predatory activity of Rhantus sikkimensis and larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens on mosquito larvae in Darjeeling, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Gautam; Ash, Anirban; Saha, Goutam K

    2006-06-01

    Predation potential of the dytiscid beetle, Rhantus sikkimensis Regimbart 1899 and the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens Wiedemann 1819 occurring along with the larval stages of the mosquitoes in the annual lentic water bodies of Darjeeling was evaluated using the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say 1823 as preys, in the laboratory under simulated natural conditions. Field collected R. sikkimensis and larvae of Tx. splendens were offered IV instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus to observe the rate of predation, at varying prey and predator densities. Based on the data obtained on the predation for a period of three consecutive days, two indices of predation, predatory impact (PI) and clearance rate (CR) values were estimated, and compared between the predator species. The rate of predation of IV instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae by R. sikkimensis ranged between 21.56 and 86.89 larvae per day, depending on the prey and predator densities. The PI value remained between 18.67 and 35.33 larvae/day depending on prey densities, while the CR ranged between 2.21 and 2.23 larvae litres/day/predator. Compared to these, the Tx. splendens larvae consumed the prey larvae at the rate of 0.67 to 34.22 larvae per day, depending on the prey and predator densities. The PI value ranged between 7.67 and 11.33 larvae/day, and the CR value ranged between 1.41 and 1.76 larvae litres/day/predator. The rate of predation, CR values and PI values of R. sikkimensis and Tx. splendens varied significantly. Both the predators R. sikkimensis and larvae of Tx. splendens can consume a good number of mosquito larvae, though the rate of consumption between the two predators vary owing to the difference in the life history traits and features. It can be assumed that these predators play an important role in larval population regulation of mosquitoes and thereby impart an effect on species composition and interactions in the aquatic insect communities of Darjeeling Hills, India.

  19. Preparation and characterisation of Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract loaded chitosan-collagen-starch membrane: role in wound healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, B; Veena, B; Jayachandran, V P; Shilpa, Joy

    2015-05-01

    Engineered scaffolds made from natural biomaterials are crucial elements in tissue engineering strategies. In this study, biological scaffold like chitosan-collagen-starch membrane (CCSM) loaded with the antibacterial agent, Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract was explored for enhanced regeneration of epithelial tissue during wound healing. Collagen was extracted from Rachycentron canadum fish skin. Membranous scaffold was prepared by mixing collagen, starch and chitosan in a fixed proportion, loaded with aqueous extract of P. granatum and its anti-pseudomonal activity was studied. Morphological characterization by SEM and mechanical property like tensile strength of the membrane were studied. Excision wound of 2 cm(2) size was induced in Guinea pig and the effect of P. granatum extract loaded CCSM in wound healing was studied. The SEM image showed deep pores in the membrane and also possessed good tensile strength. Wound surface area was reduced prominently in the experimental group with P. granatum extract loaded CCSM when compared to the group with unloaded membrane and the one with no membrane. Punica granatum extract loaded CCSM has antipseudomonal property and supported enhanced epithelial cell proliferation without leaving a scar after wound healing. This has significant therapeutic application in membranous scaffold mediated skin repair and regeneration.

  20. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Desert Herbaceous Achnatherum splendens (Achnatherum Seedlings and Identification of Salt Tolerance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Achnatherum splendens is an important forage herb in Northwestern China. It has a high tolerance to salinity and is, thus, considered one of the most important constructive plants in saline and alkaline areas of land in Northwest China. However, the mechanisms of salt stress tolerance in A. splendens remain unknown. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies can be used for global gene expression profiling. In this study, we examined sequence and transcript abundance data for the root/leaf transcriptome of A. splendens obtained using an Illumina HiSeq 2500. Over 35 million clean reads were obtained from the leaf and root libraries. All of the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq reads were assembled de novo into a total of 126,235 unigenes and 36,511 coding DNA sequences (CDS. We further identified 1663 differentially-expressed genes (DEGs between the salt stress treatment and control. Functional annotation of the DEGs by gene ontology (GO, using Arabidopsis and rice as references, revealed enrichment of salt stress-related GO categories, including “oxidation reduction”, “transcription factor activity”, and “ion channel transporter”. Thus, this global transcriptome analysis of A. splendens has provided an important genetic resource for the study of salt tolerance in this halophyte. The identified sequences and their putative functional data will facilitate future investigations of the tolerance of Achnatherum species to various types of abiotic stress.

  1. SENSITIVITY AND SPECIFICITY OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY DSSE10 IN HEAD SQUASH TOXORHYNCHITES SPLENDENS USING IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL PEROXIDASE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tika Fiona Sari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus are transmitted from human to human by the bites of infective female Aedesmosquitoes from subgenus Stegomyia. One of the way to detect Dengue virus antigen is by usingimmunohistochemical technique. This method was reported to detect dengue vims antigen in lowlevels. The aims of this study is to measure sensitivity and specificity of monoclonal antibodyDSSE10 using SBPC to detect antigen Dengue virus in head squash Toxorhynchites splendenswere infected with dengue patient serum and RT-PCR as gold standart. Artificially-infected Tx.splendens mosquitoes with serum positif dengue virus were used as infectious samples and noninfectedTx. splendens mosquitoes were used as control negative. The immunohistochemichalSBPC assay using monoclonal antibody DSSE10 then applied in mosquitoes head squash todetect Dengue vims antigen. RT-PCR as a gold standart was applied in each mosquito thorax.The result were analyzed by descriptive stasistic test and 2x2 diagnostic test table. Monoclonalantibody DSSE10 using immunohistochemical SBPC assay in head squash Tx. splendens wasgave sensitivity 87,09% and specificity 92,5%. Conclussion of this study is DSSE10 Monoclonalantibodies can be used as primary antibodies for the detection of dengue vims antigen inmosquito head squashKeywords: Dengue viruses, SBPC, antibodies DSSE10, head squash, Toxorhynchitessplendens' Virus Dengue ditularkan dari orang ke orang melalui gigitan nyamuk Aedes dari subgenusStegomyia. Salah satu cara untuk mendeteksi antigen vims Dengue adalah dengan menggunakanteknik imunohistokimia. Metode imunohistokimia dilaporkan dapat mendeteksi antigen vimsDengue dalam kadar yang rendah. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah melakukan evaluasi sensitivitasdan spesifitas antibodi monoklonal DSSE10 dengan metode imunohistokimia Streptavidin BiotinPeroxidase Complex (SBPC untuk mendeteksi antigen Dengue melalui scdiaan head squashnyamuk Toxorhynchites splendens yang diinfeksi dengan scrum penderita

  2. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  3. Effect of copper tolerant Elsholtzia splendens on bacterial community associated with Commelina communis on a copper mine spoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruyi; Guo, Fuyu; Li, Jing; Su, Nannan; Shao, Zongyuan; Zan, Shuting

    2016-08-01

    Facilitation, or positive plant-plant interaction, has received increasing concern from ecologists over the last two decades. Facilitation may occur through direct mitigation of severe environments or indirect mediation by a third participant from the same or different trophic levels. The copper (Cu) tolerant species Elsholtzia splendens facilitates the establishment and growth of co-occurring Commelina communis through indirect enrichment of microbial activity. However, whether and how E. splendens impacts the microbial community that is associated with C. communis is less known. We characterized the soil bacterial community in the rhizosphere of C. communis in the absence and presence of E. splendens using PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and sequencing. The result showed that the richness of the bacterial community increased, but diversity and evenness remained similar, in the presence of E. splendens. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria were the most dominant bacteria. The relative abundance of dominant and minor bacterial groups showed distinctly different responses to E. splendens. Principal component analysis and redundancy analysis indicated that variation of the bacterial community was determined by multiple factors and might be driven by the tested soil parameters collectively, or alternatively changed through plant root exudates or other microorganisms. Our results enhance the understanding of how the bacterial community associated with a beneficiary plant responds to a benefactor plant and suggests that the changes of bacterial community composition may have far-reaching influence on plant-soil feedback and the aboveground plant community in the long run. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Seletividade de sálvia (Salvia splendens ao herbicida oxyfluorfen veiculado à palha de arroz Selectivity of Salvia splendens to oxyfluorfen applied to rice straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.F.L. Pivetta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O manejo de plantas daninhas em canteiros de floríferas é um dos principais aspectos que interferem na manutenção dos jardins. Dessa forma, este trabalho teve como objetivo estudar a possibilidade de veiculação do oxyfluorfen à palha de arroz e a seletividade da sálvia (Salvia splendens, uma das principais floríferas produzidas e comercializadas no Brasil, ao herbicida. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, no esquema fatorial 4 x 3, com quatro repetições. Os tratamentos foram quatro quantidades de palha de arroz (0, 4, 6 e 8 t ha-1 combinadas com três doses do herbicida oxyfluorfen (0, 1 e 2 L ha-1. Observou-se que os tratamentos que levaram à veiculação do herbicida (nas duas doses testadas e nas três quantidades de palha apresentaram controle de plantas daninhas sem que efeitos fitotóxicos severos fossem observados nas plantas de sálvia. A pulverização direta do herbicida sobre o solo e as plantas de sálvia não se mostrou viável. O tratamento que proporcionou controle satisfatório de plantas daninhas sem causar danos às plantas de sálvia e que, por isso, pode ser recomendado foi o que recebeu o herbicida na dose de 2 L ha-1, veiculado a 4 t ha-1 de palha de arroz.Weed control is one of the main constrains to flower garden maintenance. This work aimed to study the possibility of translocating oxyfluorfen to rice straw and of selectivity of Salvia splendens, one of the main ornamental species produced and commercialized in Brazil, to the herbicide. A randomized block design was used in the factorial scheme 4 x 3, with four repetitions. The treatments consisted of four amounts of rice straw (0, 4, 6 and 8 t ha-1 combined with three doses of oxyfluorfen (0, 1 and 2 L ha-1. The results showed that the treatments that led to translocation of the herbicide to rice straw showed great weed control, without any high phytotoxicty damage to the salvia plants. The treatment receiving g 4 L ha-1 of herbicide in 2

  5. Fighting fish (Betta splendens) bubble nests do not inhibit microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexandria C; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2012-12-01

    Some organisms produce antimicrobial substances in nesting foam to favorably manipulate the environment to which their developing offspring are exposed. We tested if fighting fish Betta splendens foamy nest material, which is comprised of bubbles produced in the oral cavity of nesting males, has antimicrobial properties against a pathogenic bacteria (Edwardsiella tarda), a nonpathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli), or a pathogenic oomycete (Saprolegnia parasitica). We also tested if exposure to nest material increases larval survival by performing in vitro fertilizations and individually incubating eggs in bubble nest extract or tank water (control). Our results show no evidence of antimicrobial properties of bubble nests. On the contrary, bubble nests provided favorable microenvironments for the growth of Saprolegnia parasitica. Our results confirm earlier work citing the importance of male nest attendance, and suggest that the mechanism responsible for decreased survival in the absence of attending males is pathogenic microbes. 2012 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC

  6. Factors affecting oviposition site preference by Toxorhynchites splendens in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, G L; Apperson, C S; Clay, W

    1988-03-01

    In a series of laboratory oviposition assays, gravid Toxorhynchites splendens exhibited a preference for cups containing Aedes aegypti larval rearing water, but not for cups containing liquid cultures of bacteria, live Ae. aegypti in distilled water, Ae. aegypti larval holding water with reduced bacterial contamination, or methyl propionate at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% in distilled water. Preoviposition flight behavior was elicited by dark-colored containers, but few eggs were deposited if they contained no water. An invisible source of humidity placed in cups enhanced oviposition, but a reflective surface placed in dry cups did not. It is concluded that this species is strongly influenced by humidity and visual stimuli in the acceptance of a site for oviposition.

  7. Population interaction of Toxorhynchites splendens and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, D D; Das, P K

    1994-12-01

    Population interaction of Toxorhynchites splendens and Aedes aegypti in relation to the complexity of the breeding habitats and their initial number was studied in the laboratory. The predator and the prey were introduced in different ratios in the colony cages (1 m3) with different oviposition structures. Predator-prey interaction lasted for 5-9 weeks without structural complexity of the oviposition containers. When there was a structural complexity, their interaction lasted for 18 weeks. During the interaction period, Ae. aegypti number was at a lower level. Therefore, both structural complexities of the breeding sites and initial predator and prey number play a crucial role in establishing stable interaction between them at a lower threshold level for a longer period.

  8. Estimation of predation by the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens on the aquatic stages of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic Amalraj, D; Das, P K

    1998-03-01

    Predation by instars of Toxorhynchites splendens on aquatic stages of Aedes aegypti was studied by estimating functional response parameters such as attack rate (a') and handling time (Th) in the laboratory. The predator displayed typical type-II functional response, similar to that of most insect predators when presented with increasing densities of any given size class of prey. Second instar predator attacked prey significantly at higher rate than the other instars. Small prey were attacked at higher rate than the predation on larger prey. Except second instar predator, other instars showed significant reduction in a' with increase in Th. Foraging surface area did not influence the predation rate. Predation was high at high water temperature and this was more prominent in the second instar predator. However, prey handling time was independent of the water temperature. Modeling of the predation of mixed age populations of prey and the predator through this short-term functional response experiment is discussed.

  9. Assessment of (Fouquieria splendens ssp. breviflora Cell Cultures Response Under to Water Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Angélica Guerrero Zúñiga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell cultures are homogenous experimental systems, highly controllable that allow the study of short and large water stress adaptations without the interference of the different tissues and development of plants. An approach to understand these adaptations is through the presence of induced proteins; as a result of changes in genetic expression. This work analyze the response of Fouquieria splendens ssp. breviflora cell cultures exposed to abscisic acid (ABA, through the electrophoretic characterization of quantity and quality of stress induced proteins. There were recorded low molecular weight polypeptides (< 35kDa, common in experiments under ABA 10mM, followed by the association with 20 and 30mM ABA conditions, with a particularly response of cell cultures without the stress agent.

  10. Chemical components of Ardisia splendens leaves and their activity against coxsackie A16 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nguyen, Thi Hong; Vien, Trinh Anh; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Van Kiem, Phan; Van Minh, Chau; Long, Pham Quoc; Anh, Luu Tuan; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Nanyoung; Park, Seon Ju; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Using a combination of chromatographic methods, one new flavonol glycoside, myricetin 3,7-di-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (1), and nine known compounds myricitrin (2), quercetin 3,7-di-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (3), quercitrin (4), desmanthin-l (5), myricetin 3-O-(3"-O-galloyl)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (6), (+)-catechin (7), benzyl O-1-D-glucopyranoside (8), 2-phenylethyl O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (9), and corilagin (10) were isolated from the leaves of Ardisia splendens Pit. Based on an in vitro test against Coxsackie viruses A16 by SRB assay, only compounds 2, 5, and 10 exhibited activity against Coxsackie viruses A16 with IC50 values of 40.1, 32.2, and 30.5 microM, respectively. This result suggested that compounds 2, 5, and 10 might be potential agents for treating hand, foot and mouth diseases.

  11. Improved eicosapentaenoic acid production in Pythium splendens RBB-5 based on metabolic regulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liang; Zhou, Pengpeng; Zhu, Yuanmin; Zhang, Ruijiao; Yu, Longjiang

    2017-05-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid for human beings. At present, the production of commercially available long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, mainly from wild-caught ocean fish, is struggling to meet the increasing demand for EPA. Production of EPA by microorganisms may be an alternative, effective and economical method. The oleaginous fungus Pythium splendens RBB-5 is a potential source of EPA, and thanks to the simple culture conditions required, high yields can be achieved in a facile manner. In the study, lipid metabolomics was performed in an attempt to enhance EPA biosynthesis in Pythium splendens. Synthetic, metabolic regulation and gene expression analyses were conducted to clarify the mechanism of EPA biosynthesis, and guide optimization of EPA production. The results showed that the Δ 6 desaturase pathway is the main EPA biosynthetic route in this organism, and ∆ 6 , ∆ 12 and Δ 17 desaturases are the rate-limiting enzymes. All the three desaturase genes were separately introduced into the parent strain to increase the flow of fatty acids into the Δ 6 desaturase pathway. Enhanced expression of these key enzymes, in combination with improved regulation of metabolism, resulted in a maximum yield of 1.43 g/L in the D12 transgenic strain, which represents a tenfold increase over the parent strain before optimization. This is the higher EPA production yield yet reported for a microbial system. Our findings may allow the production of EPA at an industrial scale, and the strategy employed could be used to increase the production of EPA or other lipids in oleaginous microorganisms.

  12. Caffeic acid product from the highly copper-tolerant plant Elsholtzia splendens post-phytoremediation: its extraction, purification, and identification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Peng, Hong-yun; Zhang, Meng-xi; Li, Xia; Zeng, Wei-wei; Yang, Xiao-e

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, caffeic acid was an important metabolite in the highly copper-tolerant plant Elsholtzia splendens. Preparation and purification of caffeic acid were performed on the dried biomass of the plants by means of sonication/ethanol extraction, followed by purification using a macroporous resin (D101 type) column and silica gel chromatography. The faint-yellow caffeic acid product was yielded with a purity of 98.46%, and it was chemically identified from spectra of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)/carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Caffeic acid is a possible product from the post-harvest processing of Elsholtzia splendens biomass. PMID:22661211

  13. Caffeic acid product from the highly copper-tolerant plant Elsholtzia splendens post-phytoremediation: its extraction, purification, and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Peng, Hong-yun; Zhang, Meng-xi; Li, Xia; Zeng, Wei-wei; Yang, Xiao-e

    2012-06-01

    In the current study, caffeic acid was an important metabolite in the highly copper-tolerant plant Elsholtzia splendens. Preparation and purification of caffeic acid were performed on the dried biomass of the plants by means of sonication/ethanol extraction, followed by purification using a macroporous resin (D101 type) column and silica gel chromatography. The faint-yellow caffeic acid product was yielded with a purity of 98.46%, and it was chemically identified from spectra of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)/carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Caffeic acid is a possible product from the post-harvest processing of Elsholtzia splendens biomass.

  14. Role of microbial inoculation and chitosan in phytoextraction of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by Elsholtzia splendens - a field case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fayuan; Lin Xiangui; Yin Rui

    2007-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out to study the effect of microbial inoculation on heavy metal phytoextraction by Elsholtzia splendens and whether chitosan could have a synergistic effect with the microbial inocula. The microbial inocula consisted of a consortium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and two Penicillium fungi. Three treatments were included: the control, inoculation with microbial inocula, and the inoculation combined with chitosan. Microbial inoculation increased plant biomass especially shoot dry weight, enhanced shoot Cu, Zn and Pb concentrations but did not affect Cd, leading to higher shoot Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd uptake. Compared with microbial inoculation alone, chitosan application did not affect plant growth but increased shoot Zn, Pb and Cd concentrations except Cu, which led to higher phytoextraction efficiencies and partitioning to shoots of Zn, Pb and Cd. These results indicated synergistic effects between microbial inocula and chitosan on Zn, Pb and Cd phytoextraction. - Co-application of microbial inocula and chitosan enhanced heavy metal phytoextraction by E. splendens

  15. Caffeic acid product from the highly copper-tolerant plant Elsholtzia splendens post-phytoremediation: its extraction, purification, and identification*

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Yan; Peng, Hong-yun; Zhang, Meng-xi; Li, Xia; Zeng, Wei-wei; Yang, Xiao-e

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, caffeic acid was an important metabolite in the highly copper-tolerant plant Elsholtzia splendens. Preparation and purification of caffeic acid were performed on the dried biomass of the plants by means of sonication/ethanol extraction, followed by purification using a macroporous resin (D101 type) column and silica gel chromatography. The faint-yellow caffeic acid product was yielded with a purity of 98.46%, and it was chemically identified from spectra of Fourier trans...

  16. Australicola pectinatus n. gen. and n. sp. (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) from deep-sea fish Beryx splendens from Tasmania

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuchta, Roman; Scholz, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 1 (2006), s. 126-129 ISSN 0022-3395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD524/03/H133; GA ČR GA524/04/0342; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Australicola pectinatus * Beryx splendens * Triaenophoridae Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection Impact factor: 1.300, year: 2006

  17. Counting with Colours? Effect of Colours on the Numerical Abilities of House Crows (Corvus splendens) and Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Nor Amira Abdul; Ali, Zalila; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-01-01

    We conducted several aviary experiments to investigate the influence of colours in quantity judgments of two species of birds; house crow (Corvus splendens) and common myna (Acridotheres tristis). Different quantity (in seven different food proportions) of mealworms were presented nonsequentially to all birds using artificially coloured red mealworms, for experiment 1, and using artificially coloured green mealworms, for experiment 2. Both red and green coloured mealworms have no significant ...

  18. Predatory efficiency of the sewage drain inhabiting larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens Wiedemann on Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Armigeres subalbatus (Coquillett) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Gautam; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Kundu, Niloy; Kar, Pradip Kumar; Saha, Goutam Kumar

    2007-09-01

    The rate of predation by stage IV instar Toxorhynchites splendens larvae on the equivalent instar stage larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus and Armigeres subalbatus, co-occurring in sewage drains, were noted for a period of three consecutive days in the laboratory using different prey densities and combinations. The rate of predation varied by age of the predator, density of prey, and prey type. The number of Ar. subalbatus larvae consumed by a single Tx. splendens larva ranged between 0.50 +/- 0.71 and 16.40 +/- 2.01; while for Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae, the number consumed ranged from 0.20 +/- 0.42 to 20.40 +/- 1.43 per day. The pupation rates of the prey species varied in respect to control, with a minimum of 0.20 +/- 0.42 pupa/day to a maximum of 12.20 +/- 2.30 pupa/day in the presence of Tx. splendens. The values for the controls were 1.00 +/- 0.87 and 14.44 +/- 2.83 pupa/day, respectively. Irrespective of prey densities and combinations, a single Tx. splendens fourth instar larvae was found to consume on average 10.07 larvae on the first day 16.57 larvae on the second day and 4.38 larvae on the third day, killing a total of 17.70 to 45.10 larvae, in three days. In the presence of Tx. splendens, the cumulative pupation, irrespective of prey, remained between 12.20 and 45.10, and differed significantly from control where the values were between 13.90 and 54.70. The results indicate that Tx. splendens can significantly reduce immature numbers and lower the rate of pupation of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ar. subalbatus. Tx. splendens may be a potential biological resource in the control of mosquitoes inhabiting sewage drains.

  19. Predator-mediated natural selection on the wings of the damselfly Calopteryx splendens: differences in selection among trait types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Shawn R; Svensson, Erik I

    2014-07-01

    Traits that increase mating success in males may come at a cost, such as an increased risk of predation. However, predator-mediated selection is challenging to document in natural populations, hampering our understanding of the trade-offs between sexual selection and predation. Here we report on a study of predator-mediated natural selection on wing traits in the damselfly Calopteryx splendens, the males of which possess conspicuous wing patches. Wagtails (genus Motacilla) are important avian predators of C. splendens, capturing them in flight and removing the wings prior to consumption. Using geometric morphometric techniques, we quantified the strength and mode of selection on wing traits by comparing wings from depredated individuals with the standing variation present in the population. Our results reveal that predator-mediated selection is stronger on secondary sexual characters than on size and shape, suggesting that traits related to flight performance are closer to their adaptive peaks. This could be a consequence of the long-term evolutionary association with avian predators, whereas stronger selection on conspicuous secondary sexual traits may reflect trade-offs between sexual and natural selection. Finally, even though C. splendens possesses nearly identical fore- and hindwings, we found evidence for divergent selection between them.

  20. Uncertain population dynamic and state variables of alfonsino (Beryx splendens Dinámica poblacional incierta y variables de estado en alfonsino (Beryx splendens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Wiff

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Alfonsino (Beryx splendens is a species associated with seamounts, with an important fishery in Juan Fernandez archipelago, Chile (33°40'S, 79°00'W. Since 2004, this resource has been managed by catch quotas estimated from stock assessment models. The alfonsino model involves high levels of uncertainty for several reasons including a lack of knowledge of aspects of the population dynamics and poorly informative time-series that feed the proposed evaluation models. This work evaluated three hypotheses regarding population dynamics and their influence on the main state variables (biomass, recruitment of the model using age-structured and dynamic biomass models. The hypotheses corresponded to de-recruitment of older individuals, non-linearity between standardized catch per unit effort, and population abundance as well as variations of the relative importance of length structures. According to the results, the depletion of the spawning biomass between 1998 and 2008 varied between 9 and 56%, depending on the combination of hypotheses used in the model. This indicates that state variables in alfonsino are not robust to the available information; rather, they depend strongly on the hypothesis of population dynamics. The discussion is focused on interpreting the causes of the changes in the state variables in light of a conceptual model for population dynamics in alfonsino and which pieces of information would be necessary to reduce the associated uncertainty.El alfonsino (Beryx splendens es una especie asociada a montes submarinos. En Chile sustenta una importante pesquería en el archipiélago de Juan Fernández (33°40'S, 79°00'W. Desde el año 2004, este recurso es administrado a través de cuotas anuales de capturas, las cuales son estimadas desde un modelo de evaluación de stock. La modelación de la población de alfonsino se caracteriza por una alta incertidumbre, debido a diversas fuentes, como son desconocimiento de aspectos de su din

  1. Dynamics of unloaded and green tea extract loaded lecithin based liposomal dispersions investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance T2relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtil, Emrah; Dag, Damla; Guner, Selen; Unal, Kubra; Oztop, Mecit H

    2017-09-01

    Liposomes are lipid bilayer vesicles that can be used as encapsulation systems for bioactive agents to provide increased protection against environmental stresses (such as pH or temperature extremes). Time Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) that is based on differentiation of specimen contents with respect to magnetic relaxation rates provides detailed information on amount, state and distribution of water and oil and provide reproducible results on the samples. These make TD-NMR particularly suitable for time-dependent monitoring of emulsion system dynamics. In this study, spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times and relaxation spectra were used for characterizing green tea extract loaded and unloaded liposomes prepared with soy (S75) and egg lecithins (E80) by different preparation methods (such as homogenization type, pressure and solvent type). Mean particle sizes of liposomes were found to be the most influential factor in shaping mono-exponential T 2 relaxation times. The differences in particle sizes of E80 and S75 samples along with samples with different homogenization pressures could be monitored with T 2 relaxation times. Additionally, T 2 relaxation times were found to be correlated with particle shape irregularity, and chemical instability of samples due to lipid oxidation. With relaxation spectrum analysis, particular components in the sample could be distinguished (internal/external water and lipid bilayers), which gave more elaborate results on mechanisms of instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of weather conditions on dynamics of Hylocomium splendens annual increment and net production in forest communities of forest-steppe zone in Khakassia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Goncharova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of annual increments of green moss Hylocomium splendens (Hedw. Schimp. in B.S.G. in the Khakassia forest-steppe zone has been studied. The values of the moss linear and phytomass increments were investigated in different habitats for 6 years. The aboveground annual production of the H. splendens in phytocenosis was estimated. Linear increments of the H. splendens growing under the tree canopy and opening between trees were not significantly different. Phytomass increments under the tree canopy are significantly higher than in the openings between trees. The density of moss mats, proportion between leaves and stems were calculated. It was revealed that climatic factors have a different degree and duration influence on the moss increments in different habitats. Linear increments of H. splendens in different habitats synchronously respond to weather factor changes. The air temperature was the most important at the beginning and the end of the vegetation period; the amount of precipitation was more important in the middle of the growth period. Phytomass increments of H. splendens in different habitats respond differently to influence of weather conditions. Phytomass increments under the tree canopy are not sensitive to air temperature, and more sensitive to precipitations in the middle of growth period than one of opening between trees. The specificity of the climatic factors’ influence on the biomass growth depends on habitat conditions.

  3. Combining Niche Modelling, Land-Use Change, and Genetic Information to Assess the Conservation Status of Pouteria splendens Populations in Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narkis S. Morales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the conservation status of a species with little ecological information is usually a challenging process. Pouteria splendens is an endemic shrub of the coastal range of Central Chile currently classified as lower risk (LR by IUCN (version 2.3. Knowledge about this species is extremely limited. Currently P. splendens is only found in two small and isolated populations, which are thought to be remaining populations of an originally large metapopulation. However, there is no evidence to support this hypothesis, limiting our ability to gauge the real current conservation status of this species. In this study we combine niche modelling, land-use information, and genetic techniques to test the metapopulation hypothesis and reassess the conservation status of P. splendens using the IUCN criteria. We also evaluated the potential effects of climate change in the species distribution. Our results support the hypothesis of a large metapopulation that was recently fragmented. Future climate could increase the range of P. splendens; however the high level of fragmentation would preclude colonization processes. We recommend reclassifying P. splendens as Endangered (EN and developing strategies to protect the remaining populations. Similar approaches like the presented here could be used to reclassify other species with limited ecological knowledge.

  4. Sex reversal in Betta splendens Regan with emphasis on the problem of sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, T P; Larkin, J R

    1975-01-01

    To gain insight into the sex-determining mechanism of the Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, sex-reversed individuals were bred and the ratios of the spawnings were examined. Sex-reversal of 245 females was undertaken by ovariectomizing them; of these, 104 became sex-reversed. Twenty-three of these latter fish were mated to normal females and eleven spawnings were raised to maturity. These spawnings resulted in all female broods or mixed broods. Were the male fish heterogametic, a view currently held by some authors, no males would be produced in these spawnings. Thus, male heterogamety was not substaintiated in this study. Contrary to other studies, the experimental sex reversal of females is not a rare event since nearly two-thirds of the fish that survived the surgery became sex-reversed. Gross dissection and histological observation of sex-reversed fish revealed a regenerated, unpaired duct which remained after the ovaries had been removed. The tissue of the regenerate was testicular and contained active spermatogenesis. Some alterative methods of sex determination which may apply to the Betta are examined. These include the possibility of two different sex-determining races, the effects of exogenous factors, and a polygenic system of sex determination.

  5. Biological control of container-breeding mosquitoes, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus, in a Japanese island by release of Toxorhynchites splendens adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, I; Toma, T; Mogi, M

    1992-07-01

    To control container-breeding mosquitoes in the small island of Minnajima (0.56 km2), northern Okinawa, Japan, laboratory-reared adults (aged 7-10 days) of Toxorhynchites splendens (Palawan strain), a mosquito with predatory larvae, were released repeatedly during 1984, 1986 and 1987. Thirteen species of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) occurred in artificial containers, ground pools or crab-holes on the island, the predominant species being Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus and Culex (Culex) quinquefasciatus. Predatory mosquito larvae of Culex (Lutzia) fuscanus and Cx (Lt.) halifaxii were found commonly in wet containers. In the first year of study, during a period of 54 days from 13 May to 5 July 1984, totals of 879 female and 806 male adults of Tx.splendens were released on six occasions. Similarly, between 29 April and 30 August 1986, totals of 2920 female and 2878 male adult Tx.splendens were released. In the third study year, totals of 2041 female and 1783 male Tx.splendens were released on eight occasions during 199 days from 23 April to 7 November 1987. After adult releases at two sites, the immature stages of Tx.splendens were found in 164 out of 502 traps in 1984, 421 out of 933 traps in 1986, and 151 out of 502 traps in 1987. The number of immatures of Tx.splendens present in each trap varied from 1 to 40 in 1984, 1 to 29 in 1986 and 1 to 9 in 1987. Numbers of immatures of the target species found in the traps during August-September averaged 71.9/trap/month in 1984, 114.7/trap/month in 1986 and 36.0/trap/month in 1987, significantly less in the traps with Tx.splendens than in those without them. The present field studies indicated that, in this small island, approximately 250 adult female and 200 male Tx.splendens per month should be released from April to November, and the releases should be carried out every year, in order to control effectively the target mosquitoes Ae.albopictus and Cx quinquefasciatus breeding in artificial containers in Minnajima.

  6. Interactive effects of copper stress and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on photosynthetic characteristics and chlorphyl fluorescence parameters of elsholtzia splendens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Jin, Z.; Li, J.

    2017-01-01

    To determine interactive effects of added copper (Cu) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation on the photosynthesis of Elsholtzia splendens, a greenhouse pot experiment was conducted. Four treatments were used, including -Cu-AMF (no Cu addition and no AMF inoculation), +Cu-AMF (Cu addition but no AMF inoculation), -Cu+AMF (no Cu addition and AMF inoculation), and +Cu+AMF (Cu addition and AMF inoculation). Cu addition did not change diurnal variation curves of the net photosynthetic rate(PN), the intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration (Ci), the stomatal conductance (gs), or the transpiration rate (E); however, it significantly decreased the daily mean PN, gs, E, light-use efficiency (LUE), and carboxylation efficiency (CE). Furthermore, AMF inoculation significantly increased the daily mean PN, gs, LUE, and CE of E. splendens. In response to light, Cu addition significantly decreased the light-saturated net photosynthetic rate (PNmax), the light saturation point (LSP), the light compensation point (LCP), and the apparent quantum yield (AQY), while AMF inoculation significantly increased PNmax and AQY. In response to the CO/sub 2/ concentration, Cu addition significantly decreased PNmax and the CO/sub 2/ saturation point (CSP), while AMF inoculation significantly increased PNmax. Both Cu addition and AMF inoculation significantly decreased the relative chlorophyll content. Compared to the negative control treatment (-Cu-AMF), Cu addition significantly increased the minimal fluorescence, but significantly decreased maximal fluorescence, variable fluorescence,and maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII. These results suggest that AMF inoculations alleviate the inhibitory effect of copper stress on E. splendens plants by weakening its toxic effects on the photosynthetic apparatus and pigments. (author)

  7. Multiplication and distribution of type 2 dengue and Japanese encephalitis viruses in Toxorhynchites splendens after intrathoracic inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Kimura, T; Ohyama, A

    1987-01-01

    The nonhematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites (Tx.) splendens was found to be the most susceptible to type 2 dengue (D-2) and Japanese encephalitis (JEV) viruses among three hosts examined by virus titration and replication assays. After inoculation with D-2, the number of viral antigen positive cells in the head, thorax and abdomen increased up to day 15 and D-2 reached the maximum titer of 8.4 log10 PFU/g in the head on day 15. Hemocytes were the earliest cell type that could be detected as D-2 antigen positive on day 2. Multiplication of JEV was faster than that of D-2 in the mosquito. The number of JEV antigen positive cells in each part of the mosquito increased up to day 3, JEV reaching the maximum titer of 8.0 log10 PFU/g in the abdomen on day 3. Hemocytes and fat body cells (FBC) could be detected as JEV antigen positive cells on day 1. The time course of D-2 and JEV infection suggested that intrathoracically inoculated viruses were probably initially phagocytosed by hemocytes and/or FBC, and multiplied primarily in their cytoplasm. The infected hemocytes were then transported by the flow of body fluid and viruses were disseminated to other susceptible organs, such as ganglia, salivary glands, etc. The results obtained indicate that the course of infection of D-2 and JEV in Tx. splendens is similar to that in vector mosquitoes. Tx. splendens is therefore very useful for the study of these viruses.

  8. Evaluation of the molluscicidal property of Euphorbia splendens var. Hispolii (N.E.B. (Euphorbiaceae: 2. Investigation in lotic habitat

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    D. F. Baptista

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The latex of Euphorbia splendens var. hispolii in 12 ppm concentration (12 mg/l caused 100% mortality for a Biomphalaria tenagophila population in a lotic habitat after 9 hr of dripfeed application. For sentinel snails, in cages placed at the water surface and buried under 0.10 m, the mortality rates varied with the distance from the application point and were: 100% (0 m; 92.6% (50 m and 94.7% (100. No lethal effects were observed for the other living species in this habitat (Pomacea haustrum and Poecilia reticulata.

  9. Effect on growth and reproduction of hormone immersed and masculinized fighting fish Betta splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirankumar, Santhakumar; Pandian, Thavamani Jegajothivel

    2002-11-01

    To produce all-male progenies in the fighting fish, Betta splendens, six groups of fry were subjected to discrete immersion treatment at different 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT) doses (viz. 100, 200, 500, 700, 900, and 1,000 microg/l) for a constant duration (3 hr/day) and frequency (second, fifth, and eighth day after hatching). The treatment at 900 microg/l led to 98% masculinization and 71% survival at sexual maturity. Treated groups, which showed significant deviation from the 1:1 sex ratio, were classified into two different series: S1 and S2. The groups that showed nearly cent-percent masculinization were classified as S1, and the other groups were classified as S2. The S1 males showed remarkably slower growth and attained 3.5 cm total length compared to 6.0 cm attained by a normal male. The S2 males attained 5.4 cm total length. Apart from these morphological defects, both S1 and S2 males suffered functional (decreased sperm count and sperm motility) and behavioral defects (incomplete embracing during mating) in their reproductive ability, leading to approximately 50% and 30% reduction in fecundity per mating, respectively. The cumulative fecundity loss suffered by the S1 male during its active reproductive phase is discussed. When normal and sex-reversed males were presented, a female preferred the former. Progeny testing of the sex-reversed males showed the occurrence of 12.75% males, indicating the possible role of autosomal genes in the sex determination mechanism of this species. Discrete immersion treatment at optimal/super-optimal doses ensured not only a higher percentage of masculinization, but also a higher frequency of homogametic males (XX). Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Tolerância aguda e crônica de adultos de beta, Betta splendens, à salinidade da água Acute and chronic salinity tolerance in adult siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens

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    Jener Alexandre Sampaio Zuanon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a tolerância de Betta splendens à salinidade da água, realizou-se um experimento em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com seis concentrações de sal na água (0; 3; 6; 9; 12 e 15 g de sal comum/L de água, cada uma com cinco repetições (1 peixe/repetição. Fêmeas adultas de Betta splendens foram alojadas individualmente em aquários mantidos em estufa incubadora, a 26 ± 0,2 ºC e fotoperíodo de 12 horas. Os peixes foram alimentados até a saciedade, uma vez ao dia, com ração comercial. Foram mensurados o consumo diário de ração e a sobrevivência dos peixes a cada 12 horas. Para avaliar o efeito agudo da salinidade, foram calculados o tempo médio de sobrevivência e a salinidade letal mediana-96 horas, enquanto o efeito crônico (18 dias foi avaliado pelo cálculo da salinidade máxima de sobrevivência e da salinidade letal mediana. O tempo médio de sobrevivência foi significativamente menor na salinidade de 15 g/L. A salinidade letal mediana-96 horas estimada foi de 11,88 g/L, a salinidade máxima de sobrevivência entre 6 e 7 g/L, e a salinidade letal mediana de 9,35 g/L. Observou-se interação significativa entre as salinidades da água e o tempo de alimentação. Considerando que é uma espécie de água doce, o beta possui alta tolerância à salinidade da água.Salinity tolerance of Betta splendens was evaluated in a complete randomized design, with six salt concentrations in the water (0; 3; 6; 9; 12 and 15 g common salt/L with five replications (1 fish/replication. Adult female B. splendens were individually placed in aquariums in an incubation chamber at 26 ± 0.2ºC and 12-hour photoperiod. Fish were fed to satiation, once a day, with commercial diet. Feed intake and survival rate were measured every 12 hours. To evaluate the effect of acute salinity, the mean survival time and median lethal salinity-96 h were calculated, while the chronic effect (18 days was assessed by calculating

  11. Leaf litter is essential for seed survival of the endemic endangered tree Pouteria splendens (Sapotaceae from central Chile

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    G. J. Sotes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pouteria splendens (A.DC. Kuntze, the Chilean lúcumo, is an endemic tree and the only member of the Sapotaceae family in Chile. It is considered an endangered species as a consequence of its restricted distribution and small population size. Currently, individuals of P. splendens are immersed in a heterogeneous landscape with rocky mounds and plains located in areas densely populated by humans. Natural regeneration in the species seems to be low, despite the fact that plants are able to produce fruits. The species produces brightly colored fleshy drupes. There is no information about the dispersal pattern and the fate of the seeds. In this work we investigate (i the seed dispersal pattern and (ii the effect of tree canopy and the presence of leaf litter on seed survival, both in rocky mounds and plains. Results indicated an extremely low distance of seed dispersal, with most of the seeds falling down under the canopy. Seed survival under the canopy without leaf litter was very low and even zero in rocky mounds. Nevertheless, the presence of leaf litter covering the seeds increased survival in both habitats. Outside the canopy, seed survival only increased in plains. We suggest that future conservation programs should focus on protecting both adult plants and leaf litter under trees.

  12. Determination of the lethal doses LD50 and LD90 of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii latex on Physa cubensis Pfeiffer

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    Aloysio da Silva Ferrão Filho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Physa are among the most common and widespread fresh-water snails and are frequently associated with the genus Lymnaea and Biomphalaria, typically occupying the same habitat and being hosts of trematodes that can cause disease in humans. Several studies have evaluated the control of snails through the use of plant-derived molluscicides; however, few such studies exist regarding the genus Physa. Determining the correct lethal doses of [latex of Euphorbia splendens] is important for the control of the Physa cubensis snail. In one experimental model, 150 snails from Jacarepaguá, Rio de Janeiro, RJ were used. After acclimatization for 72 hours, the snails were divided into groups of 10 and placed into beakers containing different doses, each at a temperature of 26±1ºC and a relative humidity of 80±10%. The results demonstrated LD50 of 1.08 µL/L and LD90 of 3.41 µL/L, without significant changes in the physical or chemical parameters of the solutions. We conclude that E. splendens latex had a significant effect on P. cubensis in the laboratory setting.

  13. Global and New Caledonian patterns of population genetic variation in the deep-sea splendid alfonsino, Beryx splendens, inferred from mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy-Hartmann, Lauriana; Roussel, Valérie; Letourneur, Yves; Sellos, Daniel Y

    2011-12-01

    Splendid alfonsino Beryx splendens is a commercial species in several countries, but is not currently exploited in New Caledonia. Information on species biology and genetics can influence the development of fisheries and assist in their management, but the genetic structuring and diversity of B. splendens populations remain largely unknown. To improve knowledge of genetic parameters, we used mitochondrial DNA sequences to conduct a comparative study of populations from throughout the world. Fragments of 815 bp of cytochrome b gene were sequenced and used to interpret the species history. We analyzed 204 individuals representing 14 geographical populations worldwide. A special focus was put on populations from New Caledonia. Analysis of variation between sequences, based on pairwise F statistics and AMOVA, demonstrated a population subdivision between the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific Oceans (Fst = 0.11-0.32; P EEZ.

  14. Co-production of biochar, bio-oil and syngas from halophyte grass (Achnatherum splendens L.) under three different pyrolysis temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Muhammad; Chen, Qun; Yue, Yan; Pang, Renzhong; Lin, Qimei; Zhao, Xiaorong; Chen, Hao

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, pyrolysis of Achnatherum splendens L. was performed under three different pyrolysis temperature (300, 500, and 700°C) to investigate the characteristics of biochar, bio-oil, and syngas. Biochar yield decreased from 48% to 24%, whereas syngas yield increased from 34% to 54% when pyrolysis temperature was increased from 300 to 700°C. Maximum bio-oil yield (27%) was obtained at 500°C. The biochar were characterized for elemental composition, surface, and adsorption properties. The results showed that obtained biochar could be used as a potential soil amendment. The bio-oil and syngas co-products will be evaluated in the future as bioenergy sources. Overall, our results suggests that A. splendens L. could be utilized as a potential feedstock for biochar and bioenergy production through pyrolytic route. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the Molluscicidal Properties of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii (N.E.B. Latex: Experimental Test in an Endemic Area in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Mendes Nelymar M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the positive results obtained regarding the molluscicidal properties of the latex of Euphorbia splendens that were corroborated in laboratory and field tests under restricted conditions, a field study was conducted in experimental streams located in an endemic area. After recording the average annual fluctuations of vectors in three streams, a solution of E. splendens latex at 12 ppm was applied in stream A, a solution of niclosamide at 3 ppm that was applied in stream B and a third stream (C remained untreated for negative control. Applications of E. splendens and niclosamide resulted in a mortality of 100% among the snails collected in the streams A and B. No dead snails were found in the negative control stream. A monthly follow-up survey conducted during three consecutive months confirmed the return of vectors to both experimental streams treated with latex and niclosamide. This fact has called for a need to repeat application in order to reach the snails that remained buried in the mud substrate or escaped to the water edge, as well as, newly hatched snails that did not respond to the concentration of these molluscicides. Adults snails collected a month following treatment led us to believe that they had migrate from untreated areas of the streams to those previously treated

  16. Effect of Niclosamide (Bayluscide WP 70 (R, Anacardium occidentale hexane extract and Euphorbia splendens latex on behavior of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818, under laboratory conditions

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    Pedro Jurberg

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The repellent effect of the molluscicides Niclosamide (Bayluscide WP 70 (R, Anacardium occidentale and the latex of Euphorbia splendens on Biomphalaria glabrata was observed through the investigation of the occurrence of escape behavior among molluscs that were exposed to dosages lower than the LD 50. The total number of individuals out of water among the surviving snails in the control group provided a "Natural Escape Index". The comparison between this total and the total number of surviving snails in each group exposed to the different dosages of the molluscicides after 24 hr provided the "Molluscicide Escape Index" and the detection of a "Repellency Range" to these snails. The escape indexes for Niclosamide, A. occidentale and E. splendens were 10, 6.22 and 6.44 respectively. Repellency occurred at the following concentration ranges: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03 ppm Bayluscide, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 ppm A. occidentale and 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20 ppm E. splendens. The Natural Escape Index obtained in the control group was zero.

  17. The effects of experience on the development of sexual behaviour of males and females of the banded demoiselle (Calopteryx splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzijden, Machteld N; Scobell, Sunny K; Svensson, Erik I

    2014-11-01

    Mate preferences can vary in the direction of the preference, as well as the strength of the preference, and both direction and strength of preference are known to be plastic in many species. Preferences might have a learned component, and current and past social context may influence an individual's choosiness. In the damselfly species Calopteryx splendens, females increase the strength of their mate preferences with sexual experience. Here we show that sexually naïve females selectively respond to conspecific courtship as soon as physical contact has been established, suggesting a role for tactile cues perceived through interspecific morphological differences in secondary reproductive traits. In addition our data also shows that males and females selectively respond to the intensity of the courtship of the potential, conspecific mate, while ignoring such information in heterospecific potential mates. These results underscore that mate choice is the result of dynamic interactions between the sexes, where both current and past information are integrated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cognition in the Wild. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The use of Toxorhynchites splendens for identification and quantitation of serotypes contained in the tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirakanjanakit, N; Khin, M M; Yoksan, S; Bhamarapravati, N

    1999-02-12

    Assurance of identity and quantity is an indispensable part of quality control in the manufacture of vaccines. Dengue-1 PDK13, dengue-2 PDK53, dengue-3 PGMK30F3 and dengue-4 PDK48 in the live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine were assayed by identification and quantitation in a mosquito system (Toxorhynchites splendens). Each serotype of dengue virus was identified by dengue specific monoclonal antibodies in the indirect fluorescent antibody test. Virus content was estimated by calculating the 50% mosquito infectious dose (MID50). Differences from 0 to +/-0.5 log10 were observed between the original monovalent titer and that from the blend which showed no significant difference at 95% confidence limit (P < 0.05). This result indicates that there is no interference between dengue serotypes in mosquitoes infected by intrathoracic inoculation with the virus mixture. It can be also concluded that this mosquito system can be used as an effective measure for infectivity titration of each component in the tetravalent dengue vaccine.

  19. Efeitos de hormônios esteroides de contraceptivos orais combinados sobre os parâmetros comportamentais de Betta splendens (Regan, 1909)

    OpenAIRE

    B.D. Santos; M.C.G. Silva; T.P. Santos; S.C.B.L. Silva; M.R.S. Cadena; P.G. Cadena

    2016-01-01

    Os hormônios esteroides presentes em várias gerações de contraceptivos orais combinados (COC) podem se apresentar como disruptores endócrinos, produzindo alterações no comportamento e na fisiologia de peixes. Diante disso, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos de hormônios esteroides presentes em COC sobre os parâmetros comportamentais de Betta splendens, um peixe ornamental usado na aquariofilia e bastante agressivo. Machos adultos foram observados pelo método ad libitum para conf...

  20. Cloning and functional characterization of a gene for capsanthin-capsorubin synthase from tiger lily (Lilium lancifolium Thunb. 'Splendens').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeknić, Zoran; Morré, Jeffrey T; Jeknić, Stevan; Jevremović, Sladana; Subotić, Angelina; Chen, Tony H H

    2012-11-01

    The orange color of tiger lily (Lolium lancifolium 'Splendens') flowers is due, primarily, to the accumulation of two κ-xanthophylls, capsanthin and capsorubin. An enzyme, known as capsanthin-capsorubin synthase (CCS), catalyzes the conversion of antheraxanthin and violaxanthin into capsanthin and capsorubin, respectively. We cloned the gene for capsanthin-capsorubin synthase (Llccs) from flower tepals of L. lancifolium by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) with a heterologous non-degenerate primer that was based on the sequence of a gene for lycopene β-cyclase (lcyB). The full-length cDNA of Llccs was 1,785 bp long and contained an open reading frame of 1,425 bp that encoded a polypeptide of 474 amino acids with a predicted N-terminal plastid-targeting sequence. Analysis by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that expression of Llccs was spatially and temporally regulated, with expression in flower buds and flowers of L. lancifolium but not in vegetative tissues. Stable overexpression of the Llccs gene in callus tissue of Iris germanica, which accumulates several xanthophylls including violaxanthin, the precursor of capsorubin, resulted in transgenic callus whose color had changed from its normal yellow to red-orange. This novel red-orange coloration was due to the accumulation of two non-native κ-xanthophylls, capsanthin and capsorubin, as confirmed by HPLC and ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) analysis with authentic standards. Cloning of the Llccs gene should advance our understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms of the biosynthesis of κ-carotenoids in general and in the genus Lilium in particular, and will facilitate transgenic alterations of the colors of flowers and fruits of many plant species.

  1. Population mitogenomics provides insights into evolutionary history, source of invasions and diversifying selection in the House Crow (Corvus splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemińska, Urszula; Morales, Hernán E; Greening, Chris; Nyári, Árpád S; Wilson, Robyn; Song, Beng Kah; Austin, Christopher M; Sunnucks, Paul; Pavlova, Alexandra; Rahman, Sadequr

    2018-04-01

    The House Crow (Corvus splendens) is a useful study system for investigating the genetic basis of adaptations underpinning successful range expansion. The species originates from the Indian subcontinent, but has successfully spread through a variety of thermal environments across Asia, Africa and Europe. Here, population mitogenomics was used to investigate the colonisation history and to test for signals of molecular selection on the mitochondrial genome. We sequenced the mitogenomes of 89 House Crows spanning four native and five invasive populations. A Bayesian dated phylogeny, based on the 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes, supports a mid-Pleistocene (~630,000 years ago) divergence between the most distant genetic lineages. Phylogeographic patterns suggest that northern South Asia is the likely centre of origin for the species. Codon-based analyses of selection and assessments of changes in amino acid properties provide evidence of positive selection on the ND2 and ND5 genes against a background of purifying selection across the mitogenome. Protein homology modelling suggests that four amino acid substitutions inferred to be under positive selection may modulate coupling efficiency and proton translocation mediated by OXPHOS complex I. The identified substitutions are found within native House Crow lineages and ecological niche modelling predicts suitable climatic areas for the establishment of crow populations within the invasive range. Mitogenomic patterns in the invasive range of the species are more strongly associated with introduction history than climate. We speculate that invasions of the House Crow have been facilitated by standing genetic variation that accumulated due to diversifying selection within the native range.

  2. Effect of food on immature development, consumption rate, and relative growth rate of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae, a predator of container breeding mosquitoes

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    D Dominic Amalraj

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Food utilization by the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens (Wiedemann was studied in the laboratory by offering larvae of Aedes aegypti Linnaeus, Anopheles stephensi (Liston, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say. Quantitative analyses of data indicated that immature development was significantly faster with increase in food availability. The regression analysis showed that the degrees of the relationship between immature duration (Id and food availability were higher when offered early instars of prey (first and second instars than late instars. Consumption rate (Cr of the predator increased with increase in food availability and this relationship was highly significant when larvae of An. stephensi were offered as food. Consumption rate to food level decreased with increase in the age class of the prey. There was a significant negative correlation between Id and Cr. This aspect helps to increase population turnover of T. splendens in a shorter period when the prey is abundant. Conversely, the predator compensated the loss in daily food intake at low food level by extending Id thereby attains the minimum threshold pupal weight for adult emergence. There was an increase in the relative growth rate (RGR of the predator when An. stephensi was offered as prey and this was related to the high protein content of the prey per body weight. There was a positive correlation between Cr and RGR. This adaptive life characteristic strategy of this predator is useful for mass-rearing for large scale field release programmes in the control of container breeding mosquitoes is discussed.

  3. Effect of food on immature development, consumption rate, and relative growth rate of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae), a predator of container breeding mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic Amalraj, D; Sivagnaname, N; Das, P K

    2005-12-01

    Food utilization by the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens (Wiedemann) was studied in the laboratory by offering larvae of Aedes aegypti Linnaeus, Anopheles stephensi (Liston), and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say). Quantitative analyses of data indicated that immature development was significantly faster with increase in food availability. The regression analysis showed that the degrees of the relationship between immature duration (Id) and food availability were higher when offered early instars of prey (first and second instars) than late instars. Consumption rate (Cr) of the predator increased with increase in food availability and this relationship was highly significant when larvae of An. stephensi were offered as food. Consumption rate to food level decreased with increase in the age class of the prey. There was a significant negative correlation between Id and Cr. This aspect helps to increase population turnover of T. splendens in a shorter period when the prey is abundant. Conversely, the predator compensated the loss in daily food intake at low food level by extending Id thereby attains the minimum threshold pupal weight for adult emergence. There was an increase in the relative growth rate (RGR) of the predator when An. stephensi was offered as prey and this was related to the high protein content of the prey per body weight. There was a positive correlation between Cr and RGR. This adaptive life characteristic strategy of this predator is useful for mass-rearing for large scale field release programmes in the control of container breeding mosquitoes is discussed.

  4. Effects of nitrate on the diurnal vertical migration, carbon to nitrogen ratio, and the photosynthetic capacity of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium splendens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, J.J.; Horrigan, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    A non-thecate dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium splendens, was studied in a 12 d laboratory experiment in 2.0 x 0.25 m containers in which light, temperature, and nutrients could be manipulated. Under a 12 h light:12 h dark cycle, the dinoflagellates exhibited diurnal vertical migrations, swimming downward before the dark period began and upward before the end of the dark period. This vertical migration probably involved geotaxis and a diel rhythm, as well as light-mediated behavior. The vertical distribution of nitrate affected the behavior and physiology of the dinoflagellate. When nitrate was present throughout the container, the organisms resembled those in exponential batch culture both in C:N ratios and photosynthetic capacity (P/sub max/); moreover, they migrated to the surface during the day. In contrast, when nitrate was depleted, C:N ratios increased, P/sub max/ decreased, and the organisms formed a subsurface layer at a depth corresponding to the light level at which photosynthesis saturated. When nitrate was present only at the bottom of the tank, C:N ratios of the population decreased until similar to those of nutrient-saturated cells and P/sub max/ increased; however, the dinoflagellates behaved the same as nutient-depleted cells, forming a subsurface layer during the light period. Field measurements revealed a migratory subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer dominated by G. splendens. It was just above the nitracline during the day, and in the nitracline during the night, which concurs with our laboratory observations.

  5. FLUCTUATING ASYMMETRY IN THE OTOLITH WIDTH AND LENGTH OF ADULT TELEOST (Beryx splendens LOWE, 1834 (FAMILY: BERCIDAE COLLECTED FROM THE ARABIAN SEA COASTS OF SULTANATE OF OMAN

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    H.K. Albusaidi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry was described for the otolith width and length of adult teleost Beryx splendens. The results showed that the level of asymmetry of the otolith width was the highest among the two asymmetry values obtained for the otolith of B. splendens. For the otolith width character, the results showed that the level of asymmetry at its highest value in fish ranging in length between 191–200 mm and in its lowest value in fish ranging in length between 121–180 mm. For the otolith length, the highest value of asymmetry is noticed in fish ranging in length between 231–244 mm and the lowest value in fish within the length of 121–190 mm. The possible cause of the asymmetry in this species has been discussed in relation to different pollutants and their presence in the area. No trend of increase in the asymmetry values with the fish length was noticed for the otolith width, but there is a weak trend of increase with the fish length in case of otolith length character.

  6. Curcumin longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion improves the survival of endotoxemic mice by inhibiting nitric oxide-dependent HMGB1 release

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    Min Young Ahn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a well-known damage-related alarmin that participates in cellular inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms leading to HMGB1 release in inflammatory conditions and the therapeutic agents that could prevent it remain poorly understood. This study attempted to examine whether the Curcumin longa herb, which is known to have anti-inflammatory property, can modulate cellular inflammatory responses by regulating HMGB1 release. Methods The murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and/or a C. longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion (CLEN. The levels of released HMGB1, nitric oxide (NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNOS expression, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were analyzed in RAW264.7 macrophages. The effects of CLEN on survival of endotoxemic model mice, circulating HMGB1 levels, and tissue iNOS expression were also evaluated. Results We have shown that a nanoemulsion loaded with an extract from the C. longa rhizome regulates cellular inflammatory responses and LPS-induced systemic inflammation by suppressing the release of HMGB1 by macrophages. First, treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with the nanoemulsion significantly attenuated their LPS-induced release of HMGB1: this effect was mediated by inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, which in turn suppressed the NO production and iNOS expression of the cells. The nanoemulsion did not affect LPS-induced p38 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Second, intraperitoneal administration of the nanoemulsion improved the survival rate of LPS-injected endotoxemic mice. This associated with marked reductions in circulating HMGB1 levels and tissue iNOS expression. Discussion The present study shows for the first time the mechanism by which C. longa ameliorates sepsis, namely, by suppressing NO signaling and thereby inhibiting the release of the proinflammatory cytokine HMGB1

  7. Stable sulphur isotope ratios in the moss species Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. and Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. from the Kielce area (south-central Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Dolegowska, S.; Halas, S.; Trembaczowski, A. [Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Stable sulphur isotope determinations were performed on 18 moss samples collected at nine sites in forested areas of the city of Kielce. The {delta}{sup 34} S of Hylocomium splendens varied from 4.4 to 7.1%, whereas the {delta}{sup 34} S of Pleurozium schreberi was in the range of 3.7-9.1%. The Holy Cross Mountains mosses display a positive delta S-34 signature of airborne SO{sub 2} and sulphates of anthropogenic origin, which is characteristic for this part of Europe. Some spatial variations in the {delta}{sup 34}S of mosses are due to the interactions that occur between coal combustion emissions with diverse isotopic imprints, variations in wind direction and topographic features combined with biological fractionation.

  8. Myrcia splendens (Sw.) DC. (syn. M. fallax (Rich.) DC.) (Myrtaceae) Essential Oil from Amazonian Ecuador: A Chemical Characterization and Bioactivity Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalvenzi, Laura; Grandini, Alessandro; Spagnoletti, Antonella; Tacchini, Massimo; Neill, David; Ballesteros, José Luis; Sacchetti, Gianni; Guerrini, Alessandra

    2017-07-12

    In this study, we performed the chemical characterization of Myrcia splendens (Sw.) DC. (Myrtaceae) essential oil from Amazonian Ecuador and the assessment of its bioactivity in terms of cytotoxic, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity as starting point for possible applicative uses. M. splendens essential oil, obtained by hydro-distillation, was analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID): the major components were found to be trans -nerolidol (67.81%) and α-bisabolol (17.51%). Furthermore, we assessed the cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 (breast), A549 (lung) human tumor cell lines, and HaCaT (human keratinocytes) non-tumor cell line through 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2- H -tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test: promising results in terms of selectivity and efficacy against the MCF-7 cell line (IC 50 of 5.59 ± 0.13 μg/mL at 48 h) were obtained, mainly due to α-bisabolol. Furthermore, antibacterial activity against Gram positive and negative bacteria were performed through High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) bioautographic assay and microdilution method: trans -nerolidol and β-cedren-9-one were the main molecules responsible for the low antibacterial effects against human pathogens. Nevertheless, interesting values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) were noticeable against phytopathogen strains. Radical scavenging activity performed by HPTLC bioautographic and spectrophotometric 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) approaches were negligible. In conclusion, the essential oil revealed a good potential for plant defense and anti-cancer applications.

  9. Myrcia splendens (Sw. DC. (syn. M. fallax (Rich. DC. (Myrtaceae Essential Oil from Amazonian Ecuador: A Chemical Characterization and Bioactivity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scalvenzi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we performed the chemical characterization of Myrcia splendens (Sw. DC. (Myrtaceae essential oil from Amazonian Ecuador and the assessment of its bioactivity in terms of cytotoxic, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity as starting point for possible applicative uses. M. splendens essential oil, obtained by hydro-distillation, was analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS and Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID: the major components were found to be trans-nerolidol (67.81% and α-bisabolol (17.51%. Furthermore, we assessed the cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 (breast, A549 (lung human tumor cell lines, and HaCaT (human keratinocytes non-tumor cell line through 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT test: promising results in terms of selectivity and efficacy against the MCF-7 cell line (IC50 of 5.59 ± 0.13 μg/mL at 48 h were obtained, mainly due to α-bisabolol. Furthermore, antibacterial activity against Gram positive and negative bacteria were performed through High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC bioautographic assay and microdilution method: trans-nerolidol and β-cedren-9-one were the main molecules responsible for the low antibacterial effects against human pathogens. Nevertheless, interesting values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC were noticeable against phytopathogen strains. Radical scavenging activity performed by HPTLC bioautographic and spectrophotometric 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH approaches were negligible. In conclusion, the essential oil revealed a good potential for plant defense and anti-cancer applications.

  10. Potential application of extracts from Indian almond (Terminalia catappa Linn.) leaves in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens Regan) culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purivirojkul, Watchariya

    2012-01-01

    Indian almond (Terminalia catappa Linn.) leaves with green and red coloration were tested for bactericidal activity with pathogenic bacteria and their acute toxicity to Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens Regan). Powder of Indian almond leaves was extracted with water at the ratio of 1:10 (w/v) and then freeze-dried to a dry powder. Bactericidal efficacy was tested against 28 isolates of pathogenic bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Enterobacter spp., Plesiomonas shigelloides, Pseudomonas spp., Shewanella putrefaciens, Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp.) isolated from Siamese fighting fish. A paper disc diffusion method was tested on Mueller Hinton Agar (MHA) by inoculating 1 x 106 CFU/mL of each bacterial suspension. Paper disks (5 mm) were impregnated with either 10 microl of green or red Indian almond leaf extract at a concentration of 12,000 ppm, then laid on the surface of the MHA. The results revealed that aqueous extract of red Indian almond leaves could inhibit the growth of tested bacteria better than the green extract. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined. Extracts of green and red leaves were diluted in Mueller Hinton Broth (MHB) to obtain a starting extract concentration of 6,000 ppm then twofold serially diluted in a 96-well microtitre plate. The pathogenic bacteria were inoculated into each well at a density of 1 x 105 CFU/mL and incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h. The growth of bacteria was detected by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliium bromide. The MIC of the red leaf extract ranged from 187.5 to 375 ppm which was lower than for green leaf extract (375-750 ppm). The MBC range of the red leaf extract was 375-750 ppm which was lower than for the green leaf extract (750-1,500 ppm). Acute toxicity tests (96-h LC50) of Indian almond green and red leaf water extracts in Siamese fighting fish were conducted. A logarithmic-spaced series of Indian

  11. Estudio comparado del crecimiento del alfonsiño Beryx splendens Lowe, 1834 de las montañas submarinas del golfo de Guinea y del océano Índico suroccidental

    OpenAIRE

    López-Abellán, L.J. (Luis José); Santamaría, M.T.G. (María Teresa García); Román-Marcote, E. (Esther)

    2007-01-01

    The alfonsino Beryx splendens Lowe, 1834 is a species typical of elevations and promontories of the ocean bottom, which has been widely studied in its distribution areas, although characterization of its populations lacks detailed comparative analyses regarding many important aspects of its biology. The present paper studies age and growth of alfonsino from the Gulf of Guinea seamounts, based on whole otolith readings. Ages of the fish studied ranged from 1 to 21 years (14.1-46.4 cm fork leng...

  12. The use of feather as an indicator for heavy metal contamination in house crow (Corvus splendens) in the Klang area, Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaydeh, Mohammed; Ismail, Ahmad; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Aziz, Nor Azwady Abd; Taneenah, Ayat

    2016-11-01

    The Klang area of Peninsular Malaysia has experienced rapid industrial growth with intense activities, which can increase the concentration of pollutants in the environment that significantly impact on habitats and the human health. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of selected heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe, and Pb) in the heart, lung, brain, liver, kidney, muscle tissues, and feathers of house crow, Corvus splendens, in Klang, Peninsular Malaysia. House crow samples were collected from the Klang area through the Department of Public Health at Majlis Perbandaran Klang. Quantitative determination of heavy metals was carried out using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The result shows the presence of heavy metals in all biological samples of house crows. For heavy metals in all the house crow tissues analyzed, Fe concentrations were the highest, followed by those of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Ni. The feathers and kidney accumulated high concentrations of Pb, whereas the liver accumulated high concentrations of essential heavy metals (Fe > Zn > Cu > Ni). Significant variations were also detected in the concentrations of Pb among adult and juvenile and male and female bird samples. The results also revealed significant positive correlations between Pb metal concentration in the breast feathers and all internal organs. Accumulation of toxic heavy metals in feathers reflected storing and elimination processes, while the accumulation of toxic heavy metals in the kidney can be consequential to chronic exposure. The present study clearly shows the usefulness of house crow breast feather as a suitable indicator for heavy metal accumulation in the internal organs of house crows in the Klang area.

  13. Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaydarov, R. R.; Khaydarov, R. A.; Estrin, Y.; Evgrafova, S.; Scheper, T.; Endres, C.; Cho, S. Y.

    The bactericidal effect of silver nanoparticles obtained by a novel electrochemical method on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium phoeniceum cultures has been studied. The tests conducted have demonstrated that synthesized silver nanoparticles — when added to water paints or cotton fabrics — show a pronounced antibacterial/antifungal effect. It was shown that smaller silver nanoparticles have a greater antibacterial/antifungal efficacy. The paper also provides a review of scientific literature with regard to recent developments in the field of toxicity of silver nanoparticles and its effect on environment and human health.

  14. Polymeric nanoparticles encapsulating white tea extract for nutraceutical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Vanna; Lubinu, Giuseppe; Madau, Pierluigi; Pala, Nicolino; Nurra, Salvatore; Mariani, Alberto; Sechi, Mario

    2015-02-25

    With the aim to obtain controlled release and to preserve the antioxidant activity of the polyphenols, nanoencapsulation of white tea extract into polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) based on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and alginate was successfully performed. NPs were prepared by nanoprecipitation method and were characterized in terms of morphology and chemical properties. Total polyphenols and catechins contents before and after encapsulation were determined. Moreover, in vitro release profiles of encapsulated polyphenols from NPs were investigated in simulated gastrointestinal fluids. The antioxidant activity and stability of encapsulated extract were further evaluated. Interestingly, NPs released 20% of the polyphenols in simulated gastric medium, and 80% after 5 h at pH 7.4, showing a good capacity to control the polyphenols delivery. Furthermore, DPPH(•) assay confirmed that white tea extract retained its antioxidant activity and NPs protected tea polyphenols from degradation, thus opening new perspectives for the exploitation of white tea extract-loaded NPs for nutraceutical applications.

  15. Interspecies and interregional comparisons of the chemistry of PAHs and trace elements in mosses Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. and Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. from Poland and Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Galuszka, A.; Crock, J.G.; Lamothe, P.J.; Dolegowska, S.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative biogeochemical studies performed on the same plant species in remote areas enable pinpointing interspecies and interregional differences of chemical composition. This report presents baseline concentrations of PAHs and trace elements in moss species Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi from the Holy Cross Mountains (south-central Poland) (HCM) and Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve (Alaska) and Denali National Park and Preserve (Alaska). Total PAH concentrations in the mosses of HCM were in the range of 473-2970 ??g kg-1 (dry weight basis; DW), whereas those in the same species of Alaska were 80-3390 ??g kg-1 DW. Nearly all the moss samples displayed the similar ring sequence: 3 > 4 > 5 > 6 for the PAHs. The 3 + 4 ring/total PAH ratios show statistically significant differences between HCM (0.73) and Alaska (0.91). The elevated concentrations of PAHs observed in some sampling locations of the Alaskan parks were linked to local combustion of wood, with a component of vehicle particle- and vapor-phase emissions. In HCM, the principal source of PAH emissions has been linked to residential and industrial combustion of coal and vehicle traffic. In contrast to HCM, the Alaskan mosses were distinctly elevated in most of the trace elements, bearing a signature of??the underlying geology. H.??splendens and P. schreberi showed diverse bioaccumulative capabilities of PAHs in all three study areas. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Activity of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii N.E.B. (Euphorbiaceae latex against Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817 (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, Linnaeus, 1758 (Trematoda: Fasciolidae. 2: limited field-testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvalho de Vasconcellos

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The molluscicidal evaluation of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii (Crown of thorns against Lymnaea columella snails, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, in irrigation ditches of the Pisciculture Station at Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, was studied under limited field conditions. An aqueous solution of the latex at 5 mg/l was tested in two irrigation ditches (experimental and control ditches, after initial sampling of the snail population present. Twenty-four hours after application of the product, it was verified that 97.4% of free L. columella snails and 100% of snails of the same species captive in cages and used as sentinels at three points equidistant from the application site in the experimental ditch, died. For Biomphalaria tenagophila and Melanoides tuberculata snails, present in the experimental ditch, the mortality was 100%, for the species Pomacea spp. the mortality was 40%. No mortality was verified in the free mollusks, or in the sentinels in the ditch used as control. E. splendens var. hislopii latex is thus an efficient natural molluscicide, which may be used as an alternative control agent against L. columella.

  17. (BDMCA) Nanoparticles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Nanoparticle formulations were fabricated by a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique using polycaprolactone as the polymer. The nanoparticles were characterised for drug content, particles size, in vitro drug release and the drug-polymer interaction. The in vivo properties of the formulations in male ...

  18. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  19. Efeitos de hormônios esteroides de contraceptivos orais combinados sobre os parâmetros comportamentais de Betta splendens (Regan, 1909

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.D. Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Os hormônios esteroides presentes em várias gerações de contraceptivos orais combinados (COC podem se apresentar como disruptores endócrinos, produzindo alterações no comportamento e na fisiologia de peixes. Diante disso, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos de hormônios esteroides presentes em COC sobre os parâmetros comportamentais de Betta splendens, um peixe ornamental usado na aquariofilia e bastante agressivo. Machos adultos foram observados pelo método ad libitum para confecção do etograma e divididos em cinco grupos, controle e expostos aos hormônios: 17β-estradiol (E2; levonorgestrel e etinilestradiol (LEA - segunda geração de COC; gestodeno e etinilestradiol (GEA - terceira geração de COC; e drospirenona e etinilestradiol (DEA - quarta geração de COC. Os peixes foram expostos por 30 dias à concentração final de 10ng/L. Foram avaliados os comportamentos pelos métodos de varredura instantânea e animal-focal, bem como o consumo de ração. No método varredura, o comportamento descansar apresentou o maior valor (54,4±10,1% no grupo E2 (P<0,05. Os comportamentos agressivos de carga (16,1±3,6% e recuar e carga (16,4±5,1% apresentaram os maiores valores no grupo controle em relação aos demais grupos (P<0,05. Os animais do grupo E2 apresentaram maior frequência de comportamentos inativos (76,1% comparados aos de outros grupos. O comportamento atípico natação errática não foi observado no grupo controle, mas foi observado nos grupos experimentais. Os grupos E2, LEA, GEA e DEA apresentaram redução nos comportamentos agressivos (10% quando comparados ao grupo controle pelo método animal-focal. Não foram observadas diferenças na exibição desses comportamentos ao se compararem os animais expostos às diferentes gerações de contraceptivos e no consumo de ração. Pode-se concluir que 17β-estradiol causou mais efeitos aos peixes e que diferentes gerações de COC apresentaram efeitos t

  20. Rendimientos, estructuras de tallas y madurez sexual del alfonsino (Beryx splendens capturado en el cordón submarino de Juan Fernández, Chile Fishing yields, size structures, and sexual maturity of alfonsino (Beryx splendens caught on Juan Fernandez seamounts, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Guerrero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la información recopilada en lances comerciales para la captura de alfonsino (Beryx splendens realizados en montes submarinos del archipiélago de Juan Fernández (Chile, entre los años 2001 y 2003, que corresponden a la etapa de desarrollo inicial de esta pesquería. En dicho período se efectuaron 187 lances, de los cuales en 121 se obtuvo la especie objetivo, capturándose 525,1 ton, que constituyeron el 99,2% de la captura total. Por la configuración irregular de los fondos, los lances de pesca se caracterizaron por su corta duración (0,26-0,50 h, a profundidad media de 469,7 m. En este periodo se analizaron 14.773 ejemplares, 6.064 machos (41% y 8.709 hembras (59%, evidenciando un predominio de hembras. La proporción sexual estructurada a la talla mostró un predominio de machos a tallas inferiores a 24 cm de longitud de horquilla (LH. En machos el tamaño medio fluctuó entre 34,6 y 36,8 cm de LH y en hembras entre 36,2 y 38,4 cm LH. Para determinar la madurez de las gónadas, se utilizó la escala macroscópica propuesta por Lehodey et al. (1997 y se estableció que los machos alcanzaron la primera madurez (TMS50% a 34,3 cm LH y las hembras a los 33,3 cm LH. Los rendimientos promedio en el período analizado correspondieron entre 0,2 y 6,6 ton lance-1 y entre 1,8 y 19,0 ton h.a.-1 , con medias de 4,3 ton lance-1 y 9,2 ton h.a.-1 .We analyzed information collected during commercial hauls targeting alfonsino (Beryx splendens on seamounts of the Juan Fernández Archipelago (Chile from the early stages of the fishery (2001-2003. Of the 187 hauls carried out in this period, 121 were successful; alfonsino catches reached 525.1 ton, constituting 99.2%> of the total catch. Due to the irregularity of the sea bottom, short (0.26-0.50 h fishing hauls were performed at mid-depth (469.7 m. We analyzed 14,773 specimens during the study period: 6,064 males (41% and 8,709 females (59%, the latter being predominan! The size structure was

  1. Evaluation of temporal, seasonal and geographic stability of the molluscicidal property of Euphorbia splendens latex Avaliação da estabilidade temporal, estacional e geográfica da ação moluscicida do latex da Euphorbia splendens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Torres Schall

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory tests with aqueous solutions of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii latex have demonstrated seasonal stability of the molluscicidal principle, with LD90 values of 1.14 ppm (spring, 1.02 ppm (fall, 1.09 ppm (winter, and 1.07 ppm (summer that have been determined against Biomphalaria tenagophila in the field. Assays on latex collected in Belo Horizonte and Recife yielded LD90 values similar to those obtained with the reference substance collected in Rio de Janeiro (Ilha do Governador, demonstrating geographic stability of the molluscicidal effect. The molluscicidal action of aqueous dilutions of the latex in natura, centrifuged (precipitate and lyophilized, was stable for up to 124 days at room temperature (in natura and for up to 736 days in a common refrigerator at 10 to 12ºC (lyophilized product. A 5.0 ppm solution is 100% lethal for snails up to 13 days after preparation, the effect being gradually lost to almost total inactivity by the 30th day. This observation indicated that the active principle is instable. These properties together with the wide distribution of the plant, its resistance and adaptation to the tropical climate, its easy cultivation and the easy obtention of latex and preparation of the molluscicidal solution, make this a promising material for large-scale use in the control of schistosomiasisTestes de laboratório com soluções aquosas do látex da Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii demonstraram uma estabilidade estacional da atividade moluscicida do produto coletado na Ilha do Governador - RJ, encontrando-se as seguintes DL90: 1,14 ppm (primavera; 1,02 ppm (outono; 1,09 ppm (inverno e 1,07 ppm (verão sobre Biomphalaria tenagophila de campo. Ensaios com o látex da planta coletado em Belo Horizonte e Recife, identificaram DL90 semelhantes aos da substância de referência coletada no Rio, demonstrando uma estabilidade geográfica do efeito moluscicida. Usando diluições aquosas do latex in natura, centrifugado

  2. Nanoparticle standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-08

    We will purchase a COTS materials printer and adapt it for solution printing of known elemental concentration solutions. A methodology will be developed to create deposits of known mass in known locations on selected substrates. The deposits will be characterized for deposited mass, physical morphology, thickness and uniformity. Once an acceptable methodology has been developed and validated, we will create round robin samples to be characterized by LGSIMS instruments at LANL, PNNL and NIST. We will demonstrate the feasibility of depositing nanoparticles in known masses with the goal of creating separated nanoparticles in known locations.

  3. (shell) nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nanoparticles the quasistatic approximation is not appropriate and Mie theory illustrates SPR due to dipole and quadrupole in extinction ... The time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) [19] .... satile technique for determining the optical properties of nanoshells or any other spherical particles of any dimension.

  4. Estratégia de coalimentação na sobrevivência e no crescimento de larvas de Betta splendens durante a transição alimentar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Fosse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se um experimento com o objetivo de avaliar a influência do período de coalimentação na sobrevivência e no crescimento de larvas de Betta splendens. As larvas foram alimentadas com náuplios de Artemia durante sete dias e, posteriormente, submetidas aos seguintes tratamentos: jejum contínuo; ração contínua; quatro dias de coalimentação + 14 dias de ração; oito dias de coalimentação + 10 dias de ração; 12 dias de coalimentação + seis dias de ração; náuplios de Artemia durante todo o período experimental. Os valores das variáveis de desempenho das larvas do tratamento 12 dias de coalimentação + seis dias de ração e do tratamento náuplios de Artemia foram superiores aos demais tratamentos, exceto para sobrevivência, em que não houve diferença significativa com o tratamento oito dias de coalimentação + 10 dias de ração. Considerando-se apenas o tempo de oferta de Artemia (em dias, obteve-se a equação de regressão para as variáveis analisadas. A sobrevivência e a taxa de crescimento específico (TCE apresentaram efeito quadrático, e as demais variáveis apresentaram efeito linear. O ponto de máxima para sobrevivência foi de 21,7 dias (88,92% e para TCE foi de 26,2 dias (23,47% dia-1. O período de co-feeding influencia no crescimento e na sobrevivência de larvas de Betta splendens. Após o período de 19 dias de oferta de alimento vivo, com 12 dias de coalimentação, as larvas estão aptas a aproveitar de maneira eficiente o alimento inerte sem prejuízos ao crescimento e à sobrevivência.

  5. O3 Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Juan

    2016-11-16

    Ti2O3 nanoparticles with high performance of photothermal conversion are demonstrated for the first time. Benefiting from the nanosize and narrow-bandgap features, the Ti2O3 nanoparticles possess strong light absorption and nearly 100% internal solar–thermal conversion efficiency. Furthermore, Ti2O3 nanoparticle-based thin film shows potential use in seawater desalination and purification.

  6. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Subin; Panda, Tapobrata; Nair, Praseetha P; Théodore, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Metal nanoparticles have unique optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. There exist well-defined physical and chemical processes for their preparation. Those processes often yield small quantities of nanoparticles having undesired morphology, and involve high temperatures for the reaction and the use of hazardous chemicals. Relatively, the older technique of bioremediation of metals uses either microorganisms or their components for the production of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles obtained from bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and their components, etc. appear environment-friendly, as toxic chemicals are not used in the processes. In addition to this, the formation of nanoparticles takes place at almost normal temperature and pressure. Control of the shape and size of the nanoparticles is possible by appropriate selection of the pH and temperature. Three important steps are the bioconversion of Ag+ ions, conversion of desired crystals to nanoparticles, and nanoparticle stability. Generally, nanoparticles are characterized by the UV-visible spectroscopy and use of the electron microscope. Silver nanoparticles are used as antimicrobial agents and they possess antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. This review highlights the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by various organisms, possible mechanisms of their synthesis, their characterization, and applications of silver nanoparticles.

  7. Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A.; Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Thompson, John W.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Haynes, Christy L.

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticle toxicology, an emergent field, works toward establishing the hazard of nanoparticles, and therefore their potential risk, in light of the increased use and likelihood of exposure. Analytical chemists can provide an essential tool kit for the advancement of this field by exploiting expertise in sample complexity and preparation as well as method and technology development. Herein, we discuss experimental considerations for performing in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies, with a focus on nanoparticle characterization, relevant model cell systems, and toxicity assay choices. Additionally, we present three case studies (of silver, titanium dioxide, and carbon nanotube toxicity) to highlight the important toxicological considerations of these commonly used nanoparticles.

  8. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter [Houston, TX; Koh, Shirlaine [Houston, TX; Mani, Prasanna [Houston, TX; Ratndeep, Srivastava [Houston, TX

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  9. Nanoparticle agglomerates in magnetoliposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, E. R.; Ferreira, F. S.; Santos Junior, J. L.; Campello, J. C.; Socolovsky, L. M.; Lima, E. M.; Bakuzis, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetoliposomes consist of vesicles composed of a phospholipid membrane encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles. These systems have several important applications, such as in MRI contrast agents, drug and gene carriers, and cancer treatment devices. For all of these applications, controlling the number of encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles is a key issue. In this work, we used a magneto-optical technique to obtain information about the efficiency of encapsulation, the number of nanoparticles encapsulated per liposome and also about the formation of the nanoparticle structures. The parameters studied included the effect of the duration of sonication, the presence of cholesterol in the liposome membrane, as well as time-related stability. For the liposomal vesicles prepared in this work, we found between 35 and 300 nanoparticles encapsulated per liposome, depending on the experimental conditions, consisting of small linear chains of nanoparticles, basically trimers and tetramers. The methodology developed might be useful for the investigation and improvement of the properties of several magnetic nanocarrier systems.

  10. Multifunctional nanoparticles: Analytical prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dios, Alejandro Simon de; Diaz-Garcia, Marta Elena

    2010-01-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles are among the most exciting nanomaterials with promising applications in analytical chemistry. These applications include (bio)sensing, (bio)assays, catalysis and separations. Although most of these applications are based on the magnetic, optical and electrochemical properties of multifunctional nanoparticles, other aspects such as the synergistic effect of the functional groups and the amplification effect associated with the nanoscale dimension have also been observed. Considering not only the nature of the raw material but also the shape, there is a huge variety of nanoparticles. In this review only magnetic, quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, carbon and inorganic nanotubes as well as silica, titania and gadolinium oxide nanoparticles are addressed. This review presents a narrative summary on the use of multifuncional nanoparticles for analytical applications, along with a discussion on some critical challenges existing in the field and possible solutions that have been or are being developed to overcome these challenges.

  11. Nanoparticles and direct immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngobili, Terrika A

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the immune system with nanomaterials is an intensely active area of research. Specifically, the capability to induce immunosuppression is a promising complement for drug delivery and regenerative medicine therapies. Many novel strategies for immunosuppression rely on nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for small-molecule immunosuppressive compounds. As a consequence, efforts in understanding the mechanisms in which nanoparticles directly interact with the immune system have been overshadowed. The immunological activity of nanoparticles is dependent on the physiochemical properties of the nanoparticles and its subsequent cellular internalization. As the underlying factors for these reactions are elucidated, more nanoparticles may be engineered and evaluated for inducing immunosuppression and complementing immunosuppressive drugs. This review will briefly summarize the state-of-the-art and developments in understanding how nanoparticles induce immunosuppressive responses, compare the inherent properties of nanomaterials which induce these immunological reactions, and comment on the potential for using nanomaterials to modulate and control the immune system. PMID:27229901

  12. Multifunctional nanoparticles: analytical prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Alejandro Simón; Díaz-García, Marta Elena

    2010-05-07

    Multifunctional nanoparticles are among the most exciting nanomaterials with promising applications in analytical chemistry. These applications include (bio)sensing, (bio)assays, catalysis and separations. Although most of these applications are based on the magnetic, optical and electrochemical properties of multifunctional nanoparticles, other aspects such as the synergistic effect of the functional groups and the amplification effect associated with the nanoscale dimension have also been observed. Considering not only the nature of the raw material but also the shape, there is a huge variety of nanoparticles. In this review only magnetic, quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, carbon and inorganic nanotubes as well as silica, titania and gadolinium oxide nanoparticles are addressed. This review presents a narrative summary on the use of multifunctional nanoparticles for analytical applications, along with a discussion on some critical challenges existing in the field and possible solutions that have been or are being developed to overcome these challenges. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molluscicidal action of the latex of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii N.E.B. ("Christ's Crown" (Euphorbiaceae against Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817 (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica Linnaeus, 1758 (Trematode: Fasciolidae: 1- test in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvalho de Vasconcellos

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The latex action of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii (Christ's Crown against snails Lymnaea columella, intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica, derived from irrigation ditches of the Station of Pisciculture at Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, was studied in the laboratory. Lab bioassays, using aqueous solutions of the latex, varying between 0.1 and 10 mg/l, have proven molluscicidal activity of the product collected on the same day the tests were performed, during the four seasons of the year, finding the following lethal concentrations (LC90: 1.51 mg/l in the spring; 0.55 mg/l in the summer; 0.74 mg/l in the fall and 0.93 mg/l in winter, after 24 h exposure of the snails, showing significant differences among the seasons of the year (ANOVA test, F = 11.01, G.L.= 3/33, p < 0.05, as well as among the concentrations (ANOVA test, F = 27.38, G.L.= 11/33, p < 0.05. In the summer, mortality reached 100% from concentration at 0.6 mg/l, the same during fall and in winter as of 1 mg/l, while in spring it only reached 100% mortality as of 2 mg/l. Mortality in the controls was low, reaching 5% in the summer and winter and 10% in the fall and spring. None of the samples died. During the assay, with an aqueous solution of the latex at a concentration of 5 mg/l, in order to check the time of duration of the product effect, in the laboratory, it was observed that the molluscicidal activity remained stable up to the 15th day after the beginning of the test with 100% mortality of L. columella, gradually losing its effect until the 23rd day, when we no longer observed animal mortality. In the control group, there was a random daily variation in mortality rate ranging 0-50% after 48 h of observation for 30 days.

  14. [How safe are nanoparticles?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J; Meinke, M; Sterry, W; Patzelt, A

    2009-04-01

    Nanoparticles are experiencing an increasing application in dermatology and cosmetics. In both application areas, the requirements of nanoparticles are in most cases widely different. As a component of sunscreens, the nanoparticles are supposed to remain on the skin surface or in the upper most layers of the stratum corneum to protect the skin against UV-radiation of the sun. Whereas, on the other hand, when particulate substances are used as carrier systems for drugs, they have to cross the skin barrier to reach the target sites within the living tissue. We discuss the perspectives and risks of the topical application of nanoparticles.

  15. Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Yongkun; Burkhard Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are useful tools for biological applications due to their attractive physical and chemical properties. Their applications can be further expanded when they are functionalized with biological molecules. The biological molecules not only provide the interfaces for interactions between nanoparticles and biological environment, but also contribute their biological functions to the nanoparticles. Therefore, we used self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs...

  16. Optical properties of nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At the NBI I am involved in projects relating to optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in particular with respect to plasmonic heating with direct applications to photothermal cancer therapy. For this purpose we have developed heating assays that can be used to measure the heating of any...... nanoscopic heat source like an irradiated nanoparticle...

  17. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  18. Magnetic interactions between nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2010-01-01

    We present a short overview of the influence of inter-particle interactions on the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. Strong magnetic dipole interactions between ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic particles, that would be superparamagnetic if isolated, can result in a collective state...... of nanoparticles. This collective state has many similarities to spin-glasses. In samples of aggregated magnetic nanoparticles, exchange interactions are often important and this can also lead to a strong suppression of superparamagnetic relaxation. The temperature dependence of the order parameter in samples...... of strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles or goethite grains is well described by a simple mean field model. Exchange interactions between nanoparticles with different orientations of the easy axes can also result in a rotation of the sub-lattice magnetization directions....

  19. Functional Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, James

    Nanoparticle system research and characterization is the focal point of this research and dissertation. In the research presented here, magnetite, cobalt, and ferrite nanoparticle systems have been explored in regard to their magnetocaloric effect (MCE) properties, as well as for use in polymer composites. Both areas of study have potential applications across a wide variety of interdisciplinary fields. Magnetite nanoparticles have been successfully dispersed in a polymer. The surface chemistry of the magnetic nanoparticle proves critical to obtaining a homogenous and well separated high density dispersion in PMMA. Theoretical studies found in the literature have indicated that surface interface energy is a critical component in dispersion. Oleic acid is used to alter the surface of magnetite nanoparticles and successfully achieve good dispersion in a PMMA thin film. Polypyrrole is then coated onto the PMMA composite layer. The bilayer is characterized using cross-sectional TEM, cross-sectional SEM, magnetic characterization, and low frequency conductivity. The results show that the superparmagnetic properties of the as synthesized particles are maintained in the composite. With further study of the properties of these nanoparticles for real and functional uses, MCE is studied on a variety of magnetic nanoparticle systems. Magnetite, manganese zinc ferrite, and cobalt ferrite systems show significant broadening of the MCE and the ability to tune the peak temperature of MCE by varying the size of the nanoparticles. Four distinct systems are studied including cobalt, cobalt core silver shell nanoparticles, nickel ferrite, and ball milled zinc ferrite. The results demonstrate the importance of surface characteristics on MCE. Surface spin disorder appears to have a large influence on the low temperature magnetic and magnetocalorie characteristics of these nanoparticle systems.

  20. Microemulsion Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotić, M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles and nanomaterials have wide applications in electronics, physics, material design, being also utilized as sensors, catalysts, and more and more in biomedicine. Microemulsions are an exceptionally suitable medium for the synthesis of nanoparticles due to their thermodynamical stability, great solubility of both polar and nonpolar components, as well as their ability to control the size, dispersity and shape of the particles. This review presents microemulsion techniques for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. It takes place in water-in-oil microemulsions by mixing one microemulsion with a cationic precursor, and the other with a precipitating or reducing agent, or by direct addition of reducing agents or gas (O2, NH3 ili CO2 into microemul sion (Fig. 1. Metal nanoparticles are used as catalysts, sensors, ferrofluids etc. They are produced by reducing the metal cation with a suitable reducing agent. In a similar way, one can prepare nanoparticles of alloys from the metal salts, provided that the metals are mutually soluble. The microemulsion technique is also suitable for depositing nanoparticles onto various surfaces. Highly active catalysts made from nanoparticles of Pt, Pd, Rh and other noble metals may be obtained in this way. Metal oxides and hydroxides may be prepared by hydrolysis or precipitation in the water core of microemulsion. Precipitation can be initiated by adding the base or precipitating agent into the microemulsion with water solution of metal ions. Similarly, nanoparticles may be prepared of sulphides, halogenides, cyanides, carbonates, sulphates and other insoluble metal salts. To prevent oxidation of nanoparticles, especially Fe, the particles are coated with inert metals, oxides, various polymers etc. Coating may provide additional functionality; e.g. coating with gold allows subsequent functionalization with organic compounds containing sulphur, due to the strong Au–S bond. Polymer coatings decrease

  1. Electronically cloaked nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenqing

    The concept of electronic cloaking is to design objects invisible to conduction electrons. The approach of electronic cloaking has been recently suggested to design invisible nanoparticle dopants with electronic scattering cross section smaller than 1% of the physical cross section (pi a2), and therefore to enhance the carrier mobility of bulk materials. The proposed nanoparticles have core-shell structures. The dopants are incorporated inside the core, while the shell layer serves both as a spacer to separate the charge carriers from their parent atoms and as a cloaking shell to minimize the scattering cross section of the electrons from the ionized nanoparticles. Thermoelectric materials are usually highly doped to have enough carrier density. Using invisible dopants could achieve larger thermoelectric power factors by enhancing the electronic mobility. Core-shell nanoparticles show an advantage over one-layer nanoparticles, which are proposed in three-dimensional modulation doping. However designing such nanoparticles is not easy as there are too many parameters to be considered. This thesis first shows an approach to design hollow nanoparticles by applying constrains on variables. In the second part, a simple mapping approach is introduced where one can identify possible core-shell particles by comparing the dimensionless parameters of chosen materials with provided maps. In both parts of this work, several designs with realistic materials were made and proven to achieve electronic cloaking. Improvement in the thermoelectric power factor compared to the traditional impurity doping method was demonstrated in several cases.

  2. Assembling RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2017-01-01

    RNA nanoparticles are designed and self-assembled according to noncanonical interactions of naturally conserved RNA motifs and/or canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, which have potential applications in gene therapy and nanomedicine. These artificially engineered nanoparticles are mainly synthesized from in vitro transcribed RNAs, purified by denaturing and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and characterized with native PAGE, AFM, and TEM technologies. The protocols of in vitro transcription, denaturing and native PAGE, and RNA nanoparticle self-assembly are described in detail.

  3. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E.; Crisp, R.W.; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E.; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We

  4. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.

    2014-10-21

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  5. Metallic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernando

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm, covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  6. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Klem, Michael T.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches...

  7. Nanolubricant: magnetic nanoparticle based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Kinjal; Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, Ramesh V.

    2017-11-01

    In the present study magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 having average particle diameter, 11.7 nm were synthesized using chemical coprecipitation technique and dispersed in alpha olefin hydrocarbon synthetic lubricating oil. The solid weight fraction of magnetic nanoparticles in the lubricating oil was varied from 0 wt% to 10 wt%. The tribological properties were studied using four-ball tester. The results demonstrate that the coefficient of friction and wear scar diameter reduces by 45% and 30%, respectively at an optimal value, i.e. 4 wt% of magnetic nanoparticles concentration. The surface characterization of worn surface was carried out using a scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. These results implied that rolling mechanism is responsible to reduce coefficient of friction while magnetic nanoparticles act as the spacer between the asperities and reduces the wear scar diameter. The surface roughness of the worn surface studied using an atomic force microscope shows a reduction in surface roughness by a factor of four when magnetic nanoparticles are used as an additive. The positive response of magnetic nanoparticles in a lubricating oil, shows the potential replacement of conventional lubricating oil.

  8. Protein trapping of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Joo C.; Lin, Jack M.; Yaron, Peter N.; White, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We have observed the formation of protein-nanoparticle complexes at the air-water interfaces from three different methods of presenting the nanoparticles to proteins. The structures formed resemble the 'protein-nanoparticle corona' proposed by Lynch et al. [1-3) in relation to a possible route for nanoparticle entry into living cells. To do this, the methods of x-ray and neutron reflectivity (with isotopic contrast variation between the protein and nanoparticles) have been used to study the structures formed at the air-water interface of l 3 - casein presented to silica nanoparticle dispersions. Whilst the silica dispersions showed no observable reflectivity, strong signals appear in the reflectivity when protein is present. Drop-wise spreading of a small amount of protein at the air-silica sol interface and presentation of the silica sol to an isolated monomolecular protein film (made by the 'flow-trough' method [4]) gave an immediate signal. Mixing the components in solution only produces a slow response but in all cases a similar structure is formed. The different responses are interpreted in structural and stoichiometric ways.

  9. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  10. Surface chemistry of "unprotected" nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Imke; Warneke, Jonas; Neumann, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of colloidal nanoparticles in alkaline ethylene glycol is a powerful approach for the preparation of model catalysts and ligand-functionalized nanoparticles. For these systems the term "unprotected" nanoparticles has been established because no strongly binding stabilizers are req...

  11. Safety of nanoparticles in sunscreens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2009-01-01

    Sunscreens may contain ZnO or TiO2 nanoparticles to absorb UV radiation. Available data do not allow for precisely establishing risk associated with these nanoparticles. However, there is substantial evidence that the hazard of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles probably comes from their ability to generate

  12. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Anal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  13. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  14. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  15. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krantz, Kelsie E.; Christian, Jonathan H.; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Washington II, Aaron L.; Murph, Simona H.

    2016-01-01

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  16. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Kelsie E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coopersmith, Kaitlin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murph, Simona H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Trohidou, Kalliopi N

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with diameters in the range of a few nanometers are today at the cutting edge of modern technology and innovation because of their use in numerous applications ranging from engineering to biomedicine. A great deal of scientific interest has been focused on the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. The understanding of interparticle interactions is necessary to clarify the physics of these assemblies and their use in the development of high-performance magnetic materials. This book reviews prominent research studies on the static and dynamic magnetic properties of nanoparticle assemblies, gathering together experimental and computational techniques in an effort to reveal their optimized magnetic properties for biomedical use and as ultra-high magnetic recording media.

  18. Shear rheology of extended nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Matt K.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2010-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are presented for the shear rheology of suspensions of extended “jack”-shaped nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The shear viscosity is measured for two jack-shaped nanoparticle suspensions for volume fractions from 0.01 to 0.15 and compared to spherical nanoparticles of the same mass. Large differences, in some cases, orders of magnitude, are observed for both the equilibrium viscosity and diffusion constant as the shape of the nanoparticle is varied. The source of enhanced viscosity is the very large effective volume swept out by these extended nanoparticles which allows them to become highly entangled even at low volume fraction.

  19. Cardiotoxicity of nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Hasan Badie; Rezaee, Ramin; Valokala, Mahmoud Gorji; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Golokhvast, Kirill; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2016-11-15

    Nano-particles (NPs) are used in industrial and biomedical fields such as cosmetics, food additives and biosensors. Beside their favorable properties, nanoparticles are responsible for toxic effects. Local adverse effects and/or systemic toxicity are described with nanoparticle delivery to target organs of the human body. Animal studies provide evidence for the aforementioned toxicity. Cardiac function is a specific target of nanoparticles. Thus, reviewing the current bibliography on cardiotoxicity of nanoparticles and specifically of titanium, zinc, silver, carbon, silica and iron oxide nano-materials is the aim of this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biocatalytic Single Enzyme Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kim, Jungbae

    2004-03-31

    As an innovative way of enzyme stabilization, we recently developed a new enzyme composite of nano-meter scale that we call "single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs)" (9). Each enzyme molecule is surrounded with a porous composite organic/inorganic network of less than a few nanometers think. This approach represents a new type of enzyme-containing nanostructure. In experiments with perotease (chymotrypsin, CT), the activity of single enzyme nanoparticle form of the enzyme was greatly stabilized compared to the free form, without imposing a serious mass transfer limitation of substrates. In this chapter we will describe the synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of the new SENs.

  1. NANOPARTICLES IN NUCLEAR IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Vicky V Mody PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review article summarizes the current state radiolabeled nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications mainly targeting cancer. Due to their enormous flexibility, and versatility the radiolabeled nanoparticles have shown their potential in the diagnosis and therapy. As the matter of fact, these radiolabeled imaging agents enable the visualization of the cellular function and the follow-up of the molecular process in living organisms. Moreover, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has provided various innovative radionuclides and delivery systems, such as liposomes, magnetic agents, polymers, dendrimers, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes to cope up with the hurdles which have been posed by various disease states.

  2. Potencial risks of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Forbe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanotoxicology is an emergent important subdiscipline of Nanosciences, which refers to the study of the interactions of nanostructures with biological systems giving emphasis to the elucidation of the relationship between the physical and chemical properties of nanostructures with induction of toxic biological responses. Although potential beneficial effects of nanotechnologies are generally well described, the potential (eco toxicological effects and impacts of nanoparticles have so far received little attention. This is the reason why some routes of expousure, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, as well as toxicological effects of nanoparticles are discussed in this review.

  3. Nanoparticle shuttle memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex Karlwalter [Kensington, CA

    2012-03-06

    A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

  4. Actinide nanoparticle research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Denecke, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first book to cover actinide nano research. It is of interest both for fundamental research into the chemistry and physics of f-block elements as well as for applied researchers such as those studying the long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal and developing remediation strategies. The authors cover important issues of the formation of actinide nano-particles, their properties and structure, environmental behavior of colloids and nanoparticles related to the safe disposal of nuclear wastes, modeling and advanced methods of characterization at the nano-scale. (orig.)

  5. Nanoparticles from Renewable Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Roman Wurm

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of polymers from natural resources can bring many benefits for novel polymeric nanoparticle systems. Such polymers have a variety of beneficial properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, they are readily available on large scale and at low cost. As the amount of fossil fuels decrease, their application becomes more interesting even if characterization is in many cases more challenging due to structural complexity, either by broad distribution of their molecular weights polysaccharides, polyesters, lignin or by complex structure (proteins, lignin. This review summarizes different sources and methods for the preparation of biopolymer-based nanoparticle systems for various applications.

  6. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  7. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Westesen, K; Drechsler, M

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of preparing nanoparticles in the supercooled thermotropic liquid crystalline state from cholesterol esters with saturated acyl chains as well as the incorporation of model drugs into the dispersions was investigated using cholesteryl myristate (CM) as a model cholesterol ester....

  8. Asymmetric Hybrid Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumanov, George [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2015-11-05

    Hybrid Nanoparticles (AHNs) are rationally-designed multifunctional nanostructures and novel building blocks for the next generation of advanced materials and devices. Nanoscale materials attract considerable interest because of their unusual properties and potential for practical applications. Most of the activity in this field is focused on the synthesis of homogeneous nanoparticles from metals, metal oxides, semiconductors, and polymers. It is well recognized that properties of nanoparticles can be further enhanced if they are made as hybrid structures. This program is concerned with the synthesis, characterization, and application of such hybrid structures termed AHNs. AHNs are composed of a homogeneous core and several caps of different materials deposited on its surface (Fig. 1). Combined properties of the core and the caps as well as new properties that arise from core-cap and cap-cap interactions render AHNs multifunctional. In addition, specific chemical reactivity of the caps enables directional self-assembly of AHNs into complex architectures that are not possible with only spherical nanoparticles.

  9. Nanoparticles in forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Antonio A.

    2008-10-01

    Nanoparticles appear in several areas of forensic science including security documents, paints, inks, and reagents that develop latent prints. One reagent (known as the silver physical developer) that visualizes the water insoluble components of latent print residue is based on the formation of highly charged silver nanoparticles. These attach to and grow on the residue and generate a silver image. Another such reagent involves highly charged gold nanoparticles. These attach to the residue forming a weak gold image which can be amplified with a silver physical developer. Nanoparaticles are also used in items such as paints, printing inks, and writing inks. Paints and most printing inks consist of nano-sized pigments in a vehicle. However, certain modern ink jet printing inks now contain nano-sized pigments to improve their light fastness and most gel inks are also based on nano scale pigments. These nanoparticlecontaining materials often appear as evidence and are thus subject to forensic characterization. Both luminescent (quantum dots), up-converting nano scale phosphors, and non luminescent nanoparticles are used as security tags to label product, add security to documents, and as anti counterfeiting measures. These assist in determining if an item is fraudulently made.

  10. Doped barium titanate nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have synthesized nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) ion doped BaTiO3 nanoparticles through a chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The concentration of dopant varies from 0 to 2 mole% in the specimens. The results from X-ray diffractograms and transmission electron micrographs show that the particle diameters in the ...

  11. Doped barium titanate nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. We have synthesized nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) ion doped BaTiO3 nanoparticles through a chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The concentration of dopant varies from 0 to 2 mole% in the specimens. The results from X-ray diffractograms and transmission electron micrographs show that the particle ...

  12. Nanoparticle-Assisted Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and harnessing the interactions between nanoparticles and biological molecules is at the forefront of applications of nanotechnology to modern biology. Metabolomics has emerged as a prominent player in systems biology as a complement to genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Its focus is the systematic study of metabolite identities and concentration changes in living systems. Despite significant progress over the recent past, important challenges in metabolomics remain, such as the deconvolution of the spectra of complex mixtures with strong overlaps, the sensitive detection of metabolites at low abundance, unambiguous identification of known metabolites, structure determination of unknown metabolites and standardized sample preparation for quantitative comparisons. Recent research has demonstrated that some of these challenges can be substantially alleviated with the help of nanoscience. Nanoparticles in particular have found applications in various areas of bioanalytical chemistry and metabolomics. Their chemical surface properties and increased surface-to-volume ratio endows them with a broad range of binding affinities to biomacromolecules and metabolites. The specific interactions of nanoparticles with metabolites or biomacromolecules help, for example, simplify metabolomics spectra, improve the ionization efficiency for mass spectrometry or reveal relationships between spectral signals that belong to the same molecule. Lessons learned from nanoparticle-assisted metabolomics may also benefit other emerging areas, such as nanotoxicity and nanopharmaceutics.

  13. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  14. Progress toward clonable inorganic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Thomas W.; Staicu, Lucian C.; Nemeth, Richard S.; Schwartz, Cindi L.; Crawford, David; Seligman, Jeffrey D.; Hunter, William J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.; Ackerson, Christopher J.

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO32- in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular electron tomography shows the nanoparticles as intracellular, of narrow dispersity, symmetrically irregular and without any observable membrane or structured protein shell. Protein mass spectrometry of a fractionated soluble cytosolic material with selenite reducing capability identified nitrite reductase and glutathione reductase homologues as NADPH dependent candidate enzymes for the reduction of selenite to zerovalent Se nanoparticles. In vitro experiments with commercially sourced glutathione reductase revealed that the enzyme can reduce SeO32- (selenite) to Se nanoparticles in an NADPH-dependent process. The disappearance of the enzyme as determined by protein assay during nanoparticle formation suggests that glutathione reductase is associated with or possibly entombed in the nanoparticles whose formation it catalyzes. Chemically dissolving the nanoparticles releases the enzyme. The size of the nanoparticles varies with SeO32- concentration, varying in size form 5 nm diameter when formed at 1.0 μM [SeO32-] to 50 nm maximum diameter when formed at 100 μM [SeO32-]. In aggregate, we suggest that glutathione reductase possesses the key attributes of a clonable nanoparticle system: ion reduction, nanoparticle retention and size control of the nanoparticle at the enzyme site.Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO32- in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular

  15. Peptide-Assembled Optically Responsive Nanoparticle Complexes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Slocik, Joseph M; Tam, Felicia; Halas, Naomi J; Naik, Rajesh R

    2007-01-01

    .... Here we report two types of active nanoparticle complexes, with properties controlled by near-infrared illumination, resulting from the assembly of photothermally responsive plasmonic nanoparticle...

  16. Immunological properties of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, Lev A; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G

    2017-03-01

    In the past decade, gold nanoparticles have attracted strong interest from the nanobiotechnological community owing to the significant progress made in robust and easy-to-make synthesis technologies, in surface functionalization, and in promising biomedical applications. These include bioimaging, gene diagnostics, analytical sensing, photothermal treatment of tumors, and targeted delivery of various biomolecular and chemical cargos. For the last-named application, gold nanoparticles should be properly fabricated to deliver the cargo into the targeted cells through effective endocytosis. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the selective penetration of gold nanoparticles into immune cells. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with immune cell receptors is discussed. As distinct from other published reviews, we present a summary of the immunological properties of gold nanoparticles. This review also summarizes what is known about the application of gold nanoparticles as an antigen carrier and adjuvant in immunization for the preparation of antibodies in vivo . For each of the above topics, the basic principles, recent advances, and current challenges are discussed. Thus, this review presents a detailed analysis of data on interaction of gold nanoparticles with immune cells. Emphasis is placed on the systematization of data over production of antibodies by using gold nanoparticles and adjuvant properties of gold nanoparticles. Specifically, we start our discussion with current data on interaction of various gold nanoparticles with immune cells. The next section describes existing technologies to improve production of antibodies in vivo by using gold nanoparticles conjugated with specific ligands. Finally, we describe what is known about adjuvant properties of bare gold or functionalized nanoparticles. In the Conclusion section, we present a short summary of reported data and some challenges and perspectives.

  17. Nanobiotechnology today: focus on nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloviev Mikhail

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years the nanobiotechnology field and the Journal of Nanobiotechnology readership have witnessed an increase in interest towards the nanoparticles and their biological effects and applications. These include bottom-up and molecular self-assembly, biological effects of naked nanoparticles and nano-safety, drug encapsulation and nanotherapeutics, and novel nanoparticles for use in microscopy, imaging and diagnostics. This review highlights recent Journal of Nanobiotechnology publications in some of these areas http://www.jnanobiotechnology.com.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krustev, P.; Ruskov, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe different biomedical application using magnetic nanoparticles. Over the past decade, a number of biomedical applications have begun to emerge for magnetic nanoparticles of differing sizes, shapes, and compositions. Areas under investigation include targeted drug delivery, ultra-sensitive disease detection, gene therapy, high throughput genetic screening, biochemical sensing, and rapid toxicity cleansing. Magnetic nanoparticles exhibit ferromagnetic or superparamagnetic behavior, magnetizing strongly under an applied field. In the second case (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) there is no permanent magnetism once the field is removed. The superparamagnetic nanoparticles are highly attractive as in vivo probes or in vitro tools to extract information on biochemical systems. The optical properties of magnetic metal nanoparticles are spectacular and, therefore, have promoted a great deal of excitement during the last few decades. Many applications as MRI imaging and hyperthermia rely on the use of iron oxide particles. Moreover magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies are also applied to hyperthermia and have enabled tumor specific contrast enhancement in MRI. Other promising biomedical applications are connected with tumor cells treated with magnetic nanoparticles with X-ray ionizing radiation, which employs magnetic nanoparticles as a complementary radiate source inside the tumor. (authors)

  19. Biomimetic nanoparticles for inflammation targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many recent exciting developments in biomimetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. Inflammation, a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators directed against harmful stimuli, is closely associated with many human diseases. As a result, biomimetic nanoparticles mimicking immune cells can help achieve molecular imaging and precise drug delivery to these inflammatory sites. This review is focused on inflammation-targeting biomimetic nanoparticles and will provide an in-depth look at the design of these nanoparticles to maximize their benefits for disease diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  1. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Koch, Michel H J; Fahr, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Cholesteryl nonanoate (CN), myristate (CM), palmitate (CP) and oleate (CO) alone or in combination were evaluated as matrix lipids for the preparation of supercooled smectic nanoparticles with a high stability against recrystallization during storage. The phase behavior of the cholesterol esters...... in the bulk was studied by polarizing light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Colloidal dispersions with pure and mixed cholesterol ester matrices were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization and characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy......, laser diffraction combined with polarizing intensity differential scattering, DSC and SAXS. The morphology of selected formulations was studied by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. All smectic nanoparticles with a mixed cholesterol ester matrix were stable against recrystallization when stored...

  2. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is extensively used in catalysis research. Recent developments in aberration correction allows imaging surface structures with unprecedented resolution. Using these correctors in conjunction with environmental TEM (ETEM), where imaging of materials can be done...... under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...... and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...

  3. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  4. Ecotoxicity of Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sachindri; Kalaichelvan, P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a science of producing and utilizing nanosized particles that are measured in nanometers. The unique size-dependent properties make the nanoparticles superior and indispensable as they show unusual physical, chemical, and properties such as conductivity, heat transfer, melting temperature, optical properties, and magnetization. Taking the advantages of these singular properties in order to develop new products is the main purpose of nanotechnology, and that is why it is rega...

  5. Antibacterial properties of nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hajipour Mohammad J.; Fromm Katharina M.; Ashkarran Ali A.; de Aberasturi Dorleta J.; de Larramendi Idoia R.; Rojo Teofilo; Serpooshan Vahid; Parak Wolfgang J.; Mahmoudi Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Antibacterial agents are very important in the textile industry, water disinfection, medicine, and food packaging. Organic compounds used for disinfection have some disadvantages, including toxicity to the human body, therefore, the interest in inorganic disinfectants such as metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is increasing. This review focuses on the properties and applications of inorganic nanostructured materials and their surface modifications, with good antimicrobial activity. Such improved...

  6. Nanoparticle Toxicity Mechanisms: Genotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Alain; Benameur, Laı̈la

    Despite the relatively small amount of convincing experimental data, the potentially genotoxic nature of certain nanoparticles seems plausible, owing in particular to the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as the superoxide anion O2 • - , the hydroxyl radical • OH, and singlet oxygen 1O2, and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitrogen monoxide NO, the peroxynitrite anion ONOO - , the peroxynitrite radical ONOO • , and dinitrogen trioxide N2O3, a powerful nitration agent.

  7. Evaluation of nanoparticle immunotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A.; Germolec, Dori R.; Weaver, James L.

    2009-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is developing increasing numbers of drugs and diagnostics based on nanoparticles, and evaluating the immune response to these diverse formulations has become a challenge for scientists and regulatory agencies alike. An international panel of scientists and representatives from various agencies and companies reviewed the imitations of current tests at a workshop held at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland. This article outlines practical strategies for identifying and controlling interferences in common evaluation methods and the implications for regulation.

  8. Thermometry of Silicon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Zutter, Brian; Regan, B. C.

    2018-01-01

    Current thermometry techniques lack the spatial resolution required to see the temperature gradients in typical, highly scaled modern transistors. As a step toward addressing this problem, we measure the temperature dependence of the volume plasmon energy in silicon nanoparticles from room temperature to 1250 °C , using a chip-style heating sample holder in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The plasmon energy changes as expected for an electron gas subject to the thermal expansion of silicon. Reversing this reasoning, we find that measurements of the plasmon energy provide an independent measure of the nanoparticle temperature consistent with that of the heater chip's macroscopic, dual-function heater-and-thermometer to within the 5% accuracy of the thermometer's calibration. Thus, silicon has the potential to provide its own high-spatial-resolution thermometric readout signal via measurements of its volume plasmon energy. Furthermore, nanoparticles can, in general, serve as convenient nanothermometers for in situ electron-microscopy experiments.

  9. Characterization of starch nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymońska, J.; Targosz-Korecka, M.; Krok, F.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials already attract great interest because of their potential applications in technology, food science and medicine. Biomaterials are biodegradable and quite abundant in nature, so they are favoured over synthetic polymer based materials. Starch as a nontoxic, cheap and renewable raw material is particularly suitable for preparation of nanoparticles. In the paper, the structure and some physicochemical properties of potato and cassava starch particles of the size between 50 to 100 nm, obtained by mechanical treatment of native starch, were presented. We demonstrated, with the aim of the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM), that the shape and dimensions of the obtained nanoparticles both potato and cassava starch fit the blocklets - previously proposed as basic structural features of native starch granules. This observation was supported by aqueous solubility and swelling power of the particles as well as their iodine binding capacity similar to those for amylopectin-type short branched polysaccharide species. Obtained results indicated that glycosidic bonds of the branch linkage points in the granule amorphous lamellae might be broken during the applied mechanical treatment. Thus the released amylopectin clusters could escape out of the granules. The starch nanoparticles, for their properties qualitatively different from those of native starch granules, could be utilized in new applications.

  10. Chiromagnetic nanoparticles and gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jihyeon; Santos, Uallisson S.; Chekini, Mahshid; Cha, Minjeong; de Moura, André F.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2018-01-01

    Chiral inorganic nanostructures have high circular dichroism, but real-time control of their optical activity has so far been achieved only by irreversible chemical changes. Field modulation is a far more desirable path to chiroptical devices. We hypothesized that magnetic field modulation can be attained for chiral nanostructures with large contributions of the magnetic transition dipole moments to polarization rotation. We found that dispersions and gels of paramagnetic Co3O4 nanoparticles with chiral distortions of the crystal lattices exhibited chiroptical activity in the visible range that was 10 times as strong as that of nonparamagnetic nanoparticles of comparable size. Transparency of the nanoparticle gels to circularly polarized light beams in the ultraviolet range was reversibly modulated by magnetic fields. These phenomena were also observed for other nanoscale metal oxides with lattice distortions from imprinted amino acids and other chiral ligands. The large family of chiral ceramic nanostructures and gels can be pivotal for new technologies and knowledge at the nexus of chirality and magnetism.

  11. Development of calibration factors of moss (Hylocomium splendens); Utvikling av kalibreringsfaktorer for mose (Hylocomium splendens)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, T.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper relates to atmospheric deposition of trace elements in Norway. These elements are mapped geographically in every fifth year by analysing bio-monitored mosses. This is a part of an original Scandinavian monitoring program which gradually expanded to other parts of Europe. In 1995, 32 countries participated in the program. The investigation of mosses in Norway has also been used as a basis for the development of special environment indicators for monitoring atmospheric long-range transported heavy metals. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...

  13. Surface Effects in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorani, Dino

    2005-01-01

    This volume is a collection of articles on different approaches to the investigation of surface effects on nanosized magnetic materials, with special emphasis on magnetic nanoparticles. The book aims to provide an overview of progress in the understanding of surface properties and surface driven effects in magnetic nanoparticles through recent results of different modeling, simulation, and experimental investigations.

  14. Engineered Nanoparticles and Their Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsoukas, T.; Desai, T.; Lee, K.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles engineered for shape, size, and surface properties impart special functionalities including catalytic behavior, improved strength, enhanced thermal and electrical conductivity, and controlled release of host molecules. These advances have opened up applications in biomedicine, nano energetic materials, and functional nano composites. This special issue highlights successes in developing nanoparticles for a number of diverse applications.

  15. Synthesizing nanoparticles by mimicking nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    As particulate matter with at least one dimension that is less than 100 nm, nanoparticles are the minuscule building blocks of new commercial products and consumer materials in the emerging field of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles are being discovered and introduced in the marketpl...

  16. Uniform magnetic excitations in nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    2005-01-01

    materials, quantum effects give rise to a small deviation from the linear temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization at very low temperatures. The complex nature of the excited precession states of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials, with deviations from antiparallel orientation......We have used a spin-wave model to calculate the temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles. The uniform precession mode, corresponding to a spin wave with wave vector q=0, is predominant in nanoparticles and gives rise to an approximately linear temperature...... dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization well below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature for both ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic particles. This is in accordance with the results of a classical model for collective magnetic excitations in nanoparticles. In nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic...

  17. Spin structures in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik

    a detailed knowledge of it can be important for applications of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles for example combined with ferromagnetic nanoparticles in nanocomposite devices. In this thesis the magnetic structure, in particular the orientation of the spins in the antiferromagnetic sublattices......, proposed to explain the unusual magnetic properties of the mineral. In summary the thesis have demonstrated methods for investigation of spin structures in magnetic nanoparticles. In particular, the classical model of the temperature dependence of canted spin structures sucessfully explains many...... experimental observations of anomalous temperature dependence in nanoparticle and bulk systems. Morover, XY Z neutron polarisation analysis have been demonstrated to be an effective way of investigating the magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles, significantly improving the unpolarised neutron...

  18. Topotactic interconversion of nanoparticle superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Robert J; Jones, Matthew R; Lee, Byeongdu; Auyeung, Evelyn; Mirkin, Chad A

    2013-09-13

    The directed assembly of nanoparticle building blocks is a promising method for generating sophisticated three-dimensional materials by design. In this work, we have used DNA linkers to synthesize nanoparticle superlattices that have greater complexity than simple binary systems using the process of topotactic intercalation-the insertion of a third nanoparticle component at predetermined sites within a preformed binary lattice. Five distinct crystals were synthesized with this methodology, three of which have no equivalent in atomic or molecular crystals, demonstrating a general approach for assembling highly ordered ternary nanoparticle superlattices whose structures can be predicted before their synthesis. Additionally, the intercalation process was demonstrated to be completely reversible; the inserted nanoparticles could be expelled into solution by raising the temperature, and the ternary superlattice could be recovered by cooling.

  19. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  20. PREPARATIONS AND APPLICATION OF METAL NANOPARTICLES

    OpenAIRE

    Adlim, Adlim

    2010-01-01

    Terminology of metal nanoparticles, the uniqueness properties in terms of the surface atom, the quantum dot, and the magnetism are described. The further elaboration was on the synthesis of nanoparticles. Applications of metal nanoparticles in electronic, ceramic medical and catalysis were overviewed. The bibliography includes 81 references with 99% are journal articles.   Keywords: metal nanoparticles

  1. PREPARATIONS AND APPLICATION OF METAL NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adlim Adlim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Terminology of metal nanoparticles, the uniqueness properties in terms of the surface atom, the quantum dot, and the magnetism are described. The further elaboration was on the synthesis of nanoparticles. Applications of metal nanoparticles in electronic, ceramic medical and catalysis were overviewed. The bibliography includes 81 references with 99% are journal articles.   Keywords: metal nanoparticles

  2. Conjugated polymer nanoparticles, methods of using, and methods of making

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2017-03-16

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for conjugated polymer nanoparticle, method of making conjugated polymer nanoparticles, method of using conjugated polymer nanoparticle, polymers, and the like.

  3. ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles: chelator-controlled nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Lauren F.; Rentz, Nikki S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we characterize iron nanoparticles synthesized in water in the presence of a phosphonate chelator, amino tris(methylene phosphonic acid) (ATMP) for a range of molar ratios of ATMP to iron. An increase in the molar ratio from 0.05 to 0.8 decreases nanoparticle size from approximately 150 nm to less than 10 nm. Zeta potential measurements were used to evaluate colloidal stability. Zeta potential values varied as a function of pH, and zeta potential values decreased with increasing pH. At lower molar ratios of ATMP to iron, the zeta potential varied between 15 and -40 mV, passing through an isoelectric point at pH 7.5. At higher ratios, the zeta potential was negative across the measured pH range of 2-12 and varied from -2 to -55 mV. Diffraction analysis indicates that ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles may have a nano-crystalline structure, potentially with regions of amorphous iron. Characterization results of ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles are compared to results obtained for carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized iron nanoparticles. CMC stabilization caused similar peak broadening in diffraction spectra as for ATMP, suggesting similar nano-crystalline/amorphous structure; however, an increase in the molar ratio of CMC to iron did not cause the same reduction in nanoparticle size as was observed for ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles.

  4. Palladium Nanoparticle Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pavlovsky

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An innovative hydrogen sensor based on palladium (Pd nanoparticle networks is described in the article. Made by Applied Nanotech Inc. sensor has a fast response time, in the range of seconds, which is increased at 80 °C due to higher hydrogen diffusion rates into the palladium lattice. The low detection limit of the sensor is 10 ppm of H2, and the high limit is 40,000 ppm. This is 100% of a lowest flammability level of hydrogen. This range of sensitivities complies with the requirements that one would expect for a reliable hydrogen sensor.

  5. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  6. Synthesis of Core-Shell Nanoparticle Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    monodispersed gold nanoparticles , which were produced from reducing a HAuCl4 solution, in a suspension of pre- prepared Gd2O3 nanoparticles . 1...produced from reducing a HAuCl4 solution, in a suspension of pre- prepared Gd2O3 nanoparticles . 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanoparticles , Polymer Chemistry 16...known that nanoparticles of materials such as gold, silver, and magnetite can interact with electromagnetic waves (surface plasmon resonance) in the

  7. Shape evolution of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Liang, W. S.; Geng, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The tetraoctylammonium bromide-stabilized gold nanoparticles have been successfully fabricated. The shape evolution of these nanoparticles under different annealing temperatures has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. After an annealing at 100 o C for 30 min, the average diameters of the gold nanoparticles change a little. However, the shapes of gold nanoparticles change drastically, and facets appear in most nanoparticles. After an annealing at 200 o C for 30 min, not only the size but also the shape changes a lot. After an annealing at 300 o C for 30 min, two or more gold nanoparticles coalesce into bigger ones. In addition, because of the presence of Cu grid during the annealing, some gold particles become the nucleation sites of Cu 2 O nanocubes, which possess a microstructure of gold-particle core/Cu 2 O shell. These Au/Cu 2 O heterostructure nanocubes can only be formed at a relatively high temperature (≥300 o C). The results can provide some insights on controlling the shapes of gold nanoparticles.

  8. Interaction of neutrons with nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvizhevsky, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Two hypotheses concerning the interaction of neutrons with nanoparticles and having applications in the physics of ultracold neutrons (UCN) are considered. In 1997, it was found that, upon reflection from the sample surface or spectrometer walls, UCN change their energy by about 10 -7 eV with a probability of 10 -7 -10 -5 per collision. The nature of this phenomenon is not clear at present. Probably, it is due to the inelastic coherent scattering of UCN on nanoparticles or nanostructures weakly attached at the surface, in a state of Brownian thermal motion. An analysis of experimental data on the basis of this model allows one to estimate the mass of such nanoparticles and nanostructures at 10 7 a.u. The proposed hypothesis indicates a method for studying the dynamics of nanoparticles and nanostructures and, accordingly, their interactions with the surface or with one another, this method being selective in their sizes. In all experiments with UCN, the trap-wall temperature was much higher than a temperature of about 1 mK, which corresponds to the UCN energy. Therefore, UCN increased their energy. The surface density of weakly attached nanoparticles was low. If, however, the nanoparticle temperature is lower than the neutron temperature and if the nanoparticle density is high, the problem of interaction of neutrons with nanoparticles is inverted. In this case, the neutrons of initial velocity below 10 2 m/s can cool down, under certain conditions, owing to their scattering on ultracold heavy-water, deuterium, and oxygen nanoparticles to their temperature of about 1 mK, with the result that the UCN density increases by many orders of magnitude

  9. Nanoparticle optical notch filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinadhuni, Pradeep Kumar

    Developing novel light blocking products involves the design of a nanoparticle optical notch filter, working on the principle of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). These light blocking products can be used in many applications. One such application is to naturally reduce migraine headaches and light sensitivity. Melanopsin ganglion cells present in the retina of the human eye, connect to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN-the body's clock) in the brain, where they participate in the entrainment of the circadian rhythms. As the Melanopsin ganglion cells are involved in triggering the migraine headaches in photophobic patients, it is necessary to block the part of visible spectrum that activates these cells. It is observed from the action potential spectrum of the ganglion cells that they absorb light ranging from 450-500nm (blue-green part) of the visible spectrum with a λmax (peak sensitivity) of around 480nm (blue line). Currently prescribed for migraine patients is the FL-41 coating, which blocks a broad range of wavelengths, including wavelengths associated with melanopsin absorption. The nanoparticle optical notch filter is designed to block light only at 480nm, hence offering an effective prescription for the treatment of migraine headaches.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles for theragnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubayev, Veronica I.; Pisanic, Thomas R.; Jin, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a cutting-edge tool in medicine because they can be simultaneously functionalized and guided by a magnetic field. Use of MNPs has advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cell tracking and bioseparation. Integrative therapeutic and diagnostic (i.e., theragnostic) applications have emerged with MNP use, such as MRI-guided cell replacement therapy or MRI-based imaging of cancer-specific gene delivery. However, mounting evidence suggests that certain properties of nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell and tissue barriers, resistance to biodegradation) amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to molecular or bulk counterparts. Oxidative stress, a 3-tier paradigm of nanotoxicity, manifests in activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (tier I), followed by a pro-inflammatory response (tier II) and DNA damage leading to cellular apoptosis and mutagenesis (tier III). In vivo administered MNPs are quickly challenged by macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system (RES), resulting in not only neutralization of potential MNP toxicity but also reduced circulation time necessary for MNP efficacy. We discuss the role of MNP size, composition and surface chemistry in their intracellular uptake, biodistribution, macrophage recognition and cytotoxicity, and review current studies on MNP toxicity, caveats of nanotoxicity assessments and engineering strategies to optimize MNPs for biomedical use. PMID:19389434

  11. Taylor dispersion of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Sandor; Urban, Dominic A.; Milosevic, Ana M.; Crippa, Federica; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-08-01

    The ability to detect and accurately characterize particles is required by many fields of nanotechnology, including materials science, nanotoxicology, and nanomedicine. Among the most relevant physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, size and the related surface-to-volume ratio are fundamental ones. Taylor dispersion combines three independent phenomena to determine particle size: optical extinction, translational diffusion, and sheer-enhanced dispersion of nanoparticles subjected to a steady laminar flow. The interplay of these defines the apparent size. Considering that particles in fact are never truly uniform nor monodisperse, we rigorously address particle polydispersity and calculate the apparent particle size measured by Taylor dispersion analysis. We conducted case studies addressing aqueous suspensions of model particles and large-scale-produced "industrial" particles of both academic and commercial interest of various core materials and sizes, ranging from 15 to 100 nm. A comparison with particle sizes determined by transmission electron microscopy confirms that our approach is model-independent, non-parametric, and of general validity that provides an accurate account of size polydispersity—independently on the shape of the size distribution and without any assumption required a priori.

  12. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2010-01-01

    and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering.......We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization...

  13. Biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliszewska, I; Szewczyk, K; Waszak, K

    2009-01-01

    Fungus-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles is reported. The nanosilver was formed in contact with the cell-free filtrate of Penicillium strain studied. The nanoparticles were characterized by means of the UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The synthesized nanosilver showed a absorbed maximum at 425 nm in the visible region. The SEM characterization of the fungus cells treated with silver nitrite indicated that the protein might be responsible for the reduction of silver ions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed formation of silver nanoparticles in the range of 10-100 nm.

  14. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  15. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  16. Nanoparticles for cells proliferation enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, V.; Braniste, F.; Tiginyanu, I.M.; Lisii, C.; Nacu, V.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of semiconductor nanoparticles as stimulator for avian mesenchyme stem cells proliferation enhancement is demonstrated. The effect is related to nanoparticles polarization due to external ultrasound field resulting in local electrical stimulation. Our preliminary results demonstrates that the number of cells have been increased by 23 % ±2%) in cell cultures under the action of external ultrasound stimulation. Morphological analysis and viability shows no differences between the control group and the group studied. These results suggest the possibility for tissue regeneration enhancement by remote stimulation of implanted semiconductor nanoparticles. (authors)

  17. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  18. Nanoparticles Doped, Photorefractive Liquid Crystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaczmarek, Malgosia

    2005-01-01

    ...: The main objectives of this exploratory, short project will concern the study of the quality of liquid crystal cells with diluted suspensions of ferroelectric nanoparticles and their photorefractive properties...

  19. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  20. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  1. Immunological properties of gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Dykman, Lev A.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, gold nanoparticles have attracted strong interest from the nanobiotechnological community owing to the significant progress made in robust and easy-to-make synthesis technologies, in surface functionalization, and in promising biomedical applications. These include bioimaging, gene diagnostics, analytical sensing, photothermal treatment of tumors, and targeted delivery of various biomolecular and chemical cargos. For the last-named application, gold nanoparticles should be...

  2. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  3. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Corrêa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; Cruz, Adriana Dibo da; Poiate, EdgardJr.; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects re...

  4. Surface vertical deposition for gold nanoparticle film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, J J; Qiu, F S; Chen, G D; Reeves, M E

    2003-01-01

    In this rapid communication, we present the surface vertical deposition (SVD) method to synthesize the gold nanoparticle films. Under conditions where the surface of the gold nanoparticle suspension descends slowly by evaporation, the gold nanoparticles in the solid-liquid-gas junction of the suspension aggregate together on the substrate by the force of solid and liquid interface. When the surface properties of the substrate and colloidal nanoparticle suspension define for the SVD, the density of gold nanoparticles in the thin film made by SVD only depends on the descending velocity of the suspension surface and on the concentration of the gold nanoparticle suspension. (rapid communication)

  5. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  6. Biosensors Incorporating Bimetallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of electrochemical bio-sensing for target analytes based on the use of electrocatalytic bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs, which can improve both the sensitivity and selectivity of biosensors. The review moves quickly from an introduction to the field of bio-sensing, to the importance of biosensors in today’s society, the nature of the electrochemical methods employed and the attendant problems encountered. The role of electrocatalysts is introduced with reference to the three generations of biosensors. The contributions made by previous workers using bimetallic constructs, grouped by target analyte, are then examined in detail; following which, the synthesis and characterization of the catalytic particles is examined prior to a summary of the current state of endeavor. Finally, some perspectives for the future of bimetallic NPs in biosensors are given.

  7. Chemical Reactions in Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Smolík, Jiří; Moravec, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2010), s. 401-405 ISSN 1062-0125 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1633; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400720804; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/548 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoparticle * chemical reaction * size effect Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://www.scopus.com/record/display.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955925089&origin=resultslist&sort=plf-f& src =s&st1=smolik%2cj&sid=j7atgxrpM26F0dojYSZsugJ%3a170&sot=b&sdt=b&sl=21&s=AUTHOR-NAME%28smolik%2cj%29&relpos=10&relpos=10&searchTerm=AUTHOR-NAME(smolik,j)

  8. Nanoparticles in a box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Sarah; Grotheer, Sarah; Tielke, Julia

    2017-01-01

    by surface bound CO, formed during synthesis by solvent oxidation, and OH−, added to the reaction mixture. We present a protocol that allows switching reversibly the stabilization between a “CO-protected” and “OH−-protected state”. Most importantly, “OH−-protected” Pt and Ru NPs exhibit remarkable resistance......A concept is introduced that allows for the isolation, storage and re-use of surfactant-free precious metal nanoparticles (NPs) of catalytic relevance (Pt and Ru). “Surfactant-free NPs” well-defined in size (1–2 nm) are prepared in alkaline ethylene glycol. After synthesis these NPs are stabilized...... against sintering. These NPs can be isolated as solids, stored and “put into boxes” to be shipped. Thereafter they can be redispersed without changes in particle size or loss in catalytic activity. These results are expected to be of scientific and industrial relevance, as a methodology is introduced...

  9. Sonoelectrochemical Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Sáez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the nanomaterials that have been prepared to date by pulsed sonoelectrochemistry. The majority of nanomaterials produced by this method are pure metals such as silver, palladium, platinum, zinc, nickel and gold, but more recently the syntheses have been extended to include the preparation of nanosized metallic alloys and metal oxide semiconductors. A major advantage of this methodology is that the shape andsize of the nanoparticles can be adjusted by varying the operating parameters which include ultrasonic power, current density, deposition potential and the ultrasonic vs electrochemical pulse times. Together with these, it is also possible to adjust the pH, temperature and composition of the electrolyte in the sonoelectrochemistry cell.

  10. Magentite nanoparticle for arsenic remotion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viltres, H; Reguera, E; Odio, O F; Borja, R; Aguilera, Y

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic As (V) and As (III) species are commonly found in groundwater in many countries around the world. It is known that arsenic is highly toxic and carcinogenic, at present exist reports of diverse countries with arsenic concentrations in drinking water higher than those proposed by the World Health Organization (10 μg/L). It has been reported that adsorption strategies using magnetic nanoparticles as magnetite (<20 nm) proved to be very efficient for the removal of arsenic in drinking water. Magnetic nanoparticles (magnetite) were prepared using a co-precipitation method with FeCl 3 and FeCl 2 as metal source and NaOH aqueous solution as precipitating agent. Magnetite nanoparticles synthesized were put in contact with As 2 O 3 and As 2 O 5 solutions at room temperature to pH 4 and 7. The nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, DRX, UV-vis, and XRF. The results showed that synthesized magnetite had an average diameter of 11 nm and a narrow size distribution. The presence of arsenic on magnetite nanoparticles surface was confirmed, which is more remarkable when As (V) is employed. Besides, it is possible to observe that no significant changes in the band gap values after adsorption of arsenic in the nanoparticles. (paper)

  11. [Nanoparticles: properties and application prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekman, I S

    2009-01-01

    A new trend of scientific-technical and medical researches has been formed which unites nanoscience, nanotechnology, nanomedicine, nanopharmacology. Nanoparticles are the main product of nanotechnologies. Nanoparticles are organic and inorganic structures, their size being less than one hundred nanometers (nano from Greece nanos--a dwarf; particle is a separate unit which is separated from the whole). Prefix nano means 10(-9) m. Nanosizes are values from 1 to 100 nanometers, micro-sizes--from 100 to 1000 nanometers, and above 1000 nanometers--are macrosizes. By the data of Internet for 1.08.20.2008 there are 18512 papers in the world scientific literature (8663 of them were published during the last 2.5 years), where properties of nanoparticles which are obtained by different nanotechnological methods are described. Actually, quantity of works concerning nanoparticles is much more because not all publications are cited in Internet. The first publication concerning a characteristic of nanoparticles was published in 1978. The survey generalized the data of scientific literature and author's investigations which concern sizes of nanoparticles of biologic molecules and their properties.

  12. Magentite nanoparticle for arsenic remotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viltres, H.; Odio, O. F.; Borja, R.; Aguilera, Y.; Reguera, E.

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic As (V) and As (III) species are commonly found in groundwater in many countries around the world. It is known that arsenic is highly toxic and carcinogenic, at present exist reports of diverse countries with arsenic concentrations in drinking water higher than those proposed by the World Health Organization (10 μg/L). It has been reported that adsorption strategies using magnetic nanoparticles as magnetite (nanoparticles (magnetite) were prepared using a co-precipitation method with FeCl3 and FeCl2 as metal source and NaOH aqueous solution as precipitating agent. Magnetite nanoparticles synthesized were put in contact with As2O3 and As2O5 solutions at room temperature to pH 4 and 7. The nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, DRX, UV-vis, and XRF. The results showed that synthesized magnetite had an average diameter of 11 nm and a narrow size distribution. The presence of arsenic on magnetite nanoparticles surface was confirmed, which is more remarkable when As (V) is employed. Besides, it is possible to observe that no significant changes in the band gap values after adsorption of arsenic in the nanoparticles.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ying

    Nanotechnology is revolutionizing human's life. Synthesis and application of magnetic nanoparticles is a fast burgeoning field which has potential to bring significant advance in many fields, for example diagnosis and treatment in biomedical area. Novel nanoparticles to function efficiently and intelligently are in desire to improve the current technology. We used a magnetron-sputtering-based nanocluster deposition technique to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles in gas phase, and specifically engineered nanoparticles for different applications. Alternating magnetic field heating is emerging as a technique to assist cancer treatment or drug delivery. We proposed high-magnetic-moment Fe3Si particles with relatively large magnetic anisotropy energy should in principle provide superior performance. Such nanoparticles were experimentally synthesized and characterized. Their promising magnetic properties can contribute to heating performance under suitable alternating magnetic field conditions. When thermal energy is used for medical treatment, it is ideal to work in a designed temperature range. Biocompatible and "smart" magnetic nanoparticles with temperature self-regulation were designed from both materials science and biomedicine aspects. We chose Fe-Si material system to demonstrate the concept. Temperature dependent physical property was adjusted by tuning of exchange coupling between Fe atoms through incorporation of various amount of Si. The magnetic moment can still be kept in a promising range. The two elements are both biocompatible, which is favored by in-vivo medical applications. A combination of "smart" magnetic particles and thermo-sensitive polymer were demonstrated to potentially function as a platform for drug delivery. Highly sensitive diagnosis for point-of-care is in desire nowadays. We developed composition- and phase-controlled Fe-Co nanoparticles for bio-molecule detection. It has been demonstrated that Fe70Co30 nanoparticles and giant

  14. Investigation of the Interaction of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles and Nonmagnetic Nanoparticles with Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    create stable magnetite nanoparticles , to functionalize them with a biocompatible ligand, and to study the rheology of the colloidal suspension... nanoparticles showed excellent superparamagnetic behavior The surface functionalization phase focused on binding bipolar organic compounds to nanoparticles ...results will be presented in thesis report. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Superparamagnetic. magnetite , nanoparticles , magnetic properties, fcrrofluids. cell

  15. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  16. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  17. In vitro tagging of embryos with nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Fynewever, Tricia L.; Agcaoili, Evelyn S.; Jacobson, John D.; Patton, William C.; Chan, Philip J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an in vitro method for tagging embryos and to compare the development of the embryos after nanoparticles injection versus externally-applied nanoparticles derived from either polystyrene or polyacrylonitrile.

  18. Amorphous nanoparticles — Experiments and computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Vo Van; Ganguli, Dibyendu

    2012-01-01

    The data obtained by both experiments and computer simulations concerning the amorphous nanoparticles for decades including methods of synthesis, characterization, structural properties, atomic mechanism of a glass formation in nanoparticles, crystallization of the amorphous nanoparticles, physico-chemical properties (i.e. catalytic, optical, thermodynamic, magnetic, bioactivity and other properties) and various applications in science and technology have been reviewed. Amorphous nanoparticles coated with different surfactants are also reviewed as an extension in this direction. Much attention is paid to the pressure-induced polyamorphism of the amorphous nanoparticles or amorphization of the nanocrystalline counterparts. We also introduce here nanocomposites and nanofluids containing amorphous nanoparticles. Overall, amorphous nanoparticles exhibit a disordered structure different from that of corresponding bulks or from that of the nanocrystalline counterparts. Therefore, amorphous nanoparticles can have unique physico-chemical properties differed from those of the crystalline counterparts leading to their potential applications in science and technology.

  19. New magnetically responsive polydicarbazole-magnetite nanoparticles.

    OpenAIRE

    Lellouche, Jean-Paul; Perlman, Nurit; Joseph, Augustine; Govindaraji, Senthil; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Yakir, Aline; Bruce, Ian J.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetically responsive COOH-polydicarbazole-magnetite nanocomposites have been prepared by chemical oxidation of three COOH-dicarbazole monomers and - in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles. These functionalized nanoparticles have been tested for DNA hybridization experiments.

  20. Metal Nanoparticles in Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Susann; Janiak, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    During the last years ionic liquids (ILs) were increasingly used and investigated as reaction media, hydrogen sources, catalysts, templating agents and stabilizers for the synthesis of (monometallic and bimetallic) metal nanoparticles (M-NPs). Especially ILs with 1,3-dialkyl-imidazolium cations featured prominently in the formation and stabilization of M-NPs. This chapter summarizes studies which focused on the interdependencies of the IL with the metal nanoparticle and tried to elucidate, for example, influences of the IL-cation, -anion and alkyl chain length. Qualitatively, the size of M-NPs was found to increase with the size of the IL-anion. The influence of the size of imidazolium-cation is less clear. The M-NP size was both found to increase and to decrease with increasing chain lengths of the 1,3-dialkyl-imidazolium cation. It is evident from such reports on cation and anion effects of ILs that the interaction between an IL and a (growing) metal nanoparticle is far from understood. Factors like IL-viscosity, hydrogen-bonding capability and the relative ratio of polar and non-polar domains of ILs may also influence the stability of nanoparticles in ionic liquids and an improved understanding of the IL-nanoparticle interaction would be needed for a more rational design of nanomaterials in ILs. Furthermore, thiol-, ether-, carboxylic acid-, amino- and hydroxyl-functionalized ILs add to the complexity by acting also as coordinating capping ligands. In addition imidazolium cations are precursors to N-heterocyclic carbenes, NHCs which form from imidazolium-based ionic liquids by in situ deprotonation at the acidic C2-H ring position as intermediate species during the nanoparticle seeding and growth process or as surface coordinating ligand for the stabilization of the metal nanoparticle.

  1. Radiation Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan; Jamaliah Sharif; Nik Ghazali Nik Salleh; Dahlan Mohd; Kamaruddin Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Radiation processing of nano materials is one of the many applications of ionising radiation. It has the advantages of cold process, fast, homogeneous and clean processing without using chemicals, heat and no release of any volatile organic compounds. Hence, radiation processing can be categorised as a green process. The applications of ionising radiation for materials processing are well established and commercialized by way of crosslinking, grafting, curing and degradation. However, the materials use, condition of processing and the end products varies and radiation processing is continue to be developed for various applications in industry, agriculture, health care and environment. The new and emerging development of nano materials has also being incorporated in radiation processing whereby we can see the convergence of radiation and nano technology, to take advantages of the inherent properties of nano size particles. Nowadays many works are being carried out on radiation processing of nano materials. The incorporation of such nanoparticles in polymeric materials will render specific properties that find several advantages compare to conventional composites such as increase heat resistant, improve abrasion and scratch resistant and enhance mechanical properties. In recent years, polymer/clay nano composites has attracted the interest of industry because of its major improvements in physical and mechanical properties, heat stability, reduce flammability and provide enhanced barrier properties at low clay contents. In many applications, crosslinking of polymer matrix is necessary that can further improved the mechanical and physical properties of the composites. Similar research has been extended to electron beam crosslinking of electromagnetic nano composites which comprise of high volume fraction of inorganic fillers in elastomeric matrix. The effect of radiation on inorganic fillers is believed to has influence on the overall radiation crosslinking of the

  2. Glyco-gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Compostella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glyco-gold nanoparticles combine in a single entity the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles with the biological activity of carbohydrates. The result is an exciting nanosystem, able to mimic the natural multivalent presentation of saccharide moieties and to exploit the peculiar optical properties of the metallic core. In this review, we present recent advances on glyco-gold nanoparticle applications in different biological fields, highlighting the key parameters which inspire the glyco nanoparticle design.

  3. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Phototherapy for Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, C.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; He, Y.; Xin, J.; Wang, S.; Xu, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles exhibit very unique physiochemical and optical properties, which now are extensively studied in range of medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In particular, gold nanoparticles show promise in the advancement of cancer treatments. This review will provide insights into the four different cancer treatments such as photothermal therapy, gold nanoparticle-aided photodynamic therapy, gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy, and their use as drug carrier. We also discuss the mechanism of every method and the adverse effects and its limitations

  4. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M [Sandia Park, NM; Powers, Dana A [Albuquerque, NM; Zhang, Zhenyuan [Durham, NC

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  5. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    claudin-3 and claudin-4 are expressed in subsets of aggressive prostate cancer. Finally, we produced our first two batches of nanoparticles during year...1 and we were able to show that these nanoparticles bind to prostate cancer cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, superparamagnetic iron oxide...degradable polymer that is approved by the FDA, and is used in the development of our nanoparticle system. Our nanoparticles encapsulate

  6. High surface area fibrous silica nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2014-11-11

    Disclosed are high surface area nanoparticles that have a fibrous morphology. The nanoparticles have a plurality of fibers, wherein each fiber is in contact with one other fiber and each fiber has a length of between about 1 nm and about 5000 nm. Also disclosed are applications of the nanoparticles of the present invention, and methods of fabrication of the nanoparticles of the present invention.

  7. Photoacoustic signal amplification through plasmonic nanoparticle aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Carolyn L.; Nam, Seung Yun; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, using targeted plasmonic metallic nanoparticles, is a promising noninvasive molecular imaging method. Analysis of the photoacoustic signal generated by plasmonic metallic nanoparticles is complex because of the dependence upon physical properties of both the nanoparticle and the surrounding environment. We studied the effect of the aggregation of gold nanoparticles on the photoacoustic signal amplitude. We found that the photoacoustic signal from aggregated silica-coate...

  8. Nanotoxicity of gold and iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Souvik

    2011-02-01

    The extensive use of potentially hazardous nanoparticles in industrial applications suggest that their biological effects need to be evaluated following clinical testing practices as applicable for any new pharmaceutical. It was rationalized that a non hypothesis-driven approach is best suited for discovering the biological effects of nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (approximately 18 nm), showed no drastic effect on gene expression in cells but iron nanoparticles showed perturbations in the expression of a set of functional genes.

  9. Matrix-assisted peptide synthesis on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method for multistep peptide synthesis on polymeric nanoparticles of differing sizes. Polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized via their temporary embedment into a magnetic inorganic matrix that allows multistep peptide synthesis. The matrix is removed at the end of the process for obtaining nanoparticles functionalized with peptides. The matrix-assisted synthesis on nanoparticles was proved by generating various biologically relevant peptides. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Bi-metallic nanoparticles as cathode electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Wang, Xiaoping; Luo, Xiangyi; Myers, Deborah J.

    2018-03-27

    A lithium-air battery cathode catalyst includes core-shell nanoparticles on a carbon support, wherein: a core of the core-shell nanoparticles is platinum metal; and a shell of the core-shell nanoparticles is copper metal; wherein: the core-shell nanoparticles have a weight ratio of the copper metal to the platinum metal from about 4% to about 6% copper to from about 2% to about 12% platinum, with a remaining percentage being the carbon support.

  11. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Stevia extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguta, I.V.; Fesenko, T.V.; Stavinskaya, O.N.; Shpak, L.M.; Dzyuba, O.I.

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are synthesized using Stevia rebaudiana extracts. It is shown that the rate of nanoparticles formation is affected by plant cultivation conditions. It is found that, in the presence of the extract from callus, the formation of nanoparticles occurs faster than in the presence of extracts from plants grown under conditions of ex situ and in vitro. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were studied by UV and IR spectroscopies

  12. Acrylated Chitosan Nanoparticles with Enhanced Mucoadhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaked Eliyahu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acrylate modification on the mucoadhesion of chitosan at the nanoscale. Nanoparticles were fabricated from acrylated chitosan (ACS via ionic gelation with tripolyphosphate and were characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, stability, and nanoparticle yield. Chitosan (CS nanoparticles, serving as a control, were fabricated using the same procedure. The mucoadhesion of the nanoparticles was evaluated using the flow-through method after different incubation periods. The retention percentages of ACS nanoparticles were found to be significantly higher than those of CS nanoparticles, for all studied time intervals. An additional indication for the increased mucoadhesion of ACS nanoparticles was the increase in particle size obtained from the mucin particle method, in which mucin and nanoparticles are mixed at different ratios. NMR data verified the presence of free acrylate groups on the ACS nanoparticles. Thus, the improved mucoadhesion could be due to a Michael-type addition reaction between the nanoparticles and thiol groups present in mucin glycoprotein, in addition to entanglements and hydrogen bonding. Overall, ACS nanoparticles exhibit enhanced mucoadhesion properties as compared to CS nanoparticles and could be used as vehicles for drug delivery systems.

  13. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Evlyukhin, A.B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive...... to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation....

  14. Gold nanoparticles for tumour detection and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Petersen, W.; Petersen, Wilhelmina; Jose, J.; Jose, J.; van Es, P.; van Es, Peter; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Poot, Andreas A.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications is emerging rapidly. Recent developments have led to numerous studies of noble metal nanoparticles, down to the level of single molecule detection in living cells. The application of noble metal nanoparticles in diagnostics and treatment of early

  15. ECO-FRIENDLY SYNTHESIS OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    thermal and antibacterial properties of silver nanoparticles have made them suitable for many industrial applications as such it is being rated as being amongst the most commercialized metallic nanoparticles. Quite a number of studies have reported either the extracellular or intracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles ...

  16. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  17. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC)

  18. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  19. Cytotoxicity and ion release of alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Anne [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V (Germany); Fuhlrott, Jutta; Loos, Anneke [Hannover Medical School, Biovertraeglichkeitslabor BioMedimplant (Germany); Barcikowski, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.barcikowski@uni-due.de [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    It is well-known that nanoparticles could cause toxic effects in cells. Alloy nanoparticles with yet unknown health risk may be released from cardiovascular implants made of Nickel-Titanium or Cobalt-Chromium due to abrasion or production failure. We show the bio-response of human primary endothelial and smooth muscle cells exposed to different concentrations of metal and alloy nanoparticles. Nanoparticles having primary particle sizes in the range of 5-250 nm were generated using laser ablation in three different solutions avoiding artificial chemical additives, and giving access to formulations containing nanoparticles only stabilized by biological ligands. Endothelial cells are found to be more sensitive to nanoparticle exposure than smooth muscle cells. Cobalt and Nickel nanoparticles caused the highest cytotoxicity. In contrast, Titanium, Nickel-Iron, and Nickel-Titanium nanoparticles had almost no influence on cells below a nanoparticle concentration of 10 {mu}M. Nanoparticles in cysteine dissolved almost completely, whereas less ions are released when nanoparticles were stabilized in water or citrate solution. Nanoparticles stabilized by cysteine caused less inhibitory effects on cells suggesting cysteine to form metal complexes with bioactive ions in media.

  20. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  1. APPLICATION OF NANOPARTICLES IN BIOMEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Telegeeva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The advances in nanotechnology, particularly, application in biomedicine are described in the review. The characteristic of the new drug delivery systems is given including lipid, protein and polymer nanoparticles which provide stable delivery of drugs to the target of distribution in the body and prevent their rapid degradation. The advantages of nanometer scale vectors were analyzed. Due to their small size, structure and large surface area, nanoscale materials acquire necessary physico-chemical properties. These properties allow the nanoparticles, containing specific agents, to overcome the limitations existing for the forms of large sizes. This significantly facilitates the intracellular transport to specific cellular targets. Controlled deli very to the place of action and reduction of exposure time on non-target tissues increases efficacy and reduces toxicity and other side effects, which improves the patient's overall health. Use of different ways to deliver nanoparticles allows to deliver low-molecular drugs, proteins, peptides or nucleic acids to specific tissues. Various ways of nanodrugs delivery to a cell and the possibility of modifying their surface by target ligands are discussed in the review. Types of drug delivery systems: microsponges, viruses, imunoconjugates, liposomes, metal nanoparticles and quantum dots, dendrimers, natural and synthetic polymeric nanoparticles, etc are discussed. A large variety of nanovectors, as well as their modification, and loading of various drugs (the methods of inclusion and adsorption are examined, control of their release into the cell, opens prospects for their wide application for visualization of biological processes, diagnosis and therapy of wide range of diseases.

  2. Chemical synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanta, Sekher Reddy; Muralidharan, Krishnamurthi, E-mail: kmsc@uohyd.ernet.in [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad (India)

    2013-06-15

    An alternate synthetic route has been described for the production of aluminum nanoparticles (Al-NPs). These Al-NPs were obtained through a reduction of aluminum acetylacetonate [Al(acac){sub 3}] by lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH{sub 4}) in mestitylene at 165 Degree-Sign C. The side products were removed by repeated washing with dry, ice cold methanol and the reaction mixture was filtered to obtain gray-colored Al-NPs. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by Powder X-ray diffraction pattern and {sup 27}Al-MAS-NMR spectrum. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of face-centered cubic (fcc) form of aluminum. The size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope which showed particle of varying shapes with size ranging from 50 to 250 nm. The weight loss from the nanoparticles was studied by thermo gravimetric analysis which indicated that the nanoparticles were tightly bound with an unknown amorphous organic residue which cannot be removed by simple washing. The carbonaceous residue might be outcome of the decomposition of acac ligand which was responsible in stabilizing aluminum nanoparticles.

  3. Hydrogel nanoparticles in drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Mehrdad; Azadi, Amir; Rafiei, Pedram

    2008-12-14

    Hydrogel nanoparticles have gained considerable attention in recent years as one of the most promising nanoparticulate drug delivery systems owing to their unique potentials via combining the characteristics of a hydrogel system (e.g., hydrophilicity and extremely high water content) with a nanoparticle (e.g., very small size). Several polymeric hydrogel nanoparticulate systems have been prepared and characterized in recent years, based on both natural and synthetic polymers, each with its own advantages and drawbacks. Among the natural polymers, chitosan and alginate have been studied extensively for preparation of hydrogel nanoparticles and from synthetic group, hydrogel nanoparticles based on poly (vinyl alcohol), poly (ethylene oxide), poly (ethyleneimine), poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), and poly-N-isopropylacrylamide have been reported with different characteristics and features with respect to drug delivery. Regardless of the type of polymer used, the release mechanism of the loaded agent from hydrogel nanoparticles is complex, while resulting from three main vectors, i.e., drug diffusion, hydrogel matrix swelling, and chemical reactivity of the drug/matrix. Several crosslinking methods have been used in the way to form the hydrogel matix structures, which can be classified in two major groups of chemically- and physically-induced crosslinking.

  4. Laser assisted embedding of nanoparticles into metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Dong; Suslov, Sergey; Ye Chang; Liao Yiliang; Liu, C. Richard; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a methodology of half-embedding nanoparticles into metallic materials. Transparent and opaque nanoparticles are chosen to demonstrate the process of laser assisted nanoparticle embedding. Dip coating method is used to coat transparent or opaque nanoparticle on the surface of metallic material. Nanoparticles are embedded into substrate by laser irradiation. In this study, the mechanism and process of nanoparticle embedding are investigated. It is found both transparent and opaque nanoparticles embedding are with high densities and good uniformities.

  5. Nanoparticles: nanotoxicity aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastou, Elena; Gazouli, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi; Platoni, Kalliopi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.

    2017-11-01

    The giant steps towards Nanosciences dictate the need to gain a broad knowledge about not only beneficial but also noxious properties of Nanomaterials. Apart from the remarkable advantages of Nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and industry, there have been raised plenty of concerns about their potential adverse effects in living organisms and ecosystems as well. Without a doubt, it is of critical importance to ensure that NPs medical and industrial applications are accompanied by the essential safety so that the balance will be tilted in favor of the profits that society will earn. However, the evaluation of NPs toxic effects remains a great challenge for the scientific community due to the wealth of factors that Nanotoxicity depends on. Size, surface area, dosing, shape, surface coating and charge and bulk material are the basic parameters under investigation to assess the risk involved in NPs usage. Our purpose is to highlight NPs physical and chemical properties responsible for induced toxicity, describe the mechanisms that take place in their interaction with cells and organs and finally report the potential harmful consequences that may result from the innovative applications of Nanomaterials.

  6. Gold nanoparticles: generation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.R.

    2013-07-01

    In this presentation we report the reduction of Au 3+ through chemical and free radical (e solv - ) reactions both in non-aqueous and aqueous media. In chemical reduction, the spectral nature in ascorbic acid (AA) and citric acid (CA) systems was different. The band intensity of gold nanoparticles was lower in AA system. While in free radical reaction, the yield of nanoparticles was pure i.e. free from excess reactants. Under the study 60-200 nm size nanoparticles were generated, which are inert to oxygen. Using pulse radiolysis technique, the initial rate for e solv - reaction with Au 3+ was determined to be 7.6 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 . (author)

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles in medical nanorobotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.martel@polymtl.ca [Polytechnique Montréal, NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Medical nanorobotics is a field of robotics that exploits the physics at the nanoscale to implement new functionalities in untethered robotic agents aimed for ultimate operations in constrained physiological environments of the human body. The implementation of such new functionalities is achieved by embedding specific nano-components in such robotic agents. Because magnetism has been and still widely used in medical nanorobotics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in particular have shown to be well suited for this purpose. To date, although such magnetic nanoparticles play a critical role in medical nanorobotics, no literature has addressed specifically the use of MNP in medical nanorobotic agents. As such, this paper presents a short introductory tutorial and review of the use of magnetic nanoparticles in the field of medical nanorobotics with some of the related main functionalities that can be embedded in nanorobotic agents.

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles in medical nanorobotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Sylvain

    2015-02-01

    Medical nanorobotics is a field of robotics that exploits the physics at the nanoscale to implement new functionalities in untethered robotic agents aimed for ultimate operations in constrained physiological environments of the human body. The implementation of such new functionalities is achieved by embedding specific nano-components in such robotic agents. Because magnetism has been and still widely used in medical nanorobotics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in particular have shown to be well suited for this purpose. To date, although such magnetic nanoparticles play a critical role in medical nanorobotics, no literature has addressed specifically the use of MNP in medical nanorobotic agents. As such, this paper presents a short introductory tutorial and review of the use of magnetic nanoparticles in the field of medical nanorobotics with some of the related main functionalities that can be embedded in nanorobotic agents.

  9. Percolation Magnetism in Ferroelectric Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, Iryna S.; Lemishko, Serhii V.; Morozovska, Anna N.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticles of potassium tantalate (KTaO3) and potassium niobate (KNbO3) were synthesized by oxidation of metallic tantalum in molten potassium nitrate with the addition of potassium hydroxide. Magnetization curves obtained on these ferroelectric nanoparticles exhibit a weak ferromagnetism, while these compounds are nonmagnetic in a bulk. The experimental data are used as a start point for theoretical calculations. We consider a microscopic mechanism that leads to the emerging of a ferromagnetic ordering in ferroelectric nanoparticles. Our approach is based on the percolation of magnetic polarons assuming the dominant role of the oxygen vacancies. It describes the formation of surface magnetic polarons, in which an exchange interaction between electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies is mediated by magnetic impurity Fe3+ ions. The dependences of percolation radius on concentration of the oxygen vacancies and magnetic defects are determined in the framework of percolation theory.

  10. Green chemistry for nanoparticle synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haohong; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2015-08-21

    The application of the twelve principles of green chemistry in nanoparticle synthesis is a relatively new emerging issue concerning the sustainability. This field has received great attention in recent years due to its capability to design alternative, safer, energy efficient, and less toxic routes towards synthesis. These routes have been associated with the rational utilization of various substances in the nanoparticle preparations and synthetic methods, which have been broadly discussed in this tutorial review. This article is not meant to provide an exhaustive overview of green synthesis of nanoparticles, but to present several pivotal aspects of synthesis with environmental concerns, involving the selection and evaluation of nontoxic capping and reducing agents, the choice of innocuous solvents and the development of energy-efficient synthetic methods.

  11. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  12. Magnetic properties of iron nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvell, J.; Ayieta, E.; Gavrin, A.; Cheng, Ruihua; Shah, V. R.; Sokol, P.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic properties of Fe nanoparticles with different sizes synthesized by a physical deposition technique have been investigated experimentally. We have used a high pressure sputtering technique to deposit iron nanoparticles on a silicon substrate. The nanoparticles are then analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device techniques. TEM and AFM data show that the particle size could be tuned by adjusting the deposition conditions. The magnetic properties have been investigated from temperature dependent magnetization M(T) and field dependent magnetization M(H) measurements. The results show that two phases including both ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic particles are present in our system. From these data we extracted the superparamagnetic critical size to be 9 nm for our samples. Ferromagnetic particles are single magnetic domain particles and the magnetic properties can be explained by the Stoner and Wohlfarth model. For the superparamagnetic phase, the effective anisotropy constant, K eff , decreases as the particle size increases.

  13. Percolation Magnetism in Ferroelectric Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, Iryna S; Lemishko, Serhii V; Morozovska, Anna N

    2017-12-01

    Nanoparticles of potassium tantalate (KTaO 3 ) and potassium niobate (KNbO 3 ) were synthesized by oxidation of metallic tantalum in molten potassium nitrate with the addition of potassium hydroxide. Magnetization curves obtained on these ferroelectric nanoparticles exhibit a weak ferromagnetism, while these compounds are nonmagnetic in a bulk. The experimental data are used as a start point for theoretical calculations. We consider a microscopic mechanism that leads to the emerging of a ferromagnetic ordering in ferroelectric nanoparticles. Our approach is based on the percolation of magnetic polarons assuming the dominant role of the oxygen vacancies. It describes the formation of surface magnetic polarons, in which an exchange interaction between electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies is mediated by magnetic impurity Fe 3+ ions. The dependences of percolation radius on concentration of the oxygen vacancies and magnetic defects are determined in the framework of percolation theory.

  14. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana N.; Oliveira, Maria Jose A.; Silva, Andressa A. da; Leal, Jessica; Batista, Jorge G.S.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2015-01-01

    In our laboratory has been growing the interest in studying gold nanoparticles and for this reason, the aim of this work is report the first results of the effect of chitosan as stabilizer in gold nanoparticle formulation. AuNPs were synthesized by reducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl 4 ) using NaBH 4 or gamma irradiation (25kGy) as reduction agent. The chitosan (3 mol L -1 ) was added at 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5 mL. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their physical stability was determined using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer over one week during storage at room temperature. Absorption measurements indicated that the plasmon resonance wavelength appears at a wavelength around 530 nm. Has been observed that Chitosan in such quantities were not effective in stabilizing the AuNPs. (author)

  15. Synthesis of nanoparticles using ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia Xu

    2017-01-24

    The present disclosure relates to methods for producing nanoparticles. The nanoparticles may be made using ethanol as the solvent and the reductant to fabricate noble-metal nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distributions, and to coat a thin metal shell on other metal cores. With or without carbon supports, particle size is controlled by fine-tuning the reduction power of ethanol, by adjusting the temperature, and by adding an alkaline solution during syntheses. The thickness of the added or coated metal shell can be varied easily from sub-monolayer to multiple layers in a seed-mediated growth process. The entire synthesis of designed core-shell catalysts can be completed using metal salts as the precursors with more than 98% yield; and, substantially no cleaning processes are necessary apart from simple rinsing. Accordingly, this method is considered to be a "green" chemistry method.

  16. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  17. From silicon to organic nanoparticle memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukalas, D

    2009-10-28

    After introducing the operational principle of nanoparticle memory devices, their current status in silicon technology is briefly presented in this work. The discussion then focuses on hybrid technologies, where silicon and organic materials have been combined together in a nanoparticle memory device, and finally concludes with the recent development of organic nanoparticle memories. The review is focused on the nanoparticle memory concept as an extension of the current flash memory device. Organic nanoparticle memories are at a very early stage of research and have not yet found applications. When this happens, it is expected that they will not directly compete with mature silicon technology but will find their own areas of application.

  18. Synthetic pathways to make nanoparticles fluorescent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Viktoriya; Epple, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    In biosciences, it is often necessary to follow the pathway of nanoparticles within cells or tissues. The nanoparticles can be used as labeled sensors which may, e.g., address functionalities within a cell, carry other specific agents like drugs or be magnetic for tumor thermotherapy. In the context of nanotoxicology, the fate of a given nanoparticle is of interest. As many methods in cell biology are based on fluorescence detection, there is a strong demand to make nanoparticles fluorescent. Different ways to introduce fluorescence are reviewed and exemplified with typical kinds of nanoparticles, i.e. polymers, silica and calcium phosphate.

  19. SANS Study of Protein Adsorption on Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2011-07-01

    Adsorption of lysozyme protein on silica nanoparticle has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) at pH 7. The measurements were carried out on fixed concentration (1 wt %) of nanoparticles and varying concentration of protein in the range 0 to 2 wt%. It has been found that the protein is adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface at very low protein concentrations whereas strong electrostatic interaction of lysozyme with silica nanoparticles at higher protein concentrations leads to the aggregation of nanoparticles. The adsorption is found to be increased with increase in the particle size and the aggregation is determined to be fractal structure.

  20. Few-layer black phosphorus nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdenek; Bouša, Daniel; Luxa, Jan; Mazanek, Vlastimil; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-28

    Herein, black phosphorus quantum dots and nanoparticles of a few layer thickness were prepared and characterized using STEM, AFM, dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence. Impact electrochemistry of the induvidual black phosphorus nanoparticles allows their size determination. The centrifugation of colloidal black phosphorus nanoparticles allowed separation of quantum dots with sizes up to 15 nm. These black phosphorus nanoparticles exhibit a large band gap and are expected to find a wide range of applications from semiconductors to biomolecule tags. The use of black phosphorus nanoparticles for vapour sensing was successfully demonstrated.

  1. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

    2011-09-12

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  2. Antituberculous effect of silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreytsberg, G N; Gracheva, I E; Kibrik, B S; Golikov, I V

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro experiment, involving 1164 strains of the tuberculosis mycobacteria, exhibited a potentiating effect of silver nanoparticles on known antituberculous preparations in respect of overcoming drug-resistance of the causative agent. The in vitro experiment, based on the model of resistant tuberculosis, was performed on 65 white mice. An evident antituberculous effect of the nanocomposite on the basis of silver nanoparticles and isoniazid was proved. Toxicological assessment of the of nanopreparations was carried out. The performed research scientifically establishes efficacy and safety of the nanocomposite application in combination therapy of patients suffering from drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  3. Spin Structures in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Spin structures in nanoparticles of ferrimagnetic materials may deviate locally in a nontrivial way from ideal collinear spin structures. For instance, magnetic frustration due to the reduced numbers of magnetic neighbors at the particle surface or around defects in the interior can lead to spin...... canting and hence a reduced magnetization. Moreover, relaxation between almost degenerate canted spin states can lead to anomalous temperature dependences of the magnetization at low temperatures. In ensembles of nanoparticles, interparticle exchange interactions can also result in spin reorientation...

  4. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  5. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...

  6. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  7. Stimuli-responsive liposome-nanoparticle assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew R; Bothun, Geoffrey D

    2011-08-01

    Nanoscale assemblies are needed that achieve multiple therapeutic objectives, including cellular targeting, imaging, diagnostics and drug delivery. These must exhibit high stability, bioavailability and biocompatibility, while maintaining or enhancing the inherent activity of the therapeutic cargo. Liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) combine the demonstrated potential of liposome-based therapies, with functional nanoparticles. Specifically, LNAs can be used to concentrate and shield the nanoparticles and, in turn, stimuli-responsive nanoparticles that respond to external fields can be used to control liposomal release. The ability to design LNAs via nanoparticle encapsulation, decoration or bilayer-embedment offers a range of configurations with different structures and functions. This paper reviews the current state of research and understanding of the design, characterization and performance of LNAs. A brief overview is provided on liposomes and nanoparticles for therapeutic applications, followed by a discussion of the opportunities and challenges associated with combining the two in a single assembly to achieve controlled release via light or radiofrequency stimuli. LNAs offer a unique opportunity to combine the therapeutic properties of liposomes and nanoparticles. Liposomes act to concentrate small nanoparticles and shield nanoparticles from the immune system, while the nanoparticle can be used to initiate and control drug release when exposed to external stimuli. These properties provide a platform to achieve nanoparticle-controlled liposomal release. LNA design and application are still in infancy. Research concentrating on the relationships among LNA structure, function and performance is essential for the future clinical use of LNAs.

  8. Application of Gold Nanoparticles to Paint Colorants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hideo

    Metal nanoparticles possess unique properties that they do not exhibit in their bulk states. One of these properties is the color due to surface plasmon resonance. Gold nanoparticles appear red. This color has been utilized in glass for a long long time. In recent years, highly concentrated pastes of gold and silver nanoparticles have been successfully produced by using a special type of protective polymer and a mild reductant. The paste of gold nanoparticles can be used for paint and other materials as red colorants. In this article,application examples of gold nanoparticles as colorant are introduced. Recently, methods for producing bimetal nanoparticles such as gold/silver and gold/copper have been developed. These nanoparticles allow colors from yellow to green to be created. These methods and colors they produce are also described in this article.

  9. Advances in developing TiNi nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A. Torres; Cuellar, E. Lopez; Mendez, U. Ortiz; Yacaman, M. Jose

    2006-01-01

    The elaboration of nanoparticles has become a field of great interest for many scientists. Nanoparticles possess different properties than those ones shown in bulk materials. Shape memory alloys have the exceptional ability to recuperate its original shape by simple heating after being 'plastically' deformed. When this process is originated, important changes in properties, as mechanical and electrical, are developed in bulk material. If there is possible to obtain nanoparticles with shape memory effects, these nanoparticles could be used in the elaboration of nanofluids with the ability to change their electrical and thermal conductivity with temperature changes, i.e., smart nanofluids. In this work, some recent results and discussion of TiNi nanoparticles obtained by ion beam milling directly from a TiNi wire with shape memory are presented. The nanoparticles obtained by this process are about 2 nm of diameter with a composition of Ti-41.0 at.% Ni. Synthesized nanoparticles elaborated by this method have an ordered structure

  10. Biosynthesis of Metal Nanoparticles: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanostructured materials, especially metallic nanoparticles, has accrued utmost interest over the past decade owing to their unique properties that make them applicable in different fields of science and technology. The limitation to the use of these nanoparticles is the paucity of an effective method of synthesis that will produce homogeneous size and shape nanoparticles as well as particles with limited or no toxicity to the human health and the environment. The biological method of nanoparticle synthesis is a relatively simple, cheap, and environmentally friendly method than the conventional chemical method of synthesis and thus gains an upper hand. The biomineralization of nanoparticles in protein cages is one of such biological approaches used in the generation of nanoparticles. This method of synthesis apart from being a safer method in the production of nanoparticles is also able to control particle morphology.

  11. Biosynthesis of Metal Nanoparticles: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, N.; Muddapur, U.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of nano structured materials, especially metallic nanoparticles, has accrued utmost interest over the past decade owing to their unique properties that make them applicable in different fields of science and technology. The limitation to the use of these nanoparticles is the paucity of an effective method of synthesis that will produce homogeneous size and shape nanoparticles as well as particles with limited or no toxicity to the human health and the environment. The biological method of nanoparticle synthesis is a relatively simple, cheap, and environmentally friendly method than the conventional chemical method of synthesis and thus gains an upper hand. The bio mineralization of nanoparticles in protein cages is one of such biological approaches used in the generation of nanoparticles. This method of synthesis apart from being a safer method in the production of nanoparticles is also able to control particle morphology.

  12. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedyalkov, N.N., E-mail: nnn_1900@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Obara, M. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  13. Silver nanoparticles in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Victor T; Paula, Amauri J; Durán, Gabriela; Galembeck, Andre; Cogo-Müller, Karina; Franz-Montan, Michelle; Durán, Nelson

    2017-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively studied for their antimicrobial properties, which provide an extensive applicability in dentistry. Because of this increasing interest in AgNPs, the objective of this paper was to review their use in nanocomposites; implant coatings; pre-formulation with antimicrobial activity against cariogenic pathogens, periodontal biofilm, fungal pathogens and endodontic bacteria; and other applications such as treatment of oral cancer and local anesthesia. Recent achievements in the study of the mechanism of action and the most important toxicological aspects are also presented. Systematic searches were carried out in Web of Science (ISI), Google, PubMed, SciFinder and EspaceNet databases with the keywords "silver nano* or AgNP*" and "dentist* or dental* or odontol*". A total of 155 peer-reviewed articles were reviewed. Most of them were published in the period of 2012-2017, demonstrating that this topic currently represents an important trend in dentistry research. In vitro studies reveal the excellent antimicrobial activity of AgNPs when associated with dental materials such as nanocomposites, acrylic resins, resin co-monomers, adhesives, intracanal medication, and implant coatings. Moreover, AgNPs were demonstrated to be interesting tools in the treatment of oral cancers due to their antitumor properties. The literature indicates that AgNPs are a promising system with important features such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity, and a potential carrier in sustained drug delivery. However, there are some aspects of the mechanisms of action of AgNPs, and some important toxicological aspects arising from the use of this system that must be completely elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbonaceous Matter in Growing Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M. V.; Stangl, C. M.; Horan, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nanoparticles constitute the greatest portion of ambient aerosol loading by number. A major source of atmospheric nanoparticles is new particle formation (NPF), a gas to particle conversion process whereby clusters nucleate from gas phase precursors to form clusters on the order of one or a few nanometers and then grow rapidly to climatically relevant sizes. A substantial fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are thought to arise from NPF. In order to better predict the frequency, growth rates, and climatic impacts of NPF, knowledge of the chemical mechanisms by which nucleated nanoparticles grow is needed. The two main contributors to particle growth are (neutralized) sulfate and carbonaceous matter. Particle growth by sulfuric acid condensation is generally well understood, though uncertainty remains about the extent of base neutralization and the relative roles of ammonia and amines. Much less is known about carbonaceous matter, and field measurements suggest that nitrogen-containing species are important. In this presentation, recent work by our group will be described that uses a combination of ambient measurements, laboratory experiments and computational work to study carbonaceous matter in growing nanoparticles. These studies span a range of particle sizes from the initial adsorption of molecules onto a nanometer-size ammonium bisulfate seed cluster to reactions in particles that are large enough to support condensed-phase chemistry.

  15. Magnetic properties of hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic properties of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) particles with sizes of about 16 nm have been studied by use of Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, and neutron diffraction. The nanoparticles are weakly ferromagnetic at temperatures at least down to 5 K with a spontaneous...

  16. Laser generated nanoparticles based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, C; Savva, K; Kymakis, E; Stratakis, E

    2017-03-01

    The exploitation of nanoparticles (NP), synthesized via laser ablation in liquids, in photovoltaic devices is reviewed. In particular, the impact of NPs' incorporation into various building blocks within the solar cell architecture on the photovoltaic performance and stability is presented and analysed for the current state of the art photovoltaic technologies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOPARTICLES TITANIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The synthesized nanoparticles properties were compared after using methanol, ethanol, and propanol fuel sources. The synthesized TiO2 were characterized by X-ray diffraction. (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis (thermogravimetric analysis, TGA, and differential scanning calorimetry, DSC), ...

  18. Preparation methods of alginate nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paques, J.P.; Linden, van der E.; Rijn, van C.J.M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews available methods for the formation of alginate nano-aggregates, nanocapsules and nanospheres. Primarily, alginate nanoparticles are being prepared by two methods. In the “complexation method”, complex formation on the interface of an oil droplet is used to form alginate

  19. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells. PMID:23088559

  20. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  1. Computer Simulations of Lipid Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier F. Fernandez-Luengo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipid nanoparticles (LNP are promising soft matter nanomaterials for drug delivery applications. In spite of their interest, little is known about the supramolecular organization of the components of these self-assembled nanoparticles. Here, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study, employing the Martini coarse-grain forcefield, of self-assembled LNPs made by tripalmitin lipid in water. We also study the adsorption of Tween 20 surfactant as a protective layer on top of the LNP. We show that, at 310 K (the temperature of interest in biological applications, the structure of the lipid nanoparticles is similar to that of a liquid droplet, in which the lipids show no nanostructuration and have high mobility. We show that, for large enough nanoparticles, the hydrophilic headgroups develop an interior surface in the NP core that stores liquid water. The surfactant is shown to organize in an inhomogeneous way at the LNP surface, with patches with high surfactant concentrations and surface patches not covered by surfactant.

  2. Green Nanoparticles for Mosquito Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita Soni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we have used the green method for synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. In the present study the silver (Ag and gold (Au nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized by using the aqueous bark extract of Indian spice dalchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. zyelanicum or C. verum J. Presl. Additionally, we have used these synthesized nanoparticles for mosquito control. The larvicidal activity has been tested against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The results were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometer and the images were recorded with a transmission electron microscope (TEM. The efficacy tests were then performed at different concentrations and varying numbers of hours by probit analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were in spherical shape and average sizes (11.77 nm AgNPs and 46.48 nm AuNPs. The larvae of An. stephensi were found highly susceptible to the synthesized AgNPs and AuNPs than the Cx. quinquefasciatus. These results suggest that the C. zeylanicum synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of mosquito.

  3. DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, Bjoern; Olin, Haakan

    2007-01-01

    DNA self-assembly is a powerful route to the production of very small, complex structures. When used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic and highly symmetric arrays, unsuited as building blocks for any complex circuits. With the invention of DNA-scaffolded origami reported earlier this year (Rothemund P W K 2006 Nature 440 (7082) 297-302), a new route to complex nanostructures using DNA has been opened. Here, we give a short review of the field and present the current status of our experiments were DNA origami is used in conjunction with nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with thiolated single stranded DNA. Strands that are complementary to the gold particle strands can be positioned on the self-assembled DNA-structure in arbitrary patterns. This property should allow an accurate positioning of the particles by letting them hybridize on the lattice. We report on our recent experiments on this system and discuss open problems and future applications

  4. Characterization of nanoparticles released during construction of photocatalytic pavements using engineered nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, Heather; Hassan, Marwa M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing use of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles in self-cleaning materials such as photocatalytic concrete pavements, the release of nanoparticles into the environment is inevitable. Nanoparticle concentration, particle size, surface area, elemental composition, and surface morphology are pertinent to determine the associated risks. In this study, the potential of exposure to synthetic nanoparticles released during construction activities for application of photocatalytic pavements was measured during laboratory-simulated construction activities of photocatalytic mortar overlays and in an actual field application of photocatalytic spray coat. A scanning mobility particle sizer system measured the size distribution of nanoparticles released during laboratory and field activities. Since incidental nanoparticles are released during construction activities, nanoparticle emissions were compared to those from similar activities without nano-TiO 2 . Nanoparticle counts and size distribution suggest that synthetic nanoparticles are released during application of photocatalytic pavements. In order to identify the nanoparticle source, nanoparticles were also collected for offline characterization using transmission electron microscopy. However, positive identification of synthetic nanoparticles was not possible due to difficulties in obtaining high-resolution images. As a result, further research is recommended to identify nanoparticle composition and sources.

  5. Versatile Methodology to Encapsulate Gold Nanoparticles in PLGA Nanoparticles Obtained by Nano-Emulsion Templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Feiner-Gracia, Natàlia; Dols-Perez, Aurora; García-Celma, Maria José; Solans, Conxita

    2017-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been proved useful for many biomedical applications, specifically, for their use as advanced imaging systems. However, they usually present problems related with stability and toxicity. In the present work, gold-nanoparticles have been encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles using a novel methodology based on nano-emulsion templating. Firstly, gold nanoparticles have been transferred from water to ethyl acetate, a solvent classified as class III by the NIH guidelines (low toxic potential). Next, the formation of nano-emulsions loaded with gold nanoparticles has been performed using a low-energy, the phase inversion composition (PIC) emulsification method, followed by solvent evaporation giving rise to polymeric nanoparticles. Using this methodology, high concentrations of gold nanoparticles (>100 pM) have been encapsulated. Increasing gold nanoparticle concentration, nano-emulsion and nanoparticle sizes increase, resulting in a decrease on the stability. It is noteworthy that the designed nanoparticles did not produce cytotoxicity neither hemolysis at the required concentration. Therefore, it can be concluded that a novel and very versatile methodology has been developed for the production of polymeric nanoparticles loaded with gold nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of AuNP-loaded polymeric nanoparticles preparation from nano-emulsion templating.

  6. Characterization of nanoparticles released during construction of photocatalytic pavements using engineered nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dylla, Heather; Hassan, Marwa M., E-mail: marwa@lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Department of Construction Management and Industrial Engineering (United States)

    2012-03-15

    With the increasing use of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in self-cleaning materials such as photocatalytic concrete pavements, the release of nanoparticles into the environment is inevitable. Nanoparticle concentration, particle size, surface area, elemental composition, and surface morphology are pertinent to determine the associated risks. In this study, the potential of exposure to synthetic nanoparticles released during construction activities for application of photocatalytic pavements was measured during laboratory-simulated construction activities of photocatalytic mortar overlays and in an actual field application of photocatalytic spray coat. A scanning mobility particle sizer system measured the size distribution of nanoparticles released during laboratory and field activities. Since incidental nanoparticles are released during construction activities, nanoparticle emissions were compared to those from similar activities without nano-TiO{sub 2}. Nanoparticle counts and size distribution suggest that synthetic nanoparticles are released during application of photocatalytic pavements. In order to identify the nanoparticle source, nanoparticles were also collected for offline characterization using transmission electron microscopy. However, positive identification of synthetic nanoparticles was not possible due to difficulties in obtaining high-resolution images. As a result, further research is recommended to identify nanoparticle composition and sources.

  7. Nanoparticle shape, thermodynamics and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, L D; Peng, L

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles can be beautiful, as in stained glass windows, or they can be ugly as in wear and corrosion debris from implants. We estimate that there will be about 70 000 papers in 2015 with nanoparticles as a keyword, but only one in thirteen uses the nanoparticle shape as an additional keyword and research focus, and only one in two hundred has thermodynamics. Methods for synthesizing nanoparticles have exploded over the last decade, but our understanding of how and why they take their forms has not progressed as fast. This topical review attempts to take a critical snapshot of the current understanding, focusing more on methods to predict than a purely synthetic or descriptive approach. We look at models and themes which are largely independent of the exact synthetic method whether it is deposition, gas-phase condensation, solution based or hydrothermal synthesis. Elements are old dating back to the beginning of the 20th century—some of the pioneering models developed then are still relevant today. Others are newer, a merging of older concepts such as kinetic-Wulff constructions with methods to understand minimum energy shapes for particles with twins. Overall we find that while there are still many unknowns, the broad framework of understanding and predicting the structure of nanoparticles via diverse Wulff constructions, either thermodynamic, local minima or kinetic has been exceedingly successful. However, the field is still developing and there remain many unknowns and new avenues for research, a few of these being suggested towards the end of the review. (topical review)

  8. Nanoparticle shape, thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, L. D.; Peng, L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles can be beautiful, as in stained glass windows, or they can be ugly as in wear and corrosion debris from implants. We estimate that there will be about 70 000 papers in 2015 with nanoparticles as a keyword, but only one in thirteen uses the nanoparticle shape as an additional keyword and research focus, and only one in two hundred has thermodynamics. Methods for synthesizing nanoparticles have exploded over the last decade, but our understanding of how and why they take their forms has not progressed as fast. This topical review attempts to take a critical snapshot of the current understanding, focusing more on methods to predict than a purely synthetic or descriptive approach. We look at models and themes which are largely independent of the exact synthetic method whether it is deposition, gas-phase condensation, solution based or hydrothermal synthesis. Elements are old dating back to the beginning of the 20th century—some of the pioneering models developed then are still relevant today. Others are newer, a merging of older concepts such as kinetic-Wulff constructions with methods to understand minimum energy shapes for particles with twins. Overall we find that while there are still many unknowns, the broad framework of understanding and predicting the structure of nanoparticles via diverse Wulff constructions, either thermodynamic, local minima or kinetic has been exceedingly successful. However, the field is still developing and there remain many unknowns and new avenues for research, a few of these being suggested towards the end of the review.

  9. Silicalite nanoparticles that promote transgene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Megan E; Mai, Hoang Q; Salem, Aliasger K; Lee, Namhoon; Larsen, Sarah C

    2008-01-01

    Here, we report on a new zeolite-based silicalite nanoparticle that can enhance the transfection efficiencies generated by poly ethylene imine-plasmid DNA (PEI-pDNA) complexes via a sedimentation mechanism and can enhance the transfection efficiencies of pDNA alone when surface functionalized with amine groups. The silicalite nanoparticles have a mean size of 55 nm. Functionalizing the silicalite nanoparticles with amine groups results in a clear transition in zeta potential from -25.9 ± 2.3 mV (pH 7.4) for unfunctionalized silicalite nanoparticles to 4.9 ± 0.7 mV (pH 7.4) for amine functionalized silicalite nanoparticles. We identify that silicalite nanoparticles used to promote non-viral vector acceleration to the cell surface are found in acidic vesicles or the cytoplasm but not the nucleus. An MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay showed that the silicalite nanoparticles were non-toxic at the concentrations tested for transfection. We show that surface functionalization of silicalite nanoparticles with amine groups results in a significant (230%) increase in transfection efficiency of pDNA when compared to unfunctionalized silicalite nanoparticles. Silicalite nanoparticles enhanced pDNA-PEI induced transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells by over 150%

  10. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with Tacaribe virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speshock Janice L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silver nanoparticles possess many unique properties that make them attractive for use in biological applications. Recently they received attention when it was shown that 10 nm silver nanoparticles were bactericidal, which is promising in light of the growing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria. An area that has been largely unexplored is the interaction of nanomaterials with viruses and the possible use of silver nanoparticles as an antiviral agent. Results This research focuses on evaluating the interaction of silver nanoparticles with a New World arenavirus, Tacaribe virus, to determine if they influence viral replication. Surprisingly exposing the virus to silver nanoparticles prior to infection actually facilitated virus uptake into the host cells, but the silver-treated virus had a significant reduction in viral RNA production and progeny virus release, which indicates that silver nanoparticles are capable of inhibiting arenavirus infection in vitro. The inhibition of viral replication must occur during early replication since although pre-infection treatment with silver nanoparticles is very effective, the post-infection addition of silver nanoparticles is only effective if administered within the first 2-4 hours of virus replication. Conclusions Silver nanoparticles are capable of inhibiting a prototype arenavirus at non-toxic concentrations and effectively inhibit arenavirus replication when administered prior to viral infection or early after initial virus exposure. This suggests that the mode of action of viral neutralization by silver nanoparticles occurs during the early phases of viral replication.

  11. Fabrication and size control of Ag nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Farbod

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  The objective of this research was to fabricate Ag nanoparticles and control their sizes. Colloidal Ag nanoparticles with particle size of 30 nm were prepared by dissolving AgNO3 in ethanol and through the chemical reduction of Ag+ in alcohol solution. To control the nanoparticle size, different samples were fabricated by changing the AgNO3 and stabilizer concentrations and the effects of different factors on the shape and size of nanoparticles were investigated. The samples were characterized using SEM and EDX analysis. The results showed that by increasing the AgNO3 concentration, the average size of nanoparticles increases and nanoparticles lose their spherical shape. Also, we found that by using the stabilizer, it is possible to produce stable nanoparticles but increasing the stabilizer concentration caused an increase in size of nanoparticles. Fabrication of nanoparticles without using stabilizer was achieved but the results showed the nanoparticles size had a growth of 125 nm/h in the alcoholic media.

  12. PEGylated nanoparticles: protein corona and secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runa, Sabiha; Hill, Alexandra; Cochran, Victoria L.; Payne, Christine K.

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles have important biological and biomedical applications ranging from drug and gene delivery to biosensing. In the presence of extracellular proteins, a "corona" of proteins adsorbs on the surface of the nanoparticles, altering their interaction with cells, including immune cells. Nanoparticles are often functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to reduce this non-specific adsorption of proteins. To understand the change in protein corona that occurs following PEGylation, we first quantified the adsorption of blood serum proteins on bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles using gel electrophoresis. We find a threefold decrease in the amount of protein adsorbed on PEGylated gold nanoparticles compared to the bare gold nanoparticles, showing that PEG reduces, but does not prevent, corona formation. To determine if the secondary structure of corona proteins was altered upon adsorption onto the bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles, we use CD spectroscopy to characterize the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin following incubation with the nanoparticles. Our results show no significant change in protein secondary structure following incubation with bare or PEGylated nanoparticles. Further examination of the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin, α2-macroglobulin, and transferrin in the presence of free PEG showed similar results. These findings provide important insights for the use of PEGylated gold nanoparticles under physiological conditions.

  13. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by Aspergillus niger , Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results indicate the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the reaction mixture. The synthesis of nanoparticles would be suitable for developing a microbial nanotechnology biosynthesis process for mass scale production. Keywords: Silver nanoparticles, biosynthesis, fungi, Aspergillus.

  14. A Novel Strategy for Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticle Self Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verma, Jyoti; Lal, Sumit; van Veen, Henk A.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle self assemblies are one-dimensional structures of gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticle self assemblies exhibit unique physical properties and find applications in the development of biosensors. Methodologies currently available for lab-scale and commercial synthesis of gold

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  16. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  17. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John L.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  18. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  19. Preparation and application of various nanoparticles in biology and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Vardan Gasparyan

    2013-01-01

    The present paper considers prospects for application of various nanoparticles in biology and medicine. Here are presented data on preparation of gold and silver nanoparticles, and effects of shape of these nanoparticles on their optical properties. Application of these nanoparticles in diagnostics, for drug delivery and therapy, and preparation of magnetic nanoparticles from iron and cobalt salts are also discussed. Application of these nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contr...

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles: synthesis, ordering and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.; Luna, C.; Morales, M.P.; Sanz, R.; Serna, C.J.; Mijangos, C.

    2004-01-01

    Polyol methods to synthesize nanoparticles and their arrays are firstly described. Magnetic nanoparticles self-assemble under particular conditions into spherical superstructures, like CoNi nanoparticles, or planar structures with hexagonal ordering, like FePt nanoparticles. Particles and their arrays are structurally analysed by techniques like TEM, X-ray, etc. Magnetic characterization is firstly performed by VSM magnetomer as a function of the nanoparticles size paying particular attention to the transition from multidomain to single-domain structures. Later on, magnetic exchange coupling effects are discussed including the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters as coercive and exchange bias fields, as well as the influence of field or zero-field cooling processes. Finally, magnetic polymers consisting of magnetic nanoparticles embedded into PVC polymeric matrix are prepared and magnetically analysed

  1. Studies on the biodistribution of dextrin nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, C; Gama, F M [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Biological Engineering, Minho University, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ferreira, M F M; Martins, J A [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Santos, A C; Prata, M I M [IBILI, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Geraldes, C F G C, E-mail: fmgama@deb.uminho.pt [Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencia e Tecnologia e Centro de Neurociencias e Biologia Celular, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-07-23

    The characterization of biodistribution is a central requirement in the development of biomedical applications based on the use of nanoparticles, in particular for controlled drug delivery. The blood circulation time, organ biodistribution and rate of excretion must be well characterized in the process of product development. In this work, the biodistribution of recently developed self-assembled dextrin nanoparticles is addressed. Functionalization of the dextrin nanoparticles with a DOTA-monoamide-type metal chelator, via click chemistry, is described. The metal chelator functionalized nanoparticles were labelled with a {gamma}-emitting {sup 153}Sm{sup 3+} radioisotope and the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles were obtained. The effect of PEG surface coating on the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles was also studied.

  2. Studies on the biodistribution of dextrin nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, C.; Ferreira, M. F. M.; Santos, A. C.; Prata, M. I. M.; Geraldes, C. F. G. C.; Martins, J. A.; Gama, F. M.

    2010-07-01

    The characterization of biodistribution is a central requirement in the development of biomedical applications based on the use of nanoparticles, in particular for controlled drug delivery. The blood circulation time, organ biodistribution and rate of excretion must be well characterized in the process of product development. In this work, the biodistribution of recently developed self-assembled dextrin nanoparticles is addressed. Functionalization of the dextrin nanoparticles with a DOTA-monoamide-type metal chelator, via click chemistry, is described. The metal chelator functionalized nanoparticles were labelled with a γ-emitting 153Sm3 + radioisotope and the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles were obtained. The effect of PEG surface coating on the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles was also studied.

  3. How Do Enzymes 'Meet' Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zeng, Guangming; Xu, Piao; Lai, Cui; Tang, Lin

    2017-11-01

    Enzymes are fundamental biological catalysts responsible for biological regulation and metabolism. The opportunity for enzymes to 'meet' nanoparticles and nanomaterials is rapidly increasing due to growing demands for applications in nanomaterial design, environmental monitoring, biochemical engineering, and biomedicine. Therefore, understanding the nature of nanomaterial-enzyme interactions is becoming important. Since 2014, enzymes have been used to modify, degrade, or make nanoparticles/nanomaterials, while numerous nanoparticles/nanomaterials have been used as materials for enzymatic immobilization and biosensors and as enzyme mimicry. Among the various nanoparticles and nanomaterials, metal nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials have received extensive attention due to their fascinating properties. This review provides an overview about how enzymes meet nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Approaches to single-nanoparticle catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambur, Justin B; Chen, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are among the most important industrial catalysts, with applications ranging from chemical manufacturing to energy conversion and storage. Heterogeneity is a general feature among these nanoparticles, with their individual differences in size, shape, and surface sites leading to variable, particle-specific catalytic activity. Assessing the activity of individual nanoparticles, preferably with subparticle resolution, is thus desired and vital to the development of efficient catalysts. It is challenging to measure the activity of single-nanoparticle catalysts, however. Several experimental approaches have been developed to monitor catalysis on single nanoparticles, including electrochemical methods, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, X-ray microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. This review focuses on these experimental approaches, the associated methods and strategies, and selected applications in studying single-nanoparticle catalysis with chemical selectivity, sensitivity, or subparticle spatial resolution.

  5. Characterization of nanoparticles using Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A; Schoenenberger, M; Gnecco, E; Glatzel, Th; Meyer, E; Braendlin, D; Scandella, L

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles are becoming increasingly important in many areas, including catalysis, biomedical applications, and information storage. Their unique size-dependent properties make these materials superior. Using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), individual particles and groups of particles can be resolved and unlike other microscopy techniques, the AFM offers visualization and analysis in three dimensions. We prepared titanium oxide, zirconium oxide and alumina nanoparticles and/or agglomerates on different surfaces and characterized them by AFM in the dynamic mode. The goal was to determine the shape, size and/or size distribution of nanoparticles. Different dilutions of nanoparticles were applied on various substrates e.g. clean silicon, mica and chemically treated silicon and imaged at ambient conditions. Nanoparticles deposited on mica appeared to be coagulated as compared to those on silicon. Whereas, on a chemically treated surface the density of the nanoparticles was very low because of the increased hydrophobicity of the surface

  6. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrick, Todd S [South Deerfield, MA; Russell, Thomas P [Amherst, MA; Dinsmore, Anthony [Amherst, MA; Skaff, Habib [Amherst, MA; Lin, Yao [Amherst, MA

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  7. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  8. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using tannins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Rahim, Afidah Abdul; Qureshi, Ahmad Kaleem; Awang, Khalijah

    2014-09-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were prepared by rapid green synthesis using different tannin sources as reducing agent viz. chestnut (CN), mangrove (MG) and quebracho (QB). The aqueous silver ions when exposed to CN, MG and QB tannins were reduced which resulted in formation of silver nanoparticles. The resultant silver nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Furthermore, the possible mechanism of nanoparticles synthesis was also derived using FT-IR analysis. Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the synthesized nanoparticles were within 30 to 75 nm in size, while XRD results showed that nanoparticles formed were crystalline with face centered cubic geometry.

  9. Deterministic nanoparticle assemblies: from substrate to solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, Steven J; Gibson, Gary A; Yamakawa, Mineo; Li, Zhiyong; Kim, Ansoon; Norris, Kate J

    2014-01-01

    The deterministic assembly of metallic nanoparticles is an exciting field with many potential benefits. Many promising techniques have been developed, but challenges remain, particularly for the assembly of larger nanoparticles which often have more interesting plasmonic properties. Here we present a scalable process combining the strengths of top down and bottom up fabrication to generate deterministic 2D assemblies of metallic nanoparticles and demonstrate their stable transfer to solution. Scanning electron and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of these assemblies suggested the formation of nanobridges between touching nanoparticles that hold them together so as to maintain the integrity of the assembly throughout the transfer process. The application of these nanoparticle assemblies as solution-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) materials is demonstrated by trapping analyte molecules in the nanoparticle gaps during assembly, yielding uniformly high enhancement factors at all stages of the fabrication process. (paper)

  10. The challenges of testing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in algal bioassays: titanium dioxide and gold nanoparticles as case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic toxicology of engineered nanoparticles is challenged by methodological difficulties stemming partly from highly dynamic and poorly understood behavior of nanoparticles in biological test systems. In this paper scientific and technical challenges of testing not readily soluble nanoparticle...

  11. Polymer foam comprising a polymer and nanoparticles, and nanoparticles for the manufacture of such foam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancso, Gyula J.; Duvigneau, Joost; Nederkoorn, P.H.J.; Wassing, T.

    2014-01-01

    A polymer foam is produced comprising a polymer and nanoparticles having a maximum dimensionof 750 nm, which foam has cells with an average cell size of at most 1 µm and a cell density of at least 1012 cells/ml, wherein polymeric grafts have been attached to the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles may

  12. Applications of nanoparticles in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, Yolanda; Calonge, Margarita

    2010-11-01

    Nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles, have the capacity to deliver ocular drugs to specific target sites and hold promise to revolutionize the therapy of many eye diseases. Results to date strongly suggest that ocular medicine will benefit enormously from the use of this nanometric scale technology. One of the most important handicaps of the eye as a target organ for drugs is the presence of several barriers that impede direct and systemic drug access to the specific site of action. Superficial barriers include the ocular surface epithelium and the tear film, and internal barriers include the blood-aqueous and blood-retina barriers. Topical application is the preferred route for most drugs, even when the target tissues are at the back part of the eye where intraocular injections are currently the most common route of administration. Direct administration using any of these two routes faces many problems related to drug bioavailability, including side effects and repeated uncomfortable treatments to achieve therapeutic drug levels. In this regard, the advantages of using nanoparticles include improved topical passage of large, poorly water-soluble molecules such as glucocorticoid drugs or cyclosporine for immune-related, vision-threatening diseases. Other large and unstable molecules, such as nucleic acids, delivered using nanoparticles offer promising results for gene transfer therapy in severe retinal diseases. Also, nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery increases the contact time of the administered drug with its target tissue, such as in the case of brimonidine, one of the standard treatments for glaucoma, or corticosteroids used to treat autoimmune uveitis, a severe intraocular inflammatory process. In addition, nanocarriers permit the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin to reach inner eye structures using the transmucosal route. Finally, nanoparticles allow the possibility of targeted delivery to reach specific types of cancer, such as melanoma

  13. Peptide-Assembled Optically Responsive Nanoparticle Complexes (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naik, Rajesh R; Slocik, Joseph M; Tam, Felicia; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    .... Here we report two types of active nanoparticle complexes, with properties controlled by near infrared illumination, resulting from the assembly of photothermally responsive plasmonic nanoparticle...

  14. Antibiotic polymeric nanoparticles for biofilm-associated infection therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles are highly attractive as drug delivery vehicles due to their high structural integrity, stability during storage, ease of preparation and functionalization, and controlled release capability. Similarly, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, which retain the benefits of polymeric nanoparticles plus the enhanced biocompatibility and prolonged circulation time owed to the lipids, have recently emerged as a superior alternative to polymeric nanoparticles. Drug nanoparticle complex prepared by electrostatic interaction of oppositely charged drug and polyelectrolytes represents another type of polymeric nanoparticle. This chapter details the preparation, characterization, and antibiofilm efficacy testing of antibiotic-loaded polymeric and hybrid nanoparticles and antibiotic nanoparticle complex.

  15. Glyco-gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Compostella, Federica; Pitirollo, Olimpia; Silvestri, Alessandro; Polito, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Glyco-gold nanoparticles combine in a single entity the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles with the biological activity of carbohydrates. The result is an exciting nanosystem, able to mimic the natural multivalent presentation of saccharide moieties and to exploit the peculiar optical properties of the metallic core. In this review, we present recent advances on glyco-gold nanoparticle applications in different biological fields, highlighting the key parameters which inspire the glyco ...

  16. Plasmonic nanoparticles: Towards the fabrication of biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Au and Ag nanoparticles are mainly employed in the fabrication of biosensors owing to their unique optical properties compared to other noble metal nanoparticles. Many biosensors are fabricated for the rapid detection of different analytes such as organic and inorganic molecules, biomolecules like DNA, proteins, biotoxins and pathogens. In this mini review we mainly discuss on the usage of Au and Ag nanoparticles for the fabrication of colorimetric, SERS and two photon based photoluminescence biosensors.

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles From Fabrication to Clinical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thanh, Nguyen TK

    2012-01-01

    Offering the latest information in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) research, Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Fabrication to Clinical Applications provides a comprehensive review, from synthesis, characterization, and biofunctionalization to clinical applications of MNPs, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. This book, written by some of the most qualified experts in the field, not only fills a hole in the literature, but also bridges the gaps between all the different areas in this field. Translational research on tailored magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications spans a variet

  18. Mode of action of nanoparticles against insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2018-04-03

    The employment of nanoparticles obtained through various synthesis routes as novel pesticides recently attracted high research attention. An impressive number of studies have been conducted to test their toxic potential against a wide number of arthropod pests and vectors, with major emphasis on mosquitoes and ticks. However, precise information on the mechanisms of action of nanoparticles against insects and mites are limited, with the noteworthy exception of silica, alumina, silver, and graphene oxide nanoparticles on insects, while no information is available for mites. Here, I summarize current knowledge about the mechanisms of action of nanoparticles against insects. Both silver and graphene oxide nanoparticles have a significant impact on insect antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. Ag nanoparticles also reduced acetylcholinesterase activity, while polystyrene nanoparticles inhibited CYP450 isoenzymes. Au nanoparticles can act as trypsin inhibitors and disrupt development and reproduction. Metal nanoparticles can bind to S and P in proteins and nucleic acids, respectively, leading to a decrease in membrane permeability, therefore to organelle and enzyme denaturation, followed by cell death. Besides, Ag nanoparticles up- and downregulate key insect genes, reducing protein synthesis and gonadotrophin release, leading to developmental damages and reproductive failure. The toxicity of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles is due to their binding to the insect cuticle, followed by physico-sorption of waxes and lipids, leading to insect dehydration. In the final section, insect nanotoxicology research trends are critically discussed, outlining major challenges to predict the ecotoxicological consequences arising from the real-world use of nanoparticles as pesticides.

  19. Nanoparticles and nanotechnologies today and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Abaeva, L.; Shumsky, V.; Petritskaya, E.; Rogatkin, D.; Lubchenko, P.

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of nanoparticles is a priority direction of the modern science. Application of nanoparticles is widely incorporated into many spheres of human activity. The ability of nanoparticles to penetrate deeply into tissues, cells and nuclei can be used in medicine. The possibilities of molecular diagnosis and identification of biomarkers, unique for every patient, create preconditions for improving therapy by addressed delivery of medicines. However, the benefits of nanotechnology may h...

  20. Synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles with tunable susceptibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Wilson, Robert J.; Earhart, Christopher M.; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    High-moment monodisperse disk-shaped Co–Fe magnetic nanoparticles, stable in aqueous solution, were physically fabricated by using nanoimprinted templates and vacuum deposition techniques. These multilayer synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles exhibit nearly zero magnetic remanence and coercivity, and susceptibilities which can be tuned by exploiting interlayer magnetic interactions. In addition, a low cost method of scaling up the production of sub-100 nm synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. PMID:19529797

  1. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  2. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles and Its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    M. Jannathul Firdhouse; P. Lalitha

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles possess unique properties which find myriad applications such as antimicrobial, anticancer, larvicidal, catalytic, and wound healing activities. Biogenic syntheses of silver nanoparticles using plants and their pharmacological and other potential applications are gaining momentum owing to its assured rewards. This critical review is aimed at providing an insight into the phytomediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles, its significant applications in various fields, and c...

  3. Biogenic synthesized nanoparticles and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Abhijeet; Sharma, Madan Mohan

    2016-01-01

    In the present scenario, there are growing concerns over the potential impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles in the health sector. However, our understanding of how bioengineered nanoparticles may affect organisms within natural ecosystems, lags far behind our rapidly increasing ability to engineer novel nanoparticles. To date, research on the biological impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles has primarily consisted of controlled lab studies of model organisms with single species in culture media. Here, we described a cost effective and environment friendly technique for green synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized from 1 mM AgNO 3 via a green synthesis process using leaf extract as reducing as well as capping agent. Nanoparticles were characterized with the help of UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis which revealed the size of nanoparticles of 30-40 nm size. Further the nanoparticles synthesized by green route are found highly toxic against pathogenic bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi viz. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotiniasclerotiorum. The most important outcome of this work will be the development of value-added products and protection of human health from pathogens viz., bacteria, virus, fungi etc.

  4. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, I-Ju [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  5. Intestinal absorption of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Song, Yunmei; Nann, Thomas; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-07-01

    Characterization of intestinal absorption of nanoparticles is critical in the design of noninvasive anticancer, protein-based, and gene nanoparticle-based therapeutics. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the characterization of the intestinal absorption of nanoparticles and for understanding the mechanisms active in their processing within healthy intestinal cells. It is generally accepted that the cellular processing represents a major drawback of current nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems. In particular, endolysosomal trafficking causes degradation of therapeutic molecules such as proteins, lipids, acid-sensitive anticancer drugs, and genes. To date, investigations into nanoparticle processing within intestinal cells have studied mass transport through Caco-2 cells or everted rat intestinal sac models. We developed an approach to visualize directly the mechanisms of nanoparticle processing within intestinal tissue. These results clearly identify a mechanism by which healthy intestinal cells process nanoparticles and point to the possible use of this approach in the design of noninvasive nanoparticle-based therapies. Advances in nanomedicine have resulted in the development of new therapies for various diseases. Intestinal route of administration remains the easiest and most natural. The authors here designed experiments to explore and characterize the process of nanoparticle transport across the intestinal tissue. In so doing, further insights were gained for future drug design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Introduction to metal-nanoparticle plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Based on a popular article in Laser and Photonics Reviews, this book provides an explanation and overview of the techniques used to model, make, and measure metal nanoparticles, detailing results obtained and what they mean. It covers the properties of coupled metal nanoparticles, the nonlinear optical response of metal nanoparticles, and the phenomena that arise when light-emitting materials are coupled to metal nanoparticles. It also provides an overview of key potential applications and offers explanations of computational and experimental techniques giving readers a solid grounding

  7. Interaction of Inorganic Nanoparticles With Cell Membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hofmann, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    The discussion regarding toxic effects of nanoparticles, especially for people exposed to the particles during manufacturing, use of nanomaterials or because the particles have entered the biosphere...

  8. Electrosprayed nanoparticle delivery system for controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltayeb, Megdi, E-mail: megdi.eltayeb@sustech.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Sudan University of Science and Technology, PO Box 407, Khartoum (Sudan); Stride, Eleanor, E-mail: eleanor.stride@eng.ox.ac.uk [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Headington OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Edirisinghe, Mohan, E-mail: m.edirisinghe@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Harker, Anthony, E-mail: a.harker@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    This study utilises an electrohydrodynamic technique to prepare core-shell lipid nanoparticles with a tunable size and high active ingredient loading capacity, encapsulation efficiency and controlled release. Using stearic acid and ethylvanillin as model shell and active ingredients respectively, we identify the processing conditions and ratios of lipid:ethylvanillin required to form nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with a mean size ranging from 60 to 70 nm at the rate of 1.37 × 10{sup 9} nanoparticles per minute were prepared with different lipid:ethylvanillin ratios. The polydispersity index was ≈ 21% and the encapsulation efficiency ≈ 70%. It was found that the rate of ethylvanillin release was a function of the nanoparticle size, and lipid:ethylvanillin ratio. The internal structure of the lipid nanoparticles was studied by transmission electron microscopy which confirmed that the ethylvanillin was encapsulated within a stearic acid shell. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that the ethylvanillin had not been affected. Extensive analysis of the release of ethylvanillin was performed using several existing models and a new diffusive release model incorporating a tanh function. The results were consistent with a core-shell structure. - Highlights: • Electrohydrodynamic spraying is used to produce lipid-coated nanoparticles. • A new model is proposed for the release rates of active components from nanoparticles. • The technique has potential applications in food science and medicine. • Electrohydrodynamic processing controlled release lipid nanoparticles.

  9. Chemistry of Oligonucleotibe-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Letsinger, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Conjugates prepared by immobilizing thiol-terminated oligonucleotides onto gold nanoparticles from stable colloidal solutions in aqueous media The oligo nucleotides can serve as linkers to organize...

  10. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles are neuroprotective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Raitano, Joan; Chan, S.-W.

    2006-01-01

    The responses of cells exposed to nanoparticles have been studied with regard to toxicity, but very little attention has been paid to the possibility that some types of particles can protect cells from various forms of lethal stress. It is shown here that nanoparticles composed of cerium oxide or yttrium oxide protect nerve cells from oxidative stress and that the neuroprotection is independent of particle size. The ceria and yttria nanoparticles act as direct antioxidants to limit the amount of reactive oxygen species required to kill the cells. It follows that this group of nanoparticles could be used to modulate oxidative stress in biological systems

  11. Biogenic synthesized nanoparticles and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Abhijeet, E-mail: abhijeet.singh@jaipur.manipal.edu; Sharma, Madan Mohan [Manipal University Jaipur (India)

    2016-05-06

    In the present scenario, there are growing concerns over the potential impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles in the health sector. However, our understanding of how bioengineered nanoparticles may affect organisms within natural ecosystems, lags far behind our rapidly increasing ability to engineer novel nanoparticles. To date, research on the biological impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles has primarily consisted of controlled lab studies of model organisms with single species in culture media. Here, we described a cost effective and environment friendly technique for green synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized from 1 mM AgNO{sub 3} via a green synthesis process using leaf extract as reducing as well as capping agent. Nanoparticles were characterized with the help of UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis which revealed the size of nanoparticles of 30-40 nm size. Further the nanoparticles synthesized by green route are found highly toxic against pathogenic bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi viz. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotiniasclerotiorum. The most important outcome of this work will be the development of value-added products and protection of human health from pathogens viz., bacteria, virus, fungi etc.

  12. Electroluminescence Efficiency Enhancement using Metal Nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soref, Richard A; Khurgin, J. B; Sun, G

    2008-01-01

    We apply the "effective mode volume" theory to evaluate enhancement of the electroluminescence efficiency of semiconductor emitters placed in the vicinity of isolated metal nanoparticles and their arrays...

  13. Protein nanoparticles for therapeutic protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Estrada, L P; Champion, J A

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic proteins can face substantial challenges to their activity, requiring protein modification or use of a delivery vehicle. Nanoparticles can significantly enhance delivery of encapsulated cargo, but traditional small molecule carriers have some limitations in their use for protein delivery. Nanoparticles made from protein have been proposed as alternative carriers and have benefits specific to therapeutic protein delivery. This review describes protein nanoparticles made by self-assembly, including protein cages, protein polymers, and charged or amphipathic peptides, and by desolvation. It presents particle fabrication and delivery characterization for a variety of therapeutic and model proteins, as well as comparison of the features of different protein nanoparticles.

  14. Reversible Clustering of Gold Nanoparticles under Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Claes, Nathalie; Solís, Diego M; Taboada, Jose M; Bals, Sara; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Grzelczak, Marek

    2018-03-12

    A limiting factor of solvent-induced nanoparticle self-assembly is the need for constant sample dilution in assembly/disassembly cycles. Changes in the nanoparticle concentration alter the kinetics of the subsequent assembly process, limiting optical signal recovery. Herein, we show that upon confining hydrophobic nanoparticles in permeable silica nanocapsules, the number of nanoparticles participating in cyclic aggregation remains constant despite bulk changes in solution, leading to highly reproducible plasmon band shifts at different solvent compositions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Fundamental investigations of catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Christian Fink

    different topics, each related to different aspects of nanoparticle dynamics and catalysis. The first topic is the reduction of a homogeneous solid state precursor to form the catalytically active phase which is metal nanoparticles on an inert support. Here, we have reduced Cu phyllosilicate to Cu on silica......Heterogeneous catalysis, the conversion of chemicals by the use of a suitable solid state catalyst, is a very important technology in modern society and it is involved in the production of up to 90% of all chemicals. Catalysis has in this way played a significant role in the technological...... and economic development in the 20th century. There is however a downside to this development and we are seeing significant pollution and pressure on resources. Catalysis therefore has an increasingly important role in limiting pollution and optimizing the use of resources. This development will depend on our...

  16. Surface energy of explosive nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Nicolas; Bidault, Xavier; Soulard, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Recent experimental studies show that nanostructuration has a substantial impact on the detonation of high explosives: a nanostructured one leads to smaller nanodiamonds than a microstructured one. Whether it comes from a higher surface energy or from porosity, the origin of these different behaviors must be investigated. The surface energy of TATB nanoparticles with a radius from 2 nm upto 60 nm has been determined by means of ReaxFF-based simulations. Then, using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and the equation of states of the bulk material, the contribution of this excess energy to the heating of a shock-compressed nanostructured (and porous) material is evaluated and compared to the thermal effect due to its porosity collapse. A maximum temperature increase of 50 K is found for 4-nm nanoparticles, which remains negligible when compared to the few hundred degrees induced by the compaction work.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Commercial Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Priyanka; Pettee, Brian; Britt, David W.; Huang, Wenjie; Johnson, William P.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2009-07-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are finding increased use in applications ranging from biosensors to prophylactic antimicrobials embedded in socks. The release of heavy metal-containing nanoparticles (NP) into the environment may be harmful to the efficacy of beneficial microbes that function in element cycling, pollutant degradation, and plant growth. Antimicrobial activity of commercial NP of Ag, CuO, and ZnO is demonstrated here against the beneficial soil microbe, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which was modified to serve as a bioluminescent sentinel organism. "As manufactured" preparations of nano- Ag, -CuO, and -ZnO caused rapid, dose dependent loss of light output in the biosensor. Bulk equivalents of these products showed no inhibitory activity, indicating that particle size was determinant in activity.

  18. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakuzis, Andris F.

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in several biomedical applications, spanning from cell separation, early diagnosis of metastasis to even the treatment of cancer via magnetic hyperthermia (MH). This last technique consists in the increase of temperature of nanoparticles when their magnetic moments interact with a magnetic alternating field. This effect has been suggested as an innovative therapy to cancer treatment, due to the delivery of heat or therapeutic agents, such as drugs, genes, and others. In addition, several clinical studies has demonstrated synergetic effects between hyperthermia and radiotherapy [1]. This indicates a great therapeutic potential for this noninvasive and targeted technique. In this talk we will discuss results from the literature and from our own group in the treatment of cancer via magnetic hyperthermia. Several types of magnetic nanoparticles suggested for this application will be discussed, as well as the historical evolution of this procedure, which although suggested in the late 50' only recently was approved in Europe for treatment of humans with brain tumors. (author) [pt

  20. Nanoparticles in discotic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep

    The self-assembly of disc-shaped molecules creates discotic liquid crystals (DLCs). These nanomaterials of the sizes ranging from 2-6 nm are emerging as a new class of organic semiconducting materials. The unique geometry of columnar mesophases formed by discotic molecules is of great importance to study the one-dimensional charge and energy migration in organized systems. A number of applications of DLCs, such as, one-dimensional conductor, photoconductor, photovoltaic solar cells, light emitting diodes and gas sensors have been reported. The conductivity along the columns in columnar mesophases has been observed to be several orders of magnitude greater than in perpendicular direction and, therefore, DLCs are described as molecular wires. On the other hand, the fields of nanostructured materials, such as gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and graphene, have received tremendous development in the past decade due to their technological and fundamental interest. Recently the hybridization of DLCs with various metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles has been realized to alter and improve their properties. These nanocomposites are not only of basic science interest but also lead to novel materials for many device applications. This article provides an overview on the development in the field of newly immersed discotic nanoscience. After a brief introduction of DLCs, the article will cover the inclusion of various zero-, one- and two-dimensional nanoparticles in DLCs. Finally, an outlook into the future of this newly emerging intriguing field of discotic nanoscience research will be provided.

  1. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Palza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms.

  2. Spin canting in ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J., E-mail: jmarx@physik.uni-kl.de; Huang, H.; Salih, K. S. M.; Thiel, W. R.; Schünemann, V. [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Recently, an easily scalable process for the production of small (3 −7 nm) monodisperse superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles MeFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (Me = Zn, Mn, Co) from iron metal and octanoic acid has been reported (Salih et al., Chem. Mater. 25 1430–1435 2013). Here we present a Mössbauer spectroscopic study of these ferrite nanoparticles in external magnetic fields of up to B = 5 T at liquid helium temperatures. Our analysis shows that all three systems show a comparable inversion degree and the cationic distribution for the tetrahedral A and the octahedral B sites has been determined to (Zn{sub 0.19}Fe{sub 0.81}){sup A}[Zn{sub 0.81}Fe{sub 1.19}] {sup B}O{sub 4}, (Mn{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 0.85}){sup A}[Mn{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 1.15}] {sup B}O{sub 4} and (Co{sub 0.27}Fe{sub 0.73}){sup A}[Co{sub 0.73}Fe{sub 1.27}] {sup B}O{sub 4}. Spin canting occurs presumably in the B-sites and spin canting angles of 33°, 51° and 59° have been determined for the zinc, the manganese, and the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  3. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C.; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the ‘jammed’ nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems ‘chemoelectronic’. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also ‘green’, in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  4. Developing nano-particles as radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, S.

    2013-01-01

    The wide variety of core materials available, coupled with tunable surface properties, make nanoparticles an excellent platform for a broad range of biological and biomedical applications. The unique properties and utility of nanoparticles arise from a variety of attributes, including the similar size of nanoparticles and biomolecules such as proteins and polynucleic acids. Additionally, nanoparticles can be fashioned with a wide range of metal and semiconductor core materials that impart useful properties such as fluorescence and magnetic behavior. Bio-macromolecule surface recognition by nanoparticles as artificial receptors provides a potential tool for controlling cellular and extracellular processes for numerous biological applications such as transcription regulation, enzymatic inhibition, delivery and sensing. The size of nanoparticle cores can be tuned from 1.5 nm to more than 10 nm depending on the core material, providing a suitable platform for the interaction of nanoparticles with proteins and other biomolecules. The conjugation of nanoparticles with biomolecules such as proteins and DNA can be done by using two different approaches, direct covalent linkage and non-covalent interactions between the particle and bio-molecules.The most direct approach to the creation of integrated biomolecule-nanoparticle conjugates is through covalent attachment.This conjugation can be achieved either through chemisorptions of the biomolecule to the particle surface or through the use of hetero-bi-functional linkers. Chemisorption of proteins onto the surface of nanoparticles (usually containing a core of Au, ZnS, CdS, and CdSe/ZnS) can be done through cysteine residues that are present in the protein surface (e.g., oligo-peptide, serum albumin), or chemically using 2-iminothiolane (Traut's reagent). Bifunctional linkers provide a versatile means of bio-conjugation. Biomolecules are often covalently linked to ligands on the nanoparticle surface via traditional

  5. Antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles and antibiotic-adsorbed silver nanoparticles against biorecycling microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Chandni; Vala, Anjana K; Andhariya, Nidhi; Pandey, O P; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2014-09-20

    Silver nanoparticles have a huge share in nanotechnology based products used in clinical and hygiene products. Silver nanoparticles leaching from these medical and domestic products will eventually enter terrestrial ecosystems and will interact with the microbes present in the land and water. These interactions could be a threat to biorecycling microbes present in the Earth's crust. The antimicrobial action towards biorecycling microbes by leached silver nanoparticles from medical waste could be many times greater compared to that of silver nanoparticles leached from other domestic products, since medical products may contain traditional antibiotics along with silver nanoparticles. In the present article, we have evaluated the antimicrobial activities of as-synthesized silver nanoparticles, antibiotics - tetracycline and kanamycin, and antibiotic-adsorbed silver nanoparticles. The antimicrobial action of silver nanoparticles with adsorbed antibiotics is 33-100% more profound against the biorecycling microbes B. subtilis and Pseudomonas compared to the antibacterial action of silver nanoparticles of the same concentration. This study indicates that there is an immediate and urgent need for well-defined protocols for environmental exposure to silver nanoparticles, as the use of silver nanoparticles in nanotechnology based products is poorly restricted.

  6. Control of viscous fingering by nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Nasser; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2017-12-01

    A substantial viscosity increase by the addition of a low dose of nanoparticles to the base fluids can well influence the dynamics of viscous fingering. There is a lack of detailed theoretical studies that address the effect of the presence of nanoparticles on unstable miscible displacements. In this study, the impact of nonreactive nanoparticle presence on the stability and subsequent mixing of an originally unstable binary system is examined using linear stability analysis (LSA) and pseudospectral-based direct numerical simulations (DNS). We have parametrized the role of both nondepositing and depositing nanoparticles on the stability of miscible displacements using the developed static and dynamic parametric analyses. Our results show that nanoparticles have the potential to weaken the instabilities of an originally unstable system. Our LSA and DNS results also reveal that nondepositing nanoparticles can be used to fully stabilize an originally unstable front while depositing particles may act as temporary stabilizers whose influence diminishes in the course of time. In addition, we explain the existing inconsistencies concerning the effect of the nanoparticle diffusion coefficient on the dynamics of the system. This study provides a basis for further research on the application of nanoparticles for control of viscosity-driven instabilities.

  7. Phytofabrication of nanoparticles through plant as nanofactories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Jitendra; Batra, Amla; Singh, Abhijeet; Mohan Sharma, Madan

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, nanoscience and nanotechnology have emerged as a new area of fundamental science and are receiving global attention due to their extensive applications. Conventionally nanoparticles were manufactured by physical and chemical techniques. The recent development and implementation of new technologies have led to a new trend, the nano-revolution unfolding the role of plants in bio- and green synthesis of nanoparticles which seems to have drawn a quite unequivocal attention to the synthesis of stable nanoparticles. Although nanoparticles can be synthesized through many conventional methods, biological route of the synthesis is more competent than the physical and chemical techniques. Biologically synthesized nanoparticles have enjoyed an upsurge of applications in various sectors. Hence, the present study envisions biosynthesis of nanoparticles from plants which are emerging as nanofactories. Hence, the present review summarizes the literature reported thus far and envisions plants as emerging sources of nanofactories along with applications, the mechanism behind phytosynthesis of nanoparticles and the mechanism of antibacterial action of nanoparticles.

  8. Unusual multiscale mechanics of biomimetic nanoparticle hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunlong; Damasceno, Pablo F; Somashekar, Bagganahalli S; Engel, Michael; Tian, Falin; Zhu, Jian; Huang, Rui; Johnson, Kyle; McIntyre, Carl; Sun, Kai; Yang, Ming; Green, Peter F; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Glotzer, Sharon C; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2018-01-12

    Viscoelastic properties are central for gels and other materials. Simultaneously, high storage and loss moduli are difficult to attain due to their contrarian requirements to chemical structure. Biomimetic inorganic nanoparticles offer a promising toolbox for multiscale engineering of gel mechanics, but a conceptual framework for their molecular, nanoscale, mesoscale, and microscale engineering as viscoelastic materials is absent. Here we show nanoparticle gels with simultaneously high storage and loss moduli from CdTe nanoparticles. Viscoelastic figure of merit reaches 1.83 MPa exceeding that of comparable gels by 100-1000 times for glutathione-stabilized nanoparticles. The gels made from the smallest nanoparticles display the highest stiffness, which was attributed to the drastic change of GSH configurations when nanoparticles decrease in size. A computational model accounting for the difference in nanoparticle interactions for variable GSH configurations describes the unusual trends of nanoparticle gel viscoelasticity. These observations are generalizable to other NP gels interconnected by supramolecular interactions and lead to materials with high-load bearing abilities and energy dissipation needed for multiple technologies.

  9. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008,. India e-mail: ... to the Brust method for the synthesis of hydrophobized gold nanoparticles.33 This process essentially consists of .... due to rearrangement of the gold nanoparticles within domains (and reorganization of the domains themselves) on ...

  10. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropeza, S.; Corea, M.; Gómez-Yáñez, C.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.; Navarro-Clemente, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ] 2 ] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ► Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ] 2 ]. ► The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ► The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ] 2 ] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

  11. Functionalization of Biosynthesized Gold Nanoparticle from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    nanoparticles and formulated nanodrug were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, Zetasizer, Scanning and transmission Electron Microscopy .... UV–Vis Spectrophotometer (UV-1800 Shimadzu) was used to measure the wavelength .... plasma resonance at 545.5nm for biosynthesized gold nanoparticle using ...

  12. Biological synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With increasing global competitions there is a growing need to develop environmentally benevolent nanoparticles without the use of toxic chemicals. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using plant extracts became one of the potential areas of research. The bioreduction of metal ion is quite rapid, readily ...

  13. Phytosynthesized iron nanoparticles: effects on fermentative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In recent years the application of metal nanoparticles is gaining attention in various fields. The present study focuses on the additive effect of `green' synthesized iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) on dark fermentative hydrogen (H2) production by a mesophilic soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae. The FeNPs were synthesized by ...

  14. Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles to Aquatic Invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Skjolding, Lars Michael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a targeted description of some of the most important processes that influence toxicity and uptake of nanoparticles in aquatic invertebrates. It discusses silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), on how aspects of dissolution and chemical species obtained from this process can influence...

  15. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic ...

  16. The ecotoxicology and chemistry of manufactured nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Richard D; von der Kammer, Frank; Lead, Jamie R; Hassellöv, Martin; Owen, Richard; Crane, Mark

    2008-05-01

    The emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging ecotoxicological literature shows toxic effects on fish and invertebrates, often at low mg l(-1) concentrations of nanoparticles. However, data on bacteria, plants, and terrestrial species are particularly lacking at present. Initial data suggest that at least some manufactured nanoparticles may interact with other contaminants, influencing their ecotoxicity. Particle behaviour is influenced by particle size, shape, surface charge, and the presence of other materials in the environment. Nanoparticles tend to aggregate in hard water and seawater, and are greatly influenced by the specific type of organic matter or other natural particles (colloids) present in freshwater. The state of dispersion will alter ecotoxicity, but many abiotic factors that influence this, such as pH, salinity, and the presence of organic matter remain to be systematically investigated as part of ecotoxicological studies. Concentrations of manufactured nanoparticles have rarely been measured in the environment to date. Various techniques are available to characterise nanoparticles for exposure and dosimetry, although each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages for the ecotoxicologist. We conclude with a consideration of implications for environmental risk assessment of manufactured nanoparticles.

  17. Monofunctional gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Qun; Worden, James G.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to control the assembly of nanoparticle building blocks is critically important for the development of new materials and devices. The properties and functions of nanomaterials are not only dependent on the size and properties of individual particles, but also the interparticle distance and interactions. In order to control the structures of nanoassemblies, it is important to first achieve a precise control on the chemical functionality of nanoparticle building blocks. This review discusses three methods that have been reported recently for the preparation of monofunctional gold nanoparticles, i.e., nanoparticles with a single chemical functional group attached to each particle. The advantages and disadvantages of the three methods are discussed and compared. With a single functional group attached to the surface, one can treat such nanoparticles as molecular building blocks to react with other molecules or nanoparticles. In other words, by using appropriate chemical reactions, nanoparticles can be linked together into nanoassemblies and materials by covalent bonds, similar to the total chemical synthesis of complicated organic compounds from smaller molecular units. An example of using this approach for the synthesis of nanoparticle/polymer hybrid materials with optical limiting properties is presented. Other potential applications and advantages of covalent bond-based nanoarchitectures vs. non-covalent interaction-based supramolecular self-assemblies are also discussed briefly in this review

  18. Ciprofloxacin conjugated zinc oxide nanoparticle: A camouflage ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    excellent antibacterial activity against clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains of Escherichia coli,. Staphylococcus aureus and ... Keywords. Zinc oxide nanoparticles; ciprofloxacin; chemical conjugation; antibacterial property. 1. Introduction ... Nanoparticles of TiO2, ZnO, silver, etc. are commonly known for their ...

  19. The Challenge of Colloidal Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Esther; de Mello-Donega, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have developed into one of the main pillars of Nanoscience. Colloidal nanoparticles are particularly attractive as they consist of inorganic particles that are coated with a layer of organic ligand molecules. The hybrid nature of these nanostructures greatly expands the

  20. Extracellular Palladium Nanoparticle Production using Geobacter sulfurreducens

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, Matthew D.

    2013-09-03

    Sustainable methods are needed to recycle precious metals and synthesize catalytic nanoparticles. Palladium nanoparticles can be produced via microbial reduction of soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0), but in previous tests using dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB), the nanoparticles were closely associated with the cells, occupying potential reductive sites and eliminating the potential for cell reuse. The DMRB Geobacter sulfurreducens was shown here to reduce soluble Pd(II) to Pd(0) nanoparticles primarily outside the cell, reducing the toxicity of metal ions, and allowing nanoparticle recovery without cell destruction that has previously been observed using other microorganisms. Cultures reduced 50 ± 3 mg/L Pd(II) with 1% hydrogen gas (v/v headspace) in 6 h incubation tests [100 mg/L Pd(II) initially], compared to 8 ± 3 mg/L (10 mM acetate) without H2. Acetate was ineffective as an electron donor for palladium removal in the presence or absence of fumarate as an electron acceptor. TEM imaging verified that Pd(0) nanoparticles were predominantly in the EPS surrounding cells in H2-fed cultures, with only a small number of particles visible inside the cell. Separation of the cells and EPS by centrifugation allowed reuse of the cell suspensions and effective nanoparticle recovery. These results demonstrate effective palladium recovery and nanoparticle production using G. sulfurreducens cell suspensions and renewable substrates such as H2 gas. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Preparation of DPPE-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Muller, David P.; Gunter, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is presented that introduces students to nanotechnology through the preparation of nanoparticles and their visualization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiment familiarizes the students with nonaqueous solvents, biphasic reactions, phase-transfer agents, ligands to stabilize growing nanoparticles, and bidentate…

  2. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic ...

  3. Nanoparticles for Applications in Cellular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurn, K. Ted; Brown, Eric M. B.; Wu, Aiguo; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Maser, Jörg; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2007-09-01

    In the following review we discuss several types of nanoparticles (such as TiO2, quantum dots, and gold nanoparticles) and their impact on the ability to image biological components in fixed cells. The review also discusses factors influencing nanoparticle imaging and uptake in live cells in vitro. Due to their unique size-dependent properties nanoparticles offer numerous advantages over traditional dyes and proteins. For example, the photostability, narrow emission peak, and ability to rationally modify both the size and surface chemistry of Quantum Dots allow for simultaneous analyses of multiple targets within the same cell. On the other hand, the surface characteristics of nanometer sized TiO2 allow efficient conjugation to nucleic acids which enables their retention in specific subcellular compartments. We discuss cellular uptake mechanisms for the internalization of nanoparticles and studies showing the influence of nanoparticle size and charge and the cell type targeted on nanoparticle uptake. The predominant nanoparticle uptake mechanisms include clathrin-dependent mechanisms, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis.

  4. Mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Jriuan; Shafi, Kurikka V.P.M.; Ulman, Abraham; Loos, Katja; Yang, Nan-Loh; Cui, Min-Hui; Vogt, Thomas; Estournès, Claude; Locke, Dave C.

    2004-01-01

    Designing nanoparticles for practical applications requires knowledge and control of how their desired properties relate to their composition and structure. Here, we present a detailed systematic study of mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles, showing that ultrasonication provides the high-energy

  5. Polymer Grafted Nanoparticle-based Oil Dispersants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehak; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2015-03-01

    Particle-based oil dispersants mainly composed of inorganic nanoparticles such as silica nanoparticles are considered as environmentally friendly oil dispersants due to their biocompatibility and relatively low toxicity. The oil-water interfacial tension is reduced when nanoparticles segregate to the oil-water interface and this segregation is improved by grafting interfacially active polymer brushes. In this study, surfactant-like amphiphilic block copolymers were grafted from silica nanoparticles using an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method in order to increase their interfacial activity. We have studied the interfacial activity of such hybrid nanoparticles using pendant drop interfacial tension measurements, and their structure using small angle X-ray scattering. Amphiphilic copolymer grafted nanoparticles significantly reduced oil-water interfacial tension compared to the interfacial tension reduction induced by homopolymer grafted nanoparticles or the corresponding free ungrafted copolymer. Moreover, hard and stable oil-water emulsions were formed by applying the block copolymer grafted nanoparticles due to the formation of interparticle network structures, which were observed by cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS)

  6. Synthesis, stabilization, and characterization of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gregory Von, II

    Wet chemical synthesis techniques offer the ability to control various nanoparticle characteristics including size, shape, dispersibility in both aqueous and organic solvents, and tailored surface chemistries appropriate for different applications. Large quantities of stabilizing ligands or surfactants are often required during synthesis to achieve these nanoparticle characteristics. Unfortunately, excess reaction byproducts, surfactants, and ligands remaining in solution after nanoparticle synthesis can impede application, and therefore post-synthesis purification must be employed. A liquid-liquid solvent/antisolvent pair (typically ethanol/toluene or ethanol/hexane for gold nanoparticles, GNPs) can be used to both purify and size-selectively fractionate hydrophobically modified nanoparticles. Alternatively, carbon dioxide may be used in place of a liquid antisolvent, a "green" approach, enabling both nanoparticle purification and size-selective fractionation while simultaneously eliminating mixed solvent waste and allowing solvent recycle. We have used small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate the ligand structure and composition response of alkanethiol modified gold and silver nanoparticles at varying anti-solvent conditions (CO2 or ethanol). The ligand lengths and ligand solvation for alkanethiol gold and silver NPs were found to decrease with increased antisolvent concentrations directly impacting their dispersibility in solution. Calculated Flory-Huggins interaction parameters support our SANS study for dodecanethiol dispersibility in the mixed organic solvents. This research has led to a greater understanding of the liquid-liquid precipitation process for metal nanoparticles, and provides critical results for future interaction energy modeling.

  7. Blood clot detection using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Friedman, Bruce; Berwin, Brent; Shi, Yipeng; Ness, Dylan B.; Weaver, John B.

    2017-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis, the development of blood clots in the peripheral veins, is a very serious, life threatening condition that is prevalent in the elderly. To deliver proper treatment that enhances the survival rate, it is very important to detect thrombi early and at the point of care. We explored the ability of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MSB) to detect thrombus via specific binding of aptamer functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with the blood clot. MSB uses the harmonics produced by nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field to measure the rotational freedom and, therefore, the bound state of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles' relaxation time for Brownian rotation increases when bound [A.M. Rauwerdink and J. B. Weaver, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 1 (2010)]. The relaxation time can therefore be used to characterize the nanoparticle binding to thrombin in the blood clot. For longer relaxation times, the approach to saturation is more gradual reducing the higher harmonics and the harmonic ratio. The harmonic ratios of nanoparticles conjugated with anti-thrombin aptamers (ATP) decrease significantly over time with blood clot present in the sample medium, compared with nanoparticles without ATP. Moreover, the blood clot removed from the sample medium produced a significant MSB signal, indicating the nanoparticles are immobilized on the clot. Our results show that MSB could be a very useful non-invasive, quick tool to detect blood clots at the point of care so proper treatment can be used to reduce the risks inherent in deep vein thrombosis.

  8. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles titania from alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physicochemical properties of synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles from integrating sol-gel with flame-based techniques were studied. The synthesized nanoparticles properties were compared after using methanol, ethanol, and propanol fuel sources. The synthesized TiO2 were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ...

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  10. Nano-electronics and spintronics with nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmakar, S; Kumar, S; Rinaldi, R; Maruccio, G, E-mail: shilpi.karmakar@unisalento.it, E-mail: giuseppe.maruccio@unisalento.it [NNL Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Lecce (Italy)

    2011-04-01

    We review the current research on nanodevices with nanoparticles which present unique challenges in both the realization of well-controlled interfaces at the nanoscale and the ability to adequately characterize their electrical properties. In particular, we discuss the fabrication and electrical characterization of such nanodevices with special attention to devices based on metal and magnetic nanoparticles.

  11. Filtration of engineered nanoparticles using porous membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzaskus, Krzystof

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims at providing a better understanding of the fundamental aspects responsible for nanoparticle removal and fouling development during filtration of engineered nanoparticles. The emphasis is put on the role of interparticle interactions in the feed solution,

  12. Preparation of amine coated silver nanoparticles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    using aminosilanes as surfactants in different concentrations without the precipitation of particles. In this work, an analysis of the temperature influ- ence on the precipitation of silver nanoparticles was carried out. Also, the nanoparticles were func- tionalized using triethylenetetramine in order to im- prove the adhesion ...

  13. DNA controlled assembly of soft nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Jakobsen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from ass...

  14. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiorov M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  15. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorov, M.; Blums, E.; Kronkalns, G.; Krumina, A.; Lubane, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  16. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Maiorov M.; Blums E.; Kronkalns G.; Krumina A.; Lubane M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  17. Glycine functionalized alumina nanoparticles stabilize collagen in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    perse well in organic solvents rather than in water. SiO2 nanoparticles were used to crosslink the collagen and enhance the thermal stability significantly [14]. The use of functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for collagen stabi- lization both in aqueous and non-aqueous media was in recent times [15,16]. Castaneda et al ...

  18. Methotrexate nanoparticle delivery system for treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IBD were randomly assigned to treatment (MTX nanoparticles,15 mg/week) or control (azathioprine,. AZA, 2 mg/kg/day) group. Nanoparticles were ... multifactorial disorder characterized by an inappropriate immune response that includes .... version 9 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used to conduct the statistical tests.

  19. Nanoparticle Netpoints for Shape-Memory Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Praveen

    2011-08-02

    Forget-me-not: Nanoparticle fillers in shape-memory polymers usually improve mechanical properties at the expense of shape-memory performance. A new approach overcomes these drawbacks by cross-linking the functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) tethers on silica nanoparticles (see picture). Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Synthesis and optical characterization of copper nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hence, copper (Cu) colloidal NPs were prepared using laser ablation (Nd:YAG, ... Copper nanoparticles; optical property; LSPR, laser ablation. 1. Introduction. Among all nanomaterials, nanoparticles (NPs) are of great interest because of their optical, structural, ... useful for applications in a wide range of fields like can-.

  1. Generation of Nanoparticles by Spark Discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salman Tabrizi, N.

    2009-01-01

    Spark discharge is a method for producing nanoparticles from conductive materials. Besides the general advantages of nanoparticle synthesis in the gas phase, the method offers additional advantages like simplicity, compactness and versatility. The synthesis process is continuous and is performed at

  2. Non-rare earth magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Everett E.; Huba, Zachary J.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Farghaly, Ahmed; Khanna, Shiv N.; Qian, Meichun; Bertino, Massimo

    2017-09-26

    Continuous flow synthetic methods are used to make single phase magnetic metal alloy nanoparticles that do not contain rare earth metals. Soft and hard magnets made from the magnetic nanoparticles are used for a variety of purposes, e.g. in electric motors, communication devices, etc.

  3. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines...

  4. Secondary metabolites from the gorgonian Echinomuraceae splendens (Thomson and Simson)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parameswaran, P.S; Naik, C.G.; Govenkar, M.B.

    Two xanthine derivatives, caffeine (1,3,7-trimethyl-xanthine 1) and its 2-O-methyl analog 2, N-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid 3 and a tetrahydroxysterol, 1b, 3b, 5a, 6b-tetrahydro-xycholes-ane 4 have been isolated from the methanol extract...

  5. Breeding biology of House Crows ( Corvus splendens ) in Durban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Details of nestling growth, and fledging and post-fledging dependence periods, are provided. Breeding success was relatively poor. Early breeding attempts were more successful than late breeding attempts. Breeding failure was suspected, or known, to be associated with observer disturbance, egg breakage, failure of ...

  6. Nanoparticles in liquid crystals, and liquid crystals in nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Liquid crystals are remarkably sensitive to interfacial interactions. Small perturbations at a liquid crystal interface, for example, can be propagated over relatively long length scales, thereby providing the basis for a wide range of applications that rely on amplification of molecular events into macroscopic observables. Our recent research efforts have focused on the reverse phenomenon; that is, we have sought to manipulate the interfacial assembly of nanoparticles or the organization of surface active molecules by controlling the structure of a liquid crystal. This presentation will consist of a review of the basic principles that are responsible for liquid crystal-mediated interactions, followed by demonstrations of those principles in the context of two types of systems. In the first, a liquid crystal is used to direct the assembly of nanoparticles; through a combination of molecular and continuum models, it is found that minute changes in interfacial energy and particle size lead to liquid-crystal induced attractions that can span multiple orders of magnitude. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental observations, which also suggest that LC-mediated assembly provides an effective means for fabrication of plasmonic devices. In the second type of system, the structure of a liquid crystal is controlled by confinement in submicron droplets. The morphology of the liquid crystal in a drop depends on a delicate balance between bulk and interfacial contributions to the free energy; that balance can be easily perturbed by adsorption of analytes or nanoparticles at the interface, thereby providing the basis for development of hierarchical assembly of responsive, anisotropic materials. Theoretical predictions also indicate that the three-dimensional order of a liquid crystal can be projected onto a two-dimensional interface, and give rise to novel nanostructures that are not found in simple isotropic fluids.

  7. Nanoparticles in liquid crystals and liquid crystalline nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoiu, Oana; Mirzaei, Javad; Feng, Xiang; Hegmann, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Combinations of liquid crystals and materials with unique features as well as properties at the nanoscale are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to recent developments, i.e., since 2007, in areas ranging from liquid crystal-nanoparticle dispersions to nanomaterials forming liquid crystalline phases after surface modification with mesogenic or promesogenic moieties. Experimental and synthetic approaches are summarized, design strategies compared, and potential as well as existing applications discussed. Finally, a critical outlook into the future of this fascinating field of liquid crystal research is provided.

  8. Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles by Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikriye Alev Akçay

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal particles reduced to nano size by nanotechnological methods are confronted in many different fields such as biomedical and physicochemical, pharmaceutical, electric-electronic, automotive and food industries. Nanoparticles can be produced using chemical, physical and biological methods, of which chemical processes are in common use. However, physical and chemical methods are not environmentally friendly and economical because they require the use of high temperature, high pressure and toxic chemicals. For this reason, interest in the production of metal nanoparticles by biological methods, also called green technology, an environmentally friendly and sustainable approach, has increased in recent years. With some plant extracts and intracellular and extracellular secretions of microorganisms, some reduction reactions take place and metal nanoparticles are produced. Bacteria have been actively involved in nanotechnology in recent years due to their diversity in nature, their ease of isolation, and ease of nanoparticle synthesis. In this article, production and application of metal nanoparticles by using bacterial methods have been reviewed.

  9. Synthesis of silver nanoparticle and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, A Muthu Kumara; Karthikeyan, C; Rajasimman, M; Dinesh, M G

    2015-11-01

    In this work, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized by wet chemical technique, green synthesis and microbial methods. Silver nitrate (10(-3)M) was used with aqueous extract to produce silver nanoparticles. From the results it was observed that the yield of nanoparticles was high in green synthesis. The size of the silver nanoparticles was determined from Scanning Electron Microscope analysis (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out to determine the presence of biomolecules in them. Its cytotoxic effect was studied in cancerous cell line and normal cell line. MTT assay was done to test its optimal concentration and efficacy which gives valuable information for the use of silver nanoparticles for future cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetism in nanoparticles: tuning properties with coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, Patricia; De la Presa, Patricia; Marín, Pilar; Multigner, Marta; María Alonso, José; Rivero, Guillermo; María González-Calbet, José; Hernando, Antonio; Yndurain, Félix

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the effect of organic and inorganic coatings on magnetic nanoparticles. The ferromagnetic-like behaviour observed in nanoparticles constituted by materials which are non-magnetic in bulk is analysed for two cases: (a) Pd and Pt nanoparticles, formed by substances close to the onset of ferromagnetism, and (b) Au and ZnO nanoparticles, which were found to be surprisingly magnetic at the nanoscale when coated by organic surfactants. An overview of theories accounting for this unexpected magnetism, induced by the nanosize influence, is presented. In addition, the effect of coating magnetic nanoparticles with biocompatible metals, oxides or organic molecules is also reviewed, focusing on their applications. (topical review)

  11. Cytotoxicity of Poly(Alkyl Cyanoacrylate Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einar Sulheim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although nanotoxicology has become a large research field, assessment of cytotoxicity is often reduced to analysis of one cell line only. Cytotoxicity of nanoparticles is complex and should, preferentially, be evaluated in several cell lines with different methods and on multiple nanoparticle batches. Here we report the toxicity of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticles in 12 different cell lines after synthesizing and analyzing 19 different nanoparticle batches and report that large variations were obtained when using different cell lines or various toxicity assays. Surprisingly, we found that nanoparticles with intermediate degradation rates were less toxic than particles that were degraded faster or more slowly in a cell-free system. The toxicity did not vary significantly with either the three different combinations of polyethylene glycol surfactants or with particle size (range 100–200 nm. No acute pro- or anti-inflammatory activity on cells in whole blood was observed.

  12. Copper Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Biological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyvaldiev, A. S.; Zhasnakunov, Z. K.; Omurzak, E.; Doolotkeldieva, T. D.; Bobusheva, S. T.; Orozmatova, G. T.; Kelgenbaeva, Z.

    2018-01-01

    By means of XRD and FESEM analysis, it is established that copper nanoparticles with sizes less than 10 nm are formed during the chemical reduction, which form aggregates mainly with spherical shape. Presence of gelatin during the chemical reduction of copper induced formation of smaller size distribution nanoparticles than that of nanoparticles synthesized without gelatin and it can be related to formation of protective layer. Synthesized Cu nano-powders have sufficiently high activity against the Erwinia amylovora bacterium, and the bacterial growth inhibition depends on the Cu nanoparticles concentration. At a concentration of 5 mg / ml of Cu nanoparticles, the exciter growth inhibition zone reaches a maximum value within 72 hours and the lysis zone is 20 mm, and at a concentration of 1 mg / ml this value is 16 mm, which also indicates the significant antibacterial activity of this sample.

  13. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  14. Nanoparticles displacement analysis using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    StrÄ kowski, Marcin R.; Kraszewski, Maciej; StrÄ kowska, Paulina

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a versatile optical method for cross-sectional and 3D imaging of biological and non-biological objects. Here we are going to present the application of polarization sensitive spectroscopic OCT system (PS-SOCT) for quantitative measurements of materials containing nanoparticles. The PS-SOCT combines the polarization sensitive analysis with time-frequency analysis. In this contribution the benefits of using the combination of timefrequency and polarization sensitive analysis are being expressed. The usefulness of PS-SOCT for nanoparticles evaluation is going to be tested on nanocomposite materials with TiO2 nanoparticles. The OCT measurements results have been compared with SEM examination of the PMMA matrix with nanoparticles. The experiment has proven that by the use of polarization sensitive and spectroscopic OCT the nanoparticles dispersion and size can be evaluated.

  15. Nanoscale radiotherapy with hafnium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiorella, Laurence; Barouch, Gilles; Devaux, Corinne; Pottier, Agnès; Deutsch, Eric; Bourhis, Jean; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    There is considerable interest in approaches that could improve the therapeutic window of radiotherapy. In this study, hafnium oxide nanoparticles were designed that concentrate in tumor cells to achieve intracellular high-energy dose deposit. Conventional methods were used, implemented in different ways, to explore interactions of these high-atomic-number nanoparticles and ionizing radiation with biological systems. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, these nanoparticles, when exposed to high-energy photons, were shown to demonstrate an approximately ninefold radiation dose enhancement compared with water. Importantly, the nanoparticles show satisfactory dispersion and persistence within the tumor and they form clusters in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Marked antitumor activity is demonstrated in human cancer models. Safety is similar in treated and control animals as demonstrated by a broad program of toxicology evaluation. These findings, supported by good tolerance, provide the basis for developing this new type of nanoparticle as a promising anticancer approach in human patients.

  16. Nanoparticle growth in ethanol based plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, S.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Berndt, J.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.

    2018-01-01

    Nanoparticles are grown in a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge (ccrf) in argon from the sputtering of a carbonaceous film deposited on the electrodes. This brown film was previously formed from the ethanol decomposition obtained in argon/ethanol plasmas. During the nanoparticle growth, optical emission spectroscopy reveals the evolution of some typical carbonaceous molecules. The nanoparticle formation also disturbs the plasma equilibrium and induces several plasma instabilities consisting in some cases in regular plasma rotation at very low frequencies. Once nanoparticles are large enough to be observed, they constitute a dense cloud trapped in between the electrode with one central or two symmetrical voids. Ex-situ analysis by scanning electron microscopy evidences that grown nanoparticles can have original surface stuctures.

  17. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles Doped DVB Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yu; Luo Xuan; Fan Yongheng; Zhang Qingjun; Ren Hongbo; Xiao Lei

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams was researched, which can be used as ICF target materials. By high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) method, gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams were prepared, with gold nanoparticles dissolved in inner phase. The results show that the content of Au in the gold nanoparticles doped DVB foam is 3. 19%, the axial direction density of the foam is uniform which indicates none evident settlement of gold nanoparticles. SEM tests show that the gold doped DVB polymer foams have open-celled structure and very uniform aperture, and the average pore size is about 1 μm, which is much smaller than that of pure DVB foams. EDX test shows that Au disperses uniformly in the foams. (authors)

  18. nano-particles in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billotey, Claire; Bourhis, Jean; Levy, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    After a recall of the history of radiation therapy this article outlines that the presence of a high electronic density material within a tumour can artificially and locally increase the radiation absorption. It outlines the benefit of the elaboration of nano-particles from such a material for the case of external radiation therapy (increase of material density and bioavailability of nano-particles) where nano-particles can even be introduced by intravenous injection. It describes the various possibility of using nano-particles in the case of internal radiation therapy or Curie therapy. It allows a much less invasive process, the possibility of direct injection into a tumour or a cavity, and the possibility of an increase of the dose received by cells. Other topics are briefly evoked: subcellular targeting by high atomic number nano-particles, and the radiation therapy approach by Nanobiotix

  19. Structural characterization of copolymer embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, G. G.; Nastro, A.; Filippelli, L.; Cazacu, M.; Iacob, M.; Rossi, C. Oliviero; Popa, A.; Toloman, D.; Dobromir, M.; Iacomi, F.

    2015-10-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized by co-precipitation and coated by emulsion polymerization with poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) (PMMA-co-AAc) to create surface functional groups that can attach drug molecules and other biomolecules. The coated and uncoated magnetite nanoparticles were stored for two years in normal closed ships and than characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solid phase transformation of magnetite to maghemite, as well as an increase in particle size were evidenced for the uncoated nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles preserved their magnetite structure and magnetic properties. The influences of monomers and surfactant layers on interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles evidenced that the thickness of the polymer has a significant effect on magnetic properties.

  20. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  1. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong Yeol; Jeon, Sangmin; You, Dong Gil; Park, Jae Hyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-01-18

    Recently, nanotechnology has provided significant advances in biomedical applications including diagnosis and therapy. In particular, nanoparticles have emerged as valuable outcomes of nanotechnology due to their unique physicochemical properties based on size, shape, and surface properties. Among them, a large amount of research has reported imaging and therapeutic applications using inorganic nanoparticles with special properties. Inorganic nanoparticles developed for imaging and therapy contain metal (Au), metal oxide (Fe 3 O 4 , WO 3 , WO 2.9 ), semiconductor nanocrystal (quantum dots (QDs)), and lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). Based on their intrinsic properties, they can generate heat, reactive oxygen species (ROS), or energy transfer, so that they can be used for both imaging and therapy. In this review, we introduce biocompatible inorganic nanoparticles for image-guided thermal and photodynamic therapy, and discuss their promising results from in vitro and in vivo studies for biomedical applications.

  2. QCM-D study of nanoparticle interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Shengming; Liu, Qingxia; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-07-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) has been proven to be a powerful research tool to investigate in situ interactions between nanoparticles and different functionalized surfaces in liquids. QCM-D can also be used to quantitatively determine adsorption kinetics of polymers, DNA and proteins from solutions on various substrate surfaces while providing insights into conformations of adsorbed molecules. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview on various important applications of QCM-D, focusing on deposition of nanoparticles and attachment-detachment of nanoparticles on model membranes in complex fluid systems. We will first describe the working principle of QCM-D and DLVO theory pertinent to understanding nanoparticle deposition phenomena. The interactions between different nanoparticles and functionalized surfaces for different application areas are then critically reviewed. Finally, the potential applications of QCM-D in other important fields are proposed and knowledge gaps are identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sprayable Elastic Conductors Based on Block Copolymer Silver Nanoparticle Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Vural, Mert; Behrens, Adam M.; Ayyub, Omar B.; Ayoub, Joseph J.; Kofinas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Block copolymer silver nanoparticle composite elastic conductors were fabricated through solution blow spinning and subsequent nanoparticle nucleation. The reported technique allows for conformal deposition onto nonplanar substrates. We additionally demonstrated the ability to tune the strain dependence of the electrical properties by adjusting nanoparticle precursor concentration or localized nanoparticle nucleation. The stretchable fiber mats were able to display electrical conductivity val...

  4. The synthesis and characterization of iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tyler

    Nanoparticle synthesis has garnered attention for technological applications for catalysts, industrial processing, and medical applications. The size ranges for these is in the particles nanostructural domain. Pure iron nanoparticles have been of particular interest for their reactivity and relative biological inertness. Applications include cancer treatment and carrying medicine to a relevant site. Unfortunately, because of their reactivity, pure iron nanoparticles have been difficult to study. This is because of their accelerated tendency to form oxides in air, due to the increased surface area to volume ratio. Using synthesis processes with polyphenols or long chain amines, air stable iron nanoparticles have been produced with a diameter size range of ~ 2 to about ~10 nm, but apparently have transformed due to internal pressure and crystallographic defects to the FCC phase. The FCC crystals have been seen to form icosahedral and decahedral shapes. This size is within the range for use as a catalyst for the growth of both carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes as well for biomedical applications. The advantages of these kinds of catalysts are that nanotube growth can be for the first time separated from the catalyst formation. Additionally, the catalyst size can be preselected for a certain size nanotube to grow. In summary: (1) we found the size distributions of nanoparticles for various synthesis processes, (2) we discovered the right size range for growth of nanotubes from the iron nanoparticles, (3) the nanoparticles are under a very high internal pressure, (4) the nanoparticles are in the FCC phase, (5) they appear to be in icosahedral and decahedral structures, (6) they undergo room temperature twinning, (7) the FCC crystals are distorted due to carbon in octahedral sites, (8) the iron nanoparticles are stable in air, (9) adding small amounts of copper make the iron nanoparticles smaller.

  5. Water-soluble PEGylated silicon nanoparticles and their assembly into swellable nanoparticle aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zejing; Li, Yejia; Zhang, Boyu; Purkait, Tapas; Alb, Alina; Mitchell, Brian S.; Grayson, Scott M.; Fink, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble silicon nanoparticles were synthesized by grafting PEG polymers onto functionalized silicon nanoparticles with distal alkyne or azide moieties. The surface-functionalized silicon nanoparticles were produced in one step from the reactive high-energy ball milling (RHEBM) of silicon wafers with a mixture of either 5-chloro-1-pentyne in 1-pentyne or 1,7 octadiyne in 1-hexyne to afford air and water-stable chloroalkyl or alkynyl-terminated nanoparticles, respectively. Nanoparticles with the ω-chloroalkyl substituents were easily converted to ω-azidoalkyl groups through the reaction of the Si nanoparticles with sodium azide in DMF. The azido-terminated nanoparticles were then grafted with mono-alkynyl-PEG polymers using a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction to afford core–shell silicon nanoparticles with a covalently attached PEG shell. Covalently linked Si nanoparticle clusters were synthesized via the CuAAC “click” reaction of functional Si NPs with α,ω-functional PEG polymers of various lengths. Dynamic light scattering studies show that the flexible globular nanoparticle aggregates undergo a solvent-dependent change in volume (ethanol > dichloromethane > toluene) similar in behavior to hydrogel nanocomposites

  6. Engineering nanoparticle-protein associations for protein crystal nucleation and nanoparticle arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Denise N.

    Engineering the nanoparticle - protein association offers a new way to form protein crystals as well as new approaches for arrangement of nanoparticles. Central to this control is the nanoparticle surface. By conjugating polymers on the surface with controlled molecular weights many properties of the nanoparticle can be changed including its size, stability in buffers and the association of proteins with its surface. Large molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings allow for weak associations between proteins and nanoparticles. These interactions can lead to changes in how proteins crystallize. In particular, they decrease the time to nucleation and expand the range of conditions over which protein crystals form. Interestingly, when PEG chain lengths are too short then protein association is minimized and these effects are not observed. One important feature of protein crystals nucleated with nanoparticles is that the nanoparticles are incorporated into the crystals. What results are nanoparticles placed at well-defined distances in composite protein-nanoparticle crystals. Crystals on the size scale of 10 - 100 micrometers exhibit optical absorbance, fluorescence and super paramagnetic behavior derivative from the incorporated nanomaterials. The arrangement of nanoparticles into three dimensional arrays also gives rise to new and interesting physical and chemical properties, such as fluorescence enhancement and varied magnetic response. In addition, anisotropic nanomaterials aligned throughout the composite crystal have polarization dependent optical properties.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles, and silver chloride nanoparticles: an overview and comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Seabra, Amedea B

    2016-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of biogenic-synthesized silver-based nanoparticles has been the focus of increasing interest. As the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles is highly dependent on their size and surface, the complete and adequate characterization of the nanoparticle is important. This review discusses the characterization and antimicrobial activity of biogenic synthesized silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles. By revising the literature, there is confusion in the characterization of these two silver-based nanoparticles, which consequently affects the conclusion regarding to their antimicrobial activities. This review critically analyzes recent publications on the synthesis of biogenic silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles by attempting to correlate the characterization of the nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity. It was difficult to correlate the size of biogenic nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity, since different techniques are employed for the characterization. Biogenic synthesized silver-based nanoparticles are not completely characterized, particularly the nature of capped proteins covering the nanomaterials. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of theses nanoparticles is assayed by using different protocols and strains, which difficult the comparison among the published papers. It is important to select some bacteria as standards, by following international foundations (Pharmaceutical Microbiology Manual) and use the minimal inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution assays from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, which is the most common assay used in antibiotic ones. Therefore, we conclude that to have relevant results on antimicrobial effects of biogenic silver-based nanoparticles, it is necessary to have a complete and adequate characterization of these nanostructures, followed by standard methodology in microbiology protocols.

  8. The effects of bacteria-nanoparticles interface on the antibacterial activity of green synthesized silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aftab; Wei, Yun; Syed, Fatima; Tahir, Kamran; Rehman, Aziz Ur; Khan, Arifullah; Ullah, Sadeeq; Yuan, Qipeng

    2017-01-01

    Neutralization of bacterial cell surface potential using nanoscale materials is an effective strategy to alter membrane permeability, cytoplasmic leakage, and ultimate cell death. In the present study, an attempt was made to prepare biogenic silver nanoparticles using biomolecules from the aqueous rhizome extract of Coptis Chinensis. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles were surface modified with chitosan biopolymer. The prepared silver nanoparticles and chitosan modified silver nanoparticles were cubic crystalline structures (XRD) with an average particle size of 15 and 20 nm respectively (TEM, DLS). The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles were surface stabilized by polyphenolic compounds (FTIR). Coptis Chinensis mediated silver nanoparticles displayed significant activity against E. coli and Bacillus subtilus with a zone of inhibition 12 ± 1.2 (MIC = 25 μg/mL) and 18 ± 1.6 mm (MIC = 12.50 μg/mL) respectively. The bactericidal efficacy of these nanoparticles was considerably increased upon surface modification with chitosan biopolymer. The chitosan modified biogenic silver nanoparticles exhibited promising activity against E. coli (MIC = 6.25 μg/mL) and Bacillus subtilus (MIC = 12.50 μg/mL). Our results indicated that the chitosan modified silver nanoparticles were promising agents in damaging bacterial membrane potential and induction of high level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, these nanoparticles were observed to induce the release of the high level of cytoplasmic materials especially protein and nucleic acids into the media. All these findings suggest that the chitosan functionalized silver nanoparticles are efficient agents in disrupting bacterial membrane and induction of ROS leading to cytoplasmic leakage and cell death. These findings further conclude that the bacterial-nanoparticles surface potential modulation is an effective strategy in enhancing the antibacterial potency of silver nanoparticles

  9. Fabrication and properties of capsicum extract-loaded PVA and CA nanofiber patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Sila-On, Warisada; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare, characterize and evaluate electrospun polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers loaded with capsicum extract (CE) for use in topical skin treatments. CE, 0.5, 1 or 2 wt %, was loaded into PVA and CA electrospun fiber mats. Various properties of the CE-loaded fiber mats as well as release and skin permeation were investigated. The average diameters of these fibers ranged from 251-368 nm. The release rate of capsaicin from CE-loaded as-spun PVA was faster than that of the CA fiber mats and increased as the CE content in CE-loaded as-spun PVA and CA increased. The release kinetics of the CA and PVA fibers followed the Higuchi equation. The percentages of CE that permeated the shed snake skin with PVA and CA fiber mats containing 2 wt % CE after 24 h were 60% and 20%, respectively. The results suggest a potential use of PVA and CA nanofibers being used to control skin permeation of capsicum extract. Our research suggests the potential application of CE-loaded PVA electrospun mats as transdermal drug delivery systems.

  10. Classification of Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogren, Sara; Fornara, Andrea; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes. The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry...... and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using these methods, we also show that the nanocrystal size and particle morphology determines the dynamic magnetic properties for both single- and multi-core particles. The presented results are obtained from...... the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles....

  11. Diffusion of coloured silica nanoparticles into human hair

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Jaime Rocha; Sampaio, Sandra; Maia, Frederico

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for dyeing human hair fibres using coloured silica nanoparticles of 206 nm has been developed. Diffusion of coloured silica nanoparticles into hair fibres has been investigated; silica nanoparticles do not penetrate at all, or do so only sparingly, into the structure of Caucasian virgin hair. However, coloured silica nanoparticles diffused readily into bleached hair fibres. Scanning electron microscopy showed that coloured silica nanoparticles were present mainly in...

  12. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  13. Polymeric Nanocapsule from Silica Nanoparticle@Cross-linked Polymer Nanoparticles via One-Pot Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Ruoping

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A facile strategy was developed here to prepare cross-linked polymeric nanocapsules (CP nanocapsules with silica nanoparticles as templates. The silica nanoparticle@cross-linked polymer nanoparticles were prepared by the encapsulation of the silica nanoparticles by the one-pot approach via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of hydroxyethyl acrylate in the presence ofN,N′-methylenebisacrylamide as a cross-linker from the initiator-modified silica nanoparticles. After the silica nanoparticle templates were etched with hydrofluoric acid, the CP nanocapsules with particle size of about 100 nm were obtained. The strategy developed was confirmed with Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Inventor); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Inventor); Myers, Andrew William (Inventor); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Inventor); Elliott, Brian John (Inventor); Kreutzer, Cory (Inventor); Wilson, Carolina (Inventor); Meiser, Manfred (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Mehmet V; Moore, Anna; Medarova, Zdravka

    2012-05-01

    Nanotechnology is evolving as a new field that has a potentially high research and clinical impact. Medicine, in particular, could benefit from nanotechnology, due to emerging applications for noninvasive imaging and therapy. One important nanotechnological platform that has shown promise includes the so-called iron oxide nanoparticles. With specific relevance to cancer therapy, iron oxide nanoparticle-based therapy represents an important alternative to conventional chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery. Iron oxide nanoparticles are usually composed of three main components: an iron core, a polymer coating, and functional moieties. The biodegradable iron core can be designed to be superparamagnetic. This is particularly important, if the nanoparticles are to be used as a contrast agent for noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Surrounding the iron core is generally a polymer coating, which not only serves as a protective layer but also is a very important component for transforming nanoparticles into biomedical nanotools for in vivo applications. Finally, different moieties attached to the coating serve as targeting macromolecules, therapeutics payloads, or additional imaging tags. Despite the development of several nanoparticles for biomedical applications, we believe that iron oxide nanoparticles are still the most promising platform that can transform nanotechnology into a conventional medical discipline.

  16. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  17. Dynamics of solvent-free grafted nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    The diffusivity and structural relaxation characteristics of oligomer-grafted nanoparticles have been investigated with simulations of a previously proposed coarse-grained model at atmospheric pressure. Solvent-free, polymer-grafted nanoparticles as well as grafted nanoparticles in a melt were compared to a reference system of bare (ungrafted) particles in a melt. Whereas longer chains lead to a larger hydrodynamic radius and lower relative diffusivity for grafted particles in a melt, bulk solvent-free nanoparticles with longer chains have higher relative diffusivities than their short chain counterparts. Solvent-free nanoparticles with short chains undergo a glass transition as indicated by a vanishing diffusivity, diverging structural relaxation time and the formation of body-centered-cubic-like order. Nanoparticles with longer chains exhibit a more gradual increase in the structural relaxation time with decreasing temperature and concomitantly increasing particle volume fraction. The diffusivity of the long chain nanoparticles exhibits a minimum at an intermediate temperature and volume fraction where the polymer brushes of neighboring particles overlap, but must stretch to fill the interparticle space. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Tunable nanoparticle arrays at charged interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sunita; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Fukuto, Masafumi; Gang, Oleg

    2014-10-28

    Structurally tunable two-dimensional (2D) arrays of nanoscale objects are important for modulating functional responses of thin films. We demonstrate that such tunable and ordered nanoparticles (NP) arrays can be assembled at charged air-water interfaces from nanoparticles coated with polyelectrolyte chains, DNA. The electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged nonhybridizing DNA-coated gold NPs and a positively charged lipid layer at the interface facilitates the formation of a 2D hexagonally closed packed (HCP) nanoparticle lattice. We observed about 4-fold change of the monolayer nanoparticle density by varying the ionic strength of the subphase. The tunable NP arrays retain their structure reasonably well when transferred to a solid support. The influence of particle's DNA corona and lipid layer composition on the salt-induced in-plane and normal structural evolution of NP arrays was studied in detail using a combination of synchrotron-based in situ surface scattering methods, grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GISAXS), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). Comparative analysis of the interparticle distances as a function of ionic strength reveals the difference between the studied 2D nanoparticle arrays and analogous bulk polyelectrolyte star polymers systems, typically described by Daoud-Cotton model and power law scaling. The observed behavior of the 2D nanoparticle array manifests a nonuniform deformation of the nanoparticle DNA corona due to its electrostatically induced confinement at the lipid interface. The present study provides insight on the interfacial properties of the NPs coated with charged soft shells.

  19. Kinetics of laser irradiated nanoparticles cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Upadhyay Kahaly, M.; Misra, Shikha

    2018-02-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model describing the complex kinetics of a laser irradiated nanoparticle ensemble has been developed. The absorbed laser radiation here serves dual purpose, viz., photoenhanced thermionic emission via rise in its temperature and direct photoemission of electrons. On the basis of mean charge theory along with the equations for particle (electron) and energy flux balance over the nanoparticles, the transient processes of charge/temperature evolution over its surface and mass diminution on account of the sublimation (phase change) process have been elucidated. Using this formulation phenomenon of nanoparticle charging, its temperature rise to the sublimation point, mass ablation, and cloud disintegration have been investigated; afterwards, typical timescales of disintegration, sublimation and complete evaporation in reference to a graphite nanoparticle cloud (as an illustrative case) have been parametrically investigated. Based on a numerical analysis, an adequate parameter space describing the nanoparticle operation below the sublimation temperature, in terms of laser intensity, wavelength and nanoparticle material work function, has been identified. The cloud disintegration is found to be sensitive to the nanoparticle charging through photoemission; as a consequence, it illustrates that radiation operating below the photoemission threshold causes disintegration in the phase change state, while above the threshold, it occurs with the onset of surface heating.

  20. Gold Nanoparticle Quantitation by Whole Cell Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Aric W; Jeerage, Kavita M; Schwartz, Cindi L; Curtin, Alexandra E; Chiaramonti, Ann N

    2015-12-22

    Many proposed biomedical applications for engineered gold nanoparticles require their incorporation by mammalian cells in specific numbers and locations. Here, the number of gold nanoparticles inside of individual mammalian stem cells was characterized using fast focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy based tomography. Enhanced optical microscopy was used to provide a multiscale map of the in vitro sample, which allows cells of interest to be identified within their local environment. Cells were then serially sectioned using a gallium ion beam and imaged using a scanning electron beam. To confirm the accuracy of single cross sections, nanoparticles in similar cross sections were imaged using transmission electron microscopy and scanning helium ion microscopy. Complete tomographic series were then used to count the nanoparticles inside of each cell and measure their spatial distribution. We investigated the influence of slice thickness on counting single particles and clusters as well as nanoparticle packing within clusters. For 60 nm citrate stabilized particles, the nanoparticle cluster packing volume is 2.15 ± 0.20 times the volume of the bare gold nanoparticles.

  1. Neurotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Sharma, Aruna

    2012-02-01

    Human exposure to metal nanoparticles such as silver (Ag), copper (Cu) or aluminum (Al) is very common at work places involving automobile, aerospace industry, gun factories or defense related explosives making. Additional sources of exposure to engineered nanoparticles affecting human health are chemical, electronics and communication industries. The nanoparticles (ca. 20 to 120 nm) easily enter the body through inhalation and are deposited into various tissues and organs including brain, where they could stay there for long periods of time. However, the pathophysiological reactions of nanoparticles in vivo on brain function are still not well known. Previous observations from our laboratory showed that engineered nanoparticles from Ag, Cu or Al (50-60 nm) when administered through systemic or intracerebral routes in rats or mice induce neurotoxicity depending on their type, dose and duration of the exposure. These nanoparticles also altered sensory, motor and cognitive functions at the time of development of brain pathologies. Thus, neuronal, glial, axonal and endothelial cell damages are most pronounced following Ag and Cu intoxication as compared to Al in identical doses that are more pronounced in mice as compared to rats of similar age group. The functional significance of these findings and the probable mechanisms of metal nanoparticle-induced neurotoxicity are discussed in this review largely based on our own investigations.

  2. Complex conductivity response to silver nanoparticles in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increase in the use of nanoscale materials in consumer products has resulted in a growing concern of their potential hazard to ecosystems and public health from their accidental or intentional introduction to the environment. Key environmental, health, and safety research needs include knowledge and methods for their detection, characterization, fate, and transport. Specifically, techniques available for the direct detection and quantification of their fate and transport in the environment are limited. Their small size, high surface area to volume ratio, interfacial, and electrical properties make metallic nanoparticles, such as silver nanoparticles, good targets for detection using electrical geophysical techniques. Here we measured the complex conductivity response to silver nanoparticles in sand columns under varying moisture conditions (0–30%), nanoparticle concentrations (0–10 mg/g), lithology (presence of clay), pore water salinity (0.0275 and 0.1000 S/m), and particle size (35, 90–210 and 1500–2500 nm). Based on the Cole-Cole relaxation models we obtained the chargeability and the time constant. We demonstrate that complex conductivity can detect silver nanoparticles in porous media with the response enhanced by higher concentrations of silver nanoparticles, moisture content, ionic strength, clay content and particle diameter. Quantification of the volumetric silver nanoparticles content in the porous media can also be obtained from complex co

  3. Gold nanoparticles produced in a microalga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangpipat, Tiyaporn; Beattie, Isabel R.; Chisti, Yusuf; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    An efficient biological route to production of gold nanoparticles which allows the nanoparticles to be easily recovered remains elusive. Live cells of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris were incubated with a solution of gold chloride and harvested by centrifugation. Nanoparticles inside intact cells were identified by transmission electron microscopy and confirmed to be metallic gold by synchrotron based X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These intracellular gold nanoparticles were 40–60 nm in diameter. At a concentration of 1.4% Au in the alga, a better than 97% recovery of the gold from solution was achieved. A maximum of 4.2% Au in the alga was obtained. Exposure of C. vulgaris to solutions containing dissolved salts of palladium, ruthenium, and rhodium also resulted in the production of the corresponding nanoparticles within the cells. These were surmised to be also metallic, but were produced at a much lower intracellular concentration than achieved with gold. Iridium was apparently toxic to the alga. No nanoparticles were observed using platinum solutions. C. vulgaris provides a possible route to large scale production of gold nanoparticles.

  4. DNA nanoparticles with core-shell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Preethi L; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lisziewicz, Julianna; Speransky, Vlad; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-10-14

    Mannobiose-modified polyethylenimines (PEI) are used in gene therapy to generate nanoparticles of DNA that can be targeted to the antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. We report that the sugar modification alters the DNA organization within the nanoparticles from homogenous to shell-like packing. The depth-dependent packing of DNA within the nanoparticles was probed using AFM nano-indentation. Unmodified PEI-DNA nanoparticles display linear elastic properties and depth-independent mechanics, characteristic of homogenous materials. Mannobiose-modified nanoparticles, however, showed distinct force regimes that were dependent on indentation depth, with 'buckling'-like response that is reproducible and not due to particle failure. By comparison with theoretical studies of spherical shell mechanics, the structure of mannobiosylated particles was deduced to be a thin shell with wall thickness in the order of few nanometers, and a fluid-filled core. The shell-core structure is also consistent with observations of nanoparticle denting in altered solution conditions, with measurements of nanoparticle water content from AFM images, and with images of DNA distribution in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  5. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew; Elliott, Brian John; Kreutzer, Cory; Wilson, Carolina; Meiser, Manfred

    2007-07-17

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  6. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  7. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles using microbes- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulkoti, Nasreen I; Taranath, T C

    2014-09-01

    The biosynthesis of nanoparticles by microorganism is a green and eco-friendly technology. This review focuses on the use of consortium of diverse microorganisms belonging to both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles viz. silver, gold, platinum, zirconium, palladium, iron, cadmium and metal oxides such as titanium oxide, zinc oxide, etc. These microorganisms include bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi and algae. The synthesis of nanoparticles may be intracellular or extracellular. The several workers have reported that NADH dependent nitrate reductase enzyme plays a vital role in the conversion of metallic ions to nanoparticles. The FTIR study reveals that diverse biomolecules viz. carboxyl group, primary and secondary amines, amide I, II, and III bands etc serve as a tool for bioreduction and capping agents there by offering stability to particles by preventing agglomeration and growth. The size and shape of the nanoparticles vary with the organism employed and conditions employed during the synthesis which included pH, temperature and substrate concentration. The microorganisms provide diverse environment for biosynthesis of nanoparticles. These particles are safe and eco-friendly with a lot of applications in medicine, agriculture, cosmetic industry, drug delivery and biochemical sensors. The challenges for redressal include optimal production and minimal time to obtain desired size and shape, to enhance the stability of nanoparticles and optimization of specific microorganisms for specific application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanoparticle biofabrication using English ivy (Hedera helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burris Jason N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background English ivy (Hedera helix is well known for its adhesive properties and climbing ability. Essential to its ability to adhere to vertical surfaces is the secretion of a nanocomposite adhesive containing spherical nanoparticles, 60–85 nm in diameter, produced exclusively by root hairs present on adventitious roots. These organic nanoparticles have shown promise in biomedical and cosmetic applications, and represent a safer alternative to metal oxide nanoparticles currently available. Results It was discovered that the maximum adventitious root production was achieved by a 4 h application of 1 mg/ml indole-3 butyric acid (IBA to juvenile English ivy shoot segments cultured in custom vessels. After incubation of the shoots under continuous light at 83 μmol/m2 s at 20°C for 2 weeks, the adventitious roots were harvested from the culture system and it was possible to isolate 90 mg of dry weight nanoparticles per 12 g of roots. The nanoparticle morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy, and found to be similar to previous studies. Conclusions An enhanced system for the production of English ivy adventitious roots and their nanoparticles by modifying GA7 Magenta boxes and identifying the optimal concentration of IBA for adventitious root growth was developed. This system is the first such platform for growing and harvesting organic nanoparticles from plants, and represents an important step in the development of plant-based nanomanufacturing. It is a significant improvement on the exploitation of plant systems for the formation of metallic nanoparticles, and represents a pathway for the generation of bulk ivy nanoparticles for translation into biomedical applications.

  9. Nanoparticles Ecotoxicity on Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnood Reza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, development of nanotechnology as well as the toxicity potential of nanomaterials on the environment has received much attention. In order to assess the potential toxic impact of nanoparticles on aquatic environments, we used three kinds of nanoparticles, including titanium dioxide (TiO2, copper oxide (CuO, and zinc oxide (ZnO on an aquatic model species, Daphnia magna. In fact, Daphnia magna was exposed to different concentrations for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h at 20-25°C. All the important water quality parameters, such as temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO were controlled to meet the standard requirements during the experiment. The LC50 values for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h were estimated statistically using Probit methods. The LC50 48 h values for TiO2, CuO, and ZnO were 171.88 mg/l, 6.62 mg/l, and 3.23 mg/l, respectively.

  10. Silver Nanoparticles and Mitochondrial Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriberto Bressan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has gone through a period of rapid growth, thus leading to the constant increase in the application of engineered nanomaterials in daily life. Several different types of nanoparticles have been engineered to be employed in a wide array of applications due to their high surface to volume ratio that leads to unique physical and chemical properties. So far, silver nanoparticles (AgNps have been used in many more different medical devices than any other nanomaterial, mainly due to their antimicrobial properties. Despite the promising advantages posed by using AgNps in medical applications, the possible health effects associated with the inevitable human exposure to AgNps have raised concerns as to their use since a clear understanding of their specific interaction with biological systems has not been attained yet. In light of such consideration, aim of the present work is the morphological analysis of the intracellular behavior of AgNps with a diameter of 10 nm, with a special attention to their interaction with mitochondria.

  11. Obtention of Ti nanoparticles by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz E, J.R.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Santiago, P.; Ascencio, J.

    2002-01-01

    The obtention of Ti nanoparticles around 5-30 nm diameter through the laser ablation technique is reported. The formation of nanoparticles is carried out in He atmosphere to different pressures, placing directly in Si substrates (100) and in Cu grids. The results show that the work pressure is an important parameter that allows to control the nanoparticles size. Also the plasma characterization results are presented where the Ti II is the predominant specie with an average kinetic energy of 1824 eV. (Author)

  12. Nitride stabilized core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian Abraham; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2018-01-30

    Nitride stabilized metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. In one embodiment the metal nanoparticles have a continuous and nonporous noble metal shell with a nitride-stabilized non-noble metal core. The nitride-stabilized core provides a stabilizing effect under high oxidizing conditions suppressing the noble metal dissolution during potential cycling. The nitride stabilized nanoparticles may be fabricated by a process in which a core is coated with a shell layer that encapsulates the entire core. Introduction of nitrogen into the core by annealing produces metal nitride(s) that are less susceptible to dissolution during potential cycling under high oxidizing conditions.

  13. Characterization of Nanoparticles by Scattering Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Benjamin; Liu Tianbo

    2000-01-01

    Basic principles and applications of different scattering techniques (including static and dynamic light scattering (SLS and DLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS)) on the characterization of nanoparticles are reviewed in this paper. By choosing a suitable scattering technique or a combination of different techniques for nanoparticle characterization, the particles' molecular weight, radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, size distribution, shape and internal structure as well as interparticle interactions of nanoparticles, can be determined. Examples including some sophisticated colloidal systems are presented

  14. Magnetic intraparticle structure in ferromagnetic Pd nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Yojiro; Sato, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Ohnuma, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The small-angle neutron scattering measurement of Pd nanoparticles was performed to investigate their intraparticle magnetic structures. The magnetic scattering from the magnetization of the samples was observed using the polarized neutron. The nuclear scattering indicated that the Pd nanoparticles can be regarded as spherical particles, and the magnetic scattering is explained based on the shell model that the particle is composed of magnetic core and shell. The magnetic moment of the core was larger than that of the shell. These results suggest that the spontaneous magnetization of the Pd nanoparticles mainly exists in the core region. (author)

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Co nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J.; Tripathi1, J.; Kaurav, N.

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticles of Cobalt (Co) have attracted great interest in recent years because of their unique physical and optical properties that are of industrial importance. To understand their basic properties, Co nanoparticles were synthesized by Polyol method using Cobalt acetate and ethylene glycol in the presence of some pellets of sodium hydroxide. The synthesized powder was characterized X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The average particle size and lattice parameter estimated by XRD were found to be ˜37.3 nm and 3.1653 Å respectively. The results suggest suitability of these nanoparticles as dopants in other materials such as polymer materials and oxides.

  16. Sustainable steric stabilization of colloidal titania nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbasuney, Sherif, E-mail: sherif_basuney2000@yahoo.com

    2017-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Controlled surface properties of titania nanoparticles via surface modification, flocculation from aqueous phase (a), stabilization in aqueous phase (b), extraction to organic phase (c). - Highlights: • Complete change in surface properties of titania nanoparticles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. • Harvesting the formulated nanoparticles from the aqueous phase to the organic phase. • Exclusive surface modification in the reactor during nanoparticle synthesis. • Sustainable stabilization of titania nanoparticles in aqueous media with polar polymeric dispersant. - Abstract: A route to produce a stable colloidal suspension is essential if mono-dispersed particles are to be successfully synthesized, isolated, and used in subsequent nanocomposite manufacture. Dispersing nanoparticles in fluids was found to be an important approach for avoiding poor dispersion characteristics. However, there is still a great tendency for colloidal nanoparticles to flocculate over time. Steric stabilization can prevent coagulation by introducing a thick adsorbed organic layer which constitutes a significant steric barrier that can prevent the particle surfaces from coming into direct contact. One of the main features of hydrothermal synthesis technique is that it offers novel approaches for sustainable nanoparticle surface modification. This manuscript reports on the sustainable steric stabilization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle surface modification was performed via two main approaches including post-synthesis and in situ surface modification. The tuneable hydrothermal conditions (i.e. temperature, pressure, flow rates, and surfactant addition) were optimized to enable controlled steric stabilization in a continuous fashion. Effective post synthesis surface modification with organic ligand (dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA)) was achieved; the optimum surface coating temperature was reported to be 180–240 °C to ensure DDSA ring opening

  17. Species Differences Take Shape at Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Scavenius, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Cells recognize the biomolecular corona around a nanoparticle, but the biological identity of the complex may be considerably different among various species. This study explores the importance of protein corona composition for nanoparticle recognition by coelomocytes of the earthworm Eisenia...... fetida using E. fetida coelomic proteins (EfCP) as a native repertoire and fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a non-native reference. We have profiled proteins forming the long-lived corona around silver nanoparticles (75 nm OECD reference materials) and compared the responses of coelomocytes to protein coronas...

  18. Key parameters governing metallic nanoparticle electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-10-21

    Engineering metallic nanoparticles constitutes a powerful route to design next-generation electrocatalysts to be used in future energy and environmental industries. In this mini review, we cover recent advances in metallic nanoparticle electrocatalysis, with a focus on understanding how the parameters such as particle sizes, crystalline structures, shapes, compositions, nanoscale alloying and interfaces influence their electrocatalytic activity and selectivity. In addition, this review highlights viable approaches for fabrication of nanoparticle-based electrocatalytic electrodes and discusses their influences on the overall catalytic performances. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges ahead to program these key parameters to achieve highly durable designer electrocatalysts in future.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles for tunable microwave metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Noginova, Natalia

    2012-09-24

    Commonly, metamaterials are electrically engineered systems with optimized spatial arrangement of subwavelength sized metal and dielectric components. We explore alternative methods based on use of magnetic inclusions, such as magnetic nanoparticles, which can allow permeability of a composite to be tuned from negative to positive at the range of magnetic resonance. To better understand effects of particle size and magnetization dynamics, we performed electron magnetic resonance study on several varieties of magnetic nanoparticles and determined potential of nanoparticle use as building blocks for tunable microwave metamaterials. © (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  20. Sorting process of nanoparticles and applications of same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Timothy P.; Henry, Anne-Isabelle; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2017-10-31

    In one aspect of the present invention, a method for sorting nanoparticles includes preparing a high-viscosity density gradient medium filled in a container, dispersing nanoparticles into an aqueous solution to form a suspension of the nanoparticles, each nanoparticle having one or more cores and a shell encapsulating the one or more cores, layering the suspension of the nanoparticles on the top of the high-viscosity density gradient medium in the container, and centrifugating the layered suspension of the nanoparticles on the top of the high-viscosity density gradient medium in the container at a predetermined speed for a predetermined period of time to form a gradient of fractions of the nanoparticles along the container, where each fraction comprises nanoparticles in a respective one of aggregation states of the nanoparticles.

  1. Biosynthesis of Nanoparticles by Microorganisms and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqian Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of eco-friendly technologies in material synthesis is of considerable importance to expand their biological applications. Nowadays, a variety of inorganic nanoparticles with well-defined chemical composition, size, and morphology have been synthesized by using different microorganisms, and their applications in many cutting-edge technological areas have been explored. This paper highlights the recent developments of the biosynthesis of inorganic nanoparticles including metallic nanoparticles, oxide nanoparticles, sulfide nanoparticles, and other typical nanoparticles. Different formation mechanisms of these nanoparticles will be discussed as well. The conditions to control the size/shape and stability of particles are summarized. The applications of these biosynthesized nanoparticles in a wide spectrum of potential areas are presented including targeted drug delivery, cancer treatment, gene therapy and DNA analysis, antibacterial agents, biosensors, enhancing reaction rates, separation science, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The current limitations and future prospects for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles by microorganisms are discussed.

  2. Quantifying Nanoparticle Internalization Using a High Throughput Internalization Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarah K; Czuba, Ewa; Selby, Laura I; Such, Georgina K; Johnston, Angus P R

    2016-10-01

    The internalization of nanoparticles into cells is critical for effective nanoparticle mediated drug delivery. To investigate the kinetics and mechanism of internalization of nanoparticles into cells we have developed a DNA molecular sensor, termed the Specific Hybridization Internalization Probe - SHIP. Self-assembling polymeric 'pHlexi' nanoparticles were functionalized with a Fluorescent Internalization Probe (FIP) and the interactions with two different cell lines (3T3 and CEM cells) were studied. The kinetics of internalization were quantified and chemical inhibitors that inhibited energy dependent endocytosis (sodium azide), dynamin dependent endocytosis (Dyngo-4a) and macropinocytosis (5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA)) were used to study the mechanism of internalization. Nanoparticle internalization kinetics were significantly faster in 3T3 cells than CEM cells. We have shown that ~90% of the nanoparticles associated with 3T3 cells were internalized, compared to only 20% of the nanoparticles associated with CEM cells. Nanoparticle uptake was via a dynamin-dependent pathway, and the nanoparticles were trafficked to lysosomal compartments once internalized. SHIP is able to distinguish between nanoparticles that are associated on the outer cell membrane from nanoparticles that are internalized. This study demonstrates the assay can be used to probe the kinetics of nanoparticle internalization and the mechanisms by which the nanoparticles are taken up by cells. This information is fundamental for engineering more effective nanoparticle delivery systems. The SHIP assay is a simple and a high-throughput technique that could have wide application in therapeutic delivery research.

  3. Adsorption of plutonium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Wilson, Richard E; Lee, Sang Soo; Soderholm, L; Fenter, P

    2012-02-07

    Adsorption of monodisperse cubic plutonium oxide nanoparticles ("Pu-NP", [Pu(38)O(56)Cl(x)(H(2)O)(y)]((40-x)+), with a fluorite-related lattice, approximately 1 nm in edge size) to the muscovite (001) basal plane from aqueous solutions was observed in situ (in 100 mM NaCl background electrolyte at pH 2.6). Uptake capacity of the surface quantified by α-spectrometry was 0.92 μg Pu/cm(2), corresponding to 10.8 Pu per unit cell area (A(UC)). This amount is significantly larger than that of Pu(4+) needed for satisfying the negative surface charge (0.25 Pu(4+) for 1 e(-)/A(UC)). The adsorbed Pu-NPs cover 17% of the surface area, determined by X-ray reflectivity (XR). This correlates to one Pu-NP for every 14 unit cells of muscovite, suggesting that each particle compensates the charge of the unit cells onto which it adsorbs as well as those in its direct proximity. Structural investigation by resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity distinguished two different sorption states of Pu-NPs on the surface at two different regimes of distance from the surface. A fraction of Pu is distributed within 11 Å from the surface. The distribution width matches the Pu-NP size, indicating that this species represents Pu-NPs adsorbed directly on the surface. Beyond the first layer, an additional fraction of sorbed Pu was observed to extend more broadly up to more than 100 Å from the surface. This distribution is interpreted as resulting from "stacking" or aggregation of the nanoparticles driven by sorption and accumulation of Pu-NPs at the interface although these Pu-NPs do not aggregate in the solution. These results are the first in situ observation of the interaction of nanoparticles with a charged mineral-water interface yielding information important to understanding the environmental transport of Pu and other nanophase inorganic species.

  4. Green nanoparticle production using micro reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueck, A; Thoeming, J; Steinfeldt, M; Gleich, A v; Prenzel, K; Swiderek, P

    2011-01-01

    The importance and potential of nanoparticles in daily life as well as in various industrial processes is becoming more predominant. Specifically, silver nanoparticles are increasingly applied, e.g. in clothes and wipes, due to their antibacterial properties. For applications in liquid phase it is advantageous to produce the nanoparticles directly in suspension. This article describes a green production of silver nanoparticles using micro reactor technology considering principles of green chemistry. The aim is to reveal the potential and constraints of this approach and to show, how economic and environmental costs vary depending on process conditions. For this purpose our research compares the proposed process with water-based batch synthesis and demonstrates improvements in terms of product quality. Because of the lower energy consumption and lower demand of cleaning agents, micro reactor is the best ecological choice.

  5. Preparation of silver nanoparticles at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mini, E-mail: mishramini5@gmail.com [Centre of Environmental Science, Department of Botany, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, U.P. (India); Chauhan, Pratima, E-mail: mangu167@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad U.P. (India)

    2016-04-13

    Silver from ancient time is used as antimicrobial agent in the bulk form but now with the advancement in nanotechnology silver in the form of nanoparticles shown potential effect against microbes which make us easy to fight with many diseases plants and animals. In this work silver nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical routes using sodium borohydride as reducing agent at low temperature. The particles were characterized through UV-Visible spectroscopy as well as X-Ray Diffraction. The UV-visible spectra of silver nanoparticles exhibited absorption at 425 cm; the crystallite size of the particles is between 19nm to 39nm. EDAX graph shows two peaks of silver and oxygen. Water absorbed by silver nanoparticles was removed by the calcinations.

  6. and Au nanoparticles for SERS applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazio Enza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological and optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser generated plasmas in water were investigated. First, the ablation efficiency was maximized searching the optimal focusing conditions. The nanoparticle size, measured by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy, strongly depends on the laser fluence, keeping fixed the other deposition parameters such as the target to scanner objective distance and laser repetition frequency. STEM images indicate narrow gradients of NP sizes. Hence the optimization of ablation parameters favours a fine tuning of nanoparticles. UV-Visible spectroscopy helped to determine the appropriate laser wavelength to resonantly excite the localized surface plasmon to carry out Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS measurements. The SERS activity of Ag and Au substrates, obtained spraying the colloids synthesized in water, was tested using crystal violet as a probe molecule. The good SERS performance, observed at excitation wavelength 785 nm, is attributed to aggregation phenomena of nanoparticles sprayed on the support.

  7. Tailoring magnetic nanoparticle for transformers application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, P C; Silva, A S; Leite, E S; Garg, V K; Oliveira, A C; Viali, W R; Sartoratto, P P C

    2010-02-01

    In this study photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of dilution of an oil-based magnetic fluid sample on the magnetic nanoparticle surface-coating. Changes of the photoacoustic signal intensity on the band-L region (640 to 830 nm) upon dilution of the stock magnetic fluid sample were discussed in terms of molecular surface desorption. The model proposed here assumes that the driving force taking the molecules out from the nanoparticle surface into the bulk solvent is the gradient of osmotic pressure. This gradient of osmotic pressure is established between the nanoparticle surface and the bulk suspension. It is further assumed that the photoacoustic signal intensity (area under the photoacoustic spectra) scales linearly with the number of coating molecules (surface grafting) at the nanoparticle surface. This model picture provides a non-linear analytical description for the reduction of the surface grafting coefficient upon dilution, which was successfully-used to curve-fit the photoacoustic experimental data.

  8. BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marvin Lou; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

  9. Plasmon Assisted Heating of Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmaker, Adam; Boyd, David; Kumar, Rajay; Goodwin, David; Cronin, Stephen

    2007-03-01

    Optical heating of Au nanoparticles by light at the plasmonically resonant frequency is studied. Block copolymer lithography is used to create highly uniform monodisperse arrays of Au nanoparticles. Extremely high temperatures and electric fields are produced locally with relatively low intensities of laser light. The heating is quantified using three approaches: melting of glass, dissociation of carbon monoxide, and Stokes/anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Temperatures in excess of 375^oC are observed in the nanoparticles for incident light intensities of less than 7x10^3 W/cm^2. Anti-Stokes:Stokes Raman spectra of PbO deposited by plasmon assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) [1] on top of the nanoparticles show a heating factor 1570 times larger than a bulk reference sample. We show that temperature rises of this magnitude are consistent with our model of reduced heating at the nanoscale. [1] D. A. Boyd et al, Nano Lett., 6, 2592 (2006).

  10. Biological synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biological synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles using. Eclipta alba leaf extract and evaluation of its cytotoxic and antimicrobial potential. PARAMASIVAM PREMASUDHA1, MUDILI VENKATARAMANA2,∗, MARRIAPPAN ABIRAMI3,. PERIYASAMY VANATHI4, KADIRVELU KRISHNA2 and RAMASAMY ...

  11. Adsorption of amphipathic dendrons on polystyrene nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, T; Florence, A T

    2003-03-18

    Adsorption of dendrons onto nanoparticles may provide new model structures which may be useful in drug and gene delivery. Tritiated amphipathic dendrons having three lipidic (C(14)) chains coupled to branched (dendritic) lysine head groups with 8, 16 or 32 free terminal amino groups have been synthesised by solid phase peptide techniques. The interaction between these tritiated dendrons and 200 nm polystyrene latex nanoparticles was investigated in phosphate buffered saline. The amount of dendron adsorbed increased with increasing concentration of dendrons and then decreased. Maximum adsorption of dendrons per gram of nanoparticles was found to be between 8.2 and 84 x 10(-6)M, the amounts adsorbed being inversely proportional to the number of amino groups present in the molecule. The number of dendron molecules adsorbed per nanoparticle was found to be between 430 and 4421. The degree of adsorption was found to be slightly altered by the temperature. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Functionalization of biosynthesized gold nanoparticle from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biosynthesized nanoparticles and formulated nanodrug were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, Zetasizer, Scanning and transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM; TEM), Energy Dispersive spectrophotometry (EDAX) and Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy. Polyethylene glycol and Lincomycin were ...

  13. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles | Silambarasan | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    friendly and exciting approach. Several microorganisms have been known to produce silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), when silver molecules are exposed either intracellularly or extracellularly. Intracellular synthesis may accomplish a better ...

  14. UV curing of nanoparticle reinforced acrylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Flyunt, R.; Czihal, K.; Ernst, H.; Naumov, S.; Buchmeiser, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    To improve the surface hardness of radiation cured acrylate coatings, both silica nanoparticles and alumina particles with a few microns in size have been embedded into acrylate formulations. Regular mixing of nanoparticles into acrylate formulations, however, leads to highly viscous solutions inappropriate for coating procedures. The incompatibility of inorganic fillers and organic polymers can be avoided by surface modification of nanoparticles using trialkoxysilanes, which provide an interface between the two dissimilar materials. Nanoparticles modified by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MEMO) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMO), both having polymerisation-active groups, may be crosslinked with the acrylate resin. UV curing of the nanocomposites revealed an unexpected lower reactivity of the vinyl groups of VTMO modified silica compared to MEMO grafted on silica. For VTMO modification, DFT calculations showed a decrease of Mulliken atomic charge for the olefinic carbons pointing to a lower reactivity. For UV cured nano/microhybrid composites, a significant improvement of abrasion resistance was obtained.

  15. UV curing of nanoparticle reinforced acrylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, F. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany)], E-mail: frank.bauer@iom-leipzig.de; Flyunt, R.; Czihal, K. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany); Ernst, H. [University of Leipzig, Department of Experimental Physics I, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); Naumov, S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany); Buchmeiser, M.R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany); University of Leipzig, Institute of Technical Chemistry, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    To improve the surface hardness of radiation cured acrylate coatings, both silica nanoparticles and alumina particles with a few microns in size have been embedded into acrylate formulations. Regular mixing of nanoparticles into acrylate formulations, however, leads to highly viscous solutions inappropriate for coating procedures. The incompatibility of inorganic fillers and organic polymers can be avoided by surface modification of nanoparticles using trialkoxysilanes, which provide an interface between the two dissimilar materials. Nanoparticles modified by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MEMO) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMO), both having polymerisation-active groups, may be crosslinked with the acrylate resin. UV curing of the nanocomposites revealed an unexpected lower reactivity of the vinyl groups of VTMO modified silica compared to MEMO grafted on silica. For VTMO modification, DFT calculations showed a decrease of Mulliken atomic charge for the olefinic carbons pointing to a lower reactivity. For UV cured nano/microhybrid composites, a significant improvement of abrasion resistance was obtained.

  16. Nanoparticle movement: plasmonic forces and physical constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, P E; Reyes-Coronado, A; Barrera, R G; Rivacoba, A; Echenique, P M; Aizpurua, J

    2012-12-01

    Nanoparticle structures observed in aberration-corrected electron microscopes exhibit many types of behavior, some of which are dominated by intrinsic conditions, unrelated to the microscope environment. Some behaviors are clearly driven by the electron beam, however, and the question arises as to whether these are similar to intrinsic mechanisms, useful for understanding nanoscale behavior, or whether they should be regarded as unwanted modification of as-built specimens. We have studied a particular kind of beam-specimen interaction - plasmon dielectric forces caused by the electric fields imposed by a passing swift electron - identifying four types of forced motion, including both attractive and repulsive forces on single nanoparticles, and coalescent and non-coalescent forces in groups of two or more nanoparticles. We suggest that these forces might be useful for deliberate electron beam guided movement of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Degradation of magnetite nanoparticles in biomimetic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceño, Sarah; Hernandez, Ana C.; Sojo, Juan [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Lascano, Luis [Dpto. Física, Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Ecuador); Gonzalez, Gema, E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.gob.ve, E-mail: gema.gonzalez@epn.edu.ec [Escuela Nacional Politécnica (Ecuador)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} obtained by coprecipitation (COP), thermal decomposition (DT), and commercial sample (CM) have been degraded in similar conditions to physiological medium at pH 4.7 and in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.4. The formation of the nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In view of medical and environmental applications, the stability of the particles was measured with dynamic light scattering. The degradation processes were followed with atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA) and TEM. Magnetic measurements were carried out using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Our results revealed that the structural and magnetic properties of the remaining nanoparticles after the degradation process were significantly different to those of the initial suspension. The degradation kinetics is affected by the pH, the coating, and the average particle size of the nanoparticles.

  18. Bioavailability of magnetic nanoparticles to the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.-R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, P.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang-Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jung, S.-M. [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Y.-H. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tony [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-P. [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Wei, K.-C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuochenwei@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2009-05-15

    This study investigates the bioavailability of carboxymethyl dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMD-MNP) to the brain. The cytotoxicity of CMD-MNP was assessed by co-culture with C6, a rat glioma cell line. To investigate the effects of an external magnetic field on the biodistribution of nanoparticles in a rat model, a magnet of 0.3 Tesla was applied externally over the cranium and the particles injected via the external jugular vein. Nanoparticles were also injected into rats implanted with C6 tumor cells. Staining of histological samples with Prussian blue to detect iron particles revealed that the external magnetic field enhanced the aggregation of nanoparticles in the rat brain; this enhancement was even more pronounced in the tumor region.

  19. Ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to freshwater organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch

    A large variety of societal benefits are expected from the development and use of engineered nanoparticles. At present, the majority of ‘nano-products’ put on the market can be classified as consumer products, whereas future applications are expected to have more widespread and societal benefits...... in relation to appropriate test methods for identifying potential adverse effects of nanoparticles; this is of great relevance from both a scientific and regulatory point of view. An important aspect of this project was the acquisition of experience in testing nanoparticles in aqueous test systems – both...... with freshwater filter feeder Daphnia magna, sediment feeder Lumbriculus variegatus and green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The results made it possible to identify major scientific and methodological challenges in the testing of nanoparticles compared to ‘conventional’ chemicals. It has been highlighted...

  20. Ultrasensitive, Ultradense Nanoelectronic Biosensing with Nanoparticle Probes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirkin, Chad A; Ratner, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A robust and effective model for determining the presence or absence of an analyte in a DPN-assembled gold nanoparticle/DNA conjugate structure in the limit of single molecule binding was developed...

  1. Degradation of magnetite nanoparticles in biomimetic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Sarah; Hernandez, Ana C.; Sojo, Juan; Lascano, Luis; Gonzalez, Gema

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of magnetite Fe3O4 obtained by coprecipitation (COP), thermal decomposition (DT), and commercial sample (CM) have been degraded in similar conditions to physiological medium at pH 4.7 and in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.4. The formation of the nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In view of medical and environmental applications, the stability of the particles was measured with dynamic light scattering. The degradation processes were followed with atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA) and TEM. Magnetic measurements were carried out using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Our results revealed that the structural and magnetic properties of the remaining nanoparticles after the degradation process were significantly different to those of the initial suspension. The degradation kinetics is affected by the pH, the coating, and the average particle size of the nanoparticles.

  2. Sustainable green catalysis by supported metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Atsushi; Dhepe, Paresh L

    2009-01-01

    The recent progress of sustainable green catalysis by supported metal nanoparticles is described. The template synthesis of metal nanoparticles in ordered porous materials is studied for the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts capable of high activity and selectivity. The application of these materials in green catalytic processes results in a unique activity and selectivity arising from the concerted effect of metal nanoparticles and supports. The high catalytic performances of Pt nanoparticles in mesoporous silica is reported. Supported metal catalysts have also been applied to biomass conversion by heterogeneous catalysis. Additionally, the degradation of cellulose by supported metal catalysts, in which bifunctional catalysis of acid and metal plays the key role for the hydrolysis and reduction of cellulose, is also reported. Copyright 2009 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Harvesting silica nanoparticles from rice husks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weixing; Martin, Jarett C.; Zhang Ning; Ma Chao; Han Aijie; Sun Luyi

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic silica nanoparticles were synthesized using rice husks (RHs) as the raw material via controlled pyrolysis. The characterization results showed that the morphology of the synthesized silica was highly related to the pretreatment of RHs and the pyrolysis conditions. Particularly, potassium cations in RHs were found to catalyze the melting of silica, during which the amorphous silica were converted to crystalline phase. Two hours of pyrolysis at 700 °C appeared to be ideal to synthesize silica nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 20–30 nm. Higher temperature and longer duration of pyrolysis led to undesired melting of silica nanoparticles, while too low a temperature cannot effectively remove carbonous residues. Such amorphous silica nanoparticles with narrow size distribution and high purity are expected to replace silica gel and fumed silica for various applications.

  4. Preparation of copper nanoparticles by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yajian; Guo Xiongbin; Li Zhaolong; Fu Junjie; Tan Yuanyuan; Zhou Xinyao; Xu Furong

    2013-01-01

    Copper nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by 60 Co-γ radiation with aqueous solution of cupric sulfate under inert nitrogen-purged conditions. Cu nanoparticles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser particle size distribution analyzer (LSPSDA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) techniques, respectively. The effects of solution system, pH, additive of surfactant and absorbed doses on the particle size and its distribution as well as stored stability of Cu naoparticles were investigated. High resolution TEM pictures showed the formation of homogeneous cubic-structured copper nanoparticles with different sizes depends on the synthetic conditions. This new kind of synthesis method shows the excellent stability, which may provide an efficient way to improve the fine tuning of the structure and size of copper nanoparticles. (authors)

  5. Characterization of nanoparticles as candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Ferreira, E.H.; Robertis, E. de; Landi, S.M.; Gouvea, C.P.; Archanjo, B.S.; Almeida, C.A.; Araujo, J.R. de; Kuznetsov, O.; Achete, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the characterization of three different nanoparticles (silica, silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) as candidate reference material. We focus our analysis on the size distribution of those particles as measured by different microscopy techniques. (author)

  6. Opportunities from the nanoworld : Gas phase nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Koch, S. A.; Vystavel, T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present studies related to coalescence and oxidation of transition metal nanoparticles with sizes ranging between 2 and 10 nm. For cobalt and iron exposure to air leads to thin oxide shell formation (thickness

  7. Magnetic behaviour of interacting antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovich, V; Jung, G; Gorodetsky, G; Puzniak, R; Wisniewski, A; Skourski, Y; Mogilyanski, D

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic properties of interacting La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 nanoparticles have been investigated. The field-induced transition from antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) state in the La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 bulk has been observed at exceptionally high magnetic fields. For large particles, the field-induced transition widens while magnetization progressively decreases. In small particles the transition is almost fully suppressed. The thermoremanence and isothermoremanence curves constitute fingerprints of irreversible magnetization originating from nanoparticle shells. We have ascribed the magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles to a core-shell scenario with two main magnetic contributions; one attributed to the formation of a collective state formed by FM clusters in frustrated coordination at the surfaces of interacting AFM nanoparticles and the other associated with inner core behaviour as a two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnet. (paper)

  8. Degradation of magnetite nanoparticles in biomimetic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briceño, Sarah; Hernandez, Ana C.; Sojo, Juan; Lascano, Luis; Gonzalez, Gema

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of magnetite Fe 3 O 4 obtained by coprecipitation (COP), thermal decomposition (DT), and commercial sample (CM) have been degraded in similar conditions to physiological medium at pH 4.7 and in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.4. The formation of the nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In view of medical and environmental applications, the stability of the particles was measured with dynamic light scattering. The degradation processes were followed with atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA) and TEM. Magnetic measurements were carried out using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Our results revealed that the structural and magnetic properties of the remaining nanoparticles after the degradation process were significantly different to those of the initial suspension. The degradation kinetics is affected by the pH, the coating, and the average particle size of the nanoparticles.

  9. Environmentally friendly preparation of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book chapter summarizes the “state of the art” in the exploitation of various environmentally-friendly synthesis approaches, reaction precursors and conditions to manufacture metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for a vast variety of purposes.

  10. Engineering tailored nanoparticles with microbes: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ram; Pandey, Rishikesh; Barman, Ishan

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for less toxic and cleaner methods of nanomaterials production, recent developments in the biosynthesis of nanoparticles have underscored the important role of microorganisms. Their intrinsic ability to withstand variable extremes of temperature, pressure, and pH coupled with the minimal downstream processing requirements provide an attractive route for diverse applications. Yet, controlling the dispersity and facile tuning of the morphology of the nanoparticles of desired chemical compositions remains an ongoing challenge. In this Focus Review, we critically review the advances in nanoparticle synthesis using microbes, ranging from bacteria and fungi to viruses, and discuss new insights into the cellular mechanisms of such formation that may, in the near future, allow complete control over particle morphology and functionalization. In addition to serving as paradigms for cost-effective, biocompatible, and eco-friendly synthesis, microbes hold the promise for a unique template for synthesis of tailored nanoparticles targeted at therapeutic and diagnostic platform technologies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phytosynthesized iron nanoparticles: effects on fermentative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Iron nanoparticles; green synthesis; Syzygium cumini; dark fermentation; biohydrogen production; Enterobacter cloacae. ... Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur 784 028, Assam, India; Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur 784 028, ...

  12. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  13. Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles of Antiferromagnetic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bødker, Franz

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles have been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy and neutron scattering. Temperature series of Mossbauer spectra of non-interacting, superparamagnetic hematite nanoparticles were fitted by use of the Blume-Tjon relaxation model. It has been...... found that the magnetic anisotropy energy constant increases significantly with decreasing particle size. Neutron scattering experiments on similar samples give new information on both superparamagnetic relaxation and collective magnetic excitations. There is good agreement between the values...

  14. Synthesis and optical properties of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaiveer; Kaurav, Netram; Choudhary, K. K.; Okram, Gunadhor S.

    2015-07-01

    The preparation of stable, uniform silver nanoparticles by reduction of silver acetate by ethylene glycol (EG) is reported in the present paper. It is a simple process of recent interest for obtaining silver nanoparticles. The samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), which reveals an average particle size (D) of 38 nm. The UV/Vis spectra show that an absorption peak, occurring due to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), exists at 319 nm.

  15. Nanoparticle aggregation controlled by desalting kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Fresnais, J.; Lavelle, C.; Berret, J. -F.

    2010-01-01

    We report the formation of stable nanoparticle-polymer clusters obtained by electrostatic complexation. The nanoparticles placed under scrutiny are nanoceria (CeO2) coated by short poly(acrylic acid) moieties, whereas the polymers are cationic-neutral block copolymers. The cluster formation was monitored using different formulation pathways, including direct mixing, dialysis, dilution and quenching. In the first process, the hybrids were obtained by mixing stock solutions of polymers and nano...

  16. Pulmonary applications and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Card, Jeffrey W.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bonner, James C.; Nestmann, Earle R.

    2008-01-01

    Because of their unique physicochemical properties, engineered nanoparticles have the potential to significantly impact respiratory research and medicine by means of improving imaging capability and drug delivery, among other applications. These same properties, however, present potential safety concerns, and there is accumulating evidence to suggest that nanoparticles may exert adverse effects on pulmonary structure and function. The respiratory system is susceptible to injury resulting from...

  17. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of $\\simeq 4.5\\,$\\AA, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar envi...

  18. Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brown, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Coopersmith, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fulmer, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Sessions, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Ali, M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticles (NP) provides a useful advantage for many energy transfer applications. This study aims to gain an understanding of the key parameters responsible for maximizing the energy transfer leading to nanoparticle heating through the use of simulations and experimental results. It was found that magnetic field strength, NP concentration, NP composition, and coil size can be controlled to generate accurate temperature profiles in NP aqueous solutions.

  19. Shape-Controlled Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Shankar, S. S.; Bhargava, S.; Sastry, M. Synthesis of Gold Nanospheres and Nanotriangles by the Turkevich Approach. Journal of Nanoscience and...Accounts of Chemical Research 2008, 41, 1587–1595. 22. Sun, Y.; Xia, Y. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Gold And Silver Nanoparticles. Science...N.; Griep, M. H.; and Karna, S. P. Chemical vs. Sonochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Silver , Gold, and Hybrid Nanoparticles; ARL-TR-5764

  20. Potential of metal nanoparticles in organic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranu, B. C.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Saha, A.; Adak, L.; Jana, R.; Bhadra, S.; Dey, R.; Saha, D.

    2008-03-01

    Palladium(0) nanoparticle has been used as efficient catalyst for (a) the stereoselective synthesis of (E)- and (Z)-2-alkene-4-ynoates and —nitriles by a simple reaction of vic-diiodo-(E)-alkenes with acrylic esters and nitriles and (b) for the allylation of active methylene compounds by allylacetate and its derivatives. Copper(0) nanoparticle catalyzes aryl-sulfur bond formation very efficiently. All these reactions are ligand-free.

  1. BIOSYNTHESIS OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES AND CHARACTERIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    K.C. Mounika1, Katta. Manogna2

    2017-01-01

    In current science, nanotechnology has been thriving at a tremendous rate in all aspect of Science and Technology. It deals with between 1 to100 nm sizes of nanoparticles in at least one dimension and involves in developing different devices. Currently, nanobiotechnology is a commercial alternate process for chemical and physical methods for synthesis of various nanoparticles with specific functions. It is new branch of nanotechnology and combines the biological principles with physical and c...

  2. Air stable organic-inorganic nanoparticles hybrid solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lei; Yang, Jihua; Xue, Jiangeng; Holloway, Paul H.

    2015-09-29

    A solar cell includes a low work function cathode, an active layer of an organic-inorganic nanoparticle composite, a ZnO nanoparticle layer situated between and physically contacting the cathode and active layers; and a transparent high work function anode that is a bilayer electrode. The inclusion of the ZnO nanoparticle layer results in a solar cell displaying a conversion efficiency increase and reduces the device degradation rate. Embodiments of the invention are directed to novel ZnO nanoparticles that are advantageous for use as the ZnO nanoparticle layers of the novel solar cells and a method to prepare the ZnO nanoparticles.

  3. Structure, entanglements and dynamics of polymer nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karatrantos, A; Clarke, N; Composto, R J; Winey, K I

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of nanoparticles on polymer structure, nanoparticle dynamics and topological constraints (entanglements) in polymer melts for nanoparticle loading above percolation threshold as high as 40.9% using stochastic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. An increase in the number of entanglements (decrease of N e with 40.9% volume fraction of nanoparticles dispersed in the polymer matrix) in the nanocomposites is observed as evidenced by larger contour lengths of the primitive paths. Attraction between polymers and nanoparticles affects the entanglements in the nanocomposites and alters the primitive path. The diffusivity of small sized nanoparticles deviates significantly from the Stokes- Einstein relation

  4. Targeting Endothelial Cells with Multifunctional GaN/Fe Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braniste, Tudor; Tiginyanu, Ion; Horvath, Tibor; Raevschi, Simion; Andrée, Birgit; Cebotari, Serghei; Boyle, Erin C; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2017-08-10

    In this paper, we report on the interaction of multifunctional nanoparticles with living endothelial cells. The nanoparticles were synthesized using direct growth of gallium nitride on zinc oxide nanoparticles alloyed with iron oxide followed by core decomposition in hydrogen flow at high temperature. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that porcine aortic endothelial cells take up GaN-based nanoparticles suspended in the growth medium. The nanoparticles are deposited in vesicles and the endothelial cells show no sign of cellular damage. Intracellular inert nanoparticles are used as guiding elements for controlled transportation or designed spatial distribution of cells in external magnetic fields.

  5. Targeting Endothelial Cells with Multifunctional GaN/Fe Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braniste, Tudor; Tiginyanu, Ion; Horvath, Tibor; Raevschi, Simion; Andrée, Birgit; Cebotari, Serghei; Boyle, Erin C.; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the interaction of multifunctional nanoparticles with living endothelial cells. The nanoparticles were synthesized using direct growth of gallium nitride on zinc oxide nanoparticles alloyed with iron oxide followed by core decomposition in hydrogen flow at high temperature. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that porcine aortic endothelial cells take up GaN-based nanoparticles suspended in the growth medium. The nanoparticles are deposited in vesicles and the endothelial cells show no sign of cellular damage. Intracellular inert nanoparticles are used as guiding elements for controlled transportation or designed spatial distribution of cells in external magnetic fields.

  6. Method of tracing engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present application discloses a population of non-aggregated polymer-coated nanoparticles having a mean particle size (diameter) in the range of 1-100 nm, said population comprising (i) a first subpopulation of (re)active particles coated with a first polymer, and (ii) a second subpopulation...... of non-(re)active tracer particles coated with a second polymer, wherein the weight ratio between said first subpopulation and said second subpopulation is from between 85:15 to 99.99:0.01, as well as a composition comprising such a population. The population of particles is particularly useful...... for tracking of particles in methods for remediation, including in-situ remediation, of contaminated ground water and for water treatment....

  7. Engineered Nanoparticle (Eco)Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa

    for the purpose of testing engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in aquatic system are a central theme in this thesis. The research presented herein has included acute tests with freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna, genotoxicity tests with bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, as well as acellular and in vitro assays...... identification, which is an integrated part of risk assessment. The complex nature and behavior of nanomaterials in the different environmental compartments and test systems has made it difficult for the scientific community to conduct robust and reproducible tests, and consequently, for regulatory bodies...... toxicity. The information presented in this thesis may help the scientific community and regulators better understand test design and outcomes of nano-(eco)toxicological studies, which in turn may lead to a stronger scientific basis for regulation of nanomaterials....

  8. Nanoparticles Modified ITO Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z. H.

    2017-04-01

    Incorporation of nanomaterials with controlled molecular architecture shows great promise in improving electronic communication between biomolecules and the electrode substrate. In electrochemical applications metal nanoparticles (NPs) modified electrodes have been widely used and are emerging as candidates to develop highly sensitive electrochemical sensors. There has been a growing technological interest in modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes due to their prominent optoelectronic properties and their wide use as a transducing platform. The introduction of NPs into the transducing platform is commonly achieved by their adsorption onto conventional electrode surfaces in various forms, including that of a composite. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metallic NPs for surface fabrication of ITO thin films leading to detection of specific biomolecules and applications as a biosensor platform.

  9. Nanoparticles for magnetic biosensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V., E-mail: galina@we.lc.ehu.es [Universidad del País Vasco BCMaterials UPV-EHU, Leioa, 48940 Spain (Spain); Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Novoselova, Iu.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Schupletsova, V.V. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Andrade, R. [SGIker, ServiciosGenerales de Investigación, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Bilbao, 48080 Spain (Spain); Dunec, N.A.; Litvinova, L.S. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Safronov, A.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Division, RAS, Ekaterinburg, 620016 (Russian Federation); Yurova, K.A. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Kulesh, N.A. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A.N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Khlusov, I.A. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    The further development of magnetic biosensors requires a better understanding of the interaction between living systems and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We describe our experience of fabrication of stable ferrofluids (FF) using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. Their morphofunctional responses in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Stable ferrofluids (FF) were obtained using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. • Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. • Cells morphofunctional response in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. • The results can be used for magnetic biosensoring, as well as for an addressed design of cell delivery systems.

  10. Nanoparticles, nanotechnology and pulmonary nanotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently emergent field of Nanotechnology involves the production and use of structures at the nanoscale. Research at atomic, molecular or macromolecular levels, has led to new materials, systems and structures on a scale consisting of particles less than 100 nm and showing unique and unusual physical, chemical and biological properties, which has enabled new applications in diverse fields, creating a multimillion-dollar high-tech industry. Nanotechnologies have a wide variety of uses from nanomedicine, consumer goods, electronics, communications and computing to environmental applications, efficient energy sources, agriculture, water purification, textiles, and aerospace industry, among many others.The different characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, chemical properties, solubility and degree of agglomeration will determine their effects on biological systems and human health, and the likelihood of respiratory hazards. There are a number of new studies about the potential occupational and environmental effects of nanoparticles and general precautionary measures are now fully justified.Adverse respiratory effects include multifocal granulomas, peribronchial inflammation, progressive interstitial fibrosis, chronic inflammatory responses, collagen deposition and oxidative stress.The authors present an overview of the most important studies about respiratory nanotoxicology and the effects of nanoparticles and engineered nanomaterials on the respiratory system. Resumo: O campo recentemente emergente da nanotecnologia envolve a produção e o uso de estruturas em nanoescala. A pesquisa a níveis atómicos, moleculares e macro moleculares conduziu a novos materiais, sistemas e estruturas numa escala constituída por partículas menores que 100 nm, apresentando propriedades físicas, químicas e biológicas únicas e incomuns, o que tem permitido novas aplicações em diversos campos, criando uma indústria de alta

  11. Tumor Molecular Imaging with Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI can provide not only structural images using traditional imaging techniques but also functional and molecular information using many newly emerging imaging techniques. Over the past decade, the utilization of nanotechnology in MI has exhibited many significant advantages and provided new opportunities for the imaging of living subjects. It is expected that multimodality nanoparticles (NPs can lead to precise assessment of tumor biology and the tumor microenvironment. This review addresses topics related to engineered NPs and summarizes the recent applications of these nanoconstructs in cancer optical imaging, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radionuclide imaging. Key challenges involved in the translation of NPs to the clinic are discussed.

  12. Risk assessment of silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipelin, V A; Gmoshinski, I V; Khotimchenko, S A

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of metallic silver (Ag) are among the most widely used products of nanotechnology. Nanosized colloidal silver (NCS) is presented in many kinds of production as solutions of particles with diameter less than 100 nm. NCS is used in a variety of fields, including food supplements, medicines, cosmetics, packaging materials, disinfectants, water filters, and many others. Problems of toxicity and related safety of NCS for humans and environmental systems are recently overestimated basing on data of numerous toxicological studies in vitro and in vivo. The article discusses the results of current studies in recent years and the data of author's own experiments on studying the safety of NCS, that allows to move on to risk assessment of this nanomaterial presented in consumer products and environmental samples. (paper)

  13. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, Michael; Saar, Amir; Ermak, Oleg; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits. (paper)

  14. Metal enhanced fluorescence with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Shaina LaRissa Strating

    A novel hybrid nanocomposite of Au nanoparticle-modified silicon nanowire was developed for surface enhanced fluorescence applications. The designed nanocomposite contained a silicon nanowire, gold nanoparticles and a silica layer doped with dye molecules. The hybrid nanomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), fluorescence measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were uniformly adhered on the silicon nanowires and covered by a thin silica layer. The nanostructure exhibited strong capacity for surface enhanced fluorescence. Different enhancement factors were obtained by changing synthetic conditions. The second goal of the project was to determine if the shape of gold nanoparticles affects the extent of its fluorescence enhancement under constant external factors. Two shapes of gold nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by SEM, STEM, zeta potential and absorbance measurements. Then they were coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica and the fluorescence intensity was measured and compared to the pure fluorescent dye. Gold nanorods enhanced fluorescence more than gold nanostars and that the fluorescent dye Alexafluor 700 showed a greater fluorescence intensity change in the presence of nanoparticles than methylene blue.

  15. Phytosynthesis of nanoparticles: concept, controversy and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Azamal; Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting and powerful discipline of science; the altered properties of which have offered many new and profitable products and applications. Agriculture, food and medicine sector industries have been investing more in nanotechnology research. Plants or their extracts provide a biological synthesis route of several metallic nanoparticles which is more eco-friendly and allows a controlled synthesis with well-defined size and shape. The rapid drug delivery in the presence of a carrier is a recent development to treat patients with nanoparticles of certain metals. The engineered nanoparticles are more useful in increasing the crop production, although this issue is still in infancy. This is simply due to the unprecedented and unforeseen health hazard and environmental concern. The well-known metal ions such as zinc, iron and copper are essential constituents of several enzymes found in the human system even though the indiscriminate use of similar other metal nanoparticle in food and medicine without clinical trial is not advisable. This review is intended to describe the novel phytosynthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles with regard to their shape, size, structure and diverse application in almost all fields of medicine, agriculture and technology. We have also emphasized the concept and controversial mechanism of green synthesis of nanoparticles.

  16. Phytosynthesis of nanoparticles: concept, controversy and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Azamal; Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting and powerful discipline of science; the altered properties of which have offered many new and profitable products and applications. Agriculture, food and medicine sector industries have been investing more in nanotechnology research. Plants or their extracts provide a biological synthesis route of several metallic nanoparticles which is more eco-friendly and allows a controlled synthesis with well-defined size and shape. The rapid drug delivery in the presence of a carrier is a recent development to treat patients with nanoparticles of certain metals. The engineered nanoparticles are more useful in increasing the crop production, although this issue is still in infancy. This is simply due to the unprecedented and unforeseen health hazard and environmental concern. The well-known metal ions such as zinc, iron and copper are essential constituents of several enzymes found in the human system even though the indiscriminate use of similar other metal nanoparticle in food and medicine without clinical trial is not advisable. This review is intended to describe the novel phytosynthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles with regard to their shape, size, structure and diverse application in almost all fields of medicine, agriculture and technology. We have also emphasized the concept and controversial mechanism of green synthesis of nanoparticles.

  17. Fluoride loaded polymeric nanoparticles for dental delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Escudero, Carlos; Sediqi, Nadia; Smistad, Gro; Hiorth, Marianne

    2017-06-15

    The overall aim of the present paper was to develop fluoride loaded nanoparticles based on the biopolymers chitosan, pectin, and alginate, for use in dental delivery. First, the preparation of nanoparticles in the presence of sodium fluoride (NaF) as the active ingredient by ionic gelation was investigated followed by an evaluation of their drug entrapment and release properties. Chitosan formed stable, spherical, and monodisperse nanoparticles in the presence of NaF and tripolyphoshate as the crosslinker, whereas alginate and pectin were not able to form any definite nanostructures in similar conditions. The fluoride loading capacity was found to be 33-113ppm, and the entrapment efficiency 3.6-6.2% for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2-0.4% (w/w) NaF, respectively. A steady increase in the fluoride release was observed for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2% NaF both in pH5 and 7 until it reached a maximum at time point 4h and maintained at this level for at least 24h. Similar profiles were observed for formulations prepared in 0.4% NaF; however the fluoride was released at a higher level at pH5. The low concentration, but continuous delivery of fluoride from the chitosan nanoparticles, with possible expedited release in acidic environment, makes these formulations highly promising as dental delivery systems in the protection against caries development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles against osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Sifeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital (China); Jia Jingfu [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (China); Guo Xiaokui [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Institutes of Medical Sciences (China); Zhao Yaping [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (China); Liu Boyu [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Institutes of Medical Sciences (China); Chen Desheng; Guo Yongyuan; Zhang Xianlong, E-mail: zhangxianlong20101@163.com [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital (China)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used for tissue repair, magnetic resonance imaging, immunoassays and drug delivery. They are very promising in orthopaedic applications and several magnetic nanoparticles have been exploited for the treatment of orthopaedic disease. Here, we conducted an in vitro study to examine the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with human osteoblasts to evaluate the dose-related toxicity of the nanoparticles on osteoblasts. A transmission electron microscope was used to visualise the internalised magnetic nanoparticles in osteoblasts. The CCK-8 results revealed increased cell viability (107.5 % vitality compared with the control group) when co-cultured at a low concentration (20 {mu}g/mL) and decreased cell viability (59.5 % vitality in a concentration of 300 {mu}g/mL and 25.9 % in 500 {mu}g/mL) when co-cultured in high concentrations. The flow cytometric detection revealed similar results with 5.48 % of apoptosis in a concentration of 20 {mu}g/mL, 23.40 % of apoptosis in a concentration of 300 {mu}g/mL and 28.49 % in a concentration of 500 {mu}g/mL. The disrupted cytoskeleton of osteoblasts was also revealed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. We concluded that use of a low concentration of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles is important to avoid damage to osteoblasts.

  19. Toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles against osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Sifeng; Jia Jingfu; Guo Xiaokui; Zhao Yaping; Liu Boyu; Chen Desheng; Guo Yongyuan; Zhang Xianlong

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used for tissue repair, magnetic resonance imaging, immunoassays and drug delivery. They are very promising in orthopaedic applications and several magnetic nanoparticles have been exploited for the treatment of orthopaedic disease. Here, we conducted an in vitro study to examine the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with human osteoblasts to evaluate the dose-related toxicity of the nanoparticles on osteoblasts. A transmission electron microscope was used to visualise the internalised magnetic nanoparticles in osteoblasts. The CCK-8 results revealed increased cell viability (107.5 % vitality compared with the control group) when co-cultured at a low concentration (20 μg/mL) and decreased cell viability (59.5 % vitality in a concentration of 300 μg/mL and 25.9 % in 500 μg/mL) when co-cultured in high concentrations. The flow cytometric detection revealed similar results with 5.48 % of apoptosis in a concentration of 20 μg/mL, 23.40 % of apoptosis in a concentration of 300 μg/mL and 28.49 % in a concentration of 500 μg/mL. The disrupted cytoskeleton of osteoblasts was also revealed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. We concluded that use of a low concentration of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles is important to avoid damage to osteoblasts.

  20. [Nanoparticles as drug delivery systems in ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, M; Hurst, J; Strudel, L; Spitzer, M S; Schnichels, S

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticles are perfectly suited as drug delivery systems due to their size and the diversity of materials used. They are able to penetrate biological barriers, can directly deliver drugs to the target site and provide a sustained release profile. Having long been established in oncology, in the last decade research has started to take a closer look at the potential of nanoparticles for ocular drug delivery. Obstacles, such as poor delivery of drugs via eye drops and the side effects of invasive methods, such as placing implants as drug depots could be overcome. Among the most relevant investigated structures are polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers and cyclodextrins. Besides the composition of the nanoparticle itself, its efficacy and stability can be optimized through coatings; however, long-term stability, standardization of production and toxicity remain the major challenges. The preclinical and partly clinical results obtained so far will hopefully give impulse to the idea of applying nanoparticles for optimized ocular drug delivery in the near future.