WorldWideScience

Sample records for splash droplet evaporation

  1. Boundary-layer effects in droplet splashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2017-11-01

    A drop falling onto a solid substrate will disintegrate into smaller parts when its impact velocity exceeds the so called critical velocity for splashing. Under these circumstances, the very thin liquid sheet ejected tangentially to the solid after the drop touches the substrate, lifts off as a consequence of the aerodynamic forces exerted on it and finally breaks into smaller droplets, violently ejected radially outwards, provoking the splash. Here, the tangential deceleration experienced by the fluid entering the thin liquid sheet is investigated making use of boundary layer theory. The velocity component tangent to the solid, computed using potential flow theory provides the far field boundary condition as well as the pressure gradient for the boundary layer equations. The structure of the flow permits to find a self similar solution of the boundary layer equations. This solution is then used to calculate the boundary layer thickness at the root of the lamella as well as the shear stress at the wall. The splash model presented in, which is slightly modified to account for the results obtained from the boundary layer analysis, provides a very good agreement between the measurements and the predicted values of the critical velocity for the splash.

  2. Droplet Splashing by a Slingshot Mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2011-01-18

    When a drop impacts onto a liquid pool, it ejects a thin horizontal sheet of liquid, which emerges from the neck region connecting the two liquid masses. The leading section of this ejecta bends down to meet the pool liquid. When the sheet touches the pool, at an “elbow,” it ruptures and sends off microdroplets by a slingshot mechanism, driven by surface tension. High-speed imaging of the splashing droplets suggests the liquid sheet is of submicron thickness, as thin as 300 nm. Experiments in partial vacuum show that air resistance plays the primary role in bending the sheet. We identify a parameter regime where this slingshot occurs and also present a simple model for the sheet evolution, capable of reproducing the overall shape.

  3. Droplet Splashing by a Slingshot Mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Thoraval, M.-J.; Takehara, K.; Etoh, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    When a drop impacts onto a liquid pool, it ejects a thin horizontal sheet of liquid, which emerges from the neck region connecting the two liquid masses. The leading section of this ejecta bends down to meet the pool liquid. When the sheet touches the pool, at an “elbow,” it ruptures and sends off microdroplets by a slingshot mechanism, driven by surface tension. High-speed imaging of the splashing droplets suggests the liquid sheet is of submicron thickness, as thin as 300 nm. Experiments in partial vacuum show that air resistance plays the primary role in bending the sheet. We identify a parameter regime where this slingshot occurs and also present a simple model for the sheet evolution, capable of reproducing the overall shape.

  4. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  5. Splash Dynamics of Falling Surfactant-Laden Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nur; Buitrago, Lewis; Pereyra, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Splashing dynamics is a common issue in oil and gas separation technology. In this study, droplet impact of various surfactant concentrations onto solid and liquid surfaces is studied experimentally using a high-speed imaging analysis. Although this area has been widely studied in the past, there is still not a good understanding of the role of surfactant over droplet impact and characterization of resulting splash dynamics. The experiments are conducted using tap water laden with anionic surfactant. The effects of system parameters on a single droplet impingement such as surfactant concentration (no surfactant, below, at and above critical micelle concentration), parent drop diameter (2-5mm), impact velocity and type of impact surface (thin and deep pool) are investigated. Image analysis technique is shown to be an effective technique for identification of coalescence to splashing transition. In addition, daughter droplets size distributions are analyzed qualitatively in the events of splashing. As expected, it is observed that the formation of secondary droplets is affected by the surfactant concentration. A summary of findings will be discussed.

  6. Evaluation of Droplet Splashing Algorithm in LEWICE 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homenko, Hilary N.

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Branch at NASA Glenn Research has developed a computer program to simulate ice formation on the leading edge of an aircraft wing during flight through cold, moist air. As part of the branch's current research, members have developed software known as LEWICE. This program is capable of predicting the formation of ice under designated weather conditions. The success of LEWICE is an asset to airplane manufacturers, ice protection system manufacturers, and the airline industry. Simulations of ice formation conducted in the tunnel and in flight is costly and time consuming. However, the danger of in-flight icing continues to be a concern for both commercial and military pilots. The LEWICE software is a step towards inexpensive and time efficient prediction of ice collection. In the most recent version of the program, LEWICE contains an algorithm for droplet splashing. Droplet splashing is a natural occurrence that causes accumulation of ice on aircraft surfaces. At impingement water droplets lose a portion of their mass to splashing. With part of each droplet joining the airflow and failing to freeze, early versions of LEWICE without the splashing algorithm over-predicted the collection of ice on the leading edge. The objective of my project was to determine whether the revised version of LEWICE accurately reflected the ice collection data obtained from the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The experimental data from the IRT was collected by Mark Potapczuk in January, March and July of 2001 and April and December of 2002. Experimental data points were the result of ice tracings conducted shortly after testing in the tunnel. Run sheets, which included a record of velocity, temperature, liquid water content and droplet diameter, served as the input of the LEWICE computer program. Parameters identical to the tunnel conditions were used to run LEWICE 2.0 and LEWICE 3.0. The results from IRT and versions of LEWICE were compared graphically. After entering the raw

  7. Two mechanisms of droplet splashing on a solid substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Jian, Zhen; Josserand, Christophe; Popinet, Sté phane; Ray, Pascal; Zaleski, Sté phane

    2017-01-01

    related to the gas density. The two different splashing mechanisms initially suggested theoretically are observed numerically, depending on whether a jet is created before or after the impacting droplet wets the substrate. Finally, we provide a phase

  8. New models for droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-02-01

    A brief summary of new models for droplet heating and evaporation, developed mainly at the Sir Harry Ricardo Laboratory of the University of Brighton during 2011-2012, is presented. These are hydrodynamic models for mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking into account the effects of the moving boundary due to evaporation, hydrodynamic models of multi-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking and not taking into account the effects of the moving boundary, new kinetic models of mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, and a model for mono-component droplet evaporation, based on molecular dynamics simulation. The results, predicted by the new models are compared with experimental data and the prehctions of the previously developed models where possible. © 2013 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

  9. Evaporation of nanofluid droplet on heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chan Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experiment on the evaporation of nanofluid sessile droplet on a heated surface was conducted. A nanofluid of 0.5% volumetric concentration mixed with 80-nm-sized CuO powder and pure water were used for experiment. Droplet was applied to the heated surface, and images of the evaporation process were obtained. The recorded images were analyzed to find the volume, diameter, and contact angle of the droplet. In addition, the evaporative heat transfer coefficient was calculated from experimental result. The results of this study are summarized as follows: the base diameter of the droplet was maintained stably during the evaporation. The measured temperature of the droplet was increased rapidly for a very short time, then maintained constantly. The nanofluid droplet was evaporated faster than the pure water droplet under the experimental conditions of the same initial volume and temperature, and the average evaporative heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluid droplet was higher than that of pure water. We can consider the effects of the initial contact angle and thermal conductivity of nanofluid as the reason for this experimental result. However, the effect of surface roughness on the evaporative heat transfer of nanofluid droplet appeared unclear.

  10. New models for droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Gusev, Ivan G.; Xie, Jianfei; Shishkova, Irina N.; Cao, Bingyang; Snegirev, Alexander Yu.; Heikal, Morgan Raymond

    2013-01-01

    and evaporation, taking into account the effects of the moving boundary due to evaporation, hydrodynamic models of multi-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking and not taking into account the effects of the moving boundary, new kinetic models of mono

  11. Freezing of Water Droplet due to Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Isao; Fushinobu, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Yu

    In this study, the feasibility of cooling/freezing of phase change.. materials(PCMs) due to evaporation for cold storage systems was experimentally examined. A pure water was used as the test PCM, since the latent heat due to evaporation of water is about 7 times larger than that due to freezing. A water droplet, the diameter of which was 1-4 mm, was suspended in a test cell by a fine metal wire (O. D.= 100μm),and the cell was suddenly evacuated up to the pressure lower than the triple-point pressure of water, so as to enhance the evaporation from the water surface. Temperature of the droplet was measured by a thermocouple, and the cooling/freezing behavior and the temperature profile of the droplet surface were captured by using a video camera and an IR thermo-camera, respectively. The obtained results showed that the water droplet in the evacuated cell is effectively cooled by the evaporation of water itself, and is frozen within a few seconds through remarkable supercooling state. When the initial temperature of the droplet is slightly higher than the room temperature, boiling phenomena occur in the droplet simultaneously with the freezing due to evaporation. Under such conditions, it was shown that the degree of supercooling of the droplet is reduced by the bubbles generated in the droplet.

  12. Snap evaporation of droplets on smooth topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gary G; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Élfego; Le Lirzin, Youen; Nourry, Anthony; Orme, Bethany V; Pradas, Marc; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo

    2018-04-11

    Droplet evaporation on solid surfaces is important in many applications including printing, micro-patterning and cooling. While seemingly simple, the configuration of evaporating droplets on solids is difficult to predict and control. This is because evaporation typically proceeds as a "stick-slip" sequence-a combination of pinning and de-pinning events dominated by static friction or "pinning", caused by microscopic surface roughness. Here we show how smooth, pinning-free, solid surfaces of non-planar topography promote a different process called snap evaporation. During snap evaporation a droplet follows a reproducible sequence of configurations, consisting of a quasi-static phase-change controlled by mass diffusion interrupted by out-of-equilibrium snaps. Snaps are triggered by bifurcations of the equilibrium droplet shape mediated by the underlying non-planar solid. Because the evolution of droplets during snap evaporation is controlled by a smooth topography, and not by surface roughness, our ideas can inspire programmable surfaces that manage liquids in heat- and mass-transfer applications.

  13. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Vella, Dominic; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. This journal is

  14. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo

    2014-09-04

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. This journal is

  15. Diffusion and evaporation of a liquid droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, K. N.

    1980-06-01

    The process of evaporation and diffusion of a spherical liquid droplet in an atmosphere of noncondensable gas is studied theoretically. An equation for the shrinkage of the radius of the droplet is derived on the basis of continuity and momentum equations. Further, a conjugate problem consisting of the energy and mass balance for the gaseous environment is formulated. An approximation of thin thermal and diffusion boundary-layers is introduced to simplify the analysis. Results are presented for methanol-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen, and sodium-argon systems. It has been observed that the droplet of highly viscous fluid exhibits rapid contraction.

  16. Water droplet evaporation from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Kim, Wuseok; Lee, Sanghee; Baek, Seunghyeon; Yong, Kijung; Jeon, Sangmin

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation dynamics of water from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microresonator and an optical microscope. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers with different pore sizes were directly fabricated onto quartz crystal substrates and hydrophobized via chemical modification. The resulting AAO layers exhibited hydrophobic or superhydrophobic characteristics with strong adhesion to water due to the presence of sealed air pockets inside the nanopores. After placing a water droplet on the AAO membranes, variations in the resonance frequency and Q-factor were measured throughout the evaporation process, which were related to changes in mass and viscous damping, respectively. It was found that droplet evaporation from a sticky superhydrophobic surface followed a constant contact radius (CCR) mode in the early stage of evaporation and a combination of CCR and constant contact angle modes without a Cassie-Wenzel transition in the final stage. Furthermore, AAO membranes with larger pore sizes exhibited longer evaporation times, which were attributed to evaporative cooling at the droplet interface.

  17. Droplet bubbling evaporatively cools a blowfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Guilherme; Köberle, Roland; Von Zuben, Claudio J; Andrade, Denis V

    2018-04-19

    Terrestrial animals often use evaporative cooling to lower body temperature. Evaporation can occur from humid body surfaces or from fluids interfaced to the environment through a number of different mechanisms, such as sweating or panting. In Diptera, some flies move tidally a droplet of fluid out and then back in the buccopharyngeal cavity for a repeated number of cycles before eventually ingesting it. This is referred to as the bubbling behaviour. The droplet fluid consists of a mix of liquids from the ingested food, enzymes from the salivary glands, and antimicrobials, associated to the crop organ system, with evidence pointing to a role in liquid meal dehydration. Herein, we demonstrate that the bubbling behaviour also serves as an effective thermoregulatory mechanism to lower body temperature by means of evaporative cooling. In the blowfly, Chrysomya megacephala, infrared imaging revealed that as the droplet is extruded, evaporation lowers the fluid´s temperature, which, upon its re-ingestion, lowers the blowfly's body temperature. This effect is most prominent at the cephalic region, less in the thorax, and then in the abdomen. Bubbling frequency increases with ambient temperature, while its cooling efficiency decreases at high air humidities. Heat transfer calculations show that droplet cooling depends on a special heat-exchange dynamic, which result in the exponential activation of the cooling effect.

  18. Two mechanisms of droplet splashing on a solid substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Jian, Zhen

    2017-11-29

    We investigate droplet impact on a solid substrate in order to understand the influence of the gas in the splashing dynamics. We use numerical simulations where both the liquid and the gas phases are considered incompressible in order to focus on the gas inertial and viscous contributions. We first confirm that the dominant gas effect on the dynamics is due to its viscosity through the cushioning of the gas layer beneath the droplet. We then describe an additional inertial effect that is directly related to the gas density. The two different splashing mechanisms initially suggested theoretically are observed numerically, depending on whether a jet is created before or after the impacting droplet wets the substrate. Finally, we provide a phase diagram of the drop impact outputs as the gas viscosity and density vary, emphasizing the dominant effect of the gas viscosity with a small correction due to the gas density. Our results also suggest that gas inertia influences the splashing formation through a Kelvin–Helmholtz-like instability of the surface of the impacting droplet, in agreement with former theoretical works.

  19. Contact lines are unstable even under non-splashing droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Min; Kaneelil, Paul; Sun, Ying

    2017-11-01

    Drop impact is fundamental to natural and industrial processes such as rain-induced soil erosion and spray coating technologies. In this study, we elucidate the interfacial instabilities formed by air entrainment at the wetting front of impacting droplets on atomically smooth, viscous silicone oil films of constant thickness with varying droplet velocity, viscosity, surface tension, and ambient pressures. A high-speed total internal reflection microscopy technique accounting for the Fresnel relations at the droplet interface allowed for in-situ measurements of an entrained air rim at the wetting front. The growth of the air rim is a prerequisite to the instability which is formed when the gas pressure balances the capillary pressure near the wetting front. A critical capillary number, which inversely scales as the ambient pressure, is predicted and the result agrees well with the experiments. The wavenumber in the instability is shown to increase with viscosity and velocity but decrease with surface tension of the impacting drop. We thus conclude that the instability mechanism is in qualitative agreement with the Saffman-Taylor instability - where the low viscosity air is displacing the higher viscosity droplet. The low We contact line instabilities observed in this study provide a paradigm shift in the conventional understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities under drop impact which usually require We >>10.

  20. Modeling Evaporation and Particle Assembly in Colloidal Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2017-06-13

    Evaporation-induced assembly of nanoparticles in a drying droplet is of great importance in many engineering applications, including printing, coating, and thin film processing. The investigation of particle dynamics in evaporating droplets can provide fundamental hydrodynamic insight for revealing the processing-structure relationship in the particle self-organization induced by solvent evaporation. We develop a free-energy-based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method coupled with Brownian dynamics to simulate evaporating colloidal droplets on solid substrates with specified wetting properties. The influence of interface-bound nanoparticles on the surface tension and evaporation of a flat liquid-vapor interface is first quantified. The results indicate that the particles at the interface reduce surface tension and enhance evaporation flux. For evaporating particle-covered droplets on substrates with different wetting properties, we characterize the increase of evaporate rate via measuring droplet volume. We find that droplet evaporation is determined by the number density and circumferential distribution of interfacial particles. We further correlate particle dynamics and assembly to the evaporation-induced convection in the bulk and on the surface of droplet. Finally, we observe distinct final deposits from evaporating colloidal droplets with bulk-dispersed and interface-bound particles. In addition, the deposit pattern is also influenced by the equilibrium contact angle of droplet.

  1. Evaporation of impact water droplets in interception processes: Historical precedence of the hypothesis and a brief literature overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerley, David L.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryIntra-storm evaporation depths exceed post-storm evaporation depths in the interception of rainfall on plant canopies. An important fraction of the intra-storm evaporation may involve the small impact (or splash) droplets produced when raindrops, and perhaps gravity drops (drips released from plant parts), collide with wet plant surfaces. This idea has been presented as a new conception by Murakami [Murakami, S., 2006. A proposal for a new forest canopy interception mechanism: splash droplet evaporation. Journal of Hydrology 319, 72-82; Murakami, S., 2007a. Application of three canopy interception models to a young stand of Japanese cypress and interpretation in terms of interception mechanism. Journal of Hydrology 342, 305-319; Murakami, S., 2007b. A follow-up for the splash droplet evaporation hypothesis of canopy interception and remaining problems: why is humidity unsaturated during rainfall? In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference. Japan Society of Hydrology and Water Resources (in Japanese). ] but was in fact advanced by Dunin [Dunin, F.X., O'Loughlin, E.M., Reyenga, W., 1988. Interception loss from eucalypt forest: lysimeter determination of hourly rates for long term evaluation. Hydrological Processes 2, 315-329] more than 20 years ago. In addition, Dunin et al. considered that canopy ventilation might be enhanced in intense rain. This note draws attention to the historical precedence of the work of Dunin et al. and also presents a short review of literature on impact droplet production, highlighting areas where data are still required for the full exploration of the role of droplet evaporation in canopy interception. Droplet production needs to be properly parameterised and included in models of interception processes and landsurface-atmosphere interactions.

  2. The Evaporation of Liquid Droplets in Highly Turbulent Gas Streams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gould, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Single acetone and heptane droplets were suspended from a hypodermic needle in turbulent airflow, and the Nusselt number was obtained from direct measurements of the droplet diameter and evaporation rate...

  3. Shock wave-induced evaporation of water droplets in a gas-droplet mixture 646

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, H.W.J.; Cleijne, J.W.; Smolders, H.J.; Dongen, van M.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for the droplet evaporation process induced by a shock wave propagating in a fog. The model is based on the existence of a quasi-steady wet bulb state of the droplets during evaporation. It is shown that for moderate shock strength, Ma = <2,=" and=" droplet=" radii=" in=" the="

  4. Prediction of water droplet evaporation on zircaloy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chi Young; In, Wang Kee

    2014-01-01

    In the present experimental study, the prediction of water droplet evaporation on a zircaloy surface was investigated using various initial droplet sizes. To the best of our knowledge, this may be the first valuable effort for understanding the details of water droplet evaporation on a zircaloy surface. The initial contact diameters of the water droplets tested ranged from 1.76 to 3.41 mm. The behavior (i.e., time-dependent droplet volume, contact angle, droplet height, and contact diameter) and mode-transition time of the water droplet evaporation were strongly influenced by the initial droplet size. Using the normalized contact angle (θ*) and contact diameter (d*), the transitions between evaporation modes were successfully expressed by a single curve, and their criteria were proposed. To predict the temporal droplet volume change and evaporation rate, the range of θ* > 0.25 and d* > 0.9, which mostly covered the whole evaporation period and the initial contact diameter remained almost constant during evaporation, was targeted. In this range, the previous contact angle functions for the evaporation model underpredicted the experimental data. A new contact angle function of a zircaloy surface was empirically proposed, which represented the present experimental data within a reasonable degree of accuracy. (author)

  5. Universal evaporation dynamics of a confined sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Lalit; Hatte, Sandeep; Basu, Saptarshi; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-09-01

    Droplet evaporation under confinement is ubiquitous to multitude of applications such as microfluidics, surface patterning, and ink-jet printing. However, the rich physics governing the universality in the underlying dynamics remains grossly elusive. Here, we bring out hitherto unexplored universal features of the evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet entrapped in a 3D confined fluidic environment. We show, through extensive set of experiments and theoretical formulations, that the evaporation timescale for such a droplet can be represented by a unique function of the initial conditions. Moreover, using same theoretical considerations, we are able to trace and universally merge the volume evolution history of the droplets along with evaporation lifetimes, irrespective of the extent of confinement. We also showcase the internal flow transitions caused by spatio-temporal variation of evaporation flux due to confinement. These findings may be of profound importance in designing functionalized droplet evaporation devices for emerging engineering and biomedical applications.

  6. Numerical simulation of droplet evaporation between two circular plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bam, Hang Jin; Son, Gi Hun

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation is performed for droplet evaporation between two circular plates. The flow and thermal characteristics of the droplet evaporation are numerically investigated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and mass fraction in the liquid and gas phases. The liquid-gas interface is tracked by a sharp-interface level-set method which is modified to include the effects of evaporation at the liquid-gas interface and contact angle hysteresis at the liquid-gas-solid contact line. An analytical model to predict the droplet evaporation is also developed by simplifying the mass and vapor fraction equations in the gas phase. The numerical results demonstrate that the 1-D analytical prediction is not applicable to the high rate evaporation process. The effects of plate gap and receding contact angle on the droplet evaporation are also quantified.

  7. A new stationary droplet evaporation model and its validation

    OpenAIRE

    Fang WANG; Jie YAO; Shaofeng YANG; Rui LIU; Jie JIN

    2017-01-01

    The liquid droplet evaporation character is important for not only combustion chamber design process but also high-accuracy spray combustion simulation. In this paper, the suspended droplets’ evaporation character was measured in a quiescent high-temperature environment by micro high-speed camera system. The gasoline and kerosene experimental results are consistent with the reference data. Methanol, common kerosene and aviation kerosene droplet evaporation characteristics, as well as their ev...

  8. Investigation and prevention of droplet splashing during operation of a sodium free jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoppel, L.; Gordeev, S.; Wetzel, T.; Fellmoser, F.; Daubner, M.

    2010-01-01

    Many accelerator application concepts consider liquid metal as a windowless target, at which the particle beam does directly hit the liquid. One of such concepts is studied in the European project ''DIRAC-Secondary beams - Design Study''. This project is focused on the preliminary research work for construction of a new international particle accelerator - Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The planned accelerator is aimed to work with high-energy heavy-ions, such as U 238 . One of the key elements of the FAIR facility is a liquid-metal-target, made in the form of a rectangular shaped Lithium jet aligned with the gravity vector. In the course of preliminary investigations the theoretical and practical conditions for a stable liquid-metal-jet conforming to the FAIR-requirements have been studied in the Karlsruhe Liquid Metal Laboratory (KALLA) sodium facility. The acquired scientific and technological results can be transferred to liquid-metal targets in nuclear applications, for example, the IFMIF-Target for the study of fusion reactor materials and the Myrrah/XT-ADS target. The main goals of the KALLA-part of the project were to design and build a facility for experimental research on hydrodynamic phenomena of the free surface liquid metal flow as well as to look at technological problems influencing the hydrodynamic stability of such flows. One of such problems emerged already during the startup of the facility: Splashing of liquid metal drops in the vacuum volume of the target box. As a result of such splashing process, liquid metal droplets are accumulated on various internal constructional elements of the target box, for example, on the inspection windows. This effect prohibits long term operation with the facility. The present paper describes the methods used to reduce the splashing to a minimum. (orig.)

  9. A new stationary droplet evaporation model and its validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang WANG

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The liquid droplet evaporation character is important for not only combustion chamber design process but also high-accuracy spray combustion simulation. In this paper, the suspended droplets’ evaporation character was measured in a quiescent high-temperature environment by micro high-speed camera system. The gasoline and kerosene experimental results are consistent with the reference data. Methanol, common kerosene and aviation kerosene droplet evaporation characteristics, as well as their evaporation rate changing with temperature, were obtained. The evaporation rate experimental data were compared with the prediction result of Ranz-Marshall boiling temperature model (RMB, Ranz-Marshall low-temperature model (RML, drift flux model (DFM, mass analogy model (MAM, and stagnant film model (SFM. The disparity between the experimental data and the model prediction results was mainly caused by the neglect of the natural convection effect, which was never introduced into the droplet evaporation concept. A new droplet evaporation model with consideration of natural convection buoyancy force effect was proposed in this paper. Under the experimental conditions in this paper, the calculation results of the new droplet evaporation model were agreed with the experimental data for kerosene, methanol and other fuels, with less than 20% relative deviations. The relative deviations between the new evaporation model predictions for kerosene and the experimental data from the references were within 10%.

  10. Vapor-based interferometric measurement of local evaporation rate and interfacial temperature of evaporating droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-03-04

    The local evaporation rate and interfacial temperature are two quintessential characteristics for the study of evaporating droplets. Here, it is shown how one can extract these quantities by measuring the vapor concentration field around the droplet with digital holographic interferometry. As a concrete example, an evaporating freely receding pending droplet of 3M Novec HFE-7000 is analyzed at ambient conditions. The measured vapor cloud is shown to deviate significantly from a pure-diffusion regime calculation, but it compares favorably to a new boundary-layer theory accounting for a buoyancy-induced convection in the gas and the influence upon it of a thermal Marangoni flow. By integration of the measured local evaporation rate over the interface, the global evaporation rate is obtained and validated by a side-view measurement of the droplet shape. Advective effects are found to boost the global evaporation rate by a factor of 4 as compared to the diffusion-limited theory.

  11. Water Evaporation from Acoustically Levitated Aqueous Solution Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Nicole A; Donaldson, D James

    2017-09-28

    We present a systematic study of the effect of solutes on the evaporation rate of acoustically levitated aqueous solution droplets by suspending individual droplets in a zero-relative humidity environment and measuring their size as a function of time. The ratios of the early time evaporation rates of six simple salts (NaCl, NaBr, NaNO 3 , KCl, MgCl 2 , CaCl 2 ) and malonic acid to that of water are in excellent agreement with predictions made by modifying the Maxwell equation to include the time-dependent water activity of the evaporating aqueous salt solution droplets. However, the early time evaporation rates of three ammonium salt solutions (NH 4 Cl, NH 4 NO 3 , (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 ) are not significantly different from the evaporation rate of pure water. This finding is in accord with a previous report that ammonium sulfate does not depress the evaporation rate of its solutions, despite reducing its water vapor pressure, perhaps due to specific surface effects. At longer evaporation times, as the droplets approach crystallization, all but one (MgCl 2 ) of the solution evaporation rates are well described by the modified Maxwell equation.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Evaporation of Droplets with Dissolved Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Liang Xu; Min Chen; Xiao-Dong Wang; Bing-Bing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the evaporation of water droplets containing either dissolved LiCl, NaCl or KCl salt in a gaseous surrounding (nitrogen) with a constant high temperature of 600 K. The initial droplet has 298 K temperature and contains 1,120 water molecules, 0, 40, 80 or 120 salt molecules. The effects of the salt type and concentration on the evaporation rate are examined. Three stages with different evaporation rates are observed for all cases. In the initial...

  13. Raman Thermometry Measurements of Free Evaporation from Liquid Water Droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jared D.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies of evaporation have suggested that on average, molecules in the higher-energy tail of the Boltzmann distribution are more readily transferred into the vapor during evaporation. To test these conclusions, the evaporative cooling rates of a droplet train of liquid water injected into vacuum have been studied via Raman thermometry. The resulting cooling rates are fit to an evaporative cooling model based on Knudsen's maximum rate of evaporation, in which we explicitly account for surface cooling. We have determined that the value of the evaporation coefficient (γ e ) of liquid water is 0.62 ± 0.09, confirming that a rate-limiting barrier impedes the evaporation rate. Such insight will facilitate the formulation of a microscopic mechanism for the evaporation of liquid water

  14. Evaporation kinetics of sessile water droplets on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Leeladhar, Rajesh; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2013-05-21

    Evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile droplets of water on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces are experimentally investigated. The results show that a constant contact radius (CCR) mode and a constant contact angle (CCA) mode are two dominating evaporation modes during droplet evaporation on the superhydrophobic surfaces. With the decrease in the solid fraction of the superhydrophobic surfaces, the duration of a CCR mode is reduced and that of a CCA mode is increased. Compared to Rowan's kinetic model, which is based on the vapor diffusion across the droplet boundary, the change in a contact angle in a CCR (pinned) mode shows a remarkable deviation, decreasing at a slower rate on the superhydrophobic surfaces with less-solid fractions. In a CCA (receding) mode, the change in a contact radius agrees well with the theoretical expectation, and the receding speed is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces with lower solid fractions. The discrepancy between experimental results and Rowan's model is attributed to the initial large contact angle of a droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces. The droplet geometry with a large contact angle results in a narrow wedge region of air along the contact boundary, where the liquid-vapor diffusion is significantly restricted. Such an effect becomes minor as the evaporation proceeds with the decrease in a contact angle. In both the CCR and CCA modes, the evaporative mass transfer shows the linear relationship between mass(2/3) and evaporation time. However, the evaporation rate is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces, which is more significant on the surfaces with lower solid fractions. As a result, the superhydrophobic surfaces slow down the drying process of a sessile droplet on them.

  15. Modelling of heating and evaporation of n-Heptane droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2015-01-01

    This study is a part of a project that is targeted to optimize the pyrolysis process of biomass pellets for bio-oil production and to develop new technology to upgrade the bio-oil for use in transportation. Among others, study of pyrolysis of the biomass pellets and evaporation of the pyrolysis bio...... and azimuthal directions, respectively, on each of which the flow, heat and mass transfer are numerically solved using the finite volume method. During the transient heating and evaporation process, the interaction between the moving droplets and free-stream flow are properly considered. Droplet dynamics...

  16. Numerical study of droplet evaporation in an acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bänsch, Eberhard; Götz, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We present a finite element method for the simulation of all relevant processes of the evaporation of a liquid droplet suspended in an acoustic levitation device. The mathematical model and the numerical implementation take into account heat and mass transfer across the interface between the liquid and gaseous phase and the influence of acoustic streaming on this process, as well as the displacement and deformation of the droplet due to acoustic radiation pressure. We apply this numerical method to several theoretical and experimental examples and compare our results with the well-known d2-law for the evaporation of spherical droplets and with theoretical predictions for the acoustic streaming velocity. We study the influence of acoustic streaming on the distribution of water vapor and temperature in the levitation device, with special attention to the vapor distribution in the emerging toroidal vortices. We also compare the evaporation rate of a droplet with and without acoustic streaming, as well as the evaporation rates in dependence of different temperatures and sound pressure levels. Finally, a simple model of protein inactivation due to heat damage is considered and studied for different evaporation settings and their respective influence on protein damage.

  17. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo droplet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H.; Diddens, C.; Lv, P.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Zhang, X.; Lohse, D.

    2016-01-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even

  18. Micro-Particles Motion in an Evaporating Droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jung Yeul; Yoo, Jung Yul; Kim, Young Won

    2007-01-01

    Nano-particles (on the order of 1 to 100 nm) contained within the droplet are moved by liquid flow and stacked at the contact line. The self-pinned contact line under the evaporating droplet is very interesting in the field of patterning and separation of particles and biocells. Models accounting for the nano-particles' flow and deposit patterns have been reported and verified by various experiments. Here, we report for the first time a phenomenon where micro-particles (on the order of 1 μm) in the colloid droplet flow to the center of droplet. There are three modes of fluid and particle flow in the evaporating droplet. In the first mode, a self-pinned contact line is maintained and the fluid and micro/nano-particles flow to the contact line. In the second mode, micro/nano-particles self-assemble at the near contact line, as reported by Jung and Kwak. In the final mode, only micro-particles are adverted to the center of the droplet due to movement of the contact line

  19. Fast Evaporation of Spreading Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Kara; Kumar, Satish

    2011-11-01

    When a coffee droplet dries on a countertop, a dark ring of coffee solute is left behind, a phenomenon often referred to as ``the coffee-ring effect.'' A closely related yet less-well-explored phenomenon is the formation of a layer of particles, or skin, at the surface of the droplet. In this work, we explore the behavior of a mathematical model that can qualitatively describe both phenomena. We consider a thin axisymmetric droplet of a colloidal suspension on a horizontal substrate undergoing spreading and rapid evaporation. The lubrication approximation is applied to simplify the mass and momentum conservation equations, and the colloidal particles are allowed to influence droplet rheology through their effect on the viscosity. By describing the transport of the colloidal particles with the full convection-diffusion equation, we are able to capture depthwise gradients in particle concentration and thus describe skin formation, a feature neglected in prior models of droplet evaporation. Whereas capillarity creates a flow that drives particles to the contact line to produce a coffee-ring, Marangoni flows can compete with this and promote skin formation. Increases in viscosity due to particle concentration slow down droplet dynamics, and can lead to a significant reduction in the spreading rate.

  20. Experimental and numerical study of palm oil and castor oil biodiesel droplet evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Botero, M.L; Molina, A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The vaporization characteristics of Palm and Castor oil biodiesel (Ricinus comunis) droplets were studied. An experimental set-up for measuring the evaporation rate of fuel droplets at atmospheric pressure and variable temperatures was developed. The droplets were suspended on a quartz fiber with initial droplet diameters ranging from 0.9 mm to 1.3 mm. The D2 law model for droplet evaporation was used to predict the evaporation rate of the fuels. Biodiesel physical properties were e...

  1. Transient Stefan flow and thermophoresis around an evaporating droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittori, O.

    1984-01-01

    The particle scavening efficiency of vapour-grown ice crystals falling from mixed clouds proves to be very high. Stefan flow, an aerodynamic flow originating in the fluid surrounding evaporating or condensing bodies, pushes airborne particles away from the surface of the supercooled droplets evaporating in the vicinity of an ice crystal. The particle Brownian flux towards the surface of the ice crystal (terminal velocity of about 1 m s -1 ) is, therefore, enhanced. However, the efficiency of this process of airborne-particle removal is strongly reduced as a consequence of the cooling of the evaporating droplet which produces a ''thermal force'', thermophoresis, which counteracts the particle Stefan flow. At the surface of an evaporating droplet in a quasi-equilibrium state, the two airborne-particle velocity fields practically balance each other. This counteracting effect on particle motion needs to be evaluated in the transient case. An approach is presented which consists of reformulating the transient heat and mass transfer problem in such a way as to convert it into a purely heat transfer problem having a known analytical solution. The approach is discussed and found to be correct. The results of the computations show that the counteracting role of thermophoresis on Stefan-flow particle motion during the residence time of supercooled droplets in the vicinity of an ice crystal (from 10 -5 to 10 -4 s), which is also the time in which evaporation takes place, is considerably weak. It turns out to be practically negligible for large droplets (radius >= 8x10 -4 cm)

  2. Influence of the wall on the droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporative influence of the wall material and its thickness has been investigated in the present study. The wall influence for heat exchangers is particularly important in the boiling transition regime and in the event of the Leidenfrost temperature. The experimental points significantly diverge in the transition area of the boiling crisis. This fact can be explained by a different residence time of droplet on the wall surface. The discrepancy between the experimental data also takes place at the Leidenfrost temperature. The lower the thermal diffusivity of the wall material (high thermal inertia, the more the wall is cooled under a droplet.

  3. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.; Xie, Jianfei; Shishkova, Irina N.; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Heikal, Morgan Raymond

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation

  4. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S. [INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector. (orig.)

  5. Direct numerical simulations of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates direct numerical simulations of evaporating two phase flows, with applications to studying combustion in aircraft engines. Inside the engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber where it atomizes into droplets and evaporates. Combustion occurs as the fuel vapor mixes with the surrounding flow of turbulent gas. Understanding combustion, therefore, requires studying evaporation in a turbulent flow and the resulting vapor distribution. We study the problem using a finite volume framework to solve the Navier-Stokes and scalar transport equations under a low-Mach assumption [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008]. The liquid-gas interface is tracked using a conservative level-set method [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008] which allows for a sharp reconstruction of the discontinuity across the interface. Special care is taken in the discretization of cells near the liquid-gas interface to ensure the stability and accuracy of the solution. Results are discussed for non-reacting simulations of liquid droplets evaporating into a turbulent field of inert gas.

  6. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie, E-mail: leejay1986@163.com; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-07

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time. - Highlights: • Fully algebraic solutions for the spheroidal droplet evaporation rate is obtained. • We examine the effect of aspect ratio on the droplet evaporation. • We propose a calculation method of Nusselt number for spheroidal droplet.

  7. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time. - Highlights: • Fully algebraic solutions for the spheroidal droplet evaporation rate is obtained. • We examine the effect of aspect ratio on the droplet evaporation. • We propose a calculation method of Nusselt number for spheroidal droplet

  8. Velocity field measurements in an evaporating sessile droplet by means of micro-PIV technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagodnitsyna Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Velocity fields are measured in evaporating sessile droplets on two substrates with different contact angles and contact angle hysteresis using micro resolution particle image velocimetry technique. Different flow patterns are observed in different stages of droplet evaporation: a flow with vortices and a radial flow. Flow structure is found to be similar for droplets on different substrates.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of acetone inside evaporating and burning fuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shringi, D. S.; Shaw, B. D.; Dwyer, H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence was used to visualize acetone fields inside individual droplets of pure acetone as well as droplets composed of methanol or 1-propanol initially mixed with acetone. Droplets were supported on a horizontal wire and two vaporization conditions were investigated: (1) slow evaporation in room air and (2) droplet combustion, which leads to substantially faster droplet surface regression rates. Acetone was preferentially gasified, causing its concentration in droplets to drop in time with resultant decreases in acetone fluorescence intensities. Slowly vaporizing droplets did not exhibit large spatial variations of fluorescence within droplets, indicating that these droplets were relatively well mixed. Ignition of droplets led to significant variations in fluorescence intensities within droplets, indicating that these droplets were not well mixed. Ignited droplets composed of mixtures of 1-propanol and acetone showed large time-varying changes in shapes for higher acetone concentrations, suggesting that bubble formation was occurring in these droplets.

  10. The crown splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robert; Brunet, Philippe; Eggers, Jens

    2008-11-01

    The impact of a drop onto a liquid layer and the subsequent splash has important implications for diverse physical processes such as air-sea gas transfer, cooling, and combustion. In the crown splash parameter regime, the splash pattern is highly regular. We focus on this case as a model for the mechanism that leads to secondary droplets, and thus explain the drop size distribution resulting from the splash. We show that the mean number of secondary droplets is determined by the most unstable wavelength of the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. Variations from this mean are governed by the width of the spectrum. Our results for the crown splash will provide the basis for understanding more complicated splashes.

  11. Evaporation Kinetics of Polyol Droplets: Determination of Evaporation Coefficients and Diffusion Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong-Yang; Marsh, Aleksandra; Haddrell, Allen E.; Li, Zhi-Ming; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2017-11-01

    In order to quantify the kinetics of mass transfer between the gas and condensed phases in aerosol, physicochemical properties of the gas and condensed phases and kinetic parameters (mass/thermal accommodation coefficients) are crucial for estimating mass fluxes over a wide size range from the free molecule to continuum regimes. In this study, we report measurements of the evaporation kinetics of droplets of 1-butanol, ethylene glycol (EG), diethylene glycol (DEG), and glycerol under well-controlled conditions (gas flow rates and temperature) using the previously developed cylindrical electrode electrodynamic balance technique. Measurements are compared with a model that captures the heat and mass transfer occurring at the evaporating droplet surface. The aim of these measurements is to clarify the discrepancy in the reported values of mass accommodation coefficient (αM, equals to evaporation coefficient based on microscopic reversibility) for 1-butanol, EG, and DEG and improve the accuracy of the value of the diffusion coefficient for glycerol in gaseous nitrogen. The uncertainties in the thermophysical and experimental parameters are carefully assessed, the literature values of the vapor pressures of these components are evaluated, and the plausible ranges of the evaporation coefficients for 1-butanol, EG, and DEG as well as uncertainty in diffusion coefficient for glycerol are reported. Results show that αM should be greater than 0.4, 0.2, and 0.4 for EG, DEG, and 1-butanol, respectively. The refined values are helpful for accurate prediction of the evaporation/condensation rates.

  12. Flow within an evaporating glycerol-water binary droplet: Segregation by gravitational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaxing; Lv, Pengyu; Diddens, Christian; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    The flow within an evaporating glycerol-water binary droplet with Bond number Bo PIV for both sessile and pendant droplets during evaporation process, which surprisingly show opposite radial flow directions - inward and outward, respectively. This observation clearly reveals that gravitational effects play a crucial role in controlling flow fields within the evaporating droplets. We theoretically analyse that this gravity-driven effect is caused by density gradients due to the local concentration difference of glycerol within the droplet triggered by different volatilities of the two components during evaporation. Finally, for confirmation, we numerically simulate the process, revealing a good agreement with experimental results.

  13. Dynamics of contact line depinning during droplet evaporation based on thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong In; Kwak, Ho Jae; Doh, Seung Woo; Ahn, Ho Seon; Park, Hyun Sun; Kiyofumi, Moriyama; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2015-02-17

    For several decades, evaporation phenomena have been intensively investigated for a broad range of applications. However, the dynamics of contact line depinning during droplet evaporation has only been inductively inferred on the basis of experimental data and remains unclear. This study focuses on the dynamics of contact line depinning during droplet evaporation based on thermodynamics. Considering the decrease in the Gibbs free energy of a system with different evaporation modes, a theoretical model was developed to estimate the receding contact angle during contact line depinning as a function of surface conditions. Comparison of experimentally measured and theoretically modeled receding contact angles indicated that the dynamics of contact line depinning during droplet evaporation was caused by the most favorable thermodynamic process encountered during constant contact radius (CCR mode) and constant contact angle (CCA mode) evaporation to rapidly reach an equilibrium state during droplet evaporation.

  14. Evaporation and discharge dynamics of highly charged multicomponent droplets generated by electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Ronald L; Beauchamp, J L

    2010-01-28

    We investigate the Rayleigh discharge and evaporation dynamics of highly charged two-component droplets consisting principally of methanol with 2-methoxyethanol, tert-butanol, or m-nitrobenzyl alcohol. A phase Doppler anemometer (PDA) characterizes droplets generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) according to size, velocity, and charge as they move through a uniform electric field within an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). Repeated field reversals result in droplet "ping-pong" through the PDA. This generates individual droplet histories of solvent evaporation behavior and the dynamics of charge loss to progeny droplets during Rayleigh discharge events. On average, methanol droplets discharge at 127% their Rayleigh limit of charge, q(R), and release 25% of the net charge. Charge loss from methanol/2-methoxyethanol droplets behaves similarly to pure 2-methoxyethanol droplets which release approximately 28% of their net charge. Binary methanol droplets containing up to 50% tert-butanol discharge at a lower percent q(R) than pure methanol and release a greater fraction of their net charge. Mixed 99% methanol/1% m-nitrobenzyl alcohol droplets possess discharge characteristics similar to those of methanol. However, droplets of methanol containing 2% m-nitrobenzyl evaporate down to a fixed size and charge that remains constant with no observable discharges. Quasi-steady-state evaporation models accurately describe observed evaporation phenomena in which methanol/tert-butanol droplets evaporate at a rate similar to that of pure methanol and methanol/2-methoxyethanol droplets evaporate at a rate similar to that of 2-methoxyethanol. We compare these results to previous Rayleigh discharge experiments and discuss the implications for binary solvents in electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and field-induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS).

  15. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry. PMID:27125240

  16. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry.

  17. Drag of evaporating or condensing droplets in low Reynolds number flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukowicz, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    The steady-state drag of evaporating or condensing droplets in low Reynolds number flow is computed. Droplet drag in air is obtained for five representative liquids (water, methanol, benzene, heptane, octane) for a range of ambient temperatures, pressures, and vapor concentrations. The drag is in general increased for a condensing droplet, and decreased for an evaporating droplet. The changes in drag can be quite large and depend in detail on the degree of evaporation or condensation, and on the individual liquid and vapor properties. The present results are used to test the existing experimentally derived correlations of Eisenklam and Yuen and Chen in the low Reynolds number regime. The Yuen and Chen correlation is found to be quite successful, but only in the case of condensation or mild evaporation. An improved correlation is suggested for evaporating droplets

  18. Marangoni Convection in Evaporating Organic Liquid Droplets on a Nonwetting Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Aditya; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Chen, Xuemei; Garimella, Suresh V

    2016-05-17

    We quantitatively characterize the flow field inside organic liquid droplets evaporating on a nonwetting substrate. A mushroom-structured surface yields the desired nonwetting behavior with methanol droplets, while use of a cooled substrate (5-15 °C) slows the rate of evaporation to allow quasi-static particle image velocimetry. Visualization reveals a toroidal vortex within the droplet that is characteristic of surface tension-driven flow; we demonstrate by means of a scaling analysis that this recirculating flow is Marangoni convection. The velocities in the droplet are on the order of 10-45 mm/s. Thus, unlike in the case of evaporation on wetting substrates where Marangoni convection can be ignored for the purpose of estimating the evaporation rate, advection due to the surface tension-driven flow plays a dominant role in the heat transfer within an evaporating droplet on a nonwetting substrate because of the large height-to-radius aspect ratio of the droplet. We formulate a reduced-order model that includes advective transport within the droplet for prediction of organic liquid droplet evaporation on a nonwetting substrate and confirm that the predicted temperature differential across the height of the droplet matches experiments.

  19. Grouping and trapping of evaporating droplets in an oscillating gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoshevski, David; Shakked, Tal; Sazhin, Sergei S.; Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to the analysis of droplet grouping in an oscillating gas flow is suggested. This is based on the investigation of droplet trajectories in the frame of reference moving with the phase velocity of the wave. Although the equations involved are relatively simple, the analysis shows distinctive characteristics of grouping and non-grouping cases. In the case of grouping, droplet trajectories converge to the points for which the ratio of flow velocity in this frame of reference and the amplitude of flow oscillations is less than 1, and the cosine of the arc sine of this ratio is positive. In the case of non-grouping, droplet trajectories in this frame of reference oscillate around the translational velocity close to the velocity of flow in the same frame of reference. The effect of droplet size on the grouping pattern is investigated. It has been pointed out that for the smaller droplets much more stable grouping is observed. The effect of droplet evaporation is studied in the limiting case when the contribution of the heat-up period can be ignored. It is shown that evaporation can lead to droplet grouping even in the case when the non-evaporating droplets are not grouped. This is related to the reduction in droplet diameter during the evaporation process. Coupling between gas and droplets is shown to decrease the grouping tendency. A qualitative agreement between predictions of the model and in-house experimental observations referring to Diesel engine sprays has been demonstrated

  20. Evaporation of Liquid Droplet in Nano and Micro Scales from Statistical Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fei; He, Bin; Wei, Tao

    2015-04-01

    The statistical rate theory (SRT) is applied to predict the average evaporation flux of liquid droplet after the approach is validated in the sessile droplet experiments of the water and heavy water. The steady-state experiments show a temperature discontinuity at the evaporating interface. The average evaporation flux is evaluated by individually changing the measurement at a liquid-vapor interface, including the interfacial liquid temperature, the interfacial vapor temperature, the vapor-phase pressure, and the droplet size. The parameter study shows that a higher temperature jump would reduce the average evaporation flux. The average evaporation flux can significantly be influenced by the interfacial liquid temperature and the vapor-phase pressure. The variation can switch the evaporation into condensation. The evaporation flux is found to remain relative constant if the droplet is larger than a micro scale, while the smaller diameters in nano scale can produce a much higher evaporation flux. In addition, a smaller diameter of droplets with the same liquid volume has a larger surface area. It is suggested that the evaporation rate increases dramatically as the droplet shrinks into nano size.

  1. Evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet on glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings: focusing on the final stage of thin droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatapova, Elizaveta Ya; Shonina, Anna M; Safonov, Alexey I; Sulyaeva, Veronica S; Kabov, Oleg A

    2018-03-07

    The evaporation dynamics of a water droplet with an initial volume of 2 μl from glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings are investigated using the shadow technique and an optical microscope. The droplet profile for a contact angle of less than 5° is constructed using an image-analyzing interference technique, and evaporation dynamics are investigated at the final stage. We coated the glass slides with a thin film of a fluoropolymer by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method at different deposition modes depending on the deposition pressure and the temperature of the activating wire. The resulting surfaces have different structures affecting the wetting properties. Droplet evaporation from a constant contact radius mode in the early stage of evaporation was found followed by the mode where both contact angle and contact radius simultaneously vary in time (final stage) regardless of wettability of the coated surfaces. We found that depinning occurs at small contact angles of 2.2-4.7° for all samples, which are smaller than the measured receding contact angles. This is explained by imbibition of the liquid into the developed surface of the "soft" coating that leads to formation of thin droplets completely wetting the surface. The final stage, which is little discussed in the literature, is also recorded. We have singled out a substage where the contact line velocity is abruptly increasing for all coated and uncoated surfaces. The critical droplet height corresponding to the transition to this substage is about 2 μm with R/h = 107. The duration of this substage is the same for all coated and uncoated surfaces. Droplets observed at this substage for all the tested surfaces are axisymmetric. The specific evaporation rate clearly demonstrates an abrupt increase at the final substage of the droplet evaporation. The classical R 2 law is justified for the complete wetting situation where the droplet is disappearing in an axisymmetric manner.

  2. A benchmark study for the crown-type splashing dynamics of one- and two-component droplet wall-film interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, A.; Terzis, A.; Lamanna, G.; Marengo, M.; Weigand, B.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper investigates experimentally the impact dynamics of crown-type splashing for miscible two- and one-component droplet wall-film interactions over a range of Weber numbers and dimensionless film thicknesses. The splashing outcome is parametrised in terms of a set of quantifiable parameters, such as crown height, top and base diameter, wall inclination, number of fingers, and secondary droplet properties. The results show that the outcome of a splashing event is not affected by the choice of similar or dissimilar fluids, provided the dimensionless film thickness is larger than 0.1. Below this threshold, distinctive features of two-component interactions appear, such as hole formation and crown bottom breakdown. The observation of different crown shapes (e.g. V-shaped, cylindrical, and truncated-cone) confirms that vorticity production induces changes in the crown wall inclination, thus affecting the evolution of the crown height and top diameter. The evolution of the crown base diameter, instead, is mainly dependent on the relative importance of liquid inertia and viscous losses in the wall-film. The maximum number of liquid fingers decreases with increasing wall, film thickness, due to the enhanced attenuation of the effect of surface properties on the fingering process. The formation of secondary droplets is also affected by changes in the crown wall inclination. In particular, for truncated-cone shapes the occurrence of crown rim contraction induces a large scatter in the secondary droplet properties. Consequently, empirical models for the maximum number and mean diameter of the secondary droplets are derived for V-shaped crowns, as observed for the hexadecane-Hyspin interactions.

  3. Water and Ethanol Droplet Wetting Transition during Evaporation on Omniphobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    Omniphobic surfaces with reentrant microstructures have been investigated for a range of applications, but the evaporation of high- and low-surface-tension liquid droplets placed on such surfaces has not been rigorously studied. In this work, we develop a technique to fabricate omniphobic surfaces on copper substrates to allow for a systematic examination of the effects of surface topography on the evaporation dynamics of water and ethanol droplets. Compared to a water droplet, the ethanol droplet not only evaporates faster, but also inhibits Cassie-to-Wenzel wetting transitions on surfaces with certain geometries. We use an interfacial energy-based description of the system, including the transition energy barrier and triple line energy, to explain the underlying transition mechanism and behaviour observed. Suppression of the wetting transition during evaporation of droplets provides an important metric for evaluating the robustness of omniphobic surfaces requiring such functionality. PMID:26603940

  4. New approaches to the modelling of multi-component fuel droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S

    2015-02-25

    The previously suggested quasi-discrete model for heating and evaporation of complex multi-component hydrocarbon fuel droplets is described. The dependence of density, viscosity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity of liquid components on carbon numbers n and temperatures is taken into account. The effects of temperature gradient and quasi-component diffusion inside droplets are taken into account. The analysis is based on the Effective Thermal Conductivity/Effective Diffusivity (ETC/ED) model. This model is applied to the analysis of Diesel and gasoline fuel droplet heating and evaporation. The components with relatively close n are replaced by quasi-components with properties calculated as average properties of the a priori defined groups of actual components. Thus the analysis of the heating and evaporation of droplets consisting of many components is replaced with the analysis of the heating and evaporation of droplets consisting of relatively few quasi-components. It is demonstrated that for Diesel and gasoline fuel droplets the predictions of the model based on five quasi-components are almost indistinguishable from the predictions of the model based on twenty quasi-components for Diesel fuel droplets and are very close to the predictions of the model based on thirteen quasi-components for gasoline fuel droplets. It is recommended that in the cases of both Diesel and gasoline spray combustion modelling, the analysis of droplet heating and evaporation is based on as little as five quasi-components.

  5. Evaporation of sessile droplets affected by graphite nanoparticles and binary base fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2014-11-26

    The effects of ethanol component and nanoparticle concentration on evaporation dynamics of graphite-water nanofluid droplets have been studied experimentally. The results show that the formed deposition patterns vary greatly with an increase in ethanol concentration from 0 to 50 vol %. Nanoparticles have been observed to be carried to the droplet surface and form a large piece of aggregate. The volume evaporation rate on average increases as the ethanol concentration increases from 0 to 50 vol % in the binary mixture nanofluid droplets. The evaporation rate at the initial stage is more rapid than that at the late stage to dry, revealing a deviation from a linear fitting line, standing for a constant evaporation rate. The deviation is more intense with a higher ethanol concentration. The ethanol-induced smaller liquid-vapor surface tension leads to higher wettability of the nanofluid droplets. The graphite nanoparticles in ethanol-water droplets reinforce the pinning effect in the drying process, and the droplets with more ethanol demonstrate the depinning behavior only at the late stage. The addition of graphite nanoparticles in water enhances a droplet baseline spreading at the beginning of evaporation, a pinning effect during evaporation, and the evaporation rate. However, with a relatively high nanoparticle concentration, the enhancement is attenuated.

  6. Evaporation kinetics of surfactant solution droplets on rice (Oryza sativa) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Dong; Zheng, Li; Xu, Jun; Li, Feng-Min; Huang, Qi-Liang

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of evaporating sessile droplets on hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces is widely studied, and many models for these processes have been developed based on experimental evidence. However, few research has been explored on the evaporation of sessile droplets of surfactant or pesticide solutions on target crop leaves. Thus, in this paper the impact of surfactant concentrations on contact angle, contact diameter, droplet height, and evolution of the droplets’ evaporative volume on rice leaf surfaces have been investigated. The results indicate that the evaporation kinetics of surfactant droplets on rice leaves were influenced by both the surfactant concentrations and the hydrophobicity of rice leaf surfaces. When the surfactant concentration is lower than the surfactant CMC (critical micelle concentration), the droplet evaporation time is much longer than that of the high surfactant concentration. This is due to the longer existence time of a narrow wedge region under the lower surfactant concentration, and such narrow wedge region further restricts the droplet evaporation. Besides, our experimental data are shown to roughly collapse onto theoretical curves based on the model presented by Popov. This study could supply theoretical data on the evaporation of the adjuvant or pesticide droplets for practical applications in agriculture. PMID:28472108

  7. Assessment of water droplet evaporation mechanisms on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-12-23

    Evaporation rates are predicted and important transport mechanisms identified for evaporation of water droplets on hydrophobic (contact angle ~110°) and superhydrophobic (contact angle ~160°) substrates. Analytical models for droplet evaporation in the literature are usually simplified to include only vapor diffusion in the gas domain, and the system is assumed to be isothermal. In the comprehensive model developed in this study, evaporative cooling of the interface is accounted for, and vapor concentration is coupled to local temperature at the interface. Conjugate heat and mass transfer are solved in the solid substrate, liquid droplet, and surrounding gas. Buoyancy-driven convective flows in the droplet and vapor domains are also simulated. The influences of evaporative cooling and convection on the evaporation characteristics are determined quantitatively. The liquid-vapor interface temperature drop induced by evaporative cooling suppresses evaporation, while gas-phase natural convection acts to enhance evaporation. While the effects of these competing transport mechanisms are observed to counterbalance for evaporation on a hydrophobic surface, the stronger influence of evaporative cooling on a superhydrophobic surface accounts for an overprediction of experimental evaporation rates by ~20% with vapor diffusion-based models. The local evaporation fluxes along the liquid-vapor interface for both hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates are investigated. The highest local evaporation flux occurs at the three-phase contact line region due to proximity to the higher temperature substrate, rather than at the relatively colder droplet top; vapor diffusion-based models predict the opposite. The numerically calculated evaporation rates agree with experimental results to within 2% for superhydrophobic substrates and 3% for hydrophobic substrates. The large deviations between past analytical models and the experimental data are therefore reconciled with the

  8. Evaporation of Water Droplets on “Lock-and-Key” Structures with Nanoscale Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    Highly ordered poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbowl arrays (MBAs) and microcap arrays (MCAs) with “lock-and-key” properties are successfully fabricated by self-assembly and electrochemical deposition. The wetting properties and evaporation dynamics of water droplets for both cases have been...... investigated. For the MBAs case, the wetting radius of the droplets remains unchanged until the portion of the droplet completely dries out at the end of the evaporation process. The pinning state extends for more than 99.5% of the total evaporation time, and the pinning–shrinking transition is essentially...

  9. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R., E-mail: pchakraborty@iitj.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, 342011 (India); Hiremath, Kirankumar R., E-mail: k.r.hiremath@iitj.ac.in [Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, 342011 (India); Sharma, Manvendra, E-mail: PG201283003@iitj.ac.in [Defence Laboratory Jodhpur, Defence Research & Development Organisation, 342011 (India)

    2017-02-05

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  10. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R.; Hiremath, Kirankumar R.; Sharma, Manvendra

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  11. Evaporation and crystallization of a droplet of desulfurization wastewater from a coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Zhengxing; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhongqing; Qiang, Tang; Pu, Ge; Ran, Jingyu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaporation and crystallization characteristics of the droplets of desulfurization wastewater. • TGA and DSC methods were used to investigate the evaporation and crystallization processes. • Evaporation and crystallization rates increase with the increase of temperature increasing rate. • Increasing volume of the droplet increases the evaporation rate, but decreases the crystallization rate. • Structure of the crystals changes significantly when the temperature increasing rate and the volume of the droplet change. - Abstract: Relationship between evaporation and crystallization characteristics of a droplet of desulfurization wastewater from a coal-fired power plant and some operating conditions was studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) function and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results shows that, between 15 °C/min and 45 °C/min, a higher temperature increasing rate leads to higher evaporation and crystallization rates. The increment in the evaporation rate, caused by the same increment of temperature increasing rate, is larger, when the temperature increasing rate is lower. In addition, the final temperatures, ranging from 90 °C to 150 °C, have little impact on the evaporation and crystallization rates of the 0.5 μL droplet. Ultimately, for the droplets, ranging from 0.2 μL to 2.5 μL, evaporation rate increases with increasing volumes of the droplets, but the crystallization rate decreases. From the SEM results, it can be observed that the quantity of cracks on the surface of the crystals also declines with the increase in volumes. Furthermore, the Stefan flow becomes a significant and unneglectable factor in order to decrease the evaporation rate at the end of the evaporation period.

  12. Insights into Evaporative Droplet Dynamics in the High-Wind Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, T.; Richter, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Sea-spray droplets ejected into the air-sea boundary layer take part in a series of complex transport processes. To model the air-sea exchange of heat and moisture under high-wind conditions, it is important yet challenging to understand influences of evaporative droplets in the atmospheric boundary layer. We implement a high-resolution Eulerian-Lagrangian algorithm with droplets laden in a turbulent open-channel flow to reveal the dynamic and thermodynamic characteristics of evaporating sea spray. Our past numerical simulations demonstrated an overall weak modification to the total heat flux by evaporative droplets. This is due to redistributed sensible and latent heat fluxes from relatively small droplets that respond rapidly to the ambient environment or the limited residence time of larger droplets. However, droplets with a slower thermodynamic response to the environment indicate a potential to enhance the total heat flux, but this is dependent on concentration and suspension time. In the current study, we focus on correlations between the residence time and thermodynamic statistics of droplets in order to better understand how best to parameterize in large-scale models. In addition, we focus in detail on the different scales of turbulence to further characterize the range of influence that evaporating droplets have on the surrounding fluid.

  13. Development of a model for spray evaporation based on droplet analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Q.; Thu, K.; Bui, T.D.; Li, Y.; Ng, Kim Choon; Chua, K.J.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme flash evaporation occurs when superheated liquid is sprayed into a low pressure zone. This method has high potential to improve the performance of thermally-driven desalination plants. To enable a more in-depth understanding on flash evaporation of a superheated feed water spray, a theoretical model has been developed with key considerations given to droplet motion and droplet size distribution. The model has been validated against 14 experimental data sets from literature sources to within 12% discrepancy. This model is capable of accurately predicting the water productivity and thermal efficiency of existing spray evaporator under specific operating conditions. Employing this model, the effect of several design parameters on system performance was investigated. Key results revealed that smaller droplet enabled faster evaporation process while higher initial droplet velocity promoted water productivity. Thermal utilization marginally changes with the degree of superheat, which renders a quick design calculation of the brine temperature without the need for iterations. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Development of a model for spray evaporation based on droplet analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Q.

    2016-08-20

    Extreme flash evaporation occurs when superheated liquid is sprayed into a low pressure zone. This method has high potential to improve the performance of thermally-driven desalination plants. To enable a more in-depth understanding on flash evaporation of a superheated feed water spray, a theoretical model has been developed with key considerations given to droplet motion and droplet size distribution. The model has been validated against 14 experimental data sets from literature sources to within 12% discrepancy. This model is capable of accurately predicting the water productivity and thermal efficiency of existing spray evaporator under specific operating conditions. Employing this model, the effect of several design parameters on system performance was investigated. Key results revealed that smaller droplet enabled faster evaporation process while higher initial droplet velocity promoted water productivity. Thermal utilization marginally changes with the degree of superheat, which renders a quick design calculation of the brine temperature without the need for iterations. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Detailed finite element method modeling of evaporating multi-component droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diddens, Christian, E-mail: C.Diddens@tue.nl

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation of sessile multi-component droplets is modeled with an axisymmetic finite element method. The model comprises the coupled processes of mixture evaporation, multi-component flow with composition-dependent fluid properties and thermal effects. Based on representative examples of water–glycerol and water–ethanol droplets, regular and chaotic examples of solutal Marangoni flows are discussed. Furthermore, the relevance of the substrate thickness for the evaporative cooling of volatile binary mixture droplets is pointed out. It is shown how the evaporation of the more volatile component can drastically decrease the interface temperature, so that ambient vapor of the less volatile component condenses on the droplet. Finally, results of this model are compared with corresponding results of a lubrication theory model, showing that the application of lubrication theory can cause considerable errors even for moderate contact angles of 40°. - Graphical abstract:.

  16. A computational study of droplet evaporation with fuel vapor jet ejection induced by localized heat sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon; Im, Hong G.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    parametric study demonstrated that the Marangoni effect is indeed significant at realistic droplet combustion conditions, resulting in a higher evaporation constant. A modified Marangoni number was derived in order to represent the surface force

  17. Source of temperature and pressure pulsations during sessile droplet evaporation into multicomponent atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Aaron H; Sefiane, Khellil; Ward, Charles A

    2013-10-29

    During sessile droplet evaporation, studies with IR thermography and shadowgraphs have indicated temperature pulsations. We confirm those observations with microthermocouples, but microthermocouples also indicate temperature pulsations in the atmosphere of the droplet. The pressure in this atmosphere pulsated as well and was correlated with the temperature pulsations in the droplet. Also, we find that if a droplet evaporates into its own vapor, there are no temperature or pressure pulsations. The pulsations occur only if the droplet evaporates into an atmosphere with a component having a heat of solution with the droplet when it adsorbs-absorbs. None of the currently proposed mechanisms for the temperature pulsations provide an explanation for the coupling between the temperature pulsations in the droplet and the vapor-phase pressure pulsations, and for the absence of the pulsations when the system is single-component. As a mechanism for the pulsations, we propose that when a droplet is exposed to an atmosphere containing a component that has a heat of solution with the droplet, energy will be released from adsorption-absorption. This energy will cause pulsations in the evaporation flux, and these pulsations could cause the observed temperature and pressure pulsations. We examine this mechanism by showing that, if the measured temperature pulsations in a water droplet exposed to a methanol atmosphere are used as the input to a theory of evaporation kinetics (statistical rate theory), the pressure pulsations of the water vapor in the methanol atmosphere are predicted and agree with those measured with a quadrupole mass analyzer. When the inputs and outputs are reversed in the theory, we find that the temperature pulsations in the droplet are correctly predicted from the measured water vapor pulsations in the atmosphere.

  18. Thermal management of metallic surfaces: evaporation of sessile water droplets on polished and patterned stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiec, T.; Tsareva, S.; Andrieux, A.; Bortolini, G. A.; Bolzan, P. H.; Castanet, G.; Gradeck, M.; Marcos, G.

    2017-10-01

    This communication focus on the evaporation of sessile water droplets on different states of austenitic stainless steel surfaces: mirror polished, mirror polished and aged and patterned by sputtering. The evolution of the contact angle and of the droplet diameter is presented as a function of time at room temperature. For all the surface states, a constant diameter regime (CCR) is observed. An important aging effect on the contact angle is measured on polished surfaces due to atmospheric contamination. The experimental observations are compared to a quasi-static evaporation model assuming spherical caps. The evolution of the droplet volume as a function of time is almost linear with the evaporation time for all the observed surfaces. This is in accordance with the model prediction for the CCR mode for small initial contact angles. In our experiments, the evaporation time is found to be linearly dependent on the initial contact angle. This dependence is not correctly described by the evaporation model

  19. Probing the Evaporation Dynamics of Ethanol/Gasoline Biofuel Blends Using Single Droplet Manipulation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, Stella; Miles, Rachael E H; McDonald, Craig; Belotti, Yuri; Reid, Jonathan P; Kiefer, Johannes; McGloin, David

    2015-12-24

    Using blends of bioethanol and gasoline as automotive fuel leads to a net decrease in the production of harmful emission compared to the use of pure fossil fuel. However, fuel droplet evaporation dynamics change depending on the mixing ratio. Here we use single particle manipulation techniques to study the evaporation dynamics of ethanol/gasoline blend microdroplets. The use of an electrodynamic balance enables measurements of the evaporation of individual droplets in a controlled environment, while optical tweezers facilitate studies of the behavior of droplets inside a spray. Hence, the combination of both methods is perfectly suited to obtain a complete picture of the evaporation process. The influence of adding varied amounts of ethanol to gasoline is investigated, and we observe that droplets with a greater fraction of ethanol take longer to evaporate. Furthermore, we find that our methods are sensitive enough to observe the presence of trace amounts of water in the droplets. A theoretical model, predicting the evaporation of ethanol and gasoline droplets in dry nitrogen gas, is used to explain the experimental results. Also a theoretical estimation of the saturation of the environment, with other aerosols, in the tweezers is carried out.

  20. Experimental Investigation Evaporation of Liquid Mixture Droplets during Depressurization into Air Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Bi, Q. C.; Terekhov, Victor I.; Shishkin, Nikolay E.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop experimental method to study the evaporation process of liquid mixture droplets during depressurization and into air stream. During the experiment, a droplet was suspended on a thermocouple; an infrared thermal imager was used to measure the droplet surface temperature transition. Saltwater droplets were used to investigate the evaporation process during depressurization, and volatile liquid mixtures of ethanol, methanol and acetone in water were applied to experimentally research the evaporation into air stream. According to the results, the composition and concentration has a complex influence on the evaporation rate and the temperature transition. With an increase in the share of more volatile component, the evaporation rate increases. While, a higher salt concentration in water results in a lower evaporation rate. The shape variation of saltwater droplet also depends on the mass concentration in solution, whether it is higher or lower than the eutectic point (22.4%). The results provide important insight into the complex heat and mass transfer of liquid mixture during evaporation.

  1. Analytical Model for Diffusive Evaporation of Sessile Droplets Coupled with Interfacial Cooling Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan A H; Biggs, Simon R; Nguyen, Anh V

    2018-05-30

    Current analytical models for sessile droplet evaporation do not consider the nonuniform temperature field within the droplet and can overpredict the evaporation by 20%. This deviation can be attributed to a significant temperature drop due to the release of the latent heat of evaporation along the air-liquid interface. We report, for the first time, an analytical solution of the sessile droplet evaporation coupled with this interfacial cooling effect. The two-way coupling model of the quasi-steady thermal diffusion within the droplet and the quasi-steady diffusion-controlled droplet evaporation is conveniently solved in the toroidal coordinate system by applying the method of separation of variables. Our new analytical model for the coupled vapor concentration and temperature fields is in the closed form and is applicable for a full range of spherical-cap shape droplets of different contact angles and types of fluids. Our analytical results are uniquely quantified by a dimensionless evaporative cooling number E o whose magnitude is determined only by the thermophysical properties of the liquid and the atmosphere. Accordingly, the larger the magnitude of E o , the more significant the effect of the evaporative cooling, which results in stronger suppression on the evaporation rate. The classical isothermal model is recovered if the temperature gradient along the air-liquid interface is negligible ( E o = 0). For substrates with very high thermal conductivities (isothermal substrates), our analytical model predicts a reversal of temperature gradient along the droplet-free surface at a contact angle of 119°. Our findings pose interesting challenges but also guidance for experimental investigations.

  2. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  3. Experimental analysis of shape deformation of evaporating droplet using Legendre polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Apratim; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments involving heating of liquid droplets which are acoustically levitated, reveal specific modes of oscillations. For a given radiation flux, certain fluid droplets undergo distortion leading to catastrophic bag type breakup. The voltage of the acoustic levitator has been kept constant to operate at a nominal acoustic pressure intensity, throughout the experiments. Thus the droplet shape instabilities are primarily a consequence of droplet heating through vapor pressure, surface tension and viscosity. A novel approach is used by employing Legendre polynomials for the mode shape approximation to describe the thermally induced instabilities. The two dominant Legendre modes essentially reflect (a) the droplet size reduction due to evaporation, and (b) the deformation around the equilibrium shape. Dissipation and inter-coupling of modal energy lead to stable droplet shape while accumulation of the same ultimately results in droplet breakup.

  4. Experimental analysis of shape deformation of evaporating droplet using Legendre polynomials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, Apratim [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Basu, Saptarshi, E-mail: sbasu@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Kumar, Ranganathan [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2014-01-24

    Experiments involving heating of liquid droplets which are acoustically levitated, reveal specific modes of oscillations. For a given radiation flux, certain fluid droplets undergo distortion leading to catastrophic bag type breakup. The voltage of the acoustic levitator has been kept constant to operate at a nominal acoustic pressure intensity, throughout the experiments. Thus the droplet shape instabilities are primarily a consequence of droplet heating through vapor pressure, surface tension and viscosity. A novel approach is used by employing Legendre polynomials for the mode shape approximation to describe the thermally induced instabilities. The two dominant Legendre modes essentially reflect (a) the droplet size reduction due to evaporation, and (b) the deformation around the equilibrium shape. Dissipation and inter-coupling of modal energy lead to stable droplet shape while accumulation of the same ultimately results in droplet breakup.

  5. Internal flow and evaporation characteristic inside a water droplet on a vertical vibrating hydrophobic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Hun; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to understand the internal flow and the evaporation characteristics of a deionized water droplet subjected to vertical forced vibrations. To predict and evaluate its resonance frequency, the theories of Lamb, Strani, and Sabetta have been applied. To visualize the precise mode, shape, and internal flow inside a droplet, the experiment utilizes a combination of a high-speed camera, macro lens, and continuous laser. As a result, a water droplet on a hydrophobic surface has its typical shape at each mode, and complicated vortices are observed inside the droplet. In particular, large symmetrical flow streams are generated along the vertical axis at each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In addition, a bifurcation-shaped flow pattern is formed at modes 2 and 4, whereas a large ellipsoid-shape flow pattern forms at modes 6 and 8. Mode 4 has the fastest internal flow speed and evaporation rate, followed by modes 8 then 6, with 2 having the slowest of these properties. Each mode has the fastest evaporation rate amongst its neighboring frequencies. Finally, the droplet evaporation under vertical vibration would lead to more rapid evaporation, particularly for mode 4

  6. Internal flow and evaporation characteristic inside a water droplet on a vertical vibrating hydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Hun; Lim, Hee Chang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    This study aims to understand the internal flow and the evaporation characteristics of a deionized water droplet subjected to vertical forced vibrations. To predict and evaluate its resonance frequency, the theories of Lamb, Strani, and Sabetta have been applied. To visualize the precise mode, shape, and internal flow inside a droplet, the experiment utilizes a combination of a high-speed camera, macro lens, and continuous laser. As a result, a water droplet on a hydrophobic surface has its typical shape at each mode, and complicated vortices are observed inside the droplet. In particular, large symmetrical flow streams are generated along the vertical axis at each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In addition, a bifurcation-shaped flow pattern is formed at modes 2 and 4, whereas a large ellipsoid-shape flow pattern forms at modes 6 and 8. Mode 4 has the fastest internal flow speed and evaporation rate, followed by modes 8 then 6, with 2 having the slowest of these properties. Each mode has the fastest evaporation rate amongst its neighboring frequencies. Finally, the droplet evaporation under vertical vibration would lead to more rapid evaporation, particularly for mode 4.

  7. Dynamic Control of Particle Deposition in Evaporating Droplets by an External Point Source of Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Robert; Volpe, Giovanni; Parkin, Ivan P; Volpe, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    The deposition of particles on a surface by an evaporating sessile droplet is important for phenomena as diverse as printing, thin-film deposition, and self-assembly. The shape of the final deposit depends on the flows within the droplet during evaporation. These flows are typically determined at the onset of the process by the intrinsic physical, chemical, and geometrical properties of the droplet and its environment. Here, we demonstrate deterministic emergence and real-time control of Marangoni flows within the evaporating droplet by an external point source of vapor. By varying the source location, we can modulate these flows in space and time to pattern colloids on surfaces in a controllable manner.

  8. Numerical study of droplet evaporation in coupled high-temperature and electrostatic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwen Zuo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The evaporation of a sessile water droplet under the coupled electrostatic and high-temperature fields is studied numerically. The leaky dielectric model and boiling point evaporation model are used for calculating the electric force and heat mass transfer. The free surface is captured using the volume of fluid method accounting for the variable surface tension and the transition of physical properties across the interface. The flow behaviors and temperature evolutions in different applied fields are predicted. It shows that in the coupled fields, the external electrostatic field restrains the flow inside the droplet and keeps a steady circulation. The flow velocity is reduced due to the interaction between electric body force and the force caused by temperature gradient. The heat transfer from air into the droplet is reduced by the lower flow velocity. The evaporation rate of the droplet in the high-temperature field is decreased.

  9. Stick-Jump (SJ) Evaporation of Strongly Pinned Nanoliter Volume Sessile Water Droplets on Quick Drying, Micropatterned Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuisson, Damien; Merlen, Alain; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2016-03-22

    We present an experimental study of stick-jump (SJ) evaporation of strongly pinned nanoliter volume sessile water droplets drying on micropatterned surfaces. The evaporation is studied on surfaces composed of photolithographically micropatterned negative photoresist (SU-8). The micropatterning of the SU-8 enables circular, smooth, trough-like features to be formed which causes a very strong pinning of the three phase (liquid-vapor-solid) contact line of an evaporating droplet. This is ideal for studying SJ evaporation as it contains sequential constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation phases during droplet evaporation. The evaporation was studied in nonconfined conditions, and forced convection was not used. Micropatterned concentric circles were defined having an initial radius of 1000 μm decreasing by a spacing ranging from 500 to 50 μm. The droplet evaporates, successively pinning and depinning from circle to circle. For each pinning radius, the droplet contact angle and volume are observed to decrease quasi-linearly with time. The experimental average evaporation rates were found to decrease with decreasing pining radii. In contrast, the experimental average evaporation flux is found to increase with decreasing droplet radii. The data also demonstrate the influence of the initial contact angle on evaporation rate and flux. The data indicate that the total evaporation time of a droplet depends on the specific micropattern spacing and that the total evaporation time on micropatterned surfaces is always less than on flat, homogeneous surfaces. Although the surface patterning is observed to have little effect on the average droplet flux-indicating that the underlying evaporation physics is not significantly changed by the patterning-the total evaporation time is considerably modified by patterning, up to a factor or almost 2 compared to evaporation on a flat, homogeneous surface. The closely spaced concentric circle pinning maintains a large droplet radius and

  10. Volatility of Organic Aerosol: Evaporation of Ammonium Sulfate/Succinic Acid Aqueous Solution Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol. PMID:24107221

  11. Multicomponent evaporation model for pure and blended biodiesel droplets in high temperature convective environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, K.; Abu-Ramadan, E.; Li, X. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Renewable energy sources are currently being investigated for their reliability, efficiency, and applicability. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives to conventional diesel fuels in compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reported on a study that compared pure biodiesel, pure diesel and blended fuels using a comprehensive multicomponent droplet vaporization model. The model considers the difference in the gas phase diffusivity of diesel and biodiesel vapors. The paper presented the vaporization characteristics of pure diesel, pure biodiesel fuel droplets as well as the effect of mixing them in different proportions (B20 and B50). The model successfully predicted the vaporization history of a multicomponent droplet. The modeling study revealed that biodiesel droplets evaporate at a slower rate than the diesel droplets because of relatively low vapor pressure. As such, the blending of diesel fuel with small proportions of biodiesel will result in an increase in the evaporation time of diesel fuel to some extent. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Modeling the evaporation of sessile multi-component droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diddens, C.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Wijshoff, H.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    We extended a mathematical model for the drying of sessile droplets, based on the lubrication approximation, to binary mixture droplets. This extension is relevant for e.g. inkjet printing applications, where ink consisting of several components are used. The extension involves the generalization of

  13. The influence of droplet evaporation on fuel-air mixing rate in a burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, K.; Flagan, R. C.; Heywood, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments involving combustion of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels in a simple atmospheric pressure burner were used to evaluate the role of droplet evaporation in the fuel/air mixing process in liquid fuel spray flames. Both air-assist atomization and pressure atomization processes were studied; fuel/air mixing rates were determined on the basis of cross-section average oxygen concentrations for stoichiometric overall operation. In general, it is concluded that droplets act as point sources of fuel vapor until evaporation, when the fuel jet length scale may become important in determining nonuniformities of the fuel vapor concentration. In addition, air-assist atomizers are found to have short droplet evaporation times with respect to the duration of the fuel/air mixing process, while for the pressure jet atomizer the characteristic evaporation and mixing times are similar.

  14. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  15. Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, H. H.

    1953-01-01

    When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius

  16. EVAPORATIVE DROPLETS IN ONE-COMPONENT FLUIDS DRIVEN BY THERMAL GRADIENTS ON SOLID SUBSTRATES

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-01-01

    A continuum hydrodynamic model is presented for one-component liquid-gas flows on nonisothermal solid substrates. Numerical simulations are carried out for evaporative droplets moving on substrates with thermal gradients. For droplets in one-component fluids on heated/cooled substrates, the free liquid-gas interfaces are nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line while the Marangoni effect due to interfacial temperature variation is suppressed. Through evaporation/condensation near the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. Due to this effect, droplets will move toward the cold end on substrates with thermal gradients. The droplet migration velocity is found to be proportional to the change of substrate temperature across the droplet. It follows that for two droplets of different sizes on a substrate with temperature gradient, the larger droplet moves faster and will catch up with the smaller droplet ahead. As soon as they touch, they coalesce rapidly into an even larger droplet that will move even faster. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  17. EVAPORATIVE DROPLETS IN ONE-COMPONENT FLUIDS DRIVEN BY THERMAL GRADIENTS ON SOLID SUBSTRATES

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-03-20

    A continuum hydrodynamic model is presented for one-component liquid-gas flows on nonisothermal solid substrates. Numerical simulations are carried out for evaporative droplets moving on substrates with thermal gradients. For droplets in one-component fluids on heated/cooled substrates, the free liquid-gas interfaces are nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line while the Marangoni effect due to interfacial temperature variation is suppressed. Through evaporation/condensation near the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. Due to this effect, droplets will move toward the cold end on substrates with thermal gradients. The droplet migration velocity is found to be proportional to the change of substrate temperature across the droplet. It follows that for two droplets of different sizes on a substrate with temperature gradient, the larger droplet moves faster and will catch up with the smaller droplet ahead. As soon as they touch, they coalesce rapidly into an even larger droplet that will move even faster. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  18. Probing the evaporation of ternary ethanol-methanol-water droplets by cavity enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, Chris R; Homer, Chris J; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2007-10-21

    Cavity enhanced Raman scattering is used to characterise the evolving composition of ternary aerosol droplets containing methanol, ethanol and water during evaporation into a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Measurements made using non-linear stimulated Raman scattering from these ternary alcohol-water droplets allow the in situ determination of the concentration of the two alcohol components with high accuracy. The overlapping spontaneous Raman bands of the two alcohol components, arising from C-H stretching vibrational modes, are spectrally-resolved in stimulated Raman scattering measurements. We also demonstrate that the evaporation measurements are consistent with a quasi-steady state evaporation model, which can be used to interpret the evaporation dynamics occurring at a range of pressures at a particular evaporation time.

  19. Specificity Switching Pathways in Thermal and Mass Evaporation of Multicomponent Hydrocarbon Droplets: A Mesoscopic Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Rasoul; Luo, Kai H

    2017-07-10

    For well over one century, the Hertz-Knudsen equation has established the relationship between thermal - mass transfer coefficients through a liquid - vapour interface and evaporation rate. These coefficients, however, have been often separately estimated for one-component equilibrium systems and their simultaneous influences on evaporation rate of fuel droplets in multicomponent systems have yet to be investigated at the atomic level. Here we first apply atomistic simulation techniques and quantum/statistical mechanics methods to understand how thermal and mass evaporation effects are controlled kinetically/thermodynamically. We then present a new development of a hybrid method of quantum transition state theory/improved kinetic gas theory, for multicomponent hydrocarbon systems to investigate how concerted-distinct conformational changes of hydrocarbons at the interface affect the evaporation rate. The results of this work provide an important physical concept in fundamental understanding of atomistic pathways in topological interface transitions of chain molecules, resolving an open problem in kinetics of fuel droplets evaporation.

  20. Surface-induced patterns from evaporating droplets of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai De Lange; Wang, Peng; Bergli, Joakim; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2011-01-01

    Evaporation of aqueous droplets of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with a physisorbed layer of humic acid (HA) on a partially hydrophilic substrate induces the formation of a film of CNTs. Here, we investigate the role that the global geometry of the substrate surfaces has on the structure of the CNT film. On a flat mica or silica surface, the evaporation of a convex droplet of the CNT dispersion induces the well-known "coffee ring", while evaporation of a concave droplet (capillary meniscus) of the CNT dispersion in a wedge of two planar mica sheets or between two crossed-cylinder sheets induces a large area (>mm 2) of textured or patterned films characterized by different short- and long-range orientational and positional ordering of the CNTs. The resulting patterns appear to be determined by two competing or cooperative sedimentation mechanisms: (1) capillary forces between CNTs giving micrometer-sized filaments parallel to the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and (2) fingering instability at the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and subsequent pinning of CNTs on the surface giving micrometer-sized filaments of CNTs perpendicular to this boundary line. The interplay between substrate surface geometry and sedimentation mechanisms gives an extra control parameter for manipulating patterns of self-assembling nanoparticles at substrate surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Surface-induced patterns from evaporating droplets of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hongbo

    2011-06-07

    Evaporation of aqueous droplets of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with a physisorbed layer of humic acid (HA) on a partially hydrophilic substrate induces the formation of a film of CNTs. Here, we investigate the role that the global geometry of the substrate surfaces has on the structure of the CNT film. On a flat mica or silica surface, the evaporation of a convex droplet of the CNT dispersion induces the well-known "coffee ring", while evaporation of a concave droplet (capillary meniscus) of the CNT dispersion in a wedge of two planar mica sheets or between two crossed-cylinder sheets induces a large area (>mm 2) of textured or patterned films characterized by different short- and long-range orientational and positional ordering of the CNTs. The resulting patterns appear to be determined by two competing or cooperative sedimentation mechanisms: (1) capillary forces between CNTs giving micrometer-sized filaments parallel to the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and (2) fingering instability at the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and subsequent pinning of CNTs on the surface giving micrometer-sized filaments of CNTs perpendicular to this boundary line. The interplay between substrate surface geometry and sedimentation mechanisms gives an extra control parameter for manipulating patterns of self-assembling nanoparticles at substrate surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Effect of surfactant concentration on the evaporation of droplets on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaolu; Cao, Chong; Cao, Lidong; Zheng, Li; Xu, Jun; Li, Fengmin; Huang, Qiliang

    2018-04-05

    The evaporation kinetics of pesticide droplets deposited on a leaf surface can affect their application efficiency. Evaporation of droplets on the hydrophobic leaves has received considerable attention, but little is known about hydrophilic leaf surfaces. In this study, the effect of surfactant concentration on the evaporation of droplets deposited on cotton leaves was investigated. The evaporation time is roughly decreased for concentrations ranging from 0% to 0.01% and increased from 0.01% to 0.10%. Contrary to the widely held belief that pesticide retention on target crops can rapidly be formed only with surfactant concentrations exceeding the CMC (critical micelle concentration), this study demonstrates that, on hydrophilic cotton leaves, fast evaporation of the droplet at surfactant concentrations of 0.01% (CMC) can reduce the volume quickly, lower the loss point and enhance pesticide retention. In addition, the evolution of droplet volume, height and contact angle on the cotton leaf surface were measured to confirm this conclusion. The result presented herein can be used to guide the use of surfactants and pesticides in agriculture. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluid flow and particle dynamics inside an evaporating droplet containing live bacteria displaying chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokchom, Ashish Kumar; Swaminathan, Rajaram; Singh, Anugrah

    2014-10-21

    Evaporation-induced particle deposition patterns like coffee rings provide easy visual identification that is beneficial for developing inexpensive and simple diagnostic devices for detecting pathogens. In this study, the effect of chemotaxis on such pattern formation has been realized experimentally in drying droplets of bacterial suspensions. We have investigated the velocity field, concentration profile, and deposition pattern in the evaporating droplet of Escherichia coli suspension in the presence and absence of nutrients. Flow visualization experiments using particle image velocimetry (PIV) were carried out with E. coli bacteria as biological tracer particles. Experiments were conducted for suspensions of motile (live) as well as nonmotile (dead) bacteria. In the absence of any nutrient gradient like sugar on the substrate, both types of bacterial suspension showed two symmetric convection cells and a ring like deposition of particles after complete evaporation. Interestingly, the droplet containing live bacterial suspension showed a different velocity field when the sugar was placed at the base of the droplet. This can be attributed to the chemoattractant nature of the sugar, which induced chemotaxis among live bacteria targeted toward the nutrient site. Deposition of the suspended bacteria was also displaced toward the nutrient site as the evaporation proceeded. Our experiments demonstrate that both velocity fields and concentration patterns can be altered by chemotaxis to modify the pattern formation in evaporating droplet containing live bacteria. These results highlight the role of bacterial chemotaxis in modifying coffee ring patterns.

  4. Transient heating and evaporation of moving mono-component liquid fuel droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2016-01-01

    of which the flow and energy transport equations are numerically solved using the finite volume method. The computer code for the model is developed in a generic 3D framework and verified in different ways (e.g., by comparison against analytical solutions for simplified cases, and against experimental......This paper presents a complete description of a model for transient heating and evaporation of moving mono-component liquid fuel droplets. The model mainly consists of gas phase heat and mass transfer analysis, liquid phase analysis, and droplet dynamics analysis, which address the interaction...... between the moving droplets and free-stream flow, the flow and heat and mass transfer within the droplets, and the droplet dynamics and size, respectively. For the liquid phase analysis, the droplets are discretized into a number of control volumes along the radial, polar and azimuthal directions, on each...

  5. Dynamic Roughness Ratio-Based Framework for Modeling Mixed Mode of Droplet Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunjan, Madhu Ranjan; Raj, Rishi

    2017-07-18

    The spatiotemporal evolution of an evaporating sessile droplet and its effect on lifetime is crucial to various disciplines of science and technology. Although experimental investigations suggest three distinct modes through which a droplet evaporates, namely, the constant contact radius (CCR), the constant contact angle (CCA), and the mixed, only the CCR and the CCA modes have been modeled reasonably. Here we use experiments with water droplets on flat and micropillared silicon substrates to characterize the mixed mode. We visualize that a perfect CCA mode after the initial CCR mode is an idealization on a flat silicon substrate, and the receding contact line undergoes intermittent but recurring pinning (CCR mode) as it encounters fresh contaminants on the surface. The resulting increase in roughness lowers the contact angle of the droplet during these intermittent CCR modes until the next depinning event, followed by the CCA mode of evaporation. The airborne contaminants in our experiments are mostly loosely adhered to the surface and travel along with the receding contact line. The resulting gradual increase in the apparent roughness and hence the extent of CCR mode over CCA mode forces appreciable decrease in the contact angle observed during the mixed mode of evaporation. Unlike loosely adhered airborne contaminants on flat samples, micropillars act as fixed roughness features. The apparent roughness fluctuates about the mean value as the contact line recedes between pillars. Evaporation on these surfaces exhibits stick-jump motion with a short-duration mixed mode toward the end when the droplet size becomes comparable to the pillar spacing. We incorporate this dynamic roughness into a classical evaporation model to accurately predict the droplet evolution throughout the three modes, for both flat and micropillared silicon surfaces. We believe that this framework can also be extended to model the evaporation of nanofluids and the coffee-ring effect, among

  6. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, J G M; Geld, C W M van der [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Geurts, B J, E-mail: e.russo@tue.nl [Faculty EEMCS, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The two-way coupling is investigated in terms of the effects of mass and heat transfer on the droplets distributions along the channel wall-normal direction and by comparison of the droplet temperature statistics with respect to the case without evaporation and condensation. A remarkable conclusion is that the presence of evaporating and condensing droplets results in an increase in the non-dimensional heat transfer coefficient of the channel flow represented by the Nusselt number.

  7. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation coefficient and temperature gradient inside droplets. It is pointed out that for the parameters typical for Diesel engine-like conditions, the heat flux in the kinetic region is a linear function of the vapour temperature at the outer boundary of this region, but practically does not depend on vapour density at this boundary for all models, including and not including the effects of inelastic collisions, and including and not including the effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient. For any given temperature at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the heat flux are shown to decrease with increasing numbers of internal degrees of freedom of the molecules. The rate of this decrease is strong for small numbers of these degrees of freedom but negligible when the number of these degrees exceeds 20. This allows us to restrict the analysis to the first 20 arbitrarily chosen degrees of freedom of n-dodecane molecules when considering the effects of inelastic collisions. The mass flux at this boundary decreases almost linearly with increasing vapour density at the same location for all above-mentioned models. For any given vapour density at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the mass flux are smaller for the model, taking into account the contribution of internal degrees of freedom, than for the model ignoring these degrees of freedom. It is shown that the effects of inelastic collisions lead to stronger increase in the predicted droplet evaporation time in Diesel engine-like conditions relative to the hydrodynamic model, compared with the similar increase predicted by the kinetic model considering only elastic collisions. The effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient are shown to be

  8. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  9. An experimental investigation of evaporating sessile droplet on super-hydrophobic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seong Hyuk; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the evaporation process of a water droplet on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. Time-dependent contact angle, height, radius, surface area, and volume were measured for three different surfaces, such as glass, OctadecylTrichloroSilane(OTS), and AlkylKetene Dimmer(AKD) using a digital image analysis technique. For hydrophilic surfaces, the measured contact angle, liquid volume, and height are also compared with numerical estimation. It is found that for super-hydrophobic surfaces, the contact line becomes no longer pinned during evaporation, and three distinct stages for hydrophobic surface cannot be found. For the super-hydrophobic surface, it takes the longest time for evaporation because the droplet maintains spherical shape even near the end of evaporation process

  10. Water droplet condensation and evaporation in turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in the turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapour. We adopt an Euler–Lagrangian formulation based on conservation laws for the mass, momentum and energy of the continuous phase and on empirical

  11. Droplet evaporation and spread on waxy and hairy leaves associated with type and concentration of adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linyun; Zhu, Heping; Ozkan, H Erdal; Bagley, William E; Krause, Charles R

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvants can improve pesticide application efficiency and effectiveness. However, quantifications of the adjuvant-amended pesticide droplet actions on foliage, which could affect application efficiencies, are largely unknown. Droplet evaporation rates and spread on waxy or hairy leaves varied greatly with the adjuvant types tested. On waxy leaves, the wetted areas of droplets containing crop oil concentrate (COC) were significantly smaller than those containing modified seed oil (MSO), non-ionic surfactant (NIS) or oil surfactant blend (OSB), whereas the evaporation rates of COC-amended droplets were significantly higher. On hairy leaves, COC-amended droplets remained on top of the hairs without wetting the epidermis. When the relative concentration was 1.50, the wetted area of droplets with NIS was 9.2 times lower than that with MSO and 6.1 times lower than that with OSB. The wetted area increased as the adjuvant concentration increased. MSO- or OSB-amended droplets spread extensively on the hairy leaf surface until they were completely dried. These results demonstrated that the proper concentration of MSO, NIS or OSB in spray mixtures improved the homogeneity of spray coverage on both waxy and hairy leaf surfaces and could reduce pesticide use. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Pining phenomena of an evaporated droplet on the hydrophobic micro-textured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Dong In; Doh, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun Sun; Moriyama Kiyofumia; Kim, Moo Hwan; Kwak, Ho Jae; Ahn, Ho Seon

    2015-01-01

    When the decreased contact angle reaches the receding contact angle, the contact radius is reduced while maintaining a constant contact angle, i.e., this evaporation mode is known as the constant contact angle (CCA) mode. The emphasis of the droplet evaporation is that the transition from CCR to CCA modes is relative with the rate of the droplet evaporation, and it is markedly influenced by the surface wettability. In this study, it is focused on the evaporation mode transition. Especially, the transition from CCR to CCA modes is investigated on the hydrophobic microtextured surfaces. On the basis of the thermodynamics, the transition from CCR to CCA mode is theoretically analyzed. The thermodynamic model is developed to estimate the receding contact angle at the evaporation mode transition. Additionally, to compare between the theoretical model and experimental results, it is shown that the experimental receding contact angle is well estimated by the receding contact angle with the theoretical model. This study was performed to investigate the pinning phenomena of an evaporated droplet on the hydrophobic micro-textured surfaces. The pinning phenomena at the contact line were shown theoretically to be due to the most favorable thermodynamics process that caused the Gibbs free energy to rapidly reach an equilibrium state during droplet evaporation. The evaporation mode underwent a transition when the decrease in the Gibbs free energy was equivalent for the CCR and CCA modes. On the basis of the analysis described here, a theoretical model was developed to estimate the receding contact angle at the mode transition as a function of the surface conditions

  13. Heat and mass transfer of a fuel droplet evaporating in oscillatory flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangi, M.; Kobayashi, H.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical study of the heat and mass transfer from an evaporating fuel droplet in oscillatory flow was performed. The flow was assumed to be laminar and axisymmetric, and the droplet was assumed to maintain its spherical shape during its lifetime. Based on these assumptions, the conservation equations in a general curvilinear coordinate were solved numerically. The behaviors of droplet evaporation in the oscillatory flow were investigated by analyzing the effects of flow oscillation on the evaporation process of a n-heptane fuel droplet at high pressure. The response of the time history of the square of droplet diameter and space-averaged Nusselt numbers to the main flow oscillation were investigated in frequency band of 1-75 Hz with various oscillation amplitudes. Results showed that, depending on the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation, there are different modes of response of the evaporation process to the flow oscillation. One response mode is synchronous with the main flow oscillation, and thus the quasi-steady condition is attained. Another mode is asynchronous with the flow oscillation and is highly unsteady. As for the evaporation rate, however, in all conditions is more greatly enhanced in oscillatory flow than in quiescent air. To quantify the conditions of the transition from quasi-steady to unsteady, the response of the boundary layer around the droplet surface to the flow oscillation was investigated. The results led to including the oscillation Strouhal number as a criteria for the transition. The numerical results showed that at a low Strouhal number, a quasi-steady boundary layer is formed in response to the flow oscillation, whereas by increasing the oscillation Strouhal number, the phenomena become unsteady.

  14. A computational study of droplet evaporation with fuel vapor jet ejection induced by localized heat sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-05-12

    Droplet evaporation by a localized heat source under microgravity conditions was numerically investigated in an attempt to understand the mechanism of the fuel vapor jet ejection, which was observed experimentally during the flame spread through a droplet array. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a local phase change model in order to effectively capture the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It was found that the surface tension gradient caused by the temperature variation within the droplet creates a thermo-capillary effect, known as the Marangoni effect, creating an internal flow circulation and outer shear flow which drives the fuel vapor into a tail jet. A parametric study demonstrated that the Marangoni effect is indeed significant at realistic droplet combustion conditions, resulting in a higher evaporation constant. A modified Marangoni number was derived in order to represent the surface force characteristics. The results at different pressure conditions indicated that the nonmonotonic response of the evaporation rate to pressure may also be attributed to the Marangoni effect.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of monocomponent droplet temperature/refractive index, size and evaporation rate with phase rainbow refractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingchun; Crua, Cyril; Li, Haipeng; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Mädler, Lutz; Wu, Xuecheng; Gréhan, Gérard

    2018-07-01

    The accurate measurements of droplet temperature, size and evaporation rate are of great importance to characterize the heat and mass transfer during evaporation/condensation processes. The nanoscale size change of a micron-sized droplet exactly describes its transient mass transfer, but is difficult to measure because it is smaller than the resolutions of current size measurement techniques. The Phase Rainbow Refractometry (PRR) technique is developed and applied to measure droplet temperature, size and transient size changes and thereafter evaporation rate simultaneously. The measurement principle of PRR is theoretically derived, and it reveals that the phase shift of the time-resolved ripple structures linearly depends on, and can directly yield, nano-scale size changes of droplets. The PRR technique is first verified through the simulation of rainbows of droplets with changing size, and results show that PRR can precisely measure droplet refractive index, absolute size, as well as size change with absolute and relative errors within several nanometers and 0.6%, respectively, and thus PRR permits accurate measurements of transient droplet evaporation rates. The evaporations of flowing single n-nonane droplet and mono-dispersed n-heptane droplet stream are investigated by two PRR systems with a high speed linear CCD and a low speed array CCD, respectively. Their transient evaporation rates are experimentally determined and quantitatively agree well with the theoretical values predicted by classical Maxwell and Stefan-Fuchs models. With the demonstration of evaporation rate measurement of monocomponent droplet in this work, PRR is an ideal tool for measurements of transient droplet evaporation/condensation processes, and can be extended to multicomponent droplets in a wide range of industrially-relevant applications.

  16. Evaporation of Ventilated Water Droplet: Connection Between Heat and Mass Transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolík, Jiří; Ondráčková, Lucie; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Kulmala, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2001), s. 739-748 ISSN 0021-8502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : droplet evaporation * heat and mass transfer Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.605, year: 2001

  17. Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  18. Clustering and entrainment effects on the evaporation of dilute droplets in a turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Barba, Federico; Picano, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    The evaporation of droplets within turbulent sprays involves unsteady, multiscale, and multiphase processes which make its comprehension and modeling capabilities still limited. The present work aims to investigate the dynamics of droplet vaporization within a turbulent spatial developing jet in dilute, nonreacting conditions. We address the problem considering a turbulent jet laden with acetone droplets and using the direct numerical simulation framework based on a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian approach and the point droplet approximation. A detailed statistical analysis of both phases is presented. In particular, we show how crucial is the preferential sampling of the vapor phase induced by the inhomogeneous localization of the droplets through the flow. Strong droplet preferential segregation develops suddenly downstream from the inflow section both within the turbulent core and the jet mixing layer. Two distinct mechanisms have been found to drive this phenomenon: the inertial small-scale clustering in the jet core and the intermittent dynamics of droplets across the turbulent-nonturbulent interface in the mixing layer, where dry air entrainment occurs. These phenomenologies strongly affect the overall vaporization process and lead to an impressive widening of the droplet size and vaporization rate distributions in the downstream evolution of the turbulent spray.

  19. Transient heating and evaporation of moving fuel droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2014-01-01

    In combustion devices involving direct injection of low-volatility liquid fuel (e.g., bio-oils from pyrolysis process) into the combustor, transient heating and vaporization is an important controlling factor in ignition and combustion of the fuel vapor/air mixture. As a result, quite many...... experimental and numerical efforts have been made on this topic. In this paper, a comprehensive 3D model that addresses the internal circulation, heat and mass transfer within a moving droplet has been successfully developed. The model is calibrated by analytical solutions for simplified cases and validated...

  20. Ionic solubility and solutal advection governed augmented evaporation kinetics of salt solution pendant droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Vivek; Harikrishnan, A. R.; Khurana, Gargi; Dhar, Purbarun

    2018-01-01

    The presence of dispersed inclusions is known to modify the interfacial characteristics in liquids by adsorption-desorption of the ions at interfaces. The present article reports the influencing role of dissolved ions in a polar fluid on its evaporation dynamics. The evaporation dynamics of pendant droplets of aqueous solutions of variant simple salts and concentrations have been experimentally studied. The presence of salts is observed to enhance the evaporation rate (obeying the classical D2 law), and the enhancement has been found to hold a direct proportionality to the concentration of the dissolved salt. Furthermore, it is observed that the degree of enhancement in the evaporation rate is also directly proportional to the solubility of the salt in question. The phenomenon is explained based on the chemical kinetics and thermodynamics of hydration of the ionic species in the polar fluid. The classical evaporation rate constant formulation is found to be inadequate in modeling the enhanced species transport. Additional probing via particle image velocimetry reveals augmented internal circulation within the evaporating salt based drops compared to pure water. Mapping the dynamic surface tension reveals that a salt concentration gradient is generated between the bulk and periphery of the droplet and it could be responsible for the internal advection cells visualized. A thermo-solutal Marangoni and Rayleigh convection based mathematical formulation has been put forward, and it is shown that the enhanced solute-thermal convection could play a major role in enhanced evaporation. The internal circulation mapped from experiments is found to be in good quantitative agreement with the model predictions. Scaling analysis further reveals that the stability of the solutal Marangoni convection surpasses the thermal counterpart with higher salt concentration and solubility. The present article sheds insight into the possible domineering role of conjugate thermohydraulic and

  1. Evaporation of freely suspended single droplets: experimental, theoretical and computational simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hołyst, R; Litniewski, M; Jakubczyk, D; Kolwas, K; Kolwas, M; Kowalski, K; Migacz, S; Palesa, S; Zientara, M

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation is ubiquitous in nature. This process influences the climate, the formation of clouds, transpiration in plants, the survival of arctic organisms, the efficiency of car engines, the structure of dried materials and many other phenomena. Recent experiments discovered two novel mechanisms accompanying evaporation: temperature discontinuity at the liquid–vapour interface during evaporation and equilibration of pressures in the whole system during evaporation. None of these effects has been predicted previously by existing theories despite the fact that after 130 years of investigation the theory of evaporation was believed to be mature. These two effects call for reanalysis of existing experimental data and such is the goal of this review. In this article we analyse the experimental and the computational simulation data on the droplet evaporation of several different systems: water into its own vapour, water into the air, diethylene glycol into nitrogen and argon into its own vapour. We show that the temperature discontinuity at the liquid–vapour interface discovered by Fang and Ward (1999 Phys. Rev. E 59 417–28) is a rule rather than an exception. We show in computer simulations for a single-component system (argon) that this discontinuity is due to the constraint of momentum/pressure equilibrium during evaporation. For high vapour pressure the temperature is continuous across the liquid–vapour interface, while for small vapour pressures the temperature is discontinuous. The temperature jump at the interface is inversely proportional to the vapour density close to the interface. We have also found that all analysed data are described by the following equation: da/dt = P 1 /(a + P 2 ), where a is the radius of the evaporating droplet, t is time and P 1 and P 2 are two parameters. P 1 = −λΔT/(q eff ρ L ), where λ is the thermal conductivity coefficient in the vapour at the interface, ΔT is the temperature difference between the liquid droplet

  2. Visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet by dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Zhong, Liyun; Luo, Chunshu; Niu, Wenhu; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2015-07-16

    To perform the visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet, a dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry (DCSPSI) method is proposed. Based on polarization components to simultaneously generate a pair of orthogonal interferograms with the phase shifts of π/2, the real-time phase of a dynamic process can be retrieved with two-step phase-shifting algorithm. Using this proposed DCSPSI system, the transient mass (TM) of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet with different initial mass were presented through measuring the real-time 3D shape of a droplet. Moreover, the mass flux density (MFD) of the evaporating droplet and its regional distribution were also calculated and analyzed. The experimental results show that the proposed DCSPSI will supply a visual, accurate, noncontact, nondestructive, global tool for the real-time multi-parameter measurement of the droplet evaporation.

  3. Deposition pattern and tracer particle motion of evaporating multi-component sessile droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Muhammad; Yang, Yang; Raza, Ghulam; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Leping; Du, Xiaoze; Wen, Dongsheng

    2017-11-15

    The understanding of near-wall motion, evaporation behavior and dry pattern of sessile nanofluid droplets is fundamental to a wide range of applications such as painting, spray drying, thin film coating, fuel injection and inkjet printing. However, a deep insight into the heat transfer, fluid flow, near-wall particle velocity and their effects on the resulting dry patterns is still much needed to take the full advantage of these nano-sized particles in the droplet. This work investigates the effect of direct absorptive silicon/silver (Si/Ag) hybrid nanofluids via two experiments. The first experiment identifies the motion of tracer particles near the triple line of a sessile nanofluid droplet on a super-hydrophilic substrate under ambient conditions by the multilayer nanoparticle image velocimetry (MnPIV) technique. The second experiment reveals the effect of light-sensitive Si/Ag composite nanoparticles on the droplet evaporation rate and subsequent drying patterns under different radiation intensities. The results show that the presence of nanoparticle in a very small proportion significantly affects the motion of tracer particles, leading to different drying patterns and evaporation rates, which can be very important for the applications such as spray coating and inkjet printing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An Interactive Microsoft(registered tm) Excel Program for Tracking a Single Evaporating Droplet in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Marek, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    Droplet interaction with a high temperature gaseous crossflow is important because of its wide application in systems involving two phase mixing such as in combustion requiring quick mixing of fuel and air with the reduction of pollutants and for jet mixing in the dilution zone of combustors. Therefore, the focus of this work is to investigate dispersion of a two-dimensional atomized and evaporating spray jet into a two-dimensional crossflow. An interactive Microsoft Excel program for tracking a single droplet in crossflow that has previously been developed will be modified to include droplet evaporation computation. In addition to the high velocity airflow, the injected droplets are also subjected to combustor temperature and pressure that affect their motion in the flow field. Six ordinary differential equations are then solved by 4th-order Runge-Kutta method using Microsoft Excel software. Microsoft Visual Basic programming and Microsoft Excel macrocode are used to produce the data and plot graphs describing the droplet's motion in the flow field. This program computes and plots the data sequentially without forcing the user to open other types of plotting programs. A user's manual on how to use the program is included.

  5. Transparent arrays of silver nanowire rings driven by evaporation of sessile droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Kang, Giho; Seong, Baekhoon; Chae, Illkyeong; Teguh Yudistira, Hadi; Lee, Hyungdong; Kim, Hyunggun; Byun, Doyoung

    2017-11-01

    A coffee-ring pattern can be yielded on the three-phase contact line following evaporation of sessile droplets with suspended insoluble solutes, such as particles, DNA molecules, and mammalian cells. The formation of such coffee-ring, together with their suppression has been applied in printing and coating technologies. We present here an experimental study on the assembly of silver nanowires inside an evaporating droplet of a colloidal suspension. The effects of nanowire length and concentration on coffee-ring formation of the colloidal suspension were investigated. Several sizes of NWs with an aspect ratio between 50 and 1000 were systematically investigated to fabricate coffee-ring patterns. Larger droplets containing shorter nanowires formed clearer ring deposits after evaporation. An order-to-disorder transition of the nanowires’ alignment was found inside the rings. A printing technique with the evaporation process enabled fabrication of arrays of silver nanowire rings. We could manipulate the patterns silver nanowire rings, which might be applied to the transparent and flexible electrode.

  6. Transparent arrays of silver nanowire rings driven by evaporation of sessile droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Kang, Giho; Seong, Baekhoon; Chae, Illkyeong; Yudistira, Hadi Teguh; Lee, Hyungdong; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Hyunggun

    2017-01-01

    A coffee-ring pattern can be yielded on the three-phase contact line following evaporation of sessile droplets with suspended insoluble solutes, such as particles, DNA molecules, and mammalian cells. The formation of such coffee-ring, together with their suppression has been applied in printing and coating technologies. We present here an experimental study on the assembly of silver nanowires inside an evaporating droplet of a colloidal suspension. The effects of nanowire length and concentration on coffee-ring formation of the colloidal suspension were investigated. Several sizes of NWs with an aspect ratio between 50 and 1000 were systematically investigated to fabricate coffee-ring patterns. Larger droplets containing shorter nanowires formed clearer ring deposits after evaporation. An order-to-disorder transition of the nanowires’ alignment was found inside the rings. A printing technique with the evaporation process enabled fabrication of arrays of silver nanowire rings. We could manipulate the patterns silver nanowire rings, which might be applied to the transparent and flexible electrode. (paper)

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations for the motion of evaporative droplets driven by thermal gradients along nanochannels

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Congmin

    2013-04-04

    For a one-component fluid on a solid substrate, a thermal singularity may occur at the contact line where the liquid-vapor interface intersects the solid surface. Physically, the liquid-vapor interface is almost isothermal at the liquid-vapor coexistence temperature in one-component fluids while the solid surface is almost isothermal for solids of high thermal conductivity. Therefore, a temperature discontinuity is formed if the two isothermal interfaces are of different temperatures and intersect at the contact line. This leads to the so-called thermal singularity. The localized hydrodynamics involving evaporation/condensation near the contact line leads to a contact angle depending on the underlying substrate temperature. This dependence has been shown to lead to the motion of liquid droplets on solid substrates with thermal gradients (Xu and Qian 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 061603). In the present work, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as numerical experiments to further confirm the predictions made from our previous continuum hydrodynamic modeling and simulations, which are actually semi-quantitatively accurate down to the small length scales in the problem. Using MD simulations, we investigate the motion of evaporative droplets in one-component Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nanochannels with thermal gradients. The droplet is found to migrate in the direction of decreasing temperature of solid walls, with a migration velocity linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. This agrees with the prediction of our continuum model. We then measure the effect of droplet size on the droplet motion. It is found that the droplet mobility is inversely proportional to a dimensionless coefficient associated with the total rate of dissipation due to droplet movement. Our results show that this coefficient is of order unity and increases with the droplet size for the small droplets (∼10 nm) simulated in the present work. These findings are in semi

  8. Measurement and interpretation of growth and evaporation of monodispersed droplets in a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, F.; Paikert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A special gasdynamic shock tube process in combination with a Mie light scattering method is used to study growth and subsequent evaporation of monodispersed droplets carried in argon or air. The droplets are generated by homogeneous nucleation and observed in the micrometer range (0.15-6 micrometer radius). Droplet concentrations range from 10-1000/cu mm. Four different substances, i.e. water, n-propanol, methanol and n-hexane are tested for a wide range of properties. A model covering the entire range between large (Kn much greater than 1) and small Knudsen numbers (K much less than 1) is applied to interpret the experimental data. Excellent agreement is found.

  9. Flow regime and deposition pattern of evaporating binary mixture droplet suspended with particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The flow regimes and the deposition pattern have been investigated by changing the ethanol concentration in a water-based binary mixture droplet suspended with alumina nanoparticles. To visualize the flow patterns, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been applied in the binary liquid droplet containing the fluorescent microspheres. Three distinct flow regimes have been revealed in the evaporation. In Regime I, the vortices and chaotic flows are found to carry the particles to the liquid-vapor interface and to promote the formation of particle aggregation. The aggregates move inwards in Regime II as induced by the Marangoni flow along the droplet free surface. Regime III is dominated by the drying of the left water and the capillary flow driving particles radially outward is observed. The relative weightings of Regimes I and II, which are enhanced with an increasing load of ethanol, determine the motion of the nanoparticles and the formation of the final drying pattern.

  10. Simple scaling laws for the evaporation of droplets pinned on pillars: Transfer-rate- and diffusion-limited regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Perez, Ruth; García-Cordero, José L; Escobar, Juan V

    2017-12-01

    The evaporation of droplets can give rise to a wide range of interesting phenomena in which the dynamics of the evaporation are crucial. In this work, we find simple scaling laws for the evaporation dynamics of axisymmetric droplets pinned on millimeter-sized pillars. Different laws are found depending on whether evaporation is limited by the diffusion of vapor molecules or by the transfer rate across the liquid-vapor interface. For the diffusion-limited regime, we find that a mass-loss rate equal to 3/7 of that of a free-standing evaporating droplet brings a good balance between simplicity and physical correctness. We also find a scaling law for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions. The scaling laws found are validated against experiments of the evaporation of droplets of (1) water, (2) blood plasma, and (3) a mixture of water and polyethylene glycol, pinned on acrylic pillars of different diameters. These results shed light on the macroscopic dynamics of evaporation on pillars as a first step towards the understanding of other complex phenomena that may be taking place during the evaporation process, such as particle transport and chemical reactions.

  11. Simple scaling laws for the evaporation of droplets pinned on pillars: Transfer-rate- and diffusion-limited regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Perez, Ruth; García-Cordero, José L.; Escobar, Juan V.

    2017-12-01

    The evaporation of droplets can give rise to a wide range of interesting phenomena in which the dynamics of the evaporation are crucial. In this work, we find simple scaling laws for the evaporation dynamics of axisymmetric droplets pinned on millimeter-sized pillars. Different laws are found depending on whether evaporation is limited by the diffusion of vapor molecules or by the transfer rate across the liquid-vapor interface. For the diffusion-limited regime, we find that a mass-loss rate equal to 3/7 of that of a free-standing evaporating droplet brings a good balance between simplicity and physical correctness. We also find a scaling law for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions. The scaling laws found are validated against experiments of the evaporation of droplets of (1) water, (2) blood plasma, and (3) a mixture of water and polyethylene glycol, pinned on acrylic pillars of different diameters. These results shed light on the macroscopic dynamics of evaporation on pillars as a first step towards the understanding of other complex phenomena that may be taking place during the evaporation process, such as particle transport and chemical reactions.

  12. Surfactant-adsorption-induced initial depinning behavior in evaporating water and nanofluid sessile droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2015-05-19

    A surfactant-induced autophobic effect has been observed to initiate an intense depinning behavior at the initial stage of evaporation in both pure water and nanofluid sessile droplets. The cationic surfactant adsorbing to the negatively charged silicon wafer makes the solid surface more hydrophobic. The autophobing-induced depinning behavior, leading to an enlarged contact angle and a shortened base diameter, takes place only when the surfactant concentration is below its critical micelle concentration (cmc). The initial spreading degree right before the droplet retraction, the retracting velocity of the contact line, and the duration of the initial droplet retraction are shown to depend negatively on the surfactant concentration below the cmc. An unexpected enhancement in the initial depinning has been found in the nanofluid droplets, possibly resulting from the hydrophilic interplay between the graphite nanoparticle deposition and the surfactant molecules. Such promotion of the initial depinning due to the nanoparticle deposition makes the droplet retract even at a surfactant concentration higher than the cmc (1.5 cmc). The resulting deposition formed in the presence of the depinning behavior has great enhancement for coffee-ring formation as compared to the one free of surfactant, implying that the formation of a coffee ring does not require the pinning of the contact line during the entire drying process.

  13. Visualization and mechanisms of splashing erosion of electrodes in a DC air arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yi; Cui, Yufei; Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Fei; Sun, Hao; Niu, Chunping; Fan, Shaodi; Murphy, Anthony B

    2017-01-01

    The splashing erosion of electrodes in a DC atmospheric-pressure air arc has been investigated by visualization of the electrode surface and the sputtered droplets, and tracking of the droplet trajectories, using image processing techniques. A particle tracking velocimetry algorithm has been introduced to measure the sputtering velocity distribution. Erosion of both tungsten–copper and tungsten–ceria electrodes is studied; in both cases electrode erosion is found to be dominated by droplet splashing rather than metal evaporation. Erosion is directly influenced by both melting and the formation of plasma jets, and can be reduced by the tuning of the plasma jet and electrode material. The results provide an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the long lifetime of tungsten–copper electrodes, and may provide a path for the design of the electrode system subjected to electric arc to minimize erosion. (letter)

  14. Visualization and mechanisms of splashing erosion of electrodes in a DC air arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Cui, Yufei; Rong, Mingzhe; Murphy, Anthony B.; Yang, Fei; Sun, Hao; Niu, Chunping; Fan, Shaodi

    2017-11-01

    The splashing erosion of electrodes in a DC atmospheric-pressure air arc has been investigated by visualization of the electrode surface and the sputtered droplets, and tracking of the droplet trajectories, using image processing techniques. A particle tracking velocimetry algorithm has been introduced to measure the sputtering velocity distribution. Erosion of both tungsten-copper and tungsten-ceria electrodes is studied; in both cases electrode erosion is found to be dominated by droplet splashing rather than metal evaporation. Erosion is directly influenced by both melting and the formation of plasma jets, and can be reduced by the tuning of the plasma jet and electrode material. The results provide an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the long lifetime of tungsten-copper electrodes, and may provide a path for the design of the electrode system subjected to electric arc to minimize erosion.

  15. Volatility of methylglyoxal cloud SOA formed through OH radical oxidation and droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Schwier, Allison N.; Lim, Yong B.; McNeill, V. Faye; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-04-01

    The volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud processing (aqueous hydroxyl radical (radOH) oxidation and droplet evaporation) of methylglyoxal (MGly) was studied. Effective vapor pressure and effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap,eff) were determined using 1) droplets containing MGly and its oxidation products, 2) a Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG) system, and 3) Temperature Programmed Desorption Aerosol-Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TPD Aerosol-CIMS). Simulated in-cloud MGly oxidation (for 10-30 min) produces an organic mixture of higher and lower volatility components with an overall effective vapor pressure of (4 ± 7) × 10-7 atm at pH 3. The effective vapor pressure decreases by a factor of 2 with addition of ammonium hydroxide (pH 7). The fraction of organic material remaining in the particle-phase after drying was smaller than for similar experiments with glycolaldehyde and glyoxal SOA. The ΔHvap,eff of pyruvic acid and oxalic acid + methylglyoxal in the mixture (from TPD Aerosol-CIMS) were smaller than the theoretical enthalpies of the pure compounds and smaller than that estimated for the entire precursor/product mix after droplet evaporation. After 10-30 min of aqueous oxidation (one cloud cycle) the majority of the MGly + radOH precursor/product mix (even neutralized) will volatilize during droplet evaporation; neutralization and at least 80 min of oxidation at 10-12 M radOH (or >12 h at 10-14 M) is needed before low volatility ammonium oxalate exceeds pyruvate.

  16. Droplet evaporation and combustion in a liquid-gas multiphase system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradoglu, Metin; Irfan, Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    Droplet evaporation and combustion in a liquid-gas multiphase system are studied computationally using a front-tracking method. One field formulation is used to solve the flow, energy and species equations with suitable jump conditions. Both phases are assumed to be incompressible; however, the divergence-free velocity field condition is modified to account for the phase change at the interface. Both temperature and species gradient driven phase change processes are simulated. Extensive validation studies are performed using the benchmark cases: The Stefan and the sucking interface problems, d2 law and wet bulb temperature comparison with the psychrometric chart values. The phase change solver is then extended to incorporate the burning process following the evaporation as a first step towards the development of a computational framework for spray combustion. We used detailed chemistry, variable transport properties and ideal gas behaviour for a n-heptane droplet combustion; the chemical kinetics being handled by the CHEMKIN. An operator-splitting approach is used to advance temperature and species mass fraction in time. The numerical results of the droplet burning rate, flame temperature and flame standoff ratio show good agreement with the experimental and previous numeric.

  17. Sizing of single evaporating droplet with Near-Forward Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, M.; Jakubczyk, D.; Derkachov, G.; Archer, J.

    2017-11-01

    We have developed an optical setup and related numerical models to study evolution of single evaporating micro-droplets by analysis of their spectral properties. Our approach combines the advantages of the electrodynamic trapping with the broadband spectral analysis with the supercontinuum laser illumination. The elastically scattered light within the spectral range of 500-900 nm is observed by a spectrometer placed at the near-forward scattering angles between 4.3 ° and 16.2 ° and compared with the numerically generated lookup table of the broadband Mie scattering. Our solution has been successfully applied to infer the size evolution of the evaporating droplets of pure liquids (diethylene and ethylene glycol) and suspensions of nanoparticles (silica and gold nanoparticles in diethylene glycol), with maximal accuracy of ± 25 nm. The obtained results have been compared with the previously developed sizing techniques: (i) based on the analysis of the Mie scattering images - the Mie Scattering Lookup Table Method and (ii) the droplet weighting. Our approach provides possibility to handle levitating objects with much larger size range (radius from 0.5 μm to 30 μm) than with the use of optical tweezers (typically radius below 8 μm) and analyse them with much wider spectral range than with commonly used LED sources.

  18. Encapsulation of Single Nanoparticle in Fast-Evaporating Micro-droplets Prevents Particle Agglomeration in Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming; Shi, Xinjian; Lyu, Fengjiao; Levy-Wendt, Ben Louis; Zheng, Xiaolin; Tang, Sindy K Y

    2017-08-09

    This work describes the use of fast-evaporating micro-droplets to finely disperse nanoparticles (NPs) in a polymer matrix for the fabrication of nanocomposites. Agglomeration of particles is a key obstacle for broad applications of nanocomposites. The classical approach to ensure the dispersibility of NPs is to modify the surface chemistry of NPs with ligands. The surface properties of NPs are inevitably altered, however. To overcome the trade-off between dispersibility and surface-functionality of NPs, we develop a new approach by dispersing NPs in a volatile solvent, followed by mixing with uncured polymer precursors to form micro-droplet emulsions. Most of these micro-droplets contain no more than one NP per drop, and they evaporate rapidly to prevent the agglomeration of NPs during the polymer curing process. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of TiO 2 NP@PDMS nanocomposites for solar fuel generation reactions with high photocatalytic efficiency and recyclability arising from the fine dispersion of TiO 2 . Our simple method eliminates the need for surface functionalization of NPs. Our approach is applicable to prepare nanocomposites comprising a wide range of polymers embedded with NPs of different composition, sizes, and shapes. It has the potential for creating nanocomposites with novel functions.

  19. Energetics and dynamics of droplet evaporation in high temperature intermediate Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renksizbulut, M.

    Nusselt Numbers and drag coefficients of single-component liquid droplets and solid spheres in high temperature, intermediate Reynolds Number flows were investigated. The evaporation of suspended water, Methanol and n-Heptane droplets were followed in laminar air streams up to 1059 K in temperature using a steady-state measurement technique. It is found that the dynamic blowing effect of evaporation causes large reductions in heat transfer rates, and that the film conditions constitute an appropriate reference state for the evaluation of thermophysical properties. The numerical results indicate that the blowing effect of evaporation on momentum transfer is to reduce friction drag very significantly but at the same time increase pressure drag by almost an equal amount; the net effect on the total drag force being only a marginal reduction. In all cases, it is found that thermophysical property variations play a very dominant role in reducing the drag forces acting on cold particles. Results are analysed and a correlation for stagnation-point heat transfer is also presented.

  20. On the origin of surface imposed anisotropic growth of salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids crystals during droplet evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Przybyłek, Maciej; Cysewski, Piotr; Pawelec, Maciej; Ziółkowska, Dorota; Kobierski, Mirosław

    2018-01-01

    In this paper droplet evaporative crystallization of salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) crystals on different surfaces, such as glass, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and paraffin was studied. The obtained crystals were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) technique. In order to better understand the effect of the surface on evaporative crystallization, crystals deposited on glass were scraped off. Moreover, evaporative crystallization of a large volume of solution was perf...

  1. An infrared scattering by evaporating droplets at the initial stage of a pool fire suppression by water sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Dembele, Siaka; Wen, Jennifer X.

    2018-06-01

    The computational analysis of downward motion and evaporation of water droplets used to suppress a typical transient pool fire shows local regions of a high volume fraction of relatively small droplets. These droplets are comparable in size with the infrared wavelength in the range of intense flame radiation. The estimated scattering of the radiation by these droplets is considerable throughout the entire spectrum except for a narrow region in the vicinity of the main absorption peak of water where the anomalous refraction takes place. The calculations of infrared radiation field in the model pool fire indicate the strong effect of scattering which can be observed experimentally to validate the fire computational model.

  2. Role of red cells and plasma composition on blood sessile droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanotte, Luca; Laux, Didier; Charlot, Benoît; Abkarian, Manouk

    2017-11-01

    The morphology of dried blood droplets derives from the deposition of red cells, the main components of their solute phase. Up to now, evaporation-induced convective flows were supposed to be at the base of red cell distribution in blood samples. Here, we present a direct visualization by videomicroscopy of the internal dynamics in desiccating blood droplets, focusing on the role of cell concentration and plasma composition. We show that in diluted suspensions, the convection is promoted by the rich molecular composition of plasma, whereas it is replaced by an outward red blood cell displacement front at higher hematocrits. We also evaluate by ultrasounds the effect of red cell deposition on the temporal evolution of sample rigidity and adhesiveness.

  3. Formation of nitrogen-containing oligomers by methylglyoxal and amines in simulated evaporating cloud droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haan, David O; Hawkins, Lelia N; Kononenko, Julia A; Turley, Jacob J; Corrigan, Ashley L; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L

    2011-02-01

    Reactions of methylglyoxal with amino acids, methylamine, and ammonium sulfate can take place in aqueous aerosol and evaporating cloud droplets. These processes are simulated by drying droplets and bulk solutions of these compounds (at low millimolar and 1 M concentrations, respectively) and analyzing the residuals by scanning mobility particle sizing, nuclear magnetic resonance, aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), and electrospray ionization MS. The results are consistent with imine (but not diimine) formation on a time scale of seconds, followed by the formation of nitrogen-containing oligomers, methylimidazole, and dimethylimidazole products on a time scale of minutes to hours. Measured elemental ratios are consistent with imidazoles and oligomers being major reaction products, while effective aerosol densities suggest extensive reactions take place within minutes. These reactions may be a source of the light-absorbing, nitrogen-containing oligomers observed in urban and biomass-burning aerosol particles.

  4. Gas fluxing of aluminum: a bubble probe for optimization of bubbles/bubble distribution and minimization of splashing/droplet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James W. Evans; Auitumn Fjeld

    2006-01-01

    totaling 1.549 million lbs. for only thirteen of the twenty three primary smelters then in operation in the US. The research work described in the body of this report (the doctoral dissertation of Dr. Autumn M. Fjeld) had as its objective the improvement of gas fluxing technology to reduce emissions while still maintaining fluxing unit metal throughput. A second objective was a better understanding of the splashing and droplet emission that occurs during fluxing at high gas throughput rates. In the extreme such droplets can form undesired accretions on the walls and gas exit lines of the fluxing unit. Consequently, the productivity of a fluxing unit is sometimes limited by the need to avoid such spraying of droplets produced as gas bubbles break at the metal surface. The approach used was a combination of experimental work in laboratories at UC Berkeley and at the Alcoa Technical Center. The experimental work was mostly on a bubble probe that could be used to determine the extent of dispersion of gas bubbles in the fluxing unit (a parameter affecting the utilization of the injected chlorine). Additionally a high speed digital movie camera was used to study droplet formation due to gas bubbles bursting at the surface of a low melting point alloy. The experimental work was supported by mathematical modeling. In particular, two FLUENT? base mathematical models were developed to compute the metal flow and distribution of the gas within a fluxing unit. Results from these models were then used in a third model to compute emissions and the progress of impurity removal as a function of parameters such as rotor speed. The project was successful in demonstrating that the bubble probe could detect bubbles in a gas fluxing unit at the Alcoa technical Center outside Pittsburgh, PA. This unit is a commercial sized one and the probe, with its associated electronics, was subjected to the hostile molten aluminum, electrical noise etc. Despite this the probes were, on several occasions

  5. Study of the effects of elevated pressure and temperature on the evaporation of a single fuel droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, A.A.; Memon, M.A.; Durrani, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental studies were made on the evaporation of single fuel droplet in high pressure and high temperature gaseous environments. The time history of the size and the temperature of an evaporating droplet suspended on a fine quartz thread was recorded using a movie camera and an oscilloscope. The fuel used was n-heptane. The experimental range of conditions consists of gas pressure from 0 atg to 50 atg, gas temperature from 100 c to 500 c which correspond to the subcritical, critical and supercritical state of a droplet. The evaporation rate, the life time and the wet-bulb temperature of a droplet were obtained. The results showed that the temperature of an evaporating droplet increased with an increase in gas pressure and temperature, through it did not reach the critical temperature of fuel even at supercritical environments. It was evident that with an increase in gas pressure, the evaporation rate increased at high gas temperature while it decreased at low gas temperature. (author)

  6. A surrogate fuel formulation to characterize heating and evaporation of light naphtha droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Kabil, I.

    2018-03-08

    Light naphtha (LN) is gaining interest in internal combustion (IC) engine applications due to its low refining cost and higher heating values compared to commercial gasoline. To properly describe the chemical and physical behavior of the LN fuel under IC engine conditions, a systematic procedure to develop unified physical and chemical surrogates is described. The reduced component models to describe the chemical characteristics of LN are combined with the effective thermal conductivity/effective diffusivity (ETC/ED) model to represent the accurate evaporation behavior. Three surrogate fuels consisting of three to five components are presented and their performance in heating and evaporation of a single LN droplet is compared against the conventional primary reference fuel (PRF65) surrogate which is based on chemical aspects only. Unlike the previous approaches, the new surrogates also target matching the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and research octane number in order to accurately describe the chemical behavior of the fuel. Subsequently, the performance of the surrogates in describing spray characteristics is tested by computational simulations compared with experimental measurements. The simulations were carried out using CONVERGE CFD package. The ETC/ED model was implemented into CONVERGE using user-defined functions. The predicted spray penetration length for the developed surrogates shows good agreement with the experimental data. At engine-like conditions, the ETC/ED model predicts higher vapor mass than the infinite thermal conductivity/infinite diffusivity model, hence showing the expected trend by incorporating the realistic droplet heating process.

  7. Impact of droplet evaporation rate on resulting in vitro performance parameters of pressurized metered dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Poonam; Grimes, Matthew R; Stein, Stephen W; Myrdal, Paul B

    2017-08-07

    Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are widely used for the treatment of pulmonary diseases. The overall efficiency of pMDI drug delivery may be defined by in vitro parameters such as the amount of drug that deposits on the model throat and the proportion of the emitted dose that has particles that are sufficiently small to deposit in the lung (i.e., fine particle fraction, FPF). The study presented examines product performance of ten solution pMDI formulations containing a variety of cosolvents with diverse chemical characteristics by cascade impaction with three inlets (USP induction port, Alberta Idealized Throat, and a large volume chamber). Through the data generated in support of this study, it was demonstrated that throat deposition, cascade impactor deposition, FPF, and mass median aerodynamic diameter of solution pMDIs depend on the concentration and vapor pressure of the cosolvent, and the selection of model throat. Theoretical droplet lifetimes were calculated for each formulation using a discrete two-stage evaporation process model and it was determined that the droplet lifetime is highly correlated to throat deposition and FPF indicating that evaporation kinetics significantly influences pMDI drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. From bubble bursting to droplet evaporation in the context of champagne aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seon, Thomas; Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Liger-Belair, Gerard

    2015-11-01

    As champagne or sparkling wine is poured into a glass, a myriad of ascending bubbles collapse and therefore radiate a multitude of tiny droplets above the free surface into the form of very characteristic and refreshing aerosols. Because these aerosols have been found to hold the organoleptic ``essence'' of champagne they are believed to play a crucial role in the flavor release in comparison with that from a flat wine for example. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the velocity, radius and maximum height of the first jet drop following bubble collapse have been characterized, with varying bubble size and liquid properties in the context of champagne aerosols. Using the experimental results and simple theoretical models for drop and surface evaporation, we show that bubble bursting aerosols drastically enhance the transfer of liquid in the atmosphere with respect to a flat liquid surface. Contrary to popular opinion, we exhibit that small bubbles are negative in terms of aroma release, and we underline bubble radii enabling to optimize the droplet height and evaporation in the whole range of champagne properties. These results pave the road to the fine tuning of champagne aroma diffusion, a major issue of the sparkling wine industry.

  9. Effervescence in champagne and sparkling wines: From bubble bursting to droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séon, T.; Liger-Belair, G.

    2017-01-01

    When a bubble reaches an air-liquid interface, it ruptures, projecting a multitude of tiny droplets in the air. Across the oceans, an estimated 1018 to 1020 bubbles burst every second, and form the so called sea spray, a major player in earth's climate system. At a smaller scale, in a glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall, rise towards the surface and burst, giving birth to a particular aerosol that holds a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in simple liquids, we depict each step of this effervescence, from bubble bursting to drop evaporation. In particular, we propose simple scaling laws for the jet velocity and the top drop size. We unravel experimentally the intricate roles of bubble shape, capillary waves, gravity, and liquid properties in the jet dynamics and the drop detachment. We demonstrate how damping action of viscosity produces faster and smaller droplets and more generally how liquid properties enable to control the bubble bursting aerosol characteristics. In this context, the particular case of Champagne wine aerosol is studied in details and the key features of this aerosol are identified. We demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. Conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of aerosol characteristics and flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue of the sparkling wine industry.

  10. A surrogate fuel formulation to characterize heating and evaporation of light naphtha droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Kabil, I.; Sim, J.; Badra, J.A.; Eldrainy, Y.; Abdelghaffar, W.; Mubarak Ali, M. Jaasim; Ahmed, Ahfaz; Sarathy, Mani; Im, Hong G.; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2018-01-01

    Light naphtha (LN) is gaining interest in internal combustion (IC) engine applications due to its low refining cost and higher heating values compared to commercial gasoline. To properly describe the chemical and physical behavior of the LN fuel under IC engine conditions, a systematic procedure to develop unified physical and chemical surrogates is described. The reduced component models to describe the chemical characteristics of LN are combined with the effective thermal conductivity/effective diffusivity (ETC/ED) model to represent the accurate evaporation behavior. Three surrogate fuels consisting of three to five components are presented and their performance in heating and evaporation of a single LN droplet is compared against the conventional primary reference fuel (PRF65) surrogate which is based on chemical aspects only. Unlike the previous approaches, the new surrogates also target matching the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and research octane number in order to accurately describe the chemical behavior of the fuel. Subsequently, the performance of the surrogates in describing spray characteristics is tested by computational simulations compared with experimental measurements. The simulations were carried out using CONVERGE CFD package. The ETC/ED model was implemented into CONVERGE using user-defined functions. The predicted spray penetration length for the developed surrogates shows good agreement with the experimental data. At engine-like conditions, the ETC/ED model predicts higher vapor mass than the infinite thermal conductivity/infinite diffusivity model, hence showing the expected trend by incorporating the realistic droplet heating process.

  11. Complexities of splashing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deegan, R D; Brunet, P; Eggers, J

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of a drop of liquid onto a thin layer of the same liquid. We give an overview of the sequence of events that occur as the two most important dimensionless control parameters are varied. In particular, multiple cohorts of droplets can be ejected at different stages after impact due to different mechanisms. Edgerton's famous Milkdrop Coronet is only observed for a narrow range of parameters. Outside this range, the splash is either qualitatively different, or suffers from a much lower level of regularity. (cover illustration)

  12. Effect of internal flow and evaporation on hydrogel assembly process at droplet interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Giho; Seong, Baekhoon; Gim, Yeonghyeon; Ko, Han Seo; Byun, Doyoung

    2017-11-01

    Recently, controlling the behavior of nanoparticles inside liquid droplet has been widely studied. There have been many reports about the mechanism of the nanoparticles assembly and fabrication of a thin film on a substrate. However, the assembly mechanism at a liquid-air interface has not been clearly understood to form polymer chains into films. Herein, we investigated the role of internal flow on the thin film assembly process at the interface of the hydrogel droplet. The internal fluid flow during the formation of the hydrogel film was visualized systematically using micro-PIV (Particle image velocimetry) technique at various temperatures. We show that the buoyancy effect and convection flow induced by heat can affect the film morphology and its mechanical characteristics. Due to the accelerated fluid flow inside the droplet and evaporation flux, densely assembled hydrogel film was able to be formed. Film strength was increased 24% with temperature increase from 40 to 80 degrees Celsius. We expect our investigations could be applied to many applications such as self-assembly of planar structures at the interface in coating and printing process. The support from the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2015R1A2A1A05001829) is acknowledged.

  13. Single-droplet evaporation kinetics and particle formation in an acoustic levitator. Part 1: evaporation of water microdroplets assessed using boundary-layer and acoustic levitation theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffter, Heiko; Lee, Geoffrey

    2007-09-01

    The suitability of a single droplet drying acoustic levitator as a model for the spray drying of aqueous, pharmaceutically-relevant solutes used to produce protein-loaded particles has been examined. The acoustic levitator was initially evaluated by measuring the drying rates of droplets of pure water in dependence of drying-air temperature and flow rate. The measured drying rates were higher than those predicted by boundary layer theory because of the effects of primary acoustic streaming. Sherwood numbers of 2.6, 3.6, and 4.4 at drying-air temperatures of 25 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 60 degrees C were determined, respectively. Acoustic levitation theory could predict the measured drying rates and Sherwood numbers only when a forced-convection drying-air stream was used to neuralize the retarding effect of secondary acoustic streaming on evaporation rate. At still higher drying-air flow rates, the Ranz-Marshall correlation accurately predicts Sherwood number, provided a stable droplet position in the standing acoustic wave is maintained. The measured Sherwood numbers and droplet Reynolds numbers show that experiments performed in the levitator in still air are taking place effectively under conditions of substantial forced convection. The similitude of these values to those occurring in spray dryers is fortuitous for the suitability of the acoustic levitator as a droplet evaporation model for spray drying. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Adaptive Chemical Networks under Non-Equilibrium Conditions: The Evaporating Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armao, Joseph J; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2016-10-17

    Non-volatile solutes in an evaporating drop experience an out-of-equilibrium state due to non-linear concentration effects and complex flow patterns. Here, we demonstrate a small molecule chemical reaction network that undergoes a rapid adaptation response to the out-of-equilibrium conditions inside the droplet leading to control over the molecular constitution and spatial arrangement of the deposition pattern. Adaptation results in a pronounced coffee stain effect and coupling to chemical concentration gradients within the drop is demonstrated. Amplification and suppression of network species are readily identifiable with confocal fluorescence microscopy. We anticipate that these observations will contribute to the design and exploration of out-of-equilibrium chemical systems, as well as be useful towards the development of point-of-care medical diagnostics and controlled deposition of small molecules through inkjet printing. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The making of a splash

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2011-12-20

    The splash resulting from the impact of a drop onto a pool is a particularly beautiful manifestation of a canonical problem, where a mass of fluid breaks up into smaller pieces. Despite over a century of experimental study, the splashing mechanics have eluded full description, the details often being obscured by the very rapid motions and small length scales involved. Zhang et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 690, 2012, pp. 515) introduce a powerful new tool to the experimental arsenal, when they apply X-ray imaging to study the fine ejecta sheets which emerge during the earliest contact of the drop. Their images reveal hidden details and complex underlying dynamics, which will directly affect the size and velocity of the splashing droplets. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  16. Modelling of heating and evaporation of gasoline fuel droplets: A comparative analysis of approximations

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2013-09-01

    Modelling of gasoline fuel droplet heating and evaporation processes is investigated using several approximations of this fuel. These are quasi-components used in the quasi-discrete model and the approximations of these quasi-components (Surrogate I (molar fractions: 83.0% n-C 6H14 + 15.6% n-C10H22 + 1.4% n-C14H30) and Surrogate II (molar fractions: 83.0% n-C7H16 + 15.6% n-C11H24 + 1.4% n-C15H32)). Also, we have used Surrogate A (molar fractions: 56% n-C7H16 + 28% iso-C8H 18 + 17% C7H8) and Surrogate B (molar fractions: 63% n-C7H16 + 20% iso-C8H 18 + 17% C7H8), originally introduced based on the closeness of the ignition delay of surrogates to that of gasoline fuel. The predictions of droplet radii and temperatures based on three quasi-components and their approximations (Surrogates I and II) are shown to be much more accurate than the predictions using Surrogates A and B. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A study of the evaporation of heterogeneous water droplets under active heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maxim; Legros, Jean Claude; Strizhak, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Using high-speed video registration tools with a sample rate of 102-104 frames per second (fps), we studied the patterns in the evaporation of water droplets containing 1 and 2 mm individual metallic inclusions in a high-temperature gas environment. The materials of choice for the inclusions were steels (AISI 1080 carbon steel and AISI type 316L stainless steel) and pure nickel. We established the lifetimes τh of the liquid droplets under study with a controlled increase in the gas environment temperature up to 900 K. We also considered the physical aspects behind the τh distribution in the experiments conducted and specified the conditions for more effective cooling of metallic inclusions. Following the experimental research findings, a method was devised for effective reactor vessel cooling to avoid a meltdown at a nuclear power plant. The optimization of heat and mass transfer modes was performed within the framework of the strategic plan for the development of National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University as one of the world-leading universities.

  18. [Dynamics of Irreversible Evaporation of a Water-Protein Droplet and a Problem of Structural and Dynamical Experiments with Single Molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitan, K V; Armeev, G A; Shaytan, A K

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effect of isothermal and adiabatic evaporation of water on the state of a water-protein droplet. The discussed problem is of current importance due to development of techniques to perform single molecule experiments using free electron lasers. In such structure-dynamic experiments the delivery of a sample into the X-ray beam is performed using the microdroplet injector. The time between the injection and delivery is in the order of microseconds. In this paper we developed a specialized variant of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for the study of irreversible isothermal evaporation of the droplet. Using in silico experiments we determined the parameters of isothermal evaporation of the water-protein droplet with the sodium and chloride ions in the concentration range of 0.3 M at different temperatures. The energy of irreversible evaporation determined from in silico experiments at the initial stages of evaporation virtually coincides with the specific heat of evaporation for water. For the kinetics of irreversible adiabatic evaporation an exact analytical solution was obtained in the limit of high thermal conductivity of the droplet (or up to the droplet size of -100 Å). This analytical solution incorporates parameters that are determined using in silico. experiments on isothermal droplet evaporation. We show that the kinetics of adiabatic evaporation and cooling of the droplet scales with the droplet size. Our estimates of the water-protemi droplet. freezing rate in the adiabatic regime in a vacuum chamber show that additional techniques for stabilizing the temperature inside the droplet should be used in order to study the conformational transitions of the protein in single molecules. Isothermal and quasi-isothermal conditions are most suitable for studying the conformational transitions upon object functioning. However, in this case it is necessary to take into account the effects of dehydration and rapid increase of ionic strength in an

  19. A combined volume-of-fluid method and low-Mach-number approach for DNS of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2017-11-01

    Our objective is to perform DNS of finite-size droplets that are evaporating in isotropic turbulence. This requires fully resolving the process of momentum, heat, and mass transfer between the droplets and surrounding gas. We developed a combined volume-of-fluid (VOF) method and low-Mach-number approach to simulate this flow. The two main novelties of the method are: (i) the VOF algorithm captures the motion of the liquid gas interface in the presence of mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation without requiring a projection step for the liquid velocity, and (ii) the low-Mach-number approach allows for local volume changes caused by phase change while the total volume of the liquid-gas system is constant. The method is verified against an analytical solution for a Stefan flow problem, and the D2 law is verified for a single droplet in quiescent gas. We also demonstrate the schemes robustness when performing DNS of an evaporating droplet in forced isotropic turbulence.

  20. A comparative study of the mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating ethanol/water, methanol/water, and 1-propanol/water aerosol droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-02-23

    The mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating multicomponent alcohol/water droplets have been probed experimentally by examining changes in the near surface droplet composition and average droplet temperature using cavity-enhanced Raman scattering (CERS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The CERS technique provides a sensitive measure of the concentration of the volatile alcohol component in the outer shell of the droplet, due to the exponential relationship between CERS intensity and species concentration. Such volatile droplets, which are probed on a millisecond time scale, evaporate nonisothermally, resulting in both temperature and concentration gradients, as confirmed by comparisons between experimental measurements and quasi-steady state model calculations. An excellent agreement between the experimental evaporation trends and quasi-steady state model predictions is observed. An unexpectedly slow evaporation rate is observed for the evaporation of 1-propanol from a multicomponent droplet when compared to the model; possible explanations for this observation are discussed. In addition, the propagation depth of the CERS signal, and, therefore, the region of the droplet from which compositional measurements are made, can be estimated. Such measurements, when considered in conjunction with quasi-steady state theory, can allow droplet temperature gradients to be measured and vapor pressures and activity coefficients of components within the droplet to be determined.

  1. Raman Analysis of Dilute Aqueous Samples by Localized Evaporation of Submicroliter Droplets on the Tips of Superhydrophobic Copper Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Melody; Lee, Wendy W Y; McCracken, John N; Larmour, Iain A; Brennan, Steven; Bell, Steven E J

    2016-04-19

    Raman analysis of dilute aqueous solutions is normally prevented by their low signal levels. A very general method to increase the concentration to detectable levels is to evaporate droplets of the sample to dryness, creating solid deposits which are then Raman probed. Here, superhydrophobic (SHP) wires with hydrophilic tips have been used as supports for drying droplets, which have the advantage that the residue is automatically deposited at the tip. The SHP wires were readily prepared in minutes using electroless galvanic deposition of Ag onto copper wires followed by modification with a polyfluorothiol (3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,10-heptadecafluoro-1-decanethiol, HDFT). Cutting the coated wires with a scalpel revealed hydrophilic tips which could support droplets whose maximum size was determined by the wire diameter. Typically, 230 μm wires were used to support 0.6 μL droplets. Evaporation of dilute melamine droplets gave solid deposits which could be observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The limit of detection for melamine using a two stage evaporation procedure was 1 × 10(-6) mol dm(-3). The physical appearance of dried droplets of sucrose and glucose showed that the samples retained significant amounts of water, even under high vacuum. Nonetheless, the Raman detection limits of sucrose and glucose were 5 × 10(-4) and 2.5 × 10(-3) mol dm(-3), respectively, which is similar to the sensitivity reported for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection of glucose. It was also possible to quantify the two sugars in mixtures at concentrations which were similar to those found in human blood through multivariate analysis.

  2. Numerical Investigation of AdBlue Droplet Evaporation and Thermal Decomposition in the Context of NOx-SCR Using a Multi-Component Evaporation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Nishad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To cope with the progressive tightening of the emission regulations, gasoline and diesel engines will continuously require highly improved exhaust after-treatment systems. In the case of diesel engines, the selective catalytic reduction (SCR appears as one of the widely adopted technologies to reduce NOx (nitrogen oxides emissions. Thereby, with the help of available heat from exhaust gas, the injected urea–water solution (UWS turns inside the exhaust port immediately into gaseous ammonia (NH3 by evaporation of mixture and thermal decomposition of urea. The reaction and conversion efficiency mostly depend upon the evaporation and subsequent mixing of the NH3 into the exhaust gas, which in turn depends upon the engine loading conditions. Up to now, the aggregation of urea after evaporation of water and during the thermal decomposition of urea is not clearly understood. Hence, various scenarios for the urea depletion in the gaseous phase that can be envisaged have to be appraised under SCR operating conditions relying on an appropriate evaporation description. The objective of the present paper is therefore fourfold. First, a reliable multi-component evaporation model that includes a proper binary diffusion coefficient is developed for the first time in the Euler–Lagrangian CFD (computational fluid dynamics framework to account properly for the distinct evaporation regimes of adBlue droplets under various operating conditions. Second, this model is extended for thermal decomposition of urea in the gaseous phase, where, depending on how the heat of thermal decomposition of urea is provided, different scenarios are considered. Third, since the evaporation model at and around the droplet surface is based on a gas film approach, how the material properties are evaluated in the film influences the process results is reported, also for the first time. Finally, the impact of various ambient temperatures on the adBlue droplet depletion characteristics

  3. Intensive evaporation and boiling of a heterogeneous liquid droplet with an explosive disintegration in high-temperature gas area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The using of the high-speed (not less than 105 frames per second video recording tools (“Phantom” and the software package ("TEMA Automotive" allowed carrying out an experimental research of laws of intensive vaporization with an explosive disintegration of heterogeneous (with a single solid nontransparent inclusion liquid droplet (by the example of water in high-temperature (500-800 K gases (combustion products. Times of the processes under consideration and stages (liquid heat-up, evaporation from an external surface, bubble boiling at internal interfaces, growth of bubble sizes, explosive droplet breakup were established. Necessary conditions of an explosive vaporization of a heterogeneous droplet were found out. Mechanisms of this process and an influence of properties of liquid and inclusion material on them were determined.

  4. Study of the Internal Flow and Evaporation Characteristic Inside a Water Droplet on a Vertical Vibrating Hydrophobic Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang-Seok; Lim, Hee-Chang [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Thermal Marangoni flow has been observed inside droplets on heated surfaces, finally resulting in a coffee stain effect. This study aims to visualize and control the thermal Marangoni flow by employing periodic vertical vibration. The variations in the contact angle and internal volume of the droplet as it evaporates is observed by using a combination of continuous light and a still camera. With regard to the internal velocity, the particle image velocimetry system is applied to visualize the internal thermal Marangoni flow. In order to estimate the internal temperature gradient and surface tension on the surface of a droplet, the theoretical model based on the conduction and convection theory of heat transfer is applied. Thus, the internal velocity increases with an increase in plate temperature. The flow directions of the Marangoni and gravitational flows are opposite, and hence, it may be possible to control the coffee stain effect.

  5. Self-Organized Crystallization Patterns from Evaporating Droplets of Common Wheat Grain Leakages as a Potential Tool for Quality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olga Kokornaczyk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the evaporation-induced pattern formation in droplets of common wheat kernel leakages prepared out of ancient and modern wheat cultivars as a possible tool for wheat quality analysis. The experiments showed that the substances which passed into the water during the soaking of the kernels created crystalline structures with different degrees of complexity while the droplets were evaporating. The forms ranged from spots and simple structures with single ramifications, through dendrites, up to highly organized hexagonal shapes and fractal-like structures. The patterns were observed and photographed using dark field microscopy in small magnifications. The evaluation of the patterns was performed both visually and by means of the fractal dimension analysis. From the results, it can be inferred that the wheat cultivars differed in their pattern-forming capacities. Two of the analyzed wheat cultivars showed poor pattern formation, whereas another two created well-formed and complex patterns. Additionally, the wheat cultivars were analyzed for their vigor by means of the germination test and measurement of the electrical conductivity of the grain leakages. The results showed that the more vigorous cultivars also created more complex patterns, whereas the weaker cultivars created predominantly poor forms. This observation suggests a correlation between the wheat seed quality and droplet evaporation patterns.

  6. A simple technique to reduce evaporation of crystallization droplets by using plate lids with apertures for adding liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipper, Lauren E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Vestal, NY 13902 (United States); Aristide, Xavier [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); North Babylon High School, 1 Phelps Lane North, Babylon, NY 11703 (United States); Bishop, Dylan P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Northport High School, 154 Laurel Hill Road, Northport, NY 11768 (United States); Joshi, Ishita [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); St Augustine Catholic High School, 2188 Rodick Road, Markham, ON L6C 1S3 (Canada); Kharzeev, Julia [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Earl L. Vandermeulen High School, 350 Old Post Road, Port Jefferson, NY 11777 (United States); Patel, Krishna B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); John P. Stevens High School, 855 Grove Avenue, Edison, NJ 08820 (United States); Santiago, Brianna M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Connetquot High School, 190 7th Street, Bohemia, NY 11716 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Department of Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Dorsinvil, Kahille [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2014-11-28

    This article describes the use of evaporation control lids that are fitted to crystallization plates to improve the reproducibility of trials using as little as 5 nl. The plate lids contain apertures which are large enough for the transfer of protein containing droplets, but small enough to greatly reduce the rate of evaporation during the time needed to prepare the plate. A method is described for using plate lids to reduce evaporation in low-volume vapor-diffusion crystallization experiments. The plate lids contain apertures through which the protein and precipitants were added to different crystallization microplates (the reservoir was filled before fitting the lids). Plate lids were designed for each of these commonly used crystallization microplates. This system minimizes the dehydration of crystallization droplets containing just a few nanolitres of protein and precipitant, and results in more reproducible diffraction from the crystals. For each lid design, changes in the weight of the plates were used to deduce the rate of evaporation under different conditions of temperature, air movement, droplet size and precipitant. For comparison, the state of dehydration was also visually assessed throughout the experiment. Finally, X-ray diffraction methods were used to compare the diffraction of protein crystals that were conventionally prepared against those that were prepared on plates with plate lids. The measurements revealed that the plate lids reduced the rate of evaporation by 63–82%. Crystals grown in 5 nl drops that were set up with plate lids diffracted to higher resolution than similar crystals from drops that were set up without plate lids. The results demonstrate that plate lids can be instrumental for improving few-nanolitre crystallizations.

  7. Wavelength selection in the crown splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li V.; Brunet, Philippe; Eggers, Jens; Deegan, Robert D.

    2010-12-01

    The impact of a drop onto a liquid layer produces a splash that results from the ejection and dissolution of one or more liquid sheets, which expand radially from the point of impact. In the crown splash parameter regime, secondary droplets appear at fairly regularly spaced intervals along the rim of the sheet. By performing many experiments for the same parameter values, we measure the spectrum of small-amplitude perturbations growing on the rim. We show that for a range of parameters in the crown splash regime, the generation of secondary droplets results from a Rayleigh-Plateau instability of the rim, whose shape is almost cylindrical. In our theoretical calculation, we include the time dependence of the base state. The remaining irregularity of the pattern is explained by the finite width of the Rayleigh-Plateau dispersion relation. Alternative mechanisms, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, can be excluded for the experimental parameters of our study.

  8. A simple technique to reduce evaporation of crystallization droplets by using plate lids with apertures for adding liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipper, Lauren E.; Aristide, Xavier; Bishop, Dylan P.; Joshi, Ishita; Kharzeev, Julia; Patel, Krishna B.; Santiago, Brianna M.; Joshi, Karan; Dorsinvil, Kahille; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2014-01-01

    A method is described for using plate lids to reduce evaporation in low-volume vapor-diffusion crystallization experiments. The plate lids contain apertures through which the protein and precipitants were added to different crystallization microplates (the reservoir was filled before fitting the lids). Plate lids were designed for each of these commonly used crystallization microplates. This system minimizes the dehydration of crystallization droplets containing just a few nanolitres of protein and precipitant, and results in more reproducible diffraction from the crystals. For each lid design, changes in the weight of the plates were used to deduce the rate of evaporation under different conditions of temperature, air movement, droplet size and precipitant. For comparison, the state of dehydration was also visually assessed throughout the experiment. Finally, X-ray diffraction methods were used to compare the diffraction of protein crystals that were conventionally prepared against those that were prepared on plates with plate lids. The measurements revealed that the plate lids reduced the rate of evaporation by 63–82%. Crystals grown in 5 nl drops that were set up with plate lids diffracted to higher resolution than similar crystals from drops that were set up without plate lids. The results demonstrate that plate lids can be instrumental for improving few-nanolitre crystallizations. PMID:25484231

  9. COVER ILLUSTRATION: Complexities of splashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, R. D.; Brunet, P.; Eggers, J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of a drop of liquid onto a thin layer of the same liquid. We give an overview of the sequence of events that occur as the two most important dimensionless control parameters are varied. In particular, multiple cohorts of droplets can be ejected at different stages after impact due to different mechanisms. Edgerton's famous Milkdrop Coronet is only observed for a narrow range of parameters. Outside this range, the splash is either qualitatively different, or suffers from a much lower level of regularity.

  10. Evaporators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard

    1996-01-01

    Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients.......Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients....

  11. Influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism in system “water droplet-high-temperature gases” on integral characteristics of liquid evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushkov Dmitrii O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and mathematical (system of differential equations in private derivatives models of heat and mass transfer were developed to investigate the evaporation processes of water droplets and emulsions on its base moving in high-temperature (more than 1000 K gas flow. The model takes into account a conductive and radiative heat transfer in water droplet and also a convective, conductive and radiative heat exchange with high-temperature gas area. Water vapors characteristic temperature and concentration in small wall-adjacent area and trace of the droplet, numerical values of evaporation velocities at different surface temperature, the characteristic time of complete droplet evaporation were determined. Experiments for confidence estimation of calculated integral characteristics of processes under investigation - mass liquid evaporation velocities were conducted with use of cross-correlation recording video equipment. Their satisfactory fit (deviations of experimental and theoretical velocities were less than 15% was obtained. The influence of radiative heat and mass transfer mechanism on characteristics of endothermal phase transformations in a wide temperature variation range was established by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with known theoretical data for “diffusion” mechanisms of water droplets and other liquids evaporation in gas.

  12. New approaches to the modelling of multi-component fuel droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S; Elwardany, Ahmed E; Heikal, Morgan R

    2015-01-01

    numbers n and temperatures is taken into account. The effects of temperature gradient and quasi-component diffusion inside droplets are taken into account. The analysis is based on the Effective Thermal Conductivity/Effective Diffusivity (ETC/ED) model

  13. Evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, B.T.; Turner, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Evaporation has long been used as a unit operation in the manufacture of various products in the chemical-process industries. In addition, it is currently being used for the treatment of hazardous wastes such as radioactive liquids and sludges, metal-plating wastes, and other organic and inorganic wastes. Design choice is dependent on the liquid to be evaporated. The three most common types of evaporation equipment are the rising-film, falling-film, and forced-circulation evaporators. The first two rely on boiling heat transfer and the latter relies on flash vaporization. Heat exchangers, flash tanks, and ejectors are common auxiliary equipment items incorporated with evaporator bodies to complete an evaporator system. Properties of the liquid to be evaporated are critical in final selection of an appropriate evaporator system. Since operating costs are a significant factor in overall cost, heat-transfer characteristics and energy requirements are important considerations. Properties of liquids which are critical to the determination of final design include: heat capacity, heat of vaporization, density, thermal conductivity, boiling point rise, and heat-transfer coefficient. Evaporation is an expensive technology, both in terms of capital costs and operating costs. Additionally, mechanical evaporation produces a condensate and a bottoms stream, one or both of which may require further processing or disposal. 3 figs

  14. FORMING CHONDRULES IN IMPACT SPLASHES. II. VOLATILE RETENTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullemond, Cornelis Petrus; Harsono, Daniel; Stammler, Sebastian Markus [Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, Heidelberg University, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Johansen, Anders [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-11-20

    Solving the mystery of the origin of chondrules is one of the most elusive goals in the field of meteoritics. Recently, the idea of planet(esimal) collisions releasing splashes of lava droplets, long considered out of favor, has been reconsidered as a possible origin of chondrules by several papers. One of the main problems with this idea is the lack of quantitative and simple models that can be used to test this scenario by directly comparing to the many known observables of chondrules. In Paper I of this series, we presented a simple thermal evolution model of a spherically symmetric expanding cloud of molten lava droplets that is assumed to emerge from a collision between two planetesimals. The production of lava could be either because the two planetesimals were already in a largely molten (or almost molten) state due to heating by {sup 26}Al, or due to impact jetting at higher impact velocities. In the present paper, number II of this series, we use this model to calculate whether or not volatile elements such as Na and K will remain abundant in these droplets or whether they will get depleted due to evaporation. The high density of the droplet cloud (e.g., small distance between adjacent droplets) causes the vapor to quickly reach saturation pressure and thus shuts down further evaporation. We show to what extent, and under which conditions, this keeps the abundances of these elements high, as is seen in chondrules. We find that for most parameters of our model (cloud mass, expansion velocity, initial temperature) the volatile elements Mg, Si, and Fe remain entirely in the chondrules. The Na and K abundances inside the droplets will initially stay mostly at their initial values due to the saturation of the vapor pressure, but at some point start to drop due to the cloud expansion. However, as soon as the temperature starts to decrease, most or all of the vapor recondenses again. At the end, the Na and K elements retain most of their initial abundances, albeit

  15. Droplet evaporation on a horizontal substrate under gravity field by mesoscopic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chiyu; Zhang, Jianying; Bertola, Volfango; Wang, Moran

    2016-02-01

    The evaporation of water drop deposited on a horizontal substrate is investigated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for multiphase flows with a large-density ratio. To account for the variation of evaporation flux distribution along the drop interface, a novel evaporation scheme is introduced into the LBM framework, and validated by comparison with experimental data. We aim at discovering the effect of gravity on the evaporating drop in detail, and various evaporation conditions are considered as well as different wetting properties of the substrates. An effective diameter is introduced as an indicator of the critical drop size under which gravity is negligible. Our results show that such critical diameter is much smaller than the capillary length, which has been widely accepted as the critical size in previous and current works. The critical diameter is found to be almost independent of the evaporation conditions and the surface wettability. A correlation between this critical diameter and the capillary length is also proposed for easy use in applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Geurts, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  17. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  18. SPLASH'13 workshops summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, S.; Schultz, U. P.

    2013-01-01

    Following its long-standing tradition, SPLASH 2013 will host 19 high-quality workshops, allowing their participants to meet and discuss research questions with peers, to mature new and exciting ideas, and to build up communities and start new collaborations. SPLASH workshops complement the main t...

  19. Nanostructured Colloidal Particles by Confined Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers in Evaporative Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsoo P. Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Block copolymers (BCPs can create various morphology by self-assembly in bulk or film. Recently, using BCPs in confined geometries such as thin film (one-dimension, cylindrical template (two-dimension, or emulsion droplet (three-dimension, nanostructured BCP particles have been prepared, in which unique nanostructures of the BCP are formed via solvent annealing process and can be controlled depending on molecular weight ratio and interaction parameter of the BCPs, and droplet size. Moreover, by tuning interfacial property of the BCP particles, anisotropic particles with unique nanostructures have been prepared. Furthermore, for practical application such as drug delivery system, sensor, self-healing, metamaterial, and optoelectronic device, functional nanoparticles can be incorporated inside BCP particles. In this article, we summarize recent progress on the production of structured BCP particles and composite particles with metallic nanoparticles.

  20. A multi-dimensional quasi-discrete model for the analysis of Diesel fuel droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2014-08-01

    A new multi-dimensional quasi-discrete model is suggested and tested for the analysis of heating and evaporation of Diesel fuel droplets. As in the original quasi-discrete model suggested earlier, the components of Diesel fuel with close thermodynamic and transport properties are grouped together to form quasi-components. In contrast to the original quasi-discrete model, the new model takes into account the contribution of not only alkanes, but also various other groups of hydrocarbons in Diesel fuels; quasi-components are formed within individual groups. Also, in contrast to the original quasi-discrete model, the contributions of individual components are not approximated by the distribution function of carbon numbers. The formation of quasi-components is based on taking into account the contributions of individual components without any approximations. Groups contributing small molar fractions to the composition of Diesel fuel (less than about 1.5%) are replaced with characteristic components. The actual Diesel fuel is simplified to form six groups: alkanes, cycloalkanes, bicycloalkanes, alkylbenzenes, indanes & tetralines, and naphthalenes, and 3 components C19H34 (tricycloalkane), C13H 12 (diaromatic), and C14H10 (phenanthrene). It is shown that the approximation of Diesel fuel by 15 quasi-components and components, leads to errors in estimated temperatures and evaporation times in typical Diesel engine conditions not exceeding about 3.7% and 2.5% respectively, which is acceptable for most engineering applications. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical modeling of turbulent evaporating gas-droplet two-phase flows in an afterburner diffusor of turbo-fan jet engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lixing; Zhang, Jian [Qinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1990-11-01

    Two-dimensional turbulent evaporating gas-droplet two-phase flows in an afterburner diffusor of turbofan jet engines are simulated here by a k-epsilon turbulence model and a particle trajectory model. Comparison of predicted gas velocity and temperature distributions with experimental results for the cases without liquid spray shows good agreement. Gas-droplet two-phase flow predictions give plausible droplet trajectories, fuel-vapor concentration distribution, gas-phase velocity and temperature field in the presence of liquid droplets. One run of computation with this method is made for a particular afterburner. The results indicate that the location of the atomizers is not favorable to flame stabilization and combustion efficiency. The proposed numerical modeling can also be adopted for optimization design and performance evaluation of afterburner combustors of turbofan jet engines. 7 refs.

  2. Differences in Infiltration and Evaporation of Diesel and Gasoline Droplets Spilled onto Concrete Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Adrià Mora

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pollution at gas stations due to small spills that occur during vehicle refueling have received little attention. We have performed laboratory experiments to assess evaporation and infiltration of fuel spilled onto concrete. Changes in the concrete mass after small amounts of diesel and gasoline were spilled have been analyzed. Variation in humidity, among other parameters, clearly affects the measured mass since condensed water is constantly added to or released from the concrete. This mass experiences an about exponential decay in time. The difference in behavior between both fuel types is important as the percentage of evaporated mass is much larger for gasoline, while infiltration is more significant for diesel. A statistical analysis suggests that the initial spill amount does not significantly affect the fraction of infiltrated fuel over time. This finding is in agreement with pore-scale simulations that we performed. A significant amount of fuel could be seeping into soil and groundwater underneath concrete pavement at gas stations or could be released to the atmosphere. Possible solutions for pavement and groundwater pollution are considered.

  3. Quasi-static motion of microparticles at the depinning contact line of an evaporating droplet on PDMS surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying-Song; Xia, Xue-Lian; Zheng, Xu; Huang, Xianfu; Zhou, Jin-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, evaporation of sessile water droplets containing fluorescent polystyrene (PS) microparticles on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with different curing ratios was studied experimentally using laser confocal microscopy. At the beginning, there were some microparticles located at the contact line and some microparticles moved towards the line. Due to contact angle hysteresis, at first both the contact line and the microparticles were pinned. With the depinning contact line, the microparticles moved together spontaneously. Using the software ImageJ, the location of contact lines at different time were acquired and the circle centers and radii of the contact lines were obtained via the least square method. Then the average distance of two neighbor contact lines at a certain time interval was obtained to characterize the motion of the contact line. Fitting the distance-time curve at the depinning contact line stage with polynomials and differentiating the polynomials with time, we obtained the velocity and acceleration of both the contact line and the microparticles located at the line. The velocity and the maximum acceleration were, respectively, of the orders of 1 μm/s and 20-200 nm/s2, indicating that the motion of the microparticles located at the depinning contact line was quasi-static. Finally, we presented a theoretical model to describe the quasi-static process, which may help in understanding both self-pinning and depinning of microparticles.

  4. Standardization of splash device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, María; Peters, Piet

    2017-04-01

    The erosion is a complex process that has been studied extensively by numerous researchers, requiring a prolongued time effort and a large economic investment. To be effective, the measurements of erosion should be precise, controlled and replicable, and to assure efectiveness, measurement devices of erosion should be properly designed, constructed, well calibrated and also they should be operated by a trained person (Stroosnijder, 2005). Because researchers try to improve old devices, the equipment is constantly being redesigned, making the measurements not comparable and furthermore, producing a lack of available standarized device. The lack of standardization of erosion equipment is more obvious in the case of the local splash erosion, where the nature of the process makes very difficult to isolate its effects. In this article we compare the results obtained from five of the most common splash erosion devices (selected from more than 16 different currently types), under the same rain conditions, with the objective of facilitate the standardization of the method that will be more easy to build, minimizing the error. A set of six splash devices were setted in well known positions under simulated rain, to measured the differences, among devices and the accuracy of the data recovered after 10 minutes of rainfall simulation under different intensities (from 60 to 130 mm/h). The rainfall simulator of Wageningen was used, using sand as splash erosion source. Differences in the infiltration were also measured, and a calibration of sizes and speeds of the raindrops was done using the photography method (Hamidreza-Sadeghi et al., 2013). The splash devices selected for this study were unbounded splash devices (like the funnel, the cup (Fernandez-Raga et al., 2010) and the splash flume (Jomaa et al., 2010)), and bounded devices that allow the calculation of splash rate, (like the new cup (Scholten et al., 2011) and the Morgan tray). The behaviour of different splash devices

  5. Evaporation of liquid droplets of nano- and micro-meter size as a function of molecular mass and intermolecular interactions: experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyst, Robert; Litniewski, Marek; Jakubczyk, Daniel

    2017-09-13

    Transport of heat to the surface of a liquid is a limiting step in the evaporation of liquids into an inert gas. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a two component Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid revealed two modes of energy transport from a vapour to an interface of an evaporating droplet of liquid. Heat is transported according to the equation of temperature diffusion, far from the droplet of radius R. The heat flux, in this region, is proportional to temperature gradient and heat conductivity in the vapour. However at some distance from the interface, Aλ, (where λ is the mean free path in the gas), the temperature has a discontinuity and heat is transported ballistically i.e. by direct individual collisions of gas molecules with the interface. This ballistic transport reduces the heat flux (and consequently the mass flux) by the factor R/(R + Aλ) in comparison to the flux obtained from temperature diffusion. Thus it slows down the evaporation of droplets of sizes R ∼ Aλ and smaller (practically for sizes from 10 3 nm down to 1 nm). We analyzed parameter A as a function of interactions between molecules and their masses. The rescaled parameter, A(k B T b /ε 11 ) 1/2 , is a linear function of the ratio of the molecular mass of the liquid molecules to the molecular mass of the gas molecules, m 1 /m 2 (for a series of chemically similar compounds). Here ε 11 is the interaction parameter between molecules in the liquid (proportional to the enthalpy of evaporation) and T b is the temperature of the gas in the bulk. We tested the predictions of MD simulations in experiments performed on droplets of ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol. They were suspended in an electrodynamic trap and evaporated into dry nitrogen gas. A changes from ∼1 (for ethylene glycol) to approximately 10 (for tetraethylene glycol) and has the same dependence on molecular parameters as obtained for the LJ fluid in MD simulations. The value of x = A

  6. Two phases of droplet evaporation during plasma arc spraying: reply to Chen's comment about the 'rocket' effect under conditions of thermal plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, V A [Key College, 225 Dania Beach Blvd, Dania Beach, FL 33040 (United States)

    2007-07-07

    The heating history of a droplet during its flight can be divided into two phases: (a) the initial phase when evaporation, although it occurs, does not change the heat balance of the droplet much (the case considered in our previous paper and (b) the final phase when the cooling due to evaporation balances the heat flux from the plasma. The later phase is considered in Chen's comment. In our reply, a very straightforward consideration demonstrates that even in the final phase of the droplet flight, the 'rocket' effect can be significant. (reply)

  7. Solid-Liquid Interface Thermal Resistance Affects the Evaporation Rate of Droplets from a Surface: A Study of Perfluorohexane on Chromium Using Molecular Dynamics and Continuum Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haoxue; Schlawitschek, Christiane; Katyal, Naman; Stephan, Peter; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-05-30

    We study the role of solid-liquid interface thermal resistance (Kapitza resistance) on the evaporation rate of droplets on a heated surface by using a multiscale combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analytical continuum theory. We parametrize the nonbonded interaction potential between perfluorohexane (C 6 F 14 ) and a face-centered-cubic solid surface to reproduce the experimental wetting behavior of C 6 F 14 on black chromium through the solid-liquid work of adhesion (quantity directly related to the wetting angle). The thermal conductances between C 6 F 14 and (100) and (111) solid substrates are evaluated by a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics approach for a liquid pressure lower than 2 MPa. Finally, we examine the influence of the Kapitza resistance on evaporation of droplets in the vicinity of a three-phase contact line with continuum theory, where the thermal resistance of liquid layer is comparable with the Kapitza resistance. We determine the thermodynamic conditions under which the Kapitza resistance plays an important role in correctly predicting the evaporation heat flux.

  8. Evaporation of Droplets in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition Based on Energy Compensation Between Self-Cooling and Plasma Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-10-01

    In the plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process (PS-PVD), there is no obvious heating to the feedstock powders due to the free molecular flow condition of the open plasma jet. However, this is in contrast to recent experiments in which the molten droplets are transformed into vapor atoms in the open plasma jet. In this work, to better understand the heating process of feedstock powders in the open plasma jet of PS-PVD, an evaporation model of molten ZrO2 is established by examining the heat and mass transfer process of molten ZrO2. The results reveal that the heat flux in PS-PVD open plasma jet (about 106 W/m2) is smaller than that in the plasma torch nozzle (about 108 W/m2). However, the flying distance of molten ZrO2 in the open plasma jet is much longer than that in the plasma torch nozzle, so the heating in the open plasma jet cannot be ignored. The results of the evaporation model show that the molten ZrO2 can be partly evaporated by self-cooling, whereas the molten ZrO2 with a diameter <0.28 μm and an initial temperature of 3247 K can be completely evaporated within the axial distance of 450 mm by heat transfer.

  9. The making of a splash

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2011-01-01

    The splash resulting from the impact of a drop onto a pool is a particularly beautiful manifestation of a canonical problem, where a mass of fluid breaks up into smaller pieces. Despite over a century of experimental study, the splashing mechanics

  10. Experimental study of evaporation of distilled water and 10% NaCl and СaCl2 aqueous salt solutions droplets under their free falling on a heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feoktistov D.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental results of evaporation of distilled water and 10% aqueous salt solutions of NaCl and СaCl2 droplets under their free falling on a heated surface. It is proved that it is more expedient to conduct the experimental research in this field according to classical multifactorial experiment. Laser treatment of surfaces is found to increase the evaporation rate and to biases the point of boiling crisis in the region of lower surface temperatures. In this case, in the conditions of boiling crisis the frequency of contact of a droplet with a heated surface will decrease.

  11. Roughness influence on human blood drop spreading and splashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fiona; Buntsma, Naomi; Brutin, David

    2017-11-01

    The impact behaviour of complex fluid droplets is a topic that has been extensively studied but with much debate. The Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) community is encountering this scientific problem with daily practical cases since they use bloodstains as evidence in crime scene reconstruction. We aim to provide fundamental explanations in the study of blood drip stains by investigating the influence of surface roughness and wettability on the splashing limit of droplets of blood, a non-Newtonian colloidal fluid. Droplets of blood impacting perpendicularly different surfaces at different velocities were recorded. The recordings were analysed as well as the surfaces characteristics in order to find an empirical solution since we found that roughness plays a major role in the threshold of the splashing/non-splashing behaviour of blood compared to the wettability. Moreover it appears that roughness alters the deformation of the drip stains. These observations are key in characterising features of drip stains with the impacting conditions, which would answer some forensic issues.

  12. Formation and Mechanism of Superhydrophobic/Hydrophobic Surfaces Made from Amphiphiles through Droplet-Mediated Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fangyuan; Zhang, Mi; Tang, Wai-Wa; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-23

    Superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surfaces have attracted wide attention because of their broad applications in various regions, including coating, textile, packaging, electronic devices, and bioengineering. Many studies have been focused on the fabrication of superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surfaces using natural materials. In this paper, superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surfaces were formed by an amphiphilic natural protein, zein, using electrospinning. Water contact angle (WCA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the hydrophobicity and surface morphology of the electrospun structures. The highest WCA of the zein electrospun surfaces could reach 155.5 ± 1.4°. To further understand the mechanism of superhydrophobic surface formation from amphiphiles using electrospinning, a synthetic amphiphilic polymer was selected, and also, a method similar to electrospinning, spray drying, was tried. The electrospun amphiphilic polymer surface showed a high hydrophobicity with a WCA of 141.4 ± 0.7°. WCA of the spray-dried zein surface could reach 125.3 ± 2.1°. The secondary structures of the zein in the electrospun film and cast-dried film were studied using ATR-FTIR, showing that α-helix to β-sheet transformation happened during the solvent evaporation in the cast drying process but not in the electrospinning process. A formation mechanism was proposed on the basis of the orientation of the amphiphiles during the solvent evaporation of different fabrication methods. The droplet-based or jet-based evaporation during electrospinning and spray drying led to the formation of the superhydrophobic/hydrophobic surface by the accumulation of the hydrophobic groups of the amphiphiles on the surface, while the surface-based evaporation during cast drying led to the formation of the hydrophilic surface by the accumulation of the hydrophilic groups of the amphiphiles on the surface.

  13. Performance of droplet generator and droplet collector in liquid droplet radiator under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, T.; Itami, M.; Nagata, H.; Kudo, I.; Iwasaki, A.; Hosokawa, S.

    2002-06-01

    The Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) has an advantage over comparable conventional radiators in terms of the rejected heat power-weight ratio. Therefore, the LDR has attracted attention as an advanced radiator for high-power space systems that will be prerequisite for large space structures. The performance of the LDR under microgravity condition has been studied from the viewpoint of operational space use of the LDR in the future. In this study, the performances of a droplet generator and a droplet collector in the LDR are investigated using drop shafts in Japan: MGLAB and JAMIC. As a result, it is considered that (1) the droplet generator can produce uniform droplet streams in the droplet diameter range from 200 to 280 [µm] and the spacing range from 400 to 950 [µm] under microgravity condition, (2) the droplet collector with the incidence angle of 35 degrees can prevent a uniform droplet stream, in which droplet diameter is 250 [µm] and the velocity is 16 [m/s], from splashing under microgravity condition, whereas splashes may occur at the surface of the droplet collector in the event that a nonuniform droplet stream collides against it.

  14. Approximate bilateral symmetry in evaporation-induced polycrystalline structures from droplets of wheat grain leakages and fluctuating asymmetry as quality indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokornaczyk, Maria Olga; Dinelli, Giovanni; Betti, Lucietta

    2013-01-01

    The present paper reports on an observation that dendrite-like polycrystalline structures from evaporating droplets of wheat grain leakages exhibit bilateral symmetry. The exactness of this symmetry, measured by means of fluctuating asymmetry, varies depending on the cultivar and stress factor influence, and seems to correspond to the seed germination rate. In the bodies of plants, animals, and humans, the exactness of bilateral symmetry is known to reflect the environmental conditions of an organism's growth, its health, and its success in sexual selection. In polycrystalline structures, formed under the same conditions, the symmetry exactness depends on the properties of the crystallizing solution such as the composition and viscosity; however, it has never been associated with sample quality. We hypothesize here that, as in living nature, the exactness of approximate bilateral symmetry might be considered a quality indicator also in crystallographic methods applied to food quality analysis.

  15. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, Takeharugoji

    2012-01-01

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  16. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-07-18

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  17. Crystallization of urea from an evaporative aqueous solution sessile droplet at sub-boiling temperatures and surfaces with different wettability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, J.; Zarikos, I.; Terzis, A.; Roth, N.; Weigand, B.

    The injection of urea-water-solution sprays in the exhaust pipe of modern diesel engines eliminates NOx emissions in a very great extent. However, as water evaporates from the solution, urea is crystallized and causes walldeposit formations hindering the performance of selective-catalytic-reaction.

  18. Convection-enhanced water evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    B. M. Weon; J. H. Je; C. Poulard

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor is lighter than air; this can enhance water evaporation by triggering vapor convection but there is little evidence. We directly visualize evaporation of nanoliter (2 to 700 nL) water droplets resting on silicon wafer in calm air using a high-resolution dual X-ray imaging method. Temporal evolutions of contact radius and contact angle reveal that evaporation rate linearly changes with surface area, indicating convective (instead of diffusive) evaporation in nanoliter water droplet...

  19. Effect of splash on the deposition and re-entrainment in annular mist flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Heng; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method is employed to simulate the deposition process of single droplet on the liquid film. The model accounts for the presence of inertial, gravitation, viscous and surface tension and is validated by comparison with experiment results. A one-dimensional mixture model is developed to calculate the necessary parameters for the simulation of deposition on the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) condition. The correlations and methods on void fraction, entertainment fraction and droplet velocity and size distribution are employed to get the parameters of droplet and liquid film. The simulation results are analyzed to study the effect of splash on the deposition and re-entrainment process in annular-mist flow on the condition of BWR. It is found that the splash plays an important role in the deposition and re-entrainment process in high quality conditions of BWR. (author)

  20. Are splash plumes the origin of minor hotspots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. H.; Bunge, H.-P.

    2006-05-01

    It has been claimed that focused hot cylindrical upwelling plumes cause many of the surface volcanic hotspots on Earth. It has also been argued that they must originate from thermal boundary layers. In this paper, we present spherical simulations of mantle circulation at close to Earth-like vigor with significant internal heating. These show, in addition to thermal boundary layer plumes, a new class of plumes that are not rooted in thermal boundary layers. These plumes develop as instabilities from the edge of bowls of hot mantle, which are produced by cold downwelling material deforming hot sheets of mantle. The resulting bowl and plume structure can look a bit like the “splash” of a water droplet. These splash plumes might provide an explanation for some hotspots that are not underlain by thermal boundary layer sourced plumes and not initiated by large igneous provinces. We suggest that in Earth's mantle, lithospheric instabilities or small pieces of subducting slab could play the role of the model downwelling material in initiating splash plumes. Splash plumes would have implications for interpreting ocean-island basalt geochemistry, plume fixity, excess plume temperature, and estimating core heat flux. Improved seismic imaging will ultimately test this hypothesis.

  1. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  2. Splash Dynamics of Watercolors on Dry, Wet, and Cooled Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, David; Vaidya, Ashwin; Su, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    In his classic study in 1908, A.M. Worthington gave a thorough account of splashes and their formation through visualization experiments. In more recent times, there has been renewed interest in this subject, and much of the underlying physics behind Worthington's experiments has now been clarified. One specific set of such recent studies, which motivates this paper, concerns the fluid dynamics behind Jackson Pollock's drip paintings. The physical processes and the mathematical structures hidden in his works have received serious attention and made the scientific pursuit of art a compelling area of exploration. Our work explores the interaction of watercolors with watercolor paper. Specifically, we conduct experiments to analyze the settling patterns of droplets of watercolor paint on wet and frozen paper. Variations in paint viscosity, paper roughness, paper temperature, and the height of a released droplet are examined from time of impact, through its transient stages, until its final, dry state. Observable phenomena such as paint splashing, spreading, fingering, branching, rheological deposition, and fractal patterns are studied in detail and classified in terms of the control parameters.

  3. Energy balance of droplets impinging onto a wall heated above the Leidenfrost temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunand, P.; Castanet, G.; Gradeck, M.; Maillet, D.; Lemoine, F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Measurement techniques are combined to characterize the heat lost due to liquid vaporization. • The wall heat flux is estimated by infrared thermography associated with inverse heat conduction. • The liquid heating is characterized by the two-color Laser-Induced Fluorescence thermometry. • Results reveal how the heat fluxes vary with the droplet sizes and the Weber number. -- Abstract: This work is an experimental study aiming at characterizing the heat transfers induced by the impingement of water droplets (diameter 80–180 μm) on a thin nickel plate heated by electromagnetic induction. The temperature of the rear face of the nickel sample is measured by means of an infrared camera and the heat removed from the wall due to the presence of the droplets is estimated using a semi-analytical inverse heat conduction model. In parallel, the temperature of the droplets is measured using the two-color Laser-Induced Fluorescence thermometry (2cLIF) which has been extended to imagery for the purpose of these experiments. The measurements of the variation in the droplet temperature occurring during an impact allow determining the sensible heat removed by the liquid. Measurements are performed at wall conditions well above the Leidenfrost temperature. Different values of the Weber numbers corresponding to the bouncing and splashing regimes are tested. Comparisons between the heat flux removed from the wall and the sensible heat gained by the liquid allows estimating the heat flux related to liquid evaporation. Results reveal that the respective level of the droplet sensible heat and the heat lost due to liquid vaporization can vary significantly with the droplet sizes and the Weber number

  4. In situ observation on the dynamic process of evaporation and crystallization of sodium nitrate droplets on a ZnSe substrate by FTIR-ATR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Nuan; Zhang, Yun; Cai, Chen; Guo, Yu-Cong; Reid, Jonathan P; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2014-04-17

    Sodium nitrate is a main component of aging sea salt aerosol, and its phase behavior has been studied repeatedly with wide ranges observed in the efflorescence relative humidity (RH) in particular. Studies of the efflorescence dynamics of NaNO3 droplets deposited on a ZnSe substrate are reported, using an in situ Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) technique. The time-dependence of the infrared spectra of NaNO3 aerosols accompanying step changes in RH have been measured with high signal-to-noise ratio. From the IR difference spectra recorded, changes of the time-dependent absorption peak area of the O-H stretching band (ν-OH, ∼3400 cm(-1)) and the nitrate out-of-plane bending band (ν2-NO3(-), ∼836 cm(-1)) are obtained. From these measurements, changes in the IR signatures can be attributed to crystalline and solution phase nitrate ions, allowing the volume fraction of the solution droplets that have crystallized to be determined. Then, using these clear signatures of the volume fraction of droplets that have yet to crystallize, the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation kinetics can be studied from conventional measurements using a steady decline in RH. The nucleation rate measurements confirm that the rate of crystallization in sodium nitrate droplets is considerably less than in ammonium sulfate droplets at any particular degree of solute supersaturation, explaining the wide range of efflorescence RHs observed for sodium nitrate in previous studies. We demonstrate that studying nucleation kinetics using the FTIR-ATR approach has many advantages over brightfield imaging studies on smaller numbers of larger droplets or measurements made on single levitated particles.

  5. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  6. Influence of Rust Permeability on Corrosion of E690 Steel in Industrial and Non-industrial Marine Splash Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mindong; Pang, Kun; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Junsheng; Li, Xiaogang

    2018-05-01

    The corrosion behaviour of E690 steel in industrial and non-industrial marine splash environments was studied by environmental testing, morphology analysis, electrochemical measurements, and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. Chloride and sulphide anions were found to diffuse across the rust layer following the evaporation of seawater splashed on the steel's surface. The cation-selective permeability of the rust layer resulted in an anion concentration gradient across the rust layer, which was more significant in the presence of sulphur dioxide. In addition, sulphur dioxide enhanced the formation of α-FeOOH, which led to the formation of distinct anode and cathode areas at the rust/steel interface.

  7. Collisions of droplets on spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2017-10-01

    Head-on collisions between droplets and spherical particles are examined for water droplets in the diameter range between 170 μm and 280 μm and spherical particles in the diameter range between 500 μm and 2000 μm. The droplet velocities range between 6 m/s and 11 m/s, while the spherical particles are fixed in space. The Weber and Ohnesorge numbers and ratio of droplet to particle diameter were between 92 deposition and splashing regimes, a regime is observed in the intermediate region, where the droplet forms a stable crown, which does not breakup but propagates along the particle surface and passes around the particle. This regime is prevalent when the droplets collide on small particles. The characteristics of the collision at the onset of rim instability are also described in terms of the location of the film on the particle surface and the orientation and length of the ejected crown. Proper orthogonal decomposition identified that the first 2 modes are enough to capture the overall morphology of the crown at the splashing threshold.

  8. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  9. On the application of the classic Kessler and Berry schemes in Large Eddy Simulation models with a particular emphasis on cloud autoconversion, the onset time of precipitation and droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghosh

    Full Text Available Many Large Eddy Simulation (LES models use the classic Kessler parameterisation either as it is or in a modified form to model the process of cloud water autoconversion into precipitation. The Kessler scheme, being linear, is particularly useful and is computationally straightforward to implement. However, a major limitation with this scheme lies in its inability to predict different autoconversion rates for maritime and continental clouds. In contrast, the Berry formulation overcomes this difficulty, although it is cubic. Due to their different forms, it is difficult to match the two solutions to each other. In this paper we single out the processes of cloud conversion and accretion operating in a deep model cloud and neglect the advection terms for simplicity. This facilitates exact analytical integration and we are able to derive new expressions for the time of onset of precipitation using both the Kessler and Berry formulations. We then discuss the conditions when the two schemes are equivalent. Finally, we also critically examine the process of droplet evaporation within the framework of the classic Kessler scheme. We improve the existing parameterisation with an accurate estimation of the diffusional mass transport of water vapour. We then demonstrate the overall robustness of our calculations by comparing our results with the experimental observations of Beard and Pruppacher, and find excellent agreement.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure · Cloud physics and chemistry · Pollution · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Precipitation

  10. On the application of the classic Kessler and Berry schemes in Large Eddy Simulation models with a particular emphasis on cloud autoconversion, the onset time of precipitation and droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghosh

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Many Large Eddy Simulation (LES models use the classic Kessler parameterisation either as it is or in a modified form to model the process of cloud water autoconversion into precipitation. The Kessler scheme, being linear, is particularly useful and is computationally straightforward to implement. However, a major limitation with this scheme lies in its inability to predict different autoconversion rates for maritime and continental clouds. In contrast, the Berry formulation overcomes this difficulty, although it is cubic. Due to their different forms, it is difficult to match the two solutions to each other. In this paper we single out the processes of cloud conversion and accretion operating in a deep model cloud and neglect the advection terms for simplicity. This facilitates exact analytical integration and we are able to derive new expressions for the time of onset of precipitation using both the Kessler and Berry formulations. We then discuss the conditions when the two schemes are equivalent. Finally, we also critically examine the process of droplet evaporation within the framework of the classic Kessler scheme. We improve the existing parameterisation with an accurate estimation of the diffusional mass transport of water vapour. We then demonstrate the overall robustness of our calculations by comparing our results with the experimental observations of Beard and Pruppacher, and find excellent agreement.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure · Cloud physics and chemistry · Pollution · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Precipitation

  11. Splash-cup plants accelerate raindrops to disperse seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Guillermo J.; Yamada, Yasukuni; McCurley, Matthew; Hu, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The conical flowers of splash-cup plants Chrysosplenium and Mazus catch raindrops opportunistically, exploiting the subsequent splash to disperse their seeds. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we elucidate their mechanism for maximizing dispersal distance. We fabricate conical plant mimics using three-dimensional printing, and use high-speed video to visualize splash profiles and seed travel distance. Drop impacts that strike the cup off-centre achieve the largest dispersal distances of up to 1 m. Such distances are achieved because splash speeds are three to five times faster than incoming drop speeds, and so faster than the traditionally studied splashes occurring upon horizontal surfaces. This anomalous splash speed is because of the superposition of two components of momentum, one associated with a component of the drop's motion parallel to the splash-cup surface, and the other associated with film spreading induced by impact with the splash-cup. Our model incorporating these effects predicts the observed dispersal distance within 6–18% error. According to our experiments, the optimal cone angle for the splash-cup is 40°, a value consistent with the average of five species of splash-cup plants. This optimal angle arises from the competing effects of velocity amplification and projectile launching angle. PMID:23235266

  12. Leidenfrost boiling of water droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzechowski Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concerned a large water droplet at the heating surface temperature above the Leidenfrost point. The heating cylinder was the main component of experimental stand on which investigations were performed. The measurement system was placed on the high-sensitivity scales. Data transmission was performed through RS232 interface. The author-designed program, with extended functions to control the system, was applied. The present paper examines the behaviour of a large single drop levitating over a hot surface, unsteady mass of the drop, and heat transfer. In computations, the dependence, available in the literature, for the orthogonal droplet projection on the heating surface as a function of time was employed. It was confirmed that the local value of the heat transfer coefficient is a power function of the area of the droplet surface projection. Also, a linear relationship between the flux of mass evaporated from the droplet and the droplet orthogonal projection was observed.

  13. Leidenfrost boiling of water droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    The investigations concerned a large water droplet at the heating surface temperature above the Leidenfrost point. The heating cylinder was the main component of experimental stand on which investigations were performed. The measurement system was placed on the high-sensitivity scales. Data transmission was performed through RS232 interface. The author-designed program, with extended functions to control the system, was applied. The present paper examines the behaviour of a large single drop levitating over a hot surface, unsteady mass of the drop, and heat transfer. In computations, the dependence, available in the literature, for the orthogonal droplet projection on the heating surface as a function of time was employed. It was confirmed that the local value of the heat transfer coefficient is a power function of the area of the droplet surface projection. Also, a linear relationship between the flux of mass evaporated from the droplet and the droplet orthogonal projection was observed.

  14. Liquid droplet radiator technology issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1985-01-01

    The operation of the liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is analyzed to establish design constraints for the LDR components and to predict the performance of an integrated LDR system. The design constraints largely result from mass loss considerations: fluid choice is governed by evaporation loss; droplet generation techniques must be capable of precise aiming of >10 5 droplet streams; and collection losses must be less than 1 droplet in 10 7 . Concepts for droplet generation and collection components are discussed and incorporated into a mass model for an LDR system. This model predicts that LDR's using lithium, Dow 705 silicone fluid, or NaK may be several times lighter than heat pipe radiators. 13 refs

  15. Growth and instability of the liquid rim in the crown splash regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbaglah, G.; Deegan, R. D.

    2014-08-01

    We study the formation, growth, and disintegration of jets following impact of a drop on a thin film of the same liquid for We < 1000 and Re < 2000 using a combination of numerical simulations and linear stability theory (Agbaglah et al. 2013). Our simulations faithfully capture this phenomena and are in good agreement with experimental profiles obtained from high-speed X-ray imaging.We obtain scaling relations from our simulations and use these as inputs to our stability analysis. The resulting prediction for the most unstable wavelength are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that the dominant destabilizing mechanism is a competition between capillarity and inertia but that deceleration of the rim provides an additional boost to growth. We also predict over the entire parameter range of our study the number and timescale for formation of secondary droplets formed during a splash, based on the assumption that the most unstable mode sets the droplet number.

  16. A review on laser diagnostics on atomization and evaporation of liquid fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyin; Li, Shiyan; Lin, Baiyang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Jian; Xu, Bin

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the atomization and evaporation processes of liquid fuel, there are several laser diagnostics available in present. In this paper, the recent progress in laser diagnostics for atomization and evaporation will be introduced, as two categories: atomization and evaporation. The diagnostics for the former includes the primary breakup from liquid jet to ligaments or droplets and the secondary atomization from a bigger droplet to a smaller one, and the latter includes the droplet evaporation and the vapor distributions in a spray.

  17. Ordinary Chondrites Viewed as Reassembled 'Splash Ejecta'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, I. S.

    1995-09-01

    A case has already been made favouring chondrites as re-assembled "splash ejecta" following low velocity collisions between molten planetesimals[1]. Here I briefly review this hypothesis, then develop further arguments in its support. The scenario envisaged may be summarized as follows. Planetesimals grew to radii greater than 30 km in less than 1 Ma after the formation of CAIs, and they were heated rapidly by the decay of 26Al. By 2 Ma each planetesimal had a molten interior insulated by a cool, dusty carapace. Low velocity collisions at this stage released enormous, turbulent, expanding clouds of incandescent spray mixed with dust and solid grains from the carapace. The cloud constituted a rather special, transient nebular environment; as it cooled the melt droplets became chondrules. Much of the cloud's contents re-assembled under gravity onto the surface of the hot, residual planetesimal and the accumulated debris became re-heated and metamorphosed. Collisions recurred over the few million years that relative velocities remained low and planetesimals remained molten. Thus, the cumulative debris contained many recycled and broken chondrules. This scenario is apparently reconcilable with chondrule cooling rates, the preservation of clasts of "planetary" rock in chondrites, the retention of volatiles in chondrules, the preservation of solar chemistry and more than a dozen other features. Is it reasonable to claim that 30 km radius bodies existed by 1 Ma, and were substantially molten by 2 Ma? Cameron[2] argued that CAIs were saved from drifting into the sun by their incorporation, soon after formation, into planetesimals whose mass was sufficient to hold them in orbits, decoupled from the drag of nebular gas. Wetherill's models [3] show that many bodies >100 km radius may have formed on a timescale of 10^5 years. In these terms, the proposed 30 km by 1 Ma is quite conservative. Regarding 26Al heating, the remarkably constant initial ratio of 26Al/27Al (5 x 10

  18. Steady Method for the Analysis of Evaporation Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, A Alperen; Sett, Soumyadip; Oh, Junho; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-10-31

    Droplet evaporation is an important phenomenon governing many man-made and natural processes. Characterizing the rate of evaporation with high accuracy has attracted the attention of numerous scientists over the past century. Traditionally, researchers have studied evaporation by observing the change in the droplet size in a given time interval. However, the transient nature coupled with the significant mass-transfer-governed gas dynamics occurring at the droplet three-phase contact line makes the classical method crude. Furthermore, the intricate balance played by the internal and external flows, evaporation kinetics, thermocapillarity, binary-mixture dynamics, curvature, and moving contact lines makes the decoupling of these processes impossible with classical transient methods. Here, we present a method to measure the rate of evaporation of spatially and temporally steady droplets. By utilizing a piezoelectric dispenser to feed microscale droplets (R ≈ 9 μm) to a larger evaporating droplet at a prescribed frequency, we can both create variable-sized droplets on any surface and study their evaporation rate by modulating the piezoelectric droplet addition frequency. Using our steady technique, we studied water evaporation of droplets having base radii ranging from 20 to 250 μm on surfaces of different functionalities (45° ≤ θ a,app ≤ 162°, where θ a,app is the apparent advancing contact angle). We benchmarked our technique with the classical unsteady method, showing an improvement of 140% in evaporation rate measurement accuracy. Our work not only characterizes the evaporation dynamics on functional surfaces but also provides an experimental platform to finally enable the decoupling of the complex physics governing the ubiquitous droplet evaporation process.

  19. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  20. ATLAS Splash event - 6 April 2018

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The image shows a visualization of experimental data coming from the 'beam splash' tests run in April 2018 as part of the restart process of the LHC accelerator, after the winter break for maintenance. The image shows the hits of part of the tracking detector (in red, at the center), the energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter (in green), and those in the hadronic calorimeter (in yellow). The semi-transparent azure volumes are part of the hadronic calorimeter, while the grey outer structure is part of the muon spectrometer.

  1. Control of droplet size in rain-zone in wet cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitkovicova Rut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the wet cooling tower is significantly affected by the droplet size occurring in the rain zone. In order to effectively manage the size of these droplets, it was necessary to experimentally determine the effect of the fills of the cooling towers on droplets. Five types of cooling fillers were used for experimental measurements: 3 film fills and 2 splash fills - trickle and grid. Drop size measurements were performed using the LIF method. Histograms of droplets size were obtained from measured droplet sizes under each fill, and for each fill, the Sauter droplet diameter was then calculated. According to a theoretical analysis of a breakdown of droplets, the combinations of some fills and the effect of their surface treatment on the droplet diameter were then measured for comparison.

  2. A New Eulerian Model for Turbulent Evaporating Sprays in Recirculating Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittig, S.; Hallmann, M.; Scheurlen, M.; Schmehl, R.

    1993-01-01

    A new Eulerian model for the computation of turbulent evaporating sprays in recirculating flows is derived. It comprises droplet heating and evaporation processes by solving separate transport equations for the droplet's temperature and diameter. Full coupling of the droplet and the gaseous phase is

  3. Selfbound quantum droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, Tim; Wenzel, Matthias; Schmitt, Matthias; Boettcher, Fabian; Buehner, Carl; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2017-04-01

    Self-bound many-body systems are formed through a balance of attractive and repulsive forces and occur in many physical scenarios. Liquid droplets are an example of a self-bound system, formed by a balance of the mutual attractive and repulsive forces that derive from different components of the inter-particle potential. On the basis of the recent finding that an unstable bosonic dipolar gas can be stabilized by a repulsive many-body term, it was predicted that three-dimensional self-bound quantum droplets of magnetic atoms should exist. Here we report on the observation of such droplets using dysprosium atoms, with densities 108 times lower than a helium droplet, in a trap-free levitation field. We find that this dilute magnetic quantum liquid requires a minimum, critical number of atoms, below which the liquid evaporates into an expanding gas as a result of the quantum pressure of the individual constituents. Consequently, around this critical atom number we observe an interaction-driven phase transition between a gas and a self-bound liquid in the quantum degenerate regime with ultracold atoms.

  4. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  5. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-09-04

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  6. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You David J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A computer numerical control (CNC apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study. This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate. Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction. The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability, in rapid succession (using droplets

  7. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Mozumder; M. R. Ullah; A. Hossain; M. A. Islam

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot...

  8. First beam splashes at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    After a two-year shutdown, the first beams of Run 2 circulated in the LHC last Sunday. On Tuesday, the LHC operators performed dedicated runs to allow some of the experiments to record their first signals coming from particles splashed out when the circulating beams hit the collimators. Powerful reconstruction software then transforms the electronic signals into colourful images.     “Splash” events are used by the experiments to test their numerous subdetectors and to synchronise them with the LHC clock. These events are recorded when the path of particles travelling in the LHC vacuum pipe is intentionally obstructed using collimators – one-metre-long graphite or tungsten jaws that are also used to catch particles that wander too far from the beam centre and to protect the accelerator against unavoidable regular and irregular beam losses. The particles sprayed out of the collision between the beam and the collimators are mostly muons. ATLAS and CMS&...

  9. Droplet Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  10. Dynamic interactions of Leidenfrost droplets on liquid metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yujie; Liu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Leidenfrost dynamic interaction effects of the isopentane droplets on the surface of heated liquid metal were disclosed. Unlike conventional rigid metal, such conductive and deformable liquid metal surface enables the levitating droplets to demonstrate rather abundant and complex dynamics. The Leidenfrost droplets at different diameters present diverse morphologies and behaviors like rotation and oscillation. Depending on the distance between the evaporating droplets, they attract and repulse each other through the curved surfaces beneath them and their vapor flows. With high boiling point up to 2000 °C, liquid metal offers a unique platform for testing the evaporating properties of a wide variety of liquid even solid.

  11. The behavior of volatile droplets in a controlled atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrault, Gerard

    1971-01-01

    A technique permitting constant temperature and atmospheric composition to be obtained in a few minutes in a closed container allowed the equilibrium, evaporation and growth of several types of droplets to be studied. A critical review is presented on the thermodynamics of equilibria and the kinetics of evaporation and growth in the different cases. Fair agreement was reached between theory and experiment. Coefficients of evaporation, condensation, and accommodation were calculated for water and water-ClNa droplets; the theory is extended to a few particular cases of droplets containing two volatile constituents. (author) [fr

  12. Numerical analysis of splashing fluid using hybrid method of mesh-based and particle-based modelings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuatsu; Ogawara, Takuya; Kaneda, Takeshi; Maseguchi, Ryo

    2009-01-01

    In order to simulate splashing and scattering fluid behaviors, we developed a hybrid method of mesh-based model for large-scale continuum fluid and particle-based model for small-scale discrete fluid particles. As for the solver of the continuum fluid, we adopt the CIVA RefIned Multiphase SimulatiON (CRIMSON) code to evaluate two phase flow behaviors based on the recent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The phase field model has been introduced to the CRIMSON in order to solve the problem of loosing phase interface sharpness in long-term calculation. As for the solver of the discrete fluid droplets, we applied the idea of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Both continuum fluid and discrete fluid interact each other through drag interaction force. We verified our method by applying it to a popular benchmark problem of collapse of water column problems, especially focusing on the splashing and scattering fluid behaviors after the column collided against the wall. We confirmed that the gross splashing and scattering behaviors were well reproduced by the introduction of particle model while the detailed behaviors of the particles were slightly different from the experimental results. (author)

  13. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even

  14. Droplet condensation in rapidly decaying pressure fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; Bai, R.Y.; Schrock, V.E.; Hijikata, K.

    1992-01-01

    Certain promising schemes for cooling inertial confinement fusion reactors call for highly transient condensation in a rapidly decaying pressure field. After an initial period of condensation on a subcooled droplet, undesirable evaporation begins to occur. Recirculation within the droplet strongly impacts the character of this condensation-evaporation cycle, particularly when the recirculation time constant is of the order of the pressure decay time constant. Recirculation can augment the heat transfer, delay the onset of evaporation, and increase the maximum superheat inside the drop by as much as an order of magnitude. This numerical investigation identifies the most important parameters and physics characterizing transient, high heat flux droplet condensation. The results can be applied to conceptual designs of inertial confinement fusion reactors, where initial temperature differences on the order of 1,500 K decay to zero over time spans the order of tens of milliseconds

  15. Simultaneous spreading and evaporation: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Sergey; Trybala, Anna; Rubio, Ramon G; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Velarde, Manuel G

    2014-04-01

    The recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of simultaneous spreading and evaporation of liquid droplets on solid substrates is discussed for pure liquids including nanodroplets, nanosuspensions of inorganic particles (nanofluids) and surfactant solutions. Evaporation of both complete wetting and partial wetting liquids into a nonsaturated vapour atmosphere are considered. However, the main attention is paid to the case of partial wetting when the hysteresis of static contact angle takes place. In the case of complete wetting the spreading/evaporation process proceeds in two stages. A theory was suggested for this case and a good agreement with available experimental data was achieved. In the case of partial wetting the spreading/evaporation of a sessile droplet of pure liquid goes through four subsequent stages: (i) the initial stage, spreading, is relatively short (1-2 min) and therefore evaporation can be neglected during this stage; during the initial stage the contact angle reaches the value of advancing contact angle and the radius of the droplet base reaches its maximum value, (ii) the first stage of evaporation is characterised by the constant value of the radius of the droplet base; the value of the contact angle during the first stage decreases from static advancing to static receding contact angle; (iii) during the second stage of evaporation the contact angle remains constant and equal to its receding value, while the radius of the droplet base decreases; and (iv) at the third stage of evaporation both the contact angle and the radius of the droplet base decrease until the drop completely disappears. It has been shown theoretically and confirmed experimentally that during the first and second stages of evaporation the volume of droplet to power 2/3 decreases linearly with time. The universal dependence of the contact angle during the first stage and of the radius of the droplet base during the second stage on the reduced time has been

  16. Splash Safety During Dermatologic Procedures Among US Dermatology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korta, Dorota Z; Chapman, Lance W; Lee, Patrick K; Linden, Kenneth G

    2017-07-01

    Dermatologists are at potential risk of acquiring infections from contamination of the mucous membranes by blood and body fluids. However, there are little data on splash safety during procedural dermatology. To determine dermatology resident perceptions about splash risk during dermatologic procedures and to quantify the rate of protective equipment use. An anonymous on-line survey was sent to 108 United States ACGME-approved dermatology residency programs assessing frequency of facial protection during dermatologic procedures, personal history of splash injury, and, if applicable, reasons for not always wearing facial protection. A total of 153 dermatology residents responded. Rates of facial protection varied by procedure, with the highest rates during surgery and the lowest during local anesthetic injection. Over 54% of respondents reported suffering facial splash while not wearing facial protection during a procedure. In contrast, 88.9% of respondents correctly answered that there is a small risk of acquiring infection from mucosal splash. Residency program recommendations for facial protection seem to vary by procedure. The authors' results demonstrate that although facial splash is a common injury, facial protection rates and protective recommendations vary significantly by procedure. These data support the recommendation for enhanced facial protection guidelines during procedural dermatology.

  17. Drop splashing: the role of surface wettability and liquid viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, Hamed; Amirfazli, Alidad; -Team

    2017-11-01

    There are seemingly contradictory results in the literature about the role of surface wettability and drop viscosity for the splashing behavior of a drop impacting onto a surface. Motivated by such issues, we conducted a systematic experimental study where splashing behavior for a wide range of the liquid viscosity (1-100 cSt) and surface wettability (hydrophilic to hydrophobic) are examined. The experiments were performed for the liquids with both low and high surface tensions ( 20 and 72 mN/m). We found that the wettability affects the splashing threshold at high or low contact angle values. At the same drop velocity, an increase of the viscosity (up to 4 cSt) promotes the splashing; while, beyond such value, any increase in viscosity shows the opposite effect. It is also found that at a particular combination of liquid surface tension and viscosity (e.g. silicone oil, 10 cSt), an increase in the drop velocity changes the splashing to spreading. We relate such behaviors to the thickness, shape, and the velocity of the drop's lamella. Finally, to predict the splashing, we developed an empirical correlation which covers all of the previous reported data, hence clarifying the ostensible existing contradictions.

  18. Flash evaporator

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    A device and method for flash evaporating a reagent includes an evaporation chamber that houses a dome on which evaporation occurs. The dome is solid and of high thermal conductivity and mass, and may be heated to a temperature sufficient to vaporize a specific reagent. The reagent is supplied from an external source to the dome through a nozzle, and may be supplied as a continuous stream, as a shower, and as discrete drops. A carrier gas may be introduced into the evaporation chamber and cre...

  19. Microdroplet evaporation in closed digital microfluidic biochips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, Ali; Buat, Matthew D; Hoorfar, Mina

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, microdroplet evaporation in the closed digital microfluidic systems is studied for hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The contact angle and contact radius are measured by an enhanced automated polynomial fitting approach. It is observed that the contact angle for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces remains constant during the evaporation process. However, a higher evaporation rate is observed for hydrophilic droplets compared to the hydrophobic droplets. Since no contact line pinning is observed, first, an analytical model based on the uniform vapor mass flux along the liquid–vapor interface is proposed. Interestingly, it is observed that in the hydrophobic case, the analytical model gives a higher evaporation rate, whereas for the hydrophilic case, the analytical model gives a lower evaporation rate. The discrepancy between the results of the analytical modeling and the experimental values is hypothesized to be due the constant flux assumption. To verify the hypothesis, a finite volume-based numerical model is developed to find the local flux along the liquid–vapor interface. The numerical modeling results confirm that for hydrophilic droplets, the evaporation flux increases very close to the three-phase contact line. In the case of the hydrophobic droplets, on the other hand, the flux decreases close to the contact line due to vapor saturation; as a result the uniform flux assumption overestimates the mass loss. (paper)

  20. Effect of Latent Heat Released by Freezing Droplets during Frost Wave Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Shreyas; Park, Deokgeun; Singla, Nitish; Sokalski, Peter; Boyina, Kalyan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2018-05-21

    Frost spreads on nonwetting surfaces during condensation frosting via an interdroplet frost wave. When a supercooled condensate water droplet freezes on a hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surface, neighboring droplets still in the liquid phase begin to evaporate. Two possible mechanisms govern the evaporation of neighboring water droplets: (1) The difference in saturation pressure of the water vapor surrounding the liquid and frozen droplets induces a vapor pressure gradient, and (2) the latent heat released by freezing droplets locally heats the substrate, leading to evaporation of nearby droplets. The relative significance of these two mechanisms is still not understood. Here, we study the significance of the latent heat released into the substrate by freezing droplets, and its effect on adjacent droplet evaporation, by studying the dynamics of individual water droplet freezing on aluminum-, copper-, and glass-based hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces. The latent heat flux released into the substrate was calculated from the measured droplet sizes and the respective freezing times ( t f ), defined as the time from initial ice nucleation within the droplet to complete droplet freezing. To probe the effect of latent heat release, we performed three-dimensional transient finite element simulations showing that the transfer of latent heat to neighboring droplets is insignificant and accounts for a negligible fraction of evaporation during microscale frost wave propagation. Furthermore, we studied the effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the transfer of latent heat transfer to neighboring droplets by investigating the velocity of ice bridge formation. The velocity of the ice bridge was independent of the substrate thermal conductivity, indicating that adjacent droplet evaporation during condensation frosting is governed solely by vapor pressure gradients. This study not only provides key insights into the individual droplet freezing process but also

  1. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-01-01

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  2. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-04-24

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  3. Radioactive droplet moisture transfer from nuclear power plant spray pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Problem on transfer of radioactive droplet moisture with an account of its evaporation from the nuclear power plant spray pool (NPP coolant) is considered. Formulae enabling evaluation of droplet and radioactive water admixture lifetime as a whole, as well as the maximum distance (by wind), over which it can extend, are obtained. Recommendations for decrease in the droplet dispersed composition and reduction in scale of radioactive contamination of underlying surface are given. 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  4. Measuring splash erosion potential under vegetation using sand-filled splash cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, C.; Scholten, T.; Kühn, P.

    2009-04-01

    In soil erosion research it is widely accepted that vegetation is not only protecting the soil from the erosive power of rainfall. Under specific circumstances (like they occur e.g. in forests) vegetation can enhance the erosive power of rainfall by modifying its properties (esp. drop size distribution, kinetic energy). The adjacent processes are very complex and variable in time and space and depend on numerous variables (e.g. rainfall intensity, drop size distribution, drop fall velocity, height of the canopy, density of the canopy, crown and leaf traits, LAI). In the last decades a large number of studies focused this process-system using different methods and came to often different results (Brandt 1989; Calder 2001; Foot & Morgan 2005; Hall & Calder 1993; Mosley 1982; Nanko et al. 2006; Park & Cameron 2008; Vis 1986). The main objective of our field experiments in subtropical China is to quantify the modification of precipitation by its pass through the canopy layer for six different tree species, three different successional stages and three different biodiversity classes. For this, new splash cups were developed based on the archetype of Ellison (1947). In contrast to previous studies with splash cups (Vis 1986) or other forms of splash cups (Kinnell 1974; Morgan 1981) we measured the unit sand remaining inside the cup after single natural rainfall events. The new splash cups contain of a PE-flask to which a carrier system has been attached. In this carrier system a cup filled with unit sand of 125-200 µm particle size is inserted. At the bottom of the cup a silk cover is attached to avoid the loss of sand and to guarantee free drainage of water from the cup to the carrier and vice versa. Cup and PE-flask are hydraulically connected by a cotton wick to assure constant moisture content throughout the time of measuring. Additionally, vents in the carrier system ensure that the pressure arising from the insertion of the cup doesn't lead to a loss of sand. The

  5. Metal droplet erosion and shielding plasma layer under plasma flows typical of transient processes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martynenko, Yu. V., E-mail: Martynenko-YV@nrcki.ru [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    It is shown that the shielding plasma layer and metal droplet erosion in tokamaks are closely interrelated, because shielding plasma forms from the evaporated metal droplets, while droplet erosion is caused by the shielding plasma flow over the melted metal surface. Analysis of experimental data and theoretical models of these processes is presented.

  6. A Full-Scale Study of Exhaled Droplet Dispersion in the Microenvironment around one and two Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Khalegi, Farzad

    Airborne cross infection is based on transmission of microorganisms attached to exhaled droplets or particles. Traditionally two transmission routes are considered, namely via droplet nuclei ( 5-10 μm), and they correspond to two infection routes: droplet infection...... and airborne infection. A transition may take place from droplet-borne infection to airborne infection, because the exhaled droplets may evaporate in the air and droplets become droplet nuclei. Full-scale experiments on the movement of droplet nuclei (airborne infection) have been performed in a number...

  7. Nanospiral Formation by Droplet Drying: One Molecule at a Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have created nanospirals by self-assembly during droplet evaporation. The nanospirals, 60–70 nm in diameter, formed when solvent mixtures of methanol and m-cresol were used. In contrast, spin coating using only methanol as the solvent produced epitaxial films of stripe nanopatterns and using only m-cresol disordered structure. Due to the disparity in vapor pressure between the two solvents, droplets of m-cresol solution remaining on the substrate serve as templates for the self-assembly of carboxylic acid molecules, which in turn allows the visualization of solution droplet evaporation one molecule at a time.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S.

    Interaction of liquid droplets with turbulence is important in numerous applications ranging from rain formation to oil spills to spray combustion. The physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction are largely unknown, especially when compared to that of solid particles. Compared to solid particles, droplets can deform, break up, coalesce and have internal fluid circulation. The main goal of this work is to investigate using direct numerical simulation (DNS) the physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction, both for non-evaporating and evaporating droplets. To achieve this objective, we develop and couple a new pressure-correction method with the volume-of-fluid (VoF) method for simulating incompressible two-fluid flows. The method's main advantage is that the variable coefficient Poisson equation that arises in solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two-fluid flows is reduced to a constant coefficient equation. This equation can then be solved directly using, e.g., the FFT-based parallel Poisson solver. For a 10243 mesh, our new pressure-correction method using a fast Poisson solver is ten to forty times faster than the standard pressure-correction method using multigrid. Using the coupled pressure-correction and VoF method, we perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 3130 finite-size, non-evaporating droplets of diameter approximately equal to the Taylor lengthscale and with 5% droplet volume fraction in decaying isotropic turbulence at initial Taylor-scale Reynolds number Relambda = 83. In the droplet-laden cases, we vary one of the following three parameters: the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s. velocity of turbulence (0.1 ≤ Werms ≤ 5), the droplet- to carrier-fluid density ratio (1 ≤ rhod/rho c ≤ 100) or the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 ≤ mud/muc ≤ 100). We derive the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) equations for the two-fluid, carrier-fluid and droplet-fluid flow. These equations allow

  9. Effects of droplet interactions on droplet transport at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1987-01-01

    Effects of droplet interactions on drag, evaporation, and combustion of a planar droplet array, oriented perpendicular to the approaching flow, are studied numerically. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, with variable thermophysical properties, are solved using finite-difference techniques. Parameters investigated include the droplet spacing, droplet Reynolds number, approaching stream oxygen concentration, and fuel type. Results are obtained for the Reynolds number range of 5 to 100, droplet spacings from 2 to 24 diameters, oxygen concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2, and methanol and n-butanol fuels. The calculations show that the gasification rates of interacting droplets decrease as the droplet spacings decrease. The reduction in gasification rates is significant only at small spacings and low Reynolds numbers. For the present array orientation, the effects of interactions on the gasification rates diminish rapidly for Reynolds numbers greater than 10 and spacings greater than 6 droplet diameters. The effects of adjacent droplets on drag are shown to be small.

  10. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  11. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Limongi, Tania; Marinaro, Giovanni; Riekel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  12. Droplet deposition above a quench front during reflood after a large break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.

    1982-01-01

    Droplet deposition or migration towards the wall in a dispersed flow has been the subject of many investigations due to its industrial applications such as combustion of sprays of liquid fuel, evaporators, spray cooling, nuclear reactors, etc. Dispersed flow is characterized by high void and hence low droplet concentration and the theoretical study of droplet deposition is the treatment of a single droplet trajectory in the dispersed. As the droplet is travelling towards the wall, whether it will eventually be deposited on the wall or not, will be determined by the competing forces acting on it and by the boundary layer it is traversing through towards the wall. The mechanism of droplet deposition will be examined. The prediction of the boundary layer thickness will take into account the droplet size and density difference between the fluid and the droplet. Given the condition above the quench front, the minimum lateral velocity required for droplet deposition could be determined as a function of droplet diameter

  13. Evaporation of liquids on chemically patterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieyra Salas, J.A.; Darhuber, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    We studied evaporation rates of volatile liquids deposited onto chemically patterned surfaces by means of experiments and numerical simulations. We quantified the influence of the droplet geometry, in particular circular, triangular, rectangular and square shapes, as well as the influence of contact

  14. Variable focus microscopy using a suspended water droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, F A; Chau, K J

    2012-01-01

    We explore a low-technology methodology to dispense and shape water droplets for application as the magnifying element in a microscope using either reflection-mode or transmission-mode illumination. A water droplet is created at the end of a syringe and then coated with a thin layer of silicone oil to mitigate evaporation. By applying mechanical pressure to the water droplet using a metal tip, the shape of the droplet is tuned to yield focusing properties amenable for microscopy. Images captured using the microscope demonstrate micron-scale resolution, variable magnification and imaging quality comparable to that obtained by a conventional, laboratory-grade microscope. (paper)

  15. Evaporator bulb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    In order to prevent the hazard of a possible excursion in an evaporator bulb for radioactive liquids there is provided in the bottom of the vessel a recess filled with a neutron-absorbing and moderating material. The bottom drain pipe is coming out sideways and connected with a heated pipe feeding above into the vessel tangentially. (TK) [de

  16. Evaporating firewalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

  17. Water evaporation on highly viscoelastic polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Gang; Severtson, Steven J

    2012-07-03

    Results are reported for a study on the evaporation of water droplets from a highly viscoelastic acrylic polymer surface. These are contrasted with those collected for the same measurements carried out on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). For PDMS, the evaporation process involves the expected multistep process including constant drop area, constant contact angle, and finally a combination of these steps until the liquid is gone. In contrast, water evaporation from the acrylic polymer shows a constant drop area mode throughout. Furthermore, during the evaporation process, the drop area actually expands on the acrylic polymer. The single mode evaporation process is consistent with formation of wetting structures, which cannot be propagated by the capillary forces. Expansion of the drop area is attributed to the influence of the drop capillary pressure. Furthermore, the rate of drop area expansion is shown to be dependent on the thickness of the polymer film.

  18. Liquid evaporation process and evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergey, Claude; Ravenel, Jacques.

    1975-01-01

    The process described enables a liquid to be evaporated rapidly without any projection. A jet of hot gas is applied to the liquid, the power and angle of the jet being chosen so as to spin the liquid. It is particularly used in the case of radioactive products [fr

  19. Nanoparticle motion on the surface of drying droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Advances in solution-based printing and surface patterning techniques for additive manufacturing demand a clear understanding of particle dynamics in drying colloidal droplets and its relationship with deposit structure. Although the evaporation-driven deposition has been studied thoroughly for the particles dispersed in the bulk of the droplet, few investigations have focused on the particles strongly adsorbed to the droplet surface. We modeled the assembly and deposition of the surface-active particles in a drying sessile droplet with a pinned contact line by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann-Brownian dynamics method. The particle trajectory and its area density profile characterize the assembly dynamics and deposition pattern development during evaporation. While the bulk-dispersed particles continuously move to the contact line, forming the typical "coffee-ring" deposit, the interface-bound particles migrate first toward the apex and then to the contact line as the droplet dries out. To understand this unexpected behavior, we resolve the droplet velocity field both in the bulk and within the interfacial region. The simulation results agree well with the analytical solution for the Stokes flow inside an evaporating droplet. At different stages of evaporation, our study reveals that the competition between the tangential surface flow and the downward motion of the evaporating liquid-vapor interface governs the dynamics of the interface-bound particles. In particular, the interface displacement contributes to the particle motion toward the droplet apex in a short phase, while the outward advective flow prevails at the late stage of drying and carries the particles to the contact line. The final deposit of the surface-adsorbed particles exhibits a density enhancement at the center, in addition to a coffee ring. Despite its small influence on the final deposit in the present study, the distinct dynamics of surface-active particles due to the interfacial confinement

  20. Phase rainbow refractometry for accurate droplet variation characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingchun; Promvongsa, Jantarat; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Chen, Jia; Gréhan, Gérard

    2016-10-15

    We developed a one-dimensional phase rainbow refractometer for the accurate trans-dimensional measurements of droplet size on the micrometer scale as well as the tiny droplet diameter variations at the nanoscale. The dependence of the phase shift of the rainbow ripple structures on the droplet variations is revealed. The phase-shifting rainbow image is recorded by a telecentric one-dimensional rainbow imaging system. Experiments on the evaporating monodispersed droplet stream show that the phase rainbow refractometer can measure the tiny droplet diameter changes down to tens of nanometers. This one-dimensional phase rainbow refractometer is capable of measuring the droplet refractive index and diameter, as well as variations.

  1. Measurement of droplet vaporization rate enhancement caused by acoustic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Winter, M.

    1992-10-01

    Advanced laser diagnostics are being applied to quantify droplet vaporization enhancement in the presence of acoustic fields which can lead to instability in liquid-fueled rockets. While models have been developed to describe the interactions between subcritical droplet vaporization and acoustic fields in the surrounding gases, they have not been verified experimentally. In the super critical environment of a rocket engine combustor, little is understood about how the injected fluid is distributed. Experiments in these areas have been limited because of the lack of diagnostic techniques capable of providing quantitative results. Recently, however, extremely accurate vaporization rate measurements have been performed on droplets in a subcritical environment using morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's) in which fluorescence from an individual droplet provides information about its diameter. Initial measurements on methanol droplets behind a pressure pulse with a pressure ratio of 1.2 indicated that the evaporation rate in the first few microsec after wave passage was extremely high. Subsequent measurements have been made to validate these results using MDR's acquired from similarly-sized droplets using a pulse with a 1.1 pressure ratio. A baseline measurement was also made using a non evaporative fluid under similar Weber and Reynolds number conditions. The MDR technique employed for these measurements is explained and the facilities are described. The evaporation measurement results are shown and the rates observed from different droplet materials and different wave strengths are compared.

  2. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.

  3. Simulation of droplet impact onto a deep pool for large Froude numbers in different open-source codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagova, V. N.; Kraposhin, M. V.; Marchevsky, I. K.; Smirnova, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    A droplet impact on a deep pool can induce macro-scale or micro-scale effects like a crown splash, a high-speed jet, formation of secondary droplets or thin liquid films, etc. It depends on the diameter and velocity of the droplet, liquid properties, effects of external forces and other factors that a ratio of dimensionless criteria can account for. In the present research, we considered the droplet and the pool consist of the same viscous incompressible liquid. We took surface tension into account but neglected gravity forces. We used two open-source codes (OpenFOAM and Gerris) for our computations. We review the possibility of using these codes for simulation of processes in free-surface flows that may take place after a droplet impact on the pool. Both codes simulated several modes of droplet impact. We estimated the effect of liquid properties with respect to the Reynolds number and Weber number. Numerical simulation enabled us to find boundaries between different modes of droplet impact on a deep pool and to plot corresponding mode maps. The ratio of liquid density to that of the surrounding gas induces several changes in mode maps. Increasing this density ratio suppresses the crown splash.

  4. Nanoscale footprints of self-running gallium droplets on GaAs surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Wu

    Full Text Available In this work, the nanoscale footprints of self-driven liquid gallium droplet movement on a GaAs (001 surface will be presented and analyzed. The nanoscale footprints of a primary droplet trail and ordered secondary droplets along primary droplet trails are observed on the GaAs surface. A well ordered nanoterrace from the trail is left behind by a running droplet. In addition, collision events between two running droplets are investigated. The exposed fresh surface after a collision demonstrates a superior evaporation property. Based on the observation of droplet evolution at different stages as well as nanoscale footprints, a schematic diagram of droplet evolution is outlined in an attempt to understand the phenomenon of stick-slip droplet motion on the GaAs surface. The present study adds another piece of work to obtain the physical picture of a stick-slip self-driven mechanism in nanoscale, bridging nano and micro systems.

  5. User manual for SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Marvin Elwood

    2006-02-01

    The radiant heat test facility develops test sets providing well-characterized thermal environments, often representing fires. Many of the components and procedures have become standardized to such an extent that the development of a specialized design tool to determine optimal configurations for radiant heat experiments was appropriate. SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper) is that tool. SPLASH is implemented as a user-friendly, Windows-based program that allows a designer to describe a test setup in terms of parameters such as number of lamps, power, position, and separation distance. This document is a user manual for that software. Any incidental descriptions of theory are only for the purpose of defining the model inputs. The theory for the underlying model is described in SAND2005-2947 (Ref. [1]). SPLASH provides a graphical user interface to define lamp panel and shroud designs parametrically, solves the resulting radiation enclosure problem for up to 2500 surfaces, and provides post-processing to facilitate understanding and documentation of analyzed designs.

  6. SPLASH-SXDF Multi-wavelength Photometric Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Capak, Peter; Davidzon, Iary; Faisst, Andreas; Hsieh, Bau Ching; Ilbert, Olivier; Jarvis, Matt; Laigle, Clotilde; Phillips, John; Silverman, John; Strauss, Michael A.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Bowler, Rebecca; Coupon, Jean; Foucaud, Sébastien; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Masters, Daniel; McCracken, Henry Joy; Mobasher, Bahram; Ouchi, Masami; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2018-04-01

    We present a multi-wavelength catalog in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field (SXDF) as part of the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We include the newly acquired optical data from the Hyper-Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program, accompanied by IRAC coverage from the SPLASH survey. All available optical and near-infrared data is homogenized and resampled on a common astrometric reference frame. Source detection is done using a multi-wavelength detection image including the u-band to recover the bluest objects. We measure multi-wavelength photometry and compute photometric redshifts as well as physical properties for ∼1.17 million objects over ∼4.2 deg2, with ∼800,000 objects in the 2.4 deg2 HSC-Ultra-Deep coverage. Using the available spectroscopic redshifts from various surveys over the range of 0 fraction of 3.2%. The SPLASH-SXDF catalog is a valuable, publicly available resource, perfectly suited for studying galaxies in the early universe and tracing their evolution through cosmic time.

  7. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even liquid mixtures has intensively been studied over the past two decades, the evaporation of ternary mixtures of liquids with different volatilities and mutual solubilities has not yet been explored. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life—a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and anise oil) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called “Ouzo effect.” Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop. PMID:27418601

  8. Study of airborne particles generated by the impact of droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motzkus, Ch.

    2007-12-01

    A liquid droplet impinging onto surfaces occurs in many industrial and natural processes. The study of this phenomenon is fundamental in order to determine the potential sources of contamination in the case of scenarios of liquid falls such as dripping. There are very few data in the literature in the case of the impact of millimeter-size droplets. The purpose of our work is to study experimentally the particle emission during the impact of droplets onto a liquid film. Experiments were conducted to study the influence of the velocity and the diameter of the droplets, the height of the liquid film, the surface tension and viscosity of the liquid on the airborne particles. Our results, original, have made it possible to examine the relevance of existing relations, describing the transition between deposition and splash regimes, in order to determine the presence or not of airborne particles. The micro droplets produced, with diameters less than fifty micrometers, are characterised in terms of total mass and size distribution. Our results also show the influence of a combination of several factors on the production of airborne particles. For this reason, it is interesting to use dimensionless numbers, to describe the relationship between the inertial, viscosity and surface tension forces, in order to understand physically the emission of airborne particles. (author)

  9. Water evaporation: a transition path sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varilly, Patrick; Chandler, David

    2013-02-07

    We use transition path sampling to study evaporation in the SPC/E model of liquid water. On the basis of thousands of evaporation trajectories, we characterize the members of the transition state ensemble (TSE), which exhibit a liquid-vapor interface with predominantly negative mean curvature at the site of evaporation. We also find that after evaporation is complete, the distributions of translational and angular momenta of the evaporated water are Maxwellian with a temperature equal to that of the liquid. To characterize the evaporation trajectories in their entirety, we find that it suffices to project them onto just two coordinates: the distance of the evaporating molecule to the instantaneous liquid-vapor interface and the velocity of the water along the average interface normal. In this projected space, we find that the TSE is well-captured by a simple model of ballistic escape from a deep potential well, with no additional barrier to evaporation beyond the cohesive strength of the liquid. Equivalently, they are consistent with a near-unity probability for a water molecule impinging upon a liquid droplet to condense. These results agree with previous simulations and with some, but not all, recent experiments.

  10. Evaporation of Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Sunscreen Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2016-08-24

    We recently showed (Binks et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b02696) how evaporation of sunscreen films consisting of solutions of molecular UV filters leads to loss of UV light absorption and derived sun protection factor (SPF). In the present work, we investigate evaporation-induced effects for sunscreen films consisting of particle-stabilized emulsions containing a dissolved UV filter. The emulsions contained either droplets of propylene glycol (PG) in squalane (SQ), droplets of SQ in PG or droplets of decane in PG. In these different emulsion types, the SQ is involatile and shows no evaporation, the PG is volatile and evaporates relatively slowly, whereas the decane is relatively very volatile and evaporates quickly. We have measured the film mass and area, optical micrographs of the film structure, and the UV absorbance spectra during evaporation. For emulsion films containing the involatile SQ, evaporation of the PG causes collapse of the emulsion structure with some loss of specular UV absorbance due to light scattering. However, for these emulsions with droplets much larger than the wavelength of light, the light is scattered only at small forward angles so does not contribute to the diffuse absorbance and the film SPF. The UV filter remains soluble throughout the evaporation and thus the UV absorption by the filter and the SPF remain approximately constant. Both PG-in-SQ and SQ-in-PG films behave similarly and do not show area shrinkage by dewetting. In contrast, the decane-in-PG film shows rapid evaporative loss of the decane, followed by slower loss of the PG resulting in precipitation of the UV filter and film area shrinkage by dewetting which cause the UV absorbance and derived SPF to decrease. Measured UV spectra during evaporation are in reasonable agreement with spectra calculated using models discussed here.

  11. Streamer Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A. H.; Wu, Shi T.; Nerney, S.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of slow plasma heating near the tops of streamers where the plasma is only weakly contained by the magnetic field. The form it takes is the slow opening of field lines at the top of the streamer and transient formation of new solar wind. It was discovered in polytropic model calculations, where due to the absence of other energy loss mechanisms in magnetostatic streamers, its ultimate endpoint is the complete evaporation of the streamer. This takes, for plausible heating rates, weeks to months in these models. Of course streamers do not behave this way, for more than one reason. One is that there are losses due to thermal conduction to the base of the streamer and radiation from the transition region. Another is that streamer heating must have a characteristic time constant and depend on the ambient physical conditions. We use our global Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model with thermal conduction to examine a few examples of the effect of changing the heating scale height and of making ad hoc choices for how the heating depends on ambient conditions. At the same time, we apply and extend the analytic model of streamers, which showed that streamers will be unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than about 2xl0(exp 6) K. Slow solar wind is observed to come from streamers through transient releases. A scenario for this that is consistent with the above physical process is that heating increases the near-cusp temperature until field lines there are forced open. The subsequent evacuation of the flux tubes by the newly forming slow wind decreases the temperature and heating until the flux tubes are able to reclose. Then, over a longer time scale, heating begins to again refill the flux tubes with plasma and increase the temperature until the cycle repeats itself. The calculations we report here are first steps towards quantitative evaluation of this scenario.

  12. Recent progress in design of evaporators and condensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semeria, R.

    1981-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients for boilers and condensors have been improved very much during the two last decades. Particularly, for sea water desalination plants, the falling liquid film evaporator and the horizontal tube evaporator were improved for having good performances with small temperature differences. A discussion follows of research undertaken at C.E.N. Grenoble (France) which leads to heat transfer enhancement in evaporators or in condensors. Principles are investigated such as role of interfaces and effect of a good nucleation in boiling. Examples of improved techniques are given; namely: - evaporators: falling film, fluted tubes, specific liquids, - condensors: fluted tubes, special materials such as titanium, droplet condensation [fr

  13. Evaporation-induced assembly of biomimetic polypeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, Joseph; Junkin, Michael; Cappello, Joseph; Wu Xiaoyi; Wong, Pak Kin

    2008-01-01

    We report an evaporation assisted plasma lithography (EAPL) process for guided self-assembly of a biomimetic silk-elastinlike protein (SELP). We demonstrate the formation of SELP structures from millimeter to submicrometer range on plasma-treatment surface templates during an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The self-assembly processes at different humidities and droplet volumes were investigated. The process occurs efficiently in a window of optimized operating conditions found to be at 70% relative humidity and 8 μl volume of SELP solution. The EAPL approach provides a useful technique for the realization of functional devices and systems using these biomimetic materials

  14. Structural morphology of acoustically levitated and heated nanosilica droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ranganathan; Tijerino, Erick; Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-01-01

    We study the vaporization and precipitation dynamics of a nanosilica encapsulated water droplet by levitating it acoustically and heating it with a CO 2 laser. For all concentrations, we observe three phases: solvent evaporation, surface agglomeration, and precipitation leading to bowl or ring shaped structures. At higher concentrations, ring reorientation and rotation are seen consistently. The surface temperature from an infrared camera is seen to be dependent on the final geometrical shape of the droplet and its rotation induced by the acoustic field of the levitator. With nonuniform particle distribution, these structures can experience rupture which modifies the droplet rotational speed.

  15. The Effect of Salt Splash on Nylon 6,6

    OpenAIRE

    Steward, Scott D

    1999-01-01

    Abstract: One of the most common environmental exposures that nylon undergoes, when used for automotive applications, is that of salt splash, which commonly occurs during winter driving. This study looks at the effect of various salts (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2) on the thermal and mechanical properties of nylon when exposed to one and four molar aqueous salt solutions. It was found that the diffusion of salt solutions into nylon 6,6 occurred in a pseudo-Fickian manner. Also, it was found that the p...

  16. Composition measurements of binary mixture droplets by rainbow refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, J; Weigand, B

    2007-04-10

    So far, refractive index measurements by rainbow refractometry have been used to determine the temperature of single droplets and ensembles of droplets. Rainbow refractometry is, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, applied to measure composition histories of evaporating, binary mixture droplets. An evaluation method is presented that makes use of Airy theory and the simultaneous size measurement by Mie scattering imaging. The method further includes an empirical correction function for a certain diameter and refractive index range. The measurement uncertainty was investigated by numerical simulations with Lorenz-Mie theory. For the experiments, an optical levitation setup was used allowing for long measurement periods. Temperature measurements of single-component droplets at different temperature levels are shown to demonstrate the accuracy of rainbow refractometry. Measurements of size and composition histories of binary mixture droplets are presented for two different mixtures. Experimental results show good agreement with numerical results using a rapid-mixing model.

  17. Composition measurements of binary mixture droplets by rainbow refractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, J.; Weigand, B.

    2007-01-01

    So far, refractive index measurements by rainbow refractometry have been used to determine the temperature of single droplets and ensembles of droplets. Rainbow refractometry is, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, applied to measure composition histories of evaporating, binary mixture droplets. An evaluation method is presented that makes use of Airy theory and the simultaneous size measurement by Mie scattering imaging. The method further includes an empirical correction function for a certain diameter and refractive index range. The measurement uncertainty was investigated by numerical simulations with Lorenz-Mie theory. For the experiments, an optical levitation setup was used allowing for long measurement periods. Temperature measurements of single-component droplets at different temperature levels are shown to demonstrate the accuracy of rainbow refractometry. Measurements of size and composition histories of binary mixture droplets are presented for two different mixtures. Experimental results show good agreement with numerical results using a rapid-mixing model

  18. Effect of solvent on the charging mechanisms of poly(ethylene glycol) in droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Sepideh; Oh, Myong In; Consta, Styliani

    2015-03-01

    We examine the effect of solvent on the charging mechanisms of a macromolecule in a droplet by using molecular dynamics simulations. The droplet contains excess charge that is carried by sodium ions. To investigate the principles of the charging mechanisms of a macromolecule in a droplet, we simulate aqueous and methanol droplets that contain a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecule. We find that the solvent plays a critical role in the charging mechanism and in the manner that the sodiated PEG emerges from a droplet. In the aqueous droplets, the sodiated PEG is released from the droplet while it is being charged at a droplet charge state below the Rayleigh limit. The charging of PEG occurs on the surface of the droplet. In contrast to the aqueous droplets, in the methanol droplet, the sodiated PEG resides in the interior of the droplet and it may become charged at any location in the droplet, interior or surface. The sodiated PEG emerges from the droplet by drying-out of the solvent. Even though these two mechanisms appear to be phenomenologically similar to the widely accepted ion-evaporation and charge-residue mechanisms, they have fundamental differences from those. An integral part of the mechanism that the macromolecular ions emerge from droplets is the droplet morphology. Droplet morphologies give rise to different solvation interactions between the solvent and the macromolecule. In the water-sodiated PEG system, we find the extrusion of the PEG morphology, while in methanol-sodiated droplet, we find the "pearl-on-the-necklace" morphology and the extrusion of the sodiated PEG in the last stage of the desolvation process. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms that macromolecules acquire their charge in droplets produced in electrospray ionization experiments.

  19. 78 FR 28492 - Special Local Regulation; Low Country Splash, Wando River, Cooper River, and Charleston Harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Low Country Splash, Wando River, Cooper River, and Charleston Harbor... establishing a special local regulation on the waters of the Wando River, Cooper River, and Charleston Harbor... rulemaking (NPRM) entitled, ``Special Local Regulation; Low Country Splash, Wando River, Cooper River, and...

  20. 78 FR 18277 - Special Local Regulation; Low Country Splash, Wando River, Cooper River, and Charleston Harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Low Country Splash, Wando River, Cooper River, and Charleston Harbor... proposes to issue a special local regulation on the waters of the Wando River, Cooper River, and Charleston... Country Splash is scheduled to take place on the waters of the Wando River, Cooper River, and Charleston...

  1. Statistical steady states in turbulent droplet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Jeremie; Krstulovic, Giorgio; Siewert, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the general problem of turbulent condensation. Using direct numerical simulations we show that the fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. This leads to propose a Lagrangian stochastic model consisting of a set of integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is that, after a stage where the squared radius simply diffuses, the system converges exponentially fast to a statistical steady state independent of the initial conditions. The main mechanism involved in this convergence is a loss of memory induced by a significant number of droplets undergoing a complete evaporation before growing again. The statistical steady state is characterised by an exponential tail in the droplet mass distribution.

  2. Evaporation phase change processes of water/methanol mixtures on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Kun; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2011-07-01

    Evaporation phenomena are a critical and frequently seen phase change process in many heat transfer applications. In this paper, we study the evaporation process of a sessile droplet on two topologically different surfaces, including smooth and nanostructured surfaces. The nanostructured surface has an array of high-aspect-ratio nanowires (height/diameter ~ 125) and is implemented by using a simple template-based nanofabrication method. It possesses superhydrophobicity (>140°) and low contact angle hysteresis (1.2-2.1°), allowing the liquid droplets to remain in the 'fakir' state throughout the evaporation processes. Sessile droplets of deionized (DI) water and water/methanol binary mixture test liquids with their contact angles and base diameters are monitored. The results show that the nanostructures play a critical role in the droplet dynamics during evaporation.

  3. Evaporation phase change processes of water/methanol mixtures on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Kun; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Evaporation phenomena are a critical and frequently seen phase change process in many heat transfer applications. In this paper, we study the evaporation process of a sessile droplet on two topologically different surfaces, including smooth and nanostructured surfaces. The nanostructured surface has an array of high-aspect-ratio nanowires (height/diameter ∼ 125) and is implemented by using a simple template-based nanofabrication method. It possesses superhydrophobicity (>140°) and low contact angle hysteresis (1.2–2.1°), allowing the liquid droplets to remain in the 'fakir' state throughout the evaporation processes. Sessile droplets of deionized (DI) water and water/methanol binary mixture test liquids with their contact angles and base diameters are monitored. The results show that the nanostructures play a critical role in the droplet dynamics during evaporation

  4. Water Quality Survey of Splash Pads After A Waterborne Salmonellosis Outbreak--Tennessee, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Joshua L; Manners, Judy; Miller, Susan; Shepherd, Craig; Dunn, John R; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F

    2017-06-01

    Waterborne outbreaks of salmonellosis are uncommon. The Tennessee Department of Health investigated a salmonellosis outbreak of 10 cases with the only common risk factor being exposure to a single splash pad. Risks included water splashed in the face at the splash pad and no free residual chlorine in the water system. We surveyed water quality and patron behaviors at splash pads statewide. Of the 29 splash pads participating in the water quality survey, 24 (83%) used a recirculating water system. Of the 24, 5 (21%) water samples were tested by polymerase chain reaction and found to be positive for E. coli, Giardia, norovirus, or Salmonella. Among 95 patrons observed, we identified common high-risk behaviors of sitting on the fountain or spray head and putting mouth to water. Water venue regulations and improved education of patrons are important to aid prevention efforts.

  5. Study of droplet entrainment from bubbling surface in a bubble column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez de Santiago, M.

    1991-05-01

    In a bubble column droplets are ejected from the free surface by bubble bursting or splashing. Depending on their size, the droplets are partly carried away by the streaming gas or fall back to the bubbling surface by gravity force. Experiments have been carried out to determine the void fraction in the column by means of an optical probe. In the interfacial zone the bubble bursting process was captured with a high-speed video camera. Simultaneous measurements were made of size and velocity of droplets at several distances from the bubbling surface with a Phase-Doppler Anemometry. The bubble column can be divided into three regions: A lower zone with a flat profile of the local void fraction, a central zone where the flow regime is steady and an upper zone where the local void fraction grows rapidly. A two-parameter log-normal distribution function was proposed in order to describe the polydisperse distribution of droplet-size. Results were obtained concerning the entrainment, concentration, volume fraction and interfacial area of droplets. Finally, it was found that the turbulence intensity affects the droplet terminal velocity for droplets smaller than the Kolmogorov microscale [fr

  6. Characterization of decontamination factors for evaporators used in the treatment of low and intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, L.B.; Law, C.G. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Evaporator decontamination factors were studied as functions of boiloff rate, volume reduction, and feed pH. A bench-scale vertical tube evaporator operating on simulated intermediate level nuclear wastes was used. Decontamination factors were not found to be strong functions of volume reduction or boiloff below vapor velocities of 25 lb/ft 2 -hr. At higher vapor fluxes, splashing was encountered. Foaming occurred at a feed pH of 6 but not at higher values. The presence of radioisotopes in the feed had no effect on evaporator performance

  7. Laser diagnostics of an evaporating electrospray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tongxun

    2014-01-01

    An electrospray atomizer generates monodisperse, dilute sprays when working in the cone-jet mode. Evolution of an electrospray with droplet diameter below 10 μm is studied with phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) and the exciplex-PLIF technique. The evaporation rate constant is determined from droplet velocity and diameter measured with a PDPA and is found to sharply increase with the velocity slip and the coflow temperature. Fluorescence around 400 nm, usually referred to as TMPD fluorescence, is calibrated with a heated, laminar, coflow vapor jet diluted with nitrogen. The TMPD fluorescence yield nonlinearly increases with temperature up to 538 K and then declines. Single-shot images show that fluorescence around 400 nm is mainly generated from TMPD vapor and that from droplets can be neglected as a first analysis; however, fluorescence around 490 nm, usually referred to as exciplex fluorescence, is generated from both droplets and fuel vapor immediately around droplets. Exciplex fluorescence is correlated with PDPA measurements and TMPD fluorescence. Effects of temperature, fuel composition, overlap of fluorescent spectra, and chemical equilibrium for exciplex formation are discussed. Technical challenges for quantitative exciplex-PLIF measurements are highlighted.

  8. Mixed phase evaporation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus for reducing convection current heat loss in electron beam evaporator is described. A material to be evaporated (evaporant) is placed in the crucible of an electron beam evaporation source along with a porous mass formed of a powdered or finely divided solid to act as an impedance to convection currents. A feed system is employed to replenish the supply of evaporant as it is vaporized

  9. UNDESIRED SPLASH OVER ON EQUIPMENTS USING INDUCTIVE SENSORS FOR MONITORING AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLES' CONTROLLED SPEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Monteiro

    Full Text Available This article aims to evaluate instruments that oversight traffic flow electronically, using inductive surface sensors, based on the change of local magnetic field. More specifically, we study the possibility of false speed detections, due to the manifestation of the phenomenon called splash over - which means a space splash of the magnetic field lines out of the measuring zone. We show, through the literature, and practical simulations, the damage that can be caused by splash on the correct speed measurement and identification of the car under suspicions. It is also presented solutions to inhibiting unwanted velocity measurements due to this effect.

  10. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  11. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  12. Biofuels policy and the US market for motor fuels: Empirical analysis of ethanol splashing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walls, W.D., E-mail: wdwalls@ucalgary.ca [Department of Economics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Rusco, Frank; Kendix, Michael [US GAO (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Low ethanol prices relative to the price of gasoline blendstock, and tax credits, have resulted in discretionary blending at wholesale terminals of ethanol into fuel supplies above required levels-a practice known as ethanol splashing in industry parlance. No one knows precisely where or in what volume ethanol is being blended with gasoline and this has important implications for motor fuels markets: Because refiners cannot perfectly predict where ethanol will be blended with finished gasoline by wholesalers, they cannot know when to produce and where to ship a blendstock that when mixed with ethanol at 10% would create the most economically efficient finished motor gasoline that meets engine standards and has comparable evaporative emissions as conventional gasoline without ethanol blending. In contrast to previous empirical analyses of biofuels that have relied on highly aggregated data, our analysis is disaggregated to the level of individual wholesale fuel terminals or racks (of which there are about 350 in the US). We incorporate the price of ethanol as well as the blendstock price to model the wholesaler's decision of whether or not to blend additional ethanol into gasoline at any particular wholesale city-terminal. The empirical analysis illustrates how ethanol and gasoline prices affect ethanol usage, controlling for fuel specifications, blend attributes, and city-terminal-specific effects that, among other things, control for differential costs of delivering ethanol from bio-refinery to wholesale rack. - Research Highlights: > Low ethanol prices and tax credits have resulted in discretionary blending of ethanol into fuel supplies above required levels. > This has important implications for motor fuels markets and vehicular emissions. > Our analysis incorporates the price of ethanol as well as the blendstock price to model the wholesaler's decision of whether or not to blend additional ethanol into gasoline at any particular wholesale city

  13. Biofuels policy and the US market for motor fuels: Empirical analysis of ethanol splashing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walls, W.D.; Rusco, Frank; Kendix, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Low ethanol prices relative to the price of gasoline blendstock, and tax credits, have resulted in discretionary blending at wholesale terminals of ethanol into fuel supplies above required levels-a practice known as ethanol splashing in industry parlance. No one knows precisely where or in what volume ethanol is being blended with gasoline and this has important implications for motor fuels markets: Because refiners cannot perfectly predict where ethanol will be blended with finished gasoline by wholesalers, they cannot know when to produce and where to ship a blendstock that when mixed with ethanol at 10% would create the most economically efficient finished motor gasoline that meets engine standards and has comparable evaporative emissions as conventional gasoline without ethanol blending. In contrast to previous empirical analyses of biofuels that have relied on highly aggregated data, our analysis is disaggregated to the level of individual wholesale fuel terminals or racks (of which there are about 350 in the US). We incorporate the price of ethanol as well as the blendstock price to model the wholesaler's decision of whether or not to blend additional ethanol into gasoline at any particular wholesale city-terminal. The empirical analysis illustrates how ethanol and gasoline prices affect ethanol usage, controlling for fuel specifications, blend attributes, and city-terminal-specific effects that, among other things, control for differential costs of delivering ethanol from bio-refinery to wholesale rack. - Research highlights: → Low ethanol prices and tax credits have resulted in discretionary blending of ethanol into fuel supplies above required levels. → This has important implications for motor fuels markets and vehicular emissions. → Our analysis incorporates the price of ethanol as well as the blendstock price to model the wholesaler's decision of whether or not to blend additional ethanol into gasoline at any particular wholesale city-terminal.

  14. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical oil-water systems such as droplets display lifelike properties and may lend themselves to chemical programming to perform useful work, specifically with respect to the built environment. We present Butschli water-in-oil droplets as a model for further investigation into the development...... reconstructed the Butschli system and observed its life span under a light microscope, observing chemical patterns and droplet behaviors in nearly three hundred replicate experiments. Self-organizing patterns were observed, and during this dynamic, embodied phase the droplets provided a means of introducing...... temporal and spatial order in the system with the potential for chemical programmability. The authors propose that the discrete formation of dynamic droplets, characterized by their lifelike behavior patterns, during a variable window of time (from 30 s to 30 min after the addition of alkaline water...

  15. SU-8 micropatterning for microfluidic droplet and microparticle focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debuisson, Damien; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate micropatterned surfaces consisting of concentric circles and spirals which can focus an evaporating sessile droplet to a specific location on a surface. We also study the micropattern geometry to focus microparticles contained within the droplet. The micropatterned surfaces are fabricated using the photoresist SU-8. Our process enables the modification of the surface wetting via the formation of smooth trench-like defects in the SU-8 which define the micropatterns; the geometry of these micropatterns determines the droplet/microparticle focusing. It is clearly shown that the introduction of small gaps into the micropatterns promotes microparticle centring due to the modification of the depinning angle of the droplet. We also show that the use of spiral micropatterns promotes microparticle centring. Finally, microparticle focusing can be enhanced by modification of surface wetting via the addition of a thin fluorocarbon hydrophobic layer onto the SU-8

  16. Molecular investigation of evaporation of biodroplets containing single-strand DNA on graphene surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Fahimeh; Foroutan, Masumeh

    2018-02-14

    In this study, the water droplet behaviour of four different types of single-strand DNA with homogeneous base sequence on a graphene substrate during evaporation of the droplet was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation results indicated that the evaporation depended on the DNA sequence. The observed changes can be divided into four parts: (i) vaporization mode, (ii) evaporation flux, (iii) mechanism of single-strand placement on the surface, and (iv) consideration of remaining single strands after evaporation. Our simulation observations indicated different evaporation modes for thymine biodroplets as compared to those for other biodroplets. The evaporation of the thymine biodroplets occurred with an increase in the contact angle, while that of the other biodroplets occur in a constant contact angle mode. Moreover, thymine biodroplets generate the lowest contact line compared to other single strands, and it is always placed far away from the centre of the droplets during evaporation. Investigating variations in the evaporation flux shows that thymine has the highest evaporation flux and guanine has the lowest. Moreover, during initial evaporation, the flux of evaporation increases at the triple point of the biodroplets containing thymine single strands, while it decreases in the other biodroplets. The following observation was obtained from the study of the placement of single strands on the substrate: guanine and thymine interacted slower than other single strands during evaporation with graphene, adenine single strand had a higher folding during evaporation, and guanine single strand showed the lowest end-to-end distance. The investigation of single-strand DNA after evaporation shows that adenine produces the most stable structure at the end of evaporation. In addition, cytosine is the most stretched single-strand DNA due to its lack of internal π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding. Therefore, cytosine single strand is more

  17. Simultaneous determination of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients from temporal evolution of an evaporating water microdroplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zientara, M; Jakubczyk, D; Derkachov, G; Kolwas, K; Kolwas, M

    2005-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light by an evaporating droplet of pure water several micrometres in size was investigated. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap placed in a small climatic chamber. The evolution of the droplet radius and the evolution dynamics were investigated by means of analysing the scattering patterns with the aid of Mie theory. A numerical model of droplet evolution, incorporating the kinetic effects near the droplet surface, was constructed. Application of this model to the experimental data allowed us to determine the mass and thermal accommodation coefficients to be α C = 0.12 ± 0.02 and α T = 0.65 ± 0.09, respectively. This model enabled us to determine with high precision the temperature evolution of the droplet and the relative humidity in the droplet vicinity

  18. Mechanism of supercooled droplet freezing on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Stefan; Tiwari, Manish K; Doan, N Vuong; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-01-10

    Understanding ice formation from supercooled water on surfaces is a problem of fundamental importance and general utility. Superhydrophobic surfaces promise to have remarkable 'icephobicity' and low ice adhesion. Here we show that their icephobicity can be rendered ineffective by simple changes in environmental conditions. Through experiments, nucleation theory and heat transfer physics, we establish that humidity and/or the flow of a surrounding gas can fundamentally switch the ice crystallization mechanism, drastically affecting surface icephobicity. Evaporative cooling of the supercooled liquid can engender ice crystallization by homogeneous nucleation at the droplet-free surface as opposed to the expected heterogeneous nucleation at the substrate. The related interplay between droplet roll-off and rapid crystallization is also studied. Overall, we bring a novel perspective to icing and icephobicity, unveiling the strong influence of environmental conditions in addition to the accepted effects of the surface conditions and hydrophobicity.

  19. The influence of the surface composition of mixed monolayer films on the evaporation coefficient of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-07-20

    We explore the dependence of the evaporation coefficient of water from aqueous droplets on the composition of a surface film, considering in particular the influence of monolayer mixed component films on the evaporative mass flux. Measurements with binary component films formed from long chain alcohols, specifically tridecanol (C13H27OH) and pentadecanol (C15H31OH), and tetradecanol (C14H29OH) and hexadecanol (C16H33OH), show that the evaporation coefficient is dependent on the mole fractions of the two components forming the monolayer film. Immediately at the point of film formation and commensurate reduction in droplet evaporation rate, the evaporation coefficient is equal to a mole fraction weighted average of the evaporation coefficients through the equivalent single component films. As a droplet continues to diminish in surface area with continued loss of water, the more-soluble, shorter alkyl chain component preferentially partitions into the droplet bulk with the evaporation coefficient tending towards that through a single component film formed simply from the less-soluble, longer chain alcohol. We also show that the addition of a long chain alcohol to an aqueous-sucrose droplet can facilitate control over the degree of dehydration achieved during evaporation. After undergoing rapid gas-phase diffusion limited water evaporation, binary aqueous-sucrose droplets show a continued slow evaporative flux that is limited by slow diffusional mass transport within the particle bulk due to the rapidly increasing particle viscosity and strong concentration gradients that are established. The addition of a long chain alcohol to the droplet is shown to slow the initial rate of water loss, leading to a droplet composition that remains more homogeneous for a longer period of time. When the sucrose concentration has achieved a sufficiently high value, and the diffusion constant of water has decreased accordingly so that bulk phase diffusion arrest occurs in the monolayer

  20. SWFSC/MMTD/AK: Structure of Populations, Level of Abundance, and Status of Humpbacks (SPLASH) 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project was part of a larger international project (SPLASH) designed to estimate the abundance and determine the population structure for humpback whales...

  1. Evaporation of water droplet in the humid atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráčková, Lucie; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Smolík, Jiří

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 30, Suppl. 1 (1999), s. S337-S338 ISSN 0021-8502. [European Aerosol Conference EAC'99. Prague, 06.09.1999-10.09.1999] Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.887, year: 1999

  2. Numerical simulation of evaporation and absorption of inkjet printed droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    Inkjet printing is an important field of research for many industrial applications. In particular, the inkjet-printing technology is widely used in the production of a text or graphics of documents stored in electronic form by printing ink on papers and the manufacturing of microarray slides by

  3. Beam Splashes seen by the CMS detector #RestartLHC 2017 (end of April 2017)

    CERN Multimedia

    Mc Cauley, Thomas; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    CMS event display from LHC beam splash on Saturday, 29th April 2017. This is the first time the full detector has seen particles produced since the beginning of the Extended Year-End Technical Stop (EYETS) 2017. In contrast to proton-proton collisions where the particles come from the center of the detector, in splash events, particles traverse the detector horizontally from one side to the other.

  4. Beam Splashes seen by the CMS detector #RestartLHC 2018 (end of Mar 2018)

    CERN Multimedia

    Mc Cauley, Thomas; Olivito, Dominick

    2018-01-01

    CMS event displays from LHC beam splash on Friday, 30th March 2018. In contrast to proton-proton collisions where the particles come from the center of the detector, in splash events, particles traverse the detector horizontally from one side to the other. The time sampling for the picture, which is optimized for collisions at the center of the detector, amplifies the appearance of an asymmetric energy deposit in the end that the particles traverse last.

  5. Evaporation of Nanosuspensions on Substrates with Different Hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Lionel; Pajor-Swierzy, Anna; Magdassi, Shlomo; Kamyshny, Alexander; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G

    2018-01-24

    Liquid drop evaporation on surfaces is present in many industrial and medical applications, e.g., printed electronics, spraying of pesticides, DNA mapping, etc. Despite this strong interest, a theoretical description of the dynamic of the evaporation of complex liquid mixtures and nanosuspensions is still lacking. Indeed, one of the aspects that have not been included in the current theoretical descriptions is the competition between the kinetics of evaporation and the adsorption of surfactants and/or particles at the liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interfaces. Materials formed by an electrically isolating solid on which a patterned conducting layer was formed by the deposits left after drop evaporation have been considered as very promising for building electrical circuits on flexible plastic substrates. In this work, we have done an exhaustive study of the evaporation of nanosuspensions of latex and hydrophobized silver nanoparticles on four substrates of different hydrophobicity. The advancing and receding contact angles as well as the time dependence of the volume of the droplets have been measured over a broad range of particle concentrations. Also, mixtures of silver particles and a surfactant, commonly used in industrial printing, have been examined. Furthermore, the adsorption kinetics at both the air/liquid and solid/liquid interfaces have been measured. Whereas the latex particles do not adsorb at the solid/liquid and only slightly reduce the surface tension, the silver particles strongly adsorb at both interfaces. The experimental results of the evaporation process were compared with the predictions of the theory of Semenov et al. (Evaporation of Sessile Water Droplets: Universal Behavior in the Presence of Contact Angle Hysteresis. Colloids Surf. Physicochem. Eng. Asp. 2011, 391 (1-3), 135-144) and showed surprisingly good agreement despite that the theory was developed for pure liquids. The morphology of the deposits left by the droplets after total

  6. Modeling of Heating and Evaporation of FACE I Gasoline Fuel and its Surrogates

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2016-04-05

    The US Department of Energy has formulated different gasoline fuels called \\'\\'Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE)\\'\\' to standardize their compositions. FACE I is a low octane number gasoline fuel with research octane number (RON) of approximately 70. The detailed hydrocarbon analysis (DHA) of FACE I shows that it contains 33 components. This large number of components cannot be handled in fuel spray simulation where thousands of droplets are directly injected in combustion chamber. These droplets are to be heated, broken-up, collided and evaporated simultaneously. Heating and evaporation of single droplet FACE I fuel was investigated. The heating and evaporation model accounts for the effects of finite thermal conductivity, finite liquid diffusivity and recirculation inside the droplet, referred to as the effective thermal conductivity/effective diffusivity (ETC/ED) model. The temporal variations of the liquid mass fractions of the droplet components were used to characterize the evaporation process. Components with similar evaporation characteristics were merged together. A representative component was initially chosen based on the highest initial mass fraction. Three 6 components surrogates, Surrogate 1-3, that match evaporation characteristics of FACE I have been formulated without keeping same mass fractions of different hydrocarbon types. Another two surrogates (Surrogate 4 and 5) were considered keeping same hydrocarbon type concentrations. A distillation based surrogate that matches measured distillation profile was proposed. The calculated molar mass, hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratio and RON of Surrogate 4 and distillation based one are close to those of FACE I.

  7. Evaporator Cleaning Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    Operation of the 242-16H High Level Waste Evaporator proves crucial to liquid waste management in the H-Area Tank Farm. Recent operational history of the Evaporator showed significant solid formation in secondary lines and in the evaporator pot. Additional samples remain necessary to ensure material identity in the evaporator pot. Analysis of these future samples will provide actinide partitioning information and dissolution characteristics of the solid material from the pot to ensure safe chemical cleaning

  8. Evaporation and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, T.

    1993-01-01

    In this article the influence of climate change on evaporation is discussed. The emphasis is on open water evaporation. Three methods for calculating evaporation are compared considering only changes in temperature and factors directly dependent on temperature. The Penman-method is used to

  9. Fuel Evaporation in an Atmospheric Premixed Burner: Sensitivity Analysis and Spray Vaporization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dávid Csemány

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of evaporation requires accurate thermophysical properties of the liquid. Such data are well-known for conventional fossil fuels. In contrast, e.g., thermal conductivity or dynamic viscosity of the fuel vapor are rarely available for modern liquid fuels. To overcome this problem, molecular models can be used. Currently, the measurement-based properties of n-heptane and diesel oil are compared with estimated values, using the state-of-the-art molecular models to derive the temperature-dependent material properties. Then their effect on droplet evaporation was evaluated. The critical parameters were liquid density, latent heat of vaporization, boiling temperature, and vapor thermal conductivity where the estimation affected the evaporation time notably. Besides a general sensitivity analysis, evaporation modeling in a practical burner ended up with similar results. By calculating droplet motion, the evaporation number, the evaporation-to-residence time ratio can be derived. An empirical cumulative distribution function is used for the spray of the analyzed burner to evaluate evaporation in the mixing tube. Evaporation number did not exceed 0.4, meaning a full evaporation prior to reaching the burner lip in all cases. As droplet inertia depends upon its size, the residence time has a minimum value due to the phenomenon of overshooting.

  10. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  11. Droplet spectrum of a spray nozzle under different weather conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiam Felipe Silva Maciel

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The application of pesticides is always susceptible to losses through evaporation and drift of the spray droplets. With these losses, a smaller amount of pesticide reaches the target, possibly impairing the efficiency of phytosanitary control. Due to these concerns, the aim of this study was to evaluate the interference of weather conditions in the droplet spectrum produced by hydraulic spraying. To carry out the work, it was necessary to build an experimental system. This consisted of a laser particle-size analyser, hydraulic nozzle (Jacto JSF 11002, stationary sprayer, gas heater, wind tunnel, climate chamber (with the aim of maintaining the internal psychrometry similar to that of the air exiting the wind tunnel, collector, and temperature and RH sensors. The weather conditions for the study included vapour pressure deficits (VPD of 5, 9.4, 20, 30.6 and 35 hPa, and air velocities of 2, 3.6, 7.4, 11.2 and 12.8 km h-1. A Rotatable Central Composite Design was used, and the data related using Response Surface Methodology. The wind caused such a sharp drift in the fine droplets, that it greatly affected the behaviour of the entire droplet spectrum, as well as hiding the effect of the VPD. However, the conclusion is that drift and evaporation both act on the coarser droplets.

  12. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, Angelo [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Di Fabrizio, Enzo [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); BIONEM Lab at University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale Europa 88100, Germaneto-Catanzaro (Italy); Limongi, Tania [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Marinaro, Giovanni [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Riekel, Christian, E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-06-10

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  13. ACCURATE OH MASER POSITIONS FROM THE SPLASH PILOT REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Walsh, Andrew J.; Jordan, Christopher H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia); Green, James A. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 2121 (Australia); Breen, Shari L. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dawson, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Ellingsen, Simon P. [School of Physical Sciences, Private Bag 37,University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001, TAS (Australia); Gómez, José F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Paul A., E-mail: qiaohh@shao.ac.cn [Department of Astrophysics and Optic, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-12-01

    We report on high spatial resolution observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), of ground-state OH masers. These observations were carried out toward 196 pointing centers previously identified in the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl (SPLASH) pilot region, between Galactic longitudes of 334° and 344° and Galactic latitudes of −2° and +2°. Supplementing our data with data from the MAGMO (Mapping the Galactic Magnetic field through OH masers) survey, we find maser emission toward 175 of the 196 target fields. We conclude that about half of the 21 nondetections were due to intrinsic variability. Due to the superior sensitivity of the followup ATCA observations, and the ability to resolve nearby sources into separate sites, we have identified 215 OH maser sites toward the 175 fields with detections. Among these 215 OH maser sites, 111 are new detections. After comparing the positions of these 215 maser sites to the literature, we identify 122 (57%) sites associated with evolved stars (one of which is a planetary nebula), 64 (30%) with star formation, two sites with supernova remnants, and 27 (13%) of unknown origin. The infrared colors of evolved star sites with symmetric maser profiles tend to be redder than those of evolved star sites with asymmetric maser profiles, which may indicate that symmetric sources are generally at an earlier evolutionary stage.

  14. Droplet based microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  15. OCS in He droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebenev, V.

    2000-06-01

    Phenomenon of superfluidity of para-hydrogen (pH{sub 2}){sub 1-17} and helium {sup 4}He{sub 1-7000} systems doped with an OCS chromophore molecule was investigated in this work. The study of such systems became possible after the development of the depletion spectroscopy technique in helium droplets. The droplets can be easily created and doped with up to 100 particles such as OCS, para-hydrogen or ortho-hydrogen molecules and {sup 4}He atoms. The measured infrared depletion spectra give the information about the temperature of the droplets and their aggregate state. The depletion spectrum of OCS in pure {sup 4}He droplets was comprehensively studied. The rovibrational OCS spectrum shows well resolved narrow lines. The spectrum is shifted to the red relative to the corresponding gas phase spectrum and the rotational constant of OCS in {sup 4}He droplet is three times smaller than that for free molecule. Different models of OCS rotation in the helium environment were discussed. It was shown that the shapes of the rovibrational lines are defined mainly by inhomogeneous broadening due to the droplet size distribution. The sub-rotational structure of the OCS rovibrational lines was revealed in microwave-infrared double resonance experiments. This structure arises due to the interaction of the OCS with the He environment. However, the information obtained in the experiments was not enough to understand the nature of this interaction. (orig.)

  16. Ash wettability conditions splash erosion in the postfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; de Celis, Reyes; García-Moreno, Jorge; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth; Alanís, Nancy; Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo; Zavala, Lorena M.; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    à and Doerr, 2008; Woods and Balfour, 2008; Zavala et al., 2009). The presence of an ash layer may be ephemeral, as it often is quickly removed or redistributed by water and wind erosion, animals or traffic (Zavala et al., 2009a). Many authors have observed that the capacity of ash to protect soil depends on properties as the topography, the meteorological conditions and the thickness of ash coverage (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Pereira et al., 2013; Woods and Balfour, 2010; Zavala et al., 2009). Taking this into account, in this study we hypothesized that the wettability / hydrophobicity of the ash layer may have a significant effect on the soil response to splash erosion. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the dispersion of sediments produced by the impact of raindrops in function of ash wettability after a prescribed fire at plot scale. 2. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 20 November 2012, a prescribed fire was carried out in an area located in the public mount "Las Navas", near Almaden de la Plata, Sevilla (approx. 37° 50' 44.44'' N / 6° 3' 7.44''W and 428 masl). Soils are acidic and shallow, developed from acidic metamorphic rocks (schists, slates and pyrophyllites). Vegetation is dominated by shrub legumes (Calicotome villosa and several species of Ulex and Genista). The experimental area was framed and plowed to eliminate the risk of fire spreading during the experiment. Previously to burn, level staffs were installed for determination of flame height. The temperature reached in the soil was monitored during the fire by a set of six thermocouples which were buried in soil (2 cm depth) and connected to a data-logger for monitoring the topsoil temperature every 60 s. The environmental conditions were also monitored during the experiment by a mobile weather station. At the moment of the ignition, the temperature was around 20 °C and the wind speed was near 0.0 m/s. After ignition, the experimental area was allowed to burn during 2.5 h. During burning, flames

  17. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitrogen droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jacob, Eshel Ben [School of Physics and Astronomy, 69978 Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)], E-mail: aranson@msd.anl.gov

    2008-04-15

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 {sup 0}C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets.

  18. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitrogen droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S; Jacob, Eshel Ben

    2008-01-01

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 0 C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets

  19. Transport of expiratory droplets in an aircraft cabin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jitendra K; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-02-01

    The droplets exhaled by an index patient with infectious disease such as influenza or tuberculosis may be the carriers of contagious agents. Indoor environments such as the airliner cabins may be susceptible to infection from such airborne contagious agents. The present investigation computed the transport of the droplets exhaled by the index patient seated in the middle of a seven-row, twin-aisle, fully occupied cabin using the CFD simulations. The droplets exhaled were from a single cough, a single breath, and a 15-s talk of the index patient. The expiratory droplets were tracked by using Lagrangian method, and their evaporation was modeled. It was found that the bulk airflow pattern in the cabin played the most important role on the droplet transport. The droplets were contained in the row before, at, and after the index patient within 30 s and dispersed uniformly to all the seven rows in 4 minutes. The total airborne droplet fraction reduced to 48, 32, 20, and 12% after they entered the cabin for 1, 2, 3, and 4 min, respectively, because of the ventilation from the environmental control system. It is critical to predict the risk of airborne infection to take appropriate measures to control and mitigate the risk. Most of the studies in past either assume a homogenous distribution of contaminants or use steady-state conditions. The present study instead provides information on the transient movement of the droplets exhaled by an index passenger in an aircraft cabin. These droplets may contain active contagious agents and can be potent enough to cause infection. The findings can be used by medical professionals to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of risk of infection to various passengers in the cabin. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with wettability gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2012-05-11

    Droplet motion on solid substrates has been widely studied not only because of its importance in fundamental research but also because of its promising potentials in droplet-based devices developed for various applications in chemistry, biology, and industry. In this paper, we investigate the motion of an evaporating droplet in one-component fluids on a solid substrate with a wettability gradient. As is well known, there are two major difficulties in the continuum description of fluid flows and heat fluxes near the contact line of droplets on solid substrates, namely, the hydrodynamic (stress) singularity and thermal singularity. To model the droplet motion, we use the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] for the hydrodynamic equations in the bulk region, supplemented with the boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. In this continuum hydrodynamic model, various physical processes involved in the droplet motion can be taken into account simultaneously, e.g., phase transitions (evaporation or condensation), capillary flows, fluid velocity slip, and substrate cooling or heating. Due to the use of the phase field method (diffuse interface method), the hydrodynamic and thermal singularities are resolved automatically. Furthermore, in the dynamic van der Waals theory, the evaporation or condensation rate at the liquid-gas interface is an outcome of the calculation rather than a prerequisite as in most of the other models proposed for evaporating droplets. Numerical results show that the droplet migrates in the direction of increasing wettability on the solid substrates. The migration velocity of the droplet is found to be proportional to the wettability gradients as predicted by Brochard [Langmuir 5, 432 (1989)]. The proportionality coefficient is found to be linearly dependent on the ratio of slip length to initial droplet radius. These results indicate that the steady migration of the droplets results from the balance between the

  1. Droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with wettability gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2012-01-01

    Droplet motion on solid substrates has been widely studied not only because of its importance in fundamental research but also because of its promising potentials in droplet-based devices developed for various applications in chemistry, biology, and industry. In this paper, we investigate the motion of an evaporating droplet in one-component fluids on a solid substrate with a wettability gradient. As is well known, there are two major difficulties in the continuum description of fluid flows and heat fluxes near the contact line of droplets on solid substrates, namely, the hydrodynamic (stress) singularity and thermal singularity. To model the droplet motion, we use the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] for the hydrodynamic equations in the bulk region, supplemented with the boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. In this continuum hydrodynamic model, various physical processes involved in the droplet motion can be taken into account simultaneously, e.g., phase transitions (evaporation or condensation), capillary flows, fluid velocity slip, and substrate cooling or heating. Due to the use of the phase field method (diffuse interface method), the hydrodynamic and thermal singularities are resolved automatically. Furthermore, in the dynamic van der Waals theory, the evaporation or condensation rate at the liquid-gas interface is an outcome of the calculation rather than a prerequisite as in most of the other models proposed for evaporating droplets. Numerical results show that the droplet migrates in the direction of increasing wettability on the solid substrates. The migration velocity of the droplet is found to be proportional to the wettability gradients as predicted by Brochard [Langmuir 5, 432 (1989)]. The proportionality coefficient is found to be linearly dependent on the ratio of slip length to initial droplet radius. These results indicate that the steady migration of the droplets results from the balance between the

  2. Extended lattice Boltzmann scheme for droplet combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashna, Mostafa; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Fakhari, Abbas

    2017-05-01

    The available lattice Boltzmann (LB) models for combustion or phase change are focused on either single-phase flow combustion or two-phase flow with evaporation assuming a constant density for both liquid and gas phases. To pave the way towards simulation of spray combustion, we propose a two-phase LB method for modeling combustion of liquid fuel droplets. We develop an LB scheme to model phase change and combustion by taking into account the density variation in the gas phase and accounting for the chemical reaction based on the Cahn-Hilliard free-energy approach. Evaporation of liquid fuel is modeled by adding a source term, which is due to the divergence of the velocity field being nontrivial, in the continuity equation. The low-Mach-number approximation in the governing Navier-Stokes and energy equations is used to incorporate source terms due to heat release from chemical reactions, density variation, and nonluminous radiative heat loss. Additionally, the conservation equation for chemical species is formulated by including a source term due to chemical reaction. To validate the model, we consider the combustion of n-heptane and n-butanol droplets in stagnant air using overall single-step reactions. The diameter history and flame standoff ratio obtained from the proposed LB method are found to be in good agreement with available numerical and experimental data. The present LB scheme is believed to be a promising approach for modeling spray combustion.

  3. Comparison of various droplet breakup models in gas-liquid flows in high-pressure environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, H.; Ganji, D. D.; Omidvar, A.

    2008-01-01

    Droplet breakup affects spray penetration and evaporation, and plays a critical role in engine efficiency. The purpose of this research was to examine the rate of penetration and evaporation of droplets in a combustion chamber, and the efficiency of the engine when liquid jet is injected into the compressed gas chamber in an axi-symmetrical fashion leading to a turbulent and unsteady flow. As a result of interaction with the highly compressed air in the chamber, the liquid jet breaks up and forms minute droplets. These particles will in turn breakup because of aerodynamic forces, producing even smaller droplets. A number of models are available for analyzing the breakup of droplets; however, each model is typically reliable only over a limited parameter range. In this research three well-known models are applied for droplet breakup modeling and their results are compared. To obtain the details of the flow field, the Eulerian gas phase mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, as well as equations governing the transport of turbulence and fuel vapor mass fraction are solved together with equations of trajectory, momentum, mass and energy conservation for liquid droplets in Lagrangian form. The numerical solution is performed using the finite volume method and EPISO (Engine-PISO) algorithm. The results obtained from the models show that the breakup process in a high pressure environment significantly affects the penetration and evaporation rates of the spray, and the droplet size is determined by the balance between breakup and coalescence processes. It is also shown that the details of atomization in the nozzle do not significantly influence the ultimate size of droplets. It should be mentioned that droplet collision modeling has been taken into account in the computer code and is activated wherever necessary

  4. Congruent evaporation temperature of GaAs(001) controlled by As flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z. Y.; Zheng, C. X.; Tang, W. X.; Jesson, D. E.; Tersoff, J.

    2010-01-01

    The congruent evaporation temperature T c is a fundamental surface characteristic of GaAs and similar compounds. Above T c the rate of As evaporation exceeds that of Ga during Langmuir (free) evaporation into a vacuum. However, during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) there is generally an external As flux F incident on the surface. Here we show that this flux directly controls T c . We introduce a sensitive approach to measure T c based on Ga droplet stability, and determine the dependence of T c on F. This dependence is explained by a simple model for evaporation in the presence of external flux. The capability of manipulating T c via changing F offers a means of controlling congruent evaporation with relevance to MBE, surface preparation methods, and droplet epitaxy.

  5. LET dependence of bubbles evaporation pulses in superheated emulsion detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fulvio, Angela; Huang, Jean; Staib, Lawrence [Yale University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, TAC N140, New Haven, CT 06520-8043 (United States); D’Errico, Francesco [Yale University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, TAC N140, New Haven, CT 06520-8043 (United States); Scuola di Ingegneria, Universitá di Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Superheated emulsion detectors are suspensions of metastable liquid droplets in a compliant inert medium. Upon interaction with ionizing radiation, the droplets evaporate, generating visible bubbles. Bubble expansion associated with the boiling of the droplets is accompanied by pressure pulses in both the sonic and ultrasonic frequency range. In this work, we analyzed the signal generated by bubble evaporation in the frequency and time domain. We used octafluoropropane (R-218) based emulsions, sensitive to both photons and neutrons. The frequency content of the detected pulses appears to extend well into the hundreds of kHz, beyond the range used in commercial devices to count bubbles as they are formed (typically 1–10 kHz). Kilohertz components characterize the early part of the waveforms, potentially containing information about the energetics of the explosive bubble initial growth phase. The power spectral density of the acoustic signal produced by neutron-induced evaporation shows a characteristic frequency pattern in the 200–400 kHz range, which is not observed when bubbles evaporate upon gamma ray-induced irradiation. For practical applications, detection of ultrasonic pulses associated with the boiling of the superheated drops can be exploited as a fast readout method, negligibly affected by mechanical ambient noise.

  6. Classification of the ejection mechanisms of charged macromolecules from liquid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consta, Styliani; Malevanets, Anatoly

    2013-01-28

    The relation between the charge state of a macromolecule and its ejection mechanism from droplets is one of the important questions in electrospray ionization methods. In this article, effects of solvent-solute interaction on the manifestation of the charge induced instability in a droplet are examined. We studied the instabilities in a prototype system of a droplet comprised of charged poly(ethylene glycol) and methanol, acetonitrile, and water solvents. We observed instances of three, previously only conjectured, [S. Consta, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 5263 (2010)] mechanisms of macroion ejection. The mechanism of ejection of charged macroion in methanol is reminiscent of "pearl" model in polymer physics. In acetonitrile droplets, the instability manifests through formation of solvent spines around the solvated macroion. In water, we find that the macroion is ejected from the droplet through contiguous extrusion of a part of the chain. The difference in the morphology of the instabilities is attributed to the interplay between forces arising from the macroion solvation energy and the surface energy of the droplet interface. For the contiguous extrusion of a charged macromolecule from a droplet, we demonstrate that the proposed mechanism leads to ejection of the macromolecule from droplets with sizes well below the Rayleigh limit. The ejected macromolecule may hold charge significantly higher than that suggested by prevailing theories. The simulations reveal new mechanisms of macroion evaporation that differ from conventional charge residue model and ion evaporation mechanisms.

  7. Droplet Impact on a Heated Surface under a Depressurized Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Behavior of a water droplet of the diameter 1-3mm impacting on a heated surface under depressurized environment (100kPa -1kPa) has been studied. A syringe pump for droplet generation and a heated plate are set into a transparent acrylic vacuum chamber. The internal pressure of the chamber is automatically controlled at a target pressure with a rotary pump, a pressure transducer, and an electrical valve. A silicon wafer of the thickness 0.28 mm is mounted on the heater plate, whose temperature is directly measured by attaching a thermocouple on the backside. The droplet behavior is captured using a high-speed camera in a direction perpendicular to droplet velocity. Some unique behaviors of droplet are observed by decreasing the environmental pressure, which are considered to be due to two basic elements: Enhancement of evaporation due to the lowered saturation temperature, and shortage of pneumatic spring effect between the droplet and heated wall due to the lowered pressure of the air.

  8. Assembly of silver nanowire ring induced by liquid droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Baekhoon; Park, Hyun Sung; Chae, Ilkyeong; Lee, Hyungdong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jang, Hyung-Seok; Jung, Jaehyuck; Lee, Changgu; Lin, Liwei; Byun, Doyoung

    2017-11-01

    Several forces in the liquid droplet drive the nanomaterials to naturally form an assembled structure. During evaporation of a liquid droplet, nanomaterials can move to the rim of the droplet by convective flow and capillary flow, due to the difference in temperature between the top and contact line of the droplet. Here, we demonstrate a new, simple and scalable technology for the fabrication of ring-shaped Ag NWs by a spraying method. We experimentally identify the compressive force of the droplet driven by surface tension as the key mechanism for the self-assembly of ring structures. We investigated the progress of ring shape formation of Ag NWs according to the droplet size with theoretically calculated optimal conditions. As such, this self-assembly technique of making ring-shaped structures from Ag NWs could be applied to other nanomaterials. This work was supported by the New & Renewable Energy R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) Grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy. (No. 20163010071630).

  9. Theory and experimental validation of SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Porter, Jason M.

    2005-06-01

    The radiant heat test facility develops test sets providing well-characterized thermal environments, often representing fires. Many of the components and procedures have become standardized to such an extent that the development of a specialized design tool was appropriate. SPLASH (Single Panel Lamp and Shroud Helper) is that tool. SPLASH is implemented as a user-friendly program that allows a designer to describe a test setup in terms of parameters such as lamp number, power, position, and separation distance. Thermal radiation is the dominant mechanism of heat transfer and the SPLASH model solves a radiation enclosure problem to estimate temperature distributions in a shroud providing the boundary condition of interest. Irradiance distribution on a specified viewing plane is also estimated. This document provides the theoretical development for the underlying model. A series of tests were conducted to characterize SPLASH's ability to analyze lamp and shroud systems. The comparison suggests that SPLASH succeeds as a design tool. Simplifications made to keep the model tractable are demonstrated to result in estimates that are only approximately as uncertain as many of the properties and characteristics of the operating environment.

  10. De-entrainment phenomena on vertical tubes in droplet cross flow. Informal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallman, J.C.; Kirchner, W.L.

    1980-04-01

    In this study, flow conditions in the upper plenum of a PWR during the reflood stage of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) are simulated using water sprays and a draft-induced wind tunnel. The de-entrainment efficiencies of isolated structures are presented for a variety of air-water droplet cross flow conditions. Since droplet splashing and/or bouncing from the draining liquid film is not accounted for in classical inertial impaction theory, there is substantial disagreement between measurement and the theory. The de-entrainment efficiencies of isolated tubes are extrapolated to those of tubes in a multiple tube array, and a predictive relation is presented for the overall de-entrainment eficiency of multiple tube arrays

  11. A study of the current group evaporation/combustion theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion can be greatly enhanced by disintegrating the liquid fuel into droplets, an effect achieved by various configurations. A number of experiments carried out in the seventies showed that combustion of droplet arrays and sprays do not form individual flames. Moreover, the rate of burning in spray combustion greatly deviates from that of the single combustion rate. Such observations naturally challenge its applicability to spray combustion. A number of mathematical models were developed to evaluate 'group combustion' and the related 'group evaporation' phenomena. This study investigates the similarity and difference of these models and their applicability to spray combustion. Future work that should be carried out in this area is indicated.

  12. Microwave heating type evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taura, Masazumi; Nishi, Akio; Morimoto, Takashi; Izumi, Jun; Tamura, Kazuo; Morooka, Akihiko.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent evaporization stills against corrosion due to radioactive liquid wastes. Constitution: Microwaves are supplied from a microwave generator by way of a wave guide tube and through a microwave permeation window to the inside of an evaporatization still. A matching device is attached to the wave guide tube for transmitting the microwaves in order to match the impedance. When the microwaves are supplied to the inside of the evaporization still, radioactive liquid wastes supplied from a liquid feed port by way of a spray tower to the inside of the evaporization still is heated and evaporated by the induction heating of the microwaves. (Seki, T.)

  13. Wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets: A molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Borg, Matthew K; Sefiane, Khellil; Reese, Jason M

    2015-11-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wetting and evaporation of salt-water nanodroplets on platinum surfaces. Our results show that the contact angle of the droplets increases with the salt concentration. To verify this, a second simulation system of a thin salt-water film on a platinum surface is used to calculate the various surface tensions. We find that both the solid-liquid and liquid-vapor surface tensions increase with salt concentration and as a result these cause an increase in the contact angle. However, the evaporation rate of salt-water droplets decreases as the salt concentration increases, due to the hydration of salt ions. When the water molecules have all evaporated from the droplet, two forms of salt crystals are deposited, clump and ringlike, depending on the solid-liquid interaction strength and the evaporation rate. To form salt crystals in a ring, it is crucial that there is a pinned stage in the evaporation process, during which salt ions can move from the center to the rim of the droplets. With a stronger solid-liquid interaction strength, a slower evaporation rate, and a higher salt concentration, a complete salt crystal ring can be deposited on the surface.

  14. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2017-11-21

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  15. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  16. 77 FR 23120 - Special Local Regulations; Lowcountry Splash Open Water Swim, Wando River and Cooper River, Mount...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Lowcountry Splash Open Water Swim, Wando River and Cooper River, Mount... establishing special local regulations on the waters of the Wando River and Cooper River in Mount Pleasant... River and Cooper River along the shoreline of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. The Lowcountry Splash...

  17. Explosive Breakup of a Water Droplet with a Nontransparent Solid Inclusion Heated in a High-Temperature Gaseous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrienko Margarita A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the evaporation of a water droplet with a comparably sized solid nontransparent inclusion in a high-temperature (500–800 K gas medium. Water evaporates from the free surface of the inclusion. During this process, intensive vapor formation occurs on the inner interface “water droplet – solid inclusion” with the subsequent explosive decay of the droplet. Experiments have been conducted using high-speed (up to 105 fps video cameras “Phantom” and software “Phantom Camera Control”. The conditions of the explosive vapor formation of the heterogeneous water droplet were found. The typical phase change mechanisms of the heterogeneous water droplet under the conditions of intensive heat exchange were determined.

  18. Numerical and experimental studies of droplet-gas flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesang, Aage Ingebret

    2002-07-01

    This thesis considers droplet-gas flow by the use of numerical methods and experimental verification. A commercial vane separator was studied both numerical and by experiment. In addition some efforts are put into the numerical analysis of cyclones. The experimental part contains detailed measurements of the flow field between a pair of vanes in a vane separator and droplet size measurements. LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) was used to measure the velocity in two dimensions and corresponding turbulence quantities. The results from the LDA measurements are considered to be of high quality and are compared to numerical results obtained from a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis. The simulation showed good agreement between the numerical and experimental results. Combinations of different turbulence models; the standard k-epsilon model and the Reynold Stress Mode, different schemes; first order and higher order scheme and different near wall treatment of the turbulence; the Law of the wall and the Two-Layer Zonal model were used in the simulations. The Reynold Stress Model together with a higher order scheme performed rather poorly. The recirculation in parts of the separator was overpredicted in this case. For the other cases the overall predictions are satisfactory. PDA (Phase Doppler Anemometry) measurements were used to study the changes in the droplet size distribution through the vane separator. The PDA measurements show that smaller droplets are found at the outlet than present at the inlet. In the literature there exists different mechanisms for explaining the re-entrainment and generation of new droplets. The re-entrainments mechanisms are divided into four groups where droplet-droplet interaction, droplet break-up, splashing of impinging droplet and re-entrainment from the film are defined as the groups of re-entrainment mechanisms. Models for these groups are found in the literature and these models are tested for re-entrainment using the operational

  19. Numerical analyses of flashing jet structure and droplet size characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Riqiang; Jiang Shengyao; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Akira; Takata, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, flashing jets are numerically simulated using the MPS method. The boiling mode for flashing is identified as surface boiling mode, based on the postulation of jets from a short nozzle under high depressurization. The Homogeneous Non-equilibrium Relaxation Model (HRM) is used for calculating the evaporation rate of flashing. The numerical simulation results show that flashing jets comprise an inner intact core which is surrounded by two-phase droplet flow. The effect of degree of superheat on the jet topological geometry is investigated. With increasing degree of superheat, the topological shape of flashing jets evolves from cylindrical core for low degree of superheat to cone-shaped core for high degree of superheat, and meanwhile the extinction length comes to decrease and tends asymptotically constant as the injection temperature approaches the saturation temperature corresponding to the injection pressure. The analyses of the droplet size distribution engendered from primary breakup of flashing jets show that: two peaks exist for droplet size distribution at lower degree of superheat; however, merely one peak for higher degree of superheat. From droplet size distribution, it is revealed that the primary breakup mechanism of flashing jets can be attributed to dominant mechanical breakup mode plus enhancement via surface evaporation. (author)

  20. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  1. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  2. Sliding three-phase contact line of printed droplets for single-crystal arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Minxuan; Wu, Lei; Li, Yifan; Gao, Meng; Zhang, Xingye; Jiang, Lei; Song, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the behaviours of printed droplets is an essential requirement for inkjet printing of delicate three-dimensional (3D) structures or high-resolution patterns. In this work, molecular deposition and crystallization are regulated by manipulating the three-phase contact line (TCL) behaviour of the printed droplets. The results show that oriented single-crystal arrays are fabricated based on the continuously sliding TCL. Owing to the sliding of the TCL on the substrate, the outward capillary flow within the evaporating droplet is suppressed and the molecules are brought to the centre of the droplet, resulting in the formation of a single crystal. This work provides a facile strategy for controlling the structures of printed units by manipulating the TCL of printed droplets, which is significant for realizing high-resolution patterns and delicate 3D structures. (paper)

  3. Multiple and high-throughput droplet reactions via combination of microsampling technique and microfluidic chip

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2012-11-20

    Microdroplets offer unique compartments for accommodating a large number of chemical and biological reactions in tiny volume with precise control. A major concern in droplet-based microfluidics is the difficulty to address droplets individually and achieve high throughput at the same time. Here, we have combined an improved cartridge sampling technique with a microfluidic chip to perform droplet screenings and aggressive reaction with minimal (nanoliter-scale) reagent consumption. The droplet composition, distance, volume (nanoliter to subnanoliter scale), number, and sequence could be precisely and digitally programmed through the improved sampling technique, while sample evaporation and cross-contamination are effectively eliminated. Our combined device provides a simple model to utilize multiple droplets for various reactions with low reagent consumption and high throughput. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Modeling study of droplet behavior during blowdown period of large break LOCA based on experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaba, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Shigemitsu; Teramae, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    During LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) in PWR, droplets behavior during blowdown period is one of the important phenomena. For example, the spattering from falling liquid film that flows from upper plenum generates those droplets in core region. The behavior of droplets in such flow has strong effect for cladding temperature behavior because these droplets are able to remove heat from a reactor core by its direct contact on fuel rods and its evaporation at the surface. For safety analysis of LOCA in PWR, it is necessary to evaluate droplet diameter precisely in order to predict fuel cladding temperature changing by the calculation code. Based on the test results, a new droplet behavior model was developed for the MCOBRA/TRC code that predicts the droplet behavior during such LOCA events. Furthermore, the verification calculations that simulated some blowdown tests were performed using by the MCOBRA/TRAC code. These results indicated the validity of this droplet model during blow down cooling period. The experiment was focused on investigating the Weber number of steady droplet in the blow down phenomenon of large break LOCA. (author)

  5. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Kohn, M.; Pekour, M. S.; Nelson, D. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nuclei chamber (CCNC) as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (hygroscopic salts) but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres or adipic acid). The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from ambient measurements using this technique and AMS analysis were inconclusive, showing little chemical differentiation between ambient aerosol and activated droplet residuals, largely due to low signal levels. When employing as single particle mass spectrometer for compositional analysis, however, we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals.

  6. Electrical actuation of dielectric droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, N; Bahadur, V; Garimella, S V

    2008-01-01

    Electrical actuation of liquid droplets at the microscale offers promising applications in the fields of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip devices. Much prior research has targeted the electrical actuation of electrically conducting liquid droplets; however, the actuation of dielectric droplets has remained relatively unexplored, despite the advantages associated with the use of a dielectric droplet. This paper presents modeling and experimental results on the electrical actuation of dielectric droplets between two flat plates. A first-order analytical model, based on the energy-minimization principle, is developed to estimate the electrical actuation force on a dielectric droplet as it moves between two flat plates. Two versions of this analytical model are benchmarked for their suitability and accuracy against a detailed numerical model. The actuation force prediction is then combined with available semi-analytical expressions for predicting the forces opposing droplet motion to develop a model that predicts transient droplet motion under electrical actuation. Electrical actuation of dielectric droplets is experimentally demonstrated by moving transformer oil droplets between two flat plates under the influence of an actuation voltage. Droplet velocities and their dependence on the plate spacing and the applied voltage are experimentally measured and showed reasonable agreement with predictions from the models developed

  7. Microlayered flow structure around an acoustically levitated droplet under a phase-change process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koji; Abe, Yutaka; Goda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic levitation method (ALM) has found extensive applications in the fields of materials science, analytical chemistry, and biomedicine. This paper describes an experimental investigation of a levitated droplet in a 19.4-kHz single-axis acoustic levitator. We used water, ethanol, water/ethanol mixture, and hexane as test samples to investigate the effect of saturated vapor pressure on the flow field and evaporation process using a high-speed camera. In the case of ethanol, water/ethanol mixtures with initial ethanol fractions of 50 and 70 wt%, and hexane droplets, microlayered toroidal vortexes are generated in the vicinity of the droplet interface. Experimental results indicate the presence of two stages in the evaporation process of ethanol and binary mixture droplets for ethanol content >10%. The internal and external flow fields of the acoustically levitated droplet of pure and binary mixtures are clearly observed. The binary mixture of the levitated droplet shows the interaction between the configurations of the internal and external flow fields of the droplet and the concentration of the volatile fluid. Our findings can contribute to the further development of existing theoretical prediction.

  8. Vacuum evaporation of pure metals

    OpenAIRE

    Safarian, Jafar; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2013-01-01

    Theories on the evaporation of pure substances are reviewed and applied to study vacuum evaporation of pure metals. It is shown that there is good agreement between different theories for weak evaporation, whereas there are differences under intensive evaporation conditions. For weak evaporation, the evaporation coefficient in Hertz-Knudsen equation is 1.66. Vapor velocity as a function of the pressure is calculated applying several theories. If a condensing surface is less than one collision...

  9. Evaporation in hydrology and meteorology

    OpenAIRE

    Brandsma, T.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the role of evaporation in hydrology and meteorology is discussed, with the emphasis on hydrology. The basic theory of evaporation is given and methods to determine evaporation are presented. Some applications of evaporation studies in literature are given in order to illustrate the theory. Further, special conditions in evaporation are considered, followed by a fotmulation of the difficulties in determining evaporation, The last part of the paper gives a short discussion about ...

  10. Evaporation under vacuum condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuta, Satoshi; Shibata, Yuki; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Takase, Kazuyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear fusion reactor design, an event of water coolant ingress into its vacuum vessel is now being considered as one of the most probable accidents. In this report, the evaporation under vacuum condition is evaluated by using the evaporation model we have developed. The results show that shock-wave by the evaporation occurs whose behavior strongly depends on the initial conditions of vacuum. And in the case of lower initial pressure and temperature, the surface temp finally becomes higher than other conditions. (author)

  11. Droplet behaviour in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, R; Zeegers, J C H [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Michalek, W R; Kuerten, J G M, E-mail: r.liew@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    The vortex tube is an apparatus by which compressed gas is separated into cold and warm streams. Although the apparatus is mostly used for cooling, the possibility to use the vortex tube as a device for removing non-desired condensable components from gas mixtures is investigated. To give first insight on how droplets behave in the vortex tube, a MATLAB model is written. The model tracks Lagrangian droplets in time and space according to the forces acting on the droplets. Phase interactions, i.e. evaporation or condensation, are modeled according to the kinetic approach for phase interactions. Liquid (water) concentrations are shown for two cases where the humidity at the inlet of the vortex tube is varied from 0% to 50%. It is clearly observed from the results that the concentration of liquid increases with increasing humidity. The higher this concentration is, the higher the probability that droplets collide with each other and form larger droplets which are swirled towards the wall to form an easy-to-separate liquid film.

  12. Splash albedo protons between 4 and 315 MeV at high and low geomagnetic latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, K.; Stone, E.C.; Vogt, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The differential energy spectrum of splash albedo protons has been measured at high geomagnetic latitude near Fort Churchill, Manitoba, at three periods of the solar cycle in 1966, and 1969 and at low latitude near Palestine, Texas, in 1967 by using a balloon-borne solid state detector telescope. We observed splash albedo proton fluxes between 4 and 315 MeV of 81plus-or-minus11, 70plus-or-minus11, and 48plus-or-minus8 protons/(m 2 s sr) at high latitude in 1966, 1967, and 1969 and of 37plus-or-minus9 protons/(m 2 s sr) at low latitude in 1967. The decreases from 1966 to 1969 are due to solar modulation of the cosmic ray parent nuclei. The albedo spectrum shows a similar shape for both latitudes. The difference in intensity can be explained by different local geomagnetic cutoffs; i.e., a significant contribution to the splash albedo flux arises from primary particles with rigidity below 4.5 GV. The splash albedo flux near Fort Churchill is consistent with corresponding fluxes previously reported near 53degree--55degreeN. The flux below 100 MeV near Palestine is significantly lower than that reported by Verma (1967)

  13. Effects of Rainfall Intensity and Slope Angle on Splash Erosion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil erosion is a critical global environmental problem, especially in the developing countries including Nigeria. In the humid and sub-humid tropics, splash erosion resulting from intense rainfall and slope degree pose severe land degradation problems. The objective of this study is to assess the effects of some rainfall ...

  14. The Effects of Mulch Cover on Splash Erosion in Makurdi Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil erosion has continued to be a serious environmental problem, particularly among the farming communities. In Benue State, the dominant economic activity is subsistence farming which is done under sub humid rainfall conditions. Splash erosion resulting from intense rainfall therefore poses severe problems that can be ...

  15. LHC Beam Splash seen by the ATLAS detector - 5 Apr 2015 - run 260272 - event 6539

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Event display of one of the collimator "splash" events seen by the ATLAS experiment in LHC Run-2, on Tuesday April the 5th : run 260272, event 6539 . The collimator position is 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point.

  16. Influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water in aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Haddrell, Allen E; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-05-28

    Uncertainties in quantifying the kinetics of evaporation and condensation of water from atmospheric aerosol are a significant contributor to the uncertainty in predicting cloud droplet number and the indirect effect of aerosols on climate. The influence of aerosol particle surface composition, particularly the impact of surface active organic films, on the condensation and evaporation coefficients remains ambiguous. Here, we report measurements of the influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water from aerosol particles. Significant reductions in the evaporation coefficient are shown to result when condensed films are formed by monolayers of long-chain alcohols [C(n)H(2n+1)OH], with the value decreasing from 2.4 × 10(-3) to 1.7 × 10(-5) as n increases from 12 to 17. Temperature-dependent measurements confirm that a condensed film of long-range order must be formed to suppress the evaporation coefficient below 0.05. The condensation of water on a droplet coated in a condensed film is shown to be fast, with strong coherence of the long-chain alcohol molecules leading to islanding as the water droplet grows, opening up broad areas of uncoated surface on which water can condense rapidly. We conclude that multicomponent composition of organic films on the surface of atmospheric aerosol particles is likely to preclude the formation of condensed films and that the kinetics of water condensation during the activation of aerosol to form cloud droplets is likely to remain rapid.

  17. Influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water in aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James F.; Miles, Rachael E. H.; Haddrell, Allen E.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in quantifying the kinetics of evaporation and condensation of water from atmospheric aerosol are a significant contributor to the uncertainty in predicting cloud droplet number and the indirect effect of aerosols on climate. The influence of aerosol particle surface composition, particularly the impact of surface active organic films, on the condensation and evaporation coefficients remains ambiguous. Here, we report measurements of the influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water from aerosol particles. Significant reductions in the evaporation coefficient are shown to result when condensed films are formed by monolayers of long-chain alcohols [CnH(2n+1)OH], with the value decreasing from 2.4 × 10−3 to 1.7 × 10−5 as n increases from 12 to 17. Temperature-dependent measurements confirm that a condensed film of long-range order must be formed to suppress the evaporation coefficient below 0.05. The condensation of water on a droplet coated in a condensed film is shown to be fast, with strong coherence of the long-chain alcohol molecules leading to islanding as the water droplet grows, opening up broad areas of uncoated surface on which water can condense rapidly. We conclude that multicomponent composition of organic films on the surface of atmospheric aerosol particles is likely to preclude the formation of condensed films and that the kinetics of water condensation during the activation of aerosol to form cloud droplets is likely to remain rapid. PMID:23674675

  18. Is splash erosion potential species specific? Measuring of splash erosion potential under forest in different succession stages along a biodiversity gradient in the humid subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, C.; Kühn, P.; Scholten, T.

    2009-04-01

    It is widely accepted that (forest) vegetation is a key control for the type and intensity of soil erosion. The current paradigm is that natural or quasi-natural vegetation protects the soil from erosion and that agricultural vegetation or land use generally enhances erosion. The latter was in focus of most research during the last decades and less interest was paid on natural systems, which are more difficult to study. Nevertheless, afforestation is widely used as a measure of soil protection against soil erosion. Rainfall can be highly erosive particularly in the humid subtropics. Regarding climate change, also precipitation regime may change in direction to even more severe storms and higher rainfall intensities; it is a research field of growing importance. Key mechanisms of a vegetation cover in reducing or enhancing erosion are modifications of drop-size distribution, retention of raindrop impact on the soil and changes in amount and spatial distribution of rainfall at the ground surface. Controlling determinants are rainfall intensity, drop size distribution, drop fall velocity, height of the canopy as well as density of the canopy, crown and leaf traits, LAI and coverage by a litter layer. Large drops are supposed to be significant sources of splash detachment in forests (Brandt 1989; Vis 1986). However, the mechanisms of reducing (or enhancing?) splash detachment under forest in relation to species richness and species composition are not well understood. Some studies indicate that raindrop impact is species specific (Calder 2001; Nanko et al. 2006) and some neglect the effects of species specific impacts (Foot & Morgan 2005). Our research uses different methods of rainfall characterization (splash cups, tipping-bucket rain gauge, laser distrometer) to reveal the described mechanisms from the canopy through different vegetation layers to the ground. First results of splash cup measurements (revised after Ellison 1947) show that sand loss under vegetation

  19. New droplet model developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.; Moeller, P.; Treiner, J.; Weiss, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    A brief summary is given of three recent contributions to the development of the Droplet Model. The first concerns the electric dipole moment induced in octupole deformed nuclei by the Coulomb redistribution. The second concerns a study of squeezing in nuclei and the third is a study of the improved predictive power of the model when an empirical ''exponential'' term is included. 25 refs., 3 figs

  20. CAPSULE REPORT: EVAPORATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaporation has been an established technology in the metal finishing industry for many years. In this process, wastewaters containing reusable materials, such as copper, nickel, or chromium compounds are heated, producing a water vapor that is continuously removed and condensed....

  1. Acoustic droplet vaporization of vascular droplets in gas embolotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    This work is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. Additionally, micro- or nano-droplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Functionalized droplets that are targeted to tumor vasculature are examined. The influence of fluid mechanical and acoustic parameters, as well as droplet functionalization, is explored. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  2. Boilers, evaporators, and condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakac, S.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the boilers, evaporators and condensers that are used in power plants including nuclear power plants. Topics included are forced convection for single-phase side heat exchangers, heat exchanger fouling, industrial heat exchanger design, fossil-fuel-fired boilers, once through boilers, thermodynamic designs of fossil fuel-first boilers, evaporators and condensers in refrigeration and air conditioning systems (with respect to reducing CFC's) and nuclear steam generators

  3. Formation of coffee-stain patterns at the nanoscale: The role of nanoparticle solubility and solvent evaporation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Milzetti, Jasmin; Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-21

    When droplets of nanoparticle suspension evaporate from surfaces, they leave behind a deposit of nanoparticles. The mechanism of evaporation-induced pattern formation in the deposit is studied by molecular dynamics simulations for sessile nanodroplets. The influence of the interaction between nanoparticles and liquid molecules and the influence of the evaporation rate on the final deposition pattern are addressed. When the nanoparticle-liquid interaction is weaker than the liquid-liquid interaction, an interaction-driven or evaporation-induced layer of nanoparticles appears at the liquid-vapor interface and eventually collapses onto the solid surface to form a uniform deposit independently of the evaporation rate. When the nanoparticle-liquid and liquid-liquid interactions are comparable, the nanoparticles are dispersed inside the droplet and evaporation takes place with the contact line pinned at a surface defect. In such a case, a pattern with an approximate ring-like shape is found with fast evaporation, while a more uniform distribution is observed with slower evaporation. When the liquid-nanoparticle interaction is stronger than the liquid-liquid interaction, evaporation always occurs with receding contact line. The final deposition pattern changes from volcano-like to pancake-like with decreasing evaporation rate. These findings might help to design nanoscale structures like nanopatterns or nanowires on surface through controlled solvent evaporation.

  4. Optical calorimetry in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Jacob; Pattekar, Ashish; Afshinmanesh, Farzaneh; Martini, Joerg; Recht, Michael I

    2018-05-29

    A novel microfluidic calorimeter that measures the enthalpy change of reactions occurring in 100 μm diameter aqueous droplets in fluoropolymer oil has been developed. The aqueous reactants flow into a microfluidic droplet generation chip in separate fluidic channels, limiting contact between the streams until immediately before they form the droplet. The diffusion-driven mixing of reactants is predominantly restricted to within the droplet. The temperature change in droplets due to the heat of reaction is measured optically by recording the reflectance spectra of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) that are added to one of the reactant streams. As the droplets travel through the channel, the spectral characteristics of the TLC represent the internal temperature, allowing optical measurement with a precision of ≈6 mK. The microfluidic chip and all fluids are temperature controlled, and the reaction heat within droplets raises their temperature until thermal diffusion dissipates the heat into the surrounding oil and chip walls. Position resolved optical temperature measurement of the droplets allows calculation of the heat of reaction by analyzing the droplet temperature profile over time. Channel dimensions, droplet generation rate, droplet size, reactant stream flows and oil flow rate are carefully balanced to provide rapid diffusional mixing of reactants compared to thermal diffusion, while avoiding thermal "quenching" due to contact between the droplets and the chip walls. Compared to conventional microcalorimetry, which has been used in this work to provide reference measurements, this new continuous flow droplet calorimeter has the potential to perform titrations ≈1000-fold faster while using ≈400-fold less reactants per titration.

  5. The Evaporation of Liquid Micro-Drops on the Heated Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenov Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation of a heated sessile water micro-drop was studied experimentally at the substrate temperature and surrounding atmosphere from 30 to 50 °C. The studies were performed on the float glass substrate with aluminum nanocoating of optical quality. The research has shown that the specific rate of evaporation (mass loss per unit of the drop surface area increases with the decrease in droplet volume and at the last stage several times exceeds the initial value.

  6. Evaporation of a sessile water drop and a drop of aqueous salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S Y

    2017-11-07

    The influence of various factors on the evaporation of drops of water and aqueous salt solution has been experimentally studied. Typically, in the studies of drop evaporation, only the diffusive vapor transfer, radiation and the molecular heat conduction are taken into account. However, vapor-gas convection plays an important role at droplet evaporation. In the absence of droplet boiling, the influence of gas convection turns out to be the prevailing factor. At nucleate boiling, a prevailing role is played by bubbles generation and vapor jet discharge at a bubble collapse. The gas convection behavior for water and aqueous salt solution is substantially different. With a growth of salt concentration over time, the influence of the convective component first increases, reaches an extremum and then significantly decreases. At nucleate boiling in a salt solution it is incorrect to simulate the droplet evaporation and the heat transfer in quasi-stationary approximation. The evaporation at nucleate boiling in a liquid drop is divided into several characteristic time intervals. Each of these intervals is characterized by a noticeable change in both the evaporation rate and the convection role.

  7. Evaporation in hydrology and meteorology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, T.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the role of evaporation in hydrology and meteorology is discussed, with the emphasis on hydrology. The basic theory of evaporation is given and methods to determine evaporation are presented. Some applications of evaporation studies in literature are given in order to illustrate the

  8. Droplet generation during core reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    The process of entrainment and disintegration of liquid droplets by a flow of steam has considerable practical importance in calculating the effectivenes of the emergency core cooling system. Liquid entrainment is also important in determination of the critical heat flux point in general. Thus the analysis of the reflooding phase of a LOCA requires detailed knowledge of droplet size. Droplet size is mainly determined by the droplet generation mechanisms involved. To study these mechanisms, data generated in the PWR FLECHT SEASET series of experiments was analyzed. In addition, an experiment was performed in which the hydrodynamics of low quality post-CHF flow (inverted annular flow) were simulated in an adiabatic test section

  9. Experimental study of water droplets on over-heated nano/microstructured zirconium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seol Ha [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Ho Seon [Division of Mechanical System Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonwon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Heat transfer performance of a droplet on a modified zirconium surface is evaluated. • Modified (nano/micro-) surfaces enhanced heat transfer rate and Leidenfrost point. • A highly wettable condition of the modified surface contributes the enhancement. • Nano-scaled modification indicates the higher performance of droplet cooling. • Investigation via visualization of the droplet support the heat transfer experimental data. - Abstract: In this study, we observed the behavior of water droplets near the Leidenfrost point (LFP) on zirconium alloy surfaces with anodizing treatment and investigated the droplet cooling performance. The anodized zirconium surface, which consists of bundles of nanotubes (∼10–100 nm) or micro-mountain-like structures, improved the wetting characteristics of the surface. A deionized water droplet (6 μL) was dropped onto test surfaces heated to temperatures ranging from 250 °C to the LFP. The droplet dynamics were investigated through high-speed visualization, and the cooling performance was discussed in terms of the droplet evaporation time. The modified surface provided vigorous, intensive nucleate boiling in comparison with a clean, bare surface. Additionally, we observed that the structured surface had a delayed LFP due to the high wetting condition induced by strong capillary wicking forces on the structured surface.

  10. Thermal singularity and droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with thermal gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2012-01-01

    Using a continuum model capable of describing the one-component liquid-gas hydrodynamics down to the contact line scale, we carry out numerical simulation and physical analysis for the droplet motion driven by thermal singularity. For liquid droplets in one-component fluids on heated or cooled substrates, the liquid-gas interface is nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line and the Marangoni effect due to temperature gradient is suppressed. Through evaporation or condensation in the vicinity of the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. This effect on the contact angle can be used to move the droplets on substrates with thermal gradients. Our numerical results for this kind of droplet motion are explained by a simple fluid dynamical model at the droplet length scale. Since the mechanism for droplet motion is based on the change of contact angle, a separation of length scales is exhibited through a comparison between the droplet motion induced by a wettability gradient and that by a thermal gradient. It is shown that the flow field at the droplet length scale is independent of the statics or dynamics at the contact line scale.

  11. Thermal singularity and droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with thermal gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2012-06-26

    Using a continuum model capable of describing the one-component liquid-gas hydrodynamics down to the contact line scale, we carry out numerical simulation and physical analysis for the droplet motion driven by thermal singularity. For liquid droplets in one-component fluids on heated or cooled substrates, the liquid-gas interface is nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line and the Marangoni effect due to temperature gradient is suppressed. Through evaporation or condensation in the vicinity of the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. This effect on the contact angle can be used to move the droplets on substrates with thermal gradients. Our numerical results for this kind of droplet motion are explained by a simple fluid dynamical model at the droplet length scale. Since the mechanism for droplet motion is based on the change of contact angle, a separation of length scales is exhibited through a comparison between the droplet motion induced by a wettability gradient and that by a thermal gradient. It is shown that the flow field at the droplet length scale is independent of the statics or dynamics at the contact line scale.

  12. In situ droplet size and speed determination in a fluid-bed granulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Henrik; Larjo, Jussi; Antikainen, Osmo; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-05-31

    The droplet size affects the final product in fluid-bed granulation and coating. In the present study, spray characteristics of aqueous granulation liquid (purified water) were determined in situ in a fluid-bed granulator. Droplets were produced by a pneumatic nozzle. Diode laser stroboscopy (DLS) was used for droplet detection and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) was used for determination of droplet size and speed. Increased atomization pressure decreased the droplet size and the effect was most strongly visible in the 90% size fractile. The droplets seemed to undergo coalescence after which only slight evaporation occurred. Furthermore, the droplets were subjected to a strong turbulence at the event of atomization, after which the turbulence reached a minimum value in the lower halve of the chamber. The turbulence increased as speed and droplet size decreased due to the effects of the fluidizing air. The DLS and PTV system used was found to be a useful and rapid tool in determining spray characteristics and in monitoring and predicting nozzle performance. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling of fuel vapor jet eruption induced by local droplet heating

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2014-01-10

    The evaporation of a droplet by non-uniform heating is numerically investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the fuel-vapor jet eruption observed in the flame spread of a droplet array under microgravity condition. The phenomenon was believed to be mainly responsible for the enhanced flame spread rate through a droplet cloud at microgravity conditions. A modified Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a local phase change model is utilized to describe the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It is found that the localized heating creates a temperature gradient along the droplet surface, induces the corresponding surface tension gradient, and thus develops an inner flow circulation commonly referred to as the Marangoni convection. Furthermore, the effect also produces a strong shear flow around the droplet surface, thereby pushing the fuel vapor toward the wake region of the droplet to form a vapor jet eruption. A parametric study clearly demonstrated that at realistic droplet combustion conditions the Marangoni effect is indeed responsible for the observed phenomena, in contrast to the results based on constant surface tension approximation

  14. Droplet size effects on film drainage between droplet and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Benjamin; Spicer, Patrick T; Shen, Amy Q

    2006-06-06

    When a droplet approaches a solid surface, the thin liquid film between the droplet and the surface drains until an instability forms and then ruptures. In this study, we utilize microfluidics to investigate the effects of film thickness on the time to film rupture for water droplets in a flowing continuous phase of silicone oil deposited on solid poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces. The water droplets ranged in size from millimeters to micrometers, resulting in estimated values of the film thickness at rupture ranging from 600 nm down to 6 nm. The Stefan-Reynolds equation is used to model film drainage beneath both millimeter- and micrometer-scale droplets. For millimeter-scale droplets, the experimental and analytical film rupture times agree well, whereas large differences are observed for micrometer-scale droplets. We speculate that the differences in the micrometer-scale data result from the increases in the local thin film viscosity due to confinement-induced molecular structure changes in the silicone oil. A modified Stefan-Reynolds equation is used to account for the increased thin film viscosity of the micrometer-scale droplet drainage case.

  15. Partitioning washoff of manure-borne fecal indicators (Escherichia coli and stanols) into splash and hydraulic components: field rainfall simulations in a tropical agro-ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolzi, Olivier; Rochelle-Newall, Emma J.; Janeau, Jean-Louis; Viguier, Marion; Jardé, Emilie; Latsachack, Keooudone; Henri-Des-Tureaux, Thierry; Thammahacksac, Chanthamousone; Mugler, Claude; Valentin, Christian; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth

    2017-04-01

    Overland flow from manured fields and pastures is known to be an important mechanism by which organisms of faecal origin are transferred to streams in rural watersheds. In the tropical montane areas of South-East Asia, recent changes in land use have induced increased runoff, soil erosion, in-stream suspended sediment loads resulting in increased microbial pathogen dissemination and contamination of stream waters. The majority of enteric and environmental bacteria in aquatic systems are associated with particles such as sediments which can strongly influence their survival and transport characteristics. Escherichia coli (E. coli) has emerged as one of the most appropriate microbial indicators of faecal contamination of natural waters, with the presence of E. coli indicating that faecal contamination is present. In association with E. coli, faecal stanols can also be used as microbial source tracking tool for the identification of the origin of the faecal contamination (e.g. livestock, human, etc). Field rain simulations were used to examine how E.coli and stanols are exported from the surface of upland, agricultural soils during overland flow events. The objectives were to characterize the loss dynamics of these indicators from agricultural soils contaminated with livestock waste, and to partition total detachment into the splash and hydraulic components. Nine 1m2 microplots were divided in triplicated treatment groups: (a) controls with no amendments, (b) amended with pig manure or (c) poultry manure. Each plot was divided into two 0.5m2 rectangular subplots. For each simulation, one subplot was designated as a rain splash treatment; the other was covered with 2-mm grid size wire screen 10 cm above the soil surface to break the raindrops into fine droplets, thus drastically reducing their kinetic energy. E. coli concentrations in overland flow were estimated for both the attached and free living fractions and stanols were measured on the particulate matter washed

  16. On the relevance of droplet sedimentation in stratocumulus-top mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro; de Lozar, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    The interaction between droplet sedimentation, turbulent mixing, evaporative cooling, and radiative cooling at the top of stratocumulus clouds has been studied using direct numerical simulations. This interaction is important to determine the mixing rate of the cloud and dry air above it, which eventually determines the cloud lifetime. By investigating the entrainment-rate equation, which is an analytical relationship between the contributions to cloud-top entrainment from the phenomena indicated above, we have found that the reduction of entrainment velocity by droplet sedimentation can be 2 to 3 times larger than previously conjectured. The reason is twofold. First, the reduction of evaporative cooling as droplets fall out of the inversion is stronger than previously observed in large-eddy simulations, where excessive mixing by turbulence models and numerical artifacts may have partially masked this effect of sedimentation on entrainment. Second, there is a non-negligible direct contribution from mass loading, as falling droplets leave behind more buoyant air in the inversion. This contribution is proportional to the fifth moment of the droplet-size distribution, which provides further evidence for the need to better understand the evolution of the droplet-size distribution.

  17. Particle Manipulation Methods in Droplet Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenje, Maria; Fornell, Anna; Ohlin, Mathias; Nilsson, Johan

    2018-02-06

    This Feature describes the different particle manipulation techniques available in the droplet microfluidics toolbox to handle particles encapsulated inside droplets and to manipulate whole droplets. We address the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques to guide new users.

  18. Modeling black hole evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbri, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this book is two-fold: the first part gives a fully detailed and pedagogical presentation of the Hawking effect and its physical implications, and the second discusses the backreaction problem, especially in connection with exactly solvable semiclassical models that describe analytically the black hole evaporation process. The book aims to establish a link between the general relativistic viewpoint on black hole evaporation and the new CFT-type approaches to the subject. The detailed discussion on backreaction effects is also extremely valuable.

  19. Systematics of evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klots, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Beginning with rather basic principles, general relations are obtained for evaporative rate constants. These are established both as a function of energy and of temperature. In parallel with this, expressions are developed for the kinetic energy distribution of the separating species. Explicit evaluation of the rate constants in the case of 'chemical' evaporation from an entity containing n monomeric units yields as a typical result k(T)(s -1 )=3.10 13 n 2/3 exp[6/n 1/3 ]exp(-ΔE a (n)/k B T). Experimental evidence in support of this relation is cited. Applications to thermionic emission are also noted. (orig.)

  20. Vaporization of irradiated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.L.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Zardecki, A.

    1986-01-01

    The vaporization of a spherically symmetric liquid droplet subject to a high-intensity laser flux is investigated on the basis of a hydrodynamic description of the system composed of the vapor and ambient gas. In the limit of the convective vaporization, the boundary conditions at the fluid--gas interface are formulated by using the notion of a Knudsen layer in which translational equilibrium is established. This leads to approximate jump conditions at the interface. For homogeneous energy deposition, the hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically with the aid of the CON1D computer code (''CON1D: A computer program for calculating spherically symmetric droplet combustion,'' Los Alamos National Laboratory Report No. LA-10269-MS, December, 1984), based on the implict continuous--fluid Eulerian (ICE) [J. Comput. Phys. 8, 197 (1971)] and arbitrary Lagrangian--Eulerian (ALE) [J. Comput. Phys. 14, 1227 (1974)] numerical mehtods. The solutions exhibit the existence of two shock waves propagating in opposite directions with respect to the contact discontinuity surface that separates the ambient gas and vapor

  1. Explosive Leidenfrost droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, Pierre; Moreau, Florian; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    We show that Leidenfrost droplets made of an aqueous solution of surfactant undergo a violent explosion in a wide range of initial volumes and concentrations. This unexpected behavior turns out to be triggered by the formation of a gel-like shell, followed by a sharp temperature increase. Comparing a simple model of the radial surfactant distribution inside a spherical droplet with experiments allows highlighting the existence of a critical surface concentration for the shell to form. The temperature rise (attributed to boiling point elevation with surface concentration) is a key feature leading to the explosion, instead of the implosion (buckling) scenario reported by other authors. Indeed, under some conditions, this temperature increase is shown to be sufficient to trigger nucleation and growth of vapor bubbles in the highly superheated liquid bulk, stretching the surrounding elastic shell up to its rupture limit. The successive timescales characterizing this explosion sequence are also discussed. Funding sources: F.R.S. - FNRS (ODILE and DITRASOL projects, RD and SRA positions of P. Colinet and S. Dorbolo), BELSPO (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST project).

  2. Self-bound droplets of a dilute magnetic quantum liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Matthias; Wenzel, Matthias; Böttcher, Fabian; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2016-11-01

    Self-bound many-body systems are formed through a balance of attractive and repulsive forces and occur in many physical scenarios. Liquid droplets are an example of a self-bound system, formed by a balance of the mutual attractive and repulsive forces that derive from different components of the inter-particle potential. It has been suggested that self-bound ensembles of ultracold atoms should exist for atom number densities that are 108 times lower than in a helium droplet, which is formed from a dense quantum liquid. However, such ensembles have been elusive up to now because they require forces other than the usual zero-range contact interaction, which is either attractive or repulsive but never both. On the basis of the recent finding that an unstable bosonic dipolar gas can be stabilized by a repulsive many-body term, it was predicted that three-dimensional self-bound quantum droplets of magnetic atoms should exist. Here we report the observation of such droplets in a trap-free levitation field. We find that this dilute magnetic quantum liquid requires a minimum, critical number of atoms, below which the liquid evaporates into an expanding gas as a result of the quantum pressure of the individual constituents. Consequently, around this critical atom number we observe an interaction-driven phase transition between a gas and a self-bound liquid in the quantum degenerate regime with ultracold atoms. These droplets are the dilute counterpart of strongly correlated self-bound systems such as atomic nuclei and helium droplets.

  3. Analysis of organic solvents and liquid mixtures using a fiber-tip evaporation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preter, Eyal; Donlagic, Denis; Artel, Vlada; Katims, Rachel A.; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Zadok, Avi

    2014-05-01

    The instantaneous size and rate of evaporation of pendant liquid droplets placed on the cleaved facet of a standard fiber are reconstructed based on reflected optical power. Using the evaporation dynamics, the relative contents of ethanol in ethanol-water binary mixtures are assessed with 1% precision and different blends of methanol in gasoline are properly recognized. The latter application, in particular, is significant for the use of alternative fuels in the automotive sector. Also, ten organic solvents are identified based on their evaporation from a fiber facet coated with a hydrophobic, selfassembled monolayer.

  4. Millifluidic droplet analyser for microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baraban, L.; Bertholle, F.; Salverda, M.L.M.; Bremond, N.; Panizza, P.; Baudry, J.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Bibette, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel millifluidic droplet analyser (MDA) for precisely monitoring the dynamics of microbial populations over multiple generations in numerous (=103) aqueous emulsion droplets (100 nL). As a first application, we measure the growth rate of a bacterial strain and determine the minimal

  5. Model of liquid-metal splashing in the cathode spot of a vacuum arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gashkov, M. A.; Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Uimanov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of microjets is studied during the extrusion of a melted metal by the plasma pressure from craters formed on a cathode in a burning vacuum arc. An analytic model of liquid-metal splashing that includes two stages is proposed. At the first stage, the liquid motion has the axial symmetry and a liquid-metal wall surrounding the crater is formed. At the second stage, the axial symmetry is broken due to the development of the Plateau–Rayleigh instability in the upper part of the wall. The wall breakup process is shown to have a threshold. The minimal plasma pressure and the minimal electric current flowing through the crater required for obtaining the liquid-metal splashing regime are found. The basic spatial and temporal characteristics of the jet formation process are found using the analytic model.

  6. The shape and dynamics of the generation of the splash forms in single-phase systems after drop hitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochan, Agata; Beczek, Michał; Mazur, Rafał; RyŻak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2018-02-01

    The splash phenomenon is being increasingly explored with the use of modern measurement tools, including the high-speed cameras. Recording images at a rate of several thousand frames per second facilitates parameterization and description of the dynamics of splash phases. This paper describes the impact of a single drop of a liquid falling on the surface of the same liquid. Three single-phase liquid systems, i.e., water, petrol, and diesel fuel, were examined. The falling drops were characterized by different kinetic energy values depending on the height of the fall, which ranged from 0.1 to 7.0 m. Four forms, i.e., waves, crowns, semi-closed domes, and domes, were distinguished depending on the drop energy. The analysis of the recorded images facilitated determination of the static and dynamic parameters of each form, e.g., the maximum height of each splash form, the width of the splash form at its maximum height, and the rate of growth of the splash form. We, Re, Fr, and K numbers were determined for all analyzed liquid systems. On the basis of the obtained values of dimensionless numbers, the areas of occurrence of characteristic splash forms were separated.

  7. LHC Beam Splash seen by the ATLAS detector, 7 Apr 2015 - Run 260466 - event 22425

    CERN Multimedia

    Adam Bourdarios, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Event display of one of the collimator "splash" event seen by the ATLAS experiment in LHC Run-2 , on Tuesday April the 7th : event 22425, run 260466. The collimator position is 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point. The spray of particles enters ATLAS from the left hand side of the picture. The length of the yellow bars indicates the energy deposited in the ATLAS calorimeter.

  8. A Droplet Microfluidic Platform for Automating Genetic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Philip C; Shih, Steve C C; Sustarich, Jess; Keasling, Jay D; Hillson, Nathan J; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Anup K

    2016-05-20

    We present a water-in-oil droplet microfluidic platform for transformation, culture and expression of recombinant proteins in multiple host organisms including bacteria, yeast and fungi. The platform consists of a hybrid digital microfluidic/channel-based droplet chip with integrated temperature control to allow complete automation and integration of plasmid addition, heat-shock transformation, addition of selection medium, culture, and protein expression. The microfluidic format permitted significant reduction in consumption (100-fold) of expensive reagents such as DNA and enzymes compared to the benchtop method. The chip contains a channel to continuously replenish oil to the culture chamber to provide a fresh supply of oxygen to the cells for long-term (∼5 days) cell culture. The flow channel also replenished oil lost to evaporation and increased the number of droplets that could be processed and cultured. The platform was validated by transforming several plasmids into Escherichia coli including plasmids containing genes for fluorescent proteins GFP, BFP and RFP; plasmids with selectable markers for ampicillin or kanamycin resistance; and a Golden Gate DNA assembly reaction. We also demonstrate the applicability of this platform for transformation in widely used eukaryotic organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Duration and temperatures of the microfluidic heat-shock procedures were optimized to yield transformation efficiencies comparable to those obtained by benchtop methods with a throughput up to 6 droplets/min. The proposed platform offers potential for automation of molecular biology experiments significantly reducing cost, time and variability while improving throughput.

  9. Performance of evaporative condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettouney, Hisham M.; El-Dessouky, Hisham T.; Bouhamra, Walid; Al-Azmi, Bader

    2001-07-01

    Experimental investigation is conducted to study the performance of evaporative condensers/coolers. The analysis includes development of correlations for the external heat transfer coefficient and the system efficiency. The evaporative condenser includes two finned-tube heat exchangers. The system is designed to allow for operation of a single condenser, two condensers in parallel, and two condensers in series. The analysis is performed as a function of the water-to-air mass flow rate ratio (L/G) and the steam temperature. Also, comparison is made between the performance of the evaporative condenser and same device as an air-cooled condenser. Analysis of the collected data shows that the system efficiency increases at lower L/G ratios and higher steam temperatures. The system efficiency for various configurations for the evaporative condenser varies between 97% and 99%. Lower efficiencies are obtained for the air-cooled condenser, with values between 88% and 92%. The highest efficiency is found for the two condensers in series, followed by two condensers in parallel and then the single condenser. The parallel condenser configuration can handle a larger amount of inlet steam and can provide the required system efficiency and degree of subcooling. The correlation for the system efficiency gives a simple tool for preliminary system design. The correlation developed for the external heat transfer coefficient is found to be consistent with the available literature data. (Author)

  10. Capacitive sensing of droplets for microfluidic devices based on thermocapillary actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Z; Darhuber, Anton A; Troian, Sandra M; Wagner, Sigurd

    2004-10-01

    The design and performance of a miniaturized coplanar capacitive sensor is presented whose electrode arrays can also function as resistive microheaters for thermocapillary actuation of liquid films and droplets. Optimal compromise between large capacitive signal and high spatial resolution is obtained for electrode widths comparable to the liquid film thickness measured, in agreement with supporting numerical simulations which include mutual capacitance effects. An interdigitated, variable width design, allowing for wider central electrodes, increases the capacitive signal for liquid structures with non-uniform height profiles. The capacitive resolution and time response of the current design is approximately 0.03 pF and 10 ms, respectively, which makes possible a number of sensing functions for nanoliter droplets. These include detection of droplet position, size, composition or percentage water uptake for hygroscopic liquids. Its rapid response time allows measurements of the rate of mass loss in evaporating droplets.

  11. Reentrainment of droplet from grid spacer in mist flow portion of LOCA reflood of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Cho, S.K.; Sheen, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is made on the influence of a quenched grid spacer on the greatly enhanced heat transfer from heated fuel rods during the mist flow phase of emergency reflood of loss of coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The situation for the case of a dry grid spacer before its quenching has not been covered in this study. The experimental technique used is a relatively simple optical scheme which combines the reference-mode laser-Doppler anemometry making use of the scattering of a light beam from a droplet. The results reveal that the large droplets in the mist flow, which are intercepted by the grid spacer, are responsible for the creation of a large number of smaller droplets. These small droplets, due to their large surface area to mass ratios, can serve as superb evaporative cooling agents to heat transfer downstream of the grid spacer

  12. Forest evaporation models: Relationships between stand growth and evaporation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Maitre, David C

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between forest stand structure, growth and evaporation were analysed to determine whether forest evaporation can be estimated from stand growth data. This approach permits rapid assessment of the potential impacts of afforestation...

  13. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  14. Stokes flow inside an evaporating liquid line for any contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsi, A. J.; Burganos, V. N.

    2008-09-01

    Evaporation of droplets or liquid films lying on a substrate induces internal viscous flow, which affects the transport of suspended particles and, thus, the final deposit profile in numerous applications. In this work, the problem of Stokes flow inside a two-dimensional droplet, representing the cross section of an evaporating liquid line lying on a flat surface, is considered. The stream function formulation is adopted, leading to the biharmonic equation in bipolar coordinates. A solution in closed form is obtained for any contact angle in (0,π) and is, thus, valid for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. The solution can be used with any type of evaporation mechanism, including diffusion, convection, or kinetically controlled modes. Both pinned and depinned contact lines are considered. For the boundary conditions to be compatible at the contact lines, the Navier slip boundary condition is applied on the substrate. Numerical results are presented for kinetically and diffusion controlled evaporation. For pinned contact lines, the flow inside the evaporating liquid line is directed towards the edges, thus, promoting the coffee stain phenomenon. In the case of depinned contact lines and contact angle less than π/2 , the flow is directed towards the center of the droplet, whereas, for strongly hydrophobic substrates it is directed outwards.

  15. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  16. An investigation of the effects of droplet impact angle in thermal spray deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.; Neiser, R.A.; Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    It is widely held that spraying at off-normal angles can influence deposition efficiency and the properties of the deposited material. However, little quantitative information on such effects has been published. This paper reports on a series of experiments to investigate the angular dependence of deposition efficiency, surface roughness, and porosity for several thermal spray materials and processes at incidence angles ranging from 90 degree to 30 degree relative to the substrate surface. At incidence angles from 90 degree out to 60 degree, the observed changes were small and often statistically insignificant. Some significant changes began to appear at 45 degree, and at 30 degree significant changes were observed for nearly all materials and processes: deposition efficiency decreased while surface roughness and porosity increased. It is proposed that droplet splashing may cause some of the observed effects

  17. Determination of the evaporation coefficient of D2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Cohen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The evaporation rate of D2O has been determined by Raman thermometry of a droplet train (12–15 μm diameter injected into vacuum (~10-5 torr. The cooling rate measured as a function of time in vacuum was fit to a model that accounts for temperature gradients between the surface and the core of the droplets, yielding an evaporation coefficient (γe of 0.57±0.06. This is nearly identical to that found for H2O (0.62±0.09 using the same experimental method and model, and indicates the existence of a kinetic barrier to evaporation. The application of a recently developed transition-state theory (TST model suggests that the kinetic barrier is due to librational and hindered translational motions at the liquid surface, and that the lack of an isotope effect is due to competing energetic and entropic factors. The implications of these results for cloud and aerosol particles in the atmosphere are discussed.

  18. The dynamics of milk droplet-droplet collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Giulia; Kooiman, Roeland F.; Padding, Johan T.; Buist, Kay A.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Spray drying is an important industrial process to produce powdered milk, in which concentrated milk is atomized into small droplets and dried with hot gas. The characteristics of the produced milk powder are largely affected by agglomeration, combination of dry and partially dry particles, which in turn depends on the outcome of a collision between droplets. The high total solids (TS) content and the presence of milk proteins cause a relatively high viscosity of the fed milk concentrates, which is expected to largely influence the collision outcomes of drops inside the spray. It is therefore of paramount importance to predict and control the outcomes of binary droplet collisions. Only a few studies report on droplet collisions of high viscous liquids and no work is available on droplet collisions of milk concentrates. The current study therefore aims to obtain insight into the effect of viscosity on the outcome of binary collisions between droplets of milk concentrates. To cover a wide range of viscosity values, three milk concentrates (20, 30 and 46% TS content) are investigated. An experimental set-up is used to generate two colliding droplet streams with consistent droplet size and spacing. A high-speed camera is used to record the trajectories of the droplets. The recordings are processed by Droplet Image Analysis in MATLAB to determine the relative velocities and the impact geometries for each individual collision. The collision outcomes are presented in a regime map dependent on the dimensionless impact parameter and Weber ( We) number. The Ohnesorge ( Oh) number is introduced to describe the effect of viscosity from one liquid to another and is maintained constant for each regime map by using a constant droplet diameter ( d ˜ 700 μ m). In this work, a phenomenological model is proposed to describe the boundaries demarcating the coalescence-separation regimes. The collision dynamics and outcome of milk concentrates are compared with aqueous glycerol

  19. Turbulent mixing in three-dimensional droplet arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoby, M.R.G.; Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.; Marquis, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The atomisation, evaporation and subsequent mixing of fuel from a liquid spray determines the effectiveness of the combustion processes in gas turbines and internal combustion engines. In the present paper, three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the evaporation of methanol droplets in hot environments are presented. The gas phase mixing is assessed by examining the scalar dissipation and the mixture fraction probability density function (PDF). Novel multi-conditional models are proposed that use mixture fraction and structural parameters as the conditioning variables for the scalar dissipation which is found to be well predicted in terms of magnitude and distribution. The β-PDF description of the mixture fraction seems to capture well the global behaviour for a laminar environment and for time-averaged results in turbulent cases. A novel model for the mixture fraction PDF is also proposed based on the multi-conditional model for scalar dissipation and an accurate representation of the PDF is achieved.

  20. Electrohydrodynamic simulation of electrically controlled droplet generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouedraogo, Yun; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas; Gersem, Herbert De; Steinhausen, Christoph; Lamanna, Grazia; Weigand, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a full electrohydrodynamic simulation approach which allows for the accurate modeling of droplet dynamics under the influence of transient electric fields. The model takes into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. • Simulation results are shown for an electrically driven droplet generator using highly conductive acetone droplets and low conductivity pentane droplets, respectively. Excellent agreement with measurement is found. • We investigate the operation characteristic of the droplet generator by computing droplet sizes and detachment times with respect to the applied voltage. • The droplet charging effect is demonstrated for pentane droplets as well as for acetone droplets under long voltage pulses. We show that due to the very different relaxation times, the charging behavior of the two liquids is very different. • We demonstrate that due to this behavior, also the detachment mechanisms for acetone and pentane droplets are different. For low conductivity (pentane) droplets, droplet detachment is only possible after the electric fields are switched off. This is because the effective electric polarization force points upwards, thus, inhibiting the detachment of the droplet from the capillary tip. - Abstract: An electrohydrodynamic model for the simulation of droplet formation, detachment and motion in an electrically driven droplet generator is introduced. The numerical approach is based on the coupled solution of the multiphase flow problem with the charge continuity equation. For the latter, a modified convection-conduction model is applied, taking into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. This allows for a proper description of charge relaxation phenomena in the moving fluid. In particular, the charge received by the droplet after detachment is an important parameter influencing the droplet dynamics in the test chamber

  1. Oleoplaning droplets on lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dan; Timonen, Jaakko V. I.; Li, Ruoping; Velling, Seneca J.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2017-10-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in using lubricated surfaces to achieve extreme liquid repellency: a foreign droplet immiscible with the underlying lubricant layer was shown to slide off at a small tilt angle behaviour was hypothesized to arise from a thin lubricant overlayer film sandwiched between the droplet and solid substrate, but this has not been observed experimentally. Here, using thin-film interference, we are able to visualize the intercalated film under both static and dynamic conditions. We further demonstrate that for a moving droplet, the film thickness follows the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin law. The droplet is therefore oleoplaning--akin to tyres hydroplaning on a wet road--with minimal dissipative force and no contact line pinning. The techniques and insights presented in this study will inform future work on the fundamentals of wetting for lubricated surfaces and enable their rational design.

  2. Droplet Translation Actuated by Photoelectrowetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Cesar; Deegan, Robert D

    2018-03-13

    In traditional electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) devices, droplets are moved about a substrate using electric fields produced by an array of discrete electrodes. In this study, we show that a drop can be driven across a substrate with a localized light beam by exploiting the photoelectrowetting (PEW) effect, a light-activated variant of EWOD. Droplet transport actuated by PEW eliminates the need for electrode arrays and the complexities entailed in their fabrication and control, and offers a new approach for designing lab-on-a-chip applications. We report measurements of the maximum droplet speed as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied bias, intensity of illumination, volume of the droplet, and viscosity and also introduce a model that reproduces these data.

  3. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-01-01

    Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C). Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic...

  4. Experimentation, modelling and simulation of water droplets impact on ballooned sheath of PWR core fuel assemblies in a LOCA situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelong, Franck

    2010-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), during a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), liquid water evaporates and the fuel assemblies are not cooled anymore; as a consequence, the temperature rises to such an extent that some parts of the fuel assemblies can be deformed resulting in 'ballooned regions'. When reflooding occurs, the cooling of these partially blocked parts of the fuel assemblies will depend on the coolant flow that is a mixture of overheated vapour and under-saturated droplets. The aim of this thesis is to study the heat transfer between droplets and hot walls of the fuel rods. In this purpose, an experimental device has been designed in accordance with droplets and wall features (droplet velocity and diameter, wall temperature) representative of LOCA conditions. The cooling of a hot Nickel disk, previously heated by induction, is cooled down by a stream of monodispersed droplet. The rear face temperature profiles are measured by infrared thermography. Then, the estimation of wall heat flux is performed by an inverse conduction technique from these infrared images. The effect of droplet dynamical properties (diameter, velocity) on the heat flux is studied. These experimental data allow us to validate an analytical model of heat exchange between droplet and hot slab. This model is based on combined dynamical and thermal considerations. On the one hand, the droplet dynamics is considered through a spring analogy in order to evaluate the evolution of droplet features such as the spreading diameter when the droplet is squeezed over the hot surface. On the other hand, thermal parameters, such as the thickness of the vapour cushion beneath the droplet, are determined from an energy balance. In the short term, this model will be integrated in a CFD code (named NEPTUNE-CFD) to simulate the cooling of a reactor core during a LOCA, taking into account the droplet/wall heat exchange. (author)

  5. The Influence Of Mass Fraction Of Dressed Coal On Ignition Conditions Of Composite Liquid Fuel Droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlegel Nikita E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The laws of condition modification of inert heat and ignition in an oxidant flow of composite liquid fuel droplet were studied by the developed experimental setup. Investigations were for composite liquid fuel composition based on the waste of bituminous and nonbaking coal processing, appropriate carbon dust, water, used motor oil. The characteristics of boundary layer inertia heat of composite liquid fuel droplet, thermal decomposition of coal organic part, the yield of volatiles and evaporation of liquid combustion component, ignition of the gas mixture and coke residue were defined.

  6. Investigation of the liquid low-level waste evaporator steam coil failure and supporting laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawel, S.J.; Keiser, J.R.; Longmire, H.F.

    1995-05-01

    Using a remote video camera, the internals of a low-level waste evaporator tank (termed 2A2, type 304L stainless steel construction, known to have failed steam coils) were inspected. This inspection revealed at least three rather substantial holes as opposed to crack- or pit-like leak sites near the nominal solution level position on one particular steam coil. This section was removed from the evaporator vessel, and subsequent hot cell examination revealed extensive general corrosion on the process side of the coil with little or no attack on the steam side. Hot cell metallography confirmed intense general corrosion on the process side and, in addition, revealed shallow intergranular attack at the leading edge of corrosion. No pits or cracks were detected in this section of the steam coil. Laboratory corrosion tests with coupons of 304L (and other high-alloy materials) isothermally exposed in a range of solutions similar to those expected in the evaporator reveal only very low corrosion rates below 40% sodium hydroxide and the solution boiling point. However, open-quotes dried filmclose quotes experiments revealed that much more dilute solutions became aggressive to stainless steel due to concentrating effects (evaporation and periodic wetting) at the air/solution interface. The high general corrosion rates observed on the failed coil section occurred at or near the air/solution interface and were attributed to such open-quotes splash zoneclose quotes activity

  7. Distribution and function of splash, an achaete-scute homolog in the adult olfactory organ of the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Tizeta; Schmidt, Manfred; Walthall, William W.; Tai, Phang C.; Derby, Charles D.

    2011-01-01

    achaete-scute complex (ASC) genes, which encode basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, regulate embryonic and adult neurogenesis in many animals. In adult arthropods, including crustaceans, ASC homologs have been identified but rarely functionally characterized. We took advantage of the recently identified crustacean homolog, splash (spiny lobster achaete scute homolog), in the olfactory organ of the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus to examine its role in adult neurogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that splash is associated with but not restricted to sensory neuron formation in the olfactory organ, the antennular lateral flagellum (LF), of adult spiny lobsters. We demonstrated splash labeling in epithelial cells across LF developmental zones (i.e., proliferation and mature zones), in auxiliary cells surrounding dendrites of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), and in immature and mature ORNs, but not in granulocytes or chromatophores. Since ORN proliferation varies with molt stage, we examined splash expression across molt stages and found that molt stage affected splash expression in the ORN mature zone but not in the proliferation zone. In vivo incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) showed no correlation in the cellular pattern of splash expression and BrdU labeling. The intensity of splash labeling was dramatically enhanced in the proliferation zones following LF damage, suggesting enhanced splash expression during repair and/or regeneration. We conclude that splash is not closely associated with the formation of sensory neurons under normal physiological conditions, and we propose that splash is involved in repair and regeneration. We also propose that splash has additional roles other than neurogenesis in adult crustaceans. PMID:21394934

  8. Advanced evaporation/concentration treatment technology for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhijian; Lu Zhiming; Yu Ruixia

    1997-01-01

    A new and effective two stage moisture separator which removes remaining water droplet and free ion in secondary steam can be added between the evaporator and the condenser of existing liquid waste treatment system. Its addition increases decontamination factor to more than ten times. Ion content in condensed water is decreased considerably. Condensed water meets emission standard without passing through ion exchanger. Detail fundamentals are analysed and results are given: (1) system diagram, (2) structure sketch of the two stage moisture separator, (3) laboratory test results

  9. 2D SPLASH: a new method to determine the fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenn, Werner; Huemmer, Christian; Koestler, Herbert; Hahn, Dietbert; Boehm, Dirk; Gohlke, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to quantify the fatty degeneration (infiltration) of rotator cuff muscles with a new spectroscopic FLASH (SPLASH) sequence. Before planned surgery (reconstruction or muscle transfer), 20 patients (13 men, 7 women; 35-75 years) with different stages of rotator cuff disease underwent an MR examination in a 1.5-T unit. The protocol consists of imaging sequences and a newly implemented SPLASH, which allows an exact quantification of the fat/water ratio with a high spatial resolution in an arbitrarily shaped region of interest (ROI). The percentages of fat in the rotator cuff muscles were determined. To determine statistically significant differences between the different stages of rotator cuff tear, a Kruskal-Wallis H test was used. Fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus muscle was correlated with cross-sectional area (CSA) measures (Bravais-Pearson). We found significant differences between different stages of rotator cuff disease, the fatty infiltration and the volume loss (determined by the occupation ratio) of the supraspinatus muscle. With the increasing extent of rotator cuff disease, fatty infiltration increases significantly, as does the volume loss of the supraspinatus muscle. Comparing fatty infiltration and the occupation ratio individually, there was only a moderate inverse correlation between fatty infiltration and the occupation ratio, with considerable variation of data. Fatty infiltration of the infraspinatus muscle occurred when the infraspinatus tendon was involved to a lesser extent. The SPLASH sequence allows exact quantification of fatty infiltration in an arbitrarily shaped ROI. The extent of atrophy and fatty infiltration correlates with the size of the tear. Atrophy and fatty infiltration correlate only moderately and should be evaluated separately. (orig.)

  10. Miniature electron bombardment evaporation source: evaporation rate measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehasil, V.; Masek, K.; Matolin, V.; Moreau, O.

    1997-01-01

    Miniature electron beam evaporation sources which operate on the principle of vaporization of source material, in the form of a tip, by electron bombardment are produced by several companies specialized in UHV equipment. These sources are used primarily for materials that are normally difficult to deposit due to their high evaporation temperature. They are appropriate for special applications such as heteroepitaxial thin film growth requiring a very low and well controlled deposition rate. A simple and easily applicable method of evaporation rate control is proposed. The method is based on the measurement of ion current produced by electron bombardment of evaporated atoms. The absolute evaporation flux values were measured by means of the Bayard-Alpert ion gauge, which enabled the ion current vs evaporation flux calibration curves to be plotted. (author). 1 tab., 4 figs., 6 refs

  11. Evaporation kinetics and phase of laboratory and ambient secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find significantly higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense effort focused on finding additional SOA sources but leaving the fundamental assumptions used by models unchallenged. Current air-quality models use absorptive partitioning theory assuming SOA particles are liquid droplets, forming instantaneous reversible equilibrium with gas phase. Further, they ignore the effects of adsorption of spectator organic species during SOA formation on SOA properties and fate. Using accurate and highly sensitive experimental approach for studying evaporation kinetics of size-selected single SOA particles, we characterized room-temperature evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated α-pinene SOA and ambient atmospheric SOA. We found that even when gas phase organics are removed, it takes ∼24 h for pure α-pinene SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ∼10 min time scale predicted by current kinetic models. Adsorption of “spectator” organic vapors during SOA formation, and aging of these coated SOA particles, dramatically reduced the evaporation rate, and in some cases nearly stopped it. Ambient SOA was found to exhibit evaporation behavior very similar to that of laboratory-generated coated and aged SOA. For all cases studied in this work, SOA evaporation behavior is nearly size-independent and does not follow the evaporation kinetics of liquid droplets, in sharp contrast with model assumptions. The findings about SOA phase, evaporation rates, and the importance of spectator gases and aging all indicate that there is need to reformulate the way SOA formation and evaporation are treated by models. PMID:21262848

  12. PFR evaporator leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    PFR has three heat removal circuits each one having an evaporator, superheater, reheater; all separate units. The status of the system was that circuit No 3 was steaming with 10 MW thermal nuclear power; No 1 circuit was filled with sodium but with the evaporator awaiting modification to cure gas entrainment problems already reported. The leak was in No 2 circuit and was located in the evaporator unit. The evaporator is rated at 120 M thermal at full power and as such is a large unit. The circuit was filled with both sodium and water for the first time three weeks before the conference so it was recent history being reported and therefore any figures quoted should be taken as indicative only. The history of the steam generator was that it was built at works to a very high standard and underwent all the usual tests of strength, inspection of welds and helium leak testing. The steam generator is of U tube design with a tube plate to which the boiler tubes are welded, with all the welds in one of two gas spaces. The inlet and outlet sides are separated by a baffle and the salient features are illustrated in the attached figure. The unit achieved a leak tightness better than the detection limit in the helium leak test at works. This limit was assessed as being less than an equivalent leak of 10 -6 g/s water under steam generator service conditions. However even though all the steam generator units passed this test at works a further test was carried out when the circuits had been completed. The test was carried out during commissioning after sodium filling and with the units hot. The method was to introduce a mixture of helium/ argon at 500 pounds/square inch into the water side of the steam generators and measure the helium concentration in the sodium side gas spaces of the circuit. The test lasted many days and under these conditions the sensitivity is such that a leak equivalent to somewhere between 10 -7 to 10 -6 g/s equivalent water leak could be detected, i

  13. PFR evaporator leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, J A

    1975-07-01

    PFR has three heat removal circuits each one having an evaporator, superheater, reheater; all separate units. The status of the system was that circuit No 3 was steaming with 10 MW thermal nuclear power; No 1 circuit was filled with sodium but with the evaporator awaiting modification to cure gas entrainment problems already reported. The leak was in No 2 circuit and was located in the evaporator unit. The evaporator is rated at 120 M thermal at full power and as such is a large unit. The circuit was filled with both sodium and water for the first time three weeks before the conference so it was recent history being reported and therefore any figures quoted should be taken as indicative only. The history of the steam generator was that it was built at works to a very high standard and underwent all the usual tests of strength, inspection of welds and helium leak testing. The steam generator is of U tube design with a tube plate to which the boiler tubes are welded, with all the welds in one of two gas spaces. The inlet and outlet sides are separated by a baffle and the salient features are illustrated in the attached figure. The unit achieved a leak tightness better than the detection limit in the helium leak test at works. This limit was assessed as being less than an equivalent leak of 10{sup -6} g/s water under steam generator service conditions. However even though all the steam generator units passed this test at works a further test was carried out when the circuits had been completed. The test was carried out during commissioning after sodium filling and with the units hot. The method was to introduce a mixture of helium/ argon at 500 pounds/square inch into the water side of the steam generators and measure the helium concentration in the sodium side gas spaces of the circuit. The test lasted many days and under these conditions the sensitivity is such that a leak equivalent to somewhere between 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -6} g/s equivalent water leak could be

  14. Evaporation and Antievaporation Instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Addazi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We review (antievaporation phenomena within the context of quantum gravity and extended theories of gravity. The (antievaporation effect is an instability of the black hole horizon discovered in many different scenarios: quantum dilaton-gravity, f ( R -gravity, f ( T -gravity, string-inspired black holes, and brane-world cosmology. Evaporating and antievaporating black holes seem to have completely different thermodynamical features compared to standard semiclassical black holes. The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to conceptual and technical aspects of (antievaporation effects, while discussing problems that are still open.

  15. A study on entrapment: splashing of liquid UO2 over small sodium volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schins, H.; Klein, K.; Jorzik, E.

    1978-01-01

    Three experiments were done in which each time more than 1 kg of liqid UO 2 was splashed over a plate in which different stainless steel cups full of sodium were contained. No whatsoever indication of entrapment of sodium could be found. The pressure tests indicate up to 1,8 atm and they relax in some second time. These pressure diagrams have been satisfactorily analysed as indicating a sodium vapor formation. In the third experiment e.g. the quenching of 800 g UO 2 in 720 g of sodium in a closed volume of argon of 225 l will provide the requested maximum pressure

  16. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  17. A multi-component oil spill model for calculation of evaporation and dissolution of condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, H.

    1994-01-01

    It is sometimes argued that oil spilled on the sea surface will go much faster into evaporation than solution. This statement may not always be true due to effects from wave action. In such cases high concentrations in the water may occur which could be harmful to biologic life below the sea surface. This paper explains a numerical model which simulates the surface spreading of a continuous spill, exposed to currents, wind and wave action. The spill is decomposed into the different constituents present in the spill. The oil or condensate is divided into 20 different classes with increasing carbon number within the interval C4 to C55. Asphalthenes are not included (non-emulgating spill). Within each class, the hydrocarbons are divided further into 5 subsets (n-alcanes, cycloalcanes, aromatics, napthenes and resins). The model then keeps track of what happens to each of the components (evaporation, dissolution, as droplets or remains in the slick) during an actual spill event. The effect of wave action is included by assuming a balance between the downward flux of hydrocarbons caused by the breaking waves, and the upward flux of droplets driven by the boyancy of the droplets. The dissolution and evaporation of the different oil (or spill) components are then computed. The model shows that the evaporation and dissolution may in some cases be competing processes, in particular for the aromatic compounds. The paper outlines the approach chosen, as well as some example results. 16 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Mutations in MITF and PAX3 Cause “Splashed White” and Other White Spotting Phenotypes in Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, Marlis; Brooks, Samantha A.; Burger, Dominik; Drögemüller, Cord; Gerber, Vincent; Henke, Diana; Janda, Jozef; Jude, Rony; Magdesian, K. Gary; Matthews, Jacqueline M.; Poncet, Pierre-André; Svansson, Vilhjálmur; Tozaki, Teruaki; Wilkinson-White, Lorna; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso

    2012-01-01

    During fetal development neural-crest-derived melanoblasts migrate across the entire body surface and differentiate into melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells. Alterations in this precisely regulated process can lead to white spotting patterns. White spotting patterns in horses are a complex trait with a large phenotypic variance ranging from minimal white markings up to completely white horses. The “splashed white” pattern is primarily characterized by an extremely large blaze, often accompanied by extended white markings at the distal limbs and blue eyes. Some, but not all, splashed white horses are deaf. We analyzed a Quarter Horse family segregating for the splashed white coat color. Genome-wide linkage analysis in 31 horses gave a positive LOD score of 1.6 in a region on chromosome 6 containing the PAX3 gene. However, the linkage data were not in agreement with a monogenic inheritance of a single fully penetrant mutation. We sequenced the PAX3 gene and identified a missense mutation in some, but not all, splashed white Quarter Horses. Genome-wide association analysis indicated a potential second signal near MITF. We therefore sequenced the MITF gene and found a 10 bp insertion in the melanocyte-specific promoter. The MITF promoter variant was present in some splashed white Quarter Horses from the studied family, but also in splashed white horses from other horse breeds. Finally, we identified two additional non-synonymous mutations in the MITF gene in unrelated horses with white spotting phenotypes. Thus, several independent mutations in MITF and PAX3 together with known variants in the EDNRB and KIT genes explain a large proportion of horses with the more extreme white spotting phenotypes. PMID:22511888

  19. Application of Compressible Volume of Fluid Model in Simulating the Impact and Solidification of Hollow Spherical ZrO2 Droplet on a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Hadi; Emami, Mohsen Davazdah; Jazi, Hamidreza Salimi; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-12-01

    Applications of hollow spherical particles in thermal spraying process have been developed in recent years, accompanied by attempts in the form of experimental and numerical studies to better understand the process of impact of a hollow droplet on a surface. During such process, volume and density of the trapped gas inside droplet change. The numerical models should be able to simulate such changes and their consequent effects. The aim of this study is to numerically simulate the impact of a hollow ZrO2 droplet on a flat surface using the volume of fluid technique for compressible flows. An open-source, finite-volume-based CFD code was used to perform the simulations, where appropriate subprograms were added to handle the studied cases. Simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. Results showed that at high impact velocities ( U 0 > 100 m/s), the compression of trapped gas inside droplet played a significant role in the impact dynamics. In such velocities, the droplet splashed explosively. Compressibility effects result in a more porous splat, compared to the corresponding incompressible model. Moreover, the compressible model predicted a higher spread factor than the incompressible model, due to planetary structure of the splat.

  20. The Effects of Sooting and Radiation on Droplet Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Ook; Manzello, Samuel L.; Choi, Mun Young

    1997-01-01

    The burning of liquid hydrocarbon fuels accounts for a significant portion of global energy production. With predicted future increases in demand and limited reserves of hydrocarbon fuel, it is important to maximize the efficiency of all processes that involve conversion of fuel. With the exception of unwanted fires, most applications involve introduction of liquid fuels into an oxidizing environment in the form of sprays which are comprised of groups of individual droplets. Therefore, tremendous benefits can result from a better understanding of spray combustion processes. Yet, theoretical developments and experimental measurements of spray combustion remains a daunting task due to the complex coupling of a turbulent, two-phase flow with phase change and chemical reactions. However, it is recognized that individual droplet behavior (including ignition, evaporation and combustion) is a necessary component for laying the foundation for a better understanding of spray processes. Droplet combustion is also an ideal problem for gaining a better understanding of non-premixed flames. Under the idealized situation producing spherically-symmetric flames (produced under conditions of reduced natural and forced convection), it represents the simplest geometry in which to formulate and solve the governing equations of mass, species and heat transfer for a chemically reacting two phase flow with phase change. The importance of this topic has promoted extensive theoretical investigations for more than 40 years.

  1. Effects of surface deposition and droplet injection on film cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jin; Cui, Pei; Vujanović, Milan; Baleta, Jakov; Duić, Neven; Guzović, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cooling effectiveness is significantly affected by the deposition size. • Coverage area for model without mist is reduced by increasing the deposition height. • Wall temperature is decreased by 15% with 2% mist injection. • Cooling coverage is increased by more than three times with 2% mist injection. • Cooling effectiveness for mist models is improved by increasing deposition height. - Abstract: In the present research, the influence of the particle dispersion onto the continuous phase in film cooling application was analysed by means of numerical simulations. The interaction between the water droplets and the main stream plays an important role in the results. The prediction of two-phase flow is investigated by employing the discrete phase model (DPM). The results present heat transfer characteristics in the near-wall region under the influence of mist cooling. The local wall temperature distribution and film cooling effectiveness are obtained, and results show that the film cooling characteristics on the downstream wall are affected by different height of surface deposits. It is also found that smaller deposits without mist injection provide a lower wall temperature and a better cooling performance. With 2% mist injection, evaporation of water droplets improves film cooling effectiveness, and higher deposits cause lateral and downstream spread of water droplets. The results indicate that mist injection can significantly enhance film cooling performance.

  2. Framework for simulating droplet vaporization in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    A framework for performing direct numerical simulations of droplet vaporization is presented. The work is motivated by spray combustion in engines wherein fuel droplets vaporize in a turbulent gas flow. The framework is built into a conservative finite volume code for simulating low Mach number turbulent multiphase flows. Phase tracking is performed using a discretely conservative geometric volume of fluid method, while the transport of mass fraction and temperature is performed using the BQUICK scheme. Special attention is given to the implementation of transport equations near the interface to ensure the consistency between fluxes of mass, momentum, and scalars. The effect of evaporation on the flow appears as a system of coupled source terms which depend on the local thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases. The sources are implemented implicitly using an unconditionally stable, monotone scheme. Two methodologies for resolving the system's thermodynamic equilibrium are compared for their accuracy, robustness, and computational expense. Verification is performed by comparing results to known solutions in one and three dimensions. Finally, simulations of droplets vaporizing in turbulence are demonstrated, and trends for mass fraction and temperature fields are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of electrolytic alkaline cleaners by evaporative-rate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A method has been developed by which electrolytic alkaline cleaners used in large volumes in steel mills can be evaluated for their ability to clean rolling oil from steel strip without the necessity of large-scale mill trials. The method is evaporative-rate analysis, which can be used to determine the relative amount of residual oil on steel strip after cleaning. The procedure consists in placing a droplet of a solution of a volatile, radioactive, carbon-14 tagged organic compound dissolved in a more volatile solvent, on the surface of the metal, where it forms a ternary solution with any oil on the surface. The amount of oil in this ternary solution affects the rate of evaporation of the tagged compound. The rate of evaporation, monitored by a Geiger-Mueller detector, is a measure of the cleanliness of the surface. A number of commercial alkaline cleaners, both solids and liquids, were evaluated over a range of concentrations. Results indicated that the effectiveness of commercial alkaline cleaners varies greatly, and is a function of the cleaner concentration, cleaner composition, and polarity of cleaning. The presence of antifoaming agents also affects cleaning ability. The results of this study indicate that evaporative-rate analysis is a rapid and effective method for evaluating cleaners

  4. Experimental investigations on the contribution of the splash-zones in counter-flow cooling towers for water cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladea, I.; Barbu, V.

    1976-01-01

    The relatively high cost of cooling tower packs has led to investigate the contribution of the splash-zones in counter-flow cooling towers, and thereby to determine whether the pack could not be reduced so far, as to be - under certain circumstance - completely eliminated. In this case, one would come to a pure splash cooling tower which would contain inside the equipment required for drop formation only. This problem was investigated experimentally, and it was found that the pack of such a cooling tower could not be eliminated without a reduction in tower effectiveness. (orig.) [de

  5. Laser Techniques on Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannuli Antonio

    2018-01-01

    acoustically levitated droplets of trehalose aqueous solutions in order to perform spectroscopic analyses as a function of concentration and to test the theoretical diameter law. The study of such systems is important in order to better understand the behaviour of trehalose-synthesizing extremophiles that live in extreme environments. In particular, it will be shown how acoustic levitation, combined with optical spectroscopic instruments allows to explore a wide concentration range and to test the validity of the diameter law as a function of levitation lag time, i.e. the D2 vs t law. On this purpose a direct diameter monitoring by a video camera and a laser pointer was first performed; then the diameter was also evaluated by an indirect measure through an OH/CH band area ratio analysis of collected Raman and Infrared spectra. It clearly emerges that D2 vs t follows a linear trend for about 20 minutes, reaching then a plateau at longer time. This result shows how trehalose is able to avoid total water evaporation, this property being essential for the surviving of organisms under extreme environmental conditions.

  6. Laser Techniques on Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannuli, Antonio; Caccamo, Maria Teresa; Castorina, Giuseppe; Colombo, Franco; Magazù, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    This work reports the results of an experimental study where laser techniques are applied to acoustically levitated droplets of trehalose aqueous solutions in order to perform spectroscopic analyses as a function of concentration and to test the theoretical diameter law. The study of such systems is important in order to better understand the behaviour of trehalose-synthesizing extremophiles that live in extreme environments. In particular, it will be shown how acoustic levitation, combined with optical spectroscopic instruments allows to explore a wide concentration range and to test the validity of the diameter law as a function of levitation lag time, i.e. the D2 vs t law. On this purpose a direct diameter monitoring by a video camera and a laser pointer was first performed; then the diameter was also evaluated by an indirect measure through an OH/CH band area ratio analysis of collected Raman and Infrared spectra. It clearly emerges that D2 vs t follows a linear trend for about 20 minutes, reaching then a plateau at longer time. This result shows how trehalose is able to avoid total water evaporation, this property being essential for the surviving of organisms under extreme environmental conditions.

  7. 242-A evaporator hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 242-A Evaporator, on the Hanford Site. Through this document the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated. The evaporator sues a conventional, forced-circulation, vacuum evaporation system to concentrate radioactive waste solutions. This concentration results in the reduction in waste volume and reduces the number of double-shelled tanks required to store the waste

  8. Impact induced splash and spill in a quasi-confided granular medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogale, S. B.

    2005-03-01

    Dissipation of the energy of impact in a granular medium and its effects has been a subject of considerable scientific for quite some time. In this work we have explored and analyzed the splash and spill effects caused by the impact of a ball dropped from a height into a granular medium in a open container. Three different granular media, namely rice, mustard seeds, and cream of wheat were used. The amount of spilled-over granular matter was measured as a function of the ball-drop height. Digital pictures of the splash process were also recorded. The quantity of spilled granular matter varies linearly with the impact energy. However additional step like structures are also noted. Specifically, a distinct and large jump is seen in the spilled quantity at a specific impact energy in the case of mustard seeds, which also exhibit obvious charging effects and repulsion. Although the parameters such as mass per grain and packing density for the case of mustard seeds are intermediate between those for rice and cream of wheat, the spill quantity for comparable impact energy is considerably higher. These data will be presented and discussed.

  9. Impact-induced splash and spill in a quasi-confined granular medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogale, S. B.; Shinde, S. R.; Karve, P. A.; Ogale, Abhijit S.; Kulkarni, A.; Athawale, A.; Phadke, A.; Thakurdas, R.

    2006-05-01

    The splash and spill effects caused by the impact of a ball dropped from a height into a granular medium held in a small open container are examined. Different granular media, namely rice, mustard seeds, cream of wheat and plastic beads are used. The quantity of spilled-over granular matter ( W, grams) is measured as a function of the ball-drop height and compared for different cases. Digital pictures of the splash process are also recorded. The quantity W is seen to vary approximately linearly with the energy of impact. Interestingly, a distinct upward jump is seen in the spilled quantity at specific impact energy in the case of mustard seeds, which have spherical shape and also exhibit some charging effects. Similar jump was also confirmed for the case of plastic beads with broadly similar properties. Although the parameters such as mass per grain and packing density for the case of mustard seeds are intermediate between those for rice and cream of wheat, the spill quantity for comparable impact energy is considerably higher in the former case. The possible reasons for this non-monotonicity of behavior are discussed in terms of the differences in grain shapes and properties. Experiments are also performed using plastic beads of the same type but with four different sizes to explore the dependence of spilled quantity on bead size. The container size dependence is also examined for various bead types. Interesting systematics are seen, which are discussed qualitatively.

  10. Numerical Investigation of the Main Characteristics of Heat and Mass Transfer while Heating the Heterogeneous Water Droplet in the Hot Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of heat and evaporation of heterogeneous water droplet with solid (by the example of carbon inclusion in hot (from 800 K to 1500 K gases were investigated by the developed models of heat and mass transfer. We defined the limited conditions, characteristics of the droplet and the gas medium which are sufficient for implementing the “explosive” destruction of heterogeneous droplet due to intensive vaporization on an inner interface, and intensive evaporation of liquid from an external (free droplet surface. The values of the main characteristic of the process (period from start of heating to “explosive” destruction obtained in response to using various heat and mass transfer models were compared.

  11. Instability of expanding bacterial droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Rubio, Leonardo Dominguez; Brady, John F; Aranson, Igor S

    2018-04-03

    Suspensions of motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, termed active matter, manifest a remarkable propensity for self-organization, and formation of large-scale coherent structures. Most active matter research deals with almost homogeneous in space systems and little is known about the dynamics of strongly heterogeneous active matter. Here we report on experimental and theoretical studies on the expansion of highly concentrated bacterial droplets into an ambient bacteria-free fluid. The droplet is formed beneath a rapidly rotating solid macroscopic particle inserted in the suspension. We observe vigorous instability of the droplet reminiscent of a violent explosion. The phenomenon is explained in terms of continuum first-principle theory based on the swim pressure concept. Our findings provide insights into the dynamics of active matter with strong density gradients and significantly expand the scope of experimental and analytic tools for control and manipulation of active systems.

  12. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Nurtac

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

  13. Transport of radioactive droplet moisture from a source in a nuclear power plant spray pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a change in the microclimate in the region surrounding a nuclear power plant resulting from the emission of vapor form a cooling tower, evaporation of water from the water surface of a cooling pond or a spray pond, in the latter case direct radioactive contamination of the underlying surface around the nuclear power plant can also occur due to discharge of process water (radioactive) into the pond and its transport in the air over a certain distance in the form of droplet moisture. A typical example may be the situation at the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant in 1986 when accidental discharge of process water into the cooling pond occurred. Below we present a solution for the problem of transport of droplet moisture taking into account its evaporation, which may be used to estimate the scale of radioactive contamination of the locality

  14. Dual-nozzle microfluidic droplet generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Wook; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ha, Jang Ho; Ahrberg, Christian D.; Chung, Bong Geun

    2018-05-01

    The droplet-generating microfluidics has become an important technique for a variety of applications ranging from single cell analysis to nanoparticle synthesis. Although there are a large number of methods for generating and experimenting with droplets on microfluidic devices, the dispensing of droplets from these microfluidic devices is a challenge due to aggregation and merging of droplets at the interface of microfluidic devices. Here, we present a microfluidic dual-nozzle device for the generation and dispensing of uniform-sized droplets. The first nozzle of the microfluidic device is used for the generation of the droplets, while the second nozzle can accelerate the droplets and increase the spacing between them, allowing for facile dispensing of droplets. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were conducted to optimize the design parameters of the microfluidic device.

  15. Droplet and multiphase effects in a shock-driven hydrodynamic instability with reshock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John B.; Avgoustopoulos, Constantine G.; Black, Wolfgang J.; Allen, Roy C.; McFarland, Jacob A.

    2018-06-01

    Shock-driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) are unique physical phenomena that have far-reaching applications in engineering and science such as high energy explosions, scramjet combustors, and supernovae events. The SDMI arises when a multiphase field is impulsively accelerated by a shock wave and evolves as a result of gradients in particle-gas momentum transfer. A new shock tube facility has been constructed to study the SDMI. Experiments were conducted to investigate liquid particle and multiphase effects in the SDMI. A multiphase cylindrical interface was created with water droplet laden air in our horizontal shock tube facility. The interface was accelerated by a Mach 1.66 shock wave, and its reflection from the end wall. The interface development was captured using laser illumination and a high-resolution CCD camera. Laser interferometry was used to determine the droplet size distribution. A particle filtration technique was used to determine mass loading within an interface and verify particle size distribution. The effects of particle number density, particle size, and a secondary acceleration (reshock) of the interface were noted. Particle number density effects were found comparable to Atwood number effects in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for small (˜ 1.7 {μ }m) droplets. Evaporation was observed to alter droplet sizes and number density, markedly after reshock. For large diameter droplets (˜ 10.7 {μ }m), diminished development was observed with larger droplets lagging far behind the interface. These lagging droplets were also observed to breakup after reshock into structured clusters of smaller droplets. Mixing width values were reported to quantify mixing effects seen in images.

  16. Jumping-droplet electronics hot-spot cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Junho; Birbarah, Patrick; Foulkes, Thomas; Yin, Sabrina L.; Rentauskas, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Demand for enhanced cooling technologies within various commercial and consumer applications has increased in recent decades due to electronic devices becoming more energy dense. This study demonstrates jumping-droplet based electric-field-enhanced (EFE) condensation as a potential method to achieve active hot spot cooling in electronic devices. To test the viability of EFE condensation, we developed an experimental setup to remove heat via droplet evaporation from single and multiple high power gallium nitride (GaN) transistors acting as local hot spots (4.6 mm x 2.6 mm). An externally powered circuit was developed to direct jumping droplets from a copper oxide (CuO) nanostructured superhydrophobic surface to the transistor hot spots by applying electric fields between the condensing surface and the transistor. Heat transfer measurements were performed in ambient air (22-25°C air temperature, 20-45% relative humidity) to determine the effect of gap spacing (2-4 mm), electric field (50-250 V/cm), and heat flux (demonstrated to 13 W/cm"2). EFE condensation was shown to enhance the heat transfer from the local hot spot by ≈ 200% compared to cooling without jumping and by 20% compared to non-EFE jumping. Dynamic switching of the electric field for a two-GaN system reveals the potential for active cooling of mobile hot spots. The opportunity for further cooling enhancement by the removal of non-condensable gases promises hot spot heat dissipation rates approaching 120 W/cm"2. Finally, this work provides a framework for the development of active jumping droplet based vapor chambers and heat pipes capable of spatial and temporal thermal dissipation control.

  17. Jumping-droplet electronics hot-spot cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Junho; Birbarah, Patrick; Foulkes, Thomas; Yin, Sabrina L.; Rentauskas, Michelle; Neely, Jason; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-03-01

    Demand for enhanced cooling technologies within various commercial and consumer applications has increased in recent decades due to electronic devices becoming more energy dense. This study demonstrates jumping-droplet based electric-field-enhanced (EFE) condensation as a potential method to achieve active hot spot cooling in electronic devices. To test the viability of EFE condensation, we developed an experimental setup to remove heat via droplet evaporation from single and multiple high power gallium nitride (GaN) transistors acting as local hot spots (4.6 mm × 2.6 mm). An externally powered circuit was developed to direct jumping droplets from a copper oxide (CuO) nanostructured superhydrophobic surface to the transistor hot spots by applying electric fields between the condensing surface and the transistor. Heat transfer measurements were performed in ambient air (22-25 °C air temperature, 20%-45% relative humidity) to determine the effect of gap spacing (2-4 mm), electric field (50-250 V/cm) and applied heat flux (demonstrated to 13 W/cm2). EFE condensation was shown to enhance the heat transfer from the local hot spot by ≈200% compared to cooling without jumping and by 20% compared to non-EFE jumping. Dynamic switching of the electric field for a two-GaN system reveals the potential for active cooling of mobile hot spots. The opportunity for further cooling enhancement by the removal of non-condensable gases promises hot spot heat dissipation rates approaching 120 W/cm2. This work provides a framework for the development of active jumping droplet based vapor chambers and heat pipes capable of spatial and temporal thermal dissipation control.

  18. Large and Small Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils and Two Simulated Ice Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Wong, See-Cheuk; Rachman, Arief; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2007-01-01

    Water droplet impingement data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for four wings and one wing with two simulated ice shapes. The wings tested include three 36-in. chord wings (MS(1)-317, GLC-305, and a NACA 652-415) and a 57-in. chord Twin Otter horizontal tail section. The simulated ice shapes were 22.5- and 45-min glaze ice shapes for the Twin Otter horizontal tail section generated using the LEWICE 2.2 ice accretion program. The impingement experiments were performed with spray clouds having median volumetric diameters of 11, 21, 79, 137, and 168 mm. Comparisons to the experimental data were generated which showed good agreement for the clean wings and ice shapes at lower drop sizes. For larger drop sizes LEWICE 2.2 over predicted the collection efficiencies due to droplet splashing effects which were not modeled in the program. Also for the more complex glaze ice shapes interpolation errors resulted in the over prediction of collection efficiencies in cove and shadow regions of ice shapes.

  19. Contact Line Instability Caused by Air Rim Formation under Nonsplashing Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Min; Kaneelil, Paul; Kim, Hyoungsoo; Sun, Ying

    2018-05-01

    Drop impact is fundamental to various natural and industrial processes such as rain-induced soil erosion and spray-coating technologies. The recent discovery of the role of air entrainment between the droplet and the impacting surface has produced numerous works, uncovering the unique physics that correlates the air film dynamics with the drop impact outcomes. In this study, we focus on the post-failure air entrainment dynamics for We numbers well below the splash threshold under different ambient pressures and elucidate the interfacial instabilities formed by air entrainment at the wetting front of impacting droplets on perfectly smooth, viscous films of constant thickness. A high-speed total internal reflection microscopy technique accounting for the Fresnel reflection at the drop-air interface allows for in situ measurements of an entrained air rim at the wetting front. The presence of an air rim is found to be a prerequisite to the interfacial instability which is formed when the capillary pressure in the vicinity of the contact line can no longer balance the increasing gas pressure near the wetting front. A critical capillary number for the air rim formation is experimentally identified above which the wetting front becomes unstable where this critical capillary number inversely scales with the ambient pressure. The contact line instabilities at relatively low We numbers ( We ∼ O(10)) observed in this study provide insight into the conventional understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities under drop impact which usually require We ≫ 10.

  20. Colliding droplets: A short film presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1981-12-01

    A series of experiments were performed in which liquid droplets were caused to collide. Impact velocities to several meters per second and droplet diameters up to 600 micrometers were used. The impact parameters in the collisions vary from zero to greater than the sum of the droplet radii. Photographs of the collisions were taken with a high speed framing camera in order to study the impacts and subsequent behavior of the droplets.

  1. Remote sensing of height of a fog layer and temperature of fog droplets using infrared thermometer and meteorological satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Abe, H.

    1998-01-01

    To study meteorological characteristics of cool foggy easterly (Yamase), by which rice production in the Tohoku region was frequently damaged, we measured temperature of the fog layer resulted from Yamase, using infrared thermal indicator and meteorological satellite (HIMAWARI). These temperature data were compared with wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures obtained by a ventilated psychrometer. Generally, the temperature of fog droplets estimated from infrared thermal indicator was higher than the wet-bulb temperature by about 0∼1°C. This result indicates clearly that fog droplets were cooled by evaporation on the droplet surface. Under the conditions that the fog layer is homogeneous in liquid water content and fog droplet size distribution, the height of the fog layer can be estimated by the observation of visibility and relative solar radiation flux. (author)

  2. The dynamics of the water droplet impacting onto hot solid surfaces at medium Weber numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrakusuma, Windy H.; Kamal, Samsul; Indarto; Dyan Susila, M.; Hermawan; Deendarlianto

    2017-10-01

    The effects of the wettability of a droplet impacting onto a hot solid surface under medium Weber numbers were studied experimentally. The Weber numbers used in the present experiment were 52.1, 57.6, and 63.1. Three kinds of solid surfaces with different wettability were used. These were normal stainless steel (NSS), TiO2 coated NSS, and TiO2 coated NSS radiated with ultraviolet rays. The surface temperatures were varied from 60 to 200 °C. The image of side the view and 30° from horizontal were taken to explain the spreading and the interfacial behavior of a single droplet during impact the hot solid surfaces. It was found that under medium Weber numbers, the surface wettability plays an important role on the droplet spreading and evaporation time during the impact on the hot solid surfaces. The higher the wettability, the larger the droplet spreading on the hot surface, and the lower the evaporation time.

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Low-C Medium-Mn Steel in Simulated Marine Immersion and Splash Zone Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dazheng; Gao, Xiuhua; Su, Guanqiao; Du, Linxiu; Liu, Zhenguang; Hu, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of low-C medium-Mn steel in simulated marine immersion and splash zone environment was studied by static immersion corrosion experiment and wet-dry cyclic corrosion experiment, respectively. Corrosion rate, corrosion products, surface morphology, cross-sectional morphology, elemental distribution, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra were used to elucidate the corrosion behavior of low-C medium-Mn steel. The results show that corrosion rate in immersion zone is much less than that in splash zone owing to its relatively mild environment. Manganese compounds are detected in the corrosion products and only appeared in splash zone environment, which can deteriorate the protective effect of rust layer. With the extension of exposure time, corrosion products are gradually transformed into dense and thick corrosion rust from the loose and porous one in these two environments. But in splash zone environment, alloying elements of Mn appear significant enrichment in the rust layer, which decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel.

  4. Some Physics Inside Drying Droplets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    trial applications in food, biochemical or soil sciences. .... Take a metal spoon (or any other surface that does ..... samples. The shape of the suspended particles inside the droplet itself can be used to eliminate the coffee ring effect. For example ...

  5. Vapor-droplet flow equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, C.T.

    1975-01-01

    General features of a vapor-droplet flow are discussed and the equations expressing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for the vapor, liquid, and mixture using the control volume approach are derived. The phenomenological laws describing the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between phases are also reviewed. The results have application to development of water-dominated geothermal resources

  6. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  7. Liquid droplet radiator performance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    By making use of droplets rather than solid surfaces to radiate waste heat in space, the liquid droplet radiator (LDR) achieves a radiating area/mass much larger than that of conventional radiators which use fins or heat pipes. The lightweight potential of the LDR is shown to be limited primarily by the radiative properties of the droplets. The requirement that the LDR heat transfer fluid have a very low vapor pressure limits the choice of fluids to relatively few—several liquid metals and Dow 705 silicone fluid are the only suitable candidates so far identified. An experimental determination of the emittance of submillimeter droplets of Dow 705 fluid indicates than an LDR using this fluid at temperatures of 275-335 K would be ⋍ 10 times lighter than the lightest solid surface radiators. Although several liquid metals appear to offer excellent performance in LDR applications at temperatures between 200 K and 975 K, experimental determination of liquid metal emissivities is needed for a conclusive assessment.

  8. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  9. Spin lattices of walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Pedro; Pucci, Giuseppe; Goujon, Alexis; Dunkel, Jorn; Bush, John

    2017-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the spontaneous emergence of collective behavior in spin lattice of droplets walking on a vibrating fluid bath. The bottom topography consists of relatively deep circular wells that encourage the walking droplets to follow circular trajectories centered at the lattice sites, in one direction or the other. Wave-mediated interactions between neighboring drops are enabled through a thin fluid layer between the wells. The sense of rotation of the walking droplets may thus become globally coupled. When the coupling is sufficiently strong, interactions with neighboring droplets may result in switches in spin that lead to preferred global arrangements, including correlated (all drops rotating in the same direction) or anti-correlated (neighboring drops rotating in opposite directions) states. Analogies with ferromagnetism and anti-ferromagnetism are drawn. Different spatial arrangements are presented in 1D and 2D lattices to illustrate the effects of topological frustration. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants CMMI-1333242 and DMS-1614043.

  10. Some Physics Inside Drying Droplets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 2. Some Physics Inside Drying Droplets. Dileep Mampallil. General Article Volume 19 Issue 2 February 2014 pp 123-134. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/02/0123-0134 ...

  11. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation for growth of fullerene thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Fæster Nielsen, Søren

    C60 fullerene thin films of average thickness of more than 100 nm can be produced in vacuum by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A 355 nm Nd:YAG laser was directed onto a frozen target of anisole with a concentration of 0.67 wt% C60. At laser fluences below 1.5 J/cm2, a dominant...... fraction of the film molecules are C60 transferred to the substrate without any fragmentation. Highresolution SEM images of MAPLE deposited films reveal large circular droplets on the surface with high amount of material concentrated at edges (Fig. 1A). These features, observed over a wide range of laser...... fluences, are caused by ejection of large matrix-fullerene liquid droplets into the gas-phase and subsequent deposition. At similar laser energies, but using an unfocused laser beam, MAPLE favours evaporation of matrix and organic molecules, resulting in production of films with smooth surfaces and minimal...

  12. Evaporative cooling: Effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, G.; Bröde, P.; Hartog, E.A. den; Kuklane, K.; Holmer, I.; Rossi, R.M.; Richards, M.; Farnworth, B.; Wang, X.

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has

  13. Rapid Evaporation of microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2008-11-01

    When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized rapidly. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a growing interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.

  14. Drop evaporation on superhydrophobic PTFE surfaces driven by contact line dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S M M; Dias, J F; Canut, B

    2015-02-15

    In the present study, we experimentally study the evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile drops of water on highly hydrophobic surfaces (contact angle ∼160°), heated to temperatures ranging between 40° and 70 °C. These surfaces were initially constructed by means of controlled tailoring of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The evaporation of droplets was observed to occur in three distinct phases, which were the same for the different substrate temperatures. The drops started to evaporate in the constant contact radius (CCR) mode, then switched to a more complex mode characterized by a set of stick-slip events accompanied by a decrease in contact angle, and finally shifted to a mixed mode in which the contact radius and contact angle decreased simultaneously until the drops had completely evaporated. It is shown that in the case of superhydrophobic surfaces, the energy barriers (per unit length) associated with the stick-slip motion of a drop ranges in the nJ m(-1) scale. Furthermore, analysis of the evaporation rates, determined from experimental data show that, even in the CCR mode, a linear relationship between V(2/3) and the evaporation time is verified. The values of the evaporation rate constants are found to be higher in the pinned contact line regime (the CCR mode) than in the moving contact line regime. This behavior is attributed to the drop's higher surface to volume ratio in the CCR mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulation of oblique evaporating diesel sprays, and comparison with empirical correlations and simulated straight sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, I.A.; Mirza, M.R.; Rashid, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The innovation in software analysis and various available programming facilities have urged the designers at various levels to do indispensable calculations for engine flows. Presently, the 3-D analysis approach is under practice to do simulations for various parameters involving engine operations using various soft wares, 'Fluent' being the trendiest at the moment for CFD modeling. The present work involves CFD modeling of diesel fuel sprays at a specified angle with cylinder axis. Fuel spray modeling includes sub-models for aerodynamic drag, droplet oscillation and distortion, turbulence effects, droplet breakup, evaporation, and droplet collision and coalescence. The data available from existing published work is used to model the fuel spray and the subsequent simulation results are compared to experimental results to test validity of the proposed models. (author)

  16. Hypofolins A - L, ent-Labdane Diterpenoids from the Roots of Hypoestes phyllostachya 'Pink Splash'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bin; Ding, Lin-Fen; Yan, Tong; Xie, Zhang-Qiao; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Song, Liu-Dong; Wu, Xing-De; Zhao, Qin-Shi

    2018-06-01

    Twelve new ent-labdane diterpenoids, hypofolins A - F (1 - 6) and hypofolins G - L (7a/7b, 8a/8b, and 9a/9b), were isolated from the roots of Hypoestes phyllostachya 'Pink Splash'. Their structures were elucidated by extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic and HR-MS data. The absolute configurations of 1, 2, 5, and 7a/7b were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and ECD analysis, as well as chemical transformations. Compounds 7a/7b, 8a/8b, and 9a/9b were isolated as three pairs of interconverting mixture of two isomers between ketone and hemiketal types. Compound 1 showed weak cytotoxicity against SMMC-7721 cell line with IC 50 value of 31.40 μm. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  17. The Investigation of Intermediate Stage of Template Etching with Metal Droplets by Wetting Angle Analysis on (001 GaAs Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyamkina AA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, we study metal droplets on a semiconductor surface that are the initial stage for both droplet epitaxy and local droplet etching. The distributions of droplet geometrical parameters such as height, radius and volume help to understand the droplet formation that strongly influences subsequent nanohole etching. To investigate the etching and intermixing processes, we offer a new method of wetting angle analysis. The aspect ratio that is defined as the ratio of the height to radius was used as an estimation of wetting angle which depends on the droplet material. The investigation of the wetting angle and the estimation of indium content revealed significant materials intermixing during the deposition time. AFM measurements reveal the presence of two droplet groups that is in agreement with nanohole investigations. To explain this observation, we consider arsenic evaporation and consequent change in the initial substrate. On the basis of our analysis, we suggest the model of droplet evolution and the formation of two droplet groups.

  18. Thermal shock and splash effects on burned gypseous soils from the Ebro Basin (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, J.; Seeger, M.; Badía, D.; Peters, P.; Echeverría, M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Fire is a natural factor of landscape evolution in Mediterranean ecosystems. The middle Ebro Valley has extreme aridity, which results in a low plant cover and high soil erodibility, especially on gypseous substrates. The aim of this research is to analyze the effects of moderate heating on physical and chemical soil properties, mineralogical composition and susceptibility to splash erosion. Topsoil samples (15 cm depth) were taken in the Remolinos mountain slopes (Ebro Valley, NE Spain) from two soil types: Leptic Gypsisol (LP) in a convex slope and Haplic Gypsisol (GY) in a concave slope. To assess the heating effects on the mineralogy we burned the soils at 105 and 205 °C in an oven and to assess the splash effects we used a rainfall simulator under laboratory conditions using undisturbed topsoil subsamples (0-5 cm depth of Ah horizon). LP soil has lower soil organic matter (SOM) and soil aggregate stability (SAS) and higher gypsum content than GY soil. Gypsum and dolomite are the main minerals (>80%) in the LP soil, while gypsum, dolomite, calcite and quartz have similar proportions in GY soil. Clay minerals (kaolinite and illite) are scarce in both soils. Heating at 105 °C has no effect on soil mineralogy. However, heating to 205 °C transforms gypsum to bassanite, increases significantly the soil salinity (EC) in both soil units (LP and GY) and decreases pH only in GY soil. Despite differences in the content of organic matter and structural stability, both soils show no significant differences (P pores is reduced by heating, as derived from variations in soil water retention capacity.

  19. Hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops

    OpenAIRE

    Brutin, D.; Rigollet, F.; Niliot, C. Le

    2009-01-01

    Drop evaporation is a simple phenomena but still unclear concerning the mechanisms of evaporation. A common agreement of the scientific community based on experimental and numerical work evidences that most of the evaporation occurs at the triple line. However, the rate of evaporation is still empirically predicted due to the lack of knowledge on the convection cells which develop inside the drop under evaporation. The evaporation of sessile drop is more complicated than it appears due to the...

  20. Control of black hole evaporation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Doyeol

    2007-01-01

    Contradiction between Hawking's semi-classical arguments and the string theory on the evaporation of a black hole has been one of the most intriguing problems in fundamental physics. A final-state boundary condition inside the black hole was proposed by Horowitz and Maldacena to resolve this contradiction. We point out that the original Hawking effect can also be regarded as a separate boundary condition at the event horizon for this scenario. Here, we found that the change of the Hawking boundary condition may affect the information transfer from the initial collapsing matter to the outgoing Hawking radiation during the evaporation process and as a result the evaporation process itself, significantly

  1. Evaporation-induced gas-phase flows at selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirnov, I.; Kotoban, D. V.; Gusarov, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    Selective laser melting is the method for 3D printing from metals. A solid part is built from powder layer-by-layer. A continuum-wave laser beam scans every powder layer to fuse powder. The process is studied with a high-speed CCD camera at the frame rate of 104 fps and the resolution up to 5 µm per pixel. Heat transfer and evaporation in the laser-interaction zone are numerically modeled. Droplets are ejected from the melt pool in the direction around the normal to the melt surface and the powder particles move in the horizontal plane toward the melt pool. A vapor jet is observed in the direction of the normal to the melt surface. The velocities of the droplets, the powder particles, and the jet flow and the mass loss due to evaporation are measured. The gas flow around the vapor jet is calculated by Landau's model of submerged jet. The measured velocities of vapor, droplets, and powder particles correlate with the calculated flow field. The obtained results show the importance of evaporation and the flow of the vapor and the ambient gas. These gas-dynamic phenomena can explain the formation of the denudated zones and the instability at high-energy input.

  2. Introducing ultrasonic falling film evaporator for moderate temperature evaporation enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehbani, Maryam; Rahimi, Masoud

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, Ultrasonic Falling Film (USFF), as a novel technique has been proposed to increase the evaporation rate of moderate temperature liquid film. It is a proper method for some applications which cannot be performed at high temperature, such as foodstuff industry, due to their sensitivity to high temperatures. Evaporation rate of sodium chloride solution from an USFF on an inclined flat plate compared to that for Falling Film without ultrasonic irradiation (FF) at various temperatures was investigated. The results revealed that produced cavitation bubbles have different effects on evaporation rate at different temperatures. At lower temperatures, size fluctuation and collapse of bubbles and in consequence induced physical effects of cavitation bubbles resulted in more turbulency and evaporation rate enhancement. At higher temperatures, the behavior was different. Numerous created bubbles joined together and cover the plate surface, so not only decreased the ultrasound vibrations but also reduced the evaporation rate in comparison with FF. The highest evaporation rate enhancement of 353% was obtained at 40 °C at the lowest Reynolds number of 250. In addition, the results reveal that at temperature of 40 °C, USFF has the highest efficiency compared to FF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of airborne particles during the impact of droplets on a dry surface or on a liquid film; Etude de la mise en suspension de micro-gouttelettes lors de l'impact d'une goutte sur une surface seche ou sur un film liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motzkus, C.; Gensdarmes, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Service d' Etudes et de Recherches en Aerodispersion des polluants et en Confinement, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Motzkus, C.; Gehin, E. [Paris-12 Univ., Centre d' Etudes et de Recherches en Thermique, Environnement et Systeme, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2007-07-01

    The safety analyses of the nuclear facilities require extensive knowledge on the airborne micro-droplet, in order to assess the potential sources of contamination in the case of hypothetical scenarios of accidental falls of liquids caused by leakage or discharge from a container. There are very few data in the literature in the case of the impaction of millimeter-size droplets on the airborne particles. The objective of our work is to study experimentally the emission of the particles during the impaction on a dry or wet plane surface, in order to understand the mechanisms leading to the airborne icles. First experiments are carried out in order to study the airborne particles produced by the free falls of droplet according to the fall height. These results are faced with a semi empirical correlation, which describes the transition between deposition and splash. In the case of a dripping of 3.84 mm-diameter droplets, our results show that the splash occurs for a fall height above 30 cm, which leads to resuspension fractions between 1,9 10{sup -6} at 46 cm and 7,5 10{sup -6} at 80 cm. (authors)

  4. Effect of droplet size on the droplet behavior on the heterogeneous surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ho Yeon; Son, Sung Wan; Ha, ManYeong [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Gap [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The characteristics of a three-dimensional hemispherical droplet on a heterogeneous surface were studied using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The hydrophilic surface has a hydrophobic part at the center. The hemispherical droplets are located at the center of the heterogeneous surface. According to the contact angles of hydrophilic and hydrophobic bottom surfaces, the droplet either separates or reaches a new equilibrium state. The separation time varies according to the change in droplet size, and it affects the status of droplet separation. The droplet separation behavior was investigated by analyzing the velocity vector around the phase boundary line. The shape and separation time of a droplet are determined by the contact angle of each surface. The speed of droplet separation increases as the difference in contact angle increases between the hydrophobic surface and hydrophilic surface. The separation status and the separation time of a droplet are also determined by the change of the droplet size. As the size of the droplet decreases, the effect of surface tension decreases, and the separation time of the droplet also decreases. On the other hand, as the droplet becomes larger, the effect of surface tension increases and the time required for the droplet to separate also increases.

  5. Effects of Fire on Soil Splash Erosion in Semi-steppe Rangelandof Karsanak Region,Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baharlooi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The detachment process can be conceptually divided in two sub-processes included aggregate breakdown (Le Bissonnais, 1996 and movement initiation of breakdown products(Kinnell, 2005. soil detachment depends on raindrop size and mass(Elison, 1944; Bisal, 1960, drop velocity(Elison, 1944; Bisal, 1960, intensity rainfall (Ting et al, 2008, kinetic energy (Kinnell, 2003; Fernandez- Raga et al, 2010, runoff depth(Torri et al, 1987; Kinnell,1991 and 2005, crop covers(Bancy, 1994; Ghahremani et al, 2011, wind speed( Erpul et al, 2000 and experimental area (cup size (Leguedois et al, 2005; Luk, 1979; Torri and poesen, 1988. Many of studies have been conducted to evaluate the relationship between splash and slope (Bryan, 1979; Torri and Poesen, 1992; Wan et al, 1996.Torri and Poesen (1992 expressed that in steep slope the gravity force adds to the drop detaching force and decreases of soil resistance, consequently increases splash erosion rate with increasing slope. Soil splash erosion is also strongly influenced by soil properties including soil particles size distribution (Mazurak and Mosher, 1968; Legout et al, 2005; fan and li, 1993, soil shear strength(Cruse and Larson, 1977; Al-Durrah and Bradford,1981; Ekwue and ohi; 1990 , soil cohesion(Torri et al, 1987, soil organic matter content and aggregate size (Ekwue and Maiduguri, 1991; Qinjuan et al, 2008, soil aggregates stability(Qinjuan et al, 2008, surface crust (Qinjuan et al, 2008. Fire, play an important role in splash erosion. The absence of vegetation cover in disturbed lands accelerates splash erosion rates by as much as several folds compared to undisturbed sites (Lal, 2001; Thomaz and luiz, 2012.The detachment of soil particles by splash depends on several raindrop characteristics, including raindrop size and mass, drop velocity, kinetic energy, and water drop impact angle (Sharma et al., 1993; Singer and Le Bissonnais, 1998; Cruse et al., 2000, Bhattacharyya et al., 2010

  6. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1994-01-04

    An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

  7. The evaporative vector: Homogeneous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klots, C.E.

    1987-05-01

    Molecular beams of van der Waals molecules are the subject of much current research. Among the methods used to form these beams, three-sputtering, laser ablation, and the sonic nozzle expansion of neat gases - yield what are now recognized to be ''warm clusters.'' They contain enough internal energy to undergo a number of first-order processes, in particular that of evaporation. Because of this evaporation and its attendant cooling, the properties of such clusters are time-dependent. The states of matter which can be arrived at via an evaporative vector on a typical laboratory time-scale are discussed. Topics include the (1) temperatures, (2) metastability, (3) phase transitions, (4) kinetic energies of fragmentation, and (5) the expression of magical properties, all for evaporating homogeneous clusters

  8. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C. Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic strain gives rise to quantum rings with square holes and non-uniform ring stripe. Regrowth of quantum dots on these anisotropic quantum rings, Quadra-Quantum Dots (QQDs could be realized. Potential applications of these quantum nanostructures are also discussed.

  9. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J M; Bowick, M J

    2016-03-11

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional.

  10. Can a droplet break up under flow without elongating? Fragmentation of smectic monodisperse droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, L.; Engl, W.; Panizza, P.

    2004-06-01

    We study the fragmentation under shear flow of smectic monodisperse droplets at high volume fraction. Using small angle light scattering and optical microscopy, we reveal the existence of a break-up mechanism for which the droplets burst into daughter droplets of the same size. Surprisingly, this fragmentation process, which is strain controlled and occurs homogeneously in the cell, does not require any transient elongation of the droplets. Systematic experiments as a function of the initial droplet size and the applied shear rate show that the rupture is triggered by an instability of the inner droplet structure.

  11. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M

    2005-01-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to

  12. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lance, Blake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ho, Clifford K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0°, 10°, and 45°), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47° contact angle and non-wetting = 93° contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of ~3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45° tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  13. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni; Accardo, Angelo; Benseny-Cases, Nú ria; Burghammer, Manfred C.; Castillo-Michel, Hiram A.; Cotte, Marine; Dante, Silvia; De Angelis, Francesco De; Di Cola, Emanuela; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Pinning of the Contact Line during Evaporation on Heterogeneous Surfaces: Slowdown or Temporary Immobilization? Insights from a Nanoscale Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Leroy, Frédéric

    2015-07-14

    The question of the effect of surface heterogeneities on the evaporation of liquid droplets from solid surfaces is addressed through nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The mechanism behind contact line pinning which is still unclear is discussed in detail on the nanoscale. Model systems with the Lennard-Jones interaction potential were employed to study the evaporation of nanometer-sized cylindrical droplets from a flat surface. The heterogeneity of the surface was modeled through alternating stripes of equal width but two chemical types. The first type leads to a contact angle of 67°, and the other leads to a contact angle of 115°. The stripe width was varied between 2 and 20 liquid-particle diameters. On the surface with the narrowest stripes, evaporation occurred at constant contact angle as if the surface was homogeneous, with a value of the contact angle as predicted by the regular Cassie-Baxter equation. When the width was increased, the contact angle oscillated during evaporation between two boundaries whose values depend on the stripe width. The evaporation behavior was thus found to be a direct signature of the typical size of the surface heterogeneity domains. The contact angle both at equilibrium and during evaporation could be predicted from a local Cassie-Baxter equation in which the surface composition within a distance of seven fluid-particle diameters around the contact line was considered, confirming the local nature of the interactions that drive the wetting behavior of droplets. More importantly, we propose a nanoscale explanation of pinning during evaporation. Pinning should be interpreted as a drastic slowdown of the contact line dynamics rather than a complete immobilization of it during a transition between two contact angle boundaries.

  16. [Micro-droplet characterization and its application for amino acid detection in droplet microfluidic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiling; Dong, Libing; Tu, Ran; Du, Wenbin; Ji, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the droplet microfluidic system attracts interests due to its high throughput and low cost to detect and screen. The picoliter micro-droplets from droplet microfluidics are uniform with respect to the size and shape, and could be used as monodispensed micro-reactors for encapsulation and detection of single cell or its metabolites. Therefore, it is indispensable to characterize micro-droplet and its application from droplet microfluidic system. We first constructed the custom-designed droplet microfluidic system for generating micro-droplets, and then used the micro-droplets to encapsulate important amino acids such as glutamic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine to test the droplets' properties, including the stability, diffusivity and bio-compatibility for investigating its application for amino acid detection and sorting. The custom-designed droplet microfluidic system could generate the uniformed micro-droplets with a controllable size between 20 to 50 microm. The micro-droplets could be stable for more than 20 h without cross-contamination or fusion each other. The throughput of detection and sorting of the system is about 600 micro-droplets per minute. This study provides a high-throughput platform for the analysis and screening of amino acid-producing microorganisms.

  17. DNS of spark ignition and edge flame propagation in turbulent droplet-laden mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neophytou, A.; Mastorakos, E.; Cant, R.S. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    A parametric study of forced ignition at the mixing layer between air and air carrying fine monosized fuel droplets is done through one-step chemistry direct numerical simulations to determine the influence of the size and volatility of the droplets, the spark location, the droplet-air mixing layer initial thickness and the turbulence intensity on the ignition success and the subsequent flame propagation. The propagation is analyzed in terms of edge flame displacement speed, which has not been studied before for turbulent edge spray flames. Spark ignition successfully resulted in a tribrachial flame if enough fuel vapour was available at the spark location, which occurred when the local droplet number density was high. Ignition was achieved even when the spark was offset from the spray, on the air side, due to the diffusion of heat from the spark, provided droplets evaporated rapidly. Large kernels were obtained by sparking close to the spray, since fuel was more readily available. At long times after the spark, for all flames studied, the probability density function of the displacement speed was wide, with a mean value in the range 0.55-0.75S{sub L}, with S{sub L} the laminar burning velocity of a stoichiometric gaseous premixed flame. This value is close to the mean displacement speed in turbulent edge flames with gaseous fuel. The displacement speed was negatively correlated with curvature. The detrimental effect of curvature was attenuated with a large initial kernel and by increasing the thickness of the mixing layer. The mixing layer was thicker when evaporation was slow and the turbulence intensity higher. However, high turbulence intensity also distorted the kernel which could lead to high values of curvature. The edge flame reaction component increased when the maximum temperature coincided with the stoichiometric contour. The results are consistent with the limited available experimental evidence and provide insights into the processes associated with

  18. Lake Nasser evaporation reduction study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala M.I. Ebaid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the reduction of evaporation of Lake Nasser’s water caused by disconnecting (fully or partially some of its secondary channels (khors. This evaluation integrates remote sensing, Geographic Information System (GIS techniques, aerodynamic principles, and Landsat7 ETM+ images. Three main procedures were carried out in this study; the first derived the surface temperature from Landsat thermal band; the second derived evaporation depth and approximate evaporation volume for the entire lake, and quantified evaporation loss to the secondary channels’ level over one month (March by applied aerodynamic principles on surface temperature of the raster data; the third procedure applied GIS suitability analysis to determine which of these secondary channels (khors should be disconnected. The results showed evaporation depth ranging from 2.73 mm/day at the middle of the lake to 9.58 mm/day at the edge. The evaporated water-loss value throughout the entire lake was about 0.86 billion m3/month (March. The analysis suggests that it is possible to save an approximate total evaporation volume loss of 19.7 million m3/month (March, and thus 2.4 billion m3/year, by disconnecting two khors with approximate construction heights of 8 m and 15 m. In conclusion, remote sensing and GIS are useful for applications in remote locations where field-based information is not readily available and thus recommended for decision makers remotely planning in water conservation and management.

  19. Experimental test of liquid droplet radiator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, A. T.; Simon, M. A.

    The liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is a heat rejection system for space power systems wherein an array of heated liquid droplets radiates energy directly to space. The use of submillimeter droplets provides large radiating area-to-mass ratio, resulting in radiator systems which are several times lighter than conventional solid surface radiators. An experiment is described in which the power radiated by an array of 2300 streams of silicone oil droplets is measured to test a previously developed theory of the LDR radiation process. This system would be capable of rejecting several kW of heat in space. Furthermore, it would be suitable as a modular unit of an LDR designed for 100-kW power levels. The experiment provided confirmation of the theoretical dependence of droplet array emissivity on optical depth. It also demonstrated the ability to create an array of more than 1000 droplet streams having a divergence less than 1 degree.

  20. A parameterization of cloud droplet nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghan, S.J.; Chuang, C.; Penner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Droplet nucleation is a fundamental cloud process. The number of aerosols activated to form cloud droplets influences not only the number of aerosols scavenged by clouds but also the size of the cloud droplets. Cloud droplet size influences the cloud albedo and the conversion of cloud water to precipitation. Global aerosol models are presently being developed with the intention of coupling with global atmospheric circulation models to evaluate the influence of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions on climate. If these and other coupled models are to address issues of aerosol-cloud interactions, the droplet nucleation process must be adequately represented. Here we introduce a droplet nucleation parametrization that offers certain advantages over the popular Twomey (1959) parameterization

  1. Water Entry by a Train of Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Huang, Xin; Chan, Chon U.; Frommhold, Philipp Erhard; Lippert, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The impact of single droplets on a deep pool is a well-studied phenomenon which reveals reach fluid mechanics. Lesser studied is the impact of a train of droplet and the accompanied formation of largely elongated cavities, in particular for well controlled droplets. The droplets with diameters of 20-40 μm and velocities of approx. 20 m/s are generated with a piezo-actuated nozzle at rates of 200-300 kHz. Individual droplets are selected by electric charging and deflection and the impact is visualized with stroboscopic photography and high-speed videos. We study in particular the formation and shape of the cavity as by varying the number of droplets from one to 64. The cavities reach centimetres in length with lateral diameters of the order of 100 of micrometres.

  2. Optomechanics in a Levitated Droplet of Superfluid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Charles; Harris, Glen; Harris, Jack

    2017-04-01

    A critical issue common to all optomechanical systems is dissipative coupling to the environment, which limits the system's quantum coherence. Superfluid helium's extremely low optical and mechanical dissipation, as well as its high thermal conductivity and its ability cool itself via evaporation, makes the mostly uncharted territory of superfluid optomechanics an exciting avenue for exploring quantum effects in macroscopic objects. I will describe ongoing work that aims to exploit the unique properties of superfluid helium by constructing an optomechanical system consisting of a magnetically levitated droplet of superfluid helium., The optical whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the droplet, as well as the mechanical oscillations of its surface, should offer exceptionally low dissipation, and should couple to each other via the usual optomechanical interactions. I will present recent progress towards this goal, and also discuss the background for this work, which includes prior demonstrations of magnetic levitation of superfluid helium, high finesse WGMs in liquid drops, and the self-cooling of helium drops in vacuum.

  3. Preventing droplet deformation during dielectrophoretic centering of a compound emulsion droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Greg; Blue, Brent

    2012-11-01

    Compound droplets, or droplets-within-droplets, are traditionally key components in applications ranging from drug delivery to the food industry. Presently, millimeter-sized compound droplets are precursors for shell targets in inertial fusion energy work. However, a key constraint in target fabrication is a uniform shell wall thickness, which in turn requires a centered core droplet in the compound droplet precursor. Previously, Bei et al. (2009, 2010) have shown that compound droplets could be centered in a static fluid using an electric field of 0.7 kV/cm at 20 MHz. Randall et al. (2012) developed a process to center the core of a moving compound droplet, though the ~kV/cm field induced small (fluid mechanics and interfacial rheology perspective and we discuss the effective interfacial charge from an emulsifier and its impact on centering. Work funded by General Atomics Internal R&D.

  4. LHC Beam Splash seen by the ATLAS detector - 7 Apr 2015 - Run 260466 - LB 731 - Event 16848

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, EXPERIMENT

    2015-01-01

    Event display of a collimator "splash" event seen by the ATLAS experiment in LHC Run-2, on Tuesday April the 7th 2015: event 16848, run 260466. The collimator position is 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point. The figure on the left shows an axial view of the various components of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter.

  5. A Ghost Fluid/Level Set Method for boiling flows and liquid evaporation: Application to the Leidenfrost effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Alis, Romain; Lepilliez, Mathieu; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase change, in the framework of interface capturing or interface tracking methods, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method, which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. Indeed, in some specific situations involving very heterogeneous thermodynamic conditions at the interface, the distinction between boiling and evaporation is not always possible. For instance, it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate whose temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. The situation can also be ambiguous for a superheated droplet or at the contact line between a liquid and a hot wall whose temperature is higher than the saturation temperature of the liquid. In these situations, the interface temperature can locally reach the saturation temperature (boiling point), for instance near a contact line, and be cooler in other places. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Standard numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accuracy validations against theoretical solutions and experimental results to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  6. The collaborative work of droplet assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Goodman, Joel M

    2017-10-01

    Three proteins have been implicated in the assembly of cytoplasmic lipid droplets: seipin, FIT2, and perilipin. This review examines the current theories of seipin function as well as the evidence for the involvement of all three proteins in droplet biogenesis, and ends with a proposal of how they collaborate to regulate the formation of droplets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent Advances in Lipid Droplet Biology edited by Rosalind Coleman and Matthijs Hesselink. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Droplet size in a rectangular Venturi scrubber

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, M. A. M.; Henrique, P. R.; Gonçalves, J. A. S.; Coury, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The Venturi scrubber is a device which uses liquid in the form of droplets to efficiently remove fine particulate matter from gaseous streams. Droplet size is of fundamental importance for the scrubber performance. In the present experimental study, a laser diffraction technique was used in order to measure droplet size in situ in a Venturi scrubber with a rectangular cross section. Droplet size distribution was measured as a function of gas velocity (58.3 to 74.9 m/s), liquid-to-gas ratio (0...

  8. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  9. Calculation and measurement of fog droplet size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laali, A.R.; Courant, J.J.; Kleitz, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements involved in calculation and measurement of fog droplet size in steam turbines. The condensation calculations are performed for a 600 MW LP fossil fired, and for a 900 MW LP nuclear turbine. A simplified method based on classical condensation theory is used for these calculations. The fog droplet size measurement are carried out downstream of the last moving blades of these turbines in order to validate the program. The comparison between the results could lead to a better understanding of the condensation process in steam turbines. Some large droplet (re-entrained droplet) measurements are also taken using a microvideo probe

  10. Colliding droplets: a short film presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed in which liquid droplets were caused to collide. Impact velocities to several meters per second and droplet diameters up to 600 micrometers were used. The impact parameters in the collisions vary from zero to greater than the sum of the droplet radii. Photographs of the collisions were taken with a high speed framing camera in order to study the impacts and subsequent behavior of the droplets. The experiments will be discussed and a short movie film presentation of some of the impacts will be shown

  11. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaechamud T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thawatchai Phaechamud,1 Sarun Tuntarawongsa2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Pharmaceutical Intelligence Unit Prachote Plengwittaya, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand Abstract: Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (Tg of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and -31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. Keywords

  12. 2D-SPLASH spectroscopy to determine the fat/water ratio in the muscle of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koestler, H.; Kenn, W.; Huemmer, C.; Hahn, D.; Boehm, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The degree of fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff is an important factor for the prognosis of an operative reconstruction after rotator cuff tear. The aim of this work was to develop a method using a clinical MR scanner that allows the quantification of the fat/water ratio with the necessary spatial resolution. Method: A SPLASH sequence consisting of 19 complex 2D-FLASH images was implemented on a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner. The echo time was gradually increased from 5.0 ms to 50.0 ms. A spatial in plane resolution of 1.17 mm, a spectral resolution of 0.33 ppm and a spectral width of 6.25 ppm were achieved in a total acquisition time of about 3 min. The quantitative evaluation of the spectra in arbitrarily shaped regions of interest (ROIs) was obtained using a home-built reconstruction program and the time domain fit program AMARES. Results: Phantom studies show a linear relation of the concentration determined by SPLASH spectroscopy (r=0.997). Because of the high spatial resolution and the possibility to evaluate arbitrarily shaped ROIs, the determination of the fat/water ratio in single muscles in the shoulder has been possible. Conclusions: By the use of the 2D-SPLASH sequence the degree of fatty infiltration in the rotator cuff can now be determined quantitatively for the first time. (orig.) [de

  13. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-12-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  14. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  15. Internal Stellar Kinematics of M32 from the SPLASH Survey: Dark Halo Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, K. M.; Guhathakurta, P.; van der Marel, R.; Geha, M.; Kalirai, J.; Yniguez, B.; Kirby, E.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Gilbert, K.

    2013-03-01

    As part of the SPLASH survey of the Andromeda (M31) system, we have obtained Keck/DEIMOS spectra of the compact elliptical (cE) satellite M32. This is the first resolved-star kinematical study of any cE galaxy. In contrast to most previous kinematical studies that extended out to r information to account statistically for M31 contamination. The rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile extend well beyond the radius (r ~ 150'') where the isophotes are distorted. Unlike NGC 205, another close dwarf companion of M31, M32's kinematics appear regular and symmetric and do not show obvious sharp gradients across the region of isophotal elongation and twists. We interpret M31's kinematics using three-integral axisymmetric dynamical equilibrium models constructed using Schwarzschild's orbit superposition technique. Models with a constant mass-to-light ratio can fit the data remarkably well. However, since such a model requires an increasing tangential anisotropy with radius, invoking the presence of an extended dark halo may be more plausible. Such an extended dark halo is definitely required to bind a half-dozen fast-moving stars observed at the largest radii, but these stars may not be an equilibrium component of M32. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. Slip of Spreading Viscoplastic Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Balmforth, Neil J; Stoeber, Boris

    2015-11-10

    The spreading of axisymmetric viscoplastic droplets extruded slowly on glass surfaces is studied experimentally using shadowgraphy and swept-field confocal microscopy. The microscopy furnishes vertical profiles of the radial velocity using particle image velocimetry (PIV) with neutrally buoyant tracers seeded in the fluid. Experiments were conducted for two complex fluids: aqueous solutions of Carbopol and xanthan gum. On untreated glass surfaces, PIV demonstrates that both fluids experience a significant amount of effective slip. The experiments were repeated on glass that had been treated to feature positive surface charges, thereby promoting adhesion between the negatively charged polymeric constituents of the fluids and the glass surface. The Carbopol and xanthan gum droplets spread more slowly on the treated surface and to a smaller radial distance. PIV demonstrated that this reduced spreading was associated with a substantial reduction in slip. For Carbopol, the effective slip could be eliminated entirely to within the precision of the PIV measurements; the reduction in slip was less effective for xanthan gum, with a weak slip velocity remaining noticeable.

  17. Method for Measuring Cooling Efficiency of Water Droplets Impinging onto Hot Metal Discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Søreng Bjørge

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work outlines a method for measuring the cooling efficiency of droplets impinging onto hot metal discs in the temperature range of 85 °C to 400 °C, i.e., covering the boiling regimes experienced when applying water to heated objects in fires. Stainless steel and aluminum test discs (with 50-mm diameter, 10-mm thickness, and a surface roughness of Ra 0.4 or Ra 3 were suspended horizontally by four thermocouples that were used to record disc temperatures. The discs were heated by a laboratory burner prior to the experiments, and left to cool with and without applying 2.4-mm diameter water droplets to the discs while the disc temperatures were recorded. The droplets were generated by the acceleration of gravity from a hypodermic injection needle, and hit the disc center at a speed of 2.2 m/s and a rate of 0.02 g/s, i.e., about three droplets per second. Based on the recorded rate of the temperature change, as well as disc mass and disc heat capacity, the absolute droplet cooling effect and the relative cooling efficiency relative to complete droplet evaporation were obtained. There were significant differences in the cooling efficiency as a function of temperature for the two metals investigated, but there was no statistically significant difference with respect to whether the surface roughness was Ra 0.4 or Ra 3. Aluminum showed a higher cooling efficiency in the temperature range of 110 °C to 140 °C, and a lower cooling efficiency in the temperature range of 180 °C to 300 °C compared to stainless steel. Both metals gave a maximum cooling efficiency in the range of 75% to 85%. A minimum of 5% cooling efficiency was experienced for the aluminum disc at 235 °C, i.e., the observed Leidenfrost point. However, stainless steel did not give a clear minimum in cooling efficiency, which was about 12–14% for disc temperatures above 300 °C. This simple and straightforward technique is well suited for assessing the cooling efficiency of

  18. Experimental test of liquid droplet radiator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Simon, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is evolving rapidly as a lightweight system for heat rejection in space power systems. By using recirculating free streams of submillimeter droplets to radiate waste energy directly to space, the LDR can potentially be an order of magnitude lighter than conventional radiator systems which radiate from solid surfaces. The LDR is also less vulnerable to micrometeoroid damage than are conventional radiators, and it has a low transport volume. Three major development issues of this new heat rejection system are the ability to direct the droplet streams with sufficient precision to avoid fluid loss, radiative performance of the array of droplet streams which comprise the radiating elements of the LDR, and the efficacy of the droplet stream collector, again with respect to fluid loss. This paper reports experimental results bearing on the first two issues - droplet aiming in a multikilowatt-sized system, and radiated power from a large droplet array. Parallel efforts on droplet collection and LDR system design are being pursued by several research groups

  19. Multicomponent droplet vaporization in a convecting environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megaridis, C.M.; Sirignano, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a parametric study of the fundamental exchange processes for energy, mass and momentum between the liquid and gas phases of multicomponent liquid vaporizing droplets is presented. The model, which examines an isolated, vaporizing, multicomponent droplet in an axisymmetric, convecting environment, considers the different volatilities of the liquid components, the alteration of the liquid-phase properties due to the spatial/temporal variations of the species concentrations and also the effects of multicomponent diffusion. In addition, the model accounts for variable thermophysical properties, surface blowing and droplet surface regression due to vaporization, transient droplet heating with internal liquid circulation, and finally droplet deceleration with respect to the free flow due to drag. The numerical calculation employs finite-difference techniques and an iterative solution procedure that provides time-varying spatially-resolved data for both phases. The effects of initial droplet composition, ambient temperature, initial Reynolds number (based on droplet diameter), and volatility differential between the two liquid components are investigated for a liquid droplet consisting of two components with very different volatilities. It is found that mixtures with higher concentration of the less volatile substance actually vaporize faster on account of intrinsically higher liquid heating rates

  20. Fast electric control of the droplet size in a microfluidic T-junction droplet generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeian, Mostafa; Hardt, Steffen

    2018-05-01

    The effect of DC electric fields on the generation of droplets of water and xanthan gum solutions in sunflower oil at a microfluidic T-junction is experimentally studied. The electric field leads to a significant reduction of the droplet diameter, by about a factor of 2 in the case of water droplets. The droplet size can be tuned by varying the electric field strength, an effect that can be employed to produce a stream of droplets with a tailor-made size sequence. Compared to the case of purely hydrodynamic droplet production without electric fields, the electric control has about the same effect on the droplet size if the electric stress at the liquid/liquid interface is the same as the hydrodynamic stress.