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Sample records for spitzer finds water

  1. FINDING η CAR ANALOGS IN NEARBY GALAXIES USING SPITZER. I. CANDIDATE SELECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The late-stage evolution of the most massive stars such as η Carinae is controlled by the effects of mass loss, which may be dominated by poorly understood eruptive mass ejections. Understanding this population is challenging because no true analogs of η Car have been clearly identified in the Milky Way or other galaxies. We utilize Spitzer IRAC images of seven nearby (∼ 10 5 L ☉ in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8.0 μm) and are not known to be background sources. Based on our estimates for the expected number of background sources, we expect that follow-up observations will show that most of these candidates are not dust enshrouded massive stars, with an expectation of only 6 ± 6 surviving candidates. Since we would detect true analogs of η Car for roughly 200 years post-eruption, this implies that the rate of eruptions like η Car is less than the core-collapse supernova rate. It is possible, however, that every M > 40 M ☉ star undergoes such eruptions given our initial results. In Paper II we will characterize the candidates through further analysis and follow-up observations, and there is no barrier to increasing the galaxy sample by an order of magnitude. The primary limitation of the present search is that Spitzer's resolution limits us to the shorter wavelength IRAC bands. With the James Webb Space Telescope, such surveys can be carried out at the far more optimal wavelengths of 10-30 μm, allowing identification of η Car analogs for millennia rather than centuries post-eruption.

  2. Waters, dust evolution in protoplanetary disks around herbig ae/be stars—the spitzer view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juhász, A.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th.; Acke, B.; Van Den Ancker, M.; Meeus, G.; Dominik, C.; Min, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/277318416; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Waters, L.B.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present mid-infrared spectra of a comprehensive set of Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The signal-to-noise ratio of these spectra is very high, ranging between about a hundred and several hundreds. During the analysis of these data we tested the

  3. Spitzer Observations of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 During Deep Impact : Water and Dust Production and Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft encountered comet 9P/Tempel 1 on July 4th, 2005 (rh = 1.506 AU). Spectral maps covering 20'' x 67'' (1.85''/pixel) were acquired with the IRS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope (ΔSpitzer = 0.72 AU) at different times around the Deep Impact event: twice before impact (TI-41.3hrs and TI-22.9hrs) and twelve times after impact (between TI+0.67hrs and TI+1027hrs). These IRS observations (Lisse et al 2006, Sciences 313, 635) were taken from the Spitzer data archive. We present the interpretation of 5.2-7.6 µm spectra obtained in the second order of the short-wavelength module (SL2). To reduce the contribution of artifacts in the spectra, 5x5 pixel extraction apertures (9.25''x9.25'') were used. On the first stage we studied the water ν2 vibrational band emission at 6.4µm, which is present in most spectra. The water production rate before impact is deduced ( 4.25e27 molecules/sec). In order to study both the amount and origin of the water molecules released after impact, we used extractions centered on the nucleus and along the length of the slit. We analyzed the spatial distribution of water and its time evolution with a time-dependent model which describes the evolution of the water cloud after impact. The underlying continuum in the spectra provides information on the evolution and color temperature of the dust ejecta. The dust mass and dust/gas ratio in the ejecta cloud are derived and compared with other values published in the literature.

  4. Spitzer Telemetry Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanboli, Alice; Martinez, Elmain M.; McAuley, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Telemetry Processing System (SirtfTlmProc) was designed to address objectives of JPL's Multi-mission Image Processing Lab (MIPL) in processing spacecraft telemetry and distributing the resulting data to the science community. To minimize costs and maximize operability, the software design focused on automated error recovery, performance, and information management. The system processes telemetry from the Spitzer spacecraft and delivers Level 0 products to the Spitzer Science Center. SirtfTlmProc is a unique system with automated error notification and recovery, with a real-time continuous service that can go quiescent after periods of inactivity. The software can process 2 GB of telemetry and deliver Level 0 science products to the end user in four hours. It provides analysis tools so the operator can manage the system and troubleshoot problems. It automates telemetry processing in order to reduce staffing costs.

  5. Emission from water vapor and absorption from other gases at 5-7.5 μm in Spitzer-IRS Spectra Of Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, B. A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Forrest, W.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Richter, I.; Tayrien, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); D' Alessio, P.; Calvet, N. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Green, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Pontoppidan, K., E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph 5-7.5 μm spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 μm due to the ν{sub 2} = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures >500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other 6 of the 13 stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 μm, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.

  6. Exoplanet Characterization With Spitzer Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    attempts about 50 different analyses per observation, permuting different photometry aperture sizes, centering methods, and systematic models to find the best according to the standard deviation of normalized residuals and the Akaike and Bayesian Information Criteria. As a demonstration of its ease of use, two undergraduates have recently led papers based on the pipeline. The team now seeks funds for graduate student Patricio Cubillos, who is already trained and working (e.g., Cubillos et al. 2011). He will lead 1-2 secondary eclipse papers per year, based on our recent output. Three undergraduates will handle routine tasks and produce between them about one paper per year. The PI and a programmer are also supported. Our long-term goal is to produce a statistical sample of exoplanet secondary eclipses at wavelengths inaccessible to facilities other than Spitzer. These measure properties of exoplanetary atmospheres and orbits. Each planet is of significant intrinsic interest. In addition, an aggregate plot of planetary brightness vs. equilibrium temperature shows a significant jump in brightness near 2000 K. We will explore this and other results of aggregation, such as why some hot planets do or do not have thermal inversions, and under what circumstances photochemistry is important. There will be three main products from this grant: 1. Secondary eclipse analyses for 11 planets, including assessment of inversions, abundances, and thermal profiles. 2. Aggregate data analyses related to the brightness jump, which planets have thermal inversions and disequilibrium chemistry, and whether stellar metallicity, surface gravity, etc., affect the emitted fluxes. 3. Statistical enhancements to our open-source code for retrieving atmospheric composition and thermal profiles from eclipse data, using the method of Madhusudhan and Seager.

  7. Spitzer Spies Spectacular Sombrero

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2 NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope set its infrared eyes on one of the most famous objects in the sky, Messier 104, also called the Sombrero galaxy. In this striking infrared picture, Spitzer sees an exciting new view of a galaxy that in visible light has been likened to a 'sombrero,' but here looks more like a 'bulls-eye.' Recent observations using Spitzer's infrared array camera uncovered the bright, smooth ring of dust circling the galaxy, seen in red. In visible light, because this galaxy is seen nearly edge-on, only the near rim of dust can be clearly seen in silhouette. Spitzer's full view shows the disk is warped, which is often the result of a gravitational encounter with another galaxy, and clumpy areas spotted in the far edges of the ring indicate young star-forming regions. Spitzer's infrared view of the starlight from this galaxy, seen in blue, can pierce through obscuring murky dust that dominates in visible light. As a result, the full extent of the bulge of stars and an otherwise hidden disk of stars within the dust ring are easily seen. The Sombrero galaxy is located some 28 million light years away. Viewed from Earth, it is just six degrees south of its equatorial plane. Spitzer detected infrared emission not only from the ring, but from the center of the galaxy too, where there is a huge black hole, believed to be a billion times more massive than our Sun. This picture is composed of four images taken at 3.6 (blue), 4.5 (green), 5.8 (orange), and 8.0 (red) microns. The contribution from starlight (measured at 3.6 microns) has been subtracted from the 5.8 and 8-micron images to enhance the visibility of the dust features. In figure 1, the new picture of Messier 104 combines a recent infrared observation from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope with a well-known visible light image from the

  8. Spitzer - Hot & Colorful Student Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, D.; Rebull, L. M.; DeWolf, C.; Guastella, P.; Johnson, C. H.; Schaefers, J.; Spuck, T.; McDonald, J. G., III; DeWolf, T.; Brock, S.; Boerma, J.; Bemis, G.; Paulsen, K.; Yueh, N.; Peter, A.; Wassmer, W.; Haber, R.; Scaramucci, A.; Butchart, J.; Holcomb, A.; Karns, B.; Kennedy, S.; Siegel, R.; Weiser, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this poster, we present the results of several activities developed for the general science student to explore infrared light. The first activity involved measuring infrared radiation using an updated version of Newton's experiment of splitting white light and finding IR radiation. The second used Leslie's cube to allow students to observe different radiators, while the third used a modern infrared thermometer to measure and identify IR sources in an enclosed box. The last activity involved students making false-color images from narrow-band filter images from data sets from Spitzer Space Telescope, STScI Digitized Sky Survey and other sources. Using computer programs like Adobe Photoshop and free software such as ds9, Spot and Leopard, poster-like images were created by the students. This research is funded by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Please see our companion poster, Johnson et al., on the science aspect of this program, and another poster on the educational aspects, Guastella et al.

  9. Scheduling Spitzer: The SIRPASS Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittman, David S.; Hawkins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was launched on August 25, 2003 from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Base. Drifting in a unique Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, Spitzer sees an optically invisible universe dominated by dust and stars. Since 1997, the Spitzer Integrated Resource Planning and Scheduling System (SIRPASS) has helped produce spacecraft activity plans for the Spitzer Space Telescope. SIRPASS is used by members of the Observatory Planning and Scheduling Team to plan, schedule and sequence the Telescope from data made available to them from the science and engineering community. Because of the volume of data that needs to be scheduled, SIRPASS offers a variety of automated assistants to aid in this task. This paper will describe the functional elements of the SIRPASS software system -- emphasizing the role that automation plays in the system -- and will highlight lessons learned for the software developer from a decade of Spitzer Space Telescope operations experience.

  10. A Spitzer IRS Study of Comets 71P/Clark and C/2004 B1 (LINEAR): Water, Carbonates, PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Charles E.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Kelley, M. S.; Wooden, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    Production rates of volatiles are used to quantify cometary activity and to measure volatile abundances. Water is the dominant ice in cometary nuclei and its sublimation governs the activity of comets at heliocentric distances, Lisse et al. 2007, Icarus 187, 69 as reviewed by Crovisier and Bockelee-Morvan 2008, Icarus 195, 938) for comets 9P/Tempel 1 and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Support for this work provided in part by NASA through contracts 1263741, 1256406, and 1215746 issued by JPL/Caltech to the University of Minnesota, and the National Science Foundation grant AST-0706980.

  11. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as pink dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming. Red shows heated dust that pervades the region's cavities, while green highlights dense clouds. W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours. Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars. This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities. This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  12. Temporal Evolution of Water and Dust in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the Deep Impact Event, as Observed from Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.; Wooden, D. H.

    2010-10-01

    The Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft encountered comet 9P/Tempel 1 on July 4th, 2005. The spacecraft released an impactor that collided with the comet nucleus and excavated (possibly unprocessed) cometary material in a prominent ejecta plume. Spectral maps covering 20'' x 67'' (1.85''/pixel) were acquired with the IRS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope at different times around the DI event: twice before impact (TI-41.3hrs and TI-22.9hrs) and twelve times after impact (between TI+0.67hrs and TI+1027hrs). These IRS observations are stored in the Spitzer data archive and presented by Lisse et al. (2006, Science 313, 635). We present the interpretation of 5.2-7.6 micrometer spectra obtained in the second order of the short-wavelength module (SL2). To reduce the contribution of artifacts in the spectra, 5x5 pixel extraction apertures (9.25''x9.25'') were used. The underlying continuum in the spectra provides information on the grain size distribution and color temperature of the dust ejecta. In order to determine the grain size distribution, we assumed that ejecta consist of a composition of both amorphous carbon and silicates. The grains are assumed to be spherical with sizes in range from 0.1 to 100 micrometers. We used the Mie theory to calculate the optical properties of each material and the temperature of the grain. We constrained the grain size distribution and velocities from the spectra and the temporal evolution of the dust flux. The dust mass and dust/gas ratio in the ejecta cloud are also derived and compared with other values published in the literature.

  13. Spitzer Digs Up Galactic Fossil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 This false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a globular cluster previously hidden in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Globular clusters are compact bundles of old stars that date back to the birth of our galaxy, 13 or so billion years ago. Astronomers use these galactic 'fossils' as tools for studying the age and formation of the Milky Way. Most clusters orbit around the center of the galaxy well above its dust-enshrouded disc, or plane, while making brief, repeated passes through the plane that each last about a million years. Spitzer, with infrared eyes that can see into the dusty galactic plane, first spotted the newfound cluster during its current pass. A visible-light image (inset of Figure 1) shows only a dark patch of sky. The red streak behind the core of the cluster is a dust cloud, which may indicate the cluster's interaction with the Milky Way. Alternatively, this cloud may lie coincidentally along Spitzer's line of sight. Follow-up observations with the University of Wyoming Infrared Observatory helped set the distance of the new cluster at about 9,000 light-years from Earth - closer than most clusters - and set the mass at the equivalent of 300,000 Suns. The cluster's apparent size, as viewed from Earth, is comparable to a grain of rice held at arm's length. It is located in the constellation Aquila. Astronomers believe that this cluster may be one of the last in our galaxy to be uncovered. This image composite was taken on April 21, 2004, by Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). Galactic Fossil Found Behind Curtain of Dust In Figure 2, the image mosaic shows the same patch of sky in various wavelengths of light. While the visible-light image (left) shows a dark sky speckled

  14. SPITZER TRANSITS OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ1214b AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraine, Jonathan D.; Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Gillon, Michaeel; Jehin, Emmanueel [Institute d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium); Demory, Brice-Olivier; Benneke, Bjoern; Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Knutson, Heather [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Desert, Jean-Michel, E-mail: jfraine@astro.umd.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We observed the transiting super-Earth exoplanet GJ1214b using warm Spitzer at 4.5 {mu}m wavelength during a 20 day quasi-continuous sequence in 2011 May. The goals of our long observation were to accurately define the infrared transit radius of this nearby super-Earth, to search for the secondary eclipse, and to search for other transiting planets in the habitable zone of GJ1214. We here report results from the transit monitoring of GJ1214b, including a reanalysis of previous transit observations by Desert et al. In total, we analyze 14 transits of GJ1214b at 4.5 {mu}m, 3 transits at 3.6 {mu}m, and 7 new ground-based transits in the I+z band. Our new Spitzer data by themselves eliminate cloudless solar composition atmospheres for GJ1214b, and methane-rich models from Howe and Burrows. Using our new Spitzer measurements to anchor the observed transit radii of GJ1214b at long wavelengths, and adding new measurements in I+z, we evaluate models from Benneke and Seager and Howe and Burrows using a {chi}{sup 2} analysis. We find that the best-fit model exhibits an increase in transit radius at short wavelengths due to Rayleigh scattering. Pure water atmospheres are also possible. However, a flat line (no atmosphere detected) remains among the best of the statistically acceptable models, and better than pure water atmospheres. We explore the effect of systematic differences among results from different observational groups, and we find that the Howe and Burrows tholin-haze model remains the best fit, even when systematic differences among observers are considered.

  15. Spitzer Science Center within an Enterprise Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, T.

    2007-10-01

    The Spitzer Science Center's (SSC) evolutionary development approach, coupled with a flexible, scaleable hardware and software architecture has been key in Spitzer's ability to handle an explosion of data products, evolving data definitions, and changing data quality requirements. Spitzer is generating (depending on the campaign and instrument) about 10 TB of pre-archive data every 14 to 20 days. This generally reduces to between 3 TB and 6 TB of standard products, again depending on the campaign and instrument. This paper will discuss (1) the Spitzer Science Center's responses to evolving data, quality, and processing requirements and (2) how robust or not was the original architecture to allow Spitzer to accommodate on-going change.

  16. Hunting Elusive SPRITEs with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, astronomers have developed many wide-field imaging surveys in which the same targets are observed again and again. This new form of observing has allowed us to discover optical and radio transients explosive or irregular events with durations ranging from seconds to years. The dynamic infrared sky, however, has remained largely unexplored until now.Infrared ExplorationExample of a transient: SPIRITS 14ajc was visible when imaged by SPIRITS in 2014 (left) but it wasnt there during previous imaging between 2004 and 2008 (right). The bottom frame shows the difference between the two images. [Adapted from Kasliwal et al. 2017]Why hunt for infrared transients? Optical wavelengths dont allow us to observe events that are obscured, such that their own structure or their surroundings hide them from our view. Both supernovae and luminous red novae (associated with stellar mergers) are discoverable as infrared transients, and there may well be new types of transients in infrared that we havent seen before!To explore this uncharted territory, a team of scientists developed SPIRITS, the Spitzer Infrared Intensive Transients Survey. Begun in 2014, SPIRITS is a five-year long survey that uses the Spitzer Space Telescope to conduct a systematic search for mid-infrared transients in nearby galaxies.In a recent publication led by Mansi Kasliwal (Caltech and the Carnegie Institution for Science), the SPIRITS team has now detailed how their survey works and what theyve discovered in its first year.The light curves of SPRITEs (red stars) lie in the mid-infared luminosity gap between novae (orange) and supernovae (blue). [Kasliwal et al. 2017]Mystery TransientsKasliwal and collaborators used Spitzer to monitor 190 nearby galaxies. In SPIRITS first year, they found over 1958 variable stars and 43 infrared transient sources. Of these 43 transients, 21 were known supernovae, 4 were in the luminosity range of novae, and 4 had optical counterparts. The remaining 14 events

  17. Water for fish, water for power : finding a balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The impact of British Columbia Hydro's operations on the 100 different species and sub-species of fish found in the rivers of BC is discussed. The utility operates 30 hydroelectric facilities and 31 reservoirs in 6 major river basins and 27 watersheds. Three-quarters of the hydroelectricity is produced at major installations on the Peace and Columbia river systems. This booklet describes how, in their water use planning and decision-making, the utility considers impacts on aquatic and terrestrial habitats, flood control, domestic water supply and transport, as well as aesthetic requirements and recreational use. figs

  18. Spitzer IRS Observations of FU Orionis Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. D.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Watson, D. M.; Ibrahimov, M.; Furlan, E.; Sargent, B.; Forrest, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    We present 5-35 μm spectra, taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope, of five FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, BBW 76, and V346 Nor. All but V346 Nor reveal amorphous silicate grains in emission at 10 and 20 μm, and show water-vapor absorption bands at 5.8 and 6.8 μm and SiO or possibly methane absorption at 8 μm. These absorption features closely match these bands in model stellar photospheres-signs of the gaseous photospheres of the inner regions of these objects' accretion disks. The continuum emission at 5-8 μm is also consistent with such disks, and, for FU Orionis and BBW 76, longer wavelength emission may be fit by a model that includes moderate disk flaring. V1057 Cyg and V1515 Cyg have much more emission at longer wavelengths than the others, perhaps evidence of a substantial remnant of their natal, infalling envelopes.

  19. Early 2017 observations of TRAPPIST-1 with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrez, L.; Gillon, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Demory, B.-O.; de Wit, J.; Ingalls, J. G.; Agol, E.; Bolmont, E.; Burdanov, A.; Burgasser, A. J.; Carey, S. J.; Jehin, E.; Leconte, J.; Lederer, S.; Queloz, D.; Selsis, F.; Van Grootel, V.

    2018-04-01

    The recently detected TRAPPIST-1 planetary system, with its seven planets transiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star, offers the first opportunity to perform comparative exoplanetology of temperate Earth-sized worlds. To further advance our understanding of these planets' compositions, energy budgets, and dynamics, we are carrying out an intensive photometric monitoring campaign of their transits with the Spitzer Space Telescope. In this context, we present 60 new transits of the TRAPPIST-1 planets observed with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) in 2017 February and March. We combine these observations with previously published Spitzer transit photometry and perform a global analysis of the resulting extensive data set. This analysis refines the transit parameters and provides revised values for the planets' physical parameters, notably their radii, using updated properties for the star. As part of our study, we also measure precise transit timings that will be used in a companion paper to refine the planets' masses and compositions using the transit timing variations method. TRAPPIST-1 shows a very low level of low-frequency variability in the IRAC 4.5-μm band, with a photometric RMS of only 0.11 per cent at a 123-s cadence. We do not detect any evidence of a (quasi-)periodic signal related to stellar rotation. We also analyse the transit light curves individually, to search for possible variations in the transit parameters of each planet due to stellar variability, and find that the Spitzer transits of the planets are mostly immune to the effects of stellar variations. These results are encouraging for forthcoming transmission spectroscopy observations of the TRAPPIST-1 planets with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  20. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG RED QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Spoon, Henrik; Glikman, Eilat; Petric, Andreea; Schulz, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra and photometry of 13 redshift 0.4 < z < 1 dust reddened quasars obtained with Spitzer IRS and MIPS. We compare properties derived from their infrared spectral energy distributions (intrinsic active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity and far-infrared luminosity from star formation) to the host luminosities and morphologies from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and black hole masses estimated from optical and/or near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results are broadly consistent with models in which most dust reddened quasars are an intermediate phase between a merger-driven starburst triggering a completely obscured AGN, and a normal, unreddened quasar. We find that many of our objects have high accretion rates, close to the Eddington limit. These objects tend to fall below the black hole mass-bulge luminosity relation as defined by local galaxies, whereas most of our low accretion rate objects are slightly above the local relation, as typical for normal quasars at these redshifts. Our observations are therefore most readily interpreted in a scenario in which galaxy stellar mass growth occurs first by about a factor of three in each merger/starburst event, followed sometime later by black hole growth by a similar amount. We do not, however, see any direct evidence for quasar feedback affecting star formation in our objects, for example, in the form of a relationship between accretion rate and star formation. Five of our objects, however, do show evidence for outflows in the [O III]5007 Å emission line profile, suggesting that the quasar activity is driving thermal winds in at least some members of our sample.

  1. Lyman Spitzer: Life, Times, and Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lyman Spitzer was one of the major figures of twentieth centurytheoretical astrophysics. Over more than fifty years,he kept up sustained research of his own, on problems concerningthe interstellar medium, star formation, and galaxies.In addition he was a major influence on observationalprogrammes, and created a thriving ...

  2. Spitzer Parallax of OGLE-2015-BLG-0966

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Street, R. A.; Udalski, A.; Calchi Novati, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of a cold Neptune mplanet = 21 ± 2 M⊕ orbiting a 0.38 M⊙ M dwarf lying 2.5-3.3 kpc toward the Galactic center as part of a campaign combining ground-based and Spitzer observations to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. This is the first time that the complex real...

  3. Lyman Spitzer: Life, Times, and Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    College, Cambridge, in the academic year 1935–36. It was com- mon in those days for promising students from the United States to spend some time in England or Europe – the precise opposite of the situation today! Cambridge exposed Spitzer to the most distinguished astrophysi- cist of that time – Arthur Eddington.

  4. Spitzer secondary eclipses of Qatar-1b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garhart, Emily; Deming, Drake; Mandell, Avi; Knutson, Heather; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2018-02-01

    Aims: Previous secondary eclipse observations of the hot Jupiter Qatar-1b in the Ks band suggest that it may have an unusually high day side temperature, indicative of minimal heat redistribution. There have also been indications that the orbit may be slightly eccentric, possibly forced by another planet in the system. We investigate the day side temperature and orbital eccentricity using secondary eclipse observations with Spitzer. Methods: We observed the secondary eclipse with Spitzer/IRAC in subarray mode, in both 3.6 and 4.5 μm wavelengths. We used pixel-level decorrelation to correct for Spitzer's intra-pixel sensitivity variations and thereby obtain accurate eclipse depths and central phases. Results: Our 3.6 μm eclipse depth is 0.149 ± 0.051% and the 4.5 μm depth is 0.273 ± 0.049%. Fitting a blackbody planet to our data and two recent Ks band eclipse depths indicates a brightness temperature of 1506 ± 71 K. Comparison to model atmospheres for the planet indicates that its degree of longitudinal heat redistribution is intermediate between fully uniform and day-side only. The day side temperature of the planet is unlikely to be as high (1885 K) as indicated by the ground-based eclipses in the Ks band, unless the planet's emergent spectrum deviates strongly from model atmosphere predictions. The average central phase for our Spitzer eclipses is 0.4984 ± 0.0017, yielding e cos ω = -0.0028 ± 0.0027. Our results are consistent with a circular orbit, and we constrain e cos ω much more strongly than has been possible with previous observations. Tables of the lightcurve data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A55

  5. Efficient Mosaicking of Spitzer Space Telescope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Joseph; Makovoz, David; Eisenhardt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A parallel version of the MOPEX software, which generates mosaics of infrared astronomical images acquired by the Spitzer Space Telescope, extends the capabilities of the prior serial version. In the parallel version, both the input image space and the output mosaic space are divided among the available parallel processors. This is the only software that performs the point-source detection and the rejection of spurious imaging effects of cosmic rays required by Spitzer scientists. This software includes components that implement outlier-detection algorithms that can be fine-tuned for a particular set of image data by use of a number of adjustable parameters. This software has been used to construct a mosaic of the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Shallow Survey, which comprises more than 17,000 exposures in four wavelength bands from 3.6 to 8 m and spans a solid angle of about 9 square degrees. When this software was executed on 32 nodes of the 1,024-processor Cosmos cluster computer at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a speedup of 8.3 was achieved over the serial version of MOPEX. The performance is expected to improve dramatically once a true parallel file system is installed on Cosmos.

  6. SPIRITS: Uncovering Unusual Infrared Transients with Spitzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Jencson, Jacob E.; Tinyanont, Samaporn; Cao, Yi; Cook, David [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bally, John [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Masci, Frank; Armus, Lee [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cody, Ann Marie [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Bond, Howard E. [Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Contreras, Carlos [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Dykhoff, Devin A.; Amodeo, Samuel; Carlon, Robert L.; Cass, Alexander C.; Corgan, David T.; Faella, Joseph [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Boyer, Martha [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MC 665, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cantiello, Matteo [Center for Computational Astrophysics, Flatiron Institute, 162 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Fox, Ori D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2017-04-20

    We present an ongoing, five-year systematic search for extragalactic infrared transients, dubbed SPIRITS—SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey. In the first year, using Spitzer /IRAC, we searched 190 nearby galaxies with cadence baselines of one month and six months. We discovered over 1958 variables and 43 transients. Here, we describe the survey design and highlight 14 unusual infrared transients with no optical counterparts to deep limits, which we refer to as SPRITEs (eSPecially Red Intermediate-luminosity Transient Events). SPRITEs are in the infrared luminosity gap between novae and supernovae, with [4.5] absolute magnitudes between −11 and −14 (Vega-mag) and [3.6]–[4.5] colors between 0.3 mag and 1.6 mag. The photometric evolution of SPRITEs is diverse, ranging from <0.1 mag yr{sup −1} to >7 mag yr{sup −1}. SPRITEs occur in star-forming galaxies. We present an in-depth study of one of them, SPIRITS 14ajc in Messier 83, which shows shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission. This shock may have been triggered by the dynamic decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars that led to either the formation of a binary or a protostellar merger.

  7. SPITZER SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF WASP-18b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nymeyer, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Hardy, Ryan A.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Campo, Christopher J.; Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, William C.; Britt, Christopher B. T.; Cubillos, Patricio; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Hellier, Coel; Anderson, David R.; Gillon, Michael; Hebb, Leslie; Wheatley, Peter J.; Pollacco, Don

    2011-01-01

    The transiting exoplanet WASP-18b was discovered in 2008 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets project. The Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity Program observed secondary eclipses of WASP-18b using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera in the 3.6 μm and 5.8 μm bands on 2008 December 20, and in the 4.5 μm and 8.0 μm bands on 2008 December 24. We report eclipse depths of 0.30% ± 0.02%, 0.39% ± 0.02%, 0.37% ± 0.03%, 0.41% ± 0.02%, and brightness temperatures of 3100 ± 90, 3310 ± 130, 3080 ± 140, and 3120 ± 110 K in order of increasing wavelength. WASP-18b is one of the hottest planets yet discovered—as hot as an M-class star. The planet's pressure-temperature profile most likely features a thermal inversion. The observations also require WASP-18b to have near-zero albedo and almost no redistribution of energy from the day side to the night side of the planet.

  8. Spitzer Photometry of WISE-selected Brown Dwarf and Hyper-luminous Infrared Galaxy Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Bridge, Carrie R.; Cohen, Martin; Cutri, Roc M.; Donoso, Emilio; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lonsdale, Carol; Mace, Gregory; Mainzer, A.; Marsh, Ken; Padgett, Deborah; Petty, Sara; Ressler, Michael E.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stanford, Spencer A.; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wright, Edward L.; Wu, Jingwen; Yan, Lin

    2012-11-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm photometry and positions for a sample of 1510 brown dwarf candidates identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. Of these, 166 have been spectroscopically classified as objects with spectral types M(1), L(7), T(146), and Y(12). Sixteen other objects are non-(sub)stellar in nature. The remainder are most likely distant L and T dwarfs lacking spectroscopic verification, other Y dwarf candidates still awaiting follow-up, and assorted other objects whose Spitzer photometry reveals them to be background sources. We present a catalog of Spitzer photometry for all astrophysical sources identified in these fields and use this catalog to identify seven fainter (4.5 μm ~ 17.0 mag) brown dwarf candidates, which are possibly wide-field companions to the original WISE sources. To test this hypothesis, we use a sample of 919 Spitzer observations around WISE-selected high-redshift hyper-luminous infrared galaxy candidates. For this control sample, we find another six brown dwarf candidates, suggesting that the seven companion candidates are not physically associated. In fact, only one of these seven Spitzer brown dwarf candidates has a photometric distance estimate consistent with being a companion to the WISE brown dwarf candidate. Other than this, there is no evidence for any widely separated (>20 AU) ultra-cool binaries. As an adjunct to this paper, we make available a source catalog of ~7.33 × 105 objects detected in all of these Spitzer follow-up fields for use by the astronomical community. The complete catalog includes the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm photometry, along with positionally matched B and R photometry from USNO-B; J, H, and Ks photometry from Two Micron All-Sky Survey; and W1, W2, W3, and W4 photometry from the WISE all-sky catalog.

  9. Spitzer Photometry of WISE-Selected Brown Dwarf and Hyper-Lumninous Infrared Galaxy Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Bridge, Carrie R.; Cohen, Martin; Cutri, Roc M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micrometer photometry and positions for a sample of 1510 brown dwarf candidates identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. Of these, 166 have been spectroscopically classified as objects with spectral types M(1), L(7), T(146), and Y(12). Sixteen other objects are non-(sub)stellar in nature. The remainder are most likely distant L and T dwarfs lacking spectroscopic verification, other Y dwarf candidates still awaiting follow-up, and assorted other objects whose Spitzer photometry reveals them to be background sources. We present a catalog of Spitzer photometry for all astrophysical sources identified in these fields and use this catalog to identify seven fainter (4.5 m to approximately 17.0 mag) brown dwarf candidates, which are possibly wide-field companions to the original WISE sources. To test this hypothesis, we use a sample of 919 Spitzer observations around WISE-selected high-redshift hyper-luminous infrared galaxy candidates. For this control sample, we find another six brown dwarf candidates, suggesting that the seven companion candidates are not physically associated. In fact, only one of these seven Spitzer brown dwarf candidates has a photometric distance estimate consistent with being a companion to the WISE brown dwarf candidate. Other than this, there is no evidence for any widely separated (greater than 20 AU) ultra-cool binaries. As an adjunct to this paper, we make available a source catalog of 7.33 x 10(exp 5) objects detected in all of these Spitzer follow-up fields for use by the astronomical community. The complete catalog includes the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 m photometry, along with positionally matched B and R photometry from USNO-B; J, H, and Ks photometry from Two Micron All-Sky Survey; and W1, W2, W3, and W4 photometry from the WISE all-sky catalog.

  10. Europe's space telescope ISO finds water in distant places

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Equally striking is ISO's discovery of water vapour in the outer planets, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. As those chilly planets cannot release water from within, they probably have a supply of water coming from elsewhere in the Solar System. Since ISO went into orbit at the end of 1995, it has used its unique power of analysing infrared rays coming from the Universe to identify water vapour and water ice near dying stars and newborn stars. It has also measured the water vapour steaming from Comet Hale-Bopp. "Before ISO no instrument was capable of detecting water in so many places," comments ESA's director of science, Roger Bonnet. "To start revealing the cosmic history of the Earth's water is a big success for ESA and for the astronomers who use our unique infrared observatory. And ISO's discovery that water is commonplace in the Galaxy will encourage renewed speculation about life that may exist in the vicinity of other stars." Water amid the stars Primaeval hydrogen atoms make water by joining with oxygen atoms that are manufactured within stars, in nuclear reactions occurring towards the end of a star's life. Oxygen from defunct stars enriches the Galaxy, and abundant hydrogen is available to react with it. Although the existence of water in interstellar space is not surprising, the Earth's moist atmosphere makes life difficult for any astronomer who wishes to spot water vapour in the Universe with ground-based instruments. Observations from aircraft and balloons gave early hints of cosmic water, but thorough investigations had to wait for ISO's unhampered view from space. Three of the satellite's instruments, the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS), the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) and the photometer ISOPHOT operating in spectroscopic mode, take part in the hunt for water. Last year, for example, users of both SWS and LWS reported water vapour in the vicinity of the aged star, W Hydrae, from which oxygen-rich winds blow into space. The bright infrared

  11. The impact of endorsing Spitzer's proposed criteria for PTSD in the forthcoming DSM-V on male and female Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lyndsey N; Chard, Kathleen M; Schumm, Jeremiah A; O'Brien, Carol

    2011-06-01

    This study explored differences between Spitzer's proposed model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the current DSM-IV diagnostic classification scheme in 353 Veterans. The majority of Veterans (89%) diagnosed with PTSD as specified in the DSM-IV also met Spitzer's proposed criteria. Veterans who met both DSM-IV and Spitzer's proposed criteria had significantly higher Clinician Administered PTSD Scale severity scores than Veterans only meeting DSM-IV criteria. Logistic regression indicated that being African American and having no comorbid diagnosis of major depressive disorder or history of a substance use disorder were found to predict those Veterans who met current, but not proposed criteria. These findings have important implications regarding proposed changes to the diagnostic classification criteria for PTSD in the forthcoming DSM-V. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coulometry for the detection of water content in archaeological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Crupi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we performed coulometric measurements to detect the water content in archaeological pottery in order to get information on the manufacture technique. The samples under study were the so-called "Ionian Cups" coming from various archaeological sites in eastern Sicily (South-Italy. In particular, we tentatively achieved the estimation of firing temperatures of the archaeological samples by comparing the coulometric results with those obtained in the case of raw materials fired under controlled conditions. The results were in good agreement with those previously obtained on the same samples by Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS. It is worth underlying that for the first time, the detection of water content as revealed by this analytical technique was related to archaeometric issues.

  13. The impact of Spitzer infrared data on stellar mass estimates - and a revised galaxy stellar mass function at 0 < z < 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, F.; Feulner, G.; Hopp, U.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:We estimate stellar masses of galaxies in the high redshift universe with the intention of determining the influence of newly available Spitzer/IRAC infrared data on the analysis. Based on the results, we probe the mass assembly history of the universe. Methods: We use the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, which provides multiband photometry from the U-filter to the 8 μm Spitzer band for almost 15 000 galaxies with either spectroscopic (for ≈7% of the sample) or photometric redshifts, and apply a standard model fitting technique to estimate stellar masses. We than repeat our calculations with fixed photometric redshifts excluding Spitzer photometry and directly compare the outcomes to look for systematic deviations. Finally we use our results to compute stellar mass functions and mass densities up to redshift z = 5. Results: We find that stellar masses tend to be overestimated on average if further constraining Spitzer data are not included into the analysis. Whilst this trend is small up to intermediate redshifts z ⪉ 2.5 and falls within the typical error in mass, the deviation increases strongly for higher redshifts and reaches a maximum of a factor of three at redshift z ≈ 3.5. Thus, up to intermediate redshifts, results for stellar mass density are in good agreement with values taken from literature calculated without additional Spitzer photometry. At higher redshifts, however, we find a systematic trend towards lower mass densities if Spitzer/IRAC data are included.

  14. MEASURING ORGANIC MOLECULAR EMISSION IN DISKS WITH LOW-RESOLUTION SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel; Henning, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We explore the extent to which Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra taken at low spectral resolution can be used in quantitative studies of organic molecular emission from disks surrounding low-mass young stars. We use Spitzer IRS spectra taken in both the high- and low-resolution modules for the same sources to investigate whether it is possible to define line indices that can measure trends in the strength of the molecular features in low-resolution data. We find that trends in the HCN emission strength seen in the high-resolution data can be recovered in low-resolution data. In examining the factors that influence the HCN emission strength, we find that the low-resolution HCN flux is modestly correlated with stellar accretion rate and X-ray luminosity. Correlations of this kind are perhaps expected based on recent observational and theoretical studies of inner disk atmospheres. Our results demonstrate the potential of using the large number of low-resolution disk spectra that reside in the Spitzer archive to study the factors that influence the strength of molecular emission from disks. Such studies would complement results for the much smaller number of circumstellar disks that have been observed at high resolution with IRS.

  15. PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING OF THE COLDEST KNOWN BROWN DWARF WITH THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cushing, M. C.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Trucks, J. L.; Schneider, A. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Burgasser, A. J., E-mail: taran.esplin@psu.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    Because WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (hereafter WISE 0855-0714) is the coldest known brown dwarf (∼250 K) and one of the Sun’s closest neighbors (2.2 pc), it offers a unique opportunity to study a planet-like atmosphere in an unexplored regime of temperature. To detect and characterize inhomogeneities in its atmosphere (e.g., patchy clouds, hot spots), we have performed time-series photometric monitoring of WISE 0855-0714 at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m with the Spitzer Space Telescope during two 23 hr periods that were separated by several months. For both bands, we have detected variability with peak-to-peak amplitudes of 4%–5% and 3%–4% in the first and second epochs, respectively. The light curves are semiperiodic in the first epoch for both bands, but they are more irregular in the second epoch. Models of patchy clouds have predicted a large increase in mid-infrared (mid-IR) variability amplitudes (for a given cloud covering fraction) with the appearance of water ice clouds at T {sub eff} < 375 K, so if such clouds are responsible for the variability of WISE 0855-0714, then its small amplitudes of variability indicate a very small deviation in cloud coverage between hemispheres. Alternatively, the similarity in mid-IR variability amplitudes between WISE 0855-0714 and somewhat warmer T and Y dwarfs may suggest that they share a common origin for their variability (i.e., not water clouds). In addition to our variability data, we have examined other constraints on the presence of water ice clouds in the atmosphere of WISE 0855-0714, including the recent mid-IR spectrum from Skemer et al. (2016). We find that robust evidence of such clouds is not yet available.

  16. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROMETER 16 μm OBSERVATIONS OF THE GOODS FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Chary, Ranga; Elbaz, David; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Dickinson, Mark; Bridge, Carrie; Howell, Justin H.; Siana, Brian; Colbert, James; Scarlata, Claudia; Frayer, David T.; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew; Papovich, Casey; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer 16 μm imaging of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. We survey 150 arcmin 2 in each of the two GOODS fields (North and South), to an average 3σ depth of 40 and 65 μJy, respectively. We detect ∼1300 sources in both fields combined. We validate the photometry using the 3-24 μm spectral energy distribution of stars in the fields compared to Spitzer spectroscopic templates. Comparison with ISOCAM and AKARI observations in the same fields shows reasonable agreement, though the uncertainties are large. We provide a catalog of photometry, with sources cross-correlated with available Spitzer, Chandra, and Hubble Space Telescope data. Galaxy number counts show good agreement with previous results from ISOCAM and AKARI with improved uncertainties. We examine the 16-24 μm flux ratio and find that for most sources it lies within the expected locus for starbursts and infrared luminous galaxies. A color cut of S 16 /S 24 >1.4 selects mostly sources which lie at 1.1 -2 sr -1 .

  17. Spitzer and Variable Young Stars: Shining a Spotlight on Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Ann Marie; CSI 2264 Team

    2014-01-01

    Since its launch in 2003, the Spitzer Space Telescope has helped to uncover hundreds of disk bearing young stars in clusters by detecting their infrared excesses. Study of the spectral energy distributions of these objects has shed light on disk evolution, dispersal, and the relationship to planet formation. With the start of the Warm Spitzer Mission, mid-infrared time series observations have opened up a new window into the dynamic nature of these systems. Not only are young stellar objects (YSOs) highly variable, but so are their disks! I will review recent findings on mid-infrared variability in young stars, highlighting the Young Stellar Object Variability project and the joint Spitzer/CoRoT Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264. These efforts have resulted in a comprehensive census and categorization of YSO flux behavior at 0.5 through 4.5 microns, on timescales from hours to months. We now have evidence for multiple simultaneous variability mechanisms, supporting the picture of a highly dynamic star-disk system.

  18. SPITZER IRS SPECTRA OF DEBRIS DISKS IN THE SCORPIUS–CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang-Condell, Hannah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Chen, Christine H.; Mittal, Tushar; Lisse, Carey M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Manoj, P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Rd., Mumbai 400005 (India); Watson, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Nesvold, Erika; Kuchner, Marc [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2015-08-01

    We analyze spectra obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) of 110 B-, A-, F-, and G-type stars with optically thin infrared excess in the Scorpius–Centaurus OB association. The ages of these stars range from 11 to 17 Myr. We fit the infrared excesses observed in these sources by Spitzer IRS and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) to simple dust models according to Mie theory. We find that nearly all of the objects in our study can be fit by one or two belts of dust. Dust around lower mass stars appears to be closer in than around higher mass stars, particularly for the warm dust component in the two-belt systems, suggesting a mass-dependent evolution of debris disks around young stars. For those objects with stellar companions, all dust distances are consistent with truncation of the debris disk by the binary companion. The gaps between several of the two-belt systems can place limits on the planets that might lie between the belts, potentially constraining the mass and locations of planets that may be forming around these stars.

  19. COLORS OF ELLIPTICALS FROM GALEX TO SPITZER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schombert, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-color photometry is presented for a large sample of local ellipticals selected by morphology and isolation. The sample uses data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ( GALEX ), Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and Spitzer to cover the filters NUV , ugri , JHK and 3.6 μ m. Various two-color diagrams, using the half-light aperture defined in the 2MASS J filter, are very coherent from color to color, meaning that galaxies defined to be red in one color are always red in other colors. Comparison to globular cluster colors demonstrates that ellipticals are not composed of a single age, single metallicity (e.g., [Fe/H]) stellar population, but require a multi-metallicity model using a chemical enrichment scenario. Such a model is sufficient to explain two-color diagrams and the color–magnitude relations for all colors using only metallicity as a variable on a solely 12 Gyr stellar population with no evidence of stars younger than 10 Gyr. The [Fe/H] values that match galaxy colors range from −0.5 to +0.4, much higher (and older) than population characteristics deduced from Lick/IDS line-strength system studies, indicating an inconsistency between galaxy colors and line indices values for reasons unknown. The NUV colors have unusual behavior, signaling the rise and fall of the UV upturn with elliptical luminosity. Models with blue horizontal branch tracks can reproduce this behavior, indicating the UV upturn is strictly a metallicity effect.

  20. COLORS OF ELLIPTICALS FROM GALEX TO SPITZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schombert, James M., E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Multi-color photometry is presented for a large sample of local ellipticals selected by morphology and isolation. The sample uses data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ( GALEX ), Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and Spitzer to cover the filters NUV , ugri , JHK and 3.6 μ m. Various two-color diagrams, using the half-light aperture defined in the 2MASS J filter, are very coherent from color to color, meaning that galaxies defined to be red in one color are always red in other colors. Comparison to globular cluster colors demonstrates that ellipticals are not composed of a single age, single metallicity (e.g., [Fe/H]) stellar population, but require a multi-metallicity model using a chemical enrichment scenario. Such a model is sufficient to explain two-color diagrams and the color–magnitude relations for all colors using only metallicity as a variable on a solely 12 Gyr stellar population with no evidence of stars younger than 10 Gyr. The [Fe/H] values that match galaxy colors range from −0.5 to +0.4, much higher (and older) than population characteristics deduced from Lick/IDS line-strength system studies, indicating an inconsistency between galaxy colors and line indices values for reasons unknown. The NUV colors have unusual behavior, signaling the rise and fall of the UV upturn with elliptical luminosity. Models with blue horizontal branch tracks can reproduce this behavior, indicating the UV upturn is strictly a metallicity effect.

  1. Investigating Space Weather Events Impacting the Spitzer Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Leo Y.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Stowers, Kennis; Lowrance, Patrick; Stewart, Andrzej; Travis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamical process in the space environment has increased dramatically. A relatively new field of study called "Space Weather" has emerged in the last few decades. Fundamental to the study of space weather is an understanding of how space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections impact spacecraft in varying orbits and distances around the Sun. Specialized space weather satellite monitoring systems operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allow scientists to predict space weather events affecting critical systems on and orbiting the Earth. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope is in an orbit far outside the areas covered by those space weather monitoring systems. This poses a challenge for the Spitzer's Mission Operations Team in determining whether space weather events affect Spitzer.

  2. SPITZER IRAC PHOTOMETRY FOR TIME SERIES IN CROWDED FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novati, S. Calchi; Beichman, C. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gould, A.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Pogge, R. W.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W.; Poleski, R. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Yee, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bryden, G.; Henderson, C. B.; Shvartzvald, Y. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Carey, S. [Spitzer, Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Udalski, A.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Collaboration: Spitzer team; OGLE group; and others

    2015-12-01

    We develop a new photometry algorithm that is optimized for the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spitzer time series in crowded fields and that is particularly adapted to faint or heavily blended targets. We apply this to the 170 targets from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign and present the results of three variants of this algorithm in an online catalog. We present detailed accounts of the application of this algorithm to two difficult cases, one very faint and the other very crowded. Several of Spitzer's instrumental characteristics that drive the specific features of this algorithm are shared by Kepler and WFIRST, implying that these features may prove to be a useful starting point for algorithms designed for microlensing campaigns by these other missions.

  3. FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF SPITZER-SELECTED LUMINOUS STARBURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.; Omont, A.; Fiolet, N.; Beelen, A.; Dole, H.; Lagache, G.; Lonsdale, C.; Polletta, M.; Greve, T. R.; Borys, C.; Dowell, C. D.; Bell, T. A.; Cox, P.; De Breuck, C.; Farrah, D.; Menten, K. M.; Owen, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present SHARC-2 350 μm data on 20 luminous z ∼ 2 starbursts with S 1.2 m m > 2 mJy from the Spitzer-selected samples of Lonsdale et al. and Fiolet et al. All the sources were detected, with S 350 μ m > 25 mJy for 18 of them. With the data, we determine precise dust temperatures and luminosities for these galaxies using both single-temperature fits and models with power-law mass-temperature distributions. We derive appropriate formulae to use when optical depths are non-negligible. Our models provide an excellent fit to the 6 μm-2 mm measurements of local starbursts. We find characteristic single-component temperatures T 1 ≅ 35.5 ± 2.2 K and integrated infrared (IR) luminosities around 10 12.9±0.1 L sun for the SWIRE-selected sources. Molecular gas masses are estimated at ≅4 x 10 10 M sun , assuming κ 850 μ m = 0.15 m 2 kg -1 and a submillimeter-selected galaxy (SMG)-like gas-to-dust mass ratio. The best-fit models imply ∼>2 kpc emission scales. We also note a tight correlation between rest-frame 1.4 GHz radio and IR luminosities confirming star formation as the predominant power source. The far-IR properties of our sample are indistinguishable from the purely submillimeter-selected populations from current surveys. We therefore conclude that our original selection criteria, based on mid-IR colors and 24 μm flux densities, provides an effective means for the study of SMGs at z ∼ 1.5-2.5.

  4. Preliminary findings on water quality of ricing lakes on White Earth Reservation, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild rice is a cultural and economic staple of the Anishinaabe People of White Earth. Changes in land use within the watershed may impact the water quality of ricing lakes on the reservation. The purpose of this discussion is to report the preliminary findings of water quality analysis of samples ta...

  5. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of

  6. ExploreNEOs: The Warm Spitzer Near Earth Object Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D. E.; Hora, J. L.; Mueller, M.; Thomas, C. A.; Harris, A. W.; Hagen, A. R.; Mommert, M.; Benner, L.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Delbo, M.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G.; Kistler, J. L.; Mainzer, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Penprase, B.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have observed some 600 near Earth objects (NEOs) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the Warm Spitzer Space Telescope. We derive the albedo and diameter for each NEO to characterize global properties of the NEO population, among other goals.

  7. Robert Spitzer and psychiatric classification: technical challenges and ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, K S

    2016-01-01

    Dr Robert Leopold Spitzer (May 22, 1932-December 25, 2015), the architect of modern psychiatric diagnostic criteria and classification, died recently at the age of 83 in Seattle. Under his leadership, the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manuals (DSM) became the international standard.

  8. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  9. Water Rights on Community Lands: LandMark’s Findings from 100 Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Alden Wily

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes whether national laws acknowledge indigenous peoples and other rural communities in 100 countries as owners of waters that arise within their lands. Results derive from information collected by LandMark to score the legal status of community land tenure. Findings are positive; half of all countries recognize communities as lawful possessors of water on their lands. Three quarters permit communities to manage the distribution and use of water on their lands. While 71 percent of countries declare water to be a public resource, this belies the substantial existence of privately owned water. In 29 percent of countries, private water is an identified legal category, and in many other countries obtainable rights to water are sufficiently substantial to imply lawful possession. Communities are beneficiaries mainly where customary rights are accorded status as property rights, or where ownership of public lands and water are devolved to rural collectives. However, opposite trends of nationalization and regulation of water suggest that while legal recognition of community land ownership may rise in the future, this will not necessarily include waters on the land. Irrespective of tenure, rural communities in 72 of 77 countries (93.5 percent are legally assured access to water for domestic purposes. This is consistent with the rising definition of safe drinking water as a human right, although access does not necessarily come free of cost.

  10. DUST EVOLUTION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AROUND HERBIG Ae/Be STARS-THE SPITZER VIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, A.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th.; Acke, B.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Van den Ancker, M. E.; Meeus, G.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present mid-infrared spectra of a comprehensive set of Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The signal-to-noise ratio of these spectra is very high, ranging between about a hundred and several hundreds. During the analysis of these data we tested the validity of standardized protoplanetary dust models and studied grain growth and crystal formation. On the basis of the analyzed spectra, the major constituents of protoplanetary dust around Herbig Ae/Be stars are amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry, crystalline forsterite, and enstatite and silica. No other solid-state features, indicating other abundant dust species, are present in the Spitzer spectra. Deviations of the synthetic spectra from the observations are most likely related to grain shape effects and uncertainties in the iron content of the dust grains. Our analysis revealed that larger grains are more abundant in the disk atmosphere of flatter disks than in that of flared disks, indicating that grain growth and sedimentation decrease the disk flaring. We did not find, however, correlations between the value of crystallinity and any of the investigated system parameters. Our analysis shows that enstatite is more concentrated toward the warm inner disk than forsterite, in contrast to predictions of equilibrium condensation models. None of the three crystal formation mechanisms proposed so far can alone explain all our findings. It is very likely that all three play at least some role in the formation of crystalline silicates.

  11. Analysis of Spitzer-IRS spectra of hyperluminous infrared galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A.; Risaliti, G.; Nardini, E.; Panessa, F.; Carrera, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Hyperluminous infrared galaxies (HLIRG) are the most luminous persistent objects in the Universe. They exhibit extremely high star formation rates, and most of them seem to harbour an active galactic nucleus (AGN). They are unique laboratories for investigating the most extreme star formation and its connection to super-massive black hole growth. Aims: The relative AGN and starburst (SB) contributions to the total output in these objects is still debated. Our aim is to disentangle the AGN and SB emission of a sample of thirteen HLIRG. Methods: We studied the MIR low-resolution spectra of a sample of thirteen HLIRG obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on board Spitzer. The 5-8 μm range is an optimal window for detecting AGN activity even in a heavily obscured environment. We performed an SB/AGN decomposition of the continuum using templates, which has been successfully applied for ULIRG in previous works. Results: The MIR spectra of all sources is largely dominated by AGN emission. By converting the 6 μm luminosity into IR luminosity, we found that ~80% of the sample shows an IR output dominated by the AGN emission. However, the SB activity is significant in all sources (mean SB contribution ~30%), showing star formation rates ~300-3000 M⊙ yr-1. With X-ray and MIR data we estimated the dust covering factor (CF) of these HLIRG, finding that a significant fraction presents a CF consistent with unity. Along with the high X-ray absorption shown by these sources, this suggests that large amounts of dust and gas enshroud the nucleus of these HLIRG, as also observed in ULIRG. Conclusions: Our results agree with previous studies of the IR SED of HLIRG using radiative transfer models, and we find strong evidence that all HLIRG harbour an AGN. Moreover, this work provides further support for the idea that AGN and SB are both crucial to understanding the properties of HLIRG. Our study of the CF supports the hypothesis that HLIRG can be divided into two

  12. SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE MID-IR LIGHT CURVES OF NEPTUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean J.; Krick, Jessica; Ingalls, James G.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Sciences and Astrobiology Division, MS245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Gizis, John E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. Davy [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Simon, Amy A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar System Exploration Division (690.0), 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wong, Michael H. [University of California, Department of Astronomy, Berkeley CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2016 February to obtain high cadence, high signal-to-noise, 17 hr duration light curves of Neptune at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m. The light curve duration was chosen to correspond to the rotation period of Neptune. Both light curves are slowly varying with time, with full amplitudes of 1.1 mag at 3.6 μ m and 0.6 mag at 4.5 μ m. We have also extracted sparsely sampled 18 hr light curves of Neptune at W1 (3.4 μ m) and W2 (4.6 μ m) from the Wide-feld Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE )/ NEOWISE archive at six epochs in 2010–2015. These light curves all show similar shapes and amplitudes compared to the Spitzer light curves but with considerable variation from epoch to epoch. These amplitudes are much larger than those observed with Kepler / K 2 in the visible (amplitude ∼0.02 mag) or at 845 nm with the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) in 2015 and at 763 nm in 2016 (amplitude ∼0.2 mag). We interpret the Spitzer and WISE light curves as arising entirely from reflected solar photons, from higher levels in Neptune’s atmosphere than for K 2. Methane gas is the dominant opacity source in Neptune’s atmosphere, and methane absorption bands are present in the HST 763 and 845 nm, WISE W1, and Spitzer 3.6 μ m filters.

  13. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF COMET 73P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 3 USING THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Wolff, Michael J.; Lisse, Carey M.; Kelley, Michael S.; Polomski, Elisha F.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Kimes, Robin L.; Harker, David E.

    2011-01-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to observe the 5-37 μm thermal emission of comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (SW3), components B and C. We obtained low spectral resolution (R ∼ 100) data over the entire wavelength interval, along with images at 16 and 22 μm. These observations provided an unprecedented opportunity to study nearly pristine material from the surface and what was until recently the interior of an ecliptic comet-the cometary surface having experienced only two prior perihelion passages, and including material that was totally fresh. The spectra were modeled using a variety of mineral types including both amorphous and crystalline components. We find that the degree of silicate crystallinity, ∼35%, is somewhat lower than most other comets with strong emission features, while its abundance of amorphous carbon is higher. Both suggest that SW3 is among the most chemically primitive solar system objects yet studied in detail, and that it formed earlier or farther from the Sun than the bulk of the comets studied so far. The similar dust compositions of the two fragments suggest that these are not mineralogically heterogeneous, but rather uniform throughout their volumes. The best-fit particle size distribution for SW3B has a form dn/da ∼ a -3.5 , close to that expected for dust in collisional equilibrium, while that for SW3C has dn/da ∼ a -4.0 , as seen mostly in active comets with strong directed jets, such as C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp. The total mass of dust in the comae plus nearby tail, extrapolated from the field of view of the IRS peak-up image arrays, is (3-5) x 10 8 kg for B and (7-9) x 10 8 kg for C. Atomic abundances derived from the spectral models indicate a depletion of O compared to solar photospheric values, despite the inclusion of water ice and gas in the models. Atomic C may be solar or slightly sub-solar, but its abundance is complicated by the potential contribution of spectrally featureless mineral

  14. Albedo Corrections for High Albedo Near Earth Objects Observed With Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Annika; Trilling, David E.; Mommert, Michael; Hora, Joseph L.

    2017-10-01

    Thermal infrared observations are the most effective way to measure asteroid diameter and albedo. Major surveys like NEOWISE and NEOSurvey return a small fraction of objects with albedo values higher than that believed to exist in the near-Earth object (NEO) population. About 10% of Spitzer-observed NEOs have nominal albedo solutions greater than 0.5. There are many possible causes for these unrealistically high albedos, including thermal lightcurves (leading to a mis-estimate of asteroid diameter) or inaccurate absolute visual magnitudes (either from poor photometry or lightcurve effects). We present here the results of a ground-based optical photometric study of 36 high albedo NEOs from NEOSurvey (Trilling et al. 2016) using measurements from the Discovery Channel Telescope. Our findings indicate that uncertainty in the diameter has the most impact on the derived albedo of our targets, while the uncertainty in the H-magnitude and slope parameter have smaller effects. We supply corrected albedos for our target list, as well as a systematic offset dependent on the solar phase angle of the object (Mommert el al. 2017). These corrected albedo values will help constrain the albedo range in the population to better reflect its physical characteristics. This work is based in part on the observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  15. Serendipity Observations of Far Infrared Cirrus Emission in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey: Analysis of Far-Infrared Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Caroline; Helou, George; Boulanger, François; Lagache, Guilaine; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Draine, Bruce; Martin, Peter

    2009-04-01

    We present an analysis of far-infrared (FIR) dust emission from diffuse cirrus clouds. This study is based on serendipitous observations at 160 μm at high-galactic latitude with the Multiband Imaging Photometer onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope by the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. These observations are complemented with IRIS data at 100 and 60 μm and constitute one of the most sensitive and unbiased samples of FIR observations at a small scale of diffuse interstellar clouds. Outside regions dominated by the cosmic infrared background fluctuations, we observe a substantial scatter in the 160/100 colors from cirrus emission. We compared the 160/100 color variations to 60/100 colors in the same fields and find a trend of decreasing 60/100 with increasing 160/100. This trend cannot be accounted for by current dust models by changing solely the interstellar radiation field. It requires a significant change of dust properties such as grain size distribution or emissivity or a mixing of clouds in different physical conditions along the line of sight. These variations are important as a potential confusing foreground for extragalactic studies. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA.

  16. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF WHITE DWARFS: THE MISSING PLANETARY DEBRIS AROUND DZ STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, S.; Jura, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report a Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera search for infrared excesses around white dwarfs, including 14 newly observed targets and 16 unpublished archived stars. We find a substantial infrared excess around two warm white dwarfs—J220934.84+122336.5 and WD 0843+516, the latter apparently being the hottest white dwarf known to display a close-in dust disk. Extending previous studies, we find that the fraction of white dwarfs with dust disks increases as the star's temperature increases; for stars cooler than 10,000 K, even the most heavily polluted ones do not have ∼1000 K dust. There is tentative evidence that the dust disk occurrence is correlated with the volatility of the accreted material. In the Appendix, we modify a previous analysis to clarify how Poynting-Robertson drag might play an important role in transferring materials from a dust disk into a white dwarf's atmosphere.

  17. Evaluation of water hammer occurrence in nuclear power plants: technical findings relevant to unresolved safety issue A-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report, which includes responses to public comments, summarizes key technical findings relevant to the Unresolved Safety Issue A-1, Water Hammer. These findings were derived from studies of reported water hammer occurrences and underlying causes and provide key insights into means to minimize or eliminate further water hammer occurrences. This report does not represent a substitute for current rules and regulations

  18. Evaluation of water-hammer experience in nuclear power plants. Technical findings relevant to Unresolved Safety Issue A-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, A.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes key technical findings relevant to the Unresolved Safety Issue A-1, Water Hammer. These findings were derived from studies of reported water hammer occurrences and underlying causes and provide key insights into means to minimize or eliminate further water hammer occurrences. It should also be noted that this report does not represent a substitute for current rules and regulations

  19. SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF PAH PROPERTIES IN M17SW REVEALED BY SPITZER /IRS SPECTRAL MAPPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, M. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.; Suzuki, T.; Nishimura, A.; Kohno, M. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Onaka, T.; Ohashi, S. [Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nagayama, T.; Matsuo, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Umemoto, T.; Minamidani, T.; Fujita, S. [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS), 462-2, Nobeyama, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Tsuda, Y., E-mail: yamagish@ir.isas.jaxa.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Meisei University, 2-1-1 Hodokubo, Hino, Tokyo 191-0042 (Japan)

    2016-12-20

    We present Spitzer /IRS mid-infrared spectral maps of the Galactic star-forming region M17 as well as IRSF/SIRIUS Br γ and Nobeyama 45 m/FOREST {sup 13}CO ( J = 1–0) maps. The spectra show prominent features due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at wavelengths of 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, 12.0, 12.7, 13.5, and 14.2  μ m. We find that the PAH emission features are bright in the region between the H ii region traced by Br γ and the molecular cloud traced by {sup 13}CO, supporting that the PAH emission originates mostly from photo-dissociation regions. Based on the spatially resolved Spitzer /IRS maps, we examine spatial variations of the PAH properties in detail. As a result, we find that the interband ratio of PAH 7.7  μ m/PAH 11.3  μ m varies locally near M17SW, but rather independently of the distance from the OB stars in M17, suggesting that the degree of PAH ionization is mainly controlled by local conditions rather than the global UV environments determined by the OB stars in M17. We also find that the interband ratios of the PAH 12.0  μ m, 12.7  μ m, 13.5  μ m, and 14.2  μ m features to the PAH 11.3  μ m feature are high near the M17 center, which suggests structural changes of PAHs through processing due to intense UV radiation, producing abundant edgy irregular PAHs near the M17 center.

  20. THE SPITZER -HETDEX EXPLORATORY LARGE-AREA SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papovich, C.; Shipley, H. V.; Mehrtens, N.; Lanham, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Kawinwanichakij, L.; Lacy, M.; Ciardullo, R.; Gronwall, C.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Drory, N.; Gebhardt, K.; Hill, G. J.; Jogee, S.; Bassett, R.; Behroozi, P.; Blanc, G. A.; Jong, R. S. de; Gawiser, E.; Hopp, U.

    2016-01-01

    We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer /HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers ≈24 deg 2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey “Stripe 82” region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby–Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R ∼ 800 spectroscopy will produce ∼200,000 redshifts from the Ly α emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 <  z  < 3.5, and an additional ∼200,000 redshifts from the [O ii] emission for galaxies at z  < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K -band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, the presence of active galactic nuclei, and environment over a co-moving volume of ∼0.5 Gpc 3 at 1.9 <  z  < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC data set, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show that the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μ m images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1  μ Jy at both 3.6 and 4.5 μ m (1 σ , for R = 2″ circular apertures). As a demonstration of the science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of the Spitzer Exploratory programs, we provide all of the images and catalogs as part of the publication.

  1. Measurement of the Transverse Spitzer Resistivity during Collisional Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trintchouk, F.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Carter, T.A.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of the transverse resistivity was carried out in a reconnecting current sheet where the mean free path for the Coulomb collision is smaller than the thickness of the sheet. In a collisional neutral sheet without a guide field, the transverse resistivity is directly related to the reconnection rate. A remarkable agreement is found between the measured resistivity and the classical value derived by L. Spitzer. In his calculation the transverse resistivity for the electrons is higher than the parallel resistivity by a factor of 1.96. The measured values have verified this theory to within 30% errors

  2. Spitzer ’s View of the Candidate Cluster and Protocluster Catalog (CCPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, J. R.; McGaugh, S. S. [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    The Candidate Cluster and Protocluster Catalog contains 218 galaxy overdensities composed of more than 2000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts spanning the first few Gyr after the Big Bang (2.0 ≤ z < 6.6). We use Spitzer archival data to track the underlying stellar mass of these overdense regions in various temporal cross sections by building rest-frame near-infrared luminosity functions (LFs) across the span of redshifts. This exercise maps the stellar growth of protocluster galaxies, as halos in the densest environments should be the most massive from hierarchical accretion. The characteristic apparent magnitude, m *( z ), is relatively flat from 2.0 ≤ z < 6.6, consistent with a passive evolution of an old stellar population. This trend maps smoothly to lower redshift results of cluster galaxies from other works. We find no difference in the LFs of galaxies in the field versus protoclusters at a given redshift apart from their density.

  3. A MID-INFRARED IMAGING SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED GALAXIES WITH THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainline, Laura J.; Blain, A. W.; Smail, Ian; Frayer, D. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Alexander, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    We present Spitzer-IRAC and MIPS mid-IR observations of a sample of 73 radio-detected submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) with spectroscopic redshifts, the largest such sample published to date. From our data, we find that IRAC colors of SMGs are much more uniform as compared with rest-frame UV and optical colors, and z>1.5 SMGs tend to be redder in their mid-IR colors than both field galaxies and lower-z SMGs. However, the IRAC colors of the SMGs overlap those of field galaxies sufficiently that color-magnitude and color-color selection criteria suggested in the literature to identify SMG counterparts produce ambiguous counterparts within an 8'' radius in 20%-35% of cases. We use a rest-frame J-H versus H-K color-color diagram and a S 24 /S 8.0 versus S 8.0 /S 4.5 color-color diagram to determine that 13%-19% of our sample are likely to contain active galactic nuclei which dominate their mid-IR emission. We observe in the rest-frame JHK colors of our sample that the rest-frame near-IR emission of SMGs does not resemble that of the compact nuclear starburst observed in local ultraluminous IR galaxies and is consistent with more widely distributed star formation. We take advantage of the fact that many high-z galaxy populations selected at different wavelengths are detected by Spitzer to carry out a brief comparison of mid-IR properties of SMGs to UV-selected high-z galaxies, 24 μm-selected galaxies, and high-z radio galaxies, and find that SMGs have mid-IR fluxes and colors which are consistent with being more massive and more reddened than UV-selected galaxies, while the IRAC colors of SMGs are most similar to powerful high-z radio galaxies.

  4. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DEBRIS DISK CATALOG. II. SILICATE FEATURE ANALYSIS OF UNRESOLVED TARGETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Tushar [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 (United States); Chen, Christine H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jang-Condell, Hannah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Manoj, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Sargent, Benjamin A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Watson, Dan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Lisse, Carey M., E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, astronomers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates that have been compiled in the Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog. We have discovered 10 and/or 20 μm silicate emission features toward 120 targets in the catalog and modeled the IRS spectra of these sources, consistent with MIPS 70 μm observations, assuming that the grains are composed of silicates (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) and are located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. For systems better fit by the continuous disk model, we find that (1) the dust size distribution power-law index is consistent with that expected from a collisional cascade, q = 3.5-4.0, with a large number of values outside this range, and (2) the minimum grain size, a {sub min}, increases with stellar luminosity, L {sub *}, but the dependence of a {sub min} on L {sub *} is weaker than expected from radiation pressure alone. In addition, we also find that (3) the crystalline fraction of dust in debris disks evolves as a function of time with a large dispersion in crystalline fractions for stars of any particular stellar age or mass, (4) the disk inner edge is correlated with host star mass, and (5) there exists substantial variation in the properties of coeval disks in Sco-Cen, indicating that the observed variation is probably due to stochasticity and diversity in planet formation.

  5. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-09-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of archived MIPS observations of Phoebe reproduces Cassini results very accurately, thereby validating our method. For all targets, the geometric albedo is found to be low, probably below 10% and clearly below 15%. Irregular satellites are much darker than the large regular satellites. Their albedo is, however, quite similar to that of small bodies in the outer Solar System (such as cometary nuclei, Jupiter Trojans, or TNOs). This is consistent with color measurements as well as dynamical considerations which suggest a common origin of the said populations. There appear to be significant object-to-object albedo differences. Similar albedos found for some members of dynamical clusters support the idea that they may have originated in the breakup of a parent body. For three satellites, thermal data at two wavelengths are available, enabling us to constrain their thermal properties. Sub-solar temperatures are similar to that found from Cassini's Phoebe fly-by. This suggests a rather low thermal inertia, as expected for regolith-covered objects. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by JPL under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA.

  6. Albedo and Diameter Distributions of Asteroid Families Using the Spitzer Asteroid Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enga, Marie-Therese; Trilling, D.; Mueller, M.; Wasserman, L.; Sykes, M.; Blaylock, M.; Stansberry, J.; Bhattacharya, B.; Spahr, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Spitzer Asteroid Catalog contains flux measurements of asteroidsserendipitously observed in publicly available Spitzer data. At present,this catalog contains some 10,000 measurements at 24 microns only, andwill ultimately contain 100,000 measurements or more. These measurements, along with with

  7. Multiple asteroid systems : Dimensions and thermal properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lim, L. F.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We collected mid-IR spectra from 5.2 to 38 μm using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph of 28 asteroids representative of all established types of binary groups. Photometric lightcurves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the

  8. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the Gould Belt. III. A multi-wavelength view of Corona Australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Dawn E.; Caratti o Garatti, Alessio; Bourke, Tyler L.

    2011-01-01

    retrieved from the literature are also added to the list, and a total of 116 candidate YSOs in CrA are compiled. Based on these YSO candidates, the star formation rate is computed to be 12 M sun Myr-1, similar to that of the Lupus clouds. A clustering analysis was also performed, finding that the main....... Using the Spitzer data, we identify 51 young stellar objects (YSOs) in CrA which include sources in the well-studied Coronet cluster as well as sources distributed throughout the molecular cloud. Twelve of the YSOs discussed are new candidates, one of which is located in the Coronet. Known YSOs...

  9. SHARC-II Mapping of Spitzer c2d Small Clouds and Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingwen; Dunham, Michael M.; Evans, Neal J., II; Bourke, Tyler L.; Young, Chadwick H.

    2007-04-01

    We present the results of a submillimeter survey of 53 low-mass dense cores with the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II). The survey is a follow-up project to the Spitzer Legacy Program "From Molecular Cores to Planet-Forming Disks," with the purpose of creating a complete data set of nearby low-mass dense cores from the infrared to the millimeter. We present maps of 52 cores at 350 μm and three cores at 450 μm, two of which were observed at both wavelengths. Of these 52 cores, 41 were detected by SHARC-II; 32 contained one submillimeter source, while 9 contained multiple sources. For each submillimeter source detected, we report various source properties including source position, fluxes in various apertures, size, aspect ratio, and position angle. For the 12 cores that were not detected we present upper limits. The sources detected by SHARC-II have, on average, smaller sizes at the 2 σ contours than those derived from longer wavelength bolometer observations. We conclude that this is not caused by a failure to integrate long enough to detect the full extent of the core; instead it arises primarily from the fact that the observations presented in this survey are insensitive to smoothly varying extended emission. We find that SHARC-II observations of low-mass cores are much better suited to distinguishing between starless and protostellar cores than observations at longer wavelengths. Very low luminosity objects, a new class of objects being discovered by the Spitzer Space Telescope in cores previously classified as starless, look very similar at 350 μm to other cores with more luminous protostars.

  10. Spitzer Observations of MAMBO Galaxies: Weeding Out Active Nuclei in Starbursting Protoellipticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Serjeant, S.; Bertoldi, F.; Egami, E.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Barmby, P.; Bei, L.; Dole, H.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Fazio, G. G.; Frayer, D. T.; Gordon, K. D.; Hines, D. C.; Huang, J.-S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Misselt, K. A.; Miyazaki, S.; Morrison, J. E.; Papovich, C.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Rieke, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Rigby, J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smail, I.; Wilson, G.; Willner, S. P.

    2004-09-01

    We present 3.6-24 μm Spitzer observations of an unbiased sample of nine luminous, dusty galaxies selected at 1200 μm by MAMBO on the IRAM 30 m telescope, a population akin to the well-known submillimeter or SCUBA galaxies (hereafter SMGs). Owing to the coarse resolution of submillimeter/millimeter cameras, SMGs have traditionally been difficult to identify at other wavelengths. We compare our multiwavelength catalogs to show that the overlap between 24 and 1200 μm must be close to complete at these flux levels. We find that all (4/4) of the most secure >=4 σ SMGs have >=4 σ counterparts at 1.4 GHz, while the fraction drops to 7/9 using all >=3 σ SMGs. We show that combining mid-infrared (MIR) and marginal (>=3 σ) radio detections provides plausible identifications in the remaining cases, enabling us to identify the complete sample. Accretion onto an obscured central engine is betrayed by the shape of the MIR continuum emission for several sources, confirming Spitzer's potential to weed out active galaxies. We demonstrate the power of an S24μm/S8μm versus S8μm/S4.5μm color-color plot as a diagnostic for this purpose. However, we conclude that the majority (~75%) of SMGs have rest-frame mid/far-IR spectral energy distributions commensurate with obscured starbursts. Sensitive 24 μm observations are clearly a useful route to identify and characterize reliable counterparts to high-redshift far-IR-bright galaxies, complementing what is possible via deep radio imaging.

  11. Traumatic Reticuloperitonitis in Water Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis: Clinical Findings and the Associated Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged El-Ashker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to describe the clinical picture of traumatic reticuloperitonitis (TRP in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis and to evaluate the inflammatory and immunologic responses for this clinical condition. Twenty-two buffalo with acute local TRP were monitored in our study. Additionally, 10 clinically healthy buffalo were randomly selected and served as controls. Acute local TRP was initially diagnosed by clinical examination and confirmed by ultrasonographic (USG examination and/or necropsy findings. Blood samples were collected from all examined buffalo to measure the respective levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and interferon gamma (INF-γ, serum amyloid A (SAA, C-reactive protein (CRP, haptoglobin (Hp, fibrinogen (Fb, and serum sialic acid (SSA. It was found that TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, SAA, CRP, Hp, Fb, and SSA were significantly higher in buffalo with TRP than the controls. Our findings suggest that the examined immunologic variables were helpful in documenting the inflammatory response in buffalo with TRP. However, their diagnostic usefulness only becomes apparent when considered in tandem with the clinical findings for any given animal, its anamnesis, and a subsequent USG assessment. Due to the frequent complications of TRP, more accurate indicators of its occurrence and severity would be useful.

  12. Unusual Slowly Rotating Brown Dwarfs Discovered through Precision Spitzer Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Aren; Metchev, S.

    2014-01-01

    Many brown dwarfs exhibit low-amplitude rotationally modulated variability due to photospheric inhomogeneities caused by condensate clouds in their atmospheres. The Spitzer Space Telescope 'Weather on Other Worlds' (WoW) project has monitored 44 brown dwarfs at unprecedented photometric precision from space. We present one of several important new results from WoW: the discovery of brown dwarfs with unexpectedly slow rotation periods. While most brown dwarfs have periods of 2-12 hours, we have identified two with well-constrained periods of 13±1 and >20 hours, respectively, and 2 others that show more tentative evidence of longer than 20-hour periods. By serving as almost non-rotating standards, these objects will allow more accurate calibration of spectroscopic measurements of brown dwarfs' projected rotational velocities. The existence of such slowly-rotating objects also constrains models of brown dwarf formation and angular momentum evolution.

  13. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Infrared Astrophysics with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role that carbon-rich plays in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the possible existence of an abundant population of large, carbon-rich molecules in the ISM was unthinkable. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) - shockingly large molecules by the standards of traditional interstellar chemistry -are recognized throughout the Universe. In this presentation, we will examine the current state of the interstellar PAH model and explore how this data, in conjunction with the unparalleled observational data provided by the Spitzer Space Telescope, can be used to draw ever-deeper insights into the physical and chemical natures of a wide range of astrophysical environments.

  14. Effects of climate change on Pacific Northwest water-related resources: Summary of preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.; Sands, R.D.; Vail, L.W.; Chatters, J.C.; Neitzel, D.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Case Study is a multi-agency analysis of atmospheric/climatic change impacts on the Pacific Northwest (which includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and portions of the Columbia River Basin in Western Montana). The purpose of the case study, which began in fiscal year 1991, was to develop and test analytical tools, as well as to develop an assessment of the effects of climate change on climate-sensitive natural resources of the Pacific Northwest and economic sectors dependent on them. The overall study, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, was a broad-based, reconnaissance-level study to identify potential climate impacts on agriculture, coastal resources, forest resources, and irrigation in the Pacific Northwest. DOE participated in the reconnaissance study, with responsibility for hydroelectric and water supply issues. While this report briefly discusses a broader array of water issues, attention is mainly focused on three aspects of the water study: (1) the effects of the region`s higher temperatures on the demand for electric power (which in turn puts additional demand on hydroelectric resources of the region); (2) the effects of higher temperatures and changes, both in precipitation amounts and seasonality, on river flows and hydroelectric supply; and (3) the effect of higher temperatures and changed precipitation amounts and seasonality on salmonid resources -- particularly the rearing conditions in tributaries of the Columbia River Basin. Because the meaning of regional climate forecasts is still quite uncertain, most of the preliminary findings are based on sensitivity analyses and historical analog climate scenarios.

  15. The optical spectra of 24 mu m galaxies in the cosmos field. I. Spitzer MIPS bright sources in the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caputi, K. I.; Lilly, S. J.; Aussel, H.; Sanders, D.; Frayer, D.; Le Fevre, O.; Renzini, A.; Zamorani, G.; Scodeggio, M.; Contini, T.; Scoville, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Hasinger, G.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Floc'h, E.; Maier, C.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Salvato, M.; Schiminovich, D.; Silverman, J.; Surace, J.; Tasca, L.; Abbas, U.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bottini, D.; Capak, P.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Kampczyk, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Kneib, J. -P.; Knobel, C.; Kovac, K.; Lamareille, F.; Leauthaud, A.; Le Borgne, J. F.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Pello, R.; Perez-Montero, E.; Porciani, C.; Ricciardelli, E.; Scaramella, R.; Scarlata, C.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Walcher, J.; Zamojski, M.; Zucca, E.

    2008-01-01

    We study zCOSMOS-bright optical spectra for 609 Spitzer MIPS 24 mu m-selected galaxies with S-24 (mu m) > 0: 30 mJy and I <22.5 (AB mag) over 1.5 deg(2) of the COSMOS field. From emission-line diagnostics we find the following: (1) SFRs derived from the observed H alpha lambda 6563 and H beta lambda

  16. LOW FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER CANDIDATES ESTIMATED FROM A COMBINATION OF SPITZER AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Brown, Timothy M. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Seager, Sara, E-mail: desert@colorado.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02159 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  17. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-01-01

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 μm), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L ☉ and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L ☉ . The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L ☉ . Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity functions to those

  18. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Gutermuth, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Pipher, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Allen, L. E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Myers, P. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Muzerolle, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  19. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF LONG-TERM INFRARED VARIABILITY AMONG YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN CHAMAELEON I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Kevin M.; Herbst, William [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); DeMarchi, Lindsay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346 (United States); Muzerolle, James [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Balog, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Megeath, S. Thomas [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Furlan, Elise [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    Infrared variability is common among young stellar objects, with surveys finding daily to weekly fluctuations of a few tenths of a magnitude. Space-based observations can produce highly sampled infrared light curves, but are often limited to total baselines of about 1 month due to the orientation of the spacecraft. Here we present observations of the Chameleon I cluster, whose low declination makes it observable by the Spitzer Space Telescope over a 200-day period. We observe 30 young stellar objects with a daily cadence to better sample variability on timescales of months. We find that such variability is common, occurring in ∼80% of the detected cluster members. The change in [3.6]–[4.5] color over 200 days for many of the sources falls between that expected for extinction and fluctuations in disk emission. With our high cadence and long baseline we can derive power spectral density curves covering two orders of magnitude in frequency and find significant power at low frequencies, up to the boundaries of our 200-day survey. Such long timescales are difficult to explain with variations driven by the interaction between the disk and stellar magnetic field, which has a dynamical timescale of days to weeks. The most likely explanation is either structural or temperature fluctuations spread throughout the inner ∼0.5 au of the disk, suggesting that the intrinsic dust structure is highly dynamic.

  20. THE LAST GASP OF GAS GIANT PLANET FORMATION: A SPITZER STUDY OF THE 5 Myr OLD CLUSTER NGC 2362

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, Thayne; Lada, Charles J.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Irwin, Jonathan; Kenyon, Scott J.; Plavchan, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Expanding upon the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) survey from Dahm and Hillenbrand, we describe Spitzer IRAC and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations of the populous, 5 Myr old open cluster NGC 2362. We analyze the mid-IR colors of cluster members and compared their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to star+circumstellar disk models to constrain the disk morphologies and evolutionary states. Early/intermediate-type confirmed/candidate cluster members either have photospheric mid-IR emission or weak, optically thin IR excess emission at λ ≥ 24 μm consistent with debris disks. Few late-type, solar/subsolar-mass stars have primordial disks. The disk population around late-type stars is dominated by disks with inner holes (canonical 'transition disks') and 'homologously depleted' disks. Both types of disks represent an intermediate stage between primordial disks and debris disks. Thus, in agreement with previous results, we find that multiple paths for the primordial-to-debris disk transition exist. Because these 'evolved primordial disks' greatly outnumber primordial disks, our results undermine standard arguments in favor of a ∼ 5 yr timescale for the transition based on data from Taurus-Auriga. Because the typical transition timescale is far longer than 10 5 yr, these data also appear to rule out standard ultraviolet photoevaporation scenarios as the primary mechanism to explain the transition. Combining our data with other Spitzer surveys, we investigate the evolution of debris disks around high/intermediate-mass stars and investigate timescales for giant planet formation. Consistent with Currie et al., the luminosity of 24 μm emission in debris disks due to planet formation peaks at ∼10-20 Myr. If the gas and dust in disks evolve on similar timescales, the formation timescale for gas giant planets surrounding early-type, high/intermediate-mass (∼>1.4 M sun ) stars is likely 1-5 Myr. Most solar/subsolar-mass stars detected by Spitzer

  1. Do water based resins find their use in radiation cure applications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravijst, J.-P.

    1995-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for UV/EB formulation without monomers. Water dilutable oligomers offer one approach to formulations of this type. Several ways to use water as a primary means of reducing oligomer viscosities are reviewed. A number of new water dilutable acrylate resins were prepared having different functionalities and properties. Depending on the structure, viscosity decreases significantly by adding water. Good reactivity, solvent and water resistance were achieved after curing

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer photometric time series of HD 97658 (Van Grootel+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grootel, V.; Gillon, M.; Valencia, D.; Madhusudhan, N.; Dragomir, D.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Demory, B.-O.; Deming, D.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Scuflaire, R.; Seager, S.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.

    2017-07-01

    We monitored HD 97658 with Spitzer's IRAC camera on 2013 August 10 from 13:01:00 to 18:27:00 UT, corresponding to a transit window as computed from the MOST transit ephemeris (Dragomir et al. 2013, J/ApJ/772/L2). These Spitzer data were acquired in the context of the Cycle 9 program 90072 (PI: M. Gillon) dedicated to the search for the transits of RV-detected low-mass planets. They consist of 2320 sets of 64 individual subarray images obtained at 4.5 μm with an integration time of 0.08 s. They are available on the Spitzer Heritage Archive database under the form of 2320 Basic Calibrated Data files calibrated by the standard Spitzer reduction pipeline (version S19.1.0). (1 data file).

  3. Planck, Herschel & Spitzer unveil overdense z>2 regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Herve; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Chary, Ranga; Frye, Brenda; Martinache, Clement; Guery, David; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Altieri, Bruno; Flores-Cacho, Ines; Giard, Martin; Hurier, Guillaume; Lagache, Guilaine; Montier, Ludovic; Nesvadba, Nicole; Omont, Alain; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Pierini, Daniele; Puget, Jean-Loup; Scott, Douglas; Soucail, Genevieve

    2014-12-01

    At which cosmic epoch did massive galaxy clusters assemble their baryons? How does star formation occur in the most massive, most rapidly collapsing dark-matter-dense environments in the early Universe? To answer these questions, we take the completely novel approach to select the most extreme z>~2 star-forming overdensities seen over the entire sky. This selection nicely complements the other existing selections for high redshift clusters (i.e., by stellar mass, or by total mass like Sunyaev-Zeldovish (SZ) or X-ray selection). We make use of the Planck all-sky submillimetre survey to systematically identify the rarest, most luminous high-redshift sub-mm sources on the sky, either strongly gravitationally lensed galaxies, or the joint FIR/sub-mm emission from multiple intense starbursts. We observed 228 Planck sources with Herschel/SPIRE and discovered that most of them are overdensities of red galaxies with extremely high star formation rates (typically 7.e3 Msun/yr for a structure). Only Spitzer data can allow a better understanding of these promising Planck+Herschel selected sources, as is shown on a first set of IRAC data on 40 targets in GO9: (i) the good angular resolution and sensitivity of IRAC allows a proper determination of the clustered nature of each Herschel/SPIRE source; (ii) IRAC photometry (often associated with J, K) allows a good estimate of the colors and approximate photometric redshift. Note spectroscopic redshifts are available for two cluster candidates, at z=1.7 and z=2.3, confirming their high redshift nature. The successful GO9 observation of 40 fields showed that about half to be >7sigma overdensities of red IRAC sources. These observations were targeting the whole range of Herschel overdensities and significances. We need to go deeper into the Spitzer sample and acquire complete coverage of the most extreme Herschel overdensities (54 new fields). Such a unique sample has legacy value, and this is the last opportunity prior to JWST

  4. The climate of HD 189733b from fourteen transits and eclipses measured by Spitzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agol, E.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Cowan, Nicolas B.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knutson, Heather A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.; Deming, Drake; /NASA, Goddard; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Henry, Gregory W.; /Tennessee State U.; Charbonneau, David; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-07-01

    We present observations of six transits and six eclipses of the transiting planet system HD 189733 taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC camera at 8 microns, as well as a re-analysis of previously published data. We use several novel techniques in our data analysis, the most important of which is a new correction for the detector 'ramp' variation with a double-exponential function which performs better and is a better physical model for this detector variation. Our main scientific findings are: (1) an upper limit on the variability of the day-side planet flux of 2.7% (68% confidence); (2) the most precise set of transit times measured for a transiting planet, with an average accuracy of 3 seconds; (3) a lack of transit-timing variations, excluding the presence of second planets in this system above 20% of the mass of Mars in low-order mean-motion resonance at 95% confidence; (4) a confirmation of the planet's phase variation, finding the night side is 64% as bright as the day side, as well as an upper limit on the night-side variability of 17% (68% confidence); (5) a better correction for stellar variability at 8 micron causing the phase function to peak 3.5 hours before secondary eclipse, confirming that the advection and radiation timescales are comparable at the 8 micron photosphere; (6) variation in the depth of transit, which possibly implies variations in the surface brightness of the portion of the star occulted by the planet, posing a fundamental limit on non-simultaneous multi-wavelength transit absorption measurements of planet atmospheres; (7) a measurement of the infrared limb-darkening of the star, which is in good agreement with stellar atmosphere models; (8) an offset in the times of secondary eclipse of 69 seconds, which is mostly accounted for by a 31 second light travel time delay and 33 second delay due to the shift of ingress and egress by the planet hot spot; this confirms that the phase variation is due to an offset hot

  5. Marketers across the U. S. find propane water heaters a viable load-builder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    Rather than the usual annual update reporting on specific models and upgrades from water heater manufacturers, the authors concentrate on water heater marketing in the propane industry. Some of the marketing strategies they present are the result of exclusive interviews and some are recaps of water heater marketing plans mentioned in the AFRED study, but marketers across the country are unanimous in their appreciation of the lowly water heater.

  6. SERENDIPITY OBSERVATIONS OF FAR INFRARED CIRRUS EMISSION IN THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES SURVEY: ANALYSIS OF FAR-INFRARED CORRELATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bot, Caroline; Helou, George; Boulanger, Francois; Lagache, Guilaine; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Draine, Bruce; Martin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of far-infrared (FIR) dust emission from diffuse cirrus clouds. This study is based on serendipitous observations at 160 μm at high-galactic latitude with the Multiband Imaging Photometer onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope by the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. These observations are complemented with IRIS data at 100 and 60 μm and constitute one of the most sensitive and unbiased samples of FIR observations at a small scale of diffuse interstellar clouds. Outside regions dominated by the cosmic infrared background fluctuations, we observe a substantial scatter in the 160/100 colors from cirrus emission. We compared the 160/100 color variations to 60/100 colors in the same fields and find a trend of decreasing 60/100 with increasing 160/100. This trend cannot be accounted for by current dust models by changing solely the interstellar radiation field. It requires a significant change of dust properties such as grain size distribution or emissivity or a mixing of clouds in different physical conditions along the line of sight. These variations are important as a potential confusing foreground for extragalactic studies.

  7. Probing Large-scale Coherence between Spitzer IR and Chandra X-Ray Source-subtracted Cosmic Backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelluti, N.; Urry, M. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Arendt, R. [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Kashlinsky, A. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Li, Y.; Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Helgason, K. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Natarajan, P. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Finoguenov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching bei München (Germany)

    2017-09-20

    We present new measurements of the large-scale clustering component of the cross-power spectra of the source-subtracted Spitzer -IRAC cosmic infrared background and Chandra -ACIS cosmic X-ray background surface brightness fluctuations Our investigation uses data from the Chandra Deep Field South, Hubble Deep Field North, Extended Groth Strip/AEGIS field, and UDS/SXDF surveys, comprising 1160 Spitzer hours and ∼12 Ms of Chandra data collected over a total area of 0.3 deg{sup 2}. We report the first (>5 σ ) detection of a cross-power signal on large angular scales >20″ between [0.5–2] keV and the 3.6 and 4.5 μ m bands, at ∼5 σ and 6.3 σ significance, respectively. The correlation with harder X-ray bands is marginally significant. Comparing the new observations with existing models for the contribution of the known unmasked source population at z < 7, we find an excess of about an order of magnitude at 5 σ confidence. We discuss possible interpretations for the origin of this excess in terms of the contribution from accreting early black holes (BHs), including both direct collapse BHs and primordial BHs, as well as from scattering in the interstellar medium and intra-halo light.

  8. Probing Large-scale Coherence between Spitzer IR and Chandra X-Ray Source-subtracted Cosmic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Arendt, R.; Kashlinsky, A.; Li, Y.; Hasinger, G.; Helgason, K.; Urry, M.; Natarajan, P.; Finoguenov, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the large-scale clustering component of the cross-power spectra of the source-subtracted Spitzer-IRAC cosmic infrared background and Chandra-ACIS cosmic X-ray background surface brightness fluctuations Our investigation uses data from the Chandra Deep Field South, Hubble Deep Field North, Extended Groth Strip/AEGIS field, and UDS/SXDF surveys, comprising 1160 Spitzer hours and ˜12 Ms of Chandra data collected over a total area of 0.3 deg2. We report the first (>5σ) detection of a cross-power signal on large angular scales >20″ between [0.5-2] keV and the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, at ˜5σ and 6.3σ significance, respectively. The correlation with harder X-ray bands is marginally significant. Comparing the new observations with existing models for the contribution of the known unmasked source population at z < 7, we find an excess of about an order of magnitude at 5σ confidence. We discuss possible interpretations for the origin of this excess in terms of the contribution from accreting early black holes (BHs), including both direct collapse BHs and primordial BHs, as well as from scattering in the interstellar medium and intra-halo light.

  9. A Search to Uncover the Infrared Excess (IRXS) Sources in the Spitzer Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jamie Lynn; Duranko, Gary; Gorjian, Varoujan; Lineberger, Howard; Orr, Laura; Adewole, Ayomikun; Bradford, Eric; Douglas, Alea; Kohl, Steven; Larson, Lillia; Lascola, Gus; Orr, Quinton; Scott, Mekai; Walston, Joseph; Wang, Xian

    2018-01-01

    The Spitzer Enhanced Imaging Products catalog (SEIP) is a collection of nearly 42 million point sources obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope during its 5+ year cryogenic mission. Strasburger et al (2014) isolated sources with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) >10 in five infrared (IR) wavelength channels (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8 and 24 microns) to begin a search for sources with infrared excess (IRXS). They found 76 objects that were never catalogued before. Based on this success, we intend to dig deeper into the catalog in an attempt to find more IRXS sources, specifically by lowering the SNR on the 3.6, 4.5, and 24 micron channels. The ultimate goal is to use this large sample to seek rare astrophysical sources that are transitional in nature and evolutionarily very important.Our filtering of the database at SNR > 5 yielded 461,000 sources. This was further evaluated and reduced to only the most interesting based on source location on a [3.6]-[4.5] vs [4.5]-[24] color-color diagram. We chose a sample of 985 extreme IRXS sources for further inspection. All of these candidate sources were visually inspected and cross-referenced against known sources in existing databases, resulting in a list of highly reliable IRXS sources.These sources will prove important in the study of galaxy and stellar evolution, and will serve as a starting point for further investigation.

  10. Spitzer identification of potentially active Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Hora, Joseph; Smith, Howard; Chesley, Steve; Emery, Josh; Farnocchia, Davide; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan; Mueller, Migo

    2017-04-01

    The separation between asteroids and comets has become less clear with the discovery of a small group of asteroids that display comet-like activity. While the activity is attributed to different mechanisms, some objects seem to activate close to the Sun. Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) come close to the Earth and the Sun, constituting a natural laboratory for the study of thermally induced activity. Two NEA sub-populations are especially suspected of being potentially active: dormant comets and near-Sun asteroids. We propose 12.4 hrs of Spitzer IRAC observations of 3 near-Sun asteroids and one dormant comet (3552) Don Quixote, about which we have already published. Our goals are (1) to search for activity in Don Quixote, which showed CO/CO2 activity during its previous apparition and (2) to search for activity and measure the diameters and albedos of the near-Sun asteroids. In combination with a funded ground-based observing program, our results will provide significant legacy value to the investigation of activity in near-Earth asteroids.

  11. THE ATMOSPHERES OF THE HOT-JUPITERS KEPLER-5b AND KEPLER-6b OBSERVED DURING OCCULTATIONS WITH WARM-SPITZER AND KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Fressin, Francois; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Deming, Drake [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Borucki, William J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Brown, Timothy M. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Caldwell, Douglas [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W. [Berkeley Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Seager, Sara, E-mail: jdesert@cfa.harvard.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02159 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports the detection and the measurements of occultations of the two transiting hot giant exoplanets Kepler-5b and Kepler-6b by their parent stars. The observations are obtained in the near-infrared with Warm-Spitzer Space Telescope and at optical wavelengths by combining more than a year of Kepler photometry. The investigation consists of constraining the eccentricities of these systems and of obtaining broadband emergent photometric data for individual planets. For both targets, the occultations are detected at the 3{sigma} level at each wavelength with mid-occultation times consistent with circular orbits. The brightness temperatures of these planets are deduced from the infrared observations and reach T{sub Spitzer} = 1930 {+-} 100 K and T{sub Spitzer} = 1660 {+-} 120 K for Kepler-5b and Kepler-6b, respectively. We measure optical geometric albedos A{sub g} in the Kepler bandpass and find A{sub g} = 0.12 {+-} 0.04 for Kepler-5b and A{sub g} = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 for Kepler-6b, leading to upper an limit for the Bond albedo of A{sub B} {<=} 0.17 in both cases. The observations for both planets are best described by models for which most of the incident energy is redistributed on the dayside, with only less than 10% of the absorbed stellar flux redistributed to the nightside of these planets.

  12. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF EXTENDED LYMAN-α CLOUDS IN THE SSA22 FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, T. M. A.; Gonzalez, M.; Yamada, T.; Huang, J.-S.; Ashby, M. L. N; Matsuda, Y.; Egami, E.; Hayashimo, T.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm study of extended Lyman-α clouds (or Lyman-α Blobs, LABs) within the SSA22 filamentary structure at z = 3.09. We detect 6/26 LABs in all IRAC filters, four of which are also detected at 24 μm, and find good correspondence with the 850 μm measurements of Geach et al. An analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet, optical, near- and mid-infrared colors reveals that these six systems exhibit signs of nuclear activity (active galactic nucleus (AGN)) and/or extreme star formation. Notably, they have properties that bridge galaxies dominated by star formation (Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs)) and those with AGNs (LBGs classified as QSOs). The LAB systems not detected in all four IRAC bands, on the other hand, are, as a group, consistent with pure star-forming systems, similar to the majority of the LBGs within the filament. These results indicate that the galaxies within LABs do not comprise a homogeneous population, though they are also consistent with scenarios in which the gas halos are ionized through a common mechanism such as galaxy-scale winds driven by the galaxies within them, or gravitational heating of the collapsing cloud itself.

  13. Spinning Reserve from Pump Load: A Technical Findings Report to the California Department of Water Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, BJ

    2005-05-06

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at the request of the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, is investigating opportunities for electrical load to provide the ancillary service of spinning reserve to the electric grid. The load would provide this service by stopping for a short time when there is a contingency on the grid such as a transmission line or generator outage. There is a possibility that a significant portion of the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO's) spinning reserve requirement could be supplied from the California Department of Water Resources (CDWR) pumping load. Spinning reserve has never been supplied from load before, and rule changes would be needed to allow it. In this report, we are presenting technical findings on the possibility of supplying spinning reserve from pumping system load. In parallel, we are pursuing the needed rule changes with the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), and the CAISO. NERC and FERC have agreed that they have no prohibition against supplying spinning reserve from load. The WECC Minimum Operability Reliability Criteria working group has agreed that the concept should be considered, and they are presently discussing the needed tariff and rule changes. Presently, spinning reserve is provided by generation that is actually spinning but is operating at low power levels and can be ramped up quickly to provide reserve power. In a sense, this is an inefficient and environmentally unfriendly way of providing reserves because it requires the generator to operate at a low power level that may be inefficient and may discharge more pollutants per kW than operating at rated power. It would be better if this generation capacity were in a position to bid into the energy market. Providing an additional supply of spinning reserve would tend to reduce prices for

  14. Spitzer Observations of Massive, Red Galaxies at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papovich, C.; Moustakas, L. A.; Dickinson, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Rieke, G. H.; Daddi, E.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F.; Brandt, W. N.; Dahlen, T.; Egami, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Elbaz, D.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giavalisco, M.; Lucas, R. A.; Mobasher, B.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Stutz, A.; Rieke, M. J.; Yan, H.

    2006-03-01

    We study massive galaxies at z~1-3.5 using HST optical imaging, ground-based near-IR imaging, and Spitzer observations at 3-24 μm. From Ks-selected galaxies in the ~=130 arcmin2 GOODS-S field, we identify 153 distant red galaxies (DRGs) with (J-Ks)Vega>=2.3. This sample is approximately complete in stellar mass for passively evolving galaxies above 1011 Msolar and z~4-6 mag) starbursts (at zmed~1.7). Very few DRGs (=1011 Msolar have specific star formation rates (SFRs per unit mass) including the reradiated far-IR emission that range from 0.2 to 10 Gyr-1. Based on the X-ray luminosities and rest-frame near-IR colors, roughly one-quarter of the DRGs contain AGNs, implying that the growth of supermassive black holes coincides with the formation of massive galaxies. At 1.5=1011 Msolar have an integrated specific SFR comparable to the global value of all galaxies. In contrast, galaxies at z~0.3-0.75 with M>=1011 Msolar have an integrated specific SFR less than the global value and more than an order of magnitude lower than that for massive DRGs. At zcontract 1407; on observations taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555 and on observations collected at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), National Optical Astronomical Observatory (NOAO), which is operated by AURA, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. Observations have also been carried out using the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory under program ID LP168.A-0485.

  15. GALACTIC CEPHEIDS WITH SPITZER. II. SEARCH FOR EXTENDED INFRARED EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barmby, P.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.; Huelsman, D.; Fazio, G. G.; Bono, G.; Su, K. Y. L.; Welch, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    A deep and detailed examination of 29 classical Cepheids with the Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed three stars with strong nearby extended emission detected in multiple bands which appears to be physically associated with the stars. RS Pup was already known to possess extended infrared emission, while the extended emission around the other two stars (S Mus and δ Cep) is newly discovered in our observations. Four other stars (GH Lup, l Car, T Mon, and X Cyg) show tentative evidence for extended infrared emission. An unusual elongated extended object next to SZ Tau appears to be a background or foreground object in a chance alignment with the Cepheid. The inferred mass-loss rate upper limits for S Mus and δ Cep are in the range from 10 -9 to 10 -8 M sun yr -1 , with the upper limit for RS Pup as high as 10 -6 M sun yr -1 . Mass loss during post-main-sequence evolution has been proposed as a resolution to the discrepancy between pulsational and dynamical masses of Cepheid variable stars: dust in the lost material would make itself known by the presence of an infrared bright nebula or unresolved infrared excess. The observed frequency of infrared circumstellar emission (<24%) and the mass-loss rate we estimate for our sources show that dusty mass loss can only account for part of the Cepheid mass-loss discrepancy. Nevertheless, our direct evidence that mass loss is active during the Cepheid phase is an important confirmation that these processes need to be included in evolutionary and pulsation models of these stars and should be taken into account in the calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.

  16. NEOs in the mid-infrared: from Spitzer to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Thomas, Cristina A.

    2016-10-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) account for a surprisingly large fraction of the Spitzer observing time devoted to Solar System science. As a community, we should think of ways to repeat that success with JWST. JWST is planning an open Early Release Science Program, with the expected deadline for letters of intent in early 2017. We can't wait for next year's DPS to develop ideas. The time is now!In order to stir up the discussion, we will present ideas for NEO observing programs that are well adapted to JWST's capabilities and limitations, based on our recent PASP paper (Thomas et al., 2016). Obvious measurement objectives would include* size and albedo from thermal continuum (MIRI photometry)* thermal inertia for objects with well-known shape and spin state (MIRI)* taxonomy through reflection spectroscopy and emission spectroscopy in the NIR and MIR; NIR colors for faint objects.In all cases, JWST's sensitivity will allow us to go deeper than currently possible by at least an order of magnitude. Meter-sized NEOs similar to 2009 BD or 2011 MD are easy targets for MIRI spectrophotometry!The following limitations must be kept in mind, however: JWST's large size makes it slow to move. Most problematic for NEOs is probably the resulting 'speed limit': non-sidereal tracking is supported up to a rate of 30 mas/s, NEOs can easily move faster than that (ways to relax this constraint are under discussion). The average slew to a new target is budgeted to take 30 min, effectively ruling out programs many-target programs like ExploreNEOs or NEOSurvey (see D. Trilling's paper). Additionally, JWST will only observe close to quadrature, translating to large solar phase angles for NEO observations; this is familiar from other space-based IR facilities.

  17. Dust Processing in Supernova Remnants: Spitzer MIPS SED and IRS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, John W.; Petre, Robert; Katsuda Satoru; Andersen, M.; Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Bernard, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS SED and IRS observations of 14 Galactic Supernova Remnants previously identified in the GLIMPSE survey. We find evidence for SNR/molecular cloud interaction through detection of [OI] emission, ionic lines, and emission from molecular hydrogen. Through black-body fitting of the MIPS SEDs we find the large grains to be warm, 29-66 K. The dust emission is modeled using the DUSTEM code and a three component dust model composed of populations of big grains, very small grains, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We find the dust to be moderately heated, typically by 30-100 times the interstellar radiation field. The source of the radiation is likely hydrogen recombination, where the excitation of hydrogen occurred in the shock front. The ratio of very small grains to big grains is found for most of the molecular interacting SNRs to be higher than that found in the plane of the Milky Way, typically by a factor of 2--3. We suggest that dust shattering is responsible for the relative over-abundance of small grains, in agreement with prediction from dust destruction models. However, two of the SNRs are best fit with a very low abundance of carbon grains to silicate grains and with a very high radiation field. A likely reason for the low abundance of small carbon grains is sputtering. We find evidence for silicate emission at 20 $\\mu$m in their SEDs, indicating that they are young SNRs based on the strong radiation field necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs.

  18. Design Concept of Dialyzer Biomaterials: How to Find Biocompatible Polymers Based on the Biointerfacial Water Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    Although various types of materials have been used widely in dialyzers, most biomaterials lack the desired functional properties to interface with blood and have not been engineered for optimum performance. Therefore, there is increasing demand to develop novel materials to address such problems in the dialysis arena. Numerous parameters of polymeric biomaterials can affect biocompatibility in a controlled manner. The mechanisms responsible for the biocompatibility of polymers at the molecular level have not been clearly demonstrated, although many theoretical and experimental efforts have been made to try and understand them. Moreover, water interactions have been recognized as fundamental for the blood response to contact with polymers. We have proposed the 'intermediate water' concept and hypothesized that intermediate water, which prevents the proteins and blood cells from directly contacting the polymer surface, or nonfreezing water on the polymer surface, plays an important role in the biocompatibility of polymers. This chapter provides an overview of the recent experimental progress of biocompatible polymers measured by thermal, spectroscopic, and surface force techniques. Additionally, it highlights recent developments in the use of biocompatible polymeric biomaterials for dialyzers and provides an overview of the progress made in the design of multifunctional biomedical polymers by controlling the biointerfacial water structure through precision polymer synthesis. Key Messages: Intermediate water was found only in hydrated biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids, DNA and RNA) and hydrated biocompatible synthetic polymers. Intermediate water could be one of the main screening factors for the design of appropriate dialyzer materials. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Indicators of microbial beach water quality: preliminary findings from Teluk Kemang beach, Port Dickson (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Chen, Kwan Soo; Ismail, Sharifah Norkhadijah Syed

    2013-11-15

    This study aims to determine the concentrations of total coliforms and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in beach water, Teluk Kemang beach. This study was also aimed to determine relationship between total coliforms, E. coli and physicochemical parameters. As perceived health symptoms among beach visitors are rarely incorporated in beach water studies, this element was also assessed in this study. A total of eight water sampling points were selected randomly along Teluk Kemang beach. Total coliforms concentrations were found between 20 and 1940 cfu/100ml. E. coli concentrations were between 0 and 90 cfu/100ml. Significant correlations were found between total coliforms and E. coli with pH, temperature and oxidation reduction potential. Skin and eyes symptoms were the highest reported though in small numbers. Microbiological water quality in Teluk Kemang public beach was generally safe for recreational activities except sampling location near with sewage outfall. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Finding confined water in the hexagonal phase of Bi0. 05Eu0. 05Y0 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1H MAS NMR spectra of Bi0.05Eu0.05Y0.90PO4·H2O show chemical shift from −0.56 ppm at 300 K to −3.8 ppm at 215 K and another one at 5–6 ppm, which are related to the confined or interstitial water in the hexagonal structure and water molecules on the surface of the particles, respectively. Negative value of the ...

  1. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF PASSIVE AND STAR-FORMING EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: AN INFRARED COLOR-COLOR SEQUENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temi, Pasquale; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the infrared properties of a large sample of early-type galaxies, comparing data from the Spitzer archive with Ks-band emission from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. While most representations of this data result in correlations with large scatter, we find a remarkably tight relation among colors formed by ratios of luminosities in Spitzer-Multiband Imaging Photometer bands (24, 70, and 160 μm) and the Ks band. Remarkably, this correlation among E and S0 galaxies follows that of nearby normal galaxies of all morphological types. In particular, the tight infrared color-color correlation for S0 galaxies alone follows that of the entire Hubble sequence of normal galaxies, roughly in order of galaxy type from ellipticals to spirals to irregulars. The specific star formation rate (SFR) of S0 galaxies estimated from the 24 μm luminosity increases with decreasing K-band luminosity (or stellar mass) from essentially zero, as with most massive ellipticals, to rates typical of irregular galaxies. Moreover, the luminosities of the many infrared-luminous S0 galaxies can significantly exceed those of the most luminous (presumably post-merger) E galaxies. SFRs in the most infrared-luminous S0 galaxies approach 1-10 solar masses per year. Consistently, with this picture we find that while most early-type galaxies populate an infrared red sequence, about 24% of the objects (mostly S0s) are in an infrared blue cloud together with late-type galaxies. For those early-type galaxies also observed at radio frequencies, we find that the far-infrared luminosities correlate with the mass of neutral and molecular hydrogen, but the scatter is large. This scatter suggests that the star formation may be intermittent or that similar S0 galaxies with cold gaseous disks of nearly equal mass can have varying radial column density distributions that alter the local and global SFRs.

  2. SPITZER SAGE-SMC INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF MASSIVE STARS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, A. Z.; Lennon, D. J.; Massa, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalog of 5324 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 3654 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer SAGE-SMC survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3to24 μm in the UBVIJHK s +IRAC+MIPS24 bands. We compare the color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to those of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), finding that the brightest infrared sources in the SMC are also the red supergiants, supergiant B[e] (sgB[e]) stars, luminous blue variables, and Wolf-Rayet stars, with the latter exhibiting less infrared excess, the red supergiants being less dusty and the sgB[e] stars being on average less luminous. Among the objects detected at 24 μm in the SMC are a few very luminous hypergiants, four B-type stars with peculiar, flat spectral energy distributions, and all three known luminous blue variables. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and suggest a novel method of confirming Be star candidates photometrically. We find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in our SMC catalog, respectively, when compared to the LMC catalog, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We estimate mass-loss rates for the red supergiants, confirming the correlation with luminosity even at the metallicity of the SMC. Finally, we confirm the new class of stars displaying composite A and F type spectra, the sgB[e] nature of 2dFS1804 and find the F0 supergiant 2dFS3528 to be a candidate luminous blue variable with cold dust.

  3. A global analysis of Spitzer and new HARPS data confirms the loneliness and metal-richness of GJ 436 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanotte, A. A.; Gillon, M.; Demory, B.-O.; Fortney, J. J.; Astudillo, N.; Bonfils, X.; Magain, P.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Neves, V.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N.; Udry, S.

    2014-12-01

    Context. GJ 436b is one of the few transiting warm Neptunes for which a detailed characterisation of the atmosphere is possible, whereas its non-negligible orbital eccentricity calls for further investigation. Independent analyses of several individual datasets obtained with Spitzer have led to contradicting results attributed to the different techniques used to treat the instrumental effects. Aims: We aim at investigating these previous controversial results and developing our knowledge of the system based on the full Spitzer photometry dataset combined with new Doppler measurements obtained with the HARPS spectrograph. We also want to search for additional planets. Methods: We optimise aperture photometry techniques and the photometric deconvolution algorithm DECPHOT to improve the data reduction of the Spitzer photometry spanning wavelengths from 3-24 μm. Adding the high-precision HARPS radial velocity data, we undertake a Bayesian global analysis of the system considering both instrumental and stellar effects on the flux variation. Results: We present a refined radius estimate of RP = 4.10 ± 0.16 R⊕ , mass MP = 25.4 ± 2.1 M⊕, and eccentricity e = 0.162 ± 0.004 for GJ 436b. Our measured transit depths remain constant in time and wavelength, in disagreement with the results of previous studies. In addition, we find that the post-occultation flare-like structure at 3.6 μm that led to divergent results on the occultation depth measurement is spurious. We obtain occultation depths at 3.6, 5.8, and 8.0 μm that are shallower than in previous works, in particular at 3.6 μm. However, these depths still appear consistent with a metal-rich atmosphere depleted in methane and enhanced in CO/CO2, although perhaps less than previously thought. We could not detect a significant orbital modulation in the 8 μm phase curve. We find no evidence of a potential planetary companion, stellar activity, or a stellar spin-orbit misalignment. Conclusions: Recent theoretical

  4. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN η CORVI At ∼1 Gyr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 μm spectra of the warm, ∼350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star η Corvi (F2V, 1.4 ± 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at ∼3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 × 10 18 kg of 0.1-100 μm warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da ∼ a –3.5 , the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm 3 density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at ∼150 AU. At ∼1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s –1 with a rocky planetary body of mass ≤M Earth at ∼3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M Earth'sOceans ) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  5. Spitzer Evidence for a Late Heavy Bombardment and the Formation of Urelites in {eta}Corvi at Approximately 1 Gyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Chen, C. H.; Morlok, A.; Watson, D. M.; Manj, P.; Sheehan, P.; Currie, T. M.; Thebault, P.; Sitko, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2 - 35 micrometer spectra of the warm, 350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star eta Corvi (F2V, 1.4 plus or minus 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at 3 AU from the central star, in the system's Terrestrial Habitability Zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 x 10(exp 18) kg of 0.1 - 100 micrometer warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da a(exp -3.5), the equivalent of a 130 km radius KBO of 1.0 grams per cubic centimeter density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6 - 0.8 Gyr during the Late Heavy Bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper-Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first Myrs of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at approximately 150 AU. At approximately 1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 kilometers per second with a rocky planetary body of mass less than or equal to M(sub Earth at approximately 3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (greater than 0.1 % of M(sub Earth's Oceans)) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  6. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN {eta} CORVI At {approx}1 Gyr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wyatt, M. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morlok, A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Open University, Milton-Keynes (United Kingdom); Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Sheehan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Currie, T. M. [NASA-GSFC, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Thebault, P. [Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Sitko, M. L., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: wyatt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu, E-mail: a.morlok@open.ac.uk, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: psheeha2@mail.rochester.edu, E-mail: thayne.m.currie@nasa.gov, E-mail: philippe.thebault@obspm.fr, E-mail: sitko@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 475 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 {mu}m spectra of the warm, {approx}350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 {+-} 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at {approx}3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} kg of 0.1-100 {mu}m warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm{sup 3} density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at {approx}150 AU. At {approx}1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s{sup -1} with a rocky planetary body of mass {<=}M{sub Earth} at {approx}3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M{sub Earth'sOceans}) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  7. Parallel MOPEX: Computing Mosaics of Large-Area Spitzer Surveys on a Cluster Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C. Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Spitzer Science Center's MOPEX software is a part of the Spitzer Space Telescope's operational pipeline that enables detection of cosmic ray collisions with the detector array, masking of the corrupted pixels due to these collisions, subsequent mosaicking of image fields, and extraction of point sources to create catalogs of celestial objects. This paper reports on our experiences in parallelizing the parts of MOPEX related to cosmic ray rejection and mosaicking on a 1,024-processor cluster computer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The architecture and performance of the new Parallel MOPEX software are described. This work was done in order to rapidly mosaic the IRAC shallow survey data, covering a region of the sky observed with one of Spitzer's infrared instruments for the study of galaxy clusters, large-scale structure, and brown dwarfs.

  8. Microplastic pollution in China's inland water systems: A review of findings, methods, characteristics, effects, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Shi, Huahong; Peng, Jinping; Wang, Yinghui; Xiong, Xiong; Wu, Chenxi; Lam, Paul K S

    2018-03-13

    The pollution of marine environments and inland waters by plastic debris has raised increasing concerns worldwide in recent years. China is the world's largest developing country and the largest plastic producer. In this review, we gather available information on microplastic pollution in China's inland water systems. The results show that microplastics are ubiquitous in the investigated inland water systems, and high microplastic abundances were observed in developed areas. Although similar sampling and analytical methods were used for microplastic research in inland water and marine systems, methods of investigation should be standardized in the future. The characteristics of the detected microplastics suggest secondary sources as their major sources. The biological and ecological effects of microplastics have been demonstrated, but their risks are difficult to determine at this stage due to the discrepancy between the field-collected microplastics and microplastics used in ecotoxicological studies. Although many laws and regulations have already been established to manage and control plastic waste in China, the implementation of these laws and regulations has been ineffective and sometimes difficult. Several research priorities are identified, and we suggest that the Chinese government should be more proactive in tackling plastic pollution problems to protect the environment and fulfill international responsibilities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. New findings and setting the research agenda for soil and water conservation for sustainable land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Argaman, Eli; Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Quinton, John

    2014-05-01

    The session on soil and water conservation for sustainable land management provides insights into the current research producing viable measures for sustainable land management and enhancing the lands role as provider of ecosystem services. The insights into degradation processes are essential for designing and implementing feasible measures to mitigate against degradation of the land resource and adapt to the changing environment. Land degradation occurs due to multiple pressures on the land, such as population growth, land-use and land-cover changes, climate change and over exploitation of resources, often resulting in soil erosion due to water and wind, which occurs in many parts of the world. Understanding the processes of soil erosion by wind and water and the social and economic constraints faced by farmers forms an essential component of integrated land development projects. Soil and water conservation measures are only viable and sustainable if local environmental and socio-economic conditions are taken into account and proper enabling conditions and policies can be achieved. Land degradation increasingly occurs because land use, and farming systems are subject to rapid environmental and socio-economic changes without implementation of appropriate soil and water conservation technologies. Land use and its management are thus inextricably bound up with development; farmers must adapt in order to sustain the quality of their, and their families, lives. In broader perspective, soil and water conservation is needed as regulating ecosystem service and as a tool to enhance food security and biodiversity. Since land degradation occurs in many parts of the world and threatens food production and environmental stability it affects those countries with poorer soils and resilience in the agriculture sector first. Often these are the least developed countries. Therefore the work from researchers from developing countries together with knowledge from other disciplines

  10. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH SURVEY OF T TAURI STARS IN TAURUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlan, E.; Luhman, K. L.; Espaillat, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present 161 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of T Tauri stars and young brown dwarfs in the Taurus star-forming region. All of the targets were selected based on their infrared excess and are therefore surrounded by protoplanetary disks; they form the complete sample of all available IRS spectra of T Tauri stars with infrared excesses in Taurus. We also present the IRS spectra of seven Class 0/I objects in Taurus to complete the sample of available IRS spectra of protostars in Taurus. We use spectral indices that are not significantly affected by extinction to distinguish between envelope- and disk-dominated objects. Together with data from the literature, we construct spectral energy distributions for all objects in our sample. With spectral indices derived from the IRS spectra we infer disk properties such as dust settling and the presence of inner disk holes and gaps. We find a transitional disk frequency, which is based on objects with unusually large 13-31 μm spectral indices indicative of a wall surrounding an inner disk hole, of about 3%, and a frequency of about 20% for objects with unusually large 10 μm features, which could indicate disk gaps. The shape and strength of the 10 μm silicate emission feature suggests weaker 10 μm emission and more processed dust for very low mass objects and brown dwarfs (spectral types M6-M9). These objects also display weaker infrared excess emission from their disks, but do not appear to have more settled disks than their higher-mass counterparts. We find no difference for the spectral indices and properties of the dust between single and multiple systems.

  11. Dust in a Type Ia Supernova Progenitor: Spitzer Spectroscopy of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the relatively poorly-understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 micron IR spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 micron, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength IRS and IRAC data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally-heated dust emission from fast shocks (> 1000 km/s) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are approx 80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km/s) into moderate density material (n(sub o) approx 50-100 / cubic cm) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  12. A Spitzer search for transits of radial velocity detected super-Earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammer, J. A.; Knutson, H. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Howard, A. W.; Laughlin, G. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Deming, D.; Todorov, K. O.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Showman, A. P.; Lewis, N. K.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike hot Jupiters or other gas giants, super-Earths are expected to have a wide variety of compositions, ranging from terrestrial bodies like our own to more gaseous planets like Neptune. Observations of transiting systems, which allow us to directly measure planet masses and radii and constrain atmospheric properties, are key to understanding the compositional diversity of the planets in this mass range. Although Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting super-Earth candidates over the past 4 yr, the majority of these planets orbit stars that are too far away and too faint to allow for detailed atmospheric characterization and reliable mass estimates. Ground-based transit surveys focus on much brighter stars, but most lack the sensitivity to detect planets in this size range. One way to get around the difficulty of finding these smaller planets in transit is to start by choosing targets that are already known to host super-Earth sized bodies detected using the radial velocity (RV) technique. Here we present results from a Spitzer program to observe six of the most favorable RV-detected super-Earth systems, including HD 1461, HD 7924, HD 156668, HIP 57274, and GJ 876. We find no evidence for transits in any of their 4.5 μm flux light curves, and place limits on the allowed transit depths and corresponding planet radii that rule out even the most dense and iron-rich compositions for these objects. We also observed HD 97658, but the observation window was based on a possible ground-based transit detection that was later ruled out; thus the window did not include the predicted time for the transit detection recently made by the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars space telescope.

  13. Evaluation of the Ecosystem Services of Inland Waters in the Slovak Republic - To Date Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujnovský Radoslav

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem services (ES (goods and services represent the outputs of natural systems from which people can have benefits. Evaluation of the benefits resulting from ES of inland waters or the benefits, which are lost when the necessary measures are not implemented, is one of the methods of evaluating the external costs of environmental damage - environmental and resource costs. Evaluation of ES is based on the CICES classification v. 4.3, which defines provision, regulation/ maintenance and cultural services. In the assessment of ES also enters groundwater, although in comparison with surface waters in lesser extent. At present, the evaluation is performed at the level of sub-basins of the Slovak Republic. In this paper, evaluation of selected ES is presented. Use of evaluation in practice is also discussed.

  14. The Water, Energy and Food Nexus: Finding the Balance in Infrastructure Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber-lee, A. T.; Wickel, B.; Kemp-Benedict, E.; Purkey, D. R.; Hoff, H.; Heaps, C.

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that single-sector infrastructure planning is leading to severely stressed human and ecological systems. There are a number of cross-sectoral impacts in these highly inter-linked systems. Examples include: - Promotion of biofuels that leads to conversion from food crops, reducing both food and water security. - Promotion of dams solely built for hydropower rather than multi-purpose uses, that deplete fisheries and affect saltwater intrusion dynamics in downstream deltas - Historical use of water for cooling thermal power plants, with increasing pressure from other water uses, as well as problems of increased water temperatures that affect the ability to cool plants efficiently. This list can easily be expanded, as these inter-linkages are increasing over time. As developing countries see a need to invest in new infrastructure to improve the livelihoods of the poor, developed countries face conditions of deteriorating infrastructure with an opportunity for new investment. It is crucial, especially in the face of uncertainty of climate change and socio-political realities, that infrastructure planning factors in the influence of multiple sectors and the potential impacts from the perspectives of different stakeholders. There is a need for stronger linkages between science and policy as well. The Stockholm Environment Institute is developing and implementing practical and innovative nexus planning approaches in Latin America, Africa and Asia that brings together stakeholders and ways of integrating uncertainty in a cross-sectoral quantitative framework using the tools WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning) and LEAP (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning). The steps used include: 1. Identify key actors and stakeholders via social network analysis 2. Work with these actors to scope out priority issues and decision criteria in both the short and long term 3. Develop quantitative models to clarify options and balances between the needs and

  15. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses

  16. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

  17. A Direct Imaging Survey of Spitzer-detected Debris Disks: Occurrence of Giant Planets in Dusty Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Tiffany; Mawet, Dimitri; Bryan, Marta L.; Hinkley, Sasha; Bowler, Brendan P.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Batygin, Konstantin; Padgett, Deborah; Morales, Farisa Y.; Serabyn, Eugene; Christiaens, Valentin; Brandt, Timothy D.; Wahhaj, Zahed

    2017-12-01

    We describe a joint high-contrast imaging survey for planets at the Keck and Very Large Telescope of the last large sample of debris disks identified by the Spitzer Space Telescope. No new substellar companions were discovered in our survey of 30 Spitzer-selected targets. We combine our observations with data from four published surveys to place constraints on the frequency of planets around 130 debris disk single stars, the largest sample to date. For a control sample, we assembled contrast curves from several published surveys targeting 277 stars that do not show infrared excesses. We assumed a double power-law distribution in mass and semimajor axis (SMA) of the form f(m,a)={{Cm}}α {a}β , where we adopted power-law values and logarithmically flat values for the mass and SMA of planets. We find that the frequency of giant planets with masses 5-20 M Jup and separations 10-1000 au around stars with debris disks is 6.27% (68% confidence interval 3.68%-9.76%), compared to 0.73% (68% confidence interval 0.20%-1.80%) for the control sample of stars without disks. These distributions differ at the 88% confidence level, tentatively suggesting distinctness of these samples. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  18. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN ORION A. I. DISK PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. H. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Watson, Dan M.; Manoj, P.; Forrest, W. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Furlan, Elise [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Najita, Joan [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sargent, Benjamin [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Hernández, Jesús [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía, Apdo. Postal 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Adame, Lucía [Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Universidad S/N, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451, México (Mexico); Espaillat, Catherine [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Megeath, S. T. [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Muzerolle, James, E-mail: quarkosmos@kasi.re.kr [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2016-09-01

    We present our investigation of 319 Class II objects in Orion A observed by Spitzer /IRS. We also present the follow-up observations of 120 of these Class II objects in Orion A from the Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX. We measure continuum spectral indices, equivalent widths, and integrated fluxes that pertain to disk structure and dust composition from IRS spectra of Class II objects in Orion A. We estimate mass accretion rates using hydrogen recombination lines in the SpeX spectra of our targets. Utilizing these properties, we compare the distributions of the disk and dust properties of Orion A disks with those of Taurus disks with respect to position within Orion A (Orion Nebular Cluster [ONC] and L1641) and with the subgroups by the inferred radial structures, such as transitional disks (TDs) versus radially continuous full disks (FDs). Our main findings are as follows. (1) Inner disks evolve faster than the outer disks. (2) The mass accretion rates of TDs and those of radially continuous FDs are statistically significantly displaced from each other. The median mass accretion rate of radially continuous disks in the ONC and L1641 is not very different from that in Taurus. (3) Less grain processing has occurred in the disks in the ONC compared to those in Taurus, based on analysis of the shape index of the 10 μ m silicate feature ( F {sub 11.3}/ F {sub 9.8}). (4) The 20–31 μ m continuum spectral index tracks the projected distance from the most luminous Trapezium star, θ {sup 1} Ori C. A possible explanation is UV ablation of the outer parts of disks.

  19. Detection of Planetary Emission from the Exoplanet TrES-2 Using Spitzer/IRAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Francis T.; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph; Madhusudhan, N.; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the results of our observations of TrES-2 using the Infrared Array Camera on Spitzer. We monitored this transiting system during two secondary eclipses, when the planetary emission is blocked by the star. The resulting decrease in flux is 0.127% +/- 0.021%, 0.230% +/- 0.024%, 0.199% +/- 0.054%, and 0.359% +/- 0.060% at 3.6 microns, 4.5 microns, 5.8 microns, and 8.0 microns, respectively. We show that three of these flux contrasts are well fit by a blackbody spectrum with T(sub eff) = 1500 K, as well as by a more detailed model spectrum of a planetary atmosphere. The observed planet-to-star flux ratios in all four lRAC channels can be explained by models with and without a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of TrES-2, although with different atmospheric chemistry. Based on the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the chemical composition of the inversion model seems more plausible, making it a more favorable scenario. TrES-2 also falls in the category of highly irradiated planets which have been theoretically predicted to exhibit thermal inversions. However, more observations at infrared and visible wavelengths would be needed to confirm a thermal inversion in this system. Furthermore, we find that the times of the secondary eclipses are consistent with previously published times of transit and the expectation from a circular orbit. This implies that TrES-2 most likely has a circular orbit, and thus does not obtain additional thermal energy from tidal dissipation of a non-zero orbital eccentricity, a proposed explanation for the large radius of this planet. Key words: eclipses - infrared: stars - planetary systems - stars: individual (OSC 03549-02811) - techniques: photometric

  20. Asteroid (16) Psyche: Evidence for a silicate regolith from spitzer space telescope spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, Zoe A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Campins, Humberto; Hanuš, Josef; Lim, Lucy F.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2018-04-01

    Asteroid (16) Psyche is a unique, metal-rich object belonging to the "M" taxonomic class. It may be a remnant protoplanet that has been stripped of most silicates by a hit-and-run collision. Because Psyche offers insight into the planetary formation process, it is the target of NASA's Psyche mission, set to launch in 2023. In order to constrain Psyche's surface properties, we have carried out a mid-infrared (5-14 μm) spectroscopic study using data collected with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph. Our study includes two observations covering different rotational phases. Using thermophysical modeling, we find that Psyche's surface is smooth and likely has a thermal inertia Γ = 5-25 J/m2/K/s1/2 and bolometric emissivity ɛ = 0.9, although a scenario with ɛ = 0.7 and thermal inertia up to 95 J/m2/K/s1/2 is possible if Psyche is somewhat larger than previously determined. The smooth surface is consistent with the presence of a metallic bedrock, which would be more ductile than silicate bedrock, and thus may not readily form boulders upon impact events. From comparisons with laboratory spectra of silicate and meteorite powders, Psyche's 7-14 μm emissivity spectrum is consistent with the presence of fine-grained (< 75 μm) silicates on Psyche's surface. We conclude that Psyche is likely covered in a fine silicate regolith, which may also contain iron grains, overlying an iron-rich bedrock.

  1. Physical Properties of Asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, a Potential Spacecraft Target, from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Harris, A. W.

    2006-01-01

    We report on results from recent Spitzer observations of near-Earth asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, which is among the lowest-ranking objects in terms of the specific momentum Δv required to reach it from Earth. It was originally considered as a target for Hayabusa and is now under consideration as a

  2. THE TAURUS SPITZER SURVEY: NEW CANDIDATE TAURUS MEMBERS SELECTED USING SENSITIVE MID-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; McCabe, C.-E.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; Brooke, T.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Angione, J. R.; Huard, T.; Terebey, S.; Audard, M.; Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Monin, J.-L.; Menard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Fukagawa, M.; Guedel, M.; Knapp, G. R.; Allen, L. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the properties of pre-main-sequence objects in the Taurus molecular clouds as observed in seven mid- and far-infrared bands with the Spitzer Space Telescope. There are 215 previously identified members of the Taurus star-forming region in our ∼44 deg 2 map; these members exhibit a range of Spitzer colors that we take to define young stars still surrounded by circumstellar dust (noting that ∼20% of the bona fide Taurus members exhibit no detectable dust excesses). We looked for new objects in the survey field with similar Spitzer properties, aided by extensive optical, X-ray, and ultraviolet imaging, and found 148 new candidate members of Taurus. We have obtained follow-up spectroscopy for about half the candidate sample, thus far confirming 34 new members, three probable new members, and 10 possible new members, an increase of 15%-20% in Taurus members. Of the objects for which we have spectroscopy, seven are now confirmed extragalactic objects, and one is a background Be star. The remaining 93 candidate objects await additional analysis and/or data to be confirmed or rejected as Taurus members. Most of the new members are Class II M stars and are located along the same cloud filaments as the previously identified Taurus members. Among non-members with Spitzer colors similar to young, dusty stars are evolved Be stars, planetary nebulae, carbon stars, galaxies, and active galactic nuclei.

  3. The Accuracy of the Warm Spitzer Near-Earth Object Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Alan W.; Mommert, M.; Hora, J. L.; Mueller, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Delbo', M.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Mainzer, A.; Penprase, B.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Stansberry, J. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report on observations of near-Earth objects (NEOs) performed with IRAC as part of our on-going (2009-2011) Warm Spitzer NEO survey ("ExploreNEOs"), the primary aim of which is to provide sizes and albedos of some 700 NEOs. The emphasis of the work described here is an assessment of the overall

  4. Spitzer Observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 Reveal a New Path toward Breaking Strong Microlens Degeneracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozza, V.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Udalski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively break a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter s...

  5. HST and Spitzer point source and dust lane detection in powerful narrow-line radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, E. A.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Dicken, D.; Rose, M.; Axon, D. J.; Sparks, W.

    2014-10-01

    We present the analysis of infrared HST and Spitzer data for a sample of 13 FRII powerful radio galaxies at 0.03 scale toroidal structure when this is viewed edge-on (Barthel 1989, Antonucci 1993). Our high resolution infrared observations provide new information about the optical extinction, orientation, and direct AGN detection of the inner kpc-scale region of the AGN.

  6. Random walks, Brownian motion, and interacting particle systems: a festschrift in honor of Frank Spitzer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Durrett, Richard; Kesten, Harry; Spitzer, Frank

    1991-01-01

    ..., made the transparency used in the printing process. STUDENTS OF FRANK SPITZERSTUDENTS OF FRANK SPITZER 1957 J. W. Lamperti, On the asymptotic behavior of recurrent and almostrecurrent events. 1964 W. W. Whitman, Some strong laws for random walks and Brownian motion. 1965 J. C. Mineka, The existence and uniqueness of positive solutions to the Wien...

  7. Thermal properties of Trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Mommert, M.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Mueller, Th.; Kiss, C.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Harris, A. W.; Delsanti, A.; Groussin, O.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal properties of about 70 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs observed with Herschel Space Observatory [8] (either PACS or PACS and SPIRE) and Spitzer Space Telescope [12] (MIPS). We apply radiometric modeling techniques (NEATM [2]) to the measured fluxes to

  8. Thermal Properties Of Trans-neptunian Objects And Centaurs From Combined Herschel And Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, Emmanuel; Santos-Sanz, P.; Mommert, M.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Müller, T.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J.; Kiss, C.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Lacerda, P.; Harris, A.; TNOs are Cool Team, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal properties of about 70 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs observed with Herschel Space Observatory (either PACS or PACS/SPIRE) and Spitzer (MIPS). The combined wavelength range is 24-160 μm and additionally up to 500 μm for a few targets. We apply

  9. Dust evolution in protoplanetary disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars—the Spitzer view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juhász, A.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, T.; Acke, B.; van den Ancker, M.E.; Meeus, G.; Dominik, C.; Min, M.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Waters, L.B.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present mid-infrared spectra of a comprehensive set of Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The signal-to-noise ratio of these spectra is very high, ranging between about a hundred and several hundreds. During the analysis of these data we tested the

  10. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks Around Herbig Ae/Be Stars—the Spitzer View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juhasz, A.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th.; Acke, B.; van den Ancker, M. E.; Meeus, G.; Dominik, C.; Min, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present mid-infrared spectra of a comprehensive set of Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The signal-to-noise ratio of these spectra is very high, ranging between about a hundred and several hundreds. During the analysis of these data we tested the

  11. The Spitzer IRS infrared spectrum and abundances of the planetary nebula IC 2448

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guiles, S.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Pottasch, S. R.; Roellig, T. L.

    2007-01-01

    We present the mid-infrared spectrum of the planetary nebula IC 2448. In order to determine the chemical composition of the nebula, we use the infrared line fluxes from the Spitzer spectrum along with optical line fluxes from the literature and ultraviolet line fluxes from archival IUE spectra. We

  12. Visible photometry of NEOs in support of a Warm Spitzer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, David E.; Jones, Sarah; Penprase, Bryan; Emery, Josh; Harris, Alan; Spahr, Tim; Delbo, Marco

    2009-08-01

    Near Earth Objects (NEOs) may act as dynamical and compositional tracers of the history of near-Earth space. However, despite their scientific importance, key characteristics of the NEO population -- such as the size distribution, mix of albedos and mineralogies, and contributions from so-called dead or dormant comets -- remain largely unexplored; some 99% of all presently known NEOs are essentially uncharacterized. We have been awarded 500 hours of Warm Spitzer time to study some 700 NEOs. The Spitzer data will allow us to measure thermal fluxes and, in combination with optical data, derive albedos and diameters for a large fraction of all known NEOs. Remarkably, the primary uncertainty in our Spitzer results will derive from a lack of good optical photometry for our targets. Fortunately, our targets are generally bright, and obtaining good V band measurements of them requires only a modest amount of time on modest aperture telescopes. We propose here for 36 hours of SMARTS 1.3-m time or 54 hours of SMARTS 0.9-m time to obtain visible photometry of the 72 southern moderately bright ``B'' semester targets in our Warm Spitzer program. These program is ideal for queue/service observing because each observation requires only ~30 minutes and our targets are all over the sky.

  13. Bulk Densities of Binary Asteroids from the Warm Spitzer NEO Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistler, John; Trilling, D. E.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Harris, A. W.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Emery, J. P.; Fazo, G.; Mainzer, A.; Penprase, B.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Stansberry, J. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The Warm Spitzer NEO survey, ExploreNEOs, will observe approximately 700 Near Earth Asteroids. Several of these objects are known to be binary asteroid systems. Binary systems are interesting due to the unique opportunity they present for determining the masses and densities of their constituent

  14. A Search for Additional Bodies in the GJ 1132 Planetary System from 21 Ground-based Transits and a 100-hr Spitzer Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results of a search for additional bodies in the GJ 1132 system through two methods: photometric transits and transit timing variations of GJ 1132b. We collected 21 transit observations of GJ 1132b with the MEarth-South array. We obtained 100 near-continuous hours of observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope, including two transits of GJ 1132b and spanning 60% of the orbital phase of the maximum (6.9-day) period at which bodies coplanar with GJ 1132b would transit. We exclude transits of additional Mars-sized bodies, such as a second planet or a moon, with a confidence of 99.7%. We find that the planet-to-star radius ratio inferred from the MEarth and Spitzer light curves are discrepant at the 3.7σ level, which we ascribe to the effects of starspots and faculae. When we combine the mass estimate of the star (obtained from its parallax and apparent K s band magnitude) with the stellar density inferred from our high-cadence Spitzer light curve (assuming zero eccentricity), we measure the stellar radius of GJ 1132 to be {0.2105}-0.0085+0.0102 {R}⊙ , and we refine the radius measurement of GJ 1132b to 1.130+/- 0.056 {R}\\oplus . Combined with HARPS RV measurements, we determine the density of GJ 1132b to be 6.2 ± 2.0 g cm-3. We refine the ephemeris of the system (improving the period determination by an order of magnitude) and find no evidence for transit timing variations, which would be expected if there was a second planet near an orbital resonance with GJ 1132b.

  15. Initial findings: The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marseille, T.J.; Johnson, B.K.; Wallin, R.P.; Chiu, S.A.; Crawley, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building System Integration Research Program. The goal of the program is to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving integrated decision-making during design and construction. Improved decision-making could significantly reduce buildings' energy use by the year 2010. The objectives of the Commercial Building System Integration Research Program are: to identify and quantify the most significant energy-related interactions among building subsystems; to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving energy related interactions in building subsystems; and to provide guidance to designers, owners, and builders for improving the integration of building subsystems for energy efficiency. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research, development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued. In this report, the interactions of a water loop heat pump system and building structural mass and their effect on whole-building energy performance is analyzed. 10 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

  16. New Results from Spitzer's Journey Through The Earth's Resonant Ring: 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Sumita; Grogan, K.; Bhattacharya, B.; Reach, W. T.

    2006-09-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, in its solar orbit, has been drifting away from the Earth - enabling it to trace a path through the Earth's Resonant Ring, specifically, traverse through the resonant dust cloud that follows the Earth. The dust cloud causes the mid-infrared flux in the sky to be higher in the trailing direction when viewed from the Earth. After launch, Spitzer has slowly entered into the dust cloud and has crossed over the peak dust density of the trailing dust cloud. This causes a change in the trailing/leading asymmetry in the background flux. Eventually the leading flux will be higher as Spitzer views the cloud from the opposite side at the end of the mission. We have designed a zodiacal background monitoring program for the ecliptic and north and south ecliptic poles to obtain absolutely calibrated data in the MIPS total power mode. This program includes observations from 2004 to 2006 and will continue into the next observation cycle. We present new results measuring the change in the zodiacal background radiation at 24 microns in combination with science calibration observation observations from IRAC during this period. Further comparison of the multi-wavelength measurements to models shows the detailed ring structure and the provide estimates of the ring dust density in the Resonant Ring. We would like to thank NASA/JPL for funding this program through the Spitzer GO Cycle. We would also like to thank the Spitzer Science Center for helping us to schedule the individual solar system observations after the MIPS campaign dates are fixed and contributing the IRAC calibration observations.

  17. Physical Characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed Near-Earth Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbo, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) connects diagnostic spectral features to specific surface mineralogies. The combination of spectroscopy with albedos and diameters derived from thermal infrared observations can increase the scientific return beyond that of the individual datasets. For instance, some taxonomic classes can be separated into distinct compositional groupings with albedo and different mineralogies with similar albedos can be distinguished with spectroscopy. To that end, we have completed a spectroscopic observing campaign to complement the ExploreNEOs Warm Spitzer program that obtained albedos and diameters of nearly 600 NEOs (Trilling et al., 2010). The spectroscopy campaign included visible and near-infrared observations of ExploreNEOs targets from various observatories. Here we present the results of observations using the low-resolution prism mode (approx. 0.7-2.5 microns) of the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We also include near-infrared observations of Explore-NEOs targets from the MIT-UH-IRTF Joint Campaign for Spectral Reconnaissance. Our dataset includes near-infrared spectra of 187 ExploreNEOs targets (125 observations of 92 objects from our survey and 213 observations of 154 objects from the MIT survey). We identify a taxonomic class for each spectrum and use band parameter analysis to investigate the mineralogies for the S-, Q-, and V-complex objects. Our analysis suggests that for spectra that contain near-infrared data but lack the visible wavelength region, the Bus-DeMeo system misidentifies some S-types as Q-types. We find no correlation between spectral band parameters and ExploreNEOs albedos and diameters. We investigate the correlations of phase angle with band area ratio and near-infrared spectral slope. We find slightly negative Band Area Ratio (BAR) correlations with phase angle for Eros and Ivar, but a positive BAR correlation with phase angle for Ganymed.The results of our

  18. Lung function in adults following in utero and childhood exposure to arsenic in drinking water: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphiné, David C; Ferreccio, Catterina; Guntur, Sandeep; Yuan, Yan; Hammond, S Katharine; Balmes, John; Smith, Allan H; Steinmaus, Craig

    2011-08-01

    Evidence suggests that arsenic in drinking water causes non-malignant lung disease, but nearly all data concern exposed adults. The desert city of Antofagasta (population 257,976) in northern Chile had high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water (>800 μg/l) from 1958 until 1970, when a new treatment plant was installed. This scenario, with its large population, distinct period of high exposure, and accurate data on past exposure, is virtually unprecedented in environmental epidemiology. We conducted a pilot study on early-life arsenic exposure and long-term lung function. We present these preliminary findings because of the magnitude of the effects observed. We recruited a convenience sample consisting primarily of nursing school employees in Antofagasta and Arica, a city with low drinking water arsenic. Lung function and respiratory symptoms in 32 adults exposed to >800 μg/l arsenic before age 10 were compared to 65 adults without high early-life exposure. Early-life arsenic exposure was associated with 11.5% lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) (P = 0.04), 12.2% lower forced vital capacity (FVC) (P = 0.04), and increased breathlessness (prevalence odds ratio = 5.94, 95% confidence interval 1.36-26.0). Exposure-response relationships between early-life arsenic concentration and adult FEV(1) and FVC were also identified (P trend = 0.03). Early-life exposure to arsenic in drinking water may have irreversible respiratory effects of a magnitude similar to smoking throughout adulthood. Given the small study size and non-random recruitment methods, further research is needed to confirm these findings.

  19. CSO CO (2–1) and Spitzer IRAC observations of a bipolar outflow in high-mass star-forming region IRAS 22506+5944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ze-Qiang; Qiu, Ke-Ping

    2018-02-01

    We present Caltech Submillimeter Observatory CO (2–1) and Spitzer IRAC observations toward IRAS 22506+5944, which is a 104 L ⊙ massive star-forming region. The CO (2–1) maps show an east-west bipolar molecular outflow originating from the 3 mm dust continuum peak. The Spitzer IRAC color-composite image reveals a pair of bow-shaped tips which are prominent in excess 4.5μm emission and are located at the leading fronts of the bipolar outflow, providing compelling evidence for the existence of bow-shocks as the driving agents of the molecular outflow. By comparing our CO (2–1) observations with previously published CO (1–0) data, we find that the CO (2–1)/(1–0) line ratio increases from low (∼5 kms‑1) to moderate (∼8–12 kms‑1) velocities, and then decreases at higher velocities. This is qualitatively consistent with the scenario that the molecular outflow is driven by multiple bow-shocks. We also revisit the position-velocity diagram of the CO (1–0) data, and find two spur structures along the outflow axis, which are further evidence for the presence of multiple jet bowshocks. Finally, power-law fittings to the mass spectrum of the outflow gives power law indexes more consistent with the jet bow-shock model than the wide-angle wind model.

  20. SPARC: MASS MODELS FOR 175 DISK GALAXIES WITH SPITZER PHOTOMETRY AND ACCURATE ROTATION CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelli, Federico; McGaugh, Stacy S. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Schombert, James M., E-mail: federico.lelli@case.edu [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    We introduce SPARC ( Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves): a sample of 175 nearby galaxies with new surface photometry at 3.6  μ m and high-quality rotation curves from previous H i/H α studies. SPARC spans a broad range of morphologies (S0 to Irr), luminosities (∼5 dex), and surface brightnesses (∼4 dex). We derive [3.6] surface photometry and study structural relations of stellar and gas disks. We find that both the stellar mass–H i mass relation and the stellar radius–H i radius relation have significant intrinsic scatter, while the H i   mass–radius relation is extremely tight. We build detailed mass models and quantify the ratio of baryonic to observed velocity ( V {sub bar}/ V {sub obs}) for different characteristic radii and values of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (ϒ{sub ⋆}) at [3.6]. Assuming ϒ{sub ⋆} ≃ 0.5 M {sub ⊙}/ L {sub ⊙} (as suggested by stellar population models), we find that (i) the gas fraction linearly correlates with total luminosity; (ii) the transition from star-dominated to gas-dominated galaxies roughly corresponds to the transition from spiral galaxies to dwarf irregulars, in line with density wave theory; and (iii)  V {sub bar}/ V {sub obs} varies with luminosity and surface brightness: high-mass, high-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly maximal, while low-mass, low-surface-brightness galaxies are submaximal. These basic properties are lost for low values of ϒ{sub ⋆} ≃ 0.2 M {sub ⊙}/ L {sub ⊙} as suggested by the DiskMass survey. The mean maximum-disk limit in bright galaxies is ϒ{sub ⋆} ≃ 0.7 M {sub ⊙}/ L {sub ⊙} at [3.6]. The SPARC data are publicly available and represent an ideal test bed for models of galaxy formation.

  1. SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS IN THE 5 Myr OLD UPPER SCORPIUS OB ASSOCIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahm, S. E.; Carpenter, John M.

    2009-01-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra between 5.2 and 38 μm for 26 disk-bearing members of the ∼5 Myr old Upper Scorpius OB association obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find clear evidence for changes in the spectral characteristics of dust emission between the early-type (B+A) and late-type (K+M) infrared excess stars. The early-type members exhibit featureless continuum excesses that become apparent redward of ∼8 μm. In contrast, 10 and 20 μm silicate features or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission are present in all but one of the late-type excess members of Upper Scorpius. The strength of silicate emission among late-type Upper Scorpius members is spectral-type dependent, with the most prominent features being associated with K5-M2-type stars. By fitting the spectral energy distributions (SED) of a representative sample of low-mass stars with accretion disk models, we find that the SEDs are consistent with models having inner disk radii ranging from ∼0.2 to 1.2 AU. Complementary high-resolution (R ∼ 33, 000) optical (λλ4800-9200) spectra for the Upper Scorpius excess stars were examined for signatures of gaseous accretion. Of the 35 infrared excess stars identified in Upper Scorpius, only seven (all late-type) exhibit definitive signatures of accretion. Mass-accretion rates for these stars were estimated to range from 10 -11 to 10 -8.9 M sun yr -1 . Compared to Class II sources in Taurus-Auriga, the disk population in Upper Scorpius exhibits reduced levels of near- and mid-infrared excess emission and an order of magnitude lower mass-accretion rates. These results suggest that the disk structure has changed significantly over the 2-4 Myr in age separating these two stellar populations. The ubiquity of depleted inner disks in the Upper Scorpius excess sample implies that such disks are a common evolutionary pathway that persists for some time.

  2. Electron Energy Distribution in Hotspots of Cygnus A:Filling the Gap with Spitzer Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, L.; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-03-06

    Here we present Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of Cyg A with the Infrared Array Camera at 4.5 {micro}m and 8.0 {micro}m, resulting in the detection of the high-energy tails or cut-offs in the synchrotron spectra for all four hotspots of this archetype radio galaxy. When combined with the other data collected (and re-analyzed) from the literature, our observations allow for detailed modeling of the broad-band (radio-to-X-ray) emission for the brightest spots A and D. We confirm that the X-ray flux detected previously from these features is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton radiation for the magnetic field intensity B {approx} 170 {micro}G in spot A, and B {approx} 270 {micro}G in spot D. We also find that the energy density of the emitting electrons is most likely larger by a factor of a few than the energy density of the hotspots magnetic field. We construct energy spectra of the radiating ultrarelativistic electrons. We find that for both hotspots A and D these spectra are consistent with a broken power-law extending from at least 100MeV up to {approx} 100GeV, and that the spectral break corresponds almost exactly to the proton rest energy of {approx} 1GeV. We argue that the shape of the electron continuum most likely reflects two different regimes of the electron acceleration process taking place at mildly relativistic shocks, rather than resulting from radiative cooling and/or absorption e.ects. In this picture the protons inertia defines the critical energy for the hotspot electrons above which Fermi-type acceleration processes may play a major role, but below which the operating acceleration mechanism has to be of a different type. At energies {approx}> 100 GeV, the electron spectra cut-off/steepen again, most likely as a result of spectral aging due to radiative loss effects. We discuss several implications of the presented analysis for the physics of extragalactic jets.

  3. Electron Energy Distribution in Hotspots of Cygnus A:Filling the Gap with Spitzer Space Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stawarz, L.; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Here we present Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of Cyg A with the Infrared Array Camera at 4.5 (micro)m and 8.0 (micro)m, resulting in the detection of the high-energy tails or cut-offs in the synchrotron spectra for all four hotspots of this archetype radio galaxy. When combined with the other data collected (and re-analyzed) from the literature, our observations allow for detailed modeling of the broad-band (radio-to-X-ray) emission for the brightest spots A and D. We confirm that the X-ray flux detected previously from these features is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton radiation for the magnetic field intensity B ∼ 170 (micro)G in spot A, and B ∼ 270 (micro)G in spot D. We also find that the energy density of the emitting electrons is most likely larger by a factor of a few than the energy density of the hotspots magnetic field. We construct energy spectra of the radiating ultrarelativistic electrons. We find that for both hotspots A and D these spectra are consistent with a broken power-law extending from at least 100MeV up to ∼ 100GeV, and that the spectral break corresponds almost exactly to the proton rest energy of ∼ 1GeV. We argue that the shape of the electron continuum most likely reflects two different regimes of the electron acceleration process taking place at mildly relativistic shocks, rather than resulting from radiative cooling and/or absorption e.ects. In this picture the protons inertia defines the critical energy for the hotspot electrons above which Fermi-type acceleration processes may play a major role, but below which the operating acceleration mechanism has to be of a different type. At energies ∼> 100 GeV, the electron spectra cut-off/steepen again, most likely as a result of spectral aging due to radiative loss effects. We discuss several implications of the presented analysis for the physics of extragalactic jets

  4. The CO2 Abundance in Comets C2012 K1 (PanSTARRS), C2012 K5 (LINEAR), and 290P Jager as Measured with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Adam J.; Kelley, Michael S.P.; Cochran, Anita L.; Bodewits, Dennis; DiSanti, Michael A.; Dello Russo, Neil; Lisse, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most abundant ices present in comets and is therefore important for understanding cometary composition and activity. We present analysis of observations of CO2 and [O I] emission in three comets to measure the CO2 abundance and evaluate the possibility of employing observations of [O I] emission in comets as a proxy for CO2. We obtained NIR imaging sensitive to CO2 of comets C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS), C/2012 K5 (LINEAR), and 290P/Jager with the IRAC instrument on Spitzer. We acquired observations of [O I] emission in these comets with the ARCES echelle spectrometer mounted on the 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory and observations of OH with the Swift observatory (PanSTARRS) and with Keck HIRES (Jager). The CO2/H2O ratios derived from the Spitzer images are 12.6 +/- 1.3% (PanSTARRS), 28.9 +/- 3.6% (LINEAR), and 31.3 +/- 4.2% (Jager). These abundances are derived under the assumption that contamination from CO emission is negligible. The CO2 abundance for PanSTARRS is close to the average abundance measured in comets at similar heliocentric distance to date, while the abundances measured for LINEAR and Jager are significantly larger than the average abundance. From the coma morphology observed in PanSTARRS and the assumed gas expansion velocity, we derive a rotation period for the nucleus of about 9.2 h. Comparison of H2O production rates derived from ARCES and Swift data, as well as other observations, suggest the possibility of sublimation from icy grains in the inner coma. We evaluate the possibility that the [O I] emission can be employed as a proxy for CO2 by comparing CO2/H2O ratios inferred from the [O I] lines to those measured directly by Spitzer. We find that for PanSTARRS we can reproduce the observed CO2 abundance to an accuracy of approximately 20%. For LINEAR and Jager, we were only able to obtain upper limits on the CO2 abundance inferred from the [O I] lines. These upper limits are consistent with the CO2 abundances

  5. New Software for Ensemble Creation in the Spitzer-Space-Telescope Operations Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Russ; Rector, John

    2004-01-01

    Some of the computer pipelines used to process digital astronomical images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope require multiple input images, in order to generate high-level science and calibration products. The images are grouped into ensembles according to well documented ensemble-creation rules by making explicit associations in the operations Informix database at the Spitzer Science Center (SSC). The advantage of this approach is that a simple database query can retrieve the required ensemble of pipeline input images. New and improved software for ensemble creation has been developed. The new software is much faster than the existing software because it uses pre-compiled database stored-procedures written in Informix SPL (SQL programming language). The new software is also more flexible because the ensemble creation rules are now stored in and read from newly defined database tables. This table-driven approach was implemented so that ensemble rules can be inserted, updated, or deleted without modifying software.

  6. SPITZER PARALLAX OF OGLE-2015-BLG-0966: A COLD NEPTUNE IN THE GALACTIC DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Street, R. A.; Bachelet, E. [LCOGT, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Novati, S. Calchi [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hundertmark, M. P. G.; Jørgensen, U. G. [Niels Bohr Institute and Centre for Star and Planet Formation, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5, DK-1350—Copenhagen K (Denmark); Zhu, W.; Gould, A. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Yee, J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tsapras, Y. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg (ZAH), D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Dominik, M. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Andersen, M. I. [Niels Bohr Institute and Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Mariesvej 30, DK-2100—Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Bozza, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E.R. Caianiello,” Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084, Fisciano (Italy); Bramich, D. M. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Collaboration: RoboNet Project and MiNDSTEp Consortium; OGLE Project; Spitzer Team; MOA Collaboration; KMTNet Modeling Team; and others

    2016-03-10

    We report the detection of a cold Neptune m{sub planet} = 21 ± 2 M{sub ⊕} orbiting a 0.38 M{sub ⊙} M dwarf lying 2.5–3.3 kpc toward the Galactic center as part of a campaign combining ground-based and Spitzer observations to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. This is the first time that the complex real-time protocols described by Yee et al., which aim to maximize planet sensitivity while maintaining sample integrity, have been carried out in practice. Multiple survey and follow up teams successfully combined their efforts within the framework of these protocols to detect this planet. This is the second planet in the Spitzer Galactic distribution sample. Both are in the near to mid-disk and are clearly not in the Galactic bulge.

  7. Physical Properties of Asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, a Potential Spacecraft Target, from Spitzer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Harris, A. W.

    2006-09-01

    We report on results from recent Spitzer observations of near-Earth asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, which is among the lowest-ranking objects in terms of the specific momentum Δv required to reach it from Earth. It was originally considered as a target for Hayabusa and is now under consideration as a target of the planned ESA mission Don Quijote. Unfortunately, little is known about the physical properties of 1989 ML, in particular its size and albedo are unknown. Its exhibits an X type reflection spectrum, so depending on its albedo, 1989 ML may be an E, M, or P type asteroid. Provisional results from thermal-infrared observations carried out with Spitzer indicate that the albedo of 1989 ML is compatible with an M- or E-type classification. We will discuss our results and their implications for the physical properties and the rotation period of 1989 ML, and its importance as a potential spacecraft target. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  8. The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program: the life-cycle of dust and gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Point source classification - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, O. C.; Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F.; Kraemer, K. E.; Sloan, G. C.; Srinivasan, S.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Boyer, M. L.; Sargent, B. A.; McDonald, I.; Meixner, M.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Ruffle, P. M. E.; Lagadec, E.; Pauly, T.; Sewiło, M.; Clayton, G. C.; Volk, K.

    2017-09-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope observed nearly 800 point sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), taking over 1000 spectra. 197 of these targets were observed as part of the SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program; the remainder are from a variety of different calibration, guaranteed time and open time projects. We classify these point sources into types according to their infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership and variability information, using a decision-tree classification method. We then refine the classification using supplementary information from the astrophysical literature. We find that our IRS sample is comprised substantially of YSO and H II regions, post-main-sequence low-mass stars: (post-)asymptotic giant branch stars and planetary nebulae and massive stars including several rare evolutionary types. Two supernova remnants, a nova and several background galaxies were also observed. We use these classifications to improve our understanding of the stellar populations in the LMC, study the composition and characteristics of dust species in a variety of LMC objects, and to verify the photometric classification methods used by mid-IR surveys. We discover that some widely used catalogues of objects contain considerable contamination and others are missing sources in our sample.

  9. Comparison of extravascular lung water volume with radiographic findings in dogs with experimentally increased permeability pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, A.; Okumura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Hagio, M.; Fujinaga, T.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between extravascular lung water volume (ELWV) and chest radiographical findings was studied in general-anesthetized beagles. The dogs were experimentally injected with oleic acid to increase pulmonary vascular permeability. When the ELWV value in the dogs increased more than approximately 37% from the control value, their chest radiographs began to show signs of pulmonary edema. At this time, the chest X-ray density increased to 10% above the control level. PaO2 decreased, and PaCO2 increased after the administration of oleic acid. This clearly showed that the pulmonary gas exchange function was reduced following increasing ELWV. This comparison showed that probably the thermal-sodium double indicator dilution measurement of ELWV can detect slight hyperpermeability pulmonary edema that does not show on chest radiographs. The chest radiograph was therefore not suitable for the detection of slight pulmonary edema, because it did not show any changes in the early stages in hyperpermeability pulmonary edema

  10. Enhancing the Legacy of Spitzer and Herschel with the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Naveen

    The next frontier for comprehensive galaxy surveys is the epoch at z~1.5-3.5, the peak of star formation and black hole activity. Despite the new windows that Spitzer and Herschel have opened up into the stellar and dust emission of distant galaxies and AGN during this key epoch, these studies have been limited by the lack of spectroscopic redshifts and the unknown physical conditions (e.g., metallicities, ionization) within the targeted galaxies. To realize the full potential of Spitzer and Herschel, we require a large spectroscopic survey that will: (a) efficiently assemble spectroscopic redshifts for large samples of galaxies at z=1.4-3.8; (b) yield the physical conditions, including the ionization and metallicities of these galaxies; and (c) easily obtain spectroscopic redshifts even for very dusty/confused galaxies. To this end, our team has been allocated a large program of 47 Keck nights with the multi-object near-IR spectrograph MOSFIRE to carry out the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field Survey (MOSDEF) in three of the Hubble CANDELS fields. MOSDEF will obtain rest-optical spectra of ~1500 galaxies at redshifts z=1.4-3.8, targeting many of the optical nebular emission lines and continuum features (e.g., [OII], [OIII], H-beta, H-alpha, [NII], [SII], 4000 Angstrom break, Ca H and K, and Mbg) that until now have been inaccessible for large samples of distant galaxies, but which are routinely used to measure the SFRs, dust attenuation, metal and gas content, and ionization and dynamical properties in nearby galaxies. MOSDEF spectroscopy provides a critical supporting role for the analysis of Spitzer and Herschel observations of distant galaxies. With this transformative dataset, we will perform the following analyses. First, we will use Spitzer and Herschel imaging, aided with spectroscopic redshifts from MOSDEF, to construct individual and mean dust SEDs for galaxies at redshifts 1.4formation and destruction processes. Our study will greatly enhance the scientific

  11. Finding confined water in the hexagonal phase of Bi0.05Eu0.05Y0 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    water molecule is different from normal water or not. In the literature, the decrease of freezing temperature of water in pores of silica gels, zeolites and carbon nanotubes was reported and their importance in applications as well as basic understanding of confined water was discussed [3–8]. Also, the study of confined water ...

  12. Thermal-Infrared Surveys of Near-Earth Object Diameters and Albedos with Spitzer and IRTF/MIRSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Hora, Joseph L.; Chesley, Steven; Emery, Josh; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan W.; Moskovitz, Nick; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard

    2015-08-01

    More than 12000 Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) have been discovered over the past few decades and current discovery surveys find on average 4 new NEOs every night. In comparison to asteroid discovery, the physical characterization of NEOs lags far behind: measured diameters and albedos exist only for roughly 10% of all known NEOs. We describe a current and a future observing program that provide diameter and albedo measurements of a large number of NEOs.In our Spitzer Space Telescope Exploration Science program 'NEOSurvey', we are performing a fast and efficient flux-limited survey in which we measure the diameters and albedos of ~600 NEOs in a total of 710 hrs of observing time. We measure the thermal emission of our targets at 4.5 micron and combine these measurements with optical data in a thermal model. Our diameters and albedos come with highly realistic uncertainties that account for a wide range of potential asteroid properties. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties, including diameters, albedos, and flux density data. This catalog is publicly accessible and provides the latest results usually within 2 weeks after the observation.Starting in 2016, we will also make use of the refurbished and recommissioned MIRSI mid-infrared imaging camera on NASA's InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) to derive the diameters and albedos of up to 750 NEOs over a period of 3 yrs. MIRSI will be equipped with an optical camera that will allow for simultaneous optical imaging, which will improve our thermal modeling results. With MIRSI, we will focus on newly discovered NEOs that are close to Earth and hence relatively bright.The results from both programs, together with already exisiting diameter and albedo results from the literature, will form the largest database of NEO physical properties available to date. With this data set, we will be able to refine the size distribution of small NEOs and the corresponding impact frequency, and compare the

  13. EXTRASOLAR STORMS: PRESSURE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN LIGHT-CURVE PHASE IN BROWN DWARFS FROM SIMULTANEOUS HST AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Karalidi, Theodora [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Naval Air Station, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94035 (United States); Flateau, Davin [Department of Planetary Sciences, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, 1629 University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Metchev, Stanimir [The University of Western Ontario, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration, 1151 Richmond St., London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Buenzli, Esther [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Radigan, Jacqueline [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Lowrance, Patrick J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgasser, Adam J., E-mail: haoyang@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: apai@arizona.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    We present Spitzer /Infrared Array Camera Ch1 and Ch2 monitoring of six brown dwarfs during eight different epochs over the course of 20 months. For four brown dwarfs, we also obtained simulataneous Hubble Space Telescope ( HST )/WFC3 G141 grism spectra during two epochs and derived light curves in five narrowband filters. Probing different pressure levels in the atmospheres, the multiwavelength light curves of our six targets all exhibit variations, and the shape of the light curves evolves over the timescale of a rotation period, ranging from 1.4 to 13 hr. We compare the shapes of the light curves and estimate the phase shifts between the light curves observed at different wavelengths by comparing the phase of the primary Fourier components. We use state-of-the-art atmosphere models to determine the flux contribution of different pressure layers to the observed flux in each filter. We find that the light curves that probe higher pressures are similar and in phase, but are offset and often different from the light curves that probe lower pressures. The phase differences between the two groups of light curves suggest that the modulations seen at lower and higher pressures may be introduced by different cloud layers.

  14. On the mid-infrared variability of candidate eruptive variables (exors): A comparison between Spitzer and WISE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniucci, S.; Giannini, T.; Li Causi, G.; Lorenzetti, D., E-mail: simone.antoniucci@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: teresa.giannini@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: gianluca.licausi@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: dario.lorenzetti@oa-roma.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio (Italy)

    2014-02-10

    Aiming to statistically study the variability in the mid-IR of young stellar objects, we have compared the 3.6, 4.5, and 24 μm Spitzer fluxes of 1478 sources belonging to the C2D (Cores to Disks) legacy program with the WISE fluxes at 3.4, 4.6, and 22 μm. From this comparison, we have selected a robust sample of 34 variable sources. Their variations were classified per spectral Class (according to the widely accepted scheme of Class I/flat/II/III protostars), and per star forming region. On average, the number of variable sources decreases with increasing Class and is definitely higher in Perseus and Ophiuchus than in Chamaeleon and Lupus. According to the paradigm Class ≡ Evolution, the photometric variability can be considered to be a feature more pronounced in less evolved protostars, and, as such, related to accretion processes. Moreover, our statistical findings agree with the current knowledge of star formation activity in different regions. The 34 selected variables were further investigated for similarities with known young eruptive variables, namely the EXors. In particular, we analyzed (1) the shape of the spectral energy distribution, (2) the IR excess over the stellar photosphere, (3) magnitude versus color variations, and (4) output parameters of model fitting. This first systematic search for EXors ends up with 11 bona fide candidates that can be considered as suitable targets for monitoring or future investigations.

  15. How geostatistics can help you find lead and galvanized water service lines: The case of Flint, MI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    In the aftermath of Flint drinking water crisis, most US cities have been scrambling to locate all lead service lines (LSLs) in their water supply systems. This information, which is most often inaccurate or lacking, is critical to assess compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule and to plan the replacement of lead and galvanized service lines (GSLs) as currently under way in Flint. This paper presents the first geospatial approach to predict the likelihood that a home has a LSL or GSL based on neighboring field data (i.e., house inspection) and secondary information (i.e., construction year and city records). The methodology is applied to the City of Flint where 3254 homes have been inspected by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality to identify service line material. GSLs and LSLs were mostly observed in houses built prior to 1934 and during World War II, respectively. City records led to the over-identification of LSLs, likely because old records were not updated as these lines were being replaced. Indicator semivariograms indicated that both types of service line are spatially clustered with a range of 1.4km for LSLs and 2.8km for GSLs. This spatial autocorrelation was integrated with secondary data using residual indicator kriging to predict the probability of finding each type of material at the tax parcel level. Cross-validation analysis using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves demonstrated the greater accuracy of the kriging model relative to the current approach targeting houses built in the forties; in particular as more field data become available. Anticipated rates of false positives and percentages of detection were computed for different sampling strategies. This approach is flexible enough to accommodate additional sources of information, such as local code and regulatory changes, historical permit records, maintenance and operation records, or customer self-reporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The X-ray properties of five galactic supernova remnants detected by the Spitzer glimpse survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Moffitt, William P.; Rho, Jeonghee; Heinke, Craig O.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the X-ray properties of five Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs)—Kes 17 (G304.6+0.1), G311.5–0.3, G346.6–0.2, CTB 37A (G348.5+0.1), and G348.5–0.0—that were detected in the infrared by Reach et al. in an analysis of data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) that was conducted by the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present and analyze archival ASCA observations of Kes 17, G311.5–0.3, and G346.6–0.2, archival XMM-Newton observations of Kes 17, CTB 37A, and G348.5–0.0, and an archival Chandra observation of CTB 37A. All of the SNRs are clearly detected in the X-ray except possibly G348.5–0.0. Our study reveals that the four detected SNRs all feature center-filled X-ray morphologies and that the observed emission from these sources is thermal in all cases. We argue that these SNRs should be classified as mixed-morphology SNRs (MM SNRs); our study strengthens the correlation between MM SNRs and SNRs interacting with molecular clouds and suggests that the origin of MM SNRs may be due to the interactions between these SNRs and adjacent clouds. Our ASCA analysis of G311.5–0.3 reveals for the first time X-ray emission from this SNR: the X-ray emission is center-filled within the radio and infrared shells and thermal in nature (kT ∼ 0.98 keV), thus motivating its classification as an MM SNR. We find considerable spectral variations in the properties associated with the plasmas of the other X-ray-detected SNRs, such as a possible overabundance of magnesium in the plasma of Kes 17. Our new results also include the first detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic study of CTB 37A using Chandra as well as a spectroscopic study of the discrete X-ray source CXOU J171428.5–383601, which may be a neutron star associated with CTB 37A. Finally, we also estimate such properties as electron density n e , radiative age t rad and swept-up mass M X for each of the four X-ray-detected SNRs. Each of these values

  17. Spitzer/IRS Observations Of Multiple Main-Belt And Binary Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, J. Emilio; Marchis, F.; Emery, J. P.; Im, S.

    2010-10-01

    Since the discovery of Ida's companion in 1993, 195 companions of asteroids have been discovered. To understand the formation process of these interesting bodies, their physical properties such as their bulk density, size, shape, and surface roughness need to be determined. During the Spitzer Cycle-4, we obtained IRS thermal emission spectra (5-42 um) of 23 known binary systems. The majority of asteroids are from the main-belt (16), while the rest are NEOs (7). After extracting the thermal spectra, we used a modified Standard Thermal Model (STM) to calculate their equivalent diameter (from 0.8 km to 237 km), their albedo (from 0.04 for C-type to 0.394 for a V-type) and their beaming factor related to the surface roughness and thermal inertia. We derive their emissivity spectra, which is useful to detect silicate features. Combining these measurements with 3D-models of these multiple asteroid systems obtained by lightcurve inversion, we should be able to derive an accurate estimate of their bulk-density and contrast them with their taxonomic classes. Preliminary studies by Marchis et al. (2008)1, suggested a relationship between bulk density and the taxonomic class of asteroids, which varies from 0.9 g/cc for C-complex to 2.4 g/cc for S-complex asteroids. The National Science Foundation supported this research under award number AAG-0807468. It was conducted with the Spitzer space telescope, which is operated by JPL under a contract with NASA. 1 Marchis et al. , 2008, "Mid-infrared Spectra of Binary Asteroids With Spitzer/IRS", 40th DPS Meeting, Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 40, 508

  18. Multiple Asteroid Systems: Dimensions and Thermal Properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; Assafin, M.; Matins, R. Vieira; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We collected mid-IR spectra from 5.2 to 38 microns using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph of 28 asteroids representative of all established types of binary groups. Photometric light curves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the observations and reliable estimates of their absolute magnitudes. The extracted mid-IR spectra were analyzed using a modified standard thermal model (STM) and a thermophysical model (TPM) that takes into account the shape and geometry of the large primary at the time of the Spitzer observation. We derived a reliable estimate of the size, albedo, and beaming factor for each of these asteroids, representing three main taxonomic groups: C, S, and X. For large (volume-equivalent system diameter Deq > 130 km) binary asteroids, the TPM analysis indicates a low thermal inertia (Lambda thermally insulating regolith. The smaller (surface-equivalent system diameter Deff < 17 km) asteroids also show some emission lines of minerals, but they are significantly weaker, consistent with regoliths with coarser grains, than those of the large binary asteroids. The average bulk densities of these multiple asteroids vary from 0.7-1.7 g/cu cm (P-, C-type) to approx. 2 g/cu cm (S-type). The highest density is estimated for the M-type (22) Kalliope (3.2 +/- 0.9 g/cu cm). The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and emissivity spectra, made available as a supplement document, could help to constrain the surface compositions of these asteroids.

  19. Observations of V592 Cassiopeiae with the Spitzer Space Telescope - Dust in the Mid-Infrared

    OpenAIRE

    Hoard, D. W.; Kafka, Stella; Wachter, Stefanie; Howell, Steve B.; Brinkworth, Carolyn S.; Ciardi, David R.; Szkody, Paula; Belle, Kunegunda; Froning, Cynthia; van Belle, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    We present the ultraviolet-optical-infrared spectral energy distribution of the low inclination novalike cataclysmic variable (CV) V592 Cassiopeiae, including new mid-infrared observations from 3.5 to 24 μm obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. At wavelengths shortward of 8 μm, the spectral energy distribution of V592 Cas is dominated by the steady state accretion disk, but there is flux density in excess of the summed stellar components and accretion disk at longer wavelengths. Reproduc...

  20. Spitzer 3.6 and 5.8 micron Monitoring of the Seyfert 1 NGC 4051

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Adkins, J.; Borders, K.; Kelly, S.; Martin, C.; Mendez, B.; Paradis, J.; Perreira, V.; Pittman, P.; Sepulveda, B.; NGC 4051 Monitoring Group

    2009-01-01

    We used the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to monitor the Seyfert 1 active galactic nucleus NGC 4051. We took data at 3.6 and 5.8 microns every day for 10 days in June 2008. We also observed in the optical at B, V, and R bands starting a month before the IRAC observations with various ground based observatories, though we were unable to achieve daily coverage. We will present the IR and optical light curves and will search for correlated variability that may be evidence of dust reverberation. For the education and public outreach component of this program please see Sepulveda et al.

  1. REPEATABILITY OF SPITZER/IRAC EXOPLANETARY ECLIPSES WITH INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morello, G.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.

    2016-01-01

    The research of effective and reliable detrending methods for Spitzer data is of paramount importance for the characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres. To date, the totality of exoplanetary observations in the mid- and far-infrared, at wavelengths >3 μm, have been taken with Spitzer. In some cases, in past years, repeated observations and multiple reanalyses of the same data sets led to discrepant results, raising questions about the accuracy and reproducibility of such measurements. Morello et al. (2014, 2015) proposed a blind-source separation method based on the Independent Component Analysis of pixel time series (pixel-ICA) to analyze InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) data, obtaining coherent results when applied to repeated transit observations previously debated in the literature. Here we introduce a variant to the pixel-ICA through the use of wavelet transform, wavelet pixel-ICA, which extends its applicability to low-signal-to-noise-ratio cases. We describe the method and discuss the results obtained over 12 eclipses of the exoplanet XO3b observed during the “Warm Spitzer” era in the 4.5 μm band. The final results are reported, in part, also in Ingalls et al. (2016), together with results obtained with other detrending methods, and over 10 synthetic eclipses that were analyzed for the “IRAC Data Challenge 2015.” Our results are consistent within 1σ with the ones reported in Wong et al. (2014) and with most of the results reported in Ingalls et al. (2016), which appeared on arXiv while this paper was under review. Based on many statistical tests discussed in Ingalls et al. (2016), the wavelet pixel-ICA method performs as well as or better than other state-of-art methods recently developed by other teams to analyze Spitzer/IRAC data, and, in particular, it appears to be the most repeatable and the most reliable, while reaching the photon noise limit, at least for the particular data set analyzed. Another strength of the ICA approach is its highest

  2. Municipal water-based heat pump heating and/or cooling systems: Findings and recommendations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington, State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Wegman, S. [South Dakota Utilities Commission (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of the present work was to determine if existing heat pump systems based on municipal water systems meet existing water quality standards, to analyze water that has passed through a heat pump or heat exchanger to determine if corrosion products can be detected, to determine residual chlorine levels in municipal waters on the inlet as well as the outlet side of such installations, to analyses for bacterial contaminants and/or regrowth due to the presence of a heat pump or heat exchanger, to develop and suggest criteria for system design and construction, to provide recommendations and specifications for material and fluid selection, and to develop model rules and regulations for the installation, operation, and monitoring of new and existing systems. In addition, the Washington State University (WSU) has evaluated availability of computer models that would allow for water system mapping, water quality modeling and system operation.

  3. PLANETARY NEBULAE DETECTED IN THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE GLIMPSE II LEGACY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Sun Kwok

    2009-01-01

    We report the result of a search for the infrared counterparts of 37 planetary nebulae (PNs) and PN candidates in the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire II (GLIMPSE II) survey. The photometry and images of these PNs at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 μm, taken through the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), are presented. Most of these nebulae are very red and compact in the IRAC bands, and are found to be bright and extended in the 24 μm band. The infrared morphology of these objects are compared with Hα images of the Macquarie-AAO-Strasbourg (MASH) and MASH II PNs. The implications for morphological difference in different wavelengths are discussed. The IRAC data allow us to differentiate between PNs and H II regions and be able to reject non-PNs from the optical catalog (e.g., PNG 352.1 - 00.0). Spectral energy distributions are constructed by combing the IRAC and MIPS data with existing near-, mid-, and far-IR photometry measurements. The anomalous colors of some objects allow us to infer the presence of aromatic emission bands. These multi-wavelength data provide useful insights into the nature of different nebular components contributing to the infrared emission of PNs.

  4. Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared photometry of 500-750 brown dwarf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leggett, Sandy K [GEMINI OBSERVATORY; Albert, Loic [CFH TELESCOPE; Artigau, Etienne [U OF MONTREAL; Burningham, Ben [HERTFORDSHIRE U; Delfosse, Xavier [OBS. GRENOBLE; Delorme, Philippe [ST. ANDREWS U.; Forveille, Thierry [OBS. GRENOBLE; Lucas, Philip W [HERTFORDSHIRE U; Marley, Mark S [NASA AMES; Pinfield, David J [HERTFORDSHIRE U.; Reyle, Celine [OBS. BESANCON; Smart, Richard L [OSS. ASTRON, TORINO; Warren, Stephen J [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON

    2010-10-26

    Mid-infrared data, including Spitzer warm-IRAC [3.6] and [4.5] photometry, is critical for understanding the cold population of brown dwarfs now being found, objects which have more in common with planets than stars. As effective temperature (T{sub eff}) drops from 800K to 400K, the fraction of flux emitted beyond 3 {mu}m increases rapidly, from about 40% to > 75%. This rapid increase makes a color like H-[4.5] a very sensitive temperature indicator, and it can be combined with a gravity- and metallicity-sensitive color like H-K to constrain all three of these fundamental properties, which in turn gives us mass and age for these slowly cooling objects. Determination of mid-infrared color trends also allows better exploitation of the WISE mission by the community. We use new Spitzer Cycle 6 IRAC photometry, together with published data, to present trends of color with type for L0 to T10 dwarfs. We also use the atmospheric and evolutionary models of Saumon and Marley to investigate the masses and ages of 13 very late-type T dwarfs, which have H-[4.5] > 3.2 and T{sub eff} {approx} 500K to 750K.

  5. SPITZER MICROLENS MEASUREMENT OF A MASSIVE REMNANT IN A WELL-SEPARATED BINARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Bryden, G.; Henderson, C. B. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Gould, A.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Pogge, R. W.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Bozza, V.; Novati, S. Calchi [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. R. Caianiello,” Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Friedmann, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hundertmark, M. [Niels Bohr Institute and Centre for Star and Planet Formation, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Beichman, C. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Carey, S. [Spitzer, Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kerr, T.; Varricatt, W. [UKIRT, 660 N. Aohoku Place, University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Yee, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Collaboration: and; Spitzer team; OGLE group; KMTNet group; Wise group; RoboNet; MiNDSTEp; and others

    2015-12-01

    We report the detection and mass measurement of a binary lens OGLE-2015-BLG-1285La,b, with the more massive component having M{sub 1} > 1.35 M{sub ⊙} (80% probability). A main-sequence star in this mass range is ruled out by limits on blue light, meaning that a primary in this mass range must be a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH). The system has a projected separation r{sub ⊥} = 6.1 ± 0.4 AU and lies in the Galactic bulge. These measurements are based on the “microlens parallax” effect, i.e., comparing the microlensing light curve as seen from Spitzer, which lay at 1.25 AU projected from Earth, to the light curves from four ground-based surveys, three in the optical and one in the near-infrared. Future adaptive optics imaging of the companion by 30 m class telescopes will yield a much more accurate measurement of the primary mass. This discovery both opens the path and defines the challenges to detecting and characterizing BHs and NSs in wide binaries, with either dark or luminous companions. In particular, we discuss lessons that can be applied to future Spitzer and Kepler K2 microlensing parallax observations.

  6. Spitzer Observations of Dust Destruction in the Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dweek, Eli; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hwang, Una; Long, Knox X.; Petre, Robert; Rho, Jeonghee; Winkler, P. Frank

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with a neighboring molecular cloud provides a unique opportunity to measure the amount of grain destruction in an SNR shock. Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS imaging of the entire SNR at 24, 70, and 160 micrometers shows an extremely good correlation with X-ray emission, indicating that the SNR's IR radiation is dominated by the thermal emission of swept-up interstellar dust, collisionally heated by the hot shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectral observations targeted both the Bright Eastern Knot (BEK) of the SNR where a small cloud has been engulfed by the supernova blast wave and outlying portions of the associated molecular cloud that are yet to be hit by the shock front. Modeling the spectra from both regions reveals the composition and the grain size distribution of the interstellar dust, both in front of and behind the SNR shock front. The comparison shows that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the interstellar medium are destroyed within the BEK, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  7. A Spitzer Infrared Radius for the Transiting Extrasolar Planet HD 209458 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, L. Jeremy; Harrington, Joseph; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the infrared transit of the extrasolar planet HD 209458 b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. We observed two primary eclipse events (one partial and one complete transit) using the 24 micrometer array of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We analyzed a total of 2392 individual images (10-second integrations) of the planetary system, recorded before, during, and after transit. We perform optimal photometry on the images and use the local zodiacal light as a short-term flux reference. At this long wavelength, the transit curve has a simple box-like shape, allowing robust solutions for the stellar and planetary radii independent of stellar limb darkening, which is negligible at 24 micrometers. We derive a stellar radius of R(sub *) = 1.06 plus or minus 0.07 solar radius, a planetary radius of R(sub p) = 1.26 plus or minus 0.08 R(sub J), and a stellar mass of 1.17 solar mass. Within the errors, our results agree with the measurements at visible wavelengths. The 24 micrometer radius of the planet therefore does not differ significantly compared to the visible result. We point out the potential for deriving extrasolar transiting planet radii to high accuracy using transit photometry at slightly shorter IR wavelengths where greater photometric precision is possible.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer observations of Taurus members (Luhman+, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, K. L.; Allen, P. R.; Espaillat, C.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.

    2016-03-01

    For our census of the disk population in Taurus, we use images at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0um obtained with Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and images at 24um obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). The cameras produced images with FWHM=1.6"-1.9" from 3.6 to 8.0um and FWHM=5.9" at 24um. The available data were obtained through Guaranteed Time Observations for PID = 6, 36, 37 (G. Fazio), 53 (G. Rieke), 94 (C. Lawrence), 30540 (G. Fazio, J. Houck), and 40302 (J. Houck), Director's Discretionary Time for PID = 462 (L. Rebull), Legacy programs for PID = 139, 173 (N. Evans), and 30816 (D. Padgett), and General Observer programs for PID = 3584 (D. Padgett), 20302 (P. Andre), 20386 (P. Myers), 20762 (J. Swift), 30384 (T. Bourke), 40844 (C. McCabe), and 50584 (D. Padgett). The IRAC and MIPS observations were performed through 180 and 137 Astronomical Observation Requests (AORs), respectively. The characteristics of the resulting images are summarized in Tables 1 and 2. (6 data files).

  9. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF DUST DESTRUCTION IN THE PUPPIS A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Blair, William P.; Hwang, Una; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Petre, Robert; Rho, Jeonghee; Winkler, P. Frank

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with a neighboring molecular cloud provides a unique opportunity to measure the amount of grain destruction in an SNR shock. Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS imaging of the entire SNR at 24, 70, and 160 μm shows an extremely good correlation with X-ray emission, indicating that the SNR's IR radiation is dominated by the thermal emission of swept-up interstellar dust, collisionally heated by the hot shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectral observations targeted both the Bright Eastern Knot (BEK) of the SNR where a small cloud has been engulfed by the supernova blast wave and outlying portions of the associated molecular cloud that are yet to be hit by the shock front. Modeling the spectra from both regions reveals the composition and the grain size distribution of the interstellar dust, both in front of and behind the SNR shock front. The comparison shows that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the interstellar medium are destroyed within the BEK, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  10. Sensitive Spitzer Photometry of Supermassive Black Holes at the Final Stage of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Netzer, Hagai; Mor, Rivay; Trakhtenbrot, Benny

    2011-05-01

    We propose to obtain sensitive Spitzer snapshot observations of a unique sample of 35 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at redshift 4.8 for which we obtained reliable, Mg II-based determinations of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass and normalized accretion rate (L/L_Edd). These quasars appear to mark the final stage of SMBH `adolescence' in the history of the Universe as their SMBHs are significantly less massive and their L/L_Edd values are significantly higher with respect to their counterparts at lower redshifts. Our observations will provide both 1) deep coverage of the fields around these quasars which will be utilized as crucial priors for our approved Herschel/SPIRE observations of these sources, and 2) coverage of the rest-frame optical SEDs of these fast accreting quasars. The results will maximize our ability to measure the star-formation rate in the host galaxies of these quasars using Herschel. We will thus be able to investigate correlations between SMBH growth and star-forming activity in the early Universe. The Spitzer photometry will also provide invaluable information about the shape of the rest-frame optical continuum in these quasars which will be used to search for extreme disk properties that may be signatures of the remarkably high accretion rates in these sources.

  11. Looking Upstream: Findings from Focus Groups on Public Perceptions of Source Water Quality in British Columbia, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Henrich

    Full Text Available In association with the development of new microbial tests for source water quality (SWQ, focus groups with members of the public were conducted to gain insight into their perceptions of SWQ, behaviours and contaminants they think pose the greatest threat to its quality, and what/how they want to know about SWQ. Discussions revealed a low concern about SWQ in general, and in particular about microbial contamination. Participants identified behaviours that threaten SWQ, barriers to changing behaviour and suggestions for inducing change. A strong desire was expressed for water quality information to be interpreted and communicated in terms of how SWQ may impact human health and how their actions should be altered in response to test results. The information can be used to inform communication strategies and possibly impact policies associated with water quality testing and implementation of new tests. More broadly, awareness of the public's understanding and beliefs about source water can be used in working with the public to adopt water-friendly behaviours, influence the content and methods of communicating with the public about water issues and water quality, and could contribute to the direction of future research and investment into water technologies to align with the public's priorities.

  12. Looking Upstream: Findings from Focus Groups on Public Perceptions of Source Water Quality in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Natalie; Holmes, Bev; Prystajecky, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    In association with the development of new microbial tests for source water quality (SWQ), focus groups with members of the public were conducted to gain insight into their perceptions of SWQ, behaviours and contaminants they think pose the greatest threat to its quality, and what/how they want to know about SWQ. Discussions revealed a low concern about SWQ in general, and in particular about microbial contamination. Participants identified behaviours that threaten SWQ, barriers to changing behaviour and suggestions for inducing change. A strong desire was expressed for water quality information to be interpreted and communicated in terms of how SWQ may impact human health and how their actions should be altered in response to test results. The information can be used to inform communication strategies and possibly impact policies associated with water quality testing and implementation of new tests. More broadly, awareness of the public's understanding and beliefs about source water can be used in working with the public to adopt water-friendly behaviours, influence the content and methods of communicating with the public about water issues and water quality, and could contribute to the direction of future research and investment into water technologies to align with the public's priorities.

  13. Climate Change and European Water Bodies, a Review of Existing Gaps and Future Research Needs: Findings of the ClimateWater Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Monica; Harper, David M; Blaskovicova, Lotta; Hancz, Gabriella; Janauer, Georg A; Jolánkai, Zsolt; Lanz, Eva; Lo Porto, Antonio; Mándoki, Monika; Pataki, Beata; Rahuel, Jean-Luc; Robinson, Victoria J; Stoate, Chris; Tóth, Eszter; Jolánkai, Géza

    2015-08-01

    There is general agreement among scientists that global temperatures are rising and will continue to increase in the future. It is also agreed that human activities are the most important causes of these climatic variations, and that water resources are already suffering and will continue to be greatly impaired as a consequence of these changes. In particular, it is probable that areas with limited water resources will expand and that an increase of global water demand will occur, estimated to be around 35-60% by 2025 as a consequence of population growth and the competing needs of water uses. This will cause a growing imbalance between water demand (including the needs of nature) and supply. This urgency demands that climate change impacts on water be evaluated in different sectors using a cross-cutting approach (Contestabile in Nat Clim Chang 3:11-12, 2013). These issues were examined by the EU FP7-funded Co-ordination and support action "ClimateWater" (bridging the gap between adaptation strategies of climate change impacts and European water policies). The project studied adaptation strategies to minimize the water-related consequences of climate change and assessed how these strategies should be taken into consideration by European policies. This article emphasizes that knowledge gaps still exist about the direct effects of climate change on water bodies and their indirect impacts on production areas that employ large amounts of water (e.g., agriculture). Some sectors, such as ecohydrology and alternative sewage treatment technologies, could represent a powerful tool to mitigate climate change impacts. Research needs in these still novel fields are summarized.

  14. Climate Change and European Water Bodies, a Review of Existing Gaps and Future Research Needs: Findings of the ClimateWater Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Monica; Harper, David M.; Blaskovicova, Lotta; Hancz, Gabriella; Janauer, Georg A.; Jolánkai, Zsolt; Lanz, Eva; Porto, Antonio Lo; Mándoki, Monika; Pataki, Beata; Rahuel, Jean-Luc; Robinson, Victoria J.; Stoate, Chris; Tóth, Eszter; Jolánkai, Géza

    2015-08-01

    There is general agreement among scientists that global temperatures are rising and will continue to increase in the future. It is also agreed that human activities are the most important causes of these climatic variations, and that water resources are already suffering and will continue to be greatly impaired as a consequence of these changes. In particular, it is probable that areas with limited water resources will expand and that an increase of global water demand will occur, estimated to be around 35-60 % by 2025 as a consequence of population growth and the competing needs of water uses. This will cause a growing imbalance between water demand (including the needs of nature) and supply. This urgency demands that climate change impacts on water be evaluated in different sectors using a cross-cutting approach (Contestabile in Nat Clim Chang 3:11-12, 2013). These issues were examined by the EU FP7-funded Co-ordination and support action "ClimateWater" (bridging the gap between adaptation strategies of climate change impacts and European water policies). The project studied adaptation strategies to minimize the water-related consequences of climate change and assessed how these strategies should be taken into consideration by European policies. This article emphasizes that knowledge gaps still exist about the direct effects of climate change on water bodies and their indirect impacts on production areas that employ large amounts of water (e.g., agriculture). Some sectors, such as ecohydrology and alternative sewage treatment technologies, could represent a powerful tool to mitigate climate change impacts. Research needs in these still novel fields are summarized.

  15. Review of Climate Change and Water-Related Diseases in Cambodia and Findings From Stakeholder Knowledge Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Lachlan J; Chan, Vibol S; Bowen, Kathyrn J; Iddings, Steven N; Hero, Kol; Raingsey, Piseth P

    2016-03-01

    This project aims to increase the resilience of Cambodian communities to the health risks posed by climate change-related impacts on water-related diseases. There are a number of water-related diseases that are present in Cambodia and are likely to be susceptible to climate change. These include diarrheal diseases, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, melioidosis, viral hepatitis, and schistosomiasis. Certain subsectors of Cambodia's population may be more vulnerable than others with respect to climate change impacts on water and health, including agricultural workers and residents of flood-and drought-prone areas. The current level of understanding on the part of health professionals and other key stakeholders in Cambodia regarding the risks posed by climate change on water-sensitive diseases is relatively low. Strategies by which this understanding might be strengthened are suggested. © 2014 APJPH.

  16. Environmental assessment for the Waste Water Treatment Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project and finding of no significant impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The possible environmental impacts from the construction and operation of a waste water treatment facility for the West Valley Demonstration Project are presented. The West Valley Project is a demonstration project on the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. The need for the facility is the result of a rise in the work force needed for the project which rendered the existing sewage treatment plant incapable of meeting the nonradioactive waste water treatment needs

  17. Environmental assessment for the Waste Water Treatment Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project and finding of no significant impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The possible environmental impacts from the construction and operation of a waste water treatment facility for the West Valley Demonstration Project are presented. The West Valley Project is a demonstration project on the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. The need for the facility is the result of a rise in the work force needed for the project which rendered the existing sewage treatment plant incapable of meeting the nonradioactive waste water treatment needs.

  18. DEEP SPITZER 24 μm COSMOS IMAGING. I. THE EVOLUTION OF LUMINOUS DUSTY GALAXIES-CONFRONTING THE MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Floc'h, Emeric; Ilbert, Olivier; Riguccini, Laurie; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Sanders, David; Aussel, Herve; Feruglio, Chiara; Frayer, David T.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick; Arnouts, Stephane; Surace, Jason; Sheth, Kartik; Yan Lin; Rodighiero, Giulia; Heinis, Sebastien; McCracken, Henry Joy; Thompson, David; Koekemoer, Anton

    2009-01-01

    We present the first results obtained from the identification of ∼30,000 sources in the Spitzer/24 μm observations of the COSMOS field at S 24μm ∼> 80 μJy. Using accurate photometric redshifts (σ z ∼ 0.12 at z ∼ 2 for 24 μm sources with i + ∼ 2) contribute only marginally to the cosmic infrared background. Assuming flux-limited selections at optical wavelengths, we also find that the fraction of i + -band sources with 24 μm detection strongly increases up to z ∼ 2 as a consequence of the rapid evolution that star-forming galaxies have undergone with look-back time. Nonetheless, this rising trend shows a clear break at z ∼ 1.3, probably due to k-correction effects implied by the complexity of spectral energy distributions in the mid-infrared. Finally, we compare our results with the predictions from different models of galaxy formation. We note that semianalytical formalisms currently fail to reproduce the redshift distributions observed at 24 μm. Furthermore, the simulated galaxies at S 24μm > 80 μJy exhibit R-K colors much bluer than observed and the predicted K-band fluxes are systematically underestimated at z ∼> 0.5. Unless these discrepancies mainly result from an incorrect treatment of extinction in the models they may reflect an underestimate of the predicted density of high-redshift massive sources with strong ongoing star formation, which would point to more fundamental processes and/or parameters (e.g., initial mass function, critical density to form stars, feedback,...) that are still not fully controlled in the simulations. The most recent backward evolution scenarios reproduce reasonably well the flux/redshift distribution of 24 μm sources up to z ∼ 3, although none of them is able to exactly match our results at all redshifts.

  19. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission in Spitzer /IRS Maps. II. A Direct Link between Band Profiles and the Radiation Field Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E., E-mail: dstock84@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2017-03-10

    We decompose the observed 7.7 μ m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission complexes in a large sample of over 7000 mid-infrared spectra of the interstellar medium using spectral cubes observed with the Spitzer /IRS-SL instrument. In order to fit the 7.7 μ m PAH emission complex we invoke four Gaussian components, which are found to be very stable in terms of their peak positions and widths across all of our spectra, and subsequently define a decomposition with fixed parameters, which gives an acceptable fit for all the spectra. We see a strong environmental dependence on the interrelationships between our band fluxes—in the H ii regions all four components are intercorrelated, while in the reflection nebulae (RNs) the inner and outer pairs of bands correlate in the same manner as previously seen for NGC 2023. We show that this effect arises because the maps of RNs are dominated by emission from strongly irradiated photodissociation regions, while the much larger maps of H ii regions are dominated by emission from regions much more distant from the exciting stars, leading to subtly different spectral behavior. Further investigation of this dichotomy reveals that the ratio of two of these components (centered at 7.6 and 7.8 μ m) is linearly related to the UV-field intensity (log G {sub 0}). We find that this relationship does not hold for sources consisting of circumstellar material, which are known to have variable 7.7 μ m spectral profiles.

  20. c2d Spitzer IRS spectra of embedded low-mass young stars : gas-phase emission lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahuis, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Jorgensen, J. K.; Blake, G. A.; Evans, N. J.

    Context. A survey of mid-infrared gas-phase emission lines of H(2), H(2)O and various atoms toward a sample of 43 embedded low-mass young stars in nearby star-forming regions is presented. The sources are selected from the Spitzer "Cores to Disks" (c2d) legacy program. Aims. The environment of

  1. A SPITZER SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISK DUST IN THE YOUNG SERPENS CLOUD : HOW DO DUST CHARACTERISTICS EVOLVE WITH TIME?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, Isa; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Merin, Bruno; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Lahuis, Fred; Geers, Vincent C.; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Olofsson, Johan; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Brown, Joanna M.

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) mid-infrared (5-35 mu m) spectra of a complete flux-limited sample (>= 3 mJy at 8 mu m) of young stellar object (YSO) candidates selected on the basis of their infrared colors in the Serpens Molecular Cloud. Spectra of 147 sources are presented and

  2. An application of DEMATEL technique to find the effect of different factors influencing outsourcing activities in water and switch organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Hemati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Outsourcing plays an important role on reducing unnecessary activities in any organization and helps focus only on value added activities. Water resource organization in each city is responsible to supply fresh and clean water and dispose switch as efficiently as possible and all citizens normally benefit from these organizations. The proposed model of this paper uses DEMATEL to prioritize 14 different factors influencing on outsourcing activities. The survey was performed from October, 2011 to May, 2012 among employees on work for water resource organization in city of Semnan, Iran. The survey chooses a sample of 92 employees out of 120 people who worked for this organization. Cronbach alpha is calculated as 90%, which is well above the minimum acceptable level. The results of the survey indicate that expediting work process is the most important factor while reducing the cost is considered as the least important factors among 14 different items.

  3. Discovery of hyperluminous infrared galaxies using Spitzer and SHARC-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borys, C.; Barnard, V.; Bian, C.; Blain, A. W.; Brown, M. J. I.; Dey, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Frayer, D. T.; Higdon, J.; Higdon, S.; Jannuzi, B.; Le Floch, E.; Soifer, B. T.; Phillips, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    We have used observations taken as part of the Bootes Spitzer GTO program to pre-select high redshift luminous star-forming galaxy candidates. Subsequent ground-based sub-millimeter imaging with SHARC-II at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory detected several objects, including one particularly exotic one: An extremely bright infrared galaxy with an apparent luminosity in excess of 1013.5Lsolar. It has a spectral energy distribution similar to that of Arp 220, though appears to be at a much higher redshift. Although lensing is one possible explanation, this object has helped refine the selection method, and hints at a way to pre-select similar objects using mid-IR silicate absorption features.

  4. Observations of Hot-Jupiter occultations combining Spitzer and Kepler photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knutson H.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the status of an ongoing program which aim at measuring occultations by their parent stars of transiting hot giant exoplanets discovered recently by Kepler. The observations are obtained in the near infrared with WarmSpitzer Space Telescope and at optical wavelengths by combining more than a year of Kepler photometry. The investigation consists of measuring the mid-occultation times and the relative occultation depths in each band-passes. Our measurements of occultations depths in the Kepler bandpass is turned into the determination of the optical geometric albedo Ag in this wavelength domain. The brightness temperatures of these planets are deduced from the infrared observations. We combine the optical and near infrared planetary emergent fluxes to obtain broad band emergent spectra of individual planet. We finally compare these spectra to hot Jupiter atmospheric models in order broadly distinguishing these atmospheres between different classes of models.

  5. Spitzer/JWST Cross Calibration: IRAC Observations of Potential Calibrators for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Sean J.; Gordon, Karl D.; Lowrance, Patrick; Ingalls, James G.; Glaccum, William J.; Grillmair, Carl J.; E Krick, Jessica; Laine, Seppo J.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hora, Joseph L.; Bohlin, Ralph

    2017-06-01

    We present observations at 3.6 and 4.5 microns using IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope of a set of main sequence A stars and white dwarfs that are potential calibrators across the JWST instrument suite. The stars range from brightnesses of 4.4 to 15 mag in K band. The calibration observations use a similar redundancy to the observing strategy for the IRAC primary calibrators (Reach et al. 2005) and the photometry is obtained using identical methods and instrumental photometric corrections as those applied to the IRAC primary calibrators (Carey et al. 2009). The resulting photometry is then compared to the predictions based on spectra from the CALSPEC Calibration Database (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/observatory/crds/calspec.html) and the IRAC bandpasses. These observations are part of an ongoing collaboration between IPAC and STScI investigating absolute calibration in the infrared.

  6. Spitzer spectral line mapping of the HH211 outflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionatos, Odyssefs; Nisini, Brunella; Cabrit, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    of emission line diagnostics and an existing grid of molecular shock models. The physical properties of the warm gas are compared against other molecular jet tracers and to the results of a similar study towards the L1448-C outflow. Results: We have detected and mapped the v=0-0 S(0) - S(7) H2 lines and fine...... compared to solar abundances by a factor ~10-50. Conclusions: Spitzer spectral mapping observations reveal for the first time a cool H$_2$ component towards the CO jet of HH211 consistent with the CO material being fully molecular and warm at ~ 300 K. The maps also reveal for the first time the existence...... uncertainties on jet speed and shock conditions are too large for a definite conclusion....

  7. Finding confined water in the hexagonal phase of Bi0.05Eu0.05Y0 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. 1H MAS NMR spectra of Bi0.05Eu0.05Y0.90PO4·xH2O show chemical shift from. −0.56 ppm at 300 K to −3.8 ppm at 215 K and another one at 5–6 ppm, which are related to the confined or interstitial water in the hexagonal structure and water molecules on the surface of the particles, respectively. Negative value of ...

  8. A Spitzer five-band analysis of the Jupiter-sized planet TrES-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lust, Nate B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Bowman, M. Oliver [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku, E-mail: pcubillos@fulbrightmail.org [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    With an equilibrium temperature of 1200 K, TrES-1 is one of the coolest hot Jupiters observed by Spitzer. It was also the first planet discovered by any transit survey and one of the first exoplanets from which thermal emission was directly observed. We analyzed all Spitzer eclipse and transit data for TrES-1 and obtained its eclipse depths and brightness temperatures in the 3.6 μm (0.083% ± 0.024%, 1270 ± 110 K), 4.5 μm (0.094% ± 0.024%, 1126 ± 90 K), 5.8 μm (0.162% ± 0.042%, 1205 ± 130 K), 8.0 μm (0.213% ± 0.042%, 1190 ± 130 K), and 16 μm (0.33% ± 0.12%, 1270 ± 310 K) bands. The eclipse depths can be explained, within 1σ errors, by a standard atmospheric model with solar abundance composition in chemical equilibrium, with or without a thermal inversion. The combined analysis of the transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity ephemerides gives an eccentricity of e=0.033{sub −0.031}{sup +0.015}, consistent with a circular orbit. Since TrES-1's eclipses have low signal-to-noise ratios, we implemented optimal photometry and differential-evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms in our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits pipeline. Benefits include higher photometric precision and ∼10 times faster MCMC convergence, with better exploration of the phase space and no manual parameter tuning.

  9. Brown dwarf distances and atmospheres: Spitzer Parallaxes and the Keck/NIRSPEC upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily C.

    2018-01-01

    Advances in infrared technology have been essential towards improving our understanding of the solar neighborhood, revealing a large population of brown dwarfs, which span the mass regime between planets and stars. My thesis combines near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic and astrometric analysis of nearby low-mass stars and brown dwarfs with instrumentation work to upgrade the NIRSPEC instrument for the Keck II Telescope. I will present results from a program using Spitzer/IRAC data to measure precise locations and distances to 22 of the coldest and closest brown dwarfs. These distances allow us to constrain absolute physical properties, such as mass, radius, and age, of free-floating planetary-mass objects through comparison to atmospheric and evolutionary models. NIR spectroscopy combined with the Spitzer photometry reveals a detailed look into the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and gaseous extrasolar planets. Additionally, I will discuss the improvements we are making to the NIRSPEC instrument at Keck. NIRSPEC is a NIR echelle spectrograph, capable of R~2000 and R~25,000 observations in the 1-5 μm range. As part of the upgrade, I performed detector characterization, optical design of a new slit-viewing camera, mechanical testing, and electronics design. NIRSPEC’s increased efficiency will allow us to obtain moderate- and high-resolution NIR spectra of objects up to a magnitude fainter than the current NIRSPEC design. Finally, I will demonstrate the utility of a NIR laser frequency comb as a high-resolution calibrator. This new technology will revolutionize precision radial velocity measurements in the coming decade.

  10. Spitzer and Chandra Observations of the Deep Impact Encounter with Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Belton, M. J. S.; Bodewits, D.; Christian, D. J.; VanCleve, J.; Combi, M.; Dennerl, K.; Farnham, T. L.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Groussin, O.; Hoekstra, R.; Makinen, T.; McFadden, L. A.; Meech, K. J.; Schultz, P.; Weaver, H.; Wolk, S.

    2005-12-01

    On July 4, 2005 NASA's discovery mission Deep Impact (hereafter DI) sent a 375 kg impactor into the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 at 10.2 km/s relative velocity (A'Hearn et al. 2005). In the IR, Spitzer observed the comet in the unique 5-38 μm spectral range provided by the IRS instrument, allowing direct determination of silicaceous dust, PAHs, carbonates, and aluminum and iron oxides/sulfides in the subsurface material. The Spitzer observations contrasted well with the 1-5 μm spectra obtained by the DI High Resolution Instrument's IR spectrometer and ground based measurements at 1-5 um from the Keck and IRTF observatories (Meech et al. 2005), enabling us to obtain full coverage of the comet's IR spectrum from 1.0 to 38 μm. In the x-ray, the DI experiment allowed for a controlled test of the charge exchange (CXE) emission mechanism that drives cometary x-ray emission (Lisse et al. 2001, Kharchenko and Dalgarno 2001, Krasnopolsky et al. 2002) using observations with the Chandra ACIS-S CCD. The Chandra spectra show a fresh amount of neutral material was injected into a finite volume of the extended atmosphere, or coma, of the comet. In the matter of minutes, this new material directly increased the emission measure for the comet by 30 production from other measurements. Additional contemporaneous measurements by the XMM and SWIFT low energy x-ray imagers provided complimentary lightcurve data points, providing a good long term estimate of the comet's gas emission before, during, and after the Deep Impact encounter. Over the longer term, the combined lightcurves showed evidence of multiple natural outbursts of neutral gas emission from the comet.

  11. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DEBRIS DISK CATALOG. I. CONTINUUM ANALYSIS OF UNRESOLVED TARGETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Christine H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mittal, Tushar [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 (United States); Kuchner, Marc [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Forrest, William J.; Watson, Dan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Manoj, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Sargent, Benjamin A., E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, Guaranteed Time Observers, Legacy Teams, and General Observers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates. We calibrated the spectra of 571 candidates, including 64 new IRAS and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) debris disks candidates, modeled their stellar photospheres, and produced a catalog of excess spectra for unresolved debris disks. For 499 targets with IRS excess but without strong spectral features (and a subset of 420 targets with additional MIPS 70 μm observations), we modeled the IRS (and MIPS data) assuming that the dust thermal emission was well-described using either a one- or two-temperature blackbody model. We calculated the probability for each model and computed the average probability to select among models. We found that the spectral energy distributions for the majority of objects (∼66%) were better described using a two-temperature model with warm (T {sub gr} ∼ 100-500 K) and cold (T {sub gr} ∼ 50-150 K) dust populations analogous to zodiacal and Kuiper Belt dust, suggesting that planetary systems are common in debris disks and zodiacal dust is common around host stars with ages up to ∼1 Gyr. We found that younger stars generally have disks with larger fractional infrared luminosities and higher grain temperatures and that higher-mass stars have disks with higher grain temperatures. We show that the increasing distance of dust around debris disks is inconsistent with self-stirred disk models, expected if these systems possess planets at 30-150 AU. Finally, we illustrate how observations of debris disks may be used to constrain the radial dependence of material in the minimum mass solar nebula.

  12. A deep Spitzer survey of circumstellar disks in the young double cluster, h and χ Persei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Currie, Thayne; Jayawardhana, Ray [University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 2J7 (Canada); Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02140 (United States); Balog, Zoltan, E-mail: cloutier@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: currie@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    We analyze very deep Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) photometry of ∼12, 500 members of the 14 Myr old Double Cluster, h and χ Persei, building upon our earlier, shallower Spitzer Cycle 1 studies. Numerous likely members show infrared (IR) excesses at 8 μm and 24 μm, indicative of circumstellar dust. The frequency of stars with 8 μm excess is at least 2% for our entire sample, slightly lower (higher) for B/A stars (later type, lower mass stars). Optical spectroscopy also identifies gas in about 2% of systems, but with no clear trend between the presence of dust and gas. Spectral energy distribution modeling of 18 sources with detections at optical wavelengths through MIPS 24 μm reveals a diverse set of disk evolutionary states, including a high fraction of transitional disks, though similar data for all disk-bearing members would provide constraints. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we combine our results with those for other young clusters to study the global evolution of dust/gas disks. For nominal cluster ages, the e-folding times (τ{sub 0}) for the frequency of warm dust and gas are 2.75 Myr and 1.75 Myr, respectively. Assuming a revised set of ages for some clusters, these timescales increase to 5.75 and 3.75 Myr, respectively, implying a significantly longer typical protoplanetary disk lifetime than previously thought. In both cases, the transitional disk duration, averaged over multiple evolutionary pathways, is ≈1 Myr. Finally, 24 μm excess frequencies for 4-6 M {sub ☉} stars appear lower than for 1-2.5 M {sub ☉} stars in other 10-30 Myr old clusters.

  13. HEALTH RISKS FROM CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER: FINDINGS FROM THE CLINICAL INVESTIGATIONS DATA IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior studies have reported a large number of arsenicism cases in the Mongolia Autonomous Region of China due to drinking arsenic-contaminated water with concentrations up to 1.8 mg/L. However, the endemic health risks from chronic exposure to arsenic in this population have not...

  14. Mississippi waters reaching South Florida reefs under no flood conditions: synthesis of observing and modeling system findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hénaff, Matthieu; Kourafalou, Vassiliki H.

    2016-03-01

    In August 2014, in situ measurements revealed an intense salinity drop impacting South Florida coral reefs, between Pulley Ridge (Southwest Florida Shelf) and the Florida Keys. The low salinity waters had a surface signal of 32 (down from 35.2) and extended over a 15-20-m deep lens. Satellite observations showed that this abrupt drop in salinity was due to a southeastward export of Mississippi River waters from the Northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM), revealing strong interaction between coastal and oceanic flows. Unlike previous events of marked long-distance Mississippi water export, this episode is not associated with Mississippi flooding conditions, which makes it a unique study case. We have developed a high-resolution (~2 km) comprehensive hydrodynamic numerical model of the GoM to study the conditions that controlled the 2014 Mississippi River water export episode. It is based on the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and assimilates remotely sensed altimetry and sea surface temperature observations, to ensure that the simulated upper-ocean is realistic. This regional model has a detailed representation of coastal physics (especially river plume dynamics) and employs high-frequency river discharge and atmospheric forcing. The combined use of the simulation and observations reveals a unique pathway that brought Mississippi waters first eastward along the Northern GoM continental shelf, under prevailing winds and the presence of an anticyclonic Loop Current eddy, then southward along the edge of the West Florida Shelf, before reaching the deep GoM. Unlike usually observed, the offshore advection of Mississippi River waters thus took place far from the Delta area, which is another specificity of the 2014 episode. Finally, in the Florida Straits, Mississippi waters were advected from the deep ocean to the continental shelf under the influence of both deep sea (particularly a cyclonic Loop Current frontal eddy) and shelf flows (wind-induced Ekman transport). The

  15. Water and Beverage Consumption among Children Aged 4–13 Years in Lebanon: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamis Jomaa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates total water intake (TWI from plain water, beverages and foods among Lebanese children and compares TWI to dietary reference intakes (DRIs. In a national cross-sectional survey, data on demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, and physical activity characteristics were obtained from 4 to 13-year-old children (n = 752. Food and beverage consumption patterns were assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. TWI was estimated at 1651 mL/day, with beverages contributing 72% of the TWI compared to 28% from foods. Beverages with the highest contribution to TWI included plain water, fruit juice and soda. A significantly higher proportion of 9–13-year-old children failed to meet the DRIs compared to 4–8 years old (92%–98% vs. 74%. Gender differentials were observed with a significantly higher proportion of boys meeting the DRIs compared to girls. The water to energy ratio ranged between 0.84 and 0.87, which fell short of meeting the desirable recommendations. In addition, children from higher socioeconomic status had higher intakes of water from milk and bottled water, coupled with lower water intakes from sodas. The study findings show an alarming high proportion of Lebanese children failing to meet TWI recommendations, and call for culture-specific interventions to instill healthy fluid consumption patterns early in life.

  16. Beverage Consumption Habits and Association with Total Water and Energy Intakes in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Nissensohn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inadequate hydration is a public health issue that imposes a significant economic burden. In Spain, data of total water intake (TWI are scarce. There is a clear need for a national study that quantifies water and beverage intakes and explores associations between the types of beverages and energy intakes. Methods: The Anthropometry, Intake and Energy Balance Study ANIBES is a national survey of diet and nutrition conducted among a representative sample of 2285 healthy participants aged 9–75 years in Spain. Food and beverage intakes were assessed in a food diary over three days. Day and time of beverage consumption were also recorded. Results: On average, TWI was 1.7 L (SE 21.2 for men and 1.6 L (SE 18.9 for women. More than 75% of participants had inadequate TWI, according to European Food Safety Authority (EFSA recommendations. Mean total energy intake (EI was 1810 kcal/day (SE 11.1, of which 12% was provided by beverages. Water was the most consumed beverage, followed by milk. The contribution of alcoholic drinks to the EI was near 3%. For caloric soft drinks, a relatively low contribution to the EI was obtained, only 2%. Of eight different types of beverages, the variety score was positively correlated with TWI (r = 0.39 and EI (r = 0.23, suggesting that beverage variety is an indicator of higher consumption of food and drinks. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that well-conducted surveys such as the ANIBES study have the potential to yield rich contextual value data that can emphasize the need to undertake appropriate health and nutrition policies to increase the total water intake at the population level promoting a healthy Mediterranean hydration pattern.

  17. SPITZER SECONDARY ECLIPSE DEPTHS WITH MULTIPLE INTRAPIXEL SENSITIVITY CORRECTION METHODS OBSERVATIONS OF WASP-13b, WASP-15b, WASP-16b, WASP-62b, AND HAT-P-22b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilpatrick, Brian M.; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Box 1843, Brown University, Providence, RI 02904 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kataria, Tiffany [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ingalls, James G.; Krick, Jessica E., E-mail: brian_kilpatrick@brown.edu, E-mail: nlewis@stsci.org, E-mail: tiffany.kataria@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: ddeming@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: krick@ipac.caltech.edu [Spitzer Science Center, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We measure the 4.5 μ m thermal emission of five transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-13b, WASP-15b, WASP-16b, WASP-62b, and HAT-P-22b using channel 2 of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope . Significant intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer IRAC data require careful correction in order to achieve precision on the order of several hundred parts per million (ppm) for the measurement of exoplanet secondary eclipses. We determine eclipse depths by first correcting the raw data using three independent data reduction methods. The Pixel Gain Map (PMAP), Nearest Neighbors (NNBR), and Pixel Level Decorrelation (PLD) each correct for the intrapixel sensitivity effect in Spitzer photometric time-series observations. The results from each methodology are compared against each other to establish if they reach a statistically equivalent result in every case and to evaluate their ability to minimize uncertainty in the measurement. We find that all three methods produce reliable results. For every planet examined here NNBR and PLD produce results that are in statistical agreement. However, the PMAP method appears to produce results in slight disagreement in cases where the stellar centroid is not kept consistently on the most well characterized area of the detector. We evaluate the ability of each method to reduce the scatter in the residuals as well as in the correlated noise in the corrected data. The NNBR and PLD methods consistently minimize both white and red noise levels and should be considered reliable and consistent. The planets in this study span equilibrium temperatures from 1100 to 2000 K and have brightness temperatures that require either high albedo or efficient recirculation. However, it is possible that other processes such as clouds or disequilibrium chemistry may also be responsible for producing these brightness temperatures.

  18. IPHAS A-TYPE STARS WITH MID-INFRARED EXCESSES IN SPITZER SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, Antonio S.; Barlow, Michael J.; Drew, Janet E.; Unruh, Yvonne C.; Greimel, Robert; Irwin, Michael J.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    We have identified 17 A-type stars in the Galactic Plane that have mid-infrared (mid-IR) excesses at 8 μm. From observed colors in the (r' - Hα) - (r' - i') plane, we first identified 23,050 early A-type main-sequence (MS) star candidates in the Isaac Newton Photometric H-Alpha Survey (IPHAS) point source database that are located in Spitzer Galactic Legacy Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire Galactic plane fields. Imposing the requirement that they be detected in all seven Two Micron All Sky Survey and Infrared Astronomical Satellite bands led to a sample of 2692 candidate A-type stars with fully sampled 0.6 to 8 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Optical classification spectra of 18 of the IPHAS candidate A-type MS stars showed that all but one could be well fitted using MS A-type templates, with the other being an A-type supergiant. Out of the 2692 A-type candidates 17 (0.6%) were found to have 8 μm excesses above the expected photospheric values. Taking into account non-A-Type contamination estimates, the 8 μm excess fraction is adjusted to ∼0.7%. The distances to these sources range from 0.7 to 2.5 kpc. Only 10 out of the 17 excess stars had been covered by Spitzer MIPSGAL survey fields, of which five had detectable excesses at 24 μm. For sources with excesses detected in at least two mid-IR wavelength bands, blackbody fits to the excess SEDs yielded temperatures ranging from 270 to 650 K, and bolometric luminosity ratios L IR /L * from 2.2 x 10 -3 - 1.9 x 10 -2 , with a mean value of 7.9 x 10 -3 (these bolometric luminosities are lower limits as cold dust is not detectable by this survey). Both the presence of mid-IR excesses and the derived bolometric luminosity ratios are consistent with many of these systems being in the planet-building transition phase between the early protoplanetary disk phase and the later debris disk phase.

  19. Revisiting the Phase Curves of WASP-43b: Confronting Re-analyzed Spitzer Data with Cloudy Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendonça, João M.; Malik, Matej; Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2018-01-01

    and have a finite cloud-top pressure. The multi-wavelength phase curves are naturally consistent with our cloudy atmospheres, except for the 4.5 μm phase curve, which requires the presence of enhanced carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of WASP-43b. Multi-phase emission spectra at higher spectral resolution......Recently acquired Hubble and Spitzer phase curves of the short-period hot Jupiter WASP-43b make it an ideal target for confronting theory with data. On the observational front, we re-analyze the 3.6 and 4.5 μm Spitzer phase curves and demonstrate that our improved analysis better removes residual...

  20. CRYSTALLINE SILICATES IN EVOLVED STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH SPECTROSCOPY OF IRAS 16456-3542, 18354-0638, AND 23239+5754

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, B. W.; Zhang, Ke [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lisse, C. M., E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: kzhang@caltech.edu, E-mail: lia@missouri.edu, E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We report the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of three evolved stars: IRAS 16456-3542, 18354-0638, and 23239+5754. The 9.9-37.2 {mu}m Spitzer/IRS high-resolution spectra of these three sources exhibit rich sets of enstatite-dominated crystalline silicate emission features. IRAS 16456-3542 is extremely rich in crystalline silicates, with >90% of its silicate mass in crystalline form, the highest to date ever reported for crystalline silicate sources.

  1. SPITZER IRS SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS 8 μm SOURCES IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: TESTING COLOR-BASED CLASSIFICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, Catherine L.; Kastner, Joel H.; Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2009-01-01

    We present archival Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of 19 luminous 8 μm selected sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The object classes derived from these spectra and from an additional 24 spectra in the literature are compared with classifications based on Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)/MSX (J, H, K, and 8 μm) colors in order to test the 'JHK8' (Kastner et al.) classification scheme. The IRS spectra confirm the classifications of 22 of the 31 sources that can be classified under the JHK8 system. The spectroscopic classification of 12 objects that were unclassifiable in the JHK8 scheme allow us to characterize regions of the color-color diagrams that previously lacked spectroscopic verification, enabling refinements to the JHK8 classification system. The results of these new classifications are consistent with previous results concerning the identification of the most infrared-luminous objects in the LMC. In particular, while the IRS spectra reveal several new examples of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with O-rich envelopes, such objects are still far outnumbered by carbon stars (C-rich AGB stars). We show that Spitzer IRAC/MIPS color-color diagrams provide improved discrimination between red supergiants and oxygen-rich and carbon-rich AGB stars relative to those based on 2MASS/MSX colors. These diagrams will enable the most luminous IR sources in Local Group galaxies to be classified with high confidence based on their Spitzer colors. Such characterizations of stellar populations will continue to be possible during Spitzer's warm mission through the use of IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] and 2MASS colors.

  2. Properties of the Irregular Satellite System around Uranus Inferred from K2 , Herschel , and Spitzer Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas-Takács, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pál, A.; Molnár, L.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Hanyecz, O.; Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, R.; Marton, G.; Szakáts, R.; Kiss, L. L. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15-17, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Mommert, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 6010, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Müller, T., E-mail: farkas.aniko@csfk.mta.hu [Max-Plank-Institut für extraterrestrsiche Pyhsik, Garching (Germany)

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present visible-range light curves of the irregular Uranian satellites Sycorax, Caliban, Prospero, Ferdinand, and Setebos taken with the Kepler Space Telescope over the course of the K2 mission. Thermal emission measurements obtained with the Herschel /PACS and Spitzer /MIPS instruments of Sycorax and Caliban were also analyzed and used to determine size, albedo, and surface characteristics of these bodies. We compare these properties with the rotational and surface characteristics of irregular satellites in other giant planet systems and also with those of main belt and Trojan asteroids and trans-Neptunian objects. Our results indicate that the Uranian irregular satellite system likely went through a more intense collisional evolution than the irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Surface characteristics of Uranian irregular satellites seem to resemble the Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects more than irregular satellites around other giant planets, suggesting the existence of a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system inside the orbit of Uranus.

  3. NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xi; Gan, Cong-Gui; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita; He, Jin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    We have produced a catalog containing 98 newly identified massive young stellar object (MYSO) candidates associated with ongoing outflows (known as extended green objects, or EGOs). These have been identified from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) II data set and our new identifications increase the number of known EGOs to ∼400 in our Galaxy, adding to the ∼300 previously identified EGOs reported by Cyganowski et al. from the GLIMPSE I survey. The high detection rate (∼70%) of 95 GHz class I methanol masers achieved in a survey toward 57 of these new EGOs with the Mopra 22 m radio telescope demonstrates that the new EGOs are associated with outflows. Investigations of the mid-infrared properties and physical associations with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, class I and II methanol masers, and millimeter Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey sources) reveal that the newly identified EGOs are very similar in nature to those in the sample of Cyganowski et al. All of the observational evidence supports the hypothesis that EGOs correspond to MYSOs at the earliest evolutionary stage, with ongoing outflow activity, and active rapid accretion.

  4. Stellar mass estimation based on IRAC photometry for Spitzer SWIRE-field galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinan; Wu Hong; Li Haining; Cao Chen

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the feasibility of estimating the stellar mass of galaxies by mid-infrared luminosities based on a large sample of galaxies cross-identified from Spitzer SWIRE fields and the SDSS spectrographic survey. We derived the formulae to calculate the stellar mass by using IRAC 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm luminosities. The mass-to-luminosity ratios of IRAC 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm luminosities are more sensitive to the star formation history of galaxies than to other factors, such as the intrinsic extinction, metallicity and star formation rate. To remove the effect of star formation history, we used g - r color to recalibrate the formulae and obtain a better result. Researchers must be more careful when estimating the stellar mass of low metallicity galaxies using our formulae. Due to the emission from dust heated by the hottest young stars, luminous infrared galaxies present higher IRAC 4.5 μm luminosities compared to IRAC 3.6 μm luminosities. For most of type-II AGNs, the nuclear activity cannot enhance 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm luminosities compared with normal galaxies. Star formation in our AGN-hosting galaxies is also very weak, almost all of which are early-type galaxies.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer h and {chi} Persei candidate members (Cloutier+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, R.; Currie, T.; Rieke, G. H.; Kenyon, S. J.; Balog, Z.; Jayawardhana, R.

    2017-08-01

    The IRAC (Fazio et al. 2004ApJS..154...39F) observed h and {chi} Persei on October 30, 2008 (AOR IDs 2182740, 21828608, 21828096, 21828864, 21828352, and 2182912). Solar activity was normal to below average. Zodical emission ranged between ~0.02 and 2 MJy/sr from 3.6 um to 8 um. Image processing and photometry were performed separately for the short-exposure and long-exposure frames. The MIPS (Rieke et al. 2004ApJS..154...25R) imaged h and {chi} Persei on 2008 March 15-16, 2008 October 25-26, and 2009 March 26 and 29 as a part of General Observation Programs 40690 and 50664 (PI: Scott Kenyon). To identify and characterize disks surrounding h and {chi} Persei stars, we combine Spitzer data with optical/near-IR data for likely cluster members, updating the list from Currie et al. (2010, J/ApJS/186/191) with a more accurate one of 13956 stars (Table 1). (3 data files).

  6. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  7. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES WITH TIDAL DEBRIS AND THEIR SCALING RELATIONS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S4G)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Hinz, Joannah L.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Schinnerer, Eva; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; De Swardt, Bonita; Comerón, Sébastien; Regan, Michael W.; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; De Paz, Armando Gil

    2012-01-01

    Tidal debris around galaxies can yield important clues on their evolution. We have identified tidal debris in 11 early-type galaxies (T ≤ 0) from a sample of 65 early types drawn from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S 4 G). The tidal debris includes features such as shells, ripples, and tidal tails. A variety of techniques, including two-dimensional decomposition of galactic structures, were used to quantify the residual tidal features. The tidal debris contributes ∼3%-10% to the total 3.6 μm luminosity of the host galaxy. Structural parameters of the galaxies were estimated using two-dimensional profile fitting. We investigate the locations of galaxies with tidal debris in the fundamental plane and Kormendy relation. We find that galaxies with tidal debris lie within the scatter of early-type galaxies without tidal features. Assuming that the tidal debris is indicative of recent gravitational interaction or merger, this suggests that these galaxies have either undergone minor merging events so that the overall structural properties of the galaxies are not significantly altered, or they have undergone a major merging events but already have experienced sufficient relaxation and phase mixing so that their structural properties become similar to those of the non-interacting early-type galaxies.

  8. The First Simultaneous Microlensing Observations by Two Space Telescopes: Spitzer and Swift Reveal a Brown Dwarf in Event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Li, Z.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Street, R. A.; Calchi Novati, S.; Hundertmark, M.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the "microlens parallax". We report the discovery of a 30-65M J brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in the microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of approximately 5 kpc toward the Galactic Bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by Spitzer and Swift, allowing a measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an eight-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either approximately 0.25 au or approximately 45 au. This is the first microlensing event observed by Swift, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which Swift is sensitive, finding that though Swift could not measure the microlens parallax with respect to ground-based observations for this event, it can be important for other events. Specifically, it is important for detecting nearby brown dwarfs and free-floating planets in high magnification events.

  9. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the gould belt. VI. The Auriga-California molecular cloud observed with IRAC and MIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Harvey, Paul M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Tothill, Nicholas F. H. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Nutter, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queen' s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); DiFrancesco, James [National Research Council Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jørgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø. (Denmark); Allen, Lori E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Chapman, Nicholas L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Merín, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC-ESA, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Peterson, Dawn E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 μm observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg{sup 2} with IRAC and 10.47 deg{sup 2} with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHα 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the relative fraction of YSOs in earlier (Class I and F) and later (Class II) classes compared to other clouds. We perform simple SED modeling of the YSOs with disks to compare the mid-IR properties to disks in other clouds and identify 14 classical transition disk candidates. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size, and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15-20 times fewer stars.

  10. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. VI. The Auriga-California Molecular Cloud Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jorgensen, Jes K.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70 and 160 micrometers observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg(exp 2) with IRAC and 10.47 deg2 with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkH(alpha) 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the fraction of YSOs in the region with disks relative to an estimate of the diskless YSO population. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15 - 20 times fewer stars.

  11. THE UNUSUAL VERTICAL MASS DISTRIBUTION OF NGC 4013 SEEN THROUGH THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S4G)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comeron, Sebastien; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Knapen, Johan H.; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Mizusawa, Trisha; Hinz, Joannah L.; Regan, Michael W.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Menendez-Delmestre, KarIn; Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Buta, Ronald J.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.

    2011-01-01

    NGC 4013 is a nearby Sb edge-on galaxy known for its 'prodigious' H I warp and its 'giant' tidal stream. Previous work on this unusual object shows that it cannot be fitted satisfactorily by a canonical thin+thick disk structure. We have produced a new decomposition of NGC 4013, considering three stellar flattened components (thin+thick disk plus an extra and more extended component) and one gaseous disk. All four components are considered to be gravitationally coupled and isothermal. To do so, we have used the 3.6 μm images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We find evidence for NGC 4013 indeed having a thin and a thick disk and an extra flattened component. This smooth and extended component (scale height z EC ∼ 3 kpc) could be interpreted as a thick disk or as a squashed ellipsoidal halo and contains ∼20% of the total mass of all three stellar components. We argue it is unlikely to be related to the ongoing merger or due to the off-plane stars from a warp in the other two disk components. Instead, we favor a scenario in which the thick disk and the extended component were formed in a two-stage process, in which an initially thick disk has been dynamically heated by a merger soon enough in the galaxy history to have a new thick disk formed within it.

  12. OPEN CLUSTERS IN THE MILKY WAY OUTER DISK: NEWLY DISCOVERED AND UNSTUDIED CLUSTERS IN THE SPITZER GLIMPSE-360, CYG-X, AND SMOG SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasowski, G.; Beaton, R. L.; Hamm, K. K.; Majewski, S. R.; Patterson, R. J.; Babler, B.; Churchwell, E.; Meade, M.; Whitney, B. A.; Benjamin, R. A.; Watson, C.

    2013-01-01

    Open stellar clusters are extremely valuable probes of Galactic structure, star formation, kinematics, and chemical abundance patterns. Near-infrared (NIR) data have enabled the detection of hundreds of clusters hidden from optical surveys, and mid-infrared (MIR) data are poised to offer an even clearer view into the most heavily obscured parts of the Milky Way. We use new MIR images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE-360, Cyg-X, and SMOG surveys to visually identify a large number of open cluster candidates in the outer disk of the Milky Way (65° < l < 265°). Using NIR color-magnitude diagrams, stellar isochrones, and stellar reddening estimates, we derive cluster parameters (metallicity, distance, reddening) for those objects without previous identification and/or parameters in the literature. In total, we present coordinates and sizes of 20 previously unknown open cluster candidates; for 7 of these we also present metallicity, distance, and reddening values. In addition, we provide the first estimates of these values for nine clusters that had been previously cataloged. We compare our cluster sizes and other derived parameters to those in the open cluster catalog of Dias et al. and find strong similarities except for a higher mean reddening for our objects, which signifies our increased detection sensitivity in regions of high extinction. The results of this cluster search and analysis demonstrate the ability of MIR imaging and photometry to augment significantly the current census of open clusters in the Galaxy

  13. Spitzer IRS Spectroscopy of the 10 Myr-Old EF Cha Debris Disk: Evidence for Phyllosilicate-Rich Dust in the Terrestrial Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Lisse, Carey M.; Sicillia-Aguilar, Aurora; Rieke, George H.; Su, Kate Y. L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe Spitzer IRS spectroscopic observations of the approx. 10 Myr-old star, EF Chao Compositional modeling of the spectra from 5 micron to 35 micron confirms that it is surrounded by a luminous debris disk with L(sub D)/L(sub *) approx. 10(exp -3), containing dust with temperatures between 225 K and 430 K characteristic of the terrestrial zone. The EF Cha spectrum shows evidence for many solid-state features, unlike most cold, low-luminosity debris disks but like some other 10-20 Myr-old luminous, warm debris disks (e.g. HD 113766A). The EF Cha debris disk is unusually rich in a species or combination of species whose emissivities resemble that of finely-powdered, laboratory-measured phyllosilicate species (talc, saponite, and smectite), which are likely produced by aqueous alteration of primordial anhydrous rocky materials. The dust and, by inference, the parent bodies of the debris also contain abundant amorphous silicates and metal sulfides, and possibly water ice. The dust's total olivine to pyroxene ratio of approx. 2 also provides evidence of aqueous alteration. The large mass volume of grains with sizes comparable to or below the radiation blow-out limit implies that planetesimals may be colliding at a rate high enough to yield the emitting dust but not so high as to devolatize the planetesimals via impact processing. Because phyllosilicates are produced by the interactions between anhydrous rock and warm, reactive water, EF Cha's disk is a likely signpost for water delivery to the terrestrial zone of a young planetary system.

  14. MODELS OF THE η CORVI DEBRIS DISK FROM THE KECK INTERFEROMETER, SPITZER, AND HERSCHEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, J.; Beichman, C.; Millan-Gabet, R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bryden, G.; Mennesson, B. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91107 (United States); Defrère, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 993 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85721 (United States); Boccaletti, A., E-mail: lebretoj@gmail.com [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, University Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6 and University Denis Diderot Paris 7, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2016-02-01

    Debris disks are signposts of analogs to small-body populations of the solar system, often, however, with much higher masses and dust production rates. The disk associated with the nearby star η Crv is especially striking, as it shows strong mid- and far-infrared excesses despite an age of ∼1.4 Gyr. We undertake constructing a consistent model of the system that can explain a diverse collection of spatial and spectral data. We analyze Keck Interferometer Nuller measurements and revisit Spitzer and additional spectrophotometric data, as well as resolved Herschel images, to determine the dust spatial distribution in the inner exozodi and in the outer belt. We model in detail the two-component disk and the dust properties from the sub-AU scale to the outermost regions by fitting simultaneously all measurements against a large parameter space. The properties of the cold belt are consistent with a collisional cascade in a reservoir of ice-free planetesimals at 133 AU. It shows marginal evidence for asymmetries along the major axis. KIN enables us to establish that the warm dust consists of a ring that peaks between 0.2 and 0.8 AU. To reconcile this location with the ∼400 K dust temperature, very high albedo dust must be invoked, and a distribution of forsterite grains starting from micron sizes satisfies this criterion, while providing an excellent fit to the spectrum. We discuss additional constraints from the LBTI and near-infrared spectra, and we present predictions of what James Webb Space Telescope can unveil about this unusual object and whether it can detect unseen planets.

  15. DEEP JHKs AND SPITZER IMAGING OF FOUR ISOLATED MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2009-01-01

    We present observations in eight wavebands from 1.25 to 24 μm of four dense cores: L204C-2, L1152, L1155C-2, and L1228. Our goals are to study the young stellar object (YSO) population of these cores and to measure the mid-infrared extinction law. With our combined near-infrared and Spitzer photometry, we classify each source in the cores as, among other things, background stars, galaxies, or embedded YSOs. L1152 contains three YSOs and L1228 has seven, but neither L204C-2 nor L1155C-2 appear to contain any YSOs. We estimate an upper limit of 7 x 10 -5 to 5 x 10 -4 L sun for any undiscovered YSOs in our cores. We also compute the line-of-sight extinction law toward each background star. These measurements are averaged spatially, to create χ 2 maps of the changes in the mid-infrared extinction law throughout our cores, and also in different ranges of extinction. From the χ 2 maps, we identify two small regions in L1152 and L1228 where the outflows in those cores appear to be destroying the larger dust grains, thus altering the extinction law in those regions. On average, however, our extinction law is relatively flat from 3.6 to 24 μm for all ranges of extinction and in all four cores. From 3.6 to 8 μm, this law is consistent with a dust model that includes larger dust grains than the diffuse interstellar medium, which suggests grain growth has occurred in our cores. At 24 μm, our extinction law is two to four times higher than predicted by dust models. However, it is similar to other empirical measurements.

  16. THE LUMINOSITIES OF PROTOSTARS IN THE SPITZER c2d AND GOULD BELT LEGACY CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Michael M.; Arce, Hector G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Allen, Lori E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Evans II, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C. [Herzberg Institute, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Chapman, Nicholas L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cieza, Lucas A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Hatchell, Jennifer [Astrophysics Group, Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kirk, Jason M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Merin, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC-ESA, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Peterson, Dawn E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Spezzi, Loredana, E-mail: michael.dunham@yale.edu [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Motivated by the long-standing 'luminosity problem' in low-mass star formation whereby protostars are underluminous compared to theoretical expectations, we identify 230 protostars in 18 molecular clouds observed by two Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy surveys of nearby star-forming regions. We compile complete spectral energy distributions, calculate L{sub bol} for each source, and study the protostellar luminosity distribution. This distribution extends over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 L{sub Sun} to 69 L{sub Sun }, and has a mean and median of 4.3 L{sub Sun} and 1.3 L{sub Sun }, respectively. The distributions are very similar for Class 0 and Class I sources except for an excess of low luminosity (L{sub bol} {approx}< 0.5 L{sub Sun }) Class I sources compared to Class 0. 100 out of the 230 protostars (43%) lack any available data in the far-infrared and submillimeter (70 {mu}m <{lambda} < 850 {mu}m) and have L{sub bol} underestimated by factors of 2.5 on average, and up to factors of 8-10 in extreme cases. Correcting these underestimates for each source individually once additional data becomes available will likely increase both the mean and median of the sample by 35%-40%. We discuss and compare our results to several recent theoretical studies of protostellar luminosities and show that our new results do not invalidate the conclusions of any of these studies. As these studies demonstrate that there is more than one plausible accretion scenario that can match observations, future attention is clearly needed. The better statistics provided by our increased data set should aid such future work.

  17. A new look at Spitzer primary transit observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, G.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.; Howarth, I. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E6BT (United Kingdom); Peres, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Palermo, via Archirafi I-90123, Italy. (Italy); Micela, G., E-mail: giuseppe.morello.11@ucl.ac.uk [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica (previously Dipartimento di Fisica), Specola Universitaria, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1 I-90123 (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Blind source separation techniques are used to reanalyze two exoplanetary transit light curves of the exoplanet HD 189733b recorded with the IR camera IRAC on board the Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 μm during the 'cold' era. These observations, together with observations at other IR wavelengths, are crucial to characterize the atmosphere of the planet HD 189733b. Previous analyses of the same data sets reported discrepant results, hence the necessity of the reanalyses. The method we used here is based on the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) statistical technique, which ensures a high degree of objectivity. The use of ICA to detrend single photometric observations in a self-consistent way is novel in the literature. The advantage of our reanalyses over previous work is that we do not have to make any assumptions on the structure of the unknown instrumental systematics. Such 'admission of ignorance' may result in larger error bars than reported in the literature, up to a factor 1.6. This is a worthwhile tradeoff for much higher objectivity, necessary for trustworthy claims. Our main results are (1) improved and robust values of orbital and stellar parameters, (2) new measurements of the transit depths at 3.6 μm, (3) consistency between the parameters estimated from the two observations, (4) repeatability of the measurement within the photometric level of ∼2 × 10{sup –4} in the IR, and (5) no evidence of stellar variability at the same photometric level within one year.

  18. SEDS: THE SPITZER EXTENDED DEEP SURVEY. SURVEY DESIGN, PHOTOMETRY, AND DEEP IRAC SOURCE COUNTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Arendt, R. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Barmby, P. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Barro, G.; Faber, S.; Guhathakurta, P. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bell, E. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bouwens, R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Cattaneo, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Croton, D. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218 Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Dave, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dunlop, J. S. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Finlator, K. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, CK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Grogin, N. A., E-mail: mashby@cfa.harvard.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2013-05-20

    The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg{sup 2} to a depth of 26 AB mag (3{sigma}) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 {+-} 1.0 and 4.4 {+-} 0.8 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

  19. How to restore the fiduciary relationship. An interview with Eliot Spitzer. Interview by Louise O'Brien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Eliot

    2004-05-01

    Eliot Spitzer's investigations into the mutual fund and investment-banking industries have made the New York State attorney general the de facto flag bearer of corporate reform. His exposure of conflicts of interest between investment bankers and research analyst in Wall Street firms led to the $1.4 billion global settlement between regulators and banking houses in 2003. In this interview, Spitzer describes the challenge of protecting public markets from conflicts of interest, paying particular attention to how such conflicts get institutionalized in an industry. "The cases that have gotten me and my fellow regulators most upset are the ones where we've seen senior management being tolerant of rank abuses," he says. "Because then you know that the entire structure is rotten." He also points the finger squarely at boards, maintaining that board members are drawn from pools of company and industry insiders. He cites "a void in values in a lot of boardrooms," holding up executive compensation as a powerful example. "Board compensation committees ... are self-selected and interwoven--it's a rigged marketplace." He continues, "It would be interesting to see what the world would look like if CEO pay packages had to be submitted to shareholder votes." Spitzer suggests that what's really needed is for all business leaders to reinstill throughout their organizations the critical notion of a fiduciary duty--whether it is to the shareholder or to the customer. Using the mutual fund industry as an example, he also contrasts the value of enforcement with that of regulation and articulates an important--and surprisingly limited--role for government in protecting free markets.

  20. The Demographics and Properties of Wide-Orbit, Planetary-Mass Companions from PSF Fitting of Spitzer/IRAC Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Raquel; Kraus, Adam L.

    2017-06-01

    Over the past decade, a growing population of planetary-mass companions ( 100 AU) from their host stars, challenging existing models of both star and planet formation. It is unclear whether these systems represent the low-mass extreme of stellar binary formation or the high-mass and wide-orbit extreme of planet formation theories, as various proposed formation pathways inadequately explain the physical and orbital aspects of these systems. Even so, determining which scenario best reproduces the observed characteristics of the PMCs will come once a statistically robust sample of directly-imaged PMCs are found and studied.We are developing an automated pipeline to search for wide-orbit PMCs to young stars in Spitzer/IRAC images. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is the backbone of our novel point spread function (PSF) subtraction routine that efficiently creates and subtracts χ2-minimizing instrumental PSFs, simultaneously measuring astrometry and infrared photometry of these systems across the four IRAC channels (3.6 μm, 4.5 μm, 5.8 μm, and 8 μm). In this work, we present the results of a Spitzer/IRAC archival imaging study of 11 young, low-mass (0.044-0.88 M⊙ K3.5-M7.5) stars known to have faint, low-mass companions in 3 nearby star-forming regions (Chameleon, Taurus, and Upper Scorpius). We characterize the systems found to have low-mass companions with non-zero [I1] - [I4] colors, potentially signifying the presence of a circum(sub?)stellar disk. Plans for future pipeline improvements and paths forward will also be discussed. Once this computational foundation is optimized, the stage is set to quickly scour the nearby star-forming regions already imaged by Spitzer, identify potential candidates for further characterization with ground- or space-based telescopes, and increase the number of widely-separated PMCs known.

  1. The Spitzer search for the transits of HARPS low-mass planets. II. Null results for 19 planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, M.; Demory, B.-O.; Lovis, C.; Deming, D.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lo Curto, G.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Seager, S.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.

    2017-05-01

    Short-period super-Earths and Neptunes are now known to be very frequent around solar-type stars. Improving our understanding of these mysterious planets requires the detection of a significant sample of objects suitable for detailed characterization. Searching for the transits of the low-mass planets detected by Doppler surveys is a straightforward way to achieve this goal. Indeed, Doppler surveys target the most nearby main-sequence stars, they regularly detect close-in low-mass planets with significant transit probability, and their radial velocity data constrain strongly the ephemeris of possible transits. In this context, we initiated in 2010 an ambitious Spitzer multi-Cycle transit search project that targeted 25 low-mass planets detected by radial velocity, focusing mainly on the shortest-period planets detected by the HARPS spectrograph. We report here null results for 19 targets of the project. For 16 planets out of 19, a transiting configuration is strongly disfavored or firmly rejected by our data for most planetary compositions. We derive a posterior probability of 83% that none of the probed 19 planets transits (for a prior probability of 22%), which still leaves a significant probability of 17% that at least one of them does transit. Globally, our Spitzer project revealed or confirmed transits for three of its 25 targeted planets, and discarded or disfavored the transiting nature of 20 of them. Our light curves demonstrate for Warm Spitzer excellent photometric precisions: for 14 targets out of 19, we were able to reach standard deviations that were better than 50 ppm per 30 min intervals. Combined with its Earth-trailing orbit, which makes it capable of pointing any star in the sky and to monitor it continuously for days, this work confirms Spitzer as an optimal instrument to detect sub-mmag-deep transits on the bright nearby stars targeted by Doppler surveys. The photometric and radial velocity time series used in this work are only available at the

  2. COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER INFRARED ARRAY CAMERA IMAGES: DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale (∼>30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the ∼1-5 μm mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low (∼>1 nW m -2 sr -1 at 3-5 μm), and thus consistent with current γ-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs inhabited by the populations producing these

  3. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Images: Data Processing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale (gsim30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the ~1-5 μm mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low (gsim1 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3-5 μm), and thus consistent with current γ-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs inhabited by the populations producing these source

  4. Fast, rugged and sensitive ultra high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for analysis of cyanotoxins in raw water and drinking water--First findings of anatoxins, cylindrospermopsins and microcystin variants in Swedish source waters and infiltration ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekar, Heidi; Westerberg, Erik; Bruno, Oscar; Lääne, Ants; Persson, Kenneth M; Sundström, L Fredrik; Thim, Anna-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Freshwater blooms of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) in source waters are generally composed of several different strains with the capability to produce a variety of toxins. The major exposure routes for humans are direct contact with recreational waters and ingestion of drinking water not efficiently treated. The ultra high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based analytical method presented here allows simultaneous analysis of 22 cyanotoxins from different toxin groups, including anatoxins, cylindrospermopsins, nodularin and microcystins in raw water and drinking water. The use of reference standards enables correct identification of toxins as well as precision of the quantification and due to matrix effects, recovery correction is required. The multi-toxin group method presented here, does not compromise sensitivity, despite the large number of analytes. The limit of quantification was set to 0.1 μg/L for 75% of the cyanotoxins in drinking water and 0.5 μg/L for all cyanotoxins in raw water, which is compliant with the WHO guidance value for microcystin-LR. The matrix effects experienced during analysis were reasonable for most analytes, considering the large volume injected into the mass spectrometer. The time of analysis, including lysing of cell bound toxins, is less than three hours. Furthermore, the method was tested in Swedish source waters and infiltration ponds resulting in evidence of presence of anatoxin, homo-anatoxin, cylindrospermopsin and several variants of microcystins for the first time in Sweden, proving its usefulness. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SPITZER ULTRA FAINT SURVEY PROGRAM (SURFS UP). II. IRAC-DETECTED LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES AT 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 BEHIND STRONG-LENSING CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Bradač, Maruša; Hoag, Austin; Cain, Benjamin; Lubin, L. M.; Knight, Robert I. [University of California Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Lemaux, Brian C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Brammer, Gabriel B. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Castellano, Marco; Amorin, Ricardo; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Schmidt, Kasper B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Schrabback, Tim [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf Dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Linden, Anja von der, E-mail: khhuang@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: astrokuang@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program. Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 17 galaxy candidates at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 from Hubble Space Telescope images (including the full-depth images from the Hubble Frontier Fields program for MACS 1149 and MACS 0717) that have detections at signal-to-noise ratios  ≥ 3 in at least one of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of ∼1.2–5.5. Due to the magnification of the foreground galaxy clusters, the rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M{sub 1600} are between −21.2 and −18.9 mag, while their intrinsic stellar masses are between 2 × 10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙} and 2.9 × 10{sup 9}M{sub ⊙}. We identify two Lyα emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at z{sub Lyα} = 6.76 (in RXJ 1347) and one at z{sub Lyα} = 6.32 (in MACS 0454). We find that 4 out of 17 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates are favored by z ≲ 1 solutions when IRAC fluxes are included in photometric redshift fitting. We also show that IRAC [3.6]–[4.5] color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies which likely have strong nebular emission lines or obscured active galactic nucleus contributions within certain redshift windows.

  6. THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEY OF THE ORION A AND B MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF DUSTY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megeath, S. T.; Kryukova, E.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Hora, J. L.; Myers, P. C.; Fazio, G. G.; Allen, L. E.; Flaherty, K.; Hartmann, L.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc −2 to over 10,000 pc −2 , with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities ≥10 pc −2 , we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups shows that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only ∼2 Myr in age. We find that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions

  7. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTiNGS). II. DISCOVERY OF METAL-POOR DUSTY AGB STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESA-European Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th., E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-10

    The DUSTiNGS survey (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer) is a 3.6 and 4.5 μm imaging survey of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. Using two epochs, spaced approximately six months apart, we identify a total of 526 dusty variable AGB stars (sometimes called ''extreme'' or x-AGB stars; [3.6]-[4.5] > 0.1 mag). Of these, 111 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –1.5 and 12 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –2.0, making them the most metal-poor dust-producing AGB stars known. We compare these identifications to those in the literature and find that most are newly discovered large-amplitude variables, with the exception of ≈30 stars in NGC 185 and NGC 147, 1 star in IC 1613, and 1 star in Phoenix. The chemical abundances of the x-AGB variables are unknown, but the low metallicities suggest that they are more likely to be carbon-rich than oxygen-rich and comparisons with existing optical and near-IR photometry confirm that 70 of the x-AGB variables are confirmed or likely carbon stars. We see an increase in the pulsation amplitude with increased dust production, supporting previous studies suggesting that dust production and pulsation are linked. We find no strong evidence linking dust production with metallicity, indicating that dust can form in very metal-poor environments.

  8. OBSERVATIONAL 5-20 μm INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION CURVES TOWARD STAR-FORMING REGIONS DERIVED FROM SPITZER IRS SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of G0-M4 III stars behind dark clouds, I construct 5-20 μm empirical extinction curves for 0.3 ≤ A K V between ∼3 and 50. For A K K > 1, the curve exhibits lower contrast between the silicate and absorption continuum, develops ice absorption, and lies closer to the Weingartner and Draine R V = 5.5 Case B curve, a result which is consistent with that of Flaherty et al. and Chiar et al. Recently, work using Spitzer Infrared Array Camera data by Chapman et al. independently reaches a similar conclusion that the shape of the extinction curve changes as a function of increasing A K . By calculating the optical depths of the 9.7 μm silicate and 6.0, 6.8, and 15.2 μm ice features, I determine that a process involving ice is responsible for the changing shape of the extinction curve and speculate that this process is a coagulation of ice-mantled grains rather than ice-mantled grains alone.

  9. Revisiting the Phase Curves of WASP-43b: Confronting Re-analyzed Spitzer Data with Cloudy Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, João M.; Malik, Matej; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Heng, Kevin

    2018-04-01

    Recently acquired Hubble and Spitzer phase curves of the short-period hot Jupiter WASP-43b make it an ideal target for confronting theory with data. On the observational front, we re-analyze the 3.6 and 4.5 μm Spitzer phase curves and demonstrate that our improved analysis better removes residual red noise due to intra-pixel sensitivity, which leads to greater fluxes emanating from the nightside of WASP-43b, thus reducing the tension between theory and data. On the theoretical front, we construct cloud-free and cloudy atmospheres of WASP-43b using our Global Circulation Model (GCM), THOR, which solves the non-hydrostatic Euler equations (compared to GCMs that typically solve the hydrostatic primitive equations). The cloud-free atmosphere produces a reasonable fit to the dayside emission spectrum. The multi-phase emission spectra constrain the cloud deck to be confined to the nightside and have a finite cloud-top pressure. The multi-wavelength phase curves are naturally consistent with our cloudy atmospheres, except for the 4.5 μm phase curve, which requires the presence of enhanced carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of WASP-43b. Multi-phase emission spectra at higher spectral resolution, as may be obtained using the James Webb Space Telescope, and a reflected-light phase curve at visible wavelengths would further constrain the properties of clouds in WASP-43b.

  10. SPITZER AS A MICROLENS PARALLAX SATELLITE: MASS MEASUREMENT FOR THE OGLE-2014-BLG-0124L PLANET AND ITS HOST STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udalski, A.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Szymański, M. K.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Yee, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gould, A.; Zhu, W.; Pogge, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Carey, S. [Spitzer Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Calchi Novati, S. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We combine Spitzer and ground-based observations to measure the microlens parallax vector π{sub E}, and thus the mass and distance of OGLE-2014-BLG-0124L, making it the first microlensing planetary system with a space-based parallax measurement. The planet and star have masses of m ∼ 0.5 M {sub jup} and M ∼ 0.7 M {sub ☉} and are separated by a ∼ 3.1 AU in projection. The main source of uncertainty in all of these numbers (approximately 30%, 30%, and 20%) is the relatively poor measurement of the Einstein radius θ{sub E}, rather than uncertainty in π{sub E}, which is measured with 2.5% precision. This compares to 22% based on OGLE data alone, implying that the Spitzer data provide not only a substantial improvement in the precision of the π{sub E} measurement, but also the first independent test of a ground-based π{sub E} measurement.

  11. Spitzer IRS (8-30 micron) Spectra of Basaltic Asteroids 1459 Magnya and 956 Elisa: Mineralogy and Thermal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, J. P.; Moskovitz, N. A.

    2009-01-01

    We report preliminary results from Spitzer IRS (Infrared Spectrograph) spectroscopy of 956 Elisa, 1459 Magnya, and other small basaltic asteroids with the Spitzer IRS. Program targets include members of the dynamical family of the unique large differentiated asteroid 4 Vesta ("Vestoids"), several outer-main-belt basaltic asteroids whose orbits exclude them from originating on 4 Vesta, and the basaltic near-Earth asteroid 4055 Magellan. The preliminary thermal model (STM) fit to the 5--35 micron spectrum of 956 Elisa gives a radius of 5.4 +/- 0.3 km and a subsolar- point temperature of 282.2 +/- 0.5 K. This temperature corresponds to eta approximately equals 1.06 +/- 0.02, which is substantially higher than the eta approximately equals 0.756 characteristic of large main-belt asteroids. Unlike 4 Vesta and other large asteroids, therefore, 956 Elisa has significant thermal inertia in its surface layer. The wavelength of the Christiansen feature (emissivity maximum near 9 micron), the positions and shapes of the narrow maxima (10 micron, 11 micron) within the broad 9--14 micron silicate band, and the 19--20 micron minimum are consistent with features found in the laboratory spectra of diogenites and of low-Ca pyroxenes of similar composition (Wo<5, En50-En75).

  12. Use of Video Podcasts to Communicate Scientific Findings to Non-Scientists— Examples from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, D. A.; McMahon, G.; Capelli, K.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) provides information about (1) water-quality conditions and how those conditions vary locally, regionally, and nationally, (2) water-quality trends, and (3) factors that affect those conditions. As part of the NAWQA Program, the Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems (EUSE) study examined the vulnerability and resilience of streams to urbanization. Completion of the EUSE study has resulted in over 20 scientific publications. Video podcasts are being used to communicate the relevance of these scientific findings to resource managers and the general public. Two video podcasts have been produced to date (9-1-2010). The first film “Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems” is a 3-minute summary of results of the EUSE study. The film is accessible on the USGS Corecast website (http://www.usgs.gov/corecast/details.asp?ep=127) and is available in MPG, WMV, and QuickTime formats, as an audio-only podcast, with a complete transcript of the film; and as a YouTube video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYwZiiORYG8) with subtitles. The film has been viewed over 6200 times, with most downloads occurring in the first 3 weeks after the June release. Views of the film declined to approximately 60 a week for the following 9 weeks. Most of the requests for the film have originated from U.S. domain addresses with 13 percent originating from international addresses. The film was posted on YouTube in June and has received 262 views since that time. A 15-minute version of the film with more technical content is also available for access from the EUSE website (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/urban/html/podcasts.html). It has been downloaded over 660 times. The bulk of the requests occurred in the first 2 weeks after release, with most requests originating from U.S. addresses and 11 percent originating internationally. In the second film “Stormwater, Impervious Surface, and Stream Health” (not

  13. Mineralogy and Thermal Properties of V-Type Asteroid 956 Elisa: Evidence for Diogenitic Material from the Spitzer IRS (5-35 Micrometers) Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, Joshua P.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the thermal infrared (5-35 micrometer) spectrum of 956 Elisa as measured by the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph ("IRS"; Houck,1.R. et .11. [20041. Astrophys, 1. SuppL 154, 18-24) together with new ground-based lightcurve data and near-IR spectra. From the visible lightcurve photometry, we determine a rotation period of 16.494 +/- 0.001 h, identify the rotational phase of the Spitzer observations, and estimate the visible absolute magnitude (Hv) at that rotational phase to be 12.58 +/- 0.04. From radiometric analysis of the thermal flux spectrum, we find that at the time of observation 956 Elisa had a projected radius of 5.3 +/- 0.4 km with a visible albedo pv = 0.142+/- 0.022, significantly lower than that of the prototype V-type asteroid, 4 Vesta. (This corresponds to a radius of 5.2 +/- 0.4 km at lightcurve mean.) Analysis with the standard thermal model (STM) results in a sub-solar temperature of 292.3 +/- 2.8 K and beaming parameter eta = 1.16 +/- 0.05. Thermophysical modeling places a lower limit of 20 J m(exp -2)K(exp -1)s(exp -1/2) on the thermal inertia of the asteroid's surface layer (if the surface is very smooth) but more likely values fall between 30 and 150 J m(exp -2)K(exp -1)s(exp -1/2) depending on the sense of rotation. The emissivity spectrum, calculated by dividing the measured thermal flux spectrum by the modeled thermal continuum, exhibits mineralogically interpretable spectral features within the 9-12 micrometer reststrahlen band, the 15-16.5 micrometer Si-O-Si stretching region, and the 16-25 micrometer reststrahlen region that are consistent with pyroxene of diogenitic composition: extant diogenitic pyroxenes fall within the narrow compositional range W0(sub 2+/-1)En(sub 74+/-2)Fs(sub 24+/-1). Spectral deconvolution of the 9-12 micrometer reststrahlen features indicates that up to approximately 20% olivine may also be present, suggesting an olivine-diogenite-like mineralogy. The mid-IR spectrum is inconsistent with non

  14. Combining Spitzer Parallax and Keck II Adaptive Optics Imaging to Measure the Mass of a Solar-like Star Orbited by a Cold Gaseous Planet Discovered by Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Batista, V.; Bennett, D. P.; Marquette, J.-B.; Blackman, J. W.; Cole, A. A.; Coutures, C.; Danielski, C.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fukui, A.; Koshimoto, N.; Lončarić, K.; Morales, J. C.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Henderson, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Beichman, C.

    2018-02-01

    To obtain accurate mass measurements for cold planets discovered by microlensing, it is usually necessary to combine light curve modeling with at least two lens mass–distance relations. The physical parameters of the planetary system OGLE-2014-BLG-0124L have been constrained thanks to accurate parallax effect between ground-based and simultaneous space-based Spitzer observations. Here, we resolved the source+lens star from sub-arcsecond blends in H-band using adaptive optics (AO) observations with NIRC2 mounted on Keck II telescope. We identify additional flux, coincident with the source to within 160 mas. We estimate the potential contributions to this blended light (chance-aligned star, additional companion to the lens or to the source) and find that 85% of the NIR flux is due to the lens star at H L = 16.63 ± 0.06 and K L = 16.44 ± 0.06. We combined the parallax constraint and the AO constraint to derive the physical parameters of the system. The lensing system is composed of a mid-late type G main sequence star of M L = 0.9 ± 0.05 M ⊙ located at D L = 3.5 ± 0.2 kpc in the Galactic disk. Taking the mass ratio and projected separation from the original study leads to a planet of M p = 0.65 ± 0.044 M Jupiter at 3.48 ± 0.22 au. Excellent parallax measurements from simultaneous ground-space observations have been obtained on the microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, but it is only when they are combined with ∼30 minutes of Keck II AO observations that the physical parameters of the host star are well measured.

  15. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF GJ 3470 b: A VERY LOW-DENSITY NEPTUNE-SIZE PLANET ORBITING A METAL-RICH M DWARF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neves, Vasco; Santos, Nuno [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Rogers, Leslie [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gillon, Michaeel [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout, 17, Bat. B5C, Liege 1 (Belgium); Horch, Elliott [Department of Physics, 501 Crescent Street, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Sullivan, Peter [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bonfils, Xavier; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Udry, Stephane [Observatoire de Geneve, Universite de Geneve, 51 ch. des Maillettes, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Smalley, Barry, E-mail: demory@mit.edu [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST55BG (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10

    We present Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 {mu}m transit photometry of GJ 3470 b, a Neptune-size planet orbiting an M1.5 dwarf star with a 3.3 day period recently discovered in the course of the HARPS M-dwarf survey. We refine the stellar parameters by employing purely empirical mass-luminosity and surface brightness relations constrained by our updated value for the mean stellar density, and additional information from new near-infrared spectroscopic observations. We derive a stellar mass of M{sub *}= 0.539{sup +0.047}{sub -0.043} M{sub sun} and a radius of R{sub *}= 0.568{sup +0.037}{sub -0.031} R{sub sun}. We determine the host star of GJ 3470 b to be metal-rich, with a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.20 {+-} 0.10 and an effective temperature of T{sub eff} = 3600 {+-} 100 K. The revised stellar parameters yield a planetary radius R{sub p}= 4.83{sub -0.21}{sup +0.22} R{sub Circled-Plus} that is 13% larger than the value previously reported in the literature. We find a planetary mass M{sub p}= 13.9{sup +1.5}{sub -1.4} M{sub Circled-Plus} that translates to a very low planetary density, {rho}{sub p}= 0.72{sup +0.13}{sub -0.12} g cm{sup -3}, which is 33% smaller than the original value. With a mean density half of that of GJ 436 b, GJ 3470 b is an example of a very low-density low-mass planet, similar to Kepler-11 d, Kepler-11 e, and Kepler-18 c, but orbiting a much brighter nearby star that is more conducive to follow-up studies.

  16. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air ... can hurt your health. Learn more about the health effects of polluted water. You can also learn more ... Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Here are ...

  17. LOCAL BENCHMARKS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF MAJOR-MERGER GALAXIES-SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF A K-BAND SELECTED SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, C. Kevin; Cheng Yiwen; Lu Nanyao; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Cutri, Roc; Domingue, Donovan; Huang Jiasheng; Gao Yu; Sun, W.-H.; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer observations for a sample of close major-merger galaxy pairs (KPAIR sample) selected from cross-matches between the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. The goals are to study the star formation activity in these galaxies and to set a local bench mark for the cosmic evolution of close major mergers. The Spitzer KPAIR sample (27 pairs, 54 galaxies) includes all spectroscopically confirmed spiral-spiral (S+S) and spiral-elliptical (S+E) pairs in a parent sample that is complete for primaries brighter than K = 12.5 mag, projected separations of 5 h -1 kpc ≤ s ≤ 20 h -1 kpc, and mass ratios ≤2.5. The Spitzer data, consisting of images in seven bands (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8, 24, 70, 160 μm), show very diversified IR emission properties. Compared to single spiral galaxies in a control sample, only spiral galaxies in S+S pairs show significantly enhanced specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M), whereas spiral galaxies in S+E pairs do not. Furthermore, the SFR enhancement of spiral galaxies in S+S pairs is highly mass-dependent. Only those with M ∼> 10 10.5 M sun show significant enhancement. Relatively low-mass (M ∼ 10 10 M sun ) spirals in S+S pairs have about the same SFR/M compared to their counterparts in the control sample, while those with 10 11 M sun have on average a ∼3 times higher SFR/M than single spirals. There is evidence for a correlation between the global star formation activities (but not the nuclear activities) of the component galaxies in massive S+S major-merger pairs (the H olmberg effect ) . There is no significant difference in the SFR/M between the primaries and the secondaries, nor between spirals of SEP KPAIR =2.54 x 10 -4 (M sun yr -1 Mpc -3 ).

  18. The SAURON project - XX. The Spitzer [3.6] - [4.5] colour in early-type galaxies : colours, colour gradients and inverted scaling relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peletier, Reynier F.; Kutdemir, Elif; van der Wolk, Guido; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; Bacon, Roland; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Shapiro, Kristen L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van de Ven, Glenn

    We investigate the [3.6]-[4.5] Spitzer-IRAC colour behaviour of the early-type galaxies of the SAURON survey, a representative sample of 48 nearby ellipticals and lenticulars. We investigate how this colour, which is unaffected by dust extinction, can be used to constrain the stellar populations in

  19. THE ORIGIN OF THE INFRARED EMISSION IN RADIO GALAXIES. II. ANALYSIS OF MID- TO FAR-INFRARED SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE 2JY SAMPLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicken, D.; Tadhunter, C.; Axon, D.; Morganti, R.; Inskip, K. J.; Holt, J.; Delgado, R. Gonzalez; Groves, B.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of deep mid- to far-infrared (MFIR) Spitzer photometric observations of the southern 2Jy sample of powerful radio sources (0.05

  20. "TNOs are Cool" : A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. IX. Thermal properties of Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lacerda, P.; Mommert, M.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Müller, T. G.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Moreno, R.; Groussin, O.; Delsanti, A.; Harris, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to characterize the ensemble thermal properties of the Centaurs / trans-Neptunian population. Methods: Thermal flux measurements obtained with Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS provide size, albedo, and beaming factors for 85 objects (13 of which are presented here for

  1. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  2. Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chovanec, A.; Grath, J.; Kralik, M.; Vogel, W.

    2002-01-01

    An up-date overview of the situation of the Austrian waters is given by analyzing the status of the water quality (groundwater, surface waters) and water protection measures. Maps containing information of nitrate and atrazine in groundwaters (analyses at monitoring stations), nitrate contents and biological water quality of running waters are included. Finally, pollutants (nitrate, orthophosphate, ammonium, nitrite, atrazine etc.) trends in annual mean values and median values for the whole country for the years 1992-1999 are presented in tables. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  3. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available to explore desalination for future capacity. Water is essential to life: the human body is about 75 percent water, with up to 85 percent of brain cells liquid. Around 71 percent of the planet is covered in water, but 97,5 percent of it is salt water... risen to 90 percent, leaving only 10 percent for animals and plants. Yet 40 percent of the water used globally is for sanitation and other uses in buildings. The operation of buildings places a strain on raw water reserves, while wastewater and sewage...

  4. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Observations of the Galactic Center: Quantifying the Extreme Ultraviolet/Soft X-ray Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Janet P.

    2018-04-01

    It has long been shown that the extreme ultraviolet spectrum of the ionizing stars of H II regions can be estimated by comparing the observed line emission to detailed models. In the Galactic Center (GC), however, previous observations have shown that the ionizing spectral energy distribution (SED) of the local photon field is strange, producing both very low excitation ionized gas (indicative of ionization by late O stars) and also widespread diffuse emission from atoms too highly ionized to be found in normal H II regions. This paper describes the analysis of all GC spectra taken by Spitzer's Infrared Spectrograph and downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. In it, H II region densities and abundances are described, and serendipitously discovered candidate planetary nebulae, compact shocks, and candidate young stellar objects are tabulated. Models were computed with Cloudy, using SEDs from Starburst99 plus additional X-rays, and compared to the observed mid-infrared forbidden and recombination lines. The ages inferred from the model fits do not agree with recent proposed star formation sequences (star formation in the GC occurring along streams of gas with density enhancements caused by close encounters with the black hole, Sgr A*), with Sgr B1, Sgr C, and the Arches Cluster being all about the same age, around 4.5 Myr old, with similar X-ray requirements. The fits for the Quintuplet Cluster appear to give a younger age, but that could be caused by higher-energy photons from shocks from stellar winds or from a supernova.

  5. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merin, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nick F. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer C ore to Disk(c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; ∼79% in Lupus V and ∼87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A V ∼ 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  6. A SPITZER MIPS STUDY OF 2.5-2.0 M{sub Sun} STARS IN SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Christine H.; Bitner, Martin [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pecaut, Mark; Mamajek, Eric E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Su, Kate Y. L., E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m observations of 215 nearby, Hipparcos B- and A-type common proper-motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 {mu}m B+A-type disk fractions of 17/67 (25{sup +6}{sub -5}%), 36/131 (27{sup +4}{sub -4}%), and 23/95 (24{sup +5}{sub -4}%) for Upper Scorpius ({approx}11 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus ({approx}15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux ({approx}17 Myr), respectively, somewhat smaller disk fractions than previously obtained for F- and G-type members. We confirm previous IRAS excess detections and present new discoveries of 51 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L{sub IR}/L{sub *} = 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -2} and grain temperatures ranging from T{sub gr} = 40 to 300 K. In addition, we confirm that the 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m excesses (or fractional infrared luminosities) around B+A-type stars are smaller than those measured toward F+G-type stars and hypothesize that the observed disk property dependence on stellar mass may be the result of a higher stellar companion fraction around B- and A-type stars at 10-200 AU. Finally, we note that the majority of the ScoCen 24 {mu}m excess sources also possess 12 {mu}m excess, indicating that Earth-like planets may be forming via collisions in the terrestrial planet zone at {approx}10-100 Myr.

  7. Characteristics and management of flowback/produced water from hydraulically fractured wells in California - findings from the California SB 4 assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Cooley, H.; Heberger, M. G.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Domen, J. K.; Sandelin, W.; Camarillo, M. K.; Jordan, P. D.; Reagan, M. T.; Donnelly, K.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Long, J. C. S.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a recent assessment of well stimulation in California, we analyzed the hazards and potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing (the primary form of well stimulation in California) on water resources, which included an analysis of the quantity and quality of flowback/produced water generated, current management and disposal practices, associated potential release mechanisms and transport pathways that can lead to contaminants being released into the environment, and practices to mitigate or avoid impacts from produced water on water resources. The wastewater returned after stimulation includes "recovered fluids" (flowback fluids collected into tanks following stimulation, but before the start of production) and "produced water" (water extracted with oil and gas during production). In contrast to hydraulic fracturing in regions with primarily gas production, the quantities of recovered fluids from hydraulically fractured wells in California are small in comparison to the fluids injected (typically designing a produced water management plan.

  8. Does Joint Fact-finding work for Water-energy-food Nexus Issues? A Role of Scientific Evidence in Policy Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, K.

    2014-12-01

    A quite famous phrase in risk management "How safe is enough safe?" implies there exists a framing gap among experts, the general public and stakeholders. Scientific evidence that experts provide usually contains uncertainty, while the public tends to have the other type of qualitative local knowledge. As there is no zero-risk society, we have to build consensus on acceptable level of risk and trade-offs of risks based on expert knowledge and local knowledge. Therefore having a dialogue among them in the early stage of the policy process such as problem definition and agenda setting is essential to cultivate trust and to integrate their knowledge. To this end, we especially pay attention to Joint Fact-finding (JFF). The tentative definition of JFF is that a promising strategy for experts, decision makers, and key public rights-holders and stakeholders from opposing sides of an issue to work together to resolve or narrow factual disputes over public policy issues. JFF process usually begins with identifying stakeholders and holding interviews with them to determine their interests. We call this step stakeholder analysis. Then we define the scope of the study including the required scientific evidence and the preliminary list of experts. After that, stakeholders jointly select experts to participate in the study, then they work together on what they would like to clear about scientific evidence. They finally get the common understanding and findings through these collaboration. We applied the stakeholder analysis to the issue of groundwater in Obama City and the issues of hot spring water and geothermal power in Beppu City in Japan. We drew conclusions from these case studies to some extent but at the same time we found that the analysis method has a limitation in applying it to multiple nexus issues because the method based on stakeholders' cognition. For example, in Obama case, we identified a lack of cooperation among stakeholders that especially agricultural

  9. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marion County, Indiana Salt Lake County, Utah Seattle-King County, Washington Tools and Training CLPPP CAP Healthy ... wish to use tap water for drinking or cooking, especially when the water has been off and ...

  10. Household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in Vietnam and associated factors: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Lee, Jong-Koo; Oh, Juhwan; Van Minh, Hoang; Ou Lee, Chul; Hoan, Le Thi; Nam, You-Seon; Long, Tran Khanh

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress made by the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) number 7.C, Vietnam still faces challenges with regard to the provision of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. This paper describes household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities separately, and analyses factors associated with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in combination. Secondary data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey in 2000, 2006, and 2011 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance describe trends over time in access to water and sanitation by location, demographic and socio-economic factors. Binary logistic regressions (2000, 2006, and 2011) describe associations between access to water and sanitation, and geographic, demographic, and socio-economic factors. There have been some outstanding developments in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities from 2000 to 2011. In 2011, the proportion of households with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities reached 90% and 77%, respectively, meeting the 2015 MDG targets for safe drinking water and basic sanitation set at 88% and 75%, respectively. However, despite these achievements, in 2011, only 74% of households overall had access to combined improved drinking water and sanitation facilities. There were also stark differences between regions. In 2011, only 47% of households had access to both improved water and sanitation facilities in the Mekong River Delta compared with 94% in the Red River Delta. In 2011, households in urban compared to rural areas were more than twice as likely (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-2.5) to have access to improved water and sanitation facilities in combination, and households in the highest compared with the lowest wealth quintile were over 40 times more likely (OR: 42.3; 95% CI: 29.8-60.0). More efforts are required to increase household access to

  11. Household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in Vietnam and associated factors: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Lee, Jong-Koo; Oh, Juhwan; Van Minh, Hoang; Ou Lee, Chul; Hoan, Le Thi; Nam, You-Seon; Long, Tran Khanh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite progress made by the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) number 7.C, Vietnam still faces challenges with regard to the provision of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Objective This paper describes household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities separately, and analyses factors associated with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in combination. Design Secondary data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey in 2000, 2006, and 2011 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance describe trends over time in access to water and sanitation by location, demographic and socio-economic factors. Binary logistic regressions (2000, 2006, and 2011) describe associations between access to water and sanitation, and geographic, demographic, and socio-economic factors. Results There have been some outstanding developments in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities from 2000 to 2011. In 2011, the proportion of households with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities reached 90% and 77%, respectively, meeting the 2015 MDG targets for safe drinking water and basic sanitation set at 88% and 75%, respectively. However, despite these achievements, in 2011, only 74% of households overall had access to combined improved drinking water and sanitation facilities. There were also stark differences between regions. In 2011, only 47% of households had access to both improved water and sanitation facilities in the Mekong River Delta compared with 94% in the Red River Delta. In 2011, households in urban compared to rural areas were more than twice as likely (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9–2.5) to have access to improved water and sanitation facilities in combination, and households in the highest compared with the lowest wealth quintile were over 40 times more likely (OR: 42.3; 95% CI: 29.8–60.0). Conclusions More

  12. Household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in Vietnam and associated factors: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thi Tuyet-Hanh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite progress made by the Millennium Development Goal (MDG number 7.C, Vietnam still faces challenges with regard to the provision of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Objective: This paper describes household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities separately, and analyses factors associated with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in combination. Design: Secondary data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey in 2000, 2006, and 2011 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance describe trends over time in access to water and sanitation by location, demographic and socio-economic factors. Binary logistic regressions (2000, 2006, and 2011 describe associations between access to water and sanitation, and geographic, demographic, and socio-economic factors. Results: There have been some outstanding developments in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities from 2000 to 2011. In 2011, the proportion of households with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities reached 90% and 77%, respectively, meeting the 2015 MDG targets for safe drinking water and basic sanitation set at 88% and 75%, respectively. However, despite these achievements, in 2011, only 74% of households overall had access to combined improved drinking water and sanitation facilities. There were also stark differences between regions. In 2011, only 47% of households had access to both improved water and sanitation facilities in the Mekong River Delta compared with 94% in the Red River Delta. In 2011, households in urban compared to rural areas were more than twice as likely (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9–2.5 to have access to improved water and sanitation facilities in combination, and households in the highest compared with the lowest wealth quintile were over 40 times more likely (OR: 42.3; 95% CI: 29.8–60

  13. Psychometric evaluation of a brazilian portuguese version of the spitzer quality of life index in patients with low back pain Evaluación de las calidades psicométricas de una versión brasileña del spitzer quality of life index en pacientes con dolor lumbar Avaliação das qualidades psicométricas de uma versão brasileira do spitzer quality of life index em pacientes com dor lombar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Cunha Matheus Rodrigues Toledo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to adapt the Spitzer Quality of Life Index and evaluate its reliability in patients with low back pain. The following steps were followed: translation, back-translation, evaluation by a committee, and pretest. The reliability was estimated through stability and homogeneity assessment. The validity was tested comparing scores of the Spitzer (QLI with the SF-36 and the Roland-Morris. The psychometric properties were evaluated by the self-application on 120 patients. Results showed that the Cronbach's Alpha was 0.77. Intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.960 (pEste estudio tuvo como objetivo realizar la adaptación cultural del Spitzer Quality of Life Index y evaluar su confiabilidad en pacientes portadores de dolor lumbar crónico. Se siguieron las siguientes etapas: traducción, retrotraducción, evaluación por un comité y pre-prueba. La validez fue obtenida por medio de la correlación entre los puntajes del Spitzer (QLI, del SF-36 y del Roland-Morris. Las propiedades psicométricas fueron evaluadas en 120 pacientes. Los resultados demostraron un coeficiente alfa de Cronbach=0,77. En una nueva pre-prueba, se encontró un coeficiente de correlación intraclases ICC=0,960 (pEste estudo teve como objetivo realizar a adaptação cultural do Spitzer Quality of Life Index, e avaliar sua confiabilidade em pacientes portadores de dor lombar crônica. Foram seguidas as seguintes etapas: tradução, retro-tradução, avaliação por um comitê e pré-teste. A confiabilidade foi avaliada por meio da consistência interna e da estabilidade. A validade foi obtida por meio da correlação entre os escores do Spitzer (QLI, do SF-36 e do Roland-Morris. As propriedades psicométricas foram avaliadas em 120 pacientes. Os resultados demonstraram coeficiente alfa de Cronbach=0,77. No teste-reteste, encontrou-se coeficiente de correlação intraclasse ICC=0,960 (p<0,001; IC 95%: 0,943; 0,972. Coeficiente

  14. Water

    OpenAIRE

    Hertie School of Governance

    2010-01-01

    All human life depends on water and air. The sustainable management of both is a major challenge for today's public policy makers. This issue of Schlossplatz³ taps the streams and flows of the current debate on the right water governance.

  15. Ground-Water-Flow Modeling of a Freshwater and Brine-Filled Aquifer in the Onondaga Trough, Onondaga County, New York - A Summary of Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, William M.; Yager, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a hydrogeologic study that included the development of a groundwater-flow model of the glacial-drift aquifer in the Onondaga Trough near Syracuse, N.Y., which extends from the Valley Heads Moraine near Tully, N.Y., to Onondaga Lake (fig. 1). Glacial sediments within the Onondaga Trough contain freshwater, saline water, and brine, which has historically supported several chemical industries in Syracuse. The ground-water-flow model was developed as a means to assist the members of the Onondaga Lake Partnership (local, State, and Federal governmental agencies) to assess remediation plans for Onondaga Lake and the Onondaga Creek watershed. Prior to this study, in the late 1990s, very little information was known about the physical nature of the valley-fill aquifer or the quality of water within it. Acquisition of this information would help local agencies understand the interactions of fresh and saline water within the aquifer and Onondaga Lake, and would facilitate the design of proposed and ongoing remediation work in and near the lake. The USGS study characterized the geology and geochemistry of the aquifer system, estimated the rate and direction of ground-water movement, and estimated mass loadings of chloride to Onondaga Lake and its tributaries from natural and anthropogenic sources. The study required analysis of existing hydrogeologic data and drilling of new test wells to collect additional hydrogeologic data to supplement this database. A three-dimensional geologic model of the unconsolidated deposits that fill the Onondaga Trough was developed from this information. Water-quality samples were collected, and hydraulic head (water-level) measurements were made in the test wells. The water samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents to determine the composition and age of saline waters within the aquifer. The geologic model, together with the water-quality and hydraulic-head data, supported

  16. Microbiological and Chemical Findings of Water Used for Various Industrial Processes in Babol Car Factory, Iran, in 2013 A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mahdavi Omran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose: According to the reported problems in area of the inappropriateness of water quality which used for washing and staining of car apparatuses in a car factory, this research was carried out for identification of physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics of the consumed water in Babol car factory, Iran. Materials and Methods: Physical and chemical parameters of water such as total solids, total dissolved solids (TDS, turbidity, pH, electrical conductivity, total alkalinity, total hardness (TH, cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, and anions (SO42−, Cl−, NO3− were analyzed based on standard methods for examination of water and wastewater. The samples were taken from five units and were precipitated and plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with chloramphenicol and blood agar and eosin methylene blue media. Results: TDS, turbidity, pH, TH and ammonium ion were 402 mg/L, 10 NTU, 7.8, 208 mg/L and 0.04 mg/L, respectively. Ten genera of fungal colonies were isolated from these units, which from them yeast Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most prevalent. Five genera of bacteria were isolated from these samples. Entrobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas, and Bacillus were the most prevalent bacteria in water. Water quality in the activation and fixation units were the most contaminated with fungi and bacteria, respectively. Some of these units were without fungal and bacterial contaminations. Conclusion: The fungal and bacterial contaminations can be changed the quality of consumed water in the different processes such as color and turbidity. Thus, we need to use some water

  17. Multi-tracer approach (18O, 3H/3He, CFC, SF6, 35S) to find the best emergency drinking water supply, Vorarlberg, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Martin; Vergnaud, Virginie; Uriostegui, Stephanie; Esser, Bradley

    2016-04-01

    To provide an emergency drinking water supply in case of catastrophic events (regional chemical accidents, floods, earth quakes etc.), wells and springs should be known which are fed by a large reservoir. Such reservoirs provide a good filtering capacity and long Mean Residence Times (MRTs) of the raw water. Their existence allows to use these resources for longer periods excluding the danger of contamination. This provides the water authorities the necessary time to set measures to protect the general water supply. After preselection of 16 wells and springs all over the territory of the province of Vorarlberg at the western end of Austria by the local water authority, these wells and springs were measured (water temperature, electric conductivity, pH and dissolved oxygen content) and sampled monthly for δ 18O/2H measurements over the winter half-year 2013/14. At the same time the tritium concentrations of the October and March samples were measured as well. Based on the variation of the monthly on-site measurements and the δ 18O/2H results 12 wells and springs were selected for further investigations. On these sites samples for 3H/3He, CFC-11/12/113, SF6 and sulphur-35 measurements were collected in August 2014. As expected from a humid alpine area, non of the selected springs or wells showed really long MRTs. Five out of 16 investigated sites are regarded as well suited to be used as emergency water source with a range of MRTs of 9 - 30 years. Five springs and wells are regarded of limited suitability due to the shorter MRTs of 5 - 9 years. In two springs the 3H/3He method could not be applied due to He-degassing in a karst-system and during sampling. CFC and SF6 excess at some sites with anthropogenic and geogenic sources hampered the utilisation of these gases as dating tool, but they were useful as source tracers. Sulphur-35 was detected in two wells only, indicating contribution of very young water (< 1 year). In both cases MRTs of 13 - 17 years, calculated

  18. Spitzer Phase Curve Constraints for WASP-43b at 3.6 and 4.5 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kevin B.; Line, Michael R.; Bean, Jacob L.; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Showman, Adam P.; Kataria, Tiffany; Kreidberg, Laura; Feng, Y. Katherina

    2017-02-01

    Previous measurements of heat redistribution efficiency (the ability to transport energy from a planet’s highly irradiated dayside to its eternally dark nightside) show considerable variation between exoplanets. Theoretical models predict a positive correlation between heat redistribution efficiency and temperature for tidally locked planets; however, recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WASP-43b spectroscopic phase curve results are inconsistent with current predictions. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we obtained a total of three phase curve observations of WASP-43b (P = 0.813 days) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The first 3.6 μm visit exhibits spurious nightside emission that requires invoking unphysical conditions in our cloud-free atmospheric retrievals. The two other visits exhibit strong day-night contrasts that are consistent with the HST data. To reconcile the departure from theoretical predictions, WASP-43b would need to have a high-altitude, nightside cloud/haze layer blocking its thermal emission. Clouds/hazes could be produced within the planet’s cool, nearly retrograde mid-latitude flows before dispersing across its nightside at high altitudes. Since mid-latitude flows only materialize in fast-rotating (≲ 1 day) planets, this may explain an observed trend connecting measured day-night contrast with planet rotation rate that matches all current Spitzer phase curve results. Combining independent planetary emission measurements from multiple phases, we obtain a precise dayside hemisphere H2O abundance (2.5× {10}-5{--}1.1× {10}-4 at 1σ confidence) and, assuming chemical equilibrium and a scaled solar abundance pattern, we derive a corresponding metallicity estimate that is consistent with being solar (0.4-1.7). Using the retrieved global CO+CO2 abundance under the same assumptions, we estimate a comparable metallicity of 0.3-1.7× solar. This is the first time that precise abundance and metallicity constraints have been determined from multiple molecular

  19. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  20. Co-Optimizing Solutions for Water and Food – Scoping the Nexus Challenges in the Agro-Sector and finding Scalable Business Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gain Animesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Water-Energy-Food (WEF Nexus approach has an opportunity to create sustainable business solutions, especially in the agricultural sector. This report provides a clear understanding of challenges for the most promising and scalable solutions to the interconnected water, energy and food/feed/fiber problems, allowing combined co-optimization. Searching solutions for nexus challenges, a model based assessment of WEF nexus at global scale and a theoretical perspective of integrating economic and ecological objectives are presented. This study explores the opportunities for the global community to develop robust partnerships and cross sector collaboration to foster water security and increase resource use efficiency, particularly in agriculture and food industry, as part of corporate environmental and financial performance goals.

  1. Dynamic Young Stars and their Disks: A Temporal View of NGC 2264 with Spitzer and CoRoT*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Variability is a signature feature of young stars. Among the well known light curve phenomena are periodic variations attributed to surface spots and irregular changes associated with accretion or circumstellar disk material. While decades of photometric monitoring have provided a framework for classifying young star variability, we still know surprisingly little about its underlying mechanisms and connections to the surrounding disks. In the past few years, dedicated photometric monitoring campaigns from the ground and space have revolutionized our view of young stars in the time domain. We present a selection of optical and infrared time series from several recent campaigns, highlighting the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (“CSI 2264”– a joint30-day effort with the Spitzer, CoRoT, and MOST telescopes. The extraordinary photometric precision, high cadence, and long time baseline of these observations is now enabling correlation of variability properties at very different wavelengths, corresponding to locations from the stellar surface to the inner 0.1 AU of the disk. We present some results of the CSI 2264 program, including new classes of optical/infrared behavior. Further efforts to tie observed variability features to physical models will provide insights into the inner disk environment at a time when planet formation may be underway.

  2. LUMINOUS BURIED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AS A FUNCTION OF GALAXY INFRARED LUMINOSITY REVEALED THROUGH SPITZER LOW-RESOLUTION INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 5-35 μm low-resolution spectroscopic energy diagnostics of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z> 0.15, classified optically as non-Seyferts. Based on the equivalent widths of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and the optical depths of silicate dust absorption features, we searched for signatures of intrinsically luminous, but optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in these optically non-Seyfert ULIRGs. We then combined the results with those of non-Seyfert ULIRGs at z IR 12 L sun . We found that the energetic importance of buried AGNs clearly increases with galaxy infrared luminosity, becoming suddenly discernible in ULIRGs with L IR > 10 12 L sun . For ULIRGs with buried AGN signatures, a significant fraction of infrared luminosities can be accounted for by the detected buried AGN and modestly obscured (A V < 20 mag) starburst activity. The implied masses of spheroidal stellar components in galaxies for which buried AGNs become important roughly correspond to the value separating red massive and blue less-massive galaxies in the local universe. Our results may support the widely proposed AGN-feedback scenario as the origin of galaxy downsizing phenomena, where galaxies with currently larger stellar masses previously had higher AGN energetic contributions and star formation originating infrared luminosities, and have finished their major star formation more quickly, due to stronger AGN feedback.

  3. Young Stars in the Camelopardalis Dust and Molecular Clouds. VI. YSOs Verified by Spitzer and Akari Infrared Photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straižys V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Using photometric data of infrared surveys, young stellar object (YSO status is verified for 141 objects selected in our previous papers in the Cassiopeia and Camelopardalis segment of the Milky Way bounded by Galactic coordinates (l, b = (132-158°, ±12°. The area includes the known star- forming regions in the emission nebulae W3, W4 and W5 and the massive YSO AFGL490. Spectral energy distribution (SED curves between 700 nm and 160 μm, constructed from the GSC 2, 2MASS, IRAS, MSX, Spitzer and AKARI data, are used to estimate the evolutionary stages of these stars. We confirm the YSO status for most of the objects. If all of the investigated objects were YSOs, 45% of them should belong to Class I, 41% to class II and 14% to Class III. However, SEDs of some of these objects can be affected by nearby extended infrared sources, like compact H II regions, infrared clusters or dusty galaxies.

  4. Laboratory Studies of Solid CO2 Ices at Different Temperatures and Annealing Times in Support of Spitzer Space Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas; Gerakines, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    The infrared absorption features of solid carbon dioxide have been detected by space observatories in nearly all lines of sight probing the dense interstellar medium (ISM). It has also been shown that the absorption feature of solid CO2 near 658 cm-1 (15.2 μm) should be a sensitive indicator of the physical conditions of the ice (e.g., temperature and composition). However, the profile structure of this feature is not well understood, and previous laboratory studies have concentrated on a limited range of temperatures and compositions for comparisons to observed spectra from both the Infrared Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope. In the laboratory study described here, the infrared spectra of ices bearing H2O, CH3OH, and CO2 have been measured with systematically varying compositions and temperatures that span the range of the values expected in the interstellar medium. The mid-infrared spectra (λ = 2.5-25 µm) were measured for 47 different ice compositions at temperatures ranging from 5 K to evaporation (at 5 K intervals). Additionally, annealing experiments of some of these ice compositions have been investigated. These data may be used to determine thermal histories of interstellar ices. This research was supported by NASA award NNG05GE44G under the Astronomy and Physics Research & Analysis Program (APRA).

  5. NEOSURVEY 1: INITIAL RESULTS FROM THE WARM SPITZER EXPLORATION SCIENCE SURVEY OF NEAR-EARTH OBJECT PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trilling, David E.; Mommert, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 6010, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Hora, Joseph; Fazio, Giovanni; Smith, Howard [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-65, Cambridge, MA 02138-1516 (United States); Chesley, Steve [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Emery, Joshua [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tennessee, 306 EPS Building, 1412 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Harris, Alan [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489, Berlin (Germany); Mueller, Michael [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, PO Box 800, 9700AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-12-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) are small solar system bodies whose orbits bring them close to the Earth’s orbit. We are carrying out a Warm Spitzer Cycle 11 Exploration Science program entitled NEOSurvey—a fast and efficient flux-limited survey of 597 known NEOs in which we derive a diameter and albedo for each target. The vast majority of our targets are too faint to be observed by NEOWISE, though a small sample has been or will be observed by both observatories, which allows for a cross-check of our mutual results. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties. We present here the first results from this new program: fluxes and derived diameters and albedos for 80 NEOs, together with a description of the overall program and approach, including several updates to our thermal model. The largest source of error in our diameter and albedo solutions, which derive from our single-band thermal emission measurements, is uncertainty in η , the beaming parameter used in our thermal modeling; for albedos, improvements in solar system absolute magnitudes would also help significantly. All data and derived diameters and albedos from this entire program are being posted on a publicly accessible Web page at nearearthobjects.nau.edu.

  6. Irrigation Water Availability and Winter Wheat Abandonment in the North China Plain (NCP: Findings from a Case Study in Cangxian County of Hebei Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The North China Plain (NCP is the major winter wheat producing area in China. Abandonment of this crop has, however, become more and more prevalent in this region since the late 1990s. Although the underlying causes of this phenomenon remain little understood, irrigation water availability (IWA has always been regarded as the key factor limiting winter wheat production on the NCP. The aim of this paper is to determine the role played by IWA in the abandonment of winter wheat, using evidence drawn from a case study in Cangxian County, Hebei Province. First-hand data were collected for this study from 350 households in 35 villages, using semistructured one-on-one questionnaires. Five types of irrigation water sources were defined and identified at the level of individual land plots: “ground and surface water”, “just groundwater”, “just rivers”, “just reservoirs”, and “no irrigation”. These levels correspond to a decreasing trend in the overall frequency of irrigation and thus provide a clear proxy indicator for IWA. The results from a series of multilevel multinomial models show that the higher the IWA, the less likely it is for a land plot to abandon winter wheat. Specifically, using “no irrigation” cases as a control group, the results show that land plots with more sources of irrigation water also tend to be characterized by greater IWA, including “ground and surface water” and “just groundwater”, and also have lower probabilities of abandoning winter wheat. In contrast, land plots with less IWA (less irrigation water sources, including “just reservoirs” and “just rivers”, are more likely to abandon winter wheat. The results also show that, in addition to IWA, soil quality and plot size at the plot level, as well as demographic characteristics, farm equipment, and land fragmentation at the household level and irrigation prices at the village level, all play additional significant roles in the cropping

  7. Irrigation Water Availability and Winter Wheat Abandonment in the North China Plain (NCP): Findings from a Case Study in Cangxian County of Hebei Province

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Wang; Xiubin Li

    2018-01-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is the major winter wheat producing area in China. Abandonment of this crop has, however, become more and more prevalent in this region since the late 1990s. Although the underlying causes of this phenomenon remain little understood, irrigation water availability (IWA) has always been regarded as the key factor limiting winter wheat production on the NCP. The aim of this paper is to determine the role played by IWA in the abandonment of winter wheat, using evidence...

  8. Statistical comparison of leaching behavior of incineration bottom ash using seawater and deionized water: Significant findings based on several leaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Dou, Xiaomin; Ren, Fei; Chan, Wei-Ping; Chang, Victor Wei-Chung

    2018-02-15

    Bottom ashes generated from municipal solid waste incineration have gained increasing popularity as alternative construction materials, however, they contains elevated heavy metals posing a challenge for its free usage. Different leaching methods are developed to quantify leaching potential of incineration bottom ashes meanwhile guide its environmentally friendly application. Yet, there are diverse IBA applications while the in situ environment is always complicated, challenging its legislation. In this study, leaching tests were conveyed using batch and column leaching methods with seawater as opposed to deionized water, to unveil the metal leaching potential of IBA subjected to salty environment, which is commonly encountered when using IBA in land reclamation yet not well understood. Statistical analysis for different leaching methods suggested disparate performance between seawater and deionized water primarily ascribed to ionic strength. Impacts of leachant are metal-specific dependent on leaching methods and have a function of intrinsic characteristics of incineration bottom ashes. Leaching performances were further compared on additional perspectives, e.g. leaching approach and liquid to solid ratio, indicating sophisticated leaching potentials dominated by combined geochemistry. It is necessary to develop application-oriented leaching methods with corresponding leaching criteria to preclude discriminations between different applications, e.g., terrestrial applications vs. land reclamation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. THE VOLATILE COMPOSITION OF COMET C/2003 K4 (LINEAR) AT NEAR-IR WAVELENGTHS—COMPARISONS WITH RESULTS FROM THE NANÇAY RADIO TELESCOPE AND FROM THE ODIN, SPITZER, AND SOHO SPACE OBSERVATORIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Bonev, B. P., E-mail: lucas.paganini@nasa.gov [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA GSFC, MS 690, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We observed comet C/2003 K4 (LINEAR) using NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory on UT 2004 November 28, when the comet was at 1.28 AU from the Sun (post-perihelion) and 1.38 AU from Earth. We detected six gaseous species (H{sub 2}O, OH*, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 4}, and HCN) and obtained upper limits for three others (H{sub 2}CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3}). Our results indicate a water production rate of (1.72 ± 0.18) × 10{sup 29} molecules s{sup −1}, in reasonable agreement with production rates from SOHO (on the same day), Odin (one day earlier), and Nançay (about two weeks earlier). We also report abundances (relative to water) for seven trace species: CH{sub 3}OH (∼1.8%), CH{sub 4} (∼0.9%), and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (∼0.4%) that were consistent with mean values among Oort cloud (OC) comets, while NH{sub 3} (<0.55%), HCN (∼0.07%), H{sub 2}CO (<0.07%), and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (<0.04%) were “lower” than the mean values in other OC comets. We extracted inner-coma rotational temperatures for four species (H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, and CH{sub 4}), all of which are consistent with 70 K (within 1σ). The extracted ortho-para ratio for water was 3.0 ± 0.15, corresponding to spin temperatures larger than 39 K (at the 1σ level) and agreeing with those obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope at the 2σ level.

  10. A CLASSICAL MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF GALAXIES IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buta, Ronald J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Knapen, Johan H. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna (Spain); Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Comerón, Sébastien [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, FI-90014 (Finland); Elmegreen, Debra [Vassar College, Deparment of Physics and Astronomy, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Courtois, Helene [Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Lyon (France); Regan, Michael W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Paz, Armando Gil de [Departmento de Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín [University of Rio de Janeiro, Observatorio de Valongo, Ladeira Pedro Antonio, 43, CEP 20080-090, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); and others

    2015-04-15

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S{sup 4}G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S{sup 4}G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of “stellar structures” seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.

  11. Spitzer observations of the type IA supernova remnant N103B: Kepler's older cousin?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Brian J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P. [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Ghavamian, Parviz [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Raymond, John C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Long, Knox S. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Sankrit, Ravi [SOFIA Science Center, NASA AMES Research Center, M/S N211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Winkler, P. Frank [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Hendrick, Sean P., E-mail: brian.j.williams@nasa.gov [Physics Department, Millersville University, P.O. Box 1002, Millersville, PA 17551 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm{sup –3}, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements toward regions of higher than average density. This density is similar to that in Kepler's SNR, a Type Ia interacting with a circumstellar medium (CSM). Optical images show Hα emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the '18 μm' silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 μm. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic asymptotic giant branch progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.

  12. NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER/IRAC SURVEY DATA AND THEIR COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. [SSAI, Lanham MD 20706 (United States); Arendt, R. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G., E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We extend previous measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign using new data from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with depths of {approx_equal} 12 hr pixel{sup -1} over three epochs are analyzed at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Maps of the fields were assembled using a self-calibration method uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. Resolved sources were removed from the maps to a magnitude limit of mag{sub AB} {approx_equal} 25, as indicated by the level of the remaining shot noise. The maps were then Fourier transformed and their power spectra were evaluated. Instrumental noise was estimated from the time-differenced data, and subtracting this isolates the spatial fluctuations of the actual sky. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. Comparing to 8 {mu}m power spectra shows that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the fluctuations. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required for an extragalactic origin. The CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to >10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign . The low shot-noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large-scale fluctuations arise from the spatial clustering of faint sources well below the confusion noise. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is in reasonable agreement with an origin in populations clustered according to the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at epochs coinciding with the first stars era.

  13. A Snapshot Imaging Survey of Spitzer-selected Young Stellar Objects in Nearby Star Formation Regions*.t23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-10-01

    Young circumstellar disks are the dusty reservoirs in which planetary systems may eventually form. Previous HST imaging surveys have spatially resolved about twenty circumstellar disks around young stars in nearby molecular clouds. Providing key measurements of disk inclinations, outer radii, asymmetries, vertical thicknesses, and dust properties, these observations have supplied valuable constraints on theories of star and planet formation. Most of this prior work was based on source identifications made 30 years ago by the IRAS survey. With its improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, the Spitzer Space Telescope identified numerous new members of nearby star-forming regions that are optically visible, not yet observed with HST, and which possess infrared excess > 40 mJy at 24 microns (5 times fainter than the IRAS survey 25 micron sensitivity). This group of objects consists of low mass stars, young brown dwarfs, transition disks, and edge-on disks that obscure their central sources. We propose a high dynamic range ACS snapshot survey of this lower-luminosity young star population. Our goals are (1) to determine the frequency of disk detections in scattered light; (2) to measure disk sizes, internal structures, and constituent dust properties in order to test theories of protoplanetary disk evolution; (3) to identify the nearly edge-on systems which are particularly favorable for studies of disk geometry; and (4) to discover faint substellar companion objects. This survey will extend previous HST young star imaging of protoplanetary environments from a solar mass down to the substellar limit, revealing their nature and frequency in the galaxy.

  14. NO THERMAL INVERSION AND A SOLAR WATER ABUNDANCE FOR THE HOT JUPITER HD 209458B FROM HST /WFC3 SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Line, Michael R. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob; Kreidberg, Laura [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Desert, Jean-Michel [University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Diamond-Lowe, Hannah [Department of Astronomy, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-10, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The nature of the thermal structure of hot Jupiter atmospheres is one of the key questions raised by the characterization of transiting exoplanets over the past decade. There have been claims that many hot Jupiters exhibit atmospheric thermal inversions. However, these claims have been based on broadband photometry rather than the unambiguous identification of emission features with spectroscopy, and the chemical species that could cause the thermal inversions by absorbing stellar irradiation at high altitudes have not been identified despite extensive theoretical and observational effort. Here we present high-precision Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 observations of the dayside thermal emission spectrum of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b, which was the first exoplanet suggested to have a thermal inversion. In contrast to previous results for this planet, our observations detect water in absorption at 6.2 σ confidence. When combined with Spitzer photometry, the data are indicative of a monotonically decreasing temperature with pressure over the range of 1–0.001 bars at 7.7 σ confidence. We test the robustness of our results by exploring a variety of model assumptions, including the temperature profile parameterization, presence of a cloud, and choice of Spitzer data reduction. We also introduce a new analysis method to determine the elemental abundances from the spectrally retrieved mixing ratios with thermochemical self-consistency and find plausible abundances consistent with solar metallicity (0.06–10 × solar) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios less than unity. This work suggests that high-precision spectrophotometric results are required to robustly infer thermal structures and compositions of extrasolar planet atmospheres and to perform comparative exoplanetology.

  15. [The User Fact-Finding on the Electric Warm-Water Lavage Toilet Seats in the Women Consulting Our Urological Outpatient Clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Sachiko; Usui, Yukio; Inatuchi, Hiroaki; Fujisaki, Akiko; Kinjo, Manami; Yoshimura, Yoshikuni; Terachi, Toshiro; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2016-02-01

    We conducted our original self-completed questionnaire survey on a total of 305 women who came to our urology department as an outpatient from March 2014 to September 2014. They were asked to fill in the questionnaire on their experience of usage as well as how and where they were using the washing function of the toilet seat. The effective response rate was 95.4%. Seventy-nine (230) individuals were using the warm-water washing toilet seat. There was no significant difference in age between the usage group and the non-use group. The purposes of use after defection, for defecation induction, and after urination were 90.4, 41.3, and 40.4%, respectively. Regarding the kinds of washing, a strong tendency for the use of the anal washing function to induce defection and after defection was observed, whereas a tendency was observed for the use of the bidet function after urination and for washing the vagina. Since many individuals were using the washing function for the purpose of inducing defection and after urination, which were not functions assumed appropriate by the manufacturer, it was considered necessary to discuss the appropriate usage from the standpoint of an urologist.

  16. SPITZER- AND HERSCHEL-BASED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF 24 μm BRIGHT z ∼ 0.3-3.0 STARBURSTS AND OBSCURED QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajina, Anna; Yan Lin; Fadda, Dario; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Huynh, Minh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of mid-IR-selected z ∼ 0.3-3.0 and L IR ∼ 10 11 -10 13 L ☉ galaxies, and study how their SEDs differ from those of local and high-z analogs. Infrared SEDs depend both on the power source (AGN or star formation) and the dust distribution. Therefore, differences in the SEDs of high-z and local galaxies provide clues as to differences in their physical conditions. Our mid-IR flux-limited sample of 191 sources is unique in size, and spectral coverage, including Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy. Here, we add Herschel photometry at 250 μm, 350 μm, and 500 μm, which allows us, through fitting an empirical SED model, to obtain accurate total IR luminosities, as well as constrain the relative contributions of AGNs and starbursts to those luminosities. Our sample includes three broad categories of SEDs: ∼23% of the sources are AGNs (i.e., where the AGN contributes >50% of L IR ), ∼30% are starbursts where an AGN contributes IR , and the mid-IR spectra are starburst-like (i.e., strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features); and the largest group (∼47%) are composites which show both significant AGN and starburst activity. The AGN-dominated sources divide into ones that show a strong silicate 9.7 μm absorption feature, implying highly obscured systems, and ones that do not. The high-τ 9.7 sources are half of our z > 1.2 AGNs, but show SEDs that are extremely rare among local AGNs. The 30% of the sample that are starbursts, even the z ∼ 2, L IR ∼ 10 13 L ☉ ones, have lower far-IR to mid-IR continuum ratios than local Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) or the z ∼ 2 sub-mm galaxies—effectively the SEDs of our z ∼ 2 starburst-dominated ULIRGs are much closer to those of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies than ULIRGs. This is consistent with our earlier finding that, unlike local ULIRGs, our high-z starbursts are typically only in the early stages of a merger. The SEDs

  17. No Thermal Inversion and a Solar Water Abundance for the Hot Jupiter HD 209458b from HST/WFC3 Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Line, Michael R.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Kreidberg, Laura; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Showman, Adam P.; Diamond-Lowe, Hannah

    2016-12-01

    The nature of the thermal structure of hot Jupiter atmospheres is one of the key questions raised by the characterization of transiting exoplanets over the past decade. There have been claims that many hot Jupiters exhibit atmospheric thermal inversions. However, these claims have been based on broadband photometry rather than the unambiguous identification of emission features with spectroscopy, and the chemical species that could cause the thermal inversions by absorbing stellar irradiation at high altitudes have not been identified despite extensive theoretical and observational effort. Here we present high-precision Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 observations of the dayside thermal emission spectrum of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b, which was the first exoplanet suggested to have a thermal inversion. In contrast to previous results for this planet, our observations detect water in absorption at 6.2σ confidence. When combined with Spitzer photometry, the data are indicative of a monotonically decreasing temperature with pressure over the range of 1-0.001 bars at 7.7σ confidence. We test the robustness of our results by exploring a variety of model assumptions, including the temperature profile parameterization, presence of a cloud, and choice of Spitzer data reduction. We also introduce a new analysis method to determine the elemental abundances from the spectrally retrieved mixing ratios with thermochemical self-consistency and find plausible abundances consistent with solar metallicity (0.06-10 × solar) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios less than unity. This work suggests that high-precision spectrophotometric results are required to robustly infer thermal structures and compositions of extrasolar planet atmospheres and to perform comparative exoplanetology.

  18. A community randomised controlled trial evaluating a home-based environmental intervention package of improved stoves, solar water disinfection and kitchen sinks in rural Peru: rationale, trial design and baseline findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, S M; Lanata, C F; Hattendorf, J; Gil, A I; Verastegui, H; Ochoa, T; Mäusezahl, D

    2011-11-01

    Pneumonia and diarrhoea are leading causes of death in children. There is a need to develop effective interventions. We present the design and baseline findings of a community-randomised controlled trial in rural Peru to evaluate the health impact of an Integrated Home-based Intervention Package in children aged 6 to 35 months. We randomised 51 communities. The intervention was developed through a community-participatory approach prior to the trial. They comprised the construction of improved stoves and kitchen sinks, the promotion of hand washing, and solar drinking water disinfection (SODIS). To reduce the potential impact of non-blinding bias, a psychomotor stimulation intervention was implemented in the control arm. The baseline survey included anthropometric and socio-economic characteristics. In a sub-sample we determined the level of faecal contamination of drinking water, hands and kitchen utensils and the prevalence of diarrhoegenic Escherichia coli in stool specimen. We enrolled 534 children. At baseline all households used open fires and 77% had access to piped water supplies. E. coli was found in drinking water in 68% and 64% of the intervention and control households. Diarrhoegenic E. coli strains were isolated from 45/139 stool samples. The proportion of stunted children was 54%. Randomization resulted in comparable study arms. Recently, several critical reviews raised major concerns on the reliability of open health intervention trials, because of uncertain sustainability and non-blinding bias. In this regard, the presented trial featuring objective outcome measures, a simultaneous intervention in the control communities and a 12-month follow up period will provide valuable evidence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trochanteric bursitis: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revilla, T.Y.; Manjon, P.; Lozaono, C.

    1997-01-01

    To describe the radiological findings associated with trochanteric bursitis. Six patients studied by means of plain radiography (n=6), CT(n=4) and MR(n=2). The conventional radiography study was normal in two patients and disclosed bone abnormalities in four. US showed a hypoechoic or anechoic collection in all the patients. Two patients presented areas suggestive of calcification, and septa were observed in one. CT disclosed the presence of well defined, low-attenuation, unenhanced collections. MR images identified collections with a signal intensity similar to that of water. Trochanteric bursitis is a relatively common cause of hip pain, and can involve any one of a number of etiologies. US is a good imaging technique for diagnosing this pathology. (Author) 10 refs

  20. H‑ Opacity and Water Dissociation in the Dayside Atmosphere of the Very Hot Gas Giant WASP-18b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Jacob; Désert, Jean-Michel; Line, Michael R.; Bean, Jacob L.; Parmentier, Vivien; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Kreidberg, Laura; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Mansfield, Megan; Showman, Adam P.

    2018-03-01

    We present one of the most precise emission spectra of an exoplanet observed so far. We combine five secondary eclipses of the hot Jupiter WASP-18b (T day ∼ 2900 K) that we secured between 1.1 and 1.7 μm with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our extracted spectrum (S/N = 50, R ∼ 40) does not exhibit clearly identifiable molecular features but is poorly matched by a blackbody spectrum. We complement this data with previously published Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera observations of this target and interpret the combined spectrum by computing a grid of self-consistent, 1D forward models, varying the composition and energy budget. At these high temperatures, we find there are important contributions to the overall opacity from H‑ ions, as well as the removal of major molecules by thermal dissociation (including water), and thermal ionization of metals. These effects were omitted in previous spectral retrievals for very hot gas giants, and we argue that they must be included to properly interpret the spectra of these objects. We infer a new metallicity and C/O ratio for WASP-18b, and find them well constrained to be solar ([M/H] = ‑0.01 ± 0.35, C/O thermal inversions.

  1. Verified scientific findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullinger, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    In this essay, the author attempts to enlighten the reader as to the meaning of the term ''verified scientific findings'' in section 13, sub-section 1, sentence 2 of the new Chemicals Control Law. The examples given here are the generally accepted regulations in regards to technology (that is sections 7a and 18b of the WHG (law on water economy), section 3, sub-section 1 of the machine- and engine protection laws) and to the status of technology (section 3, sub-section 6 of the BImSchG (Fed. law on prevention of air-borne pollution)), and to the status of science (section 5, sub-section 2 of the AMG (drug legislation). The ''status of science and technology'' as defined in sections 4 ff of the Atomic Energy Law (AtomG) and in sections 3, 4, 12, 2) of the First Radiation Protection Ordinance (1.StrlSch. VO), is also being discussed. The author defines the in his opinion ''dynamic term'' as the generally recognized result of scientific research, and the respective possibilities of practical utilization of technology. (orig.) [de

  2. Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm Observations of HD 209458b: Three Eclipses, Two and a Half Transits, and a Phase Curve Corrupted by Instrumental Sensitivity Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Knutson, Heather; Fortney, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Deming, Drake

    2012-06-01

    We report the results of an analysis of all Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm observations of HD 209458b, one of the touchstone objects in the study of irradiated giant planet atmospheres. Altogether, we analyze two and a half transits, three eclipses, and a 58 hr near-continuous observation designed to detect the planet's thermal phase curve. The results of our analysis are: (1) a mean transit depth of 1.484% ± 0.033%, consistent with previous measurements and showing no evidence of variability in transit depth at the 3% level. (2) A mean eclipse depth of 0.338% ± 0.026%, somewhat higher than that previously reported for this system; this new value brings observations into better agreement with models. From this eclipse depth we estimate an average dayside brightness temperature of 1320 ± 80 K; the dayside flux shows no evidence of variability at the 12% level. (3) Eclipses in the system occur 32 ± 129 s earlier than would be expected from a circular orbit, which constrains the orbital quantity ecos ω to be 0.00004 ± 0.00033. This result is fully consistent with a circular orbit and sets an upper limit of 140 m s-1 (3σ) on any eccentricity-induced velocity offset during transit. The phase curve observations (including one of the transits) exhibit an anomalous trend similar to the detector ramp seen in previous Spitzer/IRAC observations; by modeling this ramp we recover the system parameters for this transit. The long-duration photometry which follows the ramp and transit exhibits a gradual ~0.2% decrease in flux over ~30 hr. This effect is similar to that seen in pre-launch calibration data taken with the 24 μm array and is better fit by an instrumental model than a model invoking planetary emission. The large uncertainties associated with this poorly understood, likely instrumental effect prevent us from usefully constraining the planet's thermal phase curve. Our observations highlight the need for a thorough understanding of detector-related instrumental effects on

  3. Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF HD 209458b: THREE ECLIPSES, TWO AND A HALF TRANSITS, AND A PHASE CURVE CORRUPTED BY INSTRUMENTAL SENSITIVITY VARIATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossfield, Ian J. M. [Department of Physics, and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Knutson, Heather [Caltech Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Deming, Drake, E-mail: ianc@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We report the results of an analysis of all Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m observations of HD 209458b, one of the touchstone objects in the study of irradiated giant planet atmospheres. Altogether, we analyze two and a half transits, three eclipses, and a 58 hr near-continuous observation designed to detect the planet's thermal phase curve. The results of our analysis are: (1) a mean transit depth of 1.484% {+-} 0.033%, consistent with previous measurements and showing no evidence of variability in transit depth at the 3% level. (2) A mean eclipse depth of 0.338% {+-} 0.026%, somewhat higher than that previously reported for this system; this new value brings observations into better agreement with models. From this eclipse depth we estimate an average dayside brightness temperature of 1320 {+-} 80 K; the dayside flux shows no evidence of variability at the 12% level. (3) Eclipses in the system occur 32 {+-} 129 s earlier than would be expected from a circular orbit, which constrains the orbital quantity ecos {omega} to be 0.00004 {+-} 0.00033. This result is fully consistent with a circular orbit and sets an upper limit of 140 m s{sup -1} (3{sigma}) on any eccentricity-induced velocity offset during transit. The phase curve observations (including one of the transits) exhibit an anomalous trend similar to the detector ramp seen in previous Spitzer/IRAC observations; by modeling this ramp we recover the system parameters for this transit. The long-duration photometry which follows the ramp and transit exhibits a gradual {approx}0.2% decrease in flux over {approx}30 hr. This effect is similar to that seen in pre-launch calibration data taken with the 24 {mu}m array and is better fit by an instrumental model than a model invoking planetary emission. The large uncertainties associated with this poorly understood, likely instrumental effect prevent us from usefully constraining the planet's thermal phase curve. Our observations highlight the need for a thorough

  4. Roman Jakobson contre Leo Spitzer : militantisme critique et défense d’une méthode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toute critique militante suppose, d’une part, une prise de position contre une thèse hégémonique ou bien consolidée qu’il faut rejeter pour en montrer les limites, et, d’autre part, une nouvelle réflexion théorique qui doit néanmoins être expliquée et illustrée. Des méthodologies différentes appliquées aux mêmes objets littéraires peuvent dès lors engager des analyses textuelles discordantes. Nous aimerions étudier les lectures que Leo Spitzer et Roman Jakobson proposent du sonnet CXIII de l’Olive de Joachin Du Bellay (1550, en les contextualisant d’abord dans le débat théorique des années 1960-1970. Les essais des deux critiques militent en faveur d’une « défense et illustration » de leur méthode en matière d’analyse littéraire. 

  5. DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB-LIKE PULSAR WIND NEBULA G54.1+0.3 AND SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE ASSOCIATED INFRARED SHELL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2010-01-01

    G54.1+0.3 is a young pulsar wind nebula (PWN), closely resembling the Crab, for which no thermal shell emission has been detected in X-rays. Recent Spitzer observations revealed an infrared (IR) shell containing a dozen point sources arranged in a ring-like structure, previously proposed to be young stellar objects. An extended knot of emission located in the NW part of the shell appears to be aligned with the pulsar's X-ray jet, suggesting a possible interaction with the shell material. Surprisingly, the IR spectrum of the knot resembles the spectrum of freshly formed dust in Cas A, and is dominated by an unidentified dust emission feature at 21 μm. The spectra of the shell also contain various emission lines and show that some are significantly broadened, suggesting that they originate in rapidly expanding supernova (SN) ejecta. We present the first evidence that the PWN is driving shocks into expanding SN ejecta and we propose an alternative explanation for the origin of the IR emission in which the shell is composed entirely of SN ejecta. In this scenario, the freshly formed SN dust is being heated by early-type stars belonging to a cluster in which the SN exploded. Simple dust models show that this interpretation can give rise to the observed shell emission and the IR point sources.

  6. CENSUS OF SELF-OBSCURED MASSIVE STARS IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER: IMPLICATIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE PROGENITORS OF SN 2008S-LIKE TRANSIENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Thompson, Todd A.; Beacom, J. F.; Prieto, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    A new link in the causal mapping between massive stars and potentially fatal explosive transients opened with the 2008 discovery of the dust-obscured progenitors of the luminous outbursts in NGC 6946 and NGC 300. Here, we carry out a systematic mid-IR photometric search for massive, luminous, and self-obscured stars in four nearby galaxies: M33, NGC 300, M81, and NGC 6946. For detection, we use only the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm IRAC bands, as these can still be used for multi-epoch Spitzer surveys of nearby galaxies (∼<10 Mpc). We combine familiar point-spread function and aperture photometry with an innovative application of image subtraction to catalog the self-obscured massive stars in these galaxies. In particular, we verify that stars analogous to the progenitors of the NGC 6946 (SN 2008S) and NGC 300 transients are truly rare in all four galaxies: their number may be as low as ∼1 per galaxy at any given moment. This result empirically supports the idea that the dust-enshrouded phase is a very short lived phenomenon in the lives of many massive stars and that these objects constitute a natural extension of the asymptotic giant branch sequence. We also provide mid-IR catalogs of sources in NGC 300, M81, and NGC 6946.

  7. Disentangling the Origin and Heating Mechanism of Supernova Dust: Late-Time Spitzer Spectroscopy of the Type IIn SN 2005ip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori D.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Dwek, Eli; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Leisenring, Jarron M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents late-time near-infrared and Spitzer mid-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of warm dust in the Type IIn SN 2005ip in NGC 2906. The spectra show evidence for two dust components with different temperatures. Spanning the peak of the thermal emission, these observations provide strong constraints on the dust mass, temperature, and luminosity, which serve as critical diagnostics for disentangling the origin and heating mechanism of each component. The results suggest the warmer dust has a mass of approx. 5 x 10(exp -4) Solar Mass and originates from newly formed dust in the ejecta, continuously heated by the circumstellar interaction. By contrast, the cooler component likely originates from a circumstellar shock echo that forms from the heating of a large, pre-existing dust shell approx. 0.01 - 0.05 Solar Mass by the late-time circumstellar interaction. The progenitor wind velocity derived from the blue edge of the He I 1.083 micro P Cygni profile indicates a progenitor eruption likely formed this dust shell approx.100 years prior to the supernova explosion, which is consistent with a Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) progenitor star. Subject

  8. Find din stemme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jette Barnholdt

    2010-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Dorte Kock og Lene Kleinschmidts: Find din stemme. En brugsbog.Hans Reitzels Forlag 2010.......Anmeldelse af Dorte Kock og Lene Kleinschmidts: Find din stemme. En brugsbog.Hans Reitzels Forlag 2010....

  9. Investigating the Evolution of the Mass-Metallicity-SFR Relation at z<1.6 with Deep GALEX and Spitzer Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jane

    The gas-phase metallicity of galaxies is a fossil tracer of what has happened physically in and around galaxies: gas inflows, star formation, mergers, and ``feedback'' from star formation. Therefore, measuring the dependence of metallicity on stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and redshift is a key test of galaxy evolution models. While metallicity studies have attempted to extend to higher redshifts, most of these studies have failed to study low-mass galaxies. This population is of great interest as stellar feedback effects, which are responsible for distributing the metals in galaxies, are expected to play a significant role in their evolution. Moreover, low-mass galaxies are the dominant population in the early universe, and are thought to produce most of the ionizing photons to reionize the universe. Here we propose to study the physical properties and evolution of emission-line selected galaxies at zstar-forming galaxies, the mass-metallicity and mass-metallicity-SFR relation over the past 8 billions years or 60% of cosmic time. Our second science objective is to determine the evolution of the stellar mass-SFR relation over the same cosmic period with a much larger sample, 9,000 emission-line galaxies. We will then use our determination of these relations to compare and constrain predictions from galaxy formation models that consider the balance between star formation and gas flows. To accomplish these goals, we will merge a unique combination of deep archival imaging from GALEX (ultraviolet) and Spitzer (infrared), existing ground-based optical through near-infrared imaging, and existing optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The latter is a strength of our program, as we have more deep follow-up spectroscopy ( 1000) on low-mass and high specific SFR galaxies than any other metallicity study. These observations will allow us to acquire robust measures of stellar masses, dust attenuation, dust-corrected SFRs, and oxygen abundances. In particular, the

  10. A mid-IR study of Hickson compact groups. II. Multiwavelength analysis of the complete GALEX-Spitzer sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsakis, T.; Charmandaris, V.; da Cunha, E.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.

    2011-09-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the impact of the environment of compact galaxy groups on the evolution of their members using a multiwavelength analysis from the ultraviolet to the infrared, for a sample of 32 Hickson compact groups (HCGs) containing 135 galaxies. Fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of all galaxies with the state-of-the-art model of da Cunha et al. (2008, MNRAS, 388, 1595) we can accurately calculate their mass, SFR, and extinction, as well as estimate their infrared luminosity and dust content. We compare our findings with samples of field galaxies, early-stage interacting pairs, and cluster galaxies with similar data. We find that classifying the groups as dynamically "old" or "young", depending on whether at least one quarter of their members are early-type systems, is physical and consistent with past classifications of HCGs based on their atomic gas content. Dynamically "old" groups are more compact and display higher velocity dispersions than "young" groups. Late-type galaxies in dynamically "young" groups have specific star formation rates (sSFRs), NUV-r, and mid-infrared colors that are similar to those of field and early-stage, interacting pair spirals. Late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups have redder NUV-r colors, because they have likely experienced several tidal encounters in the past, thereby building up their stellar mass, and display lower sSFRs. We identify several late-type galaxies that have sSFRs and colors similar to those of elliptical galaxies, since they lost part of their gas due to numerous interactions with other group members. Also, 25% of the elliptical galaxies in these groups have bluer UV/optical colors than normal ellipticals in the field, probably due to star formation as they accreted gas from other galaxies of the group or via merging of dwarf companions. Finally, our SED modeling suggests that in 13 groups, ten of which are dynamically "old", there is diffuse cold dust in the

  11. Hysterosalpingographic findings in infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bai, B. C. [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-12-15

    Four hundred and fifty four cases of H.S.G. in infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. 1. Most frequent age group was 25-29 year old, and those number of patient were 188 (41.4%). 2. Most frequent abnormal uterine findings was intravasation (113 cases), and malposition (119), irregular margin (104), filling defect (37), and diverticulum (6) in decreasing order. 3. Most frequent abnormal tubal finding was obstruction (199 cases), and hydrosalpinx (99), diverticulosis (22), intravasation (17), peritubal adhesion (13), and beaded tube (10) in decreasing order. 4. Nagative findings was seen in 155 cases (34.1%) of uterus and in 227 cases (50.0%) of fallopian tubes. 5. Nagative findings in both uterus and fallopian tubes was seen only 87 cases (19.2%)

  12. Hysterosalpingographic findings in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, M. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bai, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    Four hundred and fifty four cases of H.S.G. in infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. 1. Most frequent age group was 25-29 year old, and those number of patient were 188 (41.4%). 2. Most frequent abnormal uterine findings was intravasation (113 cases), and malposition (119), irregular margin (104), filling defect (37), and diverticulum (6) in decreasing order. 3. Most frequent abnormal tubal finding was obstruction (199 cases), and hydrosalpinx (99), diverticulosis (22), intravasation (17), peritubal adhesion (13), and beaded tube (10) in decreasing order. 4. Nagative findings was seen in 155 cases (34.1%) of uterus and in 227 cases (50.0%) of fallopian tubes. 5. Nagative findings in both uterus and fallopian tubes was seen only 87 cases (19.2%)

  13. Find a Dermatologic Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Find a Dermatologic Surgeon Please select the following ...

  14. Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Military Hospital or Clinic Change My Primary Care Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When Traveling What's Covered Health Care Dental Care Mental Health Care Pharmacy Special Needs Vision Care Benefit ...

  15. Bouveret's syndrome: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tueney, D.; Cimsit, C.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction secondary to gallstones is seen in the older population and the level of obstruction is usually at the level of the terminal ileum. Obstruction at the level of the gastric outlet is called Bouveret's syndrome. A case with perforated cholecystitis and duodenal obstruction due to a gallstone is presented. The CT findings are presented along with the clinical findings and literature review. (orig.)

  16. Ultrasonographic findings of gynecomastia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Yoon, Choon Sik; Park, Chang Yun [Yongdong Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The purposes of our study were to find out characteristic ultrasonographic findings of gynecomastia and to analyze age distribution, causative factors of gynecomastia. For these purposes, medical records of 39 male patients with gynecomastia were reviewed and sonographic findings of 13 cases of gentamycin were analyzed. Gynecomastia was found most commonly in teenagers and commonly in twenties. Almostly, it occurred without any evident etiology and classified as idiopathic or pirbuterol type. Less frequently, it occurred due to drug administration, systemic disease, or male hormone deficiency. Unilateral involvement was seen in 29 cases; 17cases involving the left and 12 cases the right. Bilateral involvement was seen in 10 cases. Sonographically,gynecomastia appeared as hypoechoic or intermediate echoic mass with various shape in the subareolar area. One case showed diffuse fatty breast pattern without definable mass. On sonographic evaluation, prominent nipple should not be misinterpreted as a breast mass. For the correct diagnosis of gynecomastia, both side breasts should be evaluated for comparison

  17. Ultrasonographic findings of gynecomastia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Yoon, Choon Sik; Park, Chang Yun

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of our study were to find out characteristic ultrasonographic findings of gynecomastia and to analyze age distribution, causative factors of gynecomastia. For these purposes, medical records of 39 male patients with gynecomastia were reviewed and sonographic findings of 13 cases of gentamycin were analyzed. Gynecomastia was found most commonly in teenagers and commonly in twenties. Almostly, it occurred without any evident etiology and classified as idiopathic or pirbuterol type. Less frequently, it occurred due to drug administration, systemic disease, or male hormone deficiency. Unilateral involvement was seen in 29 cases ; 17cases involving the left and 12 cases the right. Bilateral involvement was seen in 10 cases. Sonographically,gynecomastia appeared as hypoechoic or intermediate echoic mass with various shape in the subareolar area. One case showed diffuse fatty breast pattern without definable mass. On sonographic evaluation, prominent nipple should not be misinterpreted as a breast mass. For the correct diagnosis of gynecomastia, both side breasts should be evaluated for comparison

  18. Intrathoracic gossypiboma: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosalen Junior, Roberto Antonio; Bosi, Thiago Carneiro da Cunha; Souza, Luis Ronan Marquez Ferreira de; Andrade, Fernando Coelho Goulart de; Candido, Daniela; Lopes, Gesner Pereira; Melo, Ana Lucia Kefalas Oliveira; Fatureto, Marcelo Cunha

    2006-01-01

    The authors report three cases of intrathoracic foreign body that is defined as a cotton matrix mass, mostly retained surgical sponge, a rare complication of a thoracic surgery. The patients were evaluated by chest radiography and computed tomography with the imaging findings confirmed after thoracotomy and anatomopathological study. The mainly imaging findings consisted of intrathoracic masses in patients with previous thoracic surgery that return to hospital with lower respiratory tract symptoms in different period after surgery procedure. The three cases were related with a brief review of the literature. (author)

  19. Mobious syndrome: MR findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskal Revanna Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Möbius syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder. We report a case of Möbius syndrome in a 2-year-old girl with bilateral convergent squint and left-sided facial weakness. The characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of Möbius syndrome, which include absent bilateral abducens nerves and absent left facial nerve, were noted. In addition, there was absence of left anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA and absence of bilateral facial colliculi. Clinical features, etiology, and imaging findings are discussed.

  20. Finding optimal exact reducts

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of attribute reduction is an important problem related to feature selection and knowledge discovery. The problem of finding reducts with minimum cardinality is NP-hard. This paper suggests a new algorithm for finding exact reducts with minimum cardinality. This algorithm transforms the initial table to a decision table of a special kind, apply a set of simplification steps to this table, and use a dynamic programming algorithm to finish the construction of an optimal reduct. I present results of computer experiments for a collection of decision tables from UCIML Repository. For many of the experimented tables, the simplification steps solved the problem.

  1. DISCOVERY OF BROAD MOLECULAR LINES AND OF SHOCKED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FROM THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G357.7+0.3: HHSMT, APEX, SPITZER , AND SOFIA OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rho, J. [SETI Institute, 189 N. Bernardo Ave., Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Hewitt, J. W. [CRESST/University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bieging, J. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Reach, W. T. [Universities Space Research Association, SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94034 (United States); Andersen, M. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Güsten, R., E-mail: jrho@seti.org, E-mail: john.w.hewitt@unf.edu, E-mail: jbieging@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: wreach@sofia.usra.edu, E-mail: manderse@gemini.edu, E-mail: guesten@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hugel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-01-01

    We report a discovery of shocked gas from the supernova remnant (SNR) G357.7+0.3. Our millimeter and submillimeter observations reveal broad molecular lines of CO(2-1), CO(3-2), CO(4-3), {sup 13}CO (2-1), and {sup 13}CO (3-2), HCO{sup +}, and HCN using the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope, the Arizona 12 m Telescope, APEX, and the MOPRA Telescope. The widths of the broad lines are 15–30 km s{sup −1}, and the detection of such broad lines is unambiguous, dynamic evidence showing that the SNR G357.7+0.3 is interacting with molecular clouds. The broad lines appear in extended regions (>4.′5 × 5′). We also present the detection of shocked H{sub 2} emission in the mid-infrared but lacking ionic lines using Spitzer /IRS observations to map a few-arcminute area. The H{sub 2} excitation diagram shows a best fit with a two-temperature local thermal equilibrium model with the temperatures of ∼200 and 660 K. We observed [C ii] at 158 μ m and high- J CO(11-10) with the German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies (GREAT) on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. The GREAT spectrum of [C ii], a 3 σ detection, shows a broad line profile with a width of 15.7 km{sup −1} that is similar to those of broad CO molecular lines. The line width of [C ii] implies that ionic lines can come from a low-velocity C-shock. Comparison of H{sub 2} emission with shock models shows that a combination of two C-shock models is favored over a combination of C- and J-shocks or a single shock. We estimate the CO density, column density, and temperature using a RADEX model. The best-fit model with n (H{sub 2}) = 1.7 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −3}, N(CO) = 5.6 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}, and T  = 75 K can reproduce the observed millimeter CO brightnesses.

  2. Finding Their Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    Every time Dr. Larry Shinagawa teaches his "Introduction to Asian American Studies" course at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, he finds that 10 to 20 percent of his students are adoptees. Among other things, they hunger to better comprehend the social and political circumstances overseas leading to their adoption. In…

  3. Tooth Tutoring: The Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Richard; And Others

    Findings are reported on a three year cross-age tutoring program in which undergraduate dental hygiene students and college students from other disciplines trained upper elementary students to tutor younger students in the techniques of dental hygiene. Data includes pre-post scores on the Oral Hygiene Index of plaque for both experimental and…

  4. Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have been diagnosed with cancer, finding a doctor and treatment hospital for your cancer care is an important step to getting the best treatment possible. Learn tips for choosing a doctor and treatment facility to manage your cancer care.

  5. Granulomatous mastitis: radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, M.; Mavili, E.; Kahriman, G.; Akcan, A.C.; Ozturk, F. [Depts. of Radiology, Surgery, and Pathology, Erciyes Univ. Medical Faculty, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiological, ultrasonographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis. Material and Methods: Between April 2002 and June 2005, the mammography, ultrasound, color Doppler ultrasound, non enhanced MR, and dynamic MR findings of nine patients with the preliminary clinical diagnosis of malignancy and the final diagnosis of granulomatous mastitis were evaluated. Results: On mammography, asymmetrical focal densities with no distinct margins, ill-defined masses with spiculated contours, and bilateral multiple ill-defined nodules were seen. On ultrasound, in four patients a discrete, heterogenous hypoechoic mass, in two patients multiple abscesses, in one patient bilateral multiple central hypo peripheral hyperechoic lesions, in two patients heterogeneous hypo- and hyperechoic areas together with parenchymal distortion, and in one patient irregular hypoechoic masses with tubular extensions and abscess cavities were seen. Five of the lesions were vascular on color Doppler ultrasound. On MR mammography, the most frequent finding was focal or diffuse asymmetrical signal intensity changes that were hypointense on T1W images and hyperintense on T2W images, without significant mass effect. Nodular lesions were also seen. On dynamic contrast-enhanced mammography, mass-like enhancement, ring-like enhancement, and nodular enhancement were seen. The time-intensity curves differed from patient to patient and from lesion to lesion. Conclusion: The imaging findings of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis have a wide spectrum, and they are inconclusive for differentiating malignant and benign lesions.

  6. Quiz: Water and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your health Quiz: Water and your health Quiz: Water and your health Clean water is an important part of being healthy. Do you know all of these fun facts about water? Take this quiz to find out! Then, test ...

  7. Effective Bug Finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivas, Iago Abal

    Lightweight bug finders (also known as code scanners) are becoming popular, they scale well and can find simple yet common programming errors. It is now considered a good practice to integrate these tools as part of your development process. The Linux project, for instance, has an automated testing...... service, known as the Kbuild robot, that runs a few of these code scanners. In this project, I have carefully studied tens of historical Linux bugs, and I have found that many of these bugs, despite being conceptually simple, were not caught by any code scanning tool. The reason is that, by design, code...... by matching temporal bug-patterns against the control-flow graph of this program abstraction. I have implemented a proof-of-concept bug finder based on this technique, EBA, and confirmed that it is both scalable and effective at finding bugs. On a benchmark of historical Linux double-lock bugs, EBA was able...

  8. Gallstone ileus: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabrousse, E.; Bartholomot, B.; Sohm, O.; Kastler, B. [Dept. of Radiology A, CHU Jean Minjoz, University of Besancon (France); Wallerand, H. [Dept. of Surgery, CHU Jean Minjoz, University of Besancon (France)

    2000-06-01

    Gallstone ileus is a rare complication of recurrent gallstone cholecystitis. The classic radiographic triad of small bowel obstruction, pneumobilia and ectopic gallstone on abdominal plain radiograph is described with CT imaging. Because of the better resolution of CT compared with abdominal radiography and its recent accession to emergency use, radiologists should be aware of CT findings of gallstone ileus. We report a case in which gallstone ileus was initially diagnosed by CT. (orig.)

  9. Heterotopic pregnancy: Sonographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae Hee [CHA General Hospital of Seoul, Pochon CHA University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of the heterotopic pregnancy which is increasing recently. Thirty-nine cases of heterotopic pregnancy after ovulation induction and IVF-ET (In Vitro Fertilization-Embryo Transfer) during the recent 3 years were analyzed. They were diagnosed by ultrasonography and proved surgically afterwards. Sonographic findings were analyzed focusing on gestational week of intrauterine pregnancy and location of ectopic pregnancy. In particular, adnexal mass was evaluated with regard to size and the characteristic findings such as ectopic gestational sac (echogenic ring). Also, overian cyst and fluid collection in cul-de-sac space were reviewed carefully. Heterotopic pregnancy was proved surgically by salpingectomy in 33 cases and by resection of cornus in six cases. Sonographic diagnosis using transvaginal ultrasound was made from five weeks to nine weeks two days (six weeks and four days in average) from last menstral period in all 39 cases. Ectopic pregnancy was identified in ampullary part in 29 cases, in the isthmic portion of tube in four cases and in the cornus of uterus in six cases. The intrauterine pregnancy was diagnosed by identifying the intrauterine gestational saccontaining a yolk sac in seven cases and the embryo with fetal heart beat in the remaining 32 cases. Adnexal masses of heterotopic pregnancy were less than 3 cm in diameter in 2 cases (57%), 3-4 cm in 11 cases (28%) and more than 4 cm in 6 cases (15%). A characteristic finding of ectopic mass was echogenic ring which was visible in 33 (84.6%) cases by transvaginal ultrasound. Six cases had pelvic hematosalpinx and two had pelvic hematoma. Of 10 cases (26%) which were identified to have ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, eight (21%) had large amount of fluid collection in cul-de-sac and abdomen. Ultrasonographic identification of the intrauterine pregnancy and the ectopic chorion ring is effective for the early diagnosis of the heterotopic pregnancy.

  10. Heterotopic pregnancy: Sonographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Tae Hee

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of the heterotopic pregnancy which is increasing recently. Thirty-nine cases of heterotopic pregnancy after ovulation induction and IVF-ET (In Vitro Fertilization-Embryo Transfer) during the recent 3 years were analyzed. They were diagnosed by ultrasonography and proved surgically afterwards. Sonographic findings were analyzed focusing on gestational week of intrauterine pregnancy and location of ectopic pregnancy. In particular, adnexal mass was evaluated with regard to size and the characteristic findings such as ectopic gestational sac (echogenic ring). Also, overian cyst and fluid collection in cul-de-sac space were reviewed carefully. Heterotopic pregnancy was proved surgically by salpingectomy in 33 cases and by resection of cornus in six cases. Sonographic diagnosis using transvaginal ultrasound was made from five weeks to nine weeks two days (six weeks and four days in average) from last menstral period in all 39 cases. Ectopic pregnancy was identified in ampullary part in 29 cases, in the isthmic portion of tube in four cases and in the cornus of uterus in six cases. The intrauterine pregnancy was diagnosed by identifying the intrauterine gestational saccontaining a yolk sac in seven cases and the embryo with fetal heart beat in the remaining 32 cases. Adnexal masses of heterotopic pregnancy were less than 3 cm in diameter in 2 cases (57%), 3-4 cm in 11 cases (28%) and more than 4 cm in 6 cases (15%). A characteristic finding of ectopic mass was echogenic ring which was visible in 33 (84.6%) cases by transvaginal ultrasound. Six cases had pelvic hematosalpinx and two had pelvic hematoma. Of 10 cases (26%) which were identified to have ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, eight (21%) had large amount of fluid collection in cul-de-sac and abdomen. Ultrasonographic identification of the intrauterine pregnancy and the ectopic chorion ring is effective for the early diagnosis of the heterotopic pregnancy.

  11. Finding your next CEO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrall, Terese Hudson

    2008-12-01

    Hospital CEOs spend an average of just six years at one organization, and the cost of turnover is high. Finding executives to fill that top spot is more complicated thanks to a jittery economy, job candidates' worries about selling their homes and other issues. That's prompting hospitals to be more flexible in their recruitment efforts: considering older candidates, reviving succession planning, and even buying and selling CEOs' houses.

  12. Track finding using GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Track finding using GPUs The reconstruction and simulation of collision events is a major task in modern HEP experiments involving several ten thousands of standard CPUs. On the other hand the graphics processors (GPUs) have become much more powerful and are by far outperforming the standard CPUs in terms of floating point operations due to their massive parallel approach. The usage of these GPUs could therefore significantly reduce the overall reconstruction time per event or allow for the usage of more sophisticated algorithms. In this contribution the track finding in the ATLAS experiment will be used as an example on how the GPUs can be used in this context: the seed finding alone shows already a speed increase of one order of magnitude compared to the same implementation on a standard CPU. On the other hand the implementation on the GPU requires a change in the algorithmic flow to allow the code to work in the rather limited environment on the GPU in terms of memory, cache, and transfer speed from and to...

  13. Normal radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book is intended for learners in radiology, presenting a wealth of normal radiological findings together with a systematic guide for appraisal and interpretation, and for formulation of reports. The text examples and criteria given will help beginners in learning to 'read' a radiograph, and to verify their conclusions by means of checklists and standard reports. The case material covers numerous illustrations from the following sectors: Skeletal radiography, mammography, tomography, contrast radiography, organ examination by intravenous techniques, arthrography and angiography, and specialized radiography, (ECB) With 184 figs [de

  14. MR findings of spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojiri, Hiroya; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Toru; Doi, Michiko; Irie, Takeo; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Tada, Shinpei; Toyoda, Keiko.

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed MR images of 50 patients with spondylolisthesis to disclose MR findings of spondylolysis. In almost half of our series, spondylolysis was detected as a low signal intensity band traversing in the pairs interarticularis on both T1 and T2 weighted images. Sagittal images was superior to axial image in detection of the low signal intensity band. In some patients, a focal high signal intensity accompanying the low signal intensity band was considered to be fluid collection within pseudoarthrosis due to spondylolysis on T2-weighted image. (author)

  15. MR findings of spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojiri, Hiroya; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Toru; Doi, Michiko; Irie, Takeo; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Tada, Shinpei (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Toyoda, Keiko

    1994-08-01

    We reviewed MR images of 50 patients with spondylolisthesis to disclose MR findings of spondylolysis. In almost half of our series, spondylolysis was detected as a low signal intensity band traversing in the pairs interarticularis on both T1 and T2 weighted images. Sagittal images was superior to axial image in detection of the low signal intensity band. In some patients, a focal high signal intensity accompanying the low signal intensity band was considered to be fluid collection within pseudoarthrosis due to spondylolysis on T2-weighted image. (author).

  16. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  17. Ultrasonographic findings of Epicondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Seo Hyun; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Yang, Seong Jun [Yong San Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Kyung Mook [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonographic findings of the common extensor and flexor tendon in evaluation of patients with lateral and medial epicondylitis. Thirty eight elbows from twenty four patients (mean age=45.2 years) were included. Ultrasonographic examination was performed to evaluate lateral or medial epicondylitis. Epicondylitis was divided into five groups according to the severity of disease: 1) normal, 2) tendinopathy, 3) tendinopathy with a partial tear, partial tear and 4) complete tear. Change in the size of a tendon, bony change of the epicondylitis, presence or absence of calcification or echogenic foci in the common tendon and hypervascularity for each categories were also assessed. In addition, these lesions were divided into the superficial and deep according to the location of lesions. According to the severity, there were 15 cases of normal, 13 tendinopathies, 8 tendinopathies with a partial tear, 2 partial tears and 0 complete tear. Bony change was seen only in tendinopathy, tendinopathy with partial tear and partial tear. Calcification or echogenic foci were only observed in cases with tendinopathy and tendinopathy with partial tear. Hypervascularity was only seen in one case of tendinopathy. With thorough understanding of ultrasonographic findings of epicondylitis, ultrasonographic examination can be especially useful and effective in evaluating the severity and location of lesions.

  18. Climate change: Recent findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmans, G.H.F.M.

    1993-08-01

    In the late eighties several reports have been published on climate change and sea level rise. In the meantime insights may have changed due to the availability of better and more observations and/or more advanced climate models. The aim of this report is to present the most recent findings with respect to climate change, in particular of sea level rise, storm surges and river peak flows. These climate factors are important for the safety of low-lying areas with respect to coastal erosion and flooding. In the first chapters a short review is presented of a few of the eighties reports. Furthermore, the predictions by state of the art climate models at that time are given. The reports from the eighties should be considered as 'old' information, whereas the IPCC supplement and work, for example, by Wigley should be considered as new information. To assess the latest findings two experts in this field were interviewed: dr J. Oerlemans and dr C.J.E. Schuurmans, a climate expert from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI). Their views are presented together with results published in recent papers on the subject. On the basis of this assessment, the report presents current knowledge regarding predictions of climate change (including sea-level rise) over the next century, together with an assessment of the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 14 figs., 11 tabs., 24 refs

  19. [Ultrasound findings in rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Galván-Talamantes, Yazmin; Meza-Ayala, Cynthia Margarita; Cruz-Santana, Julio Alberto; Bonilla-Reséndiz, Luis Ignacio

    Rhabdomyolysis is defined as skeletal muscle necrosis. Ultrasound assessment has recently become a useful tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of muscle diseases, including rhabdomyolysis. A case is presented on the ultrasound findings in a patient with rhabdomyolysis. To highlight the importance of ultrasound as an essential part in the diagnosis in rhabdomyolysis, to describe the ultrasound findings, and review the literature. A 30 year-old with post-traumatic rhabdomyolysis of both thighs. Ultrasound was performed using a Philips Sparq model with a high-frequency linear transducer (5-10MHz), in low-dimensional scanning mode (2D), in longitudinal and transverse sections at the level of both thighs. The images obtained showed disorganisation of the orientation of the muscle fibres, ground glass image, thickening of the muscular fascia, and the presence of anechoic areas. Ultrasound is a useful tool in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiologic findings in neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dai Young; Jeon, Seok Chol; Lee, Kwan Se; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Choo, Dong Woon

    1979-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis is an uncommon but certainly not a rare hereditary disorder, probably of neuralcrest origin, involving not only neuroectoderm and mesoderm but also endoderm and characterized by cafe au lait spots and cutaneous and subcutaneous tumors, with secondary mesodermal defects responsible for protean osseous abnormalities and various manifestations in other systems. This paper is a study of confirmed 143 cases of neurofibromatosis collected for past 8 years. In this analysis, special attention was given to the selected 37 cases which showed abnormal findings on radiological examinations. Overall male to female ratio was 1 : 1.3. The most frequent kind of abnormalities was vertebral kyphoscoliosis in 12 cases. Among the more pathognomonic but uncommon abnormalities to neurofibromatosis, we experienced each 2 cases of lambdoid defect, pseudoarthrosis and renovascular hypertension, and 1 cases of sphenoid bone absence.

  1. MR findings in mannosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietemann, J L; Filippi de la Palavesa, M M; Tranchant, C; Kastler, B

    1990-01-01

    MR findings are reported in three patients presenting mannosidosis. Among a family of 8 children, 4 presented typical clinical and biological abnormalities related to mannosidosis. Brain MR examinations including sagittal T1 and axial T2 sections were obtained in three patients of this family (one 25-year-old male, one 34-year-old female, and one 35-year-old female). MR scans demonstrate seven types of modifications: (1) brachycephaly, (2) thick calvaria, (3) verticalization of the chiasmatic sulcus, (4) poor pneumatization of the sphenoid body, (5) partial empty sella turcica (6) cerebellar atrophy, and (7) white matter signal modifications. High signal abnormalities involving the parieto-occipital white matter are identified on axial T2-weighted scans in the three patients and are probably related to demyelination and associated gliosis as described previously by several authors on specimens.

  2. MRI finding of hemangioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Cheol; Oh, Min Cheol; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Seol, Hye Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of posterior fossa hemanangioblastoma and usefulness of contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. Seven patients with posterior fossa hemangioblastoma were studied with both pre- and post-enhanced MRI. The MR images were reviewed regarding the location, size, signal intensities of cysts and mural nodules, and their contrast enhancement pattern. Five tumors were located in cerebellar hemisphere, one in vermis, and one in posterior part of medulla. One patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease had a medullary hemangioblastoma with multiple pancreatic cysts. In 6 cases, the major portion of the tumor was cysts and had small mulkal nodules. The solid portion was relatively lange in one cases, cemprising half of the tumor cysts were oval shaped and their sized were 3-6.7 cm in diameter. In five cases(71%), septations were noted within the cysts. Cysts were isointense or slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted image and hyperintense on T2- weighted image compared with cerebrospinal fluid. Mural nodules were oval or rounded radiotherapy had better prognosis than those treated with radiotherapy alwas 0.5-2.5 cm in diameter. Mural nodules were isointense to gray matter. They were detected in five cases on T1-weighted images and one case on T2-weighted images. In two cases, vascular signal void area was noted in mural nodules. On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, all mural nodules were intensely enhanced. MRI provide to be a good diagnostic method to detect and characterize posterior fossa hemangioblastoma. The most common finding is Cystic posterior fossa lesion with enhancing mural nodule. Contrast enhancement is essential for specific diagnosis

  3. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND INFRARED LUMINOSITIES OF z Almost-Equal-To 2 DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES FROM Herschel AND Spitzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melbourne, J.; Soifer, B. T. [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 320-47, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Desai, Vandana; Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, Mail Stop 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey [University of Massachusetts, Astronomy Department, Amherst, MA (United States); Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, B. T. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Bussmann, R. S., E-mail: jmel@caltech.edu, E-mail: bts@submm.caltech.edu, E-mail: bts@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: lee@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: vandesai@gmail.com, E-mail: pope@astro.umass.edu, E-mail: dey@noao.edu, E-mail: jannuzi@noao.edu, E-mail: rbussmann@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are a subset of high-redshift (z Almost-Equal-To 2) optically-faint ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, e.g., L{sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun} ). We present new far-infrared photometry, at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m (observed-frame), from the Herschel Space Telescope for a large sample of 113 DOGs with spectroscopically measured redshifts. Approximately 60% of the sample are detected in the far-IR. The Herschel photometry allows the first robust determinations of the total infrared luminosities of a large sample of DOGs, confirming their high IR luminosities, which range from 10{sup 11.6} L{sub Sun} 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. The rest-frame near-IR (1-3 {mu}m) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the Herschel-detected DOGs are predictors of their SEDs at longer wavelengths. DOGs with 'power-law' SEDs in the rest-frame near-IR show observed-frame 250/24 {mu}m flux density ratios similar to the QSO-like local ULIRG, Mrk 231. DOGs with a stellar 'bump' in their rest-frame near-IR show observed-frame 250/24 {mu}m flux density ratios similar to local star-bursting ULIRGs like NGC 6240. None show 250/24 {mu}m flux density ratios similar to extreme local ULIRG, Arp 220; though three show 350/24 {mu}m flux density ratios similar to Arp 220. For the Herschel-detected DOGs, accurate estimates (within {approx}25%) of total IR luminosity can be predicted from their rest-frame mid-IR data alone (e.g., from Spitzer observed-frame 24 {mu}m luminosities). Herschel-detected DOGs tend to have a high ratio of infrared luminosity to rest-frame 8 {mu}m luminosity (the IR8 = L{sub IR}(8-1000 {mu}m)/{nu}L{sub {nu}}(8 {mu}m) parameter of Elbaz et al.). Instead of lying on the z = 1-2 'infrared main sequence' of star-forming galaxies (like typical LIRGs and ULIRGs at those epochs) the DOGs

  4. Dust, ice and gas in time (DIGIT): Herschel and Spitzer spectro-imaging of SMM3 and SMM4 in Serpens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionatos, O.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Green, J. D.; Herczeg, G. J.; Evans, N. J.; Kristensen, L. E.; Lindberg, J. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Mid- and far-infrared observations of the environment around embedded protostars reveal a plethora of high excitation molecular and atomic emission lines. Different mechanisms for the origin of these lines have been proposed, including shocks induced by protostellar jets and radiation or heating by the embedded protostar of its immediate surroundings. Aims: By studying of the most important molecular and atomic coolants, we aim at constraining the physical conditions around the embedded protostars SMM3 and SMM4 in the Serpens molecular cloud core and measuring the CO/H2 ratio in warm gas. Methods: Spectro-imaging observations from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) and the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) provide an almost complete wavelength coverage between 5 and 200 μm. Within this range, emission from all major molecular (H2, CO, H2O and OH) and many atomic ([OI], [CII], [FeII], [SiII] and [SI]) coolants of excited gas are detected. Emission line maps reveal the morphology of the observed emission and indicate associations between the different species. The excitation conditions for molecular species are assessed through rotational diagrams. Emission lines from major coolants are compared to the results of steady-state C- and J-type shock models. Results: Line emission tends to peak at distances of ~10-20″ from the protostellar sources with all but [CII] peaking at the positions of outflow shocks seen in near-IR and sub-millimeter interferometric observations. The [CII] emission pattern suggests that it is most likely excited from energetic UV radiation originating from the nearby flat-spectrum source SMM6. Excitation analysis indicates that H2 and CO originate in gas at two distinct rotational temperatures of ~300 K and 1000 K, while the excitation temperature for H2O and OH is ~100-200 K. The morphological and physical association between CO and H2 suggests a common excitation mechanism, which allows direct

  5. Radiographic findings in immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon, R.; Lynch, D.A.; Cink, T.M.; Newell, J.D.; Kirkpatrick, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans in patients with immunodeficiency disorders and define the role of HRCT. Thirty-three cases were retrospectively graded according to the consensus of two radiologists. Patients with HIV seropositivity and asthma were excluded. HRCT was performed in 12 cases with standard techniques. Diagnoses included common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (n = 19), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 4), chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 4), and selective immunoglobulin g deficiencies (n = 2). Chest radiographs showed bronchiectasis in 11 of 33 cases with a predominant lower lobe distribution (82%). Nodules were present in six cases and mucus plugs in four cases. HRCT showed bronchiectasis in nine of 12 cases; in five of these nine cases, bronchiectasis was not apparent on chest radiographs. Other HRCT findings included segmental air trapping (four of 12), mucus plugs (three of 12), hazy consolidation (four of 12), nodules (five of 12), and bronchiolectasis (two of 12). Therapy was altered in seven of 12 cases in which HRCT was performed. Most pertinent to clinical management were the presence of a thymoma (n = 1) and severe focal of diffuse bronchiectasis

  6. [Incidental finding of proteinuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, J

    2014-10-01

    A positive signal when testing urine for proteinuria is a frequent finding, either in the context of a routine medical check-up or when searching for a specific renal disorder. This brief overview aims to provide assistance in the classification of proteinuria and to provide guidance to the next diagnostic and therapeutic steps. The normal urine protein loss of a healthy adult is less then 150 mg/day. Higher rates of proteinuria should be confirmed as this is often a sign of glomerular or tubular damage. In addition, proteinuria is a strong prognostic factor for cardiovascular and total mortality. Principally, proteinuria is 1) a symptom of renal diseases, 2) a progression factor for renal diseases and 3) a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and total mortality. In this article proteinuria is defined, the correlation to various renal diseases is described and the relevance for progression of renal diseases and total mortality is shown. Finally, diagnostic procedures are described and a perspective on therapeutic measures is provided.

  7. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Glaucia; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  8. 18 CFR 415.3 - Purpose and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Land and water use regulations of responsible units of government shall not impair or conflict with the.... (9) Plans for land and water use adopted by responsible agencies shall not impair or conflict with... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose and findings...

  9. Water, Water Everywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2009-01-01

    Everybody knows that children love water and how great water play is for children. The author discusses ways to add water to one's playscape that fully comply with health and safety regulations and are still fun for children. He stresses the importance of creating water play that provides children with the opportunity to interact with water.

  10. Water maser emission from exoplanetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmovici, C. B.; Pogrebenko, S.

    2018-01-01

    Since the first discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet in 1995 more than 2000 exo-planets have been found to exist around main sequence stars. The detection techniques are based on the radial velocity method (which involves the measurement of the star's wobbling induced by the gravitational field of the orbiting giant planets) or on transit photometry by using space telescopes (Kepler, Corot, Hubble and Spitzer) outside the absorbing Earth atmosphere. From the ground, as infrared observations are strongly limited by atmospheric absorption, radioastronomy offers almost the only possible way to search for water presence and abundance in the planetary atmospheres of terrestrial-type planets where life may evolve. Following the discovery in 1994 of the first water maser emission in the atmosphere of Jupiter induced by a cometary impact, our measurements have shown that the water maser line at 22 GHz (1.35 cm) can be used as a powerful diagnostic tool for water search outside the solar system, as comets are able to deliver considerable amounts of water to planets raising the fascinating possibility of extraterrestrial life evolution. Thus in 1999 we started the systematic search for water on 35 different targets up to 50 light years away from the Sun. Here we report the first detection of the water maser emission from the exoplanetary systems Epsilon Eridani, Lalande 21185 and Gliese 581. We have shown the peculiar feasibility of water detection and its importance in the search for exoplanetary systems especially for the Astrobiology programs, given the possibility of long period observations using powerful radiotelescopes equipped with adequate spectrometers.

  11. Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury. Read Issue Emily Scott, Biochemist Hooked on Heme Emily Scott's research on a family of enzymes ... and Biochemistry Enzymes, Molecular Probes, Metabolic Engineering, Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, ...

  12. STAR POLYMER/WATER SOLUTIONS: NEW EXPERIMENTAL FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Branca

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is to highlight a number of recent experimental results that have contributed significantly to the research area of star polymer. Firstly we will refer to a very impressive SANS work by J.Peyrelasse, C.Perreur, J.-P.Habas and J.Francois which is focused on the study of the structural properties of aqueous solutions of a star copolymer of PEO and PPO by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. Next, we will refer to some experimental advances reported in the work by R.Triolo, V.Arrighi, A.Triolo, P.Migliardo, S.Magazu, J.B.McClain, D.Betts, J.M.DeSimone, H.D.Middendorf, which deals with a study of some dynamical properties of PS-b-PFOA aggregates in supercritical CO2 by Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering.

  13. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  14. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Mukesh Gandhi, MD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings.

  15. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings. PMID:27186241

  16. Water management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Manitoba Hydro's efforts to maximize production efficiency while meeting safety and environmental concerns regarding water management were discussed. The four-step dam safety program was outlined, consisting of inspection, repairs and improvements, flooding studies, and emergency preparedness plans. An oil spill which occurred in 1995 on the Nelson River after a transformer at the Kettle Generating Station failed, was described. A boom was used to contain the oil, and a skimmer unit was used to remove oil and soot from the surface of the water. Manitoba Hydro is also conducting studies to find ways to protect the generating stations from zebra mussels, and precautions are being taken to prevent old lead-based paint from reaching the Winnipeg River. It was noted that the drought which hit northern Manitoba during the spring and summer of 1995 reduced the water supplies to the lowest levels ever recorded at the Churchill River Diversion. 2 figs

  17. Water management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Manitoba Hydro`s efforts to maximize production efficiency while meeting safety and environmental concerns regarding water management were discussed. The four-step dam safety program was outlined, consisting of inspection, repairs and improvements, flooding studies, and emergency preparedness plans. An oil spill which occurred in 1995 on the Nelson River after a transformer at the Kettle Generating Station failed, was described. A boom was used to contain the oil, and a skimmer unit was used to remove oil and soot from the surface of the water. Manitoba Hydro is also conducting studies to find ways to protect the generating stations from zebra mussels, and precautions are being taken to prevent old lead-based paint from reaching the Winnipeg River. It was noted that the drought which hit northern Manitoba during the spring and summer of 1995 reduced the water supplies to the lowest levels ever recorded at the Churchill River Diversion. 2 figs.

  18. Water supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Options and methodologies for the development of fresh water supplies on Bikini Atoll are much the same as those practiced in the rest of the Marshall Islands and for that matter, most atolls in the central Pacific Ocean Basin. That is, rainfall distribution on Bikini produces a distinct wet season, lasting from about May through November, with the remaining months being generally dry. As a result, fresh water from surface catchments tends to be plentiful during the wet season? but is usually scarce during the dry months, and alternative sources such as groundwater must be utilized during this time. On Bikini the problems of fresh water supply are somewhat more difficult than for most Marshall Island atolls because rainfall is only about half the Marshall Island's average. Tus water supply is a critical factor limiting the carrying capacity of Bikini Atoll. To address this problem BARC has undertaken a study of the Bikini Atoll water supply. Te primary objectives of this work are to determine: (1) alternatives available for fresh water supply, 2 the amounts, location and quality of available supplies and 3 optimal development methods. The study planned for one's year duration, has been underway only since the summer of 1985 and is thus not yet fully completed. However, work done to date, which is presented in this report of preliminary findings, provides a reasonably accurate picture of Bikini's fresh water supplies and the various options available for their development. The work remaining to be completed will mainly add refinements to the water supply picture presented in the sections to follow

  19. Correlation of Imaging Findings with Pathologic Findings of Sclerosing Adenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pure sclerosing adenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic findings in 40 cases of pure sclerosing adenosis confirmed by core needle biopsy (n = 23), vacuum-assisted biopsy (n = 7), excision biopsy (n = 9), and lumpectomy (n = 1) from January 2002 to March 2010. All imaging findings were analyzed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). Radiologic features were correlated with pathologic findings. Although most mammograms showed negative findings (57%), calcification was the most common abnormal finding of sclerosing adenosis. On sonography, the most common finding was a circumscribed oval hypoechoic mass without posterior features (78%). Most masses showed BI-RADS category 3, (75%, 27/36). Five cases showed categories 4 or 5 (14%, 5/36). Most mammographic and sonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis are non-specific and non-pathognomonic, even though sometimes sclerosing adenosis can be radiologically or histopathologically confused with malignancy

  20. Correlation of Imaging Findings with Pathologic Findings of Sclerosing Adenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pure sclerosing adenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic findings in 40 cases of pure sclerosing adenosis confirmed by core needle biopsy (n = 23), vacuum-assisted biopsy (n = 7), excision biopsy (n = 9), and lumpectomy (n = 1) from January 2002 to March 2010. All imaging findings were analyzed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). Radiologic features were correlated with pathologic findings. Although most mammograms showed negative findings (57%), calcification was the most common abnormal finding of sclerosing adenosis. On sonography, the most common finding was a circumscribed oval hypoechoic mass without posterior features (78%). Most masses showed BI-RADS category 3, (75%, 27/36). Five cases showed categories 4 or 5 (14%, 5/36). Most mammographic and sonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis are non-specific and non-pathognomonic, even though sometimes sclerosing adenosis can be radiologically or histopathologically confused with malignancy

  1. Finding costs methodology - alternative approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaddis, D.

    1992-01-01

    Though the context may vary, the topic of the day in the oil and gas industry is ''finding costs per barrel.'' First, there have been numerous articles in both the popular media and the industry press that have argued it is cheaper for companies to buy reserves that find them with the drill bit. Financial analysts have emphasized the importance of comparing relative finding costs when evaluating different companies. The success of failure of a company's management has been judged on the basis of finding costs. In discussing oil and gas prices, economists commonly refer to the relationship between the market prices of oil and gas and their finding costs, and no discussion of the U.S. petroleum industry and the development of a national energy policy is complete without reference to finding costs. (Author)

  2. CT findings of infant epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojoh, Hiroatsu; Kataoka, Kenkichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Shozo; Tomita, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    CT diagnosis of infantile epilepsy was evaluated. High incidence of abnormal CT findings in infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome was same as in other reports. Comparison between CT findings and neurological complications and that between CT findings and electroencephalogram findings revealed a stronger relationship existing in the former. This suggested that CT is more useful as a measure to detect underlying diseases which are due to organic change of the brain to cause epilepsy, rather than as that to disclose epileptic primary lesions of functional change. (Ueda, J.)

  3. CT findings of infant epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojoh, Hiroatsu; Kataoka, Kenkichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro (Children' s Medical Center, Shizuoka (Japan)); Nakano, Shozo; Tomita, Yutaka

    1982-10-01

    CT diagnosis of infantile epilepsy was evaluated. High incidence of abnormal CT findings in infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome was same as in other reports. Comparison between CT findings and neurological complications and that between CT findings and electroencephalogram findings revealed a stronger relationship existing in the former. This suggested that CT is more useful as a measure to detect underlying diseases which are due to organic change of the brain to cause epilepsy, rather than as that to disclose epileptic primary lesions of functional change.

  4. Water Footprint and Virtual Water Trade of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente de Paulo R. da Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater scarcity has increased at an alarming rate worldwide; improved water management plays a vital role in increasing food production and security. This study aims to determine the water footprint of Brazil’s national food consumption, the virtual water flows associated with international trade in the main agricultural commodities, as well as water scarcity, water self-sufficiency and water dependency per Brazilian region. While previous country studies on water footprints and virtual water trade focused on virtual water importers or water-scarce countries, this is the first study to concentrate on a water-abundant virtual water-exporting country. Besides, it is the first study establishing international virtual water trade balances per state, which is relevant given the fact that water scarcity varies across states within the country, so the origin of virtual water exports matters. The results show that the average water footprint of Brazilian food consumption is 1619 m3/person/year. Beef contributes most (21% to this total. We find a net virtual water export of 54.8 billion m3/year, mainly to Europe, which imports 41% of the gross amount of the virtual water exported from Brazil. The northeast, the region with the highest water scarcity, has a net import of virtual water. The southeast, next in terms of water scarcity, shows large virtual water exports, mainly related to the export of sugar. The north, which has the most water, does not show a high virtual water export rate.

  5. CT findings of necrotizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Im, Jung Gi; Whang, Sung Il; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, Jae Kyo; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia causes necrosis of pulmonary parenchyma and may lead to pulmonary gangrene. Prior to the antibiotic era, extensive pulmonary involvement was potentially fatal, but the incidence of necrotizing pneumoniais now less common. On contrast-enhanced CT scans, consolidation with contrast enhancement containing necrotic foci with low attenuation and cavities is characteristic. Radiologic findings do not differ according to the causative organism and in most of cases, specific diagnosis may be impossible. Clinical findings and certain characteristic radiologic findings may be helpful for narrowing the differential diagnosis. We illustrate the clinical and radiologic characteristics of necrotizing pneumonia according to causative bacterial organisms

  6. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mee Hyun; Jung, Hee Tae; Lee, Young Joong; Yoon, Jong Sup

    1986-01-01

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  7. findings from specialist treatment centres

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    8.3%) cited methaqualone as their primary substance of abuse. Discussion. The findings from our study confirm that OTC/prescription medicine misuse is frequently reported among patients in substance abuse treatment settings. Compared with ...

  8. Dermoscopy Findings of Hidroacanthoma Simplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yota Sato

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hidroacanthoma simplex (HAS, also known as intraepidermal eccrine poroma, is a rare eccrine adnexal tumor that tends to be misdiagnosed as other types of benign skin tumor, including clonal seborrheic keratosis. Notably, HAS is sometimes misdiagnosed and treated by cryosurgery as seborrheic keratosis, which could trigger the later development of porocarcinoma. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of HAS is indispensable for dermatologists to avoid the development of malignant tumors by an unsuitable treatment. In this report, we present the characteristic dermoscopy findings of HAS. Indeed, the dermoscopy findings might be related to the melanin-rich necrotic cells in the epidermis, which are quite different from dermoscopy findings of clonal seborrheic keratosis. As a previous report suggested, it is difficult for a dermatologist to differentiate HAS from clonal seborrheic keratosis by the naked eye. Our findings might be supportive for the early diagnosis of HAS.

  9. Find your future in mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gunzehauser, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    "Find Your Future in Mathematics introduces 8 high-interest mathematical careers via reader-friendly profiles and sidebar features that inspire extended learning, online research, and critical thinking skills. Back matter includes additional learning activities"-- Provided by publisher.

  10. Find an Allergist/Immunologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Dem Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho ... meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen counts Continuing education center Find an allergist / immunologist Journals Login / My ...

  11. Learning as way-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    motions of humans and non-human agencies. The findings reveal that learning; formal and informal can be conceptualized by the metaphor of way-finding; embodied, emotionally and/or cognitive both individually and socially. Way-finding, is argued, to be a contemporary concept for learning processes......Based on empirical case-study findings and the theoretical framework of learning by Illeris coupled with Nonaka & Takeuchis´s perspectives on knowledge creation, it is stressed that learning are conditioned by contextual orientations-processes in spaces near the body (peripersonal spaces) through......, knowledge development and identity-shaping, where learning emerges through motions, feeling and thinking within an information rich world in constant change....

  12. Find selv fred og ro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juelskjær, Malou

    2010-01-01

    I klasseværelset er det lærerens ansvar at skabe ro. Men i de nye skolebygninger er det den enkelte elevs ansvar at finde frem til fredfyldte steder.......I klasseværelset er det lærerens ansvar at skabe ro. Men i de nye skolebygninger er det den enkelte elevs ansvar at finde frem til fredfyldte steder....

  13. Radiologic findings of granulomatous mastitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Ji Young; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Soung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Jun, Woo Sun; Park, Kyeong Mee; Han, Se Hwan [Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    The describe the radiologic findings of granulomatous mastitis of the breast. This study included 19 patients (age range: 22 to 56 years; mean 37 years) with 22 lesions that were pathologically confirmed as having granulomatous mastitis. All the patients underwent a breast ultrasonography and 13 patients underwent a mammography. The results of the mammography revealed focal asymmetry (n = 9), multiple ill-defined isodense nodules (n 2), ill-defined nodular density on craniocaudal view (n = 1), and unremarkable finding (n = 1). The sonographic findings included continuous or discontinuous multiple tubular and nodular low echoic lesions (n = 7), ill-defined heterogeneously low echoic lesion (n = 5), irregular-shaped, ill-defined low echoic mass (n = 4), fluid collection with internal floating materials suggesting the presence of an abscess (n = 4), ill-defined heterogeneously low echoic lesion and abscess (n = 1), and multiple ill-defined nodules (n = 1). In the case of granulomatous mastitis, the mammography results indicate a lack of specificity between normal findings and focal asymmetry. The sonographic findings indicate that ill-defined heterogeneously low echoic lesions or irregular shaped, ill-defined low echoic masses are difficult to differentiate from breast cancer. The sonographic findings of abscesses indicate a difficulty in differentiating them from cases of pyogenic mastitis. However, multiple tubular and nodular low echoic lesions, especially with a continuous appearance, should point to granulomatous mastitis, and is helpful in its differential diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Water And Waste Water Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Byeong Ju

    1988-04-01

    This book shows US the distribution diagram of water and waste water processing with device of water processing, and device of waste water processing, property of water quality like measurement of pollution of waste water, theoretical Oxygen demand, and chemical Oxygen demand, processing speed like zero-order reactions and enzyme reactions, physical processing of water and waste water, chemical processing of water and waste water like neutralization and buffering effect, biological processing of waste water, ammonia removal, and sludges processing.

  15. Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics Training & Education Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Water Contamination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ...

  16. Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the safest water supplies in the world, but drinking water quality can vary from place to place. ... water supplier must give you annual reports on drinking water. The reports include where your water came ...

  17. Research findings with clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjugn, Roger

    2015-05-05

    Medical and health research may yield findings that are of direct clinical significance for project participants. The Council of Europe has stated that information on such findings shall be offered to participants, and that applications to research ethics committees shall include plans for managing such findings. The purpose of the study was to investigate how the management of such findings had been described in research projects that had been granted prior approval by a regional committee for medical and health research ethics (REK). Research projects that were associated with Oslo University Hospital and had a start-up date in 2011 were identified in the database of the regional ethics committee. Copies of the application form submitted to the committee, project protocols, participant information/consent forms and letters of approval were reviewed with regard to information on the management of findings with possible clinical implications. Of the 87 projects found in the database, 70 were included in the study. Of these, 57 studies involved direct interaction with humans, whereof 45 with intended use of biological material. In 21 studies, the management of findings with possible clinical implications was described in one or more documents. In all of these projects, the applicant him-/herself had referred to this topic in the initial application. The absence of written information on the management of research findings with possible clinical implications is not in conformity with the recommendations issued by the Council of Europe. By introducing a separate item for this in the form to be submitted to the regional ethics committee for application of prior approval, this issue could be made subject to better assessment.

  18. CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia: correlation with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Young Goo; Park, Un Sup

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings to help differentiating from lung cancer. We evaluated radiologic and pathologic findings of five patients with solitary pulmonary nodule which were confirmed as focal organizing pneumonia pathologically. On CT scan, focal organizing pneumonia had irregular margin contacting the pleura in all five cases. The shape of the nodules were spherical to wedge or elliptical and the size from 3.5cm to 5.5cm(average 4.2 cm) in largest diameter. On postcontrast CT scan, all nodules showed enhancement and four cases showed central low density components. Two nodules contained air within the nodule. In four cases, pleural changes such as effusion and/or focal thickening were noted. No lymphadenopathy was found in all cases. Pathologically, the enhancing portion on CT showed findings of organizing pneumonia such as granulation tissue with fibroblast proliferation in alveolar space and interstitial thickening. The central low density areas on CT were due to ischemic necrosis, abscess and exudate, transudate and infiltration of foamy histiocyte. The possibility of focal organizing pneumonia should be considered when peripherally located solitary pulmonary nodule had enhancing component with no combined lymphadenopathy on CT scan

  19. Ultrasonographic finding of trophoblastic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    Authors analysed ultrasonographic findings of 50 cases of trophoblastic diseases which were confirmed by D and E or hysterectomy. The following result was observed. 1. Among the 50 cases, 43 cases were hydatidiform moles and remainders were choriocarcionmas 2. Ultrasonographic findings of hydatidi form mole were as follows. a. The size of uterus was larger than that of expected one in 55 percent of cases and smaller than that in 9 percent. b. The vesicular pattern of internal echo could be found in all of the cases, and homogeneous echo pattern were observed in 32 cases(75 percent). c. secondary change, such as myometrial hemorrhage or necrosis, was shown in 33 cases (77 percent). d.In 34 cases (80 percent), sharply separable uterine wall from internal echo was demonstrated. e. In 8 cases(19 percent), ovarian theca-lutein cysts were observed. Among them, 5 cases contained bilateral cysts. All cysts had internal septation. 3. Ultrasonographic findings of choriocarcinomas showed similar findings of those of hydatidiform moles, but different findings from H-moles were more irregular vesicular pattern(4 cases: 57 percent) and inseparable vesicular pattern from uterine wall echo. 4. Correct diagnosis was made in 48 cases out of 50 and the diagnostic accuracy was 95 percent

  20. CT finding of cryptococcal meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, H.; Ueda, M.; Ito, K.; Matsuoka, T. (Ohkawara Neurosurgical Hospital, Muroran (Japan))

    1981-08-01

    We have experienced 14 cases of cryptococcal meningitis in the last 6 years. Their neurological signs, CT findings, and prognoses were studied. They fall into three types: the brain-stem-encephalitis type, the cortical-encephalitis type, and the meningitis type, according to the clinical course. The first type (6 cases) revealed mainly cerebellar signs, eye-movement damage, and so forth. The second type (5 cases) demonstrated ''Personality'' changes, chiefly aphasia. The third type (5 cases) did not show any focal signs. Prognosis of the brain-stem-encephalitis type was very poor, with a 50% mortality rate. In the survivors, also, clinical signs did not disappear for a long time. Repeated CT was performed in 13 among the 14 cases; abnormal CT findings were revealed in 5 cases because of cryptococcal infection. Granuloma shadow and ventriculitis shadow were observed in 3 cases each. These abnormal findings disappeared upon treatment except in one case. The clinical signs are not completely related with the CT finding, but it is useful that the site which has been infiltrated by the cryptococcus can be observed. Abnormal CT findings were observed in the 4 cases of the brain-stem-encephalitis type among the 5 abnormal cases. It is very useful to know the severity of the condition.

  1. Pubic insufficiency fracture: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Tae Kyu; Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Jeong Mi; Kim, Jee Young; Chung, Hong Jun; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Eun Ja; Kang, So Won; Han Tae Il

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MRI findings of pubic insufficiency fracture. In nine cases of pubic insufficiency fracture, the findings of plain radiography (n=9), MRI (n=9), and bone scintigraphy (n=8) were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed, with regard to fracture site, the destructive pattern revealed by plain radiography, and uptake by other pelvic bones, as demonstrated by RI bone scanning. The MR findings evaluated were the fracture gap and its signal intensity, the site and signal intensity of the soft tissue mass, and other pelvic bone fractures. Plain radiography revealed osteolysis and sclerosis of pubic bone in eight of nine cases (89%), and parasymphyseal fractures in seven (78%). RI indicated uptake by the sacrum in six cases (66%), and by the ilium in three (33%). MR findings of fracture gap (seven cases, 78%) were hypo to isointensity on T1WI, hyper intensity on T2WI and the absence of contrast enhancement. Soft tissue masses were found in seven cases (78%); in four of these the location was parasymphyseal, and in three, surrounding muscle was involved. Hypo to isointensity was revealed by T1WI, hyperintensity by T2WI, and there was peripheral enhancement. Other associated pelvic bone fractures involved the sacrum in seven cases and the ilium in four. The characteristic MR findings of pubic insufficiency fracture were parasymphyseal location, fracture gap, peripherally enhanced soft tissue mass formation, and fractures of other pelvic bones, namely the sacrum and ilium

  2. CT findings of periappendiceal abscesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Ill; Kang, Kyung Sook; Suh, Myung Ok; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Jong Sup [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    CT has been widely used in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal abscesses, but its findings of periappendiceal abscesses are not well known. CT findings of 15 cases of periappendiceal abscesses were analyzed retrospectively. The results were as follows; 1.The most prevalent age groups were 5th. and 6th. decades and a male to female ratio was 7:8. 2.CT findings of periappendiceal abscesses were cystic low density mass in 7 cases (46.5%), solid soft tissue mass in 2 patients (13.5%) and mixed density mass in 6 cases (40%). 3.Associated CT findings were fat plane obliteration in 12 cases (80%), fascial thickening in 10 cases (66%), enhancing wall in 7 cases (46.5%), internal air density in 5 cases (33%), cecal wall thickening in 3 cases (20%) and ascites in 2 cases (13.5%). 4.Abscess was localized in RLQ medial to cecum in 10 cases (66%), extended to posterior pararenal space in 2 cases (13.5%), pelvic cavity in 2 cases (13.5%) and RUQ in 1 case (7%). We think that CT is an useful diagnostic method of periappendiceal abscesses especially when clinical findings are atypical.

  3. CT findings of renal abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jun; Kim, Mi Young; Woo, Jung Ju; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Won Hong; Jeon, Jeong Dong; Jeon, Woo Ki; Han, Chang Yul

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine characteristic CT findings in renal abscess. Twenty cases of renal abscess were retrospectively analyzed for CT findings relating to the shape and extent of the abscess, change of nephrogram, peripheral rim enhancement, wedge-shaped enhancement on delayed scans, enlargement of the kidney involved and associated findings. Seven patients had a renal abscess at the right kidney, nine at the lift kidney and two bilaterally. The abscesses were round in 18 cases and finger-like in two. Rim enhancement around renal abscess was seen in four cases (20%). Changes in the nephrogram around the abscess were seen in 12 cases (60%). In all six patients who had undergone delayed postcontrast scans, wedge-shaped enhancement was shown around the abscess (100%). In the observation of the extent of renal abscesses, 14 cases were within the kidney, six cases extended the beyond renal capsule, and two were loculated in the renal fascia itself. Renal enlargement was seen in nine cases (45%). These results suggest that CT findings such as delayed wedge-shaped enhancement, change of nephrogram, peripheral rim enhancement, renal enlargement, and associated findings are valuable for diagnosis, and that CT also gives information concerning the extent, evolution and complication of a renal abscess

  4. Methanol poisoning: characteristic MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nirdesh; Himanshu, Dandu; Verma, Shailendra Prasad; Parihar, Anit

    2013-01-01

    Acute methanol intoxication is not an unusual poisoning. It can have serious neurological sequelae. We emphasize how neuroimaging can help in distinguishing methanol poisoning from other causes of acute unconsciousness in alcoholic patients such as hypoglycemic brain damage and carbon monoxide poisoning or head injury, which are frequently observed in alcoholic patients and are also responsible for altered sensorium. The most important findings in MR brain imaging in methanol poisoning have been bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis. Other less common findings are subcortical and deep white matter lesions, cerebral and cerebellar cortical lesions, and midbrain lesions, cerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, and even enhancement of necrotic lesions, we found almost the entire spectrum of MRI findings in this patient with methanol poisoning. Neurological sequelae can entail the course and prognosis in methanol poisoning. The patient died because of ventilator-associated pneumonia that developed in the course of prolonged hospitalization.

  5. Adrenoleukodystrophy: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.J. [Dept. of Radiology, King Saud Univ., King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Kolawole, T.M. [Dept. of Radiology, King Saud Univ., King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Malabarey, T.M. [Dept. of Radiology, King Saud Univ., King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Herbish, A.S. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jurrayan, N.A.M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Saleh, M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-06-01

    A case of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) with CT and MRI findings is described. The CT scan showed low densities in the white matter of the parietal and occipital lobes. No calcifications were seen. Post-contrast CT showed an abnormal enhancement within the involved white matter. MRI showed changes of demyelination around the atria of the lateral ventricles bilaterally involving the posterior aspect of the cerebrum symmetrically. The posterior part of the posterior corpus callosum, splenium and pyramidal tracts also showed increased signal intensity. From a review of the literature, these findings are typical of the radiological changes seen in ALD. ALD can be diagnosed from typical history and biochemical changes as well as from CT and MRI findings. (orig.)

  6. Primary hepatic sarcomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ri-Sheng; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Biao; Wang, Liu-Hong [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hangzhou (China); Xu, Xiu-Fang [Zhejiang Medical College, Teaching and Research Group of Radiology, Hangzhou (China)

    2008-10-15

    Primary hepatic sarcomas are rare tumors that are difficult to diagnose clinically. Different primary hepatic sarcomas may have different clinical, morphologic, and radiological features. In this pictorial review, we summarized computed tomography (CT) findings of some relatively common types of hepatic sarcomas, including angiosarcoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE), liposarcoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma (UES), leiomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), and carcinosarcoma (including cystadenocarcinosarcoma). To our knowledge, hepatic cystadenocarcinosarcoma has not been described in the English literature. The CT findings in our case are similar to that of cystadenocarcinoma, a huge, multilocular cystic mass with a large mural nodule and solid portion. The advent of CT has allowed earlier detection of primary hepatic sarcomas as well as more accurate diagnosis and characterization. In addition, we briefly discuss the MRI findings and diagnostic value of primary hepatic sarcomas. (orig.)

  7. CT and MRI normal findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.

    1998-01-01

    This book gives answers to questions frequently heard especially from trainees and doctors not specialising in the field of radiology: Is that a normal finding? How do I decide? What are the objective criteria? The information presented is three-fold. The normal findings of the usual CT and MRI examinations are shown with high-quality pictures serving as a reference, with inscribed important additional information on measures, angles and other criteria describing the normal conditions. These criteria are further explained and evaluated in accompanying texts which also teach the systematic approach for individual picture analysis, and include a check list of major aspects, as a didactic guide for learning. The book is primarily intended for students, radiographers, radiology trainees and doctors from other medical fields, but radiology specialists will also find useful details of help in special cases. (orig./CB) [de

  8. Radiologic findings of neonatal sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sam Soo; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Guk Myeong; Jung, Hye Won; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bokyung Kim; Lee, Nam Yong

    1997-01-01

    To review the simple radiographic and sonographic findings in infants with neonatal sepsis. We retrospectively analyzed simple chest and abdominal radiographs, and brain sonograms in 36 newborn infants (preterm : term=23 :13). With neonatal sepsis diagnosed by blood culture and clinical manifestations. Pulmonary parenchymal infiltrate excluding respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary edema or atelectasis was found in 22 infants (61%). Paralytic ileus, hepatosplenomegaly, and necrotizing enterocolitis were present in 18(50%), 9(25%), and 1(3%) infants, respectively, while skeletal changes suggesting osteomyelitis were found in three. Brain sonography was performed in 29 infants and in four, abnormalities were seen ; these comprised three germinal matrix hemorrhages and one intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In six patients(17%) radiologic examinations revealed no abnormality. In patients with neonatal sepsis, pulmonary infiltrates and paralytic ileus were common abnormalities. Although these were nonspecific, radiologic findings may be used to supplement clinical and laboratory findings in diagnosing neonatal sepsis and planning its treatment

  9. Radiologic findings of neonatal sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Guk Myeong; Jung, Hye Won [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bokyung Kim; Lee, Nam Yong [Sansung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To review the simple radiographic and sonographic findings in infants with neonatal sepsis. We retrospectively analyzed simple chest and abdominal radiographs, and brain sonograms in 36 newborn infants (preterm : term=23 :13). With neonatal sepsis diagnosed by blood culture and clinical manifestations. Pulmonary parenchymal infiltrate excluding respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary edema or atelectasis was found in 22 infants (61%). Paralytic ileus, hepatosplenomegaly, and necrotizing enterocolitis were present in 18(50%), 9(25%), and 1(3%) infants, respectively, while skeletal changes suggesting osteomyelitis were found in three. Brain sonography was performed in 29 infants and in four, abnormalities were seen ; these comprised three germinal matrix hemorrhages and one intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In six patients(17%) radiologic examinations revealed no abnormality. In patients with neonatal sepsis, pulmonary infiltrates and paralytic ileus were common abnormalities. Although these were nonspecific, radiologic findings may be used to supplement clinical and laboratory findings in diagnosing neonatal sepsis and planning its treatment.

  10. CT findings of the thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Yun Hwan; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Woun Kyun; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1987-01-01

    In 14 cases of normal and abnormal thymus proved surgically and histopathologically in korea University Hae Wha Hospital during recent 6 years, the clinical and CT findings were analyzed. 1. Of 14 cases, 2 cases were normal thymus, 5 cases were thymic hyperplasia, 4 cases were benign thymoma, 2 case were malignant thymoma and 1 case was thymic cyst. 2. Of 14 cases, 10 cases were associated with myasthenia gravis, and 7 of these 10 cases were 3rd to 5th decades females. Among 10 cases with myasthenia gravis. 5 cases were thymic hyperplasia, 1 case was benign thymoma, 2 cases were malignant thymoma, and 2 cases were normal thymus. 3. All 5 thymic hyperplasia were associated with myasthenia gravis. CT findings of thymic hyperplasia were normal in 4 cases and increased lobe thickness in 1 case. 4. Of 4 cases of benign thymoma, only 1 case was associated with myasthenia gravis, and all 4 cases were positive findings in CT scan. CT findings of benign thymoma were round or oval soft tissue mass in anterior mediastinum, and 1 case had punctuate calcifications. 5. Of 2 cases of malignant thymoma, all 2 cases were associated with myasthenia gravis and positive findings in CT scan. CT findings of malignant thymoma were anterior mediastinal soft tissue mass with obliteration of the normal fat planes surrounding great vessels. SVC compression, and pleural tumor implants. 6. CT yielded significant diagnostic information of differential diagnosis between thymoma and thymoma hyperplasia in myasthenia gravis patients. Also CT was highly sensitive test in detection of thymoma and determined the extent and invasiveness of thymoma.

  11. CT findings of colonic diverticulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Shigeru; Ohba, Satoru [Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Medical School; Mizutani, Masaru [and others

    1998-11-01

    Although colonic diverticulitis has no indication for operation, but in some mistaken cases were operated with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We evaluated the CT findings of colonic diverticulitis about 19 cases and of asymptomatic colonic diverticula about 15 cases retrospectively. Diagnosis was confirmed of barium enema and operation. CT are complementary methods of examination that can delineated the range of thickening of the colon and the extension of inflammatory changes around the colon. We also believe that CT findings of colonic diverticulitis are useful for differentiating from a diagnosis of appendicitis. (author)

  12. Pulmonary amyloidosis: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Ferreira, Angela; Crespo, Sheila Jandira Vianna

    2003-01-01

    We report the computed tomography findings of five patients with pathology proven pulmonary amyloidosis. Tracheobronchial amyloidosis with calcified nodules and plaques in the tracheal wall were seen in two patients. Two other patients had diffuse parenchymal disease with calcified lesions, one had reticular and nodular sub pleural opacities whereas the other had nodular interlobular septal thickening and a parenchymal consolidation. The latter presented the nodular type of the disease with multiple sharp nodules scattered throughout the lungs and interspersed calcifications. The computed tomography findings observed were not specific but strongly suggestive of amyloidosis. (author)

  13. Dermoscopy Findings of Pseudolymphomatous Folliculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fujimura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudolymphomatous folliculitis (PLF, which clinically mimicks cutaneous lymphoma, is a rare manifestation of cutaneous pseudolymphoma and cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia. Here, we report on a 45-year-old Japanese woman with PLF. Dermoscopy findings revealed prominent arborizing vessels with small perifollicular and follicular yellowish spots and follicular red dots. A biopsy specimen also revealed dense lymphocytes, especially CD1a+ cells, infiltrated around the hair follicles. Without any additional treatment, the patient’s nodule rapidly decreased. The presented case suggests that typical dermoscopy findings could be a possible supportive tool for the diagnosis of PLF.

  14. Scintigraphic findings in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Jackson, F I

    1977-06-01

    A prospective study of bone scintigraphic findings has been carried out in 63 patients, firmly diagnosed as having ankylosing spondylitis. In addition to abnormal uptake of the radiotracer at the sacroiliac joints, a peripheral arthropathy has been a common finding, particularly in the proximal joints, occurring in up to 50% of patients. Increased uptake of radiotracer in the spine has also been found both diffusely and focally. Focal increases have been noted at the apophyseal joints in 40% of patients and in three patients with a sterile intervertebral diskitis, an unusual complication of this disease only diagnosed in two patients after bone scintigraphy.

  15. CT findings of colonic diverticulitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shigeru; Ohba, Satoru; Mizutani, Masaru

    1998-01-01

    Although colonic diverticulitis has no indication for operation, but in some mistaken cases were operated with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We evaluated the CT findings of colonic diverticulitis about 19 cases and of asymptomatic colonic diverticula about 15 cases retrospectively. Diagnosis was confirmed of barium enema and operation. CT are complementary methods of examination that can delineated the range of thickening of the colon and the extension of inflammatory changes around the colon. We also believe that CT findings of colonic diverticulitis are useful for differentiating from a diagnosis of appendicitis. (author)

  16. Musculoskeletal Findings in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bicer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, relapsing uveitis, mucocutaneous, articular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and vascular manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations may also occur in Behcet's disease, and arthritis and arthralgia are the most common musculoskeletal findings followed by enthesopathy, avascular necrosis, myalgia, and myositis. Although the main pathology of Behcet's disease has been known to be the underlying vasculitis, the etiology and exact pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear. Musculoskeletal findings of Behcet's disease, the relationship between Behcet's disease and spondyloarthropathy disease complex, and the status of bone metabolism in patients with Behcet's disease were discussed in this paper.

  17. CT findings of kikuchi disease : correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Nam; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyun Jin; Park, Jung Hoon; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Hye Sook [Maryknoll General Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To evaluate by means of retrospective analysis of neck CT scans the CT findings which suggest kikuchi disease. The authors evaluated the CT findings of seven cases of Kikuchi disease histologically confirmed by excisional biopsy. Four males and three females aged between 12 and 43 (mean;28) years were included. The authors retrospectively analyzed distribution, bilaterality, the presence of aggregation, the presence of intranodal low density after contrast enhancement, the number,size, shape and location of areas of intranodal low density, and the presence of extracapsular extension in involved nodes, as seen on pre-and post-contrast CT scans. Attempts were then made to correlate the CT with the pathologic findings. The range of conditions affecting patients included palpable(7/7) and tender(6/7) nodes, fever(5/7), night sweat(2/7), leukopenia(2/7), and weight loss(1/7). The internal jugular and spinal accessory chains were involved in all seven cases, followed by the submandibular(6/7), submental(5/7), supraclavicular(1/7) and axillary(1/7) nodes. The findings observed also included bilateral involvement of the internal jugular chain(6/7), the spinal accessory chain(5/7), and the submandibular(4/6) and supraclavicular nodes(1/1). CT revealed that in all cases, pathologic lymph nodes showed aggregation in one or several nodal groups, namely a mixed homogeneous(mean, 60%)or inhomogeneous(mean, 40%) enhancement pattern;intranodal low densities with the number(1-7), size(1-7mm) and shape(oval, round, or elongated) of varying degree and predominantly (92%) peripheral location, and extracapsular extension. The CT findings which suggest Kikuchi disease in cervical lymphadenopathy were (1) involvement varying from no intranodal low density to prominent intranodal low densities; (2) intranodal low densities, with the number, size and shape of varying degree and predominantly peripheral location, which were correlated with pathologic findings, including variable intranodal

  18. Coral reef fish smell leaves to find island homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Danielle L; Jones, Geoffrey P; Munday, Philip L; Planes, Serge; Pratchett, Morgan S; Srinivasan, Maya; Syms, Craig; Thorrold, Simon R

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that some coral reef fish larvae return to natal reefs, while others disperse to distant reefs. However, the sensory mechanisms used to find settlement sites are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that larvae use olfactory cues to navigate home or find other suitable reef habitats. Here we show a strong association between the clownfish Amphiprion percula and coral reefs surrounding offshore islands in Papua New Guinea. Host anemones and A. percula are particularly abundant in shallow water beneath overhanging rainforest vegetation. A series of experiments were carried out using paired-choice flumes to evaluate the potential role of water-borne olfactory cues in finding islands. Recently settled A. percula exhibited strong preferences for: (i) water from reefs with islands over water from reefs without islands; (ii) water collected near islands over water collected offshore; and (iii) water treated with either anemones or leaves from rainforest vegetation. Laboratory reared-juveniles exhibited the same positive response to anemones and rainforest vegetation, suggesting that olfactory preferences are innate rather than learned. We hypothesize that A. percula use a suite of olfactory stimuli to locate vegetated islands, which may explain the high levels of self-recruitment on island reefs. This previously unrecognized link between coral reefs and island vegetation argues for the integrated management of these pristine tropical habitats. PMID:18755672

  19. Transfusional hemosiderosis; correlation of MR findings with clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Ok; Kim, Ju Heon; Jeon, Woo Jin; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Suh, Soo Jhi [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-15

    Parenchymal iron deposition occurs in hemochromatosis, while iron is deposited in reticuloendothelial cells after blood transfusions(Hemosiderosis). We studied correlation between MR finding and clinical findings(serum ferritin, TSI, LFT, disease duration) of hemosiderosis. 12 patients with chronic renal failure and one patient with aplastic anemia, who have received multiple transfusion, were performed MRI with a 2.0 Tesla unit. In all of 13 patients(17 cases), the liver revealed low signal intensity equal to background noise. In 4 of 17 cases whose serum ferritin level was below 1000 ng/ml, pancreas, gastric wall, adrenal gland were involved in 1 case. In 4 cases with serum ferritin level between 1000 and 1500, pancreas was involved in 2 cases, and other organ was involved in 1 case. In 9 cases with serum ferritin level above 1500ng/ml, pancreas was involved in 9 cases, and other origin 4 cases. The MR findings are well correlated with serum ferritin level whereas the TSI, LFT, disease duration are not correlated with involved organ on MR.

  20. Writing audit findings: Be reasonable!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girvin, N.W.

    1992-05-01

    A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address ``root cause`` as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a ``root problems`` approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee`s part. This in itself, is its own reward.

  1. Writing audit findings: Be reasonable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girvin, N.W.

    1992-05-01

    A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address root cause'' as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a root problems'' approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee's part. This in itself, is its own reward.

  2. Radiological findings in NAO syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Otaibi, Leftan; Hugosson, Claes O. [Department of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Mayouf, Sulalman M.; Majeed, Mahmoud; Al-Eid, Wea' am; Bahabri, Sultan [Department of Paediatrics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2002-07-01

    Background: Diseases exhibiting osteolysis in children are rare hereditary conditions. Several types have been recognised with different clinical manifestations. One type includes subcutaneous nodules, arthropathy and osteolysis and has been termed NAO syndrome. Previous radiological reports have described the affected bones, usually the carpal and tarsal regions, but a detailed analysis of the radiological findings of both the axial as well as the appendicular skeleton has not been reported. Objectives: To describe the radiological findings in a large group of children with an autosomal recessive disease characterized by nodules, familial arthropathy and osteolysis. Materials and methods: The study comprises 14 patients from 9 families and all patients had the triad of nodulosis, arthropathy and osteolysis (NAO). Results: The most common radiological manifestations were osteopenia, undertubulation of long bones, arthritic changes, sclerotic sutures of the calvaria, osteolysis and muscle contractures. Other common findings were squared vertebrae, broad medial clavicles and brachycephaly. Progress of disease was documented in more than half of the patients. Conclusions: Our study is the first report of the detailed radiological findings of NAO syndrome. In NAO syndrome, both the axial and appendicular skeleton are involved (orig.)

  3. Radiological findings in NAO syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Otaibi, Leftan; Hugosson, Claes O.; Al-Mayouf, Sulalman M.; Majeed, Mahmoud; Al-Eid, Wea'am; Bahabri, Sultan

    2002-01-01

    Background: Diseases exhibiting osteolysis in children are rare hereditary conditions. Several types have been recognised with different clinical manifestations. One type includes subcutaneous nodules, arthropathy and osteolysis and has been termed NAO syndrome. Previous radiological reports have described the affected bones, usually the carpal and tarsal regions, but a detailed analysis of the radiological findings of both the axial as well as the appendicular skeleton has not been reported. Objectives: To describe the radiological findings in a large group of children with an autosomal recessive disease characterized by nodules, familial arthropathy and osteolysis. Materials and methods: The study comprises 14 patients from 9 families and all patients had the triad of nodulosis, arthropathy and osteolysis (NAO). Results: The most common radiological manifestations were osteopenia, undertubulation of long bones, arthritic changes, sclerotic sutures of the calvaria, osteolysis and muscle contractures. Other common findings were squared vertebrae, broad medial clavicles and brachycephaly. Progress of disease was documented in more than half of the patients. Conclusions: Our study is the first report of the detailed radiological findings of NAO syndrome. In NAO syndrome, both the axial and appendicular skeleton are involved (orig.)

  4. CT findings of pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yukio; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Sato, Toru; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2006-01-01

    For the treatment for pulmonary hypertension (PH), the differential diagnosis of its causal diseases is essential. To determine whether X-ray CT is useful for differentiating PH, we reviewed CT findings of 53 patients (18 men and 35 women, mean age of 44.9) given a diagnosis of PH, consisting of 25 with primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), 18 with chronic pulmonary embolism (cPE), 6 with Eisenmenger syndrome, 5 cases of collagen diseases, 2 of acute PE, and 1 of cor pulmonale. The intrapulmonary distribution of CT findings (ground glass opacity [GGO], mosaic attenuation, striation and/or infiltration, and interlobular septal thickening) were reviewed and scored on a 4-point scale (grade 0: no findings, 1: involving one third of the lung, 2: involving one-two thirds, and 3: diffuse distribution) by two radiologists who reached a consensus. PPH showed preferentially diffuse distribution of GGO as compared with cPE (p<0.05). However, there was no apparent relationship between the pulmonary vascular resistance and the distribution of GGO in PPH cases. The mosaic attenuation pattern was more frequent in cPE (43%) than PPH (12%; p<0.05). Striation and/or infiltration was observed in 36% of cPE, but only 4% of PPH. Interlobular septal thickening was seen in 16% of PPH, and 0% in cPE. Evaluation of CT findings is useful to differentiate PH. (author)

  5. Finding Maximal Quasiperiodicities in Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Pedersen, Christian N. S.

    2000-01-01

    of length n in time O(n log n) and space O(n). Our algorithm uses the suffix tree as the fundamental data structure combined with efficient methods for merging and performing multiple searches in search trees. Besides finding all maximal quasiperiodic substrings, our algorithm also marks the nodes...... in the suffix tree that have a superprimitive path-label....

  6. Fabrication Aware Form-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm Pedersen, Ole; Larsen, Niels Martin; Pigram, Dave

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design and construction method that combines two distinct material systems with fabrication aware form-finding and file-to-factory workflows. The method enables the fluent creation of complex materially efficient structures comprising high populations of geometrically uniqu...

  7. CT-findings in amoebiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.; Reiser, M.; Lukas, P.

    1985-12-01

    With an increase of travel to foreign countries with endemic amoebiasis we will find this disease also in western countries. The typical pathologic changes can be identified in CT, as we report in a case with proved amoebiasis which showed an abscess in the bowel-wall and another in the neighbouring liver. (orig.).

  8. Finding Cryptography in Object Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason L. Wright

    2008-10-01

    Finding and identifying Cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, a heuristic method for determining the likelihood that a given function contains a cryptographic algorithm is discussed and the results of applying this method in various environments is shown. The algorithm is based on frequency analysis of opcodes that make up each function within a binary.

  9. MEMS AO for Planet Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shanti; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Mike; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Levine, B. Martin; Samuele, Rocco; Lane, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; hide

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for planet finding using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Adaptive Optics (AO). The use of a deformable mirror (DM) is described as a part of the instrument that was designed with a nulling interferometer. The strategy that is used is described in detail.

  10. Can I Trust Your Findings?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuervo-Cazurra, Alvaro; Andersson, Ulf; Yoko Brannen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    this complexity and ensure that readers can trust their findings. We provide suggestions for how to rule out alternative explanations, explaining key considerations not only in empirical analyses, but also in theory building and in research design. Our discussion covers both qualitative and quantitative studies...

  11. MRI findings in cranial eumycetoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Munawwar; Sureka, Jyoti; Chacko, Geeta; Eapen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Cranial eumycetoma (CE) due to direct inoculation of Madurella grisea into the scalp is extremely rare. We describe a case of CE caused by direct inoculation of M. grisea with the characteristic MRI findings of the “dot-in-circle” sign and a conglomeration of multiple, extremely hypointense “dots.”

  12. Dermoscopic findings in cicatricial alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher Arı

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dermoscopy is an important tool for the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions. Newly, this method has also been used in the diagnosis and follow-up hair and scalp disorders. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate dermoscopic findings in a sample of patients with clinical and histopathological compatible with cicatricial alopecia. Methods: Twenty nine patients with cicatricial alopecia diagnosed by clinical and histological findings were examined by dermoscopy.. Results: Dermoscopic features evaluated included folliculitis decalvans (n=8, pseudopelade of Brocq (n=7, lichen planopilaris (n=6, discoid lupus erythematosus (n=2, dissecting cellulitis (n=1, and secondary cicatricial alopecia (n=5. Visualization of structures previously examined with naked eye were seen in great detail with dermoscopy. The loss of follicular orifices was seen in all patients with cicatricial alopecia. Perifollicular scaling, arborizing red lines, honeycomb pigment pattern, white dots and tufted hairs were the other most obvious findings. Conclusion: Use of dermoscopy in the clinical evaluation of cicatrical alopecia improves diagnostic capability beyond simple clinic inspection, but larger studies correlating dermoscopic findings with histopathology exams are needed to improve understanding of this method.

  13. Symmetric imaging findings in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Learning objectives: to make a list of diseases and syndromes which manifest as bilateral symmetric findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; to discuss the clinical and radiological differential diagnosis for these diseases; to explain which of these conditions necessitates urgent therapy and when additional studies and laboratory can precise diagnosis. There is symmetry in human body and quite often we compare the affected side to the normal one but in neuroradiology we might have bilateral findings which affected pair structures or corresponding anatomic areas. It is very rare when clinical data prompt diagnosis. Usually clinicians suspect such an involvement but Ct and MRI can reveal symmetric changes and are one of the leading diagnostic tool. The most common location of bilateral findings is basal ganglia and thalamus. There are a number of diseases affecting these structures symmetrically: metabolic and systemic diseases, intoxication, neurodegeneration and vascular conditions, toxoplasmosis, tumors and some infections. Malformations of cortical development and especially bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria requires not only exact report on the most affected parts but in some cases genetic tests or combination with other clinical symptoms. In the case of herpes simplex encephalitis bilateral temporal involvement is common and this finding very often prompt therapy even before laboratory results. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PReS) and some forms of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy can lead to symmetric changes. In these acute conditions MR plays a crucial role not only in diagnosis but also in monitoring of the therapeutic effect. Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 or type 2 can demonstrate bilateral optic glioma combined with spinal neurofibroma and bilateral acoustic schwanoma respectively. Mirror-image aneurysm affecting both internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries is an example of symmetry in

  14. Water footprint as a tool for integrated water resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaya, Maite; Hoekstra, Arjen

    2010-05-01

    In a context where water resources are unevenly distributed and, in some regions precipitation and drought conditions are increasing, enhanced water management is a major challenge to final consumers, businesses, water resource users, water managers and policymakers in general. By linking a large range of sectors and issues, virtual water trade and water footprint analyses provide an appropriate framework to find potential solutions and contribute to a better management of water resources. The water footprint is an indicator of freshwater use that looks not only at direct water use of a consumer or producer, but also at the indirect water use. The water footprint of a product is the volume of freshwater used to produce the product, measured over the full supply chain. It is a multi-dimensional indicator, showing water consumption volumes by source and polluted volumes by type of pollution; all components of a total water footprint are specified geographically and temporally. The water footprint breaks down into three components: the blue (volume of freshwater evaporated from surface or groundwater systems), green (water volume evaporated from rainwater stored in the soil as soil moisture) and grey water footprint (the volume of polluted water associated with the production of goods and services). Closely linked to the concept of water footprint is that of virtual water trade, which represents the amount of water embedded in traded products. Many nations save domestic water resources by importing water-intensive products and exporting commodities that are less water intensive. National water saving through the import of a product can imply saving water at a global level if the flow is from sites with high to sites with low water productivity. Virtual water trade between nations and even continents could thus be used as an instrument to improve global water use efficiency and to achieve water security in water-poor regions of the world. The virtual water trade

  15. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 μm selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] ≤ 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg 2 . The typical photometric redshift accuracy is Δz/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 μm data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z ∼> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 μm data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  16. Summary and findings: Chapter A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslia, Morris L.; Suárez-Soto, René J.; Sautner, Jason B.; Anderson, Barbara A.; Jones, L. Elliott; Faye, Robert E.; Aral, Mustafa M.; Guan, Jiabao; Jang, Wonyong; Telci, Ilker T.; Grayman, Walter M.; Bove, Frank J.; Ruckart, Perri Z.; Moore, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is conducting epidemiological studies to evaluate the potential for health effects from exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in finished water supplied to family housing units at U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina (USMCB Camp Lejeune). The core period of interest for the epidemiological studies is 1968– 1985. VOCs of major interest to the epidemiological studies include tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2-tDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and benzene.

  17. Neuroimaging findings in movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topalov, N.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Neuroimaging methods are of great importance for the differential diagnostic delimitation of movement disorders associated with structural damage (neoplasms, ischemic lesions, neuroinfections) from those associated with specific pathophysiological mechanisms (dysmetabolic disorders, neurotransmitter disorders). Learning objective: Presentation of typical imaging findings contributing to nosological differentiation in groups of movement disorders with similar clinical signs. In this presentation are discussed neuroimaging findings in Parkinson‘s disease, atypical parkinsonian syndromes (multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration), parkinsonism in genetically mediated diseases (Wilson’s disease, pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration – PKAN), vascular parkinsonism, hyperkinetic movement disorders (palatal tremor, Huntington‘s chorea, symptomatic chorea in ischemic stroke and diabetes, rubral tremor, ballismus, hemifacial spasm). Contemporary neuroimaging methods enable support for diagnostic and differential diagnostic precision of a number of hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders, which is essential for neurological clinical practice

  18. Learning as way-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    , is based on the findings from research of the implementation of blended learning in two undergraduate programmes at University College North in Denmark. The data collection methods is based on eighteen focus-group interview collected in a period of the first two years of students enrolment in radiography...... take conditions of attention overload into account as an everyday condition which is more than ever actualized by the extended disruptions both by the information technology and other spaces. Based on the discussion areas for future research are suggested.......This paper is based on case study findings from studying undergraduate students’ perceptions of their navigation in a blended learning environment where different learning spaces are offered. In this paper learning is regarded as a multi-level and multi complex concept. In this regard the concept...

  19. Radiologic findings of hemophilic arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Young Hwan; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Chu Wan

    1980-01-01

    Hemophilia is a primary disorder of coagulation complicated by spontaneous intra-articular hemorrhage. This paper is to describe and analyze the radiographic findings of involved bone and joints of hemophilic patients for past 5 years. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution of the total 28 patients was ranging from 1 year to 42 years. 86% of patients was below the age of 20 years. 2. The incidence of joint involvement was in next order; knee joint (25), elbow joint (4), ankle joint (2), hip joint (1). 3. The radiologic findings of involved joint were characterized by irregularity of articular cortices (22), joint space change (19), soft tissue swelling (19), subchondral or intra-osseous cyst (12), periarticular osteoporosis (19), degenerative change (10), condylar enlargement (11) intercondylar notch widening (21) and flexion deformity (13)

  20. Ultrasonographic findings of accessory breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Ki Keun; Cho, Jae Hyun; Yoon, Choon Sik; Kim, Mi Hye

    1993-01-01

    Accessory breast is an ectopic breast tissue from developmental remnants. It sometimes begins to make symptom, pain and swelling, during premenstrual period or pregnancy. For it has been known as a rear condition, it has occasionally misdiagnosed as a abnormal mass, such as lymphadenitis or hidradentis. We have analyzed 52 accessory breast tissues prospectively, to document the characteristic findings of accessory breast. In summary, the characteristic sonographic findings of accessory breast were the presence of breast tissue superficial to the axillary fascia or underlying fascia if not in axilla, resembling the patient's own breast pattern, the presence of converging appearance of dilated ducts, presence of nipple and/or areola, the obliteration of inner wall of dermis, the obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer, and the downward displacement of axillary fascia or underlying fascia if not in axilla without interruption

  1. Learning as way-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    This paper is based on case study findings from studying undergraduate students’ perceptions of their navigation in a blended learning environment where different learning spaces are offered. In this paper learning is regarded as a multi-level and multi complex concept. In this regard the concept......, is based on the findings from research of the implementation of blended learning in two undergraduate programmes at University College North in Denmark. The data collection methods is based on eighteen focus-group interview collected in a period of the first two years of students enrolment in radiography...... and teachers education. Furthermore, a survey was conducted after three month of students’ enrolment and some few observations-studies in teachers’ education. The empirical data are interpreted in a narrative form through the use of prefiguration, configuration and refiguration and presented as themes around...

  2. CT findings of peritoneal mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Young Hoon; Oh, Yeon Hee; Kim, Hong; Kim, Jung Sik; Woo, Seong Ku; Kim, Ok Bae; Joo, Yang Goo

    1990-01-01

    The peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare neoplasm which arises from the peritoneal lining of the abdomen, tending to spread along the peritoneal cavity and to invade abdominal organs. Authors report the CT findings of 4 patients with histologically proven peritoneal mesothelioma seen at Dongsan Medical Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University. None of them had a history of exposure to asbestos and no clear etiologic factor could be determined in any patient. CT showed peritoneal and mesenteric thickenings in all cases, omental thickenings in 3 cases, peritoneal nodules, mesenteric masses or omental masses in 2 cases each other, bowel wall involvement in 1 case, and disproportionally small ascites in 2 cases. Distant hematogenous metastases to the liver and retroperitoneal lymph nodes were seen in 1 case. Our experience with 4 peritoneal mesotheliomas as well as a review of the recent imaging literature shows excellent correlation between computed tomography and the operitoneoscopic findings

  3. Ultrasonography findings of gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chong Ku; Choi, Ji Bai; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Soon Young

    1985-01-01

    Stomach carcinoma is more common disease in Korea than western countries. The reported ultrasonographic findings of gastric carcinoma were thickening of gastric wall and 'pseudokidney' sign. The author analyzed ultrasonographic findings of 101 cases with gastric carcinoma who were performed ultrasonography and gastroscopy at Kyung Hee University Hospital from October 1982 to October 1985. The results were as followings; 1. Types of gastric carcinoma were consisted with infiltrative type 68 cases, infiltrative type with ulceration 16 cases, polypoid type with ulceration 1 case, infiltrative adn polypoid type 4 cases, limits plastica type 3 cases, ulcerative type 1 case and polypoid type 1 case. 2. Extent of the lesions were in body and antrum 45 cases, entire stomach 18 cases, antrum 18 cases, body 12 cases, body and fundus 6 cases. 3. Ultrasonography was useful in demonstrating the extent of the tumor and the presence of materials elsewhere in abdomen

  4. Electroencephalographic findings in panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcele Regine de Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have reported the importance of electroencephalography (EEG as a method for investigating abnormal parameters in psychiatric disorders. Different findings in time and frequency domain analysis with regard to central nervous system arousal during acute panic states have already been obtained. This study aimed to systematically review the EEG findings in panic disorder (PD, discuss them having a currently accepted neuroanatomical hypothesis for this pathology as a basis, and identify limitations in the selected studies. Literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, using the keywords electroencephalography and panic disorder; 16 articles were selected. Despite the inconsistency of EEG findings in PD, the major conclusions about the absolute power of alpha and beta bands point to a decreased alpha power, while beta power tends to increase. Different asymmetry patterns were found between studies. Coherence studies pointed to a lower degree of inter-hemispheric functional connectivity at the frontal region and intra-hemispheric at the bilateral temporal region. Studies on possible related events showed changes in memory processing in PD patients when exposed to aversive stimuli. It was noticed that most findings reflect the current neurobiological hypothesis of PD, where inhibitory deficits of the prefrontal cortex related to the modulation of amygdala activity, and the subsequent activation of subcortical regions, may be responsible to trigger anxiety responses. We approached some important issues that need to be considered in further researches, especially the use of different methods for analyzing EEG signals. Keywords: Electroencephalography, panic disorder, neurobiology, brain mapping.

  5. Finding related functional neuroimaging volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a content-based image retrieval technique for finding related functional neuroimaging experiments by voxelization of sets of stereotactic coordinates in Talairach space, comparing the volumes and reporting related volumes in a sorted list. Voxelization is accomplished by convolving each...... coordinate with a Gaussian kernel. The scheme allows us to compare experiments represented as either lists of coordinates or volumes, and we introduce alternative entrances to databases by image-based indices constructed via novelty measures and singular value decomposition....

  6. CT finding of emphysematous gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Won; Juhn, Jae Ryang; Cha, Seong Sook; Eun, Tchoong Kie; Chung, Duck Hwan

    1988-01-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare entity of infectious gastritis caused by gas-forming organisms and only 32 cases have been reported. CT is helpful in the diagnosis particularly in mild cases that there is only a small amount of gas. Typical CT findings of emphysematous gastritis are gas bubbles within the irregular thickened gastric wall and dilated stomach filled with secretions, debris and a large amount of gas. We report a case that was diagnosed by CT and operation.

  7. Root finding with threshold circuits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 462, Nov 30 (2012), s. 59-69 ISSN 0304-3975 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : root finding * threshold circuit * power series Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.489, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304397512008006#

  8. MRI findings in bipartite patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanagh, Eoin C. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Zoga, Adam; Omar, Imran [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ford, Stephanie; Eustace, Stephen [Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Schweitzer, Mark [Hospital for Joint Disease, Orthopedic Institute, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Bipartite patella is a known cause of anterior knee pain. Our purpose was to detail the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bipartite patella in a retrospective cohort of patients imaged at our institution. MRI exams from 53 patients with findings of bipartite patella were evaluated to assess for the presence of bone marrow edema within the bipartite fragment and for the presence of abnormal signal across the synchondrosis or pseudarthrosis. Any other significant knee pathology seen at MRI was also recorded. We also reviewed 400 consecutive knee MRI studies to determine the MRI prevalence of bipartite patella. Of the 53 patients with bipartite patella 40 (75%) were male; 35 (66%) had edema within the bipartite fragment. Of the 18 with no edema an alternative explanation for knee pain was found in 13 (72%). Edema within the bipartite fragment was the sole finding in 26 of 53 (49%) patients. Bipartite patella was seen in 3 (0.7%) of 400 patients. In patients with bipartite patella at knee MRI, bone marrow edema within the bipartite fragment was the sole finding on knee MRI in almost half of the patients in our series. (orig.)

  9. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: chest CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Helena Ribeiro; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ranke, Felipe Mussi von [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Diagnostico por Imagem; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Souza, Carolina Althoff [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the findings on chest CTs in 16 patients (8 men and 8 women) with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving patients ranging from 2 to 72 years of age. The evaluation of the CT scans was independently performed by two observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. The inclusion criteria were presence of abnormalities on the CT scans, and the diagnosis was confirmed by anatomopathological examination of the papillomatous lesions. Results: The most common symptoms were hoarseness, cough, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infections. The major CT findings were nodular formations in the trachea, solid or cavitated nodules in the lung parenchyma, air trapping, masses, and consolidation. Nodular formations in the trachea were observed in 14 patients (87.5%). Only 2 patients had lesions in lung parenchyma without tracheal involvement. Only 1 patient had no pulmonary dissemination of the disease, showing airway involvement only. Solid and cavitated lung nodules were observed in 14 patients (87.5%) and 13 (81.2%), respectively. Masses were observed in 6 patients (37.5%); air trapping, in 3 (18.7%); consolidation in 3 (18.7%); and pleural effusion, in 1 (6.3%). Pulmonary involvement was bilateral in all cases. Conclusions: The most common tomography findings were nodular formations in the trachea, as well as solid or cavitated nodules and masses in the lung parenchyma. Malignant transformation of the lesions was observed in 5 cases. (author)

  10. Radiologic findings of pulmonary endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Bok; Lee, Eil Seong; Jung, Hae Kyoung; Kim, Uk Jung; Yi, Jeong Geun; Kang, Ik Won; Kook, Shin Ho; Park, Jae Sung; Ryu, Dae Sik

    1998-01-01

    To describe the radiologic findings of pulmonary endometriosis. This study involved five patients with catamenial hemoptysis diagnosed as pulmonary endometriosis. All cases were diagnosed on the basis of bronchoscopic abnormalities. In one patient, endometrial glandular cells were seen on transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy. In three, hemoptysis ceased after Danazol treatment. The pattern, location and number of parenchymal abnormalities and the presence or absence of pleural lesion were analyzed retrospectively on plain chest radiographs (n=3D5) and CT scans(n=3D5). Follow-up study for each menstrual period was performed in two cases and changes from the initial lesion were assessed. Plain chest radiographic findings showed focal ground-glass opacity in three cases;two were in the right lung and one in the left. CT findings included ground-glass attenuation (n=3D3) and a mixed pattern of ground-glass attenuations and consolidations(n=3D2). Sites were single in four cases, and in one case, there were two; thus there were in all six lesions. Five of these were located in the right lung and subpleural region, continving to the pleura. Pleural lesion was not detected on either chest radiographs or CT scans. Follow-up CT scans (n=3D2) showed a similar lesion at the same site. In patient with repeated catamenial hemoptysis, CT may be helpful for the diagnosis of pulmonary endometriosis by exclusion of other diseases.=20

  11. CT findings of thymic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ho Son; Lee, Sang Jin; Hwang, Mi Soo; Cho, Kil Ho; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    1991-01-01

    A CT scan can make accurate diagnoses of most thymic masses by assessing their size, shape, and internal architecture and is especially effective in detecting pleural implants, mediastinal involvement, and pulmonary parenchymal invasion in malignant thymoma. The authors analyzed the CT findings of 10 histologically-proven thymic masses from 1983 to 1990 in Yeungnam University Hospital. There were 10 cases of thymic masses in the anterior mediastinum consisting of 6 benign, 3 invasive thymomas, and one thymolipoma, while myasthenia gravis was associated with 2 cases of benign thymomas and with one case of invasive thymomas. The CT findings of the benign thymomas (6 cases) were well-defined, bordered, round-or oval-shaped masses with a well-preserved fat plane between the thymic mass and mediastinal great vessels, with no evidence of pleural implants and lung parenchymal invasion. The CT findings of the invasive thymomas (3 cases) were irregular, marginated lobular masses with obliteration of the fat plane between the thymic mass and surrounding great vessels, with evidence of local invasion such as extension to A-P window and mass effect to bronchus. Irregular pleural thickening due to pleural metastasis, multiple metastatic lung parenchymal nodules, and multiple mediastinal lymph node enlargement were also seen in the invasive thymomas. One case of thymolipoma showed an approximately 20cm-size, well-defined fat density mass containing internal septations

  12. Water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The overall NRC program for the resolution of the water hammer issue is divided into four tasks: water hammer summary reports; revision of CP and OL review procedures; water hammer positions for operating reactors; and water hammer safety studies

  13. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg

    Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark...... is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  14. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter......Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  15. Radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kounn Sik; Im, Chung Kie

    1985-01-01

    The pulmonary aspergillosis is a group of three separate disease, comprising invasive aspergillosis, aspergilloma, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, or a disease process in which one of three entities overlap with another process such as mucoid impaction, pulmonary infiltration with eosinophilia, bronchocentric granulomatosis, microgranulomatous hypersensitivity, or asthma. The radiological findings of 24 cases of pulmonary aspergillosis diagnosed and treated at Seoul National University Hospital during the past 7 years were analyzed retrospectively. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnosis of 24 cases of pulmonary aspergillosis was aspergilloma in 16 cases, invasive aspergillosis in 2 cases, variant form of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in 3 cases, and endobronchial aspergillosis in 3 cases. 2. The underlying causes of the aspergilloma were healed tuberculous cavity in 6 cases, bronchiectasis in 8 cases, and no underlying cause were found in 2 cases. All the 16 cases of aspergilloma were correctly diagnosed without difficultly by demonstrating the intracavitary mass or air meniscus. 3. Radiological findings of the invasive aspergillosis in kidney transplant patients were multiple round nodules with early cavitation and formation of aspergilloma which shows slowly progressive cavitation over 13 months in one case, and diffusely scattered miliary nodules with occasional cavitation in the other case. 4. Classic allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis were not found in our series but variant form of ABPA was found in 3 young female patients. All the three patients shows some degree of central bronchiectasis and combined aspergilloma was found in 2 cases. 5. Three patients diagnosed as endobronchial aspergillosis-saprophytic infection of aspergillus in the bronchial tree-by bronchoscopic biopsy shows nonspecific radiological findings

  16. MRI findings in Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raval Monali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7, abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  17. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  18. Capillaroscopic Findings in Primary Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambova, Sevdalina; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2017-06-07

    Although Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is observed in a significant proportion of patients with primary fibromyalgia, the available data on capillaroscopic findings in primary fibromyalgia are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the capillaroscopic pattern in patients with primary fibromyalgia. 26 patients with primary fibromyalgia (25 women and 1 man) were included in the study. Mean age was 55±10 years. As control groups were examined 31 patients with primary RP and 35 healthy volunteers. Capillaroscopic examination was performed with a videocapillaroscope Videocap 3.0 (DS Medica), magnification 200x. The following capillaroscopic parameters were evaluated: distribution, shape, width, length, mean capillary density, presence of avascular areas, haemorrhages, neoangiogenesis, visibility of subpapillary plexus. RP was present in 65% (17/26) of the patients with primary fibromyalgia. The most frequent finding in patients with primary fibromyalgia was presence of dilated capillaries in 85% (22/26) of cases, including patients with RP as well as patients without peripheral vasospasm. However, the mean diameter of the arterial and the venous limb were significantly higher in the subgroup of fibromyalgia patients with clinical symptoms of RP. Analogous changes - the presence of dilated capillaries - were found in 96.6% (29/30) of patients with primary RP. In the group of primary fibromyalgia, signs of microangiopathy characteristic of connective tissue diseases could not be observed. In our study, the most frequent capillaroscopic finding in patients with primary fibromyalgia was presence of dilated capillaries analogous to primary RP. Capillaroscopic signs suggestive of connective tissue disease could not be found in primary fibromyalgia patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatico, Rosana; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Yanez, Paulina; Romero, Carlos; Trejo, Mariano; Lambre, Hector

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author) [es

  20. Duodenal diverticulitis. computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.; Martin, S.; Garcia, J.; Dominguez, A.

    2001-01-01

    Duodenal diverticular occur very frequently among the general public. However, duodenal diverticulitis is a very uncommon clinical entity, the diagnosis of which requires radiological studies since the clinical signs cam mimic a great number of disease processes with different treatments. We present a case of duodenal diverticulitis in which the diagnosis according to ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) studies was confirmed intraoperatively. We also review the few cases of this entity reported in the literature. The CT findings are highly suggestive of duodenal diverticulitis given their similarity to those associated with diverticulitis at other sites. (Author) 5 refs,

  1. Imaging findings of Paragonimus westermani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shambhu Kumar Sah

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The imaging findings of P. westermani is so diverse and non-specific due to its complex life cycle and several life stages during infestation of human; however, common features include nodule, GGO, worm cyst, migration track, pleural effusion, pleural thickening on chest CT scan; patchy low or mixed density lesions on brain CT scan; ring enhancing lesion on brain MRI scan; conglomerated small cystic or serpentine lesions and migration track in liver and spleen on abdominal CT scan. The characteristic imaging features of paragonimiasis are worm cyst and migration track.

  2. MR findings in peliosis hepatis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Coskun, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Cila, A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Guergey, A. [Dept. of Pediatric Hematology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    1995-02-01

    We report the MR findings of peliosis hepatis in a patient with Fanconi anemia who had been treated with anabolic androgenic steroids for 3 years. The MR examination of the upper abdomen was performed on a 0.5 T system. The signal intensity of the right lobe of the liver was diffusely increased in all sequences. Within the enlarged liver, multiple foci of brighter signal were seen involving both right and left lobes. The lesions showed contrast enhancement. A cystic cavity with an enhancing rim was seen representing a haematoma cavity. The spleen was spared the patient died of sepsis and the postmortem examination confirmed the diagnosis of peliosis hepatis. (orig.)

  3. MR findings in peliosis hepatis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatci, I.; Coskun, M.; Boyvat, F.; Cila, A.; Guergey, A.

    1995-01-01

    We report the MR findings of peliosis hepatis in a patient with Fanconi anemia who had been treated with anabolic androgenic steroids for 3 years. The MR examination of the upper abdomen was performed on a 0.5 T system. The signal intensity of the right lobe of the liver was diffusely increased in all sequences. Within the enlarged liver, multiple foci of brighter signal were seen involving both right and left lobes. The lesions showed contrast enhancement. A cystic cavity with an enhancing rim was seen representing a haematoma cavity. The spleen was spared the patient died of sepsis and the postmortem examination confirmed the diagnosis of peliosis hepatis. (orig.)

  4. CT findings of retroperitoneal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Moon; Huh, Jin Do; Kim, Ho Joon; Joh, Young Duk; Chun, Byung Hee [Kosin Medical College, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Seong Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Retrospective analysis of forty one retroperitoneal masses was made with computed tomography. All cases were confirmed pathologically by operation or needle aspiration biopsy. The cases were; 14 abscesses, 2 leiomyosarcomas, 2 rhabdomyosarcomas, 2 liposarcomas, 1 undifferentiated sarcoma, 3 endodermal sinus tumors, 4 teratomas, 2 neurofibromas, 1 neurilemoma, 3 neuroblastomas, 4 malignant lymphomas, 2 malignant fibrous histiocytomas and 1 hemangiopericytoma. Tumors originated from urinary tract and pancreas were not included. Findings favor tumor rather than inflammation were; large lobulated soft tissue mass with eccentric or heterogeneous low density, thick cavity wall, disruption of fascial planes, regional lymphnode enlargement and distant metastasis.

  5. MRI findings of intraocular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Makoto; Nagai, Haruhiko; Ueno, Tetsuji; Igarashi, Yasuo (Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan)); Narazaki, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Akira

    1989-06-01

    MRI findings of intra-ocular lesion were studied on seven cases : two cases of choroidal malignant melanoma, one case of choroidal tumor, two cases of retinal detachment with vitreous hemorrhage, and two cases of choroidal detachment. Intraocular lesions were clearly visualized by T{sub 1} weighted MRI which was of great benefit in visualizing morphological changes. T{sub 2} weighted images could not visualize morphological changes very well, but had some merits in differentiating the ocular pathology. MRI was a very useful examination for intra-ocular lesions. (author).

  6. MRI findings of intraocular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Makoto; Nagai, Haruhiko; Ueno, Tetsuji; Igarashi, Yasuo; Narazaki, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    MRI findings of intra-ocular lesion were studied on seven cases : two cases of choroidal malignant melanoma, one case of choroidal tumor, two cases of retinal detachment with vitreous hemorrhage, and two cases of choroidal detachment. Intraocular lesions were clearly visualized by T 1 weighted MRI which was of great benefit in visualizing morphological changes. T 2 weighted images could not visualize morphological changes very well, but had some merits in differentiating the ocular pathology. MRI was a very useful examination for intra-ocular lesions. (author)

  7. Ultrasound findings in biliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Sik; Lee, Yong Woo; Cheung, Hwan

    1986-01-01

    In the liver and biliary system ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful imaging techniques. It is usually the first radiological procedure selected and is often sufficient alone to enable a clinical decision to be made. Good result with ultrasound depend critically on expert scanning technique coupled with an understanding of tomographic anatomy and, of course, an appreciation of the clinical significance of any findings. In addition to we'd like to stress on the ultrasonical anatomy and for the technologist and also discuss about pathological part

  8. Fabrication Aware Form-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm Pedersen, Ole; Larsen, Niels Martin; Pigram, Dave

    2014-01-01

    parts. The first material system employs a novel rotated joint design to allow the structural tuning of quasi-reciprocal timber frame elements fabricated from multi-axis machined plywood sheet stock. The second em-loys discontinuous post-tensioning to assemble unique precast concrete components......This paper describes a design and construction method that combines two distinct material systems with fabrication aware form-finding and file-to-factory workflows. The method enables the fluent creation of complex materially efficient structures comprising high populations of geometrically unique...

  9. MR findings of polymyositis / dermatomyositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Soo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Moon, Won Jin; Lee, Tae Hee; Park, Ki Ho; Park, Dong Woo; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MR findings and useful sequences in Polymyositis/ Dermatomyositis, and to correlate MR findings with disease activity. Materials and Methods: The study included nine clinically proven cases of Polymyositis/Dermatomyositis, eight involving the thigh and one, the shoulder (2 cases, 1 follow-up). The contrast between affected and normal muscles and difference in signal intensity ratio in the muscle groups were retrospectively evaluated on Gd-enhanced T1WI and T2WI. We also evaluated the magnitude of involvement of muscle groups, fatty replacement of muscle and change of subcutaneous fat layer, and correlated signal intensity ratio with serum level of muscle enzymes. Differences in signal intensity ratio and the frequency of chemical shift artifact were evaluated on T2WI as active and inactive groups classified according to clinical findings, and the chemical shift artifact was correlated with the finding of Gd-enhanced T1WI. Except in the case of one shoulder, statistical analysis was assessed by the Anova test and-test. Results: On Gd-enhanced T1WI and T2WI contrast was 0.54 and 0.82, respectively and p value was 0.02. With regard to difference in signal intensity ratios of muscle groups, as seen on Gd-enhanced T1WI and T2WI, p valves were 0.07 and < 0.01, respectively. Muscle involvement was thus clearly visualized on T2WI. The order of frequency of involved muscle groups was vastus muscles, gluteus maximus, sartorius muscles, adductor muscles, gracilis muscle, and hamstring muscles. Fatty replacement and subcutaneous fatty change were visualized in five cases and one, respectively. The correlation coefficient between the signal intensity seen on T2WI and muscle enzymes was 0.59 (CPK) and 0.52 (LDH). The chemical-shift artifact was detected in both clinical groups (four active two inactive) and corresponded to one case of muscle involvement and five of perimuscular edema, as seen on Gd-enhanced T1WI. Conclusion: T2WI is

  10. Sonographic findings in Gouty Nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Young; Jeon, Woo Ki; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Yong Soo; Han, Chang Yul; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Sung Tag; Lee, Yoon Woo

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasound(US) findings of hyperechoic renal medulla in gouty nephropathy were compared with clinical features such as serum uric acid level to evaluate its usefulness in determination of the treatment and prognosis. A retrospective review of US of 36 cases of qouty arthritis was classified into four groups according to the medullary echogenicity (O :normal, grade I: renal medulla as isoechoic as renal cortex, grade II; heterogeneous increased echogenicity of renal medulla than that of renal cortex, grade III: the echogenicity of all renal medulla higher than that of renal cortex with renal contour deformity) which were compared with the serum urate level and associated conditions. Nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis were analyzed through the KUB and the RGB. The degree of hyperechoic renal medulla was related to the level of serum uric acid, and in group IV, six cases of obstructive uropathy (nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis) showed deformed renal contour. Associated conditions such as hypertension, alcoholism, diabetes mellitus and drug abuse were distributed in relation to the degree of hyperechoic renal medullas. US findings of hyperechoic renal mebulla was related with uric acid level in gouty nephropathy and thus could be valuable for treatment decision and prediction of prognosis

  11. Radioreklamen skal finde sine ben

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigurd Bennike

    1989-08-01

    Full Text Available Den 1. august 1988 startede radioreklamerne i Danmark uden nævneværdig opmærksomhed fra hverken pressen eller medieforskerne. Annoncørerne, reklamebureauerne og de store radiostationer har haft lidt svært ved at finde hinanden. Og heller ikke nemt ved at finde ud af, hvem der skulle producere reklamerne og hvordan sådan nogle skal lyde på dansk. Som det indirekte fremgår af denne artikel, så er det svært at få tal ud af branchen. - Men et kvalificeret gæt lyder på, at der er omsat for mellem 20 og 40 millioner kroner på de første måneder, koncentreret på mindre end 50 af de 237 nærradiosendetilladelser. De radiostationer der vælger at sende reklamer, skal betale 10% af deres omsætning til en særlig radiofond, hvis midler deles ud til de græsrodsradioer, som ikke kan eller vil skaffe sig reklameindtægter.

  12. Radiologic findings of epiploic appendagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztunali, C.; Kara, T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Epiploic appendagitis is a rare condition characterized by the ischemia and inflammation of the epiploic appendices of the colon. Its clinical features can mimic acute abdominal diseases such as diverticulitis and appendicitis. Objectives: The aim of this report is to present typical ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) features of this benign disease. Materials and method: A 44 year old man admitted to emergency department with a localized pain to umbilical region. His physical examination revealed rebound tenderness. He had no fever and his laboratory findings were normal. US examination showed a hyperechoic mass with a hypoechoic rim posterior to abdominal wall. Results: He was diagnosed with epiploic appendagitis and CT features confirmed the diagnosis. After a 5-day antibiotic treatment his clinical symptoms resolved. Conclusion: Epiploic appendagitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with an acute onset, localized pain. Because it is managed medically and has a self limited course, recognition of radiologic findings of this entity is important

  13. Ultrasonographic finding of intrahepatic stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wang Yul; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1983-01-01

    Correct diagnosis of intrahepatic stone with differentiation from extrahepatic stone is very important because of their different surgical procedure. The ultrasonography is very simple and noninvasive diagnostic method for detection of intrahepatic stone than other method. So the authors analysed the ultrasonographic findings of 30 patients with intrahepatic stones and the results are as follows: 1. Among 30 cases, 13(43.3%) were male, 17(56.7%) were female with predominancy in 5th and 6th decades. 2. 1) In distribution of stones 16 cases(53.5%) were in the left duct, 11 cases(36.7%) in both ducts, 3 cases(10%) in the right duct. 2) In location of intrahepatic stones, 9 cases(30%) were only in the intrahepatic ducts, 21 cases (70%) associated stones in the extrahepatic duct and or GB. 3. In sonography of 30 cases of intrahepatic stones 1) The shape of stone was round in 27 cases(90%) and tubular due to impacted stone in 3 cases (10%) 2) The echogenicity of stones was strong in 25 cases(83.3%) and weak in 5 cases(16.7%). 3) The shadow posterior to stones was strong in 23 cases(76.7%) and weak in 7 cases(23.3%) 4. As associated findings, metastatic lesion in liver 2 cases(6.7%), liver cirrhosis 2 cases(6.7%), hepatic and perihepatic abscess 4 cases(13.3%)were found liver(13.3%) were found

  14. The radiologic findings of neurofibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Sun; Park, Yeon Won; Kim, No Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin Medical College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Soo Jhi [Keimyung University Medical College, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-08-15

    Neurofibromatosis, or von Recklinghausen's disease, is a hereditary, harmartomatous disorder that primarily involves neuro ectoderm and mesoderm. The estimated incidence is 1 in 2,500 to 3,000 births. The clinical features are skin manifestations such as cafe-au-lait spots, skeletal manifestations primarily involving vertebrae, central and peripheral nervous manifestations, and other associated abnormalities with increased risk of malignancy. The authors analysed the radiologic findings of 18 cases of patients with neurofibromatosis who visited Pusan Kosin Medical Center and Taegu Dongsan Medical Center during the last five years. All were proven by surgery, biopsy and other diagnostic criteria. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio was 11:7 and the age ranged from 11 months to 51 years. 2. All the cases fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Crowe and associates. 3. Bone manifestations were present in 44% of the cases. The other radiologic findings were intrathoracic meningocele, bilateral acoustic neurinomas, mediastinal or chest wall mass shadows, and peripheral soft tissue masses. 4. One of the soft tissue masses was proved to be malignant.

  15. The radiologic findings of neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Sun; Park, Yeon Won; Kim, No Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1986-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis, or von Recklinghausen's disease, is a hereditary, harmartomatous disorder that primarily involves neuro ectoderm and mesoderm. The estimated incidence is 1 in 2,500 to 3,000 births. The clinical features are skin manifestations such as cafe-au-lait spots, skeletal manifestations primarily involving vertebrae, central and peripheral nervous manifestations, and other associated abnormalities with increased risk of malignancy. The authors analysed the radiologic findings of 18 cases of patients with neurofibromatosis who visited Pusan Kosin Medical Center and Taegu Dongsan Medical Center during the last five years. All were proven by surgery, biopsy and other diagnostic criteria. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio was 11:7 and the age ranged from 11 months to 51 years. 2. All the cases fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Crowe and associates. 3. Bone manifestations were present in 44% of the cases. The other radiologic findings were intrathoracic meningocele, bilateral acoustic neurinomas, mediastinal or chest wall mass shadows, and peripheral soft tissue masses. 4. One of the soft tissue masses was proved to be malignant.

  16. MRI findings of vermian medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Eun; Choi, Kyu Ho; Chung, Myung Hee; Yang, Il Kwon; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Park, Young Sub

    1996-01-01

    To find characteristic MRI features of vermian medulloblastoma. Materials and methods; MRI studies and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 12 patients with surgically proven midline medulloblastoma. The assessment concerned appearance of the mass in relation to surrounding structures: MR signal intensity; the enhancement pattern; the mass's location and size: presence of a cystic/necrotic area, calcification, or vascular void: extension through the foramen Luschka: degree of hydrocephalus: and presence of tonsillar herniation. The midline medulloblastoma commonly showed roundish moon-surface appearance, especially on the axial T2-weighted images. All tumors showed heterogeneous signal intensities mainly due to intratumoral cystic/necrotic or hemorrhagic changes. The tumors were commonly located at mid-and/or inferior vermis. Occasionally the tumors extended through the foramen Luschka, and caused obstructive hydrocephalus of moderate to severe degree. Post-contrast study showed heterogeneous, dense contrast enhancement in the majority of patients. The MR finding of the moon-surface appearance formed by both the mass and the intratumoral cystic/necrotic change as seen on axial T2-weighted images could be helpful in the diagnosis of vermian medulloblastoma

  17. MR findings of cyclosporine neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Po Song; Ahn, Kook Jin; Ahn, Bo Young; Jung, Hae An; Kim, Hee Je; Lee, Jae Mun

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the MR findings of cyclosporine-induced neurotoxicity in patients receiving high dose of cyclosporine and to suggest the possible pathogenetic mechanism. The cases of seven patients (2 males, 5 females;18-36 years old) who suffered seizures after receiving high-dose cyclosporine for bone marrow transplantation due to diseases such as aplastic anemia or leukemia were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the location and pattern of abnormal signal intensity seen on T2 weighted images, the presence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen on follow-up MR performed at intervals of 12-30 days after initial MR in five of seven patients. We analyzed levels of blood cyclosporine and magnesium, and investigated the presence of hypertension at the sity of the seizure. Locations of the lesions were bilateral(n=3D5), unilateral(n=3D2), parietal(n=3D6), occipital(n=3D6), temporal(n=3D4), and in the frontal lobe(n=3D3). Frontal lesions showed high signal intensities in the borderline ischemic zone of the frontal lobe between the territory of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. In six of the seven patients, cortical and subcortical areas including subcortical U-fibers were seen on T2-weighted images to be involved in the parietooccipital lobes. Only one of the seven showed high signal intensity in the left basal ganglia. All lesions showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and iso to low signal intensity on T1-weighted. In five of seven patients there was no definite enhancement, but in the other two, enhancement was slight. In four of seven patients seizures occurred within high therapeutic ranges(250-450ng/ml), while others suffered such attacks at levels below the therapeutic range. After cyclospirine was administered at a reduced dosage or stopped, follow-up MR images showed the complete or near-total disappearance of the abnormal findings previously described. Only two patients had hypertension, and the others normotension. Five of the

  18. Retroperitoneal fibrosis: findings with MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Rodrigo, J.; Marti-Bonnati, L.; Diago, T.; Ferrer, M.D.; Aleixandre, A.; Morote, V.

    1993-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RF) is an uncommon disease characterized by the presence of a chronic inflammatory reaction, with the formation of fibrous tissue that replaces the normal retroperitoneal tissue, trapping vessels and/or ureters. We present a retrospective review of 3 cases of idiopathic RF studied by means of ultrasound, CT scan and MR imaging, and we assess the features of the MR image, as well as its capacity for characterizing the lesion. We compare the findings obtained with 3 imaging techniques, describing the utility of each one, and their advantages and disadvantages in the assessment of this pathology. In MR, idiopathic RF appears as a hypodense mass in SET1, SE-T2 and STIR sequences. (Author) 9 ref

  19. MR findings in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Taouli, Bachir; Genant, Harry K.; Zaim, Souhil; Miaux, Yves; Peterfy, Charles G.

    2003-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability. Recent advances in drug discovery techniques and improvements in understanding the pathophysiology of osteoarthritic disorders have resulted in an unprecedented number of new therapeutic agents. Of all imaging modalities, radiography has been the most widely used for the diagnosis and management of the progression of knee OA. Magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively recent technique and its applications to osteoarthritis have been limited. Compared with conventional radiography, MR imaging offers unparalleled discrimination among articular soft tissues by directly visualizing all components of the knee joint simultaneously and therefore allowing the knee joint to be evaluated as a whole organ. In this article we present the MR findings in knee OA including cartilage abnormalities, osteophytes, bone edema, subarticular cysts, bone attrition, meniscal tears, ligament abnormalities, synovial thickening, joint effusion, intra-articular loose bodies, and periarticular cysts. (orig.)

  20. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  1. Radiographic findings in Marfan's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Osamu; Koyama, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax and apical bulla are included in minor criteria of the diagnosis of Marfan's syndrome. We evaluated the frequency of radiological abnormal findings of the lung in Marfan's syndrome. Lungs could be assessed with CT in 38 cases that were selected from 50 cases in Marfan's syndrome with a cardiovascular disease or the valvular disease. Eleven cases (22%) in 50 cases had the past history of spontaneous pneumothorax. Chest CT scan in 38 cases showed emphysematous bullae in 12 cases, apical scar in eight cases, centrilobular emphysema in three cases, and bronchiectasis in one case. CT manifestations of the lung in Marfan's syndrome were mainly spontaneous pneumothorax and apical bullae as were previously reported. (author)

  2. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  3. Milnacipran: recent findings in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest editors: Stuart Montgomery (London

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available EDITORIAL FOREWORDPage 1   Milnacipran: recent findings in depression Stuart Montgomery (London, UK and Mike Briley (Castres, France REVIEWSPage 3   Suicidality: risk factors and the effects of antidepressants. The example of parallel reduction of suicidality and other depressive symptoms during treatment with the SNRI, milnacipran Philippe Courtet (Montpellier, FrancePage 9   Treatment of patients with comorbid depression and diabetes with metformin and milnacipran Peter Hofmann (Graz, AustriaPage 17  Antidepressant therapy with milnacipran and venlafaxine Lucilla Mansuy (Toulouse, FrancePage 23  Milnacipran: a unique antidepressant? Siegfried Kasper and Gerald Pail (Vienna, Austria This supplement is based on a symposium that took place at the 9th International Forum on Mood and Anxiety in Monte Carlo in November 2009 and is supported by an unconditional education grant from Pierre Fabre Médicament.

  4. Pathomorphological findings in preterm infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, G.

    2000-01-01

    Pathomorphology in the preterm infant represents an interaction of morphological organ immaturity and neonatal management with their respective sequelae. Pathomorphological examples include the modification in the morphology of hyaline membrane disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia as a consequence of modern neonatal therapy. Hemorrhagic and ischemic/hypoxic lesions of the central nervous system may occur in age- and agent-related distributional patterns, with subependymal hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia representing the most important examples. The most common intestinal finding, namely, necrotizing enterocolitis, typically shows segmental alterations, the morphology of which largely depends on the dominating causative agent. Hepatic cholestasis and fatty change are mostly consequences of parenteral nutrition or hypoxic/ischemic stress. Hepatic necrosis can be associated with the latter, but may also indicate disseminated intravascular coagulation. Vascular pathomorphology is represented by thromembolic lesions, in most instances corresponding to sequelae of neonatal management. (orig.) [de

  5. Nerootologic Finding in AIDS Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Asadifar

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Here we have mentioned the case of a Caucasian man affected with human immunodeficiency virus during blood injection in a heart surjury.He demonstrated vertigo, dissequilibrium and neurological problems secondry to his disease 4 years later. Auditory and vestibular system disfunction became obvious based on the neurological examinations. optokinetic nystagmus, ataxia in addition to lack of response by caloric stimulation was attained in electronystagmographic examination.absolute latencies and interpeak intervals were prolonged in the auditory brain-stem responses(ABR.abnormal low scores were obtained in SSI test bilaterally.organic brain lesion and severe anxiety have been diagnised during psychological examination. Human immunodeficiency virus was detected in brain, cerebellum and brainstem cells by means of autopsia.meanwhile the pathologic changes were cosistent with neuro-otological findings

  6. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Haydee; Beccar Varela, Lucia; De Felippi, Maria S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the usefulness of computerized tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Material and Methods: A double helical CT was performed in 6 patients referred to our center because of a chest X-ray with pulmonary infiltrates. Clinical presentation was cough, fever and eosinophilia in peripheral blood. Patients' age ranged from 25 to 55 years; 4 were women and 2 were men, one of the latter had a history of bronchial asthma. All patients received treatment with corticosteroids, with remission of the clinical and radiological parameters. Three patients underwent a control CT. Results: Findings consisted in focal parenchymal alterations, with areas of pulmonary consolidation and areas of 'ground glass' appearance; both patterns coexisted in certain areas. In 3 cases the lesions extended from the apices to the pulmonary bases, with predominance of the upper and middle fields. In 1 patient, there was frank predominance in the left hemi thorax. In another patient, who had a history of asthma, there were signs of pulmonary hyperinflation, with diffuse thickening of the bronchial walls, added to the previously mentioned findings, which involved the entire lung. In the mediastinum, 1 patient had lymph nodes larger than 1 cm, 3 had lymph nodes that were not enlarged but were more numerous than usual, and in the remaining patients no lymph nodes were found. The control CT's showed almost total resolution of the pulmonary infiltrates. Conclusion: The combination of eosinophilia and characteristic pulmonary infiltrates with a likely clinical presentation, associated with an optimal response to treatment with corticosteroids allows to make a reliable diagnosis and avoids the need for a pulmonary biopsy. (author)

  7. [Pathomorphologic findings following intensive therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchti, C

    1986-05-24

    Based on autopsy findings in 301 adults who had died after intensive care, different patterns of single or multiple organ damage were identified. Signs of septicemia and/or exudative-to-fibrosing alveolitis (EFA) of the lungs, the prominent cause of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were recognized in 89 cases. Severe, progressive EFA, which appears to ensue mainly from continuing damage to alveolar walls, consequent fibroblast proliferation and so-called atelectatic induration (collapsed alveoli forming single thick septa), was registered only in individuals who had undergone long-term intensive care. The latter was necessitated in various severe conditions of which abdominal disease was the most important. Systemic disorders, such as hemorrhagic diathesis and multiple organ damage ("multiple organ failure"), showed a close correlation with septicemia. Infections with gram-negative bacteria appear to play a special role in such processes. Morphologically, these cases were characterized by multiple organ/system damage, e.g., in order of frequency, partial necrosis of renal proximal tubules, followed by signs of regeneration; jaundice; splenitis; lobular pneumonia; centrolobular-to-zonal liver necrosis, in part combined with cholestasis; petechial and/or extended hemorrhage; and others. This complex pattern contrasted strongly with findings in individuals who had been admitted to intensive care because of e.g. a cardiovascular incident: in this latter group (125 cases) intensive care was usually of short duration, progressive EFA was largely absent, signs of septicemia were exceptional, and multiple organ/system damage was rare. The group with polytraumatism (28 cases) exhibited a pattern of organ damage intermediate between (a) and (b).

  8. THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF NEARBY DENSE CORES. IX. DISCOVERY OF A VERY LOW LUMINOSITY OBJECT DRIVING A MOLECULAR OUTFLOW IN THE DENSE CORE L673-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, Michael M.; Evans, Neal J.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Myers, Philip C.; Huard, Tracy L.; Stutz, Amelia M.

    2010-01-01

    We present new infrared, submillimeter, and millimeter observations of the dense core L673-7 and report the discovery of a low-luminosity, embedded Class 0 protostar driving a molecular outflow. L673-7 is seen in absorption against the mid-infrared background in 5.8, 8, and 24 μm Spitzer images, allowing for a derivation of the column density profile and total enclosed mass of L673-7, independent of dust temperature assumptions. Estimates of the core mass from these absorption profiles range from 0.2to4.5 M sun . Millimeter continuum emission indicates a mass of ∼2 M sun , both from a direct calculation assuming isothermal dust and from dust radiative transfer models constrained by the millimeter observations. We use dust radiative transfer models to constrain the internal luminosity of L673-7, defined to be the luminosity of the central source and excluding the luminosity from external heating, to be L int = 0.01-0.045 L sun , with L int ∼ 0.04 L sun the most likely value. L673-7 is thus classified as a very low luminosity object (VeLLO), and is among the lowest luminosity VeLLOs yet studied. We calculate the kinematic and dynamic properties of the molecular outflow in the standard manner. From the outflow properties and standard assumptions regarding the driving of outflows, we calculate the time-averaged protostellar mass accretion rate, total protostellar mass accreted, and expected accretion luminosity to be acc >≥1.2 x 10 -6 (sin i)/(co 2 i) M sun yr -1 , M acc ≥0.07 1/cos i M sun , and L acc ≥ 0.36 L sun , respectively. The discrepancy between this calculated L acc and the L int derived from dust radiative transfer models indicates that the current accretion rate is much lower than the average rate over the lifetime of the outflow. Although the protostar embedded within L673-7 is consistent with currently being substellar, it is unlikely to remain as such given the substantial mass reservoir remaining in the core.

  9. River coalitions and water trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansink, Erik; Gengenbach, Michael; Weikard, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    We analyse coalition stability in a game with a spatial structure. We consider a set of agents located along a river who abstract scarce water for their own benefit. Agents may enter an agreement to mutually acknowledge property rights in river water as a prerequisite for water trade. We find that

  10. Bottled Water: United States Consumers and Their Perceptions of Water Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zhihua; Morton, Lois Wright; Mahler, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Consumption of bottled water is increasing worldwide. Prior research shows many consumers believe bottled water is convenient and has better taste than tap water, despite reports of a number of water quality incidents with bottled water. The authors explore the demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users in the U.S. and the relationship between bottled water use and perceptions of the quality of local water supply. They find that U.S. consumers are more likely to report...

  11. Water citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paerregaard, Karsten; Stensrud, Astrid Bredholt; Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the implementation of Peru’s new water law and discusses how it produces new forms of water citizenship. Inspired by the global paradigm of “integrated water resources management,” the law aims to include all citizens in the management of the country’s water resources...... by embracing a “new water culture.” We ask what forms of water citizenship emerge from the new water law and how they engage with local water practices and affect existing relations of inequality. We answer these questions ethnographically by comparing previous water legislation and how the new law currently...... is negotiated and contested in three localities in Peru’s southern highlands. We argue that the law creates a new water culture that views water as a substance that is measurable, quantifiable, and taxable, but that it neglects other ways of valuing water. We conclude that water citizenship emerges from...

  12. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hong Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yoo, In Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen.

  13. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hong Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yoo, In Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen

  14. MRI findings of congenita dysosmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Hui; Feng Feng; Liu Jianfeng; Wu Xueyan; Wang Jian; Ni Daofeng; Sun Hongyi; Chen Jun; Jin Zhengyu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the MRI findings of congenital dysosmia. Methods: Forty-seven patients with congenital dysosmia (39 with Kallmann syndrome and 8 with isolated dysosmia) and 21 normal volunteers underwent MRI examination. The features of congenital malformation were recorded. The volume of olfactory bulbs, depth of olfactory sulci as well as diameters of pituitary glands and stalks were measured. The rate of dysplasia of olfactory bulbs and tracts in the two patients groups was compared with X 2 test. The difference of volume of olfactory bulbs between the two groups was evaluated with nonparametric test. And the difference of diameters of pituitary glands and stalks was analyzed with analysis of variance. Results: All the patients had abnormal findings in olfactory bulbs, tracts and/or olfactory sulci on MR images. The patterns of congenital malformation may be dysplastic of hypoplastic, symmetric or asymmetric. The proportion of patients with dysplasia of olfactory bulbs and tracts in Kallmann syndrome patients (31/39) was higher than that in isolated dysosmia ones (2/8) (X 2 = 6.998, P =0.008), and the olfactory bulbs'volume of patients with Kallmann syndrome (median 8 mm 3 ) was smaller than that of patients with isolated dysosmia (median 22 mm 3 ) (Z = -2.902, P =0.004). The pituitary glands were smaller and the stalks were thinner in patients with Kallmann syndrome than those in volunteers [ the anteroposterior diameter of pituitary glands in Kallmann syndrome (7.22 ± 1.93) mm, that in normal volunteers (9.94 ± 1.59) mm, F= 16.835, P =0.000; height of pituitary glands in Kallmann syndrome (3.71 ± 1.74) mm, that in normal volunteers (6.00 ± 1.24) mm, F =16.092, P =0.000; the anteroposterior diameter of pituitary stalks in Kallmann syndrome (1.19 ± 0.55) mm, that in normal volunteers (1.88 ± 0.49) mm, F =13.060, P =0.000]. Conclusions: In congenital dysosmic patients, dysplasia or hypoplasia of olfactory bulbs, tracts and sulci can be clearly depicted

  15. Structural findings at hysterosalpingography in patients with infertility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 289 consecutive patients who underwent hysterosalpingography using ionic water-soluble contrast media was done at 2 private x-ray units in Kampala. Clinical notes and radiological findings were analysed for demographic data, uterine status, tubal and pelvic pathology.

  16. MR findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M.; Pawlik, H.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Paediatric Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Darge, K. [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Children`s Hospital of the University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Baborie, A. [Department of Neuropathology, Neurozentrum, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Korinthenberg, R. [Department of Neuropaediatrics, Children`s Hospital, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    We present four cases with combined hypoplasia of the cerebellum and the ventral pons - pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). PCH represents an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with fetal onset. The disease is rare, with less than 20 cases having been reported. The main findings of PCH and the inclusion criteria for our cases can be summarised as progressive microcephaly from birth, pontocerebellar hypoplasia documented by MRI and marked chorea, which may change, later in childhood, to more dystonic patterns. The cerebral cortex becomes progressively atrophic. Motor and mental development are delayed, and epilepsy, mainly tonic-clonic seizures, is frequent. The MRI features in all of our cases were: (1) Hypoplastic cerebellum situated close to the tentorium. The hypoplastic cerebellum has a reduced number of folia, in contrast to the normal number of thin folia in simple cerebellar atrophy. (2) The cerebellar hemispheres are reduced to bean-like or wing-like structures. The cerebellar hemispheres appear to `float` in the posterior fossa. (3) Markedly hypoplastic ventral pons. (4) Slight atrophy of the supratentorial gyral pattern. (5) Dilated cerebromedullary cistern and fourth ventricle. (6) Delayed myelination of the white matter. (7) No significant disorganisation of brain architecture and no severe corpus callosum defect. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  17. CT findings of osteogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, Nobuto; Otsuru, Katsuyasu; Lee, Soichi; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Shigemori, Minoru.

    1987-08-01

    Two cases of osteogenesis imperfecta found in one family (father and daughter) are reported, and the CT findings are described. Case 1 is a 58-year-old man who fell and struck his head at home on November 10, 1984. He was transferred to Omuta City Hospital when he became semicomatose and decerebrate posturing was noted. His family history revealed 8 persons with osteogenesis imperfecta. A skull X-ray film showed a large skull vault, many wormian bones at the lambdoid suture, platybasia, and a basilar impression. A CT scan demonstrated a right acute subdural hematoma, while the bone image showed well-developed mastoid air cells and a skull deformity characteristic of osteogenesis imperfecta. He had an emergency operation, and a 170-gr clot was successfully evacuated. A postoperative CT scan demonstrated brain atrophy, possibly present before head trauma. Case 2 is the daughter of Case 1 (a 27-year-old woman). She also showed characteristic neuroradiological manifestations on a plain skull film and on a CT scan. A basilar impression and platybasia were also demonstrated. In this report, the possible mechanism of the production of a traumatic acute subdural hematoma is also discussed.

  18. Form finding in elastic gridshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Changyeob; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O.; Jawed, Mohammad K.; Reis, Pedro M.

    2018-01-01

    Elastic gridshells comprise an initially planar network of elastic rods that are actuated into a shell-like structure by loading their extremities. The resulting actuated form derives from the elastic buckling of the rods subjected to inextensibility. We study elastic gridshells with a focus on the rational design of the final shapes. Our precision desktop experiments exhibit complex geometries, even from seemingly simple initial configurations and actuation processes. The numerical simulations capture this nonintuitive behavior with excellent quantitative agreement, allowing for an exploration of parameter space that reveals multistable states. We then turn to the theory of smooth Chebyshev nets to address the inverse design of hemispherical elastic gridshells. The results suggest that rod inextensibility, not elastic response, dictates the zeroth-order shape of an actuated elastic gridshell. As it turns out, this is the shape of a common household strainer. Therefore, the geometry of Chebyshev nets can be further used to understand elastic gridshells. In particular, we introduce a way to quantify the intrinsic shape of the empty, but enclosed regions, which we then use to rationalize the nonlocal deformation of elastic gridshells to point loading. This justifies the observed difficulty in form finding. Nevertheless, we close with an exploration of concatenating multiple elastic gridshell building blocks.

  19. CT findings of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kie Hwan; Byun, Hong Sik; Chin, Soo Yil [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    CT findings in 64 patients of nasopharyngeal cancer are analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the region of origin and the route of spread. The results are as follows: 1. The most frequently involved wall is lateral well (90%), followed by posterior wall (78%) and superior wall (58%). 2. There are invasion to parapharyngeal space (86%), retropharyngeal and prevertebral space (72%), carotid space (46%), and masticator space (18%) in that order. 3. Involved anatomic sites are Rosenmueller fossa (90%), torus tubarius (78%), E-tube orifice (68%), carotid sheath (46%), soft palate (50%), nasal cavity (36%), skull base (28%), prevertebral muscle (26%) and intracranial fossa (16%). 4. Direct extension to intracranial fossa is via sphenoid sinus (6/8), foramen lacerum (5/8), foramen ovale (4/8), and jugular foramen (4/8) in that order. 5. Invasion to prevertebral space leads to intraspinal extension (3/13). 6. Cervical lymph node metastasis of found in internal jugular (82%),spinal accessory (56%) and retropharyngeal chain (42%) in that order. 7. After radiation therapy, most frequent site of recurrence is posterior wall (10/14) followed by lateral wall (9/14), superior wall (5/14) and cervical lymph node (6/14), but the presence of recurrence is difficult to determine based on CT only.

  20. MR findings in intralabyrinthine schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montague, Mary-Louise; Kishore, Ameet; Hadley, Donald M.; O' Reilly, Brian

    2002-05-01

    AIM: Intralabyrinthine schwannomas (ILS) are rare benign tumours. They are not always recognized on routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We aimed to study the clinical presentation and MRI findings in our patients with ILS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients with vestibular schwannomas treated at this center. RESULTS: Of 144 vestibular schwannomas studied at this centre, three patients had an ILS. The most common presenting symptoms were unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. Two patients demonstrated a progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The third patient had a severe SNHL at presentation. MRI enhanced with contrast medium was positive in the two patients with progressive SNHL and negative in the patient with the severe SNHL. CONCLUSION: This series demonstrates the ability of MRI to identify schwannomas filling the labyrinth, and also its inability to identify extremely small ILS. It underlines the importance of sending the cristae of patients undergoing labyrinthectomy for presumed Meniere's disease for histological examination. Montague, M.-L. et al. (2002)

  1. Polysomnographic findings in craniopharyngioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Line; Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Jennum, Poul

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether damage to the hypothalamus due to craniopharyngioma or consequent surgery may involve the sleep-wake regulatory system, resulting in sleep disturbances and sleepiness. Seven craniopharyngioma patients and 10 healthy controls were evaluated with sleep questionnaires including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, polysomnography, and a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Five patients and eight controls had lumbar puncture performed to determine hypocretin-1 levels. Patients tended to feel sleepier than control individuals of the same age (p = 0.09). No subjects had symptoms of hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralyses, or cataplexies. Four patients and one control had periodic leg movements (PLMs). One patient had fragmented sleep pattern, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia, and PLMs. One patient had short sleep periods during the daytime. Four patients had fragmented sleep pattern. With the MSLT, four patients and two controls had mean sleep latency of sleep periods, respectively. All subjects showed normal hypocretin-1 levels. Four patients had electrophysiological findings indicative of central hypersomnia including one patient meeting the criteria of narcolepsy. The sleep-wake regulatory system may be involved in craniopharyngioma patients.

  2. CT findings of osteogenesis imperfecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, Nobuto; Otsuru, Katsuyasu; Lee, Soichi; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Shigemori, Minoru.

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of osteogenesis imperfecta found in one family (father and daughter) are reported, and the CT findings are described. Case 1 is a 58-year-old man who fell and struck his head at home on November 10, 1984. He was transferred to Omuta City Hospital when he became semicomatose and decerebrate posturing was noted. His family history revealed 8 persons with osteogenesis imperfecta. A skull X-ray film showed a large skull vault, many wormian bones at the lambdoid suture, platybasia, and a basilar impression. A CT scan demonstrated a right acute subdural hematoma, while the bone image showed well-developed mastoid air cells and a skull deformity characteristic of osteogenesis imperfecta. He had an emergency operation, and a 170-gr clot was successfully evacuated. A postoperative CT scan demonstrated brain atrophy, possibly present before head trauma. Case 2 is the daughter of Case 1 (a 27-year-old woman). She also showed characteristic neuroradiological manifestations on a plain skull film and on a CT scan. A basilar impression and platybasia were also demonstrated. In this report, the possible mechanism of the production of a traumatic acute subdural hematoma is also discussed. (author)

  3. MR findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Pawlik, H.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M.; Darge, K.; Baborie, A.; Korinthenberg, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present four cases with combined hypoplasia of the cerebellum and the ventral pons - pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). PCH represents an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with fetal onset. The disease is rare, with less than 20 cases having been reported. The main findings of PCH and the inclusion criteria for our cases can be summarised as progressive microcephaly from birth, pontocerebellar hypoplasia documented by MRI and marked chorea, which may change, later in childhood, to more dystonic patterns. The cerebral cortex becomes progressively atrophic. Motor and mental development are delayed, and epilepsy, mainly tonic-clonic seizures, is frequent. The MRI features in all of our cases were: (1) Hypoplastic cerebellum situated close to the tentorium. The hypoplastic cerebellum has a reduced number of folia, in contrast to the normal number of thin folia in simple cerebellar atrophy. (2) The cerebellar hemispheres are reduced to bean-like or wing-like structures. The cerebellar hemispheres appear to 'float' in the posterior fossa. (3) Markedly hypoplastic ventral pons. (4) Slight atrophy of the supratentorial gyral pattern. (5) Dilated cerebromedullary cistern and fourth ventricle. (6) Delayed myelination of the white matter. (7) No significant disorganisation of brain architecture and no severe corpus callosum defect. (orig.)

  4. Neuroimaging findings in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, J N; Berman Rosa, M; Gouin, J-P; Dang-Vu, T T

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques have accelerated progress in the study and understanding of sleep in humans. Neuroimaging studies in primary insomnia remain relatively few, considering the important prevalence of this disorder in the general population. This review examines the contribution of functional and structural neuroimaging to our current understanding of primary insomnia. Functional studies during sleep provided support for the hyperarousal theory of insomnia. Functional neuroimaging also revealed abnormalities in cognitive and emotional processing in primary insomnia. Results from structural studies suggest neuroanatomical alterations in primary insomnia, mostly in the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. However, these results are not well replicated across studies. A few magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies revealed abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and bioenergetics in primary insomnia. The inconsistencies among neuroimaging findings on insomnia are likely due to clinical heterogeneity, differences in imaging and overall diversity of techniques and designs employed. Larger samples, replication, as well as innovative methodologies are necessary for the progression of this perplexing, yet promising area of research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. MR findings of brainstem injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Man Soo; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Park, Choong Ki [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dae Chul [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Dankook University of College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    To analyze the characteristics of traumatic brainstem injury by CT and MR. CT and MR studies of 10 patients with traumatic brainstem lesion in MR were retrospectively reviewed, particularly attended to location, signal intensity and associated lesions. CT failed to depict 8 of 10 brainstem lesions. All lesions were detected in MR images with T2-weighted images showing higher detection rate (n = 10) (100%) than T1-weighted images (n = 3) (30%) or CT (n = 2) (20%). The brainstem lesions located in the dorsolateral aspects of the rostral brainstem (mid brain and upper pons) in 7 (70%) cases, in ventral aspects of rostral brain in 2 (20%) cases and in median portion of pons in 1 (10%) case. Corpus callosal (n = 5), lobar white matter (n = 5) diffuse axonal injury, and 2 hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia were the associated findings. MR imaging is more helpful than CT in the detection of brainstem injury, especially T2 weighted images. Primary brainstem lesions were typically located in the dorsolateral aspect of rostral brainstem (midbrain and upper pons). Corpus callosum and white matter lesions were frequently associated.

  6. Radiological findings in Wolfram syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadidy, Azmy M.; Jarrah, Nadim S.; Al-Till, Maha I.; Ajlouni, Kamal M.; El-Shanti, Haten E.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the precise radiologic findings in Wolfram syndrome (WFS) patients using objective techniques in order to better define the reference population for the clinicl evaluation. 16 patients (6 males, 10 female) with WFS found in 4 families were included in this study.14 patients with WFS-2 came from 3 families while 2 patients with EFS-1 came from one family. All patients were studied at Jordan University Hospital, Amman,Jordan from January 2001 to January 2003 by definite radiologic techniques as part of a thorough clinical comprehesive assesment. These incclude intravenous urography, abdominal and pelvic ultrasonography, barium meal, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and magnetic resonance imaging with and without contrasts to the brain and the pituitary glands.5 of the female ptients had a small uterus. Spina bifida was found in 7, hydronephrosis in 9 and hydroureter in 5 patiets. Peptic ulcer was detected in 10 out of 14 available patients and helicobacter pylori in 7 out of 16 patients. Atrophy was detected was detected in all brains, 9 brain stems, 12 cerebellums and 14 optic tracts of all patients. The size of pituitary glands was variable. The particular radiological assesment of the patients with WFS proved that, urinary tract dialtation was detected in WFS-1and WFS-2 patients though all WFS-2 patients.No significant radiologic difference was between patients with WFS-1 and WFS-2. (author)

  7. Idiopathic polyhydramnios and postnatal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorleijn, Desirée M J; Cohen-Overbeek, Titia E; Groenendaal, Floris; Bruinse, Hein W; Stoutenbeek, Philip

    2009-04-01

    Our objective was to investigate the outcome of neonates with idiopathic polyhydramnios in the first year after birth. All patients diagnosed in the Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam and the University Medical Centre Utrecht between January 2000 and April 2005 with idiopathic polyhydramnios were studied. The outcome variables included mode of delivery, pre-term delivery, birth weight, macrosomia, large-for-gestational-age (weight > p90), neonatal or infant mortality and infant morbidity at 1 year after delivery. These were related to antenatal findings, including the onset of polyhydramnios and ultrasonographic evidence of macrosomia (estimated fetal weight > p90). Polyhydramnios was diagnosed at a mean gestational age (+/- s.d.) of 31.0 +/- 4.9 weeks. The mean gestational age at birth (+/- s.d.) was 37.9 +/- 3.7 weeks. Macrosomia at birth was present in 25.3% (22/88). Sixty-three of 88 infants were in good health 1 year after birth; 20 infants had an abnormality and 5 children had died. Macrosomia and detection of polyhydramnios in the third trimester was associated significantly with a good outcome. In neonates with idiopathic polyhydramnios, abnormalities were detected during the first year of life in 28.4%. Detection of polyhydramnios in the second trimester and low or normal birth weight are risk factors for associated abnormalities.

  8. Radiologic findings of osteochondritis dissecans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Choi, Choong Gon; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Seon Kyu; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-15

    To evaluate the radiographic characteristics of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and useful parameter for predicting mechanical stability, we retrospectively analysed 26 plain radiographic examinations and seven MR imagings in 28 cases of OCD in 24 patients. Typical radiologic findings were osteochondral defect with sclerotic rim of variable thickness and osteochondral fragment. Sites of osteochondral defect were medial (35.9%) or lateral (32%) femoral chondyle and medial (7.1%) or lateral (25%) side of talar dome. Sclerotic rim was seen in 24 cases (85%) and osteochondral fragments including nine loose bodies were seen in 21 cases (75%). The size of osteochondral defect with unstable fragment (average 2.05 cm) and loose body (2.04 cm) in the knee joint were similar to, but statistically larger than that with stable fragment (1.35 cm). All osteochondral defects were well visualized on MR images. Abnormalities of articular cartilage and effusion in the interface between the parent bone and fragment were seen in five cases of which there were confirmed three unstable cases arthroscopically. We concluded that size of defect may be a good parameter for predicting mechanical stability and MRI may be useful in the diagnosis of OCD and determining the methods of treatment.

  9. Radiologic findings of osteochondritis dissecans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Choi, Choong Gon; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Seon Kyu; Kim, Chu Wan

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the radiographic characteristics of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and useful parameter for predicting mechanical stability, we retrospectively analysed 26 plain radiographic examinations and seven MR imagings in 28 cases of OCD in 24 patients. Typical radiologic findings were osteochondral defect with sclerotic rim of variable thickness and osteochondral fragment. Sites of osteochondral defect were medial (35.9%) or lateral (32%) femoral chondyle and medial (7.1%) or lateral (25%) side of talar dome. Sclerotic rim was seen in 24 cases (85%) and osteochondral fragments including nine loose bodies were seen in 21 cases (75%). The size of osteochondral defect with unstable fragment (average 2.05 cm) and loose body (2.04 cm) in the knee joint were similar to, but statistically larger than that with stable fragment (1.35 cm). All osteochondral defects were well visualized on MR images. Abnormalities of articular cartilage and effusion in the interface between the parent bone and fragment were seen in five cases of which there were confirmed three unstable cases arthroscopically. We concluded that size of defect may be a good parameter for predicting mechanical stability and MRI may be useful in the diagnosis of OCD and determining the methods of treatment

  10. Lyman Spitzer: Life, Times, and Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The quotes are because this is not a steady downward journey but a slight bias in the collisions which ultimately results in a shrinking of the orbit. At some stage ... Another important work with Schwarzschild was motivated by the observation that older stars seemed to have higher random ve- locities. This was attributed to ...

  11. Lyman Spitzer: Life, Times, and Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 23, Issue 4. Current Issue Volume 23 | Issue 4. April 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Categories · Special Issues · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  12. Fluoridated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Fluoridated Water On This Page What is fluoride, and where is it found? What is water fluoridation? When did water fluoridation begin in the ...

  13. Parasites: Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  14. Water Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Water Safety KidsHealth / For Teens / Water Safety What's in ... drownings are tied to alcohol use. At the Water Park OK, so you do more splashing than ...

  15. Water Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Water Safety KidsHealth / For Parents / Water Safety What's in ... remains your best measure of protection. Making Kids Water Wise It's important to teach your kids proper ...

  16. Water Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abira, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Water is essential for life and ecological sustenance; its availability is essential component of national welfare and productivity.The country's socio-economic activities are largely dependent on the natural endowment of water resources. Kenya's water resources comprises of surface waters (rivers, lakes and wetlands) and ground water. Surface water forms 86% of total water resources while the rest is ground water Geological, topographical and climatic factors influence the natural availability and distribution of water with the rainfall distribution having the major influence. Water resources in Kenya are continuously under threat of depletion and quality degradation owing to rising population, industrialization, changing land use and settlement activities as well as natural changes. However, the anticipated climate change is likely to exacerbate the situation resulting in increased conflict over water use rights in particular, and, natural resource utilisation in general. The impacts of climate change on the water resources would lead to other impacts on environmental and socio-economic systems

  17. Water pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2013-01-01

    Students will learn about what causes water pollution and how to be environmentally aware. *Note: Students should understand the concept of the water cycle before moving onto water pollution (see Lesson Plan “Oceans all Around Us”).

  18. Pollution! Find a STEM solution!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takač, Danijela; Moćan, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Primary and secondary school Pantovčak is an innovative school in downtown Zagreb, Croatia. The school is involved in many projects concerning STEM education. Pollution! Find a STEM solution! is a two year long cross-curricular project that grew out of identified need to develop STEM and ICT skills more. Pisa results make evident that students' knowledge is poor and motivation for math and similar subjects is low. Implying priorities of European Commission, like e-learning, raises motivation and also develops basic skills and improves knowledge in science, math, physic, ICT. Main objectives are to increase students' interest in STEM education and careers and introduce them to all available new trends in technology, engineering and science in their region by visiting clean technology industries and strengthening links with them, to introduce some future digital jobs and prepare students for rapid technological changes by integrating ICT into classroom practice more, to highlight the importance of global environmental issues and improve the knowledge in the areas of sustainable development and renewable energy, to develop collaborative partnership between schools and the wider community in formal, non-formal and informal learning, to support multilingualism by publishing Open Educational Resources in 8 different languages and to strengthen the professional profile of the teaching profession. The project brings together 231 teachers and 2729 students from five different European countries in learning to think globally and work on activities that contribute to the community's well-being. There are altogether 33 activities, divided in 4 categories. STEM activities are focused on students building the devices for measuring air, light and noise pollution in their school and homes. They use the scientific method to analyze the data and compare the results with their peers to find a solution. Eskills, digital literacy and digital jobs are focused on introducing career

  19. MEMS direction finding acoustic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasiri, Gamani; Alves, Fabio; Swan, William

    2017-06-01

    Conventional directional sound sensing systems employ an array of spatially separated microphones to achieve directivity. However, there are insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly that can determine the direction of sound using a miniature hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are coupled mechanically with a separation of only 0.5 mm and yet have a remarkable sensitivity to the direction of sound. The MEMS based sensor mimicking the fly's hearing system was fabricated using an SOI substrate with a 25 μm device layer. The sensor consists of two 1.5 mm x1.6 mm wings connected in the middle by a 2.7 mm x 30 μm bridge. The entire structure is connected to the substrate by two torsional legs at the center. The frequency response of the sensor showed two resonance frequencies at approximately 1.1 kHz (rocking) and 1.5 kHz (bending). The resonance at 1.1 kHz is due to rocking of the wings by twisting the legs and the other at 1.5 kHz is due to bending of the bridge. The response of the sensor was probed electronically using comb finger capacitors integrated to the edges of the wings and with the help of an MS3110 chip. A peak output voltage of about 9V/Pa was measured for sound incident normal to the device at the resonance frequency of the bending mode. The bearing of the incident sound under these conditions could be determined to within a few degrees. These findings indicate the potential use of the MEMS sensor to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  20. Post-therapeutic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollice, Saverio, E-mail: saveriopollice@hotmail.it [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, “L. Bonomo Hospital”, 76123 Andria, BT (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Department of Neuroradiology, “Cardarelli Hospital”, Naples (Italy); Scarabino, Tommaso, E-mail: tscarabino@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, “L. Bonomo Hospital”, 76123 Andria, BT (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • This study is the result of collaboration between neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. • Comparison between neuroimaging techniques to better evaluate the complications after treatment of the spin. • Evaluation of the imaging features of complications and definition of follow-up. - Abstract: Any surgical approach modifies the normal anatomical and functional arrangement of the segmental spine which is aimed, therefore image interpretation cannot ignore a correct set of knowledge in the field of anatomy, pathophysiology, drug compliance, interventional radiology and surgery. Neuroradiological imaging has an important role before surgery to direct the surgeon or interventional radiologist during the operation, both in post-surgery, where imaging examination can rightly evaluate properties and effects of the treatment and can detect potential complications as infections, abscess, bleeding, exuberant scar, mobilization and rupture of devices. The available methods of imaging are the X-rays (XR) made at least in two projections, Computed Tomography (CT) with MPR (multiplanar) and VR (volume rendering) reconstruction, and Magnetic Resonance (MR), often performed before and after contrast media injection. Imaging assessment of spine after surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including surgical procedures and disease for which it was performed; biomechanical of the underlying cortical and cancellous bone findings; conditions of muscles, intervertebral disk and ligaments; time since surgery procedures; duration and nature of the post-surgical syndrome. Depending upon several factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities (X-rays, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance) may be required to evaluate effectiveness of the treatment; to demonstrate any clinically relevant abnormality at the treated region and adjacent structures (complications such as inflammation, abscesses, bleeding and misplacement of the device); to

  1. Skin findings in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; Danback, Joshua R; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-09-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the skin and vascular elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%), and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity), and E (Young's modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Accounting for Water Insecurity in Modeling Domestic Water Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaitsis, S. E.; Huber-lee, A. T.; Vogel, R. M.; Naumova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Water demand management uses price elasticity estimates to predict consumer demand in relation to water pricing changes, but studies have shown that many additional factors effect water consumption. Development scholars document the need for water security, however, much of the water security literature focuses on broad policies which can influence water demand. Previous domestic water demand studies have not considered how water security can affect a population's consumption behavior. This study is the first to model the influence of water insecurity on water demand. A subjective indicator scale measuring water insecurity among consumers in the Palestinian West Bank is developed and included as a variable to explore how perceptions of control, or lack thereof, impact consumption behavior and resulting estimates of price elasticity. A multivariate regression model demonstrates the significance of a water insecurity variable for data sets encompassing disparate water access. When accounting for insecurity, the R-squaed value improves and the marginal price a household is willing to pay becomes a significant predictor for the household quantity consumption. The model denotes that, with all other variables held equal, a household will buy more water when the users are more water insecure. Though the reasons behind this trend require further study, the findings suggest broad policy implications by demonstrating that water distribution practices in scarcity conditions can promote consumer welfare and efficient water use.