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Sample records for spittlebugs philaenus spumarius

  1. Antennal olfactory responses of adult meadow spittlebug, Philaenus spumarius, to volatile organic compounds (VOCs.

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    Giacinto Salvatore Germinara

    Full Text Available The meadow spittlebug, Philaenus spumarius L. (Hemiptera, Aphrophoridae is a commonly found vector of Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. (1987 strain subspecies pauca associated with the "Olive Quick Decline Syndrome" in Italy. To contribute to the knowledge of the adult P. spumarius chemoreceptivity, electroantennographic (EAG responses of both sexes to 50 volatile organic compounds (VOCs including aliphatic aldehydes, alcohols, esters, and ketones, terpenoids, and aromatics were recorded. Measurable EAG responses were elicited by all compounds tested. In both sexes, octanal, 2-octanol, 2-decanone, (E-2-hexenyl acetate, and vanillin elicited the strongest antennal amplitude within the chemical groups of aliphatic saturated aldehydes, aliphatic alcohols, aliphatic acetates and aromatics, respectively. Male and female EAG responses to sulcatol, (±linalool, and sulcatone were higher than those to other terpenoinds. In both sexes, the weakest antennal stimulants were phenethyl alcohol and 2-pentanone. Sexual differences in the EAG amplitude were found only for four of test compounds suggesting a general similarity between males and females in antennal sensitivity. The olfactory system of both sexes proved to be sensitive to changes in stimulus concentration, carbon chain length, and compound structure. Compounds with short carbon chain length (C5-C6 elicited lower EAG amplitudes than compounds with higher carbon chain length (C9-C10 in all classes of aliphatic hydrocarbons with different functional groups. The elucidation of the sensitivity profile of P. spumarius to a variety of VOCs provides a basis for future identification of behaviorally-active compounds useful for developing semiochemical-based control strategies of this pest.

  2. Genetic variation and constraints on the evolution of defense against spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius) herbivory in Mimulus guttatus.

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    Ivey, C T; Carr, D E; Eubanks, M D

    2009-03-01

    Plants mediate carbon into most ecosystems and are thus under persistent attack by diverse enemies. The evolution of defense against such assaults will depend on the availability of genetic variation, as well as the costs and constraints on defense. We estimated the magnitude of genetic variation for defense against spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius) herbivory in Mimulus guttatus using a diallel cross-grown in a greenhouse. Except for flowering time, additive genetic variation for the plant traits we measured was negligible, regardless of herbivory environment. In contrast, nonadditive genetic variation contributed significantly to all plant traits measured. We found significant additive genetic variation among plants for biomass of adult spittlebugs, suggesting heritability for resistance to herbivory. The other putative resistance trait measured, spittlebug maturation time, was not significantly heritable. We found no evidence for significant genetic variation for tolerance to herbivory except for a small non-nuclear paternal contribution to tolerance for flower number. Additive genetic correlations indicated that more resistant plant genotypes (in terms of adult spittlebug biomass) were also smaller in the absence of spittlebugs, suggesting a potential cost of resistance to herbivory. We found no other significant genetic correlations indicating a cost of defense, nor did we find evidence for a tradeoff between resistance and tolerance to herbivory. Overall, these results suggest the future adaptive evolution of tolerance to spittlebugs in this population will be limited primarily by available genetic variation, whereas the future evolution of antibiosis resistance may be constrained by allocation costs of resistance.

  3. Transmission of Xylella fastidiosa to Grapevine by the Meadow Spittlebug.

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    Cornara, D; Sicard, A; Zeilinger, A R; Porcelli, F; Purcell, A H; Almeida, R P P

    2016-11-01

    There is little information available on Xylella fastidiosa transmission by spittlebugs (Hemiptera, Cercopoidea). This group of insect vectors may be of epidemiological relevance in certain diseases, so it is important to better understand the basic parameters of X. fastidiosa transmission by spittlebugs. We used grapevines as a host plant and the aphrophorid Philaenus spumarius as a vector to estimate the effect of plant access time on X. fastidiosa transmission to plants; in addition, bacterial population estimates in the heads of vectors were determined and correlated with plant infection status. Results show that transmission efficiency of X. fastidiosa by P. spumarius increased with plant access time, similarly to insect vectors in another family (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae). Furthermore, a positive correlation between pathogen populations in P. spumarius and transmission to plants was observed. Bacterial populations in insects were one to two orders of magnitude lower than those observed in leafhopper vectors, and population size peaked within 3 days of plant access period. These results suggest that P. spumarius has either a limited number of sites in the foregut that may be colonized, or that fluid dynamics in the mouthparts of these insects is different from that in leafhoppers. Altogether our results indicate that X. fastidiosa transmission by spittlebugs is similar to that by leafhoppers. In addition, the relationship between cell numbers in vectors and plant infection may have under-appreciated consequences to pathogen spread.

  4. Infectivity and transmission of Xylella fastidiosa Salento strain by Philaenus spumarius L. (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae) in Apulia, Italy

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    Discovery of X. fastidiosa from olive trees with “Olive quick decline syndrome" (OQDS) in October 2013 on the western coast of the Salento Peninsula prompted an immediate search for insect vectors of the bacterium. The dominant xylem-fluid feeding hemipteran collected in olive orchards was the meado...

  5. Isoclast™ Active as a new tool for controlling Xylella fastidiosa invasion via vector control

    OpenAIRE

    Mezei, Imre; Convertini, Stefano; Drei, Francesco; Tescari, Enzo; Torne, Maria; Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Dongiovanni, Crescenza; Porcelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a quarantine bacterium species invading Europe and recognised as the agent of “Olive Quick Decline Syndrome” (OQDS) disease and which has already killed hundreds of thousands of olive trees in southern Italy. The Palearctic spittlebug Philaenus spumarius (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae,) has been identified as the major vector of this bacterium in Italy being frequently encountered and widely spread in Europe. Juveniles are abundant in spittle on herbs either in natural, agric...

  6. Spittlebug impacts on sugarcane quality and ethanol production

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    Gisele Cristina Ravaneli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the impacts of spittlebug (Mahanarva fimbriolata attack on sugarcane quality and ethanol production. Technological and microbiological parameters of juice and fermentation process were evaluated in ten fermentation cycles and two harvest seasons. Treatments consisted of different spittlebug stalk damage levels: control, with 100% of apparently healthy stalks; medium, with 15% of damaged or dry stalks (DDS; high, with 30% of DDS; and very high, with 60% of DDS. Spittlebug attack caused significant losses in cane quality, reducing total soluble solids, sucrose content, total reducing sugars, and pH, and increasing total phenolic compounds, and total and volatile juice acidity. The fermentation process was also significantly affected, resulting in lower ethanol content in wine. There was an increase in acetaldehyde concentration in the distillate. The spittlebug attack caused negative impacts on sugarcane quality and fermentation process, and these impacts are stronger in late season harvests.

  7. The Effect of Climate and Spittlebug (aeneolamia albofasciata) on Buffelgrass (cenchrus cilaris L.) Productivity in the Sonoran Desert

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    Martin-Rivera, Martha H.

    1994-01-01

    I conducted field studies during 1984-1988 to determine how (1) precipitation amount and distribution affect buffelgrass [Cenchrus ciliaris L. (Link) l productivity, (2) summer rainfall amount and distribution and temperature influenced the spittlebug (Aeneolamia albofasciata Lalleman) life cycle, and (3) summer burning affects spittlebug densities and buffelgrass productivity. Experiment I was conducted from 1985 through 1988. Forage samples collected at 15 -day intervals were separated i...

  8. Two new species of the Neotropical spittlebug genus Monecphora Amyot & Serville (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) with key and notes of species of the genus.

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    Carvalho, Gervásio Silva; Sakakibara, Albino Morimasa; Webb, Michael D

    2016-02-09

    Two new species of the Neotropical spittlebug genus Monecphora Amyot & Serville are described: Monecphora machadoi sp. nov. (Holotype male deposited in NMW: Brazil, "Natterer") and Monecphora broomfieldi sp. nov. (Holotype male deposited in BMNH: Costa Rica, Turrialba, 3-8.VII.1981, W.R. Dolling leg.) and a key and notes to species of the genus are provided. Lectotypes are designated for Tomaspis fryi Distant, Monecphora nigritarsis Stål, and Monecphora semilutea Stål. In addition, two corrections are made to the Cercopid Spittlebugs of the New World (Carvalho & Webb 2005) with respect to figures 70-73 and 193-194 (see Corrigenda).

  9. Identification of three potential insect vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in southern Italy

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    Toufic ELBEAINO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify potential vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in olive orchards in Puglia (southern Italy, Hemiptera insects were collected from October to December, 2013, in olive orchards with high incidences of X. fastidiosa associated with “rapid decline” symptoms. The study focused on species in the Auchenorrhyncha (sharpshooter leafhoppers and froghoppers or spittlebugs, a group that includes known vectors of X. fastidiosa.  Adults of three species, i.e. Philaenus spumarius L. (Aphrophoridae, Neophilaenus campestris Fallén (Aphrophoridae and Euscelis lineolatus Brullé (Cicadellidae were captured, from which total DNA was extracted and assayed by PCR using three sets of specific primers designed for X. fastidiosa detection. Results of PCR showed that 38 out of a total of 84 tested insects were positive for X. fastidiosa, i.e. eight (of 20 P. spumarius, 14 (of 18 N. campestris and 16 (of 46 E. lineolatus. PCR amplicons of the RNA polymerase sigma-70 factor gene from six specimens (two of each insect species were sequenced. The sequences obtained were 99.3‒99.4% identical. BlastN analyses demonstrated these sequences to be similar to those of X. fastidiosa isolates from olive OL-X and OL-G reported from Puglia, whereas they displayed distant molecular identity (always less than 98% with X. fastidiosa subspecies from other countries. The detection of X. fastidiosa in P. spumarius and, for the first time, in N. campestris and E. lineolatus (which, unlike the others, is a phloem feeder, indicates potential vectoring roles of these insects for the spread of the bacterium in Puglia. Further investigations and specific infectivity trials are required to definitively determine the roles of these insects as effective vectors of this pathogen.

  10. Induction of insect plant resistance to the spittlebug Mahanarva fimbriolata Stal (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) in sugarcane by silicon application

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    Korndorfer, A.P.; Grisoto, E.; Vendramim, J.D., E-mail: korndorfer@hotmail.co [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia e Acarologia

    2011-05-15

    Changes in the agroecosystem with the increase of green cane harvesting in Brazil affected the insect populations associated to this crop, and secondary pests like the spittlebug Mahanarva fimbriolata Stal, became much more important. Many studies have demonstrated the active role played by silicon in plant defense against herbivory. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of silicon applications on the biology of the spittlebug reared on two resistant (SP79-1011 and SP80-1816) and one susceptible (SP81-3250) sugarcane cultivars. Sugarcane plants were grown under greenhouse conditions and submitted to different treatments: with and without silicon fertilizer in two different soil type (sandy and clay soil). The newly hatched nymphs were transferred to sugarcane roots and placed into boxes with lids, to keep a moistened and dark environment favoring their growth and maintenance of the root system, providing food access to the developing nymphs. After emergence, adult males and females were placed in cages for mating and oviposition. The silicon absorbed and accumulated in the plant caused an increase in nymphal mortality, and depending on the sugarcane cultivar tested this element also provided an increase in the duration of the nymphal stage and a decrease in the longevity of males and females. 'SP79-1011' presented the highest silicon content in leaves, and M. fimbriolata had the highest nymph mortality and the shortest female longevity. The pre-oviposition period, fecundity and egg viability were not affected by the silicon content in plants or the cultivar used. (author)

  11. Survey of potential sharpshooter and spittlebug vectors of Xylella fastidiosa to grapevines at the São Francisco River Valley, Brazil

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    Rudiney Ringenberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Survey of potential sharpshooter and spittlebug vectors of Xylella fastidiosa to grapevines at the São Francisco River Valley, Brazil. Pierce's disease of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa, is a serious problem in some regions of North America, not yet reported in Brazil. In this study, a survey of potential sharpshooter (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae, Cicadellinae and spittlebug (Hemiptera, Cercopidae vectors of X. fastidiosa was conducted in vineyards at the São Francisco River Valley, a major grape growing region in Brazil. Four vineyards of Vitis vinifera L. were sampled fortnightly from June/2005 to June/2007, using yellow sticky cards, each placed at two different heights (45 cm aboveground and 45 cm above the crop canopy in 10 sampling localities. A total of 4,095 specimens of sharpshooters were collected, nearly all from 3 Proconiini species, Homalodisca spottii Takiya, Cavichioli & McKamey, 2006 (96.8% of the specimens, Tapajosa fulvopunctata (Signoret, 1854 (3.1%, and Tretogonia cribrata Melichar, 1926 (1 specimen. Hortensia similis (Walker, 1851 (2 specimens was the only Cicadellini species. Only 1 cercopid specimen, belonging to Aeneolamia colon (Germar, 1821, was trapped. Even though they are not considered potential Xylella vectors, 2 Gyponini leafhoppers were collected: Curtara samera DeLong & Freytag, 1972 (11 specimens and Curtara inflata DeLong & Freytag, 1976 (1 specimen. Homalodisca spottii was observed feeding and mating on green branches of grapevines, in addition to egg masses. Because of its prevalence on the crop canopy, occurrence throughout the year (with peaks from February to August, and ability to colonize grapevines, H. spottii could be an important vector if a X. fastidiosa strain pathogenic to grapevines becomes introduced at the São Francisco River Valley.

  12. Free proline accumulation in sugarcane under water restriction and spittlebug infestation Acúmulo de prolina em cana-de-açúcar sob estresse hídrico ou submetida ao ataque de cigarrinha-das-raízes

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    Eduardo Rossini Guimarães

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mahanarva fimbriolata (Stål (Hemiptera: Cercopidae has become a key pest in the sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum fields of center-south Brazil. Although some control technologies have shown to be efficient, the damage promoted by this spittlebug species and its interaction with sugarcane are poorly characterized. At high infestation levels the symptoms are similar to those of severe water restriction. This work was conducted to determine whether the stress promoted by spittlebug infestation can be measured in terms of free proline accumulation. The water restriction tolerance of two sugarcane genotypes was also compared. Two experiments were set up in a greenhouse and arranged in a completely randomized design in a 2 x 2 x 4 factorial, with two cultivars (SP80-1816 and RB72454, two stress levels (control and ten nymphs per plant or 50% water restriction, and four sampling dates. The water deficit caused by spittlebug nymphs sucking xylem sap does not result in proline accumulation, illustrating that there are different mechanisms to sense when the water deficit is caused by insect feeding or water potential variation in root cells. The cultivar RB72454 accumulates more free-proline, and the dry mass accumulation and stalk growth are less affected in this cultivar under water restriction. The levels of compatible solutes probably cannot be used to measure spittlebug infestation stress in sugarcane and RB72454 is more tolerant to water shortage than SP80-1816.A cigarrinha-das-raízes Mahanarva fimbriolata (Stål (Hemiptera: Cercopidae tornou-se uma praga importante da cultura da cana-de-açúcar na região centro-sul do Brasil. Estratégias de controle têm sido desenvolvidas, mas os danos promovidos por essa praga e sua interação com a cana-de-açúcar ainda são pouco caracterizados. Em altos níveis de infestação da praga, os sintomas nas plantas são muito semelhantes à restrição hídrica severa. Este trabalho foi conduzido com o

  13. Spittlebug infestation in sugarcane affects ethanolic fermentation A infestação de cigarrinha-das-raízes em cana-de-açúcar afeta a fermentação etanólica

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    Gisele Cristina Ravaneli

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The spittlebug (Mahanarva fimbriolata has become a key pest of the sugarcane crop in Brazil with the increase of green-cane harvesting, causing stalk yield and cane quality losses. This research was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the spittlebug (Mahanarva fimbriolata on cane quality and juice fermentation. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized 5 × 2 factorial design, with five spittlebug infestation levels (0-0.5; 0.6-2.5; 2.6-5; 5.1-8; 8.1-12.5 nymphs m-1, controlled or not with thiamethoxam (0.2 kg of active ingredient ha-1. To conduct fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (fresh and pressed baker's yeast was inoculated to musts at a concentration of 30 g L-1. Microbiological analyses were performed at the beginning, middle and end of the fermentation process. The alcohol content and total residual reducing sugars were measured in the wine. Spittlebug attack influenced negatively sugarcane quality, yeast cell and bud viability, and wine alcohol content. Insecticide application resulted in higher cane quality and cell and bud viabilities, resulting in increased fermentation yield.A cigarrinha-das-raízes (Mahanarva fimbriolata tornou-se praga-chave na cultura da cana-de-açúcar com a expansão das áreas de colheita sem queima, comprometendo a produtividade e a qualidade da matéria-prima e consequentemente o processamento industrial. Essa pesquisa objetivou avaliar os efeitos da cigarrinha-das-raízes (Mahanarva fimbriolata sobre a qualidade da cana-de-açúcar e a fermentação do caldo. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 5 × 2, sendo cinco níveis iniciais de infestação da cigarrinha-das-raízes (0-0,5; 0,6-2,5; 2,6-5; 5,1-8; 8,1-12,5 ninfas m-1, controlados ou não com o inseticida thiamethoxam (0,2 kg de ingrediente ativo ha-1. Para a fermentação alcoólica, o fermento prensado Saccharomyces cerevisiae foi inoculado aos mostos na concentração de 30 g L-1

  14. Desempenho de pontas de pulverização em Brachiaria brizantha cv. MG-4 para controle de ninfas de cigarrinhas das pastagens Spray nozzles performance in Brachiaria brizantha cv. MG-4 for pastures spittlebugs nymphs control

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    Cleber D. de G. Maciel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivo estudar o desempenho de pontas de pulverização na deposição da calda inseticida para o controle de ninfas de cigarrinhas das pastagens em Brachiaria brizantha cv. MG-4. Doze tratamentos foram estudados em esquema fatorial 6x2, constituídos pelo contraste de seis pontas de pulverização e pressões de 196 e 392 kPa: TF-VP2 (336 L ha-1 e 467 L ha-1; AI11002-VS (184 L ha-1 e 200 L ha-1; XR11002-VS (200 L ha-1 e 280 L ha-1; TT11002-VP (200 L ha-1 e 280 L ha-1; TJ60-11002VS (208 L ha-1 e 280 L ha-1 e TX-VK4 (72 L ha-1 e 97 L ha-1. Para monitorar a deposição das caldas de pulverização, utilizaram-se os traçadores Azul Brilhante FD&C-1 (0,3% p/v e Amarelo de Tartrasina FD&C-5 (0,6% p/v. Alvos artificiais, constituídos de lâminas de vidro, foram posicionados na base das plantas, próximos à superfície do solo, e os depósitos por unidade de área das soluções pulverizadas foram quantificados por espectrofotometria. As pontas TF-VP2, XR11002-VS e AI11002-VS, nas pressões de 196 e 392 kPa, proporcionam as maiores deposições da calda de pulverização na região das espumas das cigarrinhas das pastagens, apesar de apresentarem menor uniformidade na distribuição dos depósitos em relação a TX-VK4, XR110.02-VS e TJ110.02-VS. O aumento da pressão de 196 para 392 kPa promoveu aumento na deposição da calda de pulverização sobre a Brachiaria brizantha e na região onde se encontram as espumas das cigarrinhas para todos os tipos de pontas estudadas.The work aimed to study spray nozzles performance in pesticide sprayer deposition for controlling pastures spittlebugs nymphs in Brachiaria brizantha cv. MG-4 pasture. Twelve treatments were studied in factorial scheme 6x2, constituted by the contrast of six spray nozzles and 196 and 392 kPa work pressures: TF-VP2 (336 L ha-1 and 467 L ha-1; AI11002-VS (184 L ha-1 and 200 L ha-1; XR11002-VS (200 L ha-1 and 280 L ha-1; TT11002-VP (200 L ha-1 and 280 L ha¹; TJ60

  15. Seleção de genótipos de capim-elefante quanto à resistência à cigarrinha-das-pastagens Selection of elephant grass genotypes for resistance to spittlebug

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    Alexander Machado Auad

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar genótipos de capim-elefante (Pennisetum purpureum Schum. quanto à resistência à cigarrinha-das-pastagens (Mahanarva spectabilis. Para avaliação da antibiose, aos trinta dias após o plantio, cada planta foi infestada com seis ovos próximos à eclosão, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com 30 genótipos e dez repetições. Quarenta e cinco dias após a eclosão das ninfas, avaliou-se a porcentagem de sobrevivência do inseto-praga nos diferentes genótipos. Para avaliação da não-preferência, foram quantificados, quinzenalmente, o número e tamanho de ninfas por vaso, em plantas mantidas em casa de vegetação, onde adultos de M. spectabilis eram periodicamente liberados, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com três repetições por genótipo, em dois períodos de amostragem. Os genótipos Cameroon de Piracicaba, Pioneiro, Cuba 169, Santa Rita, Mineiro Ipeaco, Mercker Comum de Pinda e CNPGL 96-27-3 foram selecionados quanto à resistência, pelo mecanismo de antibiose. O número e o tamanho médio das ninfas variaram significativamente em razão do genótipo de capim-elefante, no estudo da não-preferência. Os genótipos Roxo de Botucatu e Pioneiro são candidatos à testemunha suscetível e resistente, respectivamente, pelo mecanismo de antibiose, e os genótipos Cameroon e Cameroon Piracicaba são promissores pelo mecanismo de não-preferência.The objective of this work was to evaluate genotypes of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum. regarding resistance to the spittlebug Mahanarva spectabilis. For antibiosis evaluation, each plant was infested with six eggs near hatching, thirty days after planting, in a completely randomized design with 30 genotypes and ten repetitions. Forty-five days after the nymphs hatched, the insect survival rate was evaluated on the different genotypes. For nonpreference mechanism evaluation, the size and number of the nymphs per pot were

  16. Seasonal Fluctuations of Sap-Feeding Insect Species Infected by Xylella fastidiosa in Apulian Olive Groves of Southern Italy.

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    Ben Moussa, Issam Eddine; Mazzoni, Valerio; Valentini, Franco; Yaseen, Thaer; Lorusso, Donato; Speranza, Stefano; Digiaro, Michele; Varvaro, Leonardo; Krugner, Rodrigo; D'Onghia, Anna Maria

    2016-08-01

    A study on seasonal abundance of Auchenorrhyncha species and their infectivity by Xylella fastidiosa in the Apulia region of Italy was conducted to identify ideal periods for monitoring and adoption of potential control measures against insect vectors. Adult populations of Auchenorrhyncha species were monitored monthly over a 2-yr period from five olive groves. A total of 15 species were captured, identified, and tested for presence of X. fastidiosa by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For three species, Philaenus spumarius L., Neophilaenus campestris (Fallèn), and Euscelis lineolatus Brullé, positive reactions to X. fastidiosa were obtained, on average, in 16.3, 15.9 and 18.4% of adult insects, respectively. Philaneous spumarius was the dominant species (39.8% of total Auchenorrhyncha captured) with the highest adult abundance in summer months. Adult P. spumarius and N. campestris were first detected between March and May in both years, and all insects tested during these periods (year 1: n = 42, year 2: n = 132) gave negative reactions to X. fastidiosa by PCR. Similarly, first adults of E. lineolatus that appeared from October to November (year 1: n = 20, year 2: n = 15) tested negative for presence of X. fastidiosa Given the lack of transstadial and transovarial transmission of X. fastidiosa and considering that P. spumarius is univoltine, control measures against nymphal stages of P. spumarius should be investigated as means of population suppression to reduce spread of X. fastidiosa in olive groves. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The multidimensional behavioural hypervolumes of two interacting species predict their space use and survival.

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    Lichtenstein, James L L; Wright, Colin M; McEwen, Brendan; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2017-10-01

    Individual animals differ consistently in their behaviour, thus impacting a wide variety of ecological outcomes. Recent advances in animal personality research have established the ecological importance of the multidimensional behavioural volume occupied by individuals and by multispecies communities. Here, we examine the degree to which the multidimensional behavioural volume of a group predicts the outcome of both intra- and interspecific interactions. In particular, we test the hypothesis that a population of conspecifics will experience low intraspecific competition when the population occupies a large volume in behavioural space. We further hypothesize that populations of interacting species will exhibit greater interspecific competition when one or both species occupy large volumes in behavioural space. We evaluate these hypotheses by studying groups of katydids ( Scudderia nymphs) and froghoppers ( Philaenus spumarius ), which compete for food and space on their shared host plant, Solidago canadensis . We found that individuals in single-species groups of katydids positioned themselves closer to one another, suggesting reduced competition, when groups occupied a large behavioural volume. When both species were placed together, we found that the survival of froghoppers was greatest when both froghoppers and katydids occupied a small volume in behavioural space, particularly at high froghopper densities. These results suggest that groups that occupy large behavioural volumes can have low intraspecific competition but high interspecific competition. Thus, behavioural hypervolumes appear to have ecological consequences at both the level of the population and the community and may help to predict the intensity of competition both within and across species.

  18. Damages of spittlebug on sugarcane quality and fermentation process Danos promovidos por cigarrinha-das-raízes na qualidade da cana e processo fermentativo

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    Débora Branquinho Garcia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the raw material defines the industrial potential production. The harvest of raw sugarcane promoted a favorable environment for the increase of Mahanarva fimbriolata (Stål, 1854 pest that affects the plant development. This research was undertaken to evaluate the effects of M. fimbriolata on sugarcane quality and fermentation process. For the technological analysis, four damage levels and two evaluation periods were evaluated, while four fermentation cycles and two evaluation periods were tested for microbiological analysis, with three replications. The determined parameters were Brix (soluble solids, Pol (apparent sucrose, Purity, reducing sugars (RS, total reducing sugars (TRS, Total Acidity, pH and Total Phenolic Compounds in juice. In the fermentation process cellular viability analysis, yeast sprout and bacterial concentration were carried out. The wine was submitted to alcohol content, TRRS (total residual reducing sugars and fermentation efficiency. The treatment with 60% of damage steams exhibited the lowest averages of Brix, Pol, Purity and TRS of the juice. An increase of the RS% of the juice and content of total phenolic compounds was observed. The cellular and sprouts viability were reduced with the increase in the damages caused by M. fimbriolata. The fermentation process exhibited larger quantities of contaminators. With the damages, the wine TRRS quantity was superior and, consequently there was a decrease of the alcoholic content and fermentation efficiency. The damages caused by M. fimbriolata affected the quality of the raw material, compromising the fermentative process, and increase the production of phenolic compounds and contaminators.A qualidade da matéria-prima define o potencial de produção da indústria. A colheita de cana sem queima proporcionou um ambiente favorável ao aumento da infestação da Mahanarva fimbriolata (Stål, 1854, que suga a planta e afeta seu desenvolvimento. Avaliaram-se os danos promovidos pela M. fimbriolata na qualidade da cana e no processo fermentativo. Os tratamentos utilizados foram quatro níveis de danos e duas épocas de avaliações para as análises tecnológicas, e quatro níveis de danos, quatro ciclos fermentativos e duas épocas de avaliações para as análises microbiológicas com três repetições. Foram determinados Brix (sólidos solúveis, Pol (sacarose aparente, Pureza, açúcar redutor total (ART, açúcar redutor (AR, Acidez Total, pH, e teor de compostos fenólicos totais no caldo. No processo fermentativo foram realizadas análises de viabilidade celular, brotos de leveduras e concentração de bactérias. Determinaram-se açúcar redutor residual Total (ARRT, teor alcoólico nos vinhos e a eficiência da fermentação. Os tratamentos com 60% dos colmos danificados apresentaram menor média de Brix, Pol, Pureza e ART do caldo. Verificou-se aumento do AR% caldo e dos teores de compostos fenólicos totais. A viabilidade celular e de brotos foram reduzidas com o aumento dos danos provocados pela M. fimbriolata. O processo fermentativo apresentou maiores quantidades de contaminantes. Com os danos a quantidade de ARRT dos vinhos foi maior, houve redução do teor alcoólico, assim como na eficiência da fermentação. Os danos causados pela M. fimbriolata afetaram a qualidade da matéria-prima, comprometendo o processo fermentativo, além de aumentar a produção de compostos fenólicos e contaminantes.

  19. Characterization of Metarhizium anisopliae using amplifed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    edoja

    sugar cane spittlebug (IPA213, IPA215, IPA219 and IPA216) and the grasshopper (IPA217). It is noteworthy that these five isolates are used as biological control for growing sugar cane on an industrial scale for the Brazilian Northeast. Hence, the importance to genetically characterize these isolates of Metarhizium cannot ...

  20. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1993. Information report No. O-X-436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birch skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  1. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1994. Information report No. O-X-447. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birch skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  2. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1992. Information report No. O-X-430. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Report for 1992 summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birth skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  3. Management strategy, shade, and landscape composition effects on urban landscape plant quality and arthropod abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, S K; Latimer, J G; Oetting, R D; McQueen, R D; Eckberg, T B; Prinster, M

    2000-10-01

    Intensity and type of management, the cultural variable shade, and the combination of woody and herbaceous annual and perennial plants were evaluated for their effect on key landscape arthropod pests. Azalea lace bugs, Stephanitis pyrioides (Scott), and twolined spittlebugs, Prosapia bicincta (Say), were most effectively suppressed in landscape designed with resistant plant species of woody ornamentals and turf. Landscapes containing susceptible plant counterparts were heavily infested by these two insect species in untreated control plots. A traditional management program of prescribed herbicide, insecticide, and fungicide applications effectively suppressed azalea lace bug and produced a high-quality landscape. Targeted integrated pest management with solely horticultural oils resulted in intermediate levels of azalea lace bug. Neither program completely controlled twolined spittlebug on hollies or turf. Carabidae, Staphylinidae, Formicidae, and Araneae were not reduced by any management strategy. Lace bugs (Stephanitis) were more common in plots with 50% shade than those in full sun. Spittlebugs (Prosapia) were more common in the shade during 1996 and in the sun during 1997. Spiders and ants were more often collected in full sun plots. Carabids, staphylinids, and spiders were more commonly collected from pitfall traps in turf than in wood-chip mulched plant beds, whereas ants were equally common in both locations. The addition of herbaceous plants to the landscape beds had little effect on pest insect abundance.

  4. Short communication. A survey of potential insect vectors of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa in three regions of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao R. S. Lopes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a rapid-spreading olive disease associated with Xylella fastidiosa in southern Italy represents a high risk to susceptible crops in other countries of the Mediterranean basin, if insect vectors occur in the region. The goal of this study was to identify xylem-feeding Auchenorrhyncha that could potentially act as vectors of X. fastidiosa in three regions of Spain (Andalucía, Murcia and Madrid. Samplings with sweep net and stem tap were carried out in October/2004 on grapevines and adjacent crops (olives, nectarine, citrus, Prunus spp., ornamental trees and herbaceous weeds. Yellow sticky cards were placed in ten vineyards located across 100 km in Andalucía and in three vineyards distant 10-15 km apart in Murcia. Specimens of frequently-trapped species were tested by nested- or multiplex-PCR for the presence of X. fastidiosa. The Typhlocybinae leafhopper, Austroasca (Jacobiasca lybica (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae was the most abundant species in vineyards and citrus orchards. Planthoppers (Hemiptera: Fulgoroidea and psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea were prevalent on olives. Cicadellinae leafhoppers (known as sharpshooters, which are major vectors of X. fastidiosa in the Americas, were not found in the samples. The only potential vectors were spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopoidea collected on Populus sp., herbaceous and on conifer trees (Pinus halepense; the spittlebug Neophileanus sp. was common on conifer trees adjacent to a vineyard in Jumilla. None of the insect samples tested positive for X. fastidiosa by PCR assays. However, spittlebugs already associated with susceptible crops in Spain may allow fast spread of X. fastidiosa in case this pathogen is introduced.

  5. Sugarcane straw and the populations of pests and nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Luci Dinardo-Miranda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The green cane harvesting represented a significant change in sugarcane ecosystem due to the presence of straw left on the soil and to the absence of fire. These two factors may affect the populations of pests and their natural enemies. Among the pests benefit from the green cane harvesting stand out the spittlebug, Mahanarva fimbriolata, the curculionid Sphenophorus levis and sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis. In areas of green cane harvesting, the population of these species grew faster than in areas of burnt cane. On the other hand, there are virtually no records of attacks by lesser cornstalk borers in areas of green cane harvesting. Populations of plant parasitic nematodes and the beetles Migdolus fryanus, very important pests of sugarcane, were apparently not affected by the green cane harvesting. Despite the absence of more consistent information, it appears that populations of ants and the giant borer Telchin licus can increase in green cane areas, due primarily to the difficulty of pest control. The partial or total removal of straw from the field represents an additional change to the ecosystem that could alter the status of pests and nematodes. It is likely that spittlebug, the curculionid S. levis and sugarcane borer populations decrease if a portion of the straw is removed from the field. However, the pest populations in areas where the straw is collected will not return to their original conditions at the time of burnt cane harvesting because the absence of fire will be maintained.

  6. First occurrence of tetrodotoxin in a dendrobatid frog (Colostethus inguinalis), with further reports for the bufonid genus Atelopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J W; Gusovsky, F; Myers, C W; Yotsu-Yamashita, M; Yasumoto, T

    1994-03-01

    The water-soluble toxin present in skin of Colostethus inguinalis (Dendrobatidae) was identified as tetrodotoxin by fluorometric HPLC analysis. The amount of tetrodotoxin per frog skin was estimated by HPLC, mouse toxicity, and inhibition of [3H]saxitoxin binding to brain membranes as 0.1 to 1.2 micrograms. Small amounts of anhydrotetrodotoxin and 4-epietrodotoxin also were present. Tetrodotoxin-like activity was not detected by inhibition of [3H]saxitoxin binding in other species of Colostethus nor in other dendrobatids (Aromobates, Dendrobates, Phyllobates). Tetrodotoxin-like activity was present in extracts of skin of five species of Atelopus (Bufonidae). HPLC analysis identified tetrodotoxin as the major toxic component in Atelopus spumarius and A. varius, as a minor component in A. spurrelli, and as a trace component in A. ignescens and A. zeteki. The major tetrodotoxin-like compounds in the last three species were not identified. Tetrodotoxin-like activity was not detected by inhibition of [3H]saxitoxin binding in skin extracts from three other genera of bufonids.

  7. Two ancient bacterial endosymbionts have coevolved with the planthoppers (Insecta: Hemiptera: Fulgoroidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Julie M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the hemipteran suborder Auchenorrhyncha (commonly known as planthoppers, tree- and leafhoppers, spittlebugs, and cicadas are unusual among insects known to harbor endosymbiotic bacteria in that they are associated with diverse assemblages of bacterial endosymbionts. Early light microscopic surveys of species representing the two major lineages of Auchenorrhyncha (the planthopper superfamily Fulgoroidea; and Cicadomorpha, comprising Membracoidea [tree- and leafhoppers], Cercopoidea [spittlebugs], and Cicadoidea [cicadas], found that most examined species harbored at least two morphologically distinct bacterial endosymbionts, and some harbored as many as six. Recent investigations using molecular techniques have identified multiple obligate bacterial endosymbionts in Cicadomorpha; however, much less is known about endosymbionts of Fulgoroidea. In this study, we present the initial findings of an ongoing PCR-based survey (sequencing 16S rDNA of planthopper-associated bacteria to document endosymbionts with a long-term history of codiversification with their fulgoroid hosts. Results Results of PCR surveys and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA recovered a monophyletic clade of Betaproteobacteria associated with planthoppers; this clade included Vidania fulgoroideae, a recently described bacterium identified in exemplars of the planthopper family Cixiidae. We surveyed 77 planthopper species representing 18 fulgoroid families, and detected Vidania in 40 species (representing 13 families. Further, we detected the Sulcia endosymbiont (identified as an obligate endosymbiont of Auchenorrhyncha in previous studies in 30 of the 40 species harboring Vidania. Concordance of the Vidania phylogeny with the phylogeny of the planthopper hosts (reconstructed based on sequence data from five genes generated from the same insect specimens from which the bacterial sequences were obtained was supported by statistical tests of

  8. Two ancient bacterial endosymbionts have coevolved with the planthoppers (Insecta: Hemiptera: Fulgoroidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Julie M; Cryan, Jason R

    2012-06-14

    Members of the hemipteran suborder Auchenorrhyncha (commonly known as planthoppers, tree- and leafhoppers, spittlebugs, and cicadas) are unusual among insects known to harbor endosymbiotic bacteria in that they are associated with diverse assemblages of bacterial endosymbionts. Early light microscopic surveys of species representing the two major lineages of Auchenorrhyncha (the planthopper superfamily Fulgoroidea; and Cicadomorpha, comprising Membracoidea [tree- and leafhoppers], Cercopoidea [spittlebugs], and Cicadoidea [cicadas]), found that most examined species harbored at least two morphologically distinct bacterial endosymbionts, and some harbored as many as six. Recent investigations using molecular techniques have identified multiple obligate bacterial endosymbionts in Cicadomorpha; however, much less is known about endosymbionts of Fulgoroidea. In this study, we present the initial findings of an ongoing PCR-based survey (sequencing 16S rDNA) of planthopper-associated bacteria to document endosymbionts with a long-term history of codiversification with their fulgoroid hosts. Results of PCR surveys and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA recovered a monophyletic clade of Betaproteobacteria associated with planthoppers; this clade included Vidania fulgoroideae, a recently described bacterium identified in exemplars of the planthopper family Cixiidae. We surveyed 77 planthopper species representing 18 fulgoroid families, and detected Vidania in 40 species (representing 13 families). Further, we detected the Sulcia endosymbiont (identified as an obligate endosymbiont of Auchenorrhyncha in previous studies) in 30 of the 40 species harboring Vidania. Concordance of the Vidania phylogeny with the phylogeny of the planthopper hosts (reconstructed based on sequence data from five genes generated from the same insect specimens from which the bacterial sequences were obtained) was supported by statistical tests of codiversification. Codiversification tests also

  9. Evaluation of the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis: loss of defense against generalist but not specialist herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull-Sanders, Helen M; Clare, Robert; Johnson, Robert H; Meyer, Gretchen A

    2007-04-01

    The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis predicts that invasive plant species may escape their specialized natural enemies in their introduced range and subsequently evolve with a decrease in investment in anti-herbivore chemical defenses relative to native conspecifics. We compared the chemical profile of 10 populations of US native and 20 populations of European invasive Solidago gigantea. To test for differences in inducibility between native and invasive populations, we measured secondary chemistry in both damaged and undamaged plants. We also performed bioassays with three specialist and two generalist insect herbivores from four different feeding guilds. There was no evidence that invasive populations had reduced concentrations of sesquiterpenes, diterpenes, or short-chain hydrocarbons (SCH), although significant variation among populations was detected. Sesquiterpene and diterpene concentrations were not influenced by damage to the host plant, whereas SCH concentrations were decreased by damage for both native and invasive plants. Performance of the three specialist insects was not affected by the continental origin of the host plant. However, larval mass of the generalist caterpillar Spodoptera exigua was 37% lower on native plants compared to invasive plants. The other generalist insect, a xylem-tapping spittlebug that occurs on both continents, performed equally well on native and invasive plants. These results offer partial support for the defense predictions of the EICA hypothesis: the better growth of Spodoptera caterpillars on European plants shows that some defenses have been lost in the introduced range, even though our measures of secondary chemistry did not detect differences between continents. Our results show significant variation in chemical defenses and herbivore performance across populations on both continents and emphasize the need for analysis across a broad spatial scale and the use of multiple herbivores.