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Sample records for spirometry forced expiratory

  1. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711. Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  2. Age group classification and gender detection based on forced expiratory spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgun, Sema; Ozbek, I Yucel

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates the utility of forced expiratory spirometry (FES) test with efficient machine learning algorithms for the purpose of gender detection and age group classification. The proposed method has three main stages: feature extraction, training of the models and detection. In the first stage, some features are extracted from volume-time curve and expiratory flow-volume loop obtained from FES test. In the second stage, the probabilistic models for each gender and age group are constructed by training Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) and Support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. In the final stage, the gender (or age group) of test subject is estimated by using the trained GMM (or SVM) model. Experiments have been evaluated on a large database from 4571 subjects. The experimental results show that average correct classification rate performance of both GMM and SVM methods based on the FES test is more than 99.3 % and 96.8 % for gender and age group classification, respectively.

  3. The Concave Shape of the Forced Expiratory Flow-Volume Curve in 3 Seconds Is a Practical Surrogate of FEV1/FVC for the Diagnosis of Airway Limitation in Inadequate Spirometry.

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    Li, Hao; Liu, Chunhong; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Spirometry is important for the differential diagnosis of dyspnea. However, some patients cannot exhale for ≥6 s to achieve the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the reliability of a new parameter that quantifies the degree of concavity in the first 3 s to define airway limitation as a surrogate for the FEV 1 /FVC. Four hundred spirometry test results were selected through complete random sampling. The new parameter, termed the AUC 3 /AT 3 , was calculated as the area under the descending limb of the expiratory flow-volume curve before the end of the first 3 s (AUC 3 ) divided by the area of the triangle before the end of the first 3 s (AT 3 ). The AUC 3 /AT 3 was compared with the FEV 1 /FVC using Pearson's correlation analysis. The level of agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of airway obstruction was analyzed using the kappa statistic. We also compared the diagnostic accuracy of the new index with that of the FEV 1 /forced expiratory volume in the first 3 s (FEV 3 ). There was a strong correlation (r = 0.88, P < .001) between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC. There was also strong agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of obstruction with kappa indices of 0.72 (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] criterion) and 0.67 (lower limit of normal criterion), and these values were greater than those obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 . The AUC 3 /AT 3 also exhibited acceptable sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. The diagnostic accuracies of the AUC 3 /AT 3 were 86.3% (GOLD criterion) and 83.8% (lower limit of normal criterion), which were greater than the 76.0 and 74.0% obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 , respectively. The AUC 3 /AT 3 can be utilized as a surrogate parameter for the FEV 1 /FVC when patients cannot complete a 6-s expiratory effort. Additionally, the

  4. Lung function in North American Indian children: reference standards for spirometry, maximal expiratory flow volume curves, and peak expiratory flow.

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    Wall, M A; Olson, D; Bonn, B A; Creelman, T; Buist, A S

    1982-02-01

    Reference standards of lung function was determined in 176 healthy North American Indian children (94 girls, 82 boys) 7 to 18 yr of age. Spirometry, maximal expiratory flow volume curves, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured using techniques and equipment recommended by the American Thoracic Society. Standing height was found to be an accurate predictor of lung function, and prediction equations for each lung function variable are presented using standing height as the independent variable. Lung volumes and expiratory flow rates in North American Indian children were similar to those previously reported for white and Mexican-American children but were greater than those in black children. In both boys and girls, lung function increased in a curvilinear fashion. Volume-adjusted maximal expiratory flow rates after expiring 50 or 75% of FVC tended to decrease in both sexes as age and height increased. Our maximal expiratory flow volume curve data suggest that as North American Indian children grow, lung volume increases at a slightly faster rate than airway size does.

  5. PIKO-6® vs. forced spirometry in asthmatic children.

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    Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Larios-Castañeda, Pablo José; Miguel-Reyes, José Luis; Briseño, David Martínez; Flores-Campos, Roberto; Sáenz-López, Juan Arturo; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2014-12-01

    The PIKO-6® is an electronic device that measures forced expiratory volume at seconds 1 (FEV1) and 6 (FEV6) of a forced vital capacity (FVC) maneuver. This device could aid in diagnosing obstructive respiratory diseases. To determine the concordance of FEV1, FEV6, and the FEV1/FEV6 quotient achieved with PIKO-6® versus spirometric values from asthmatic patients, and compare results with measures from healthy children. A cross-sectional study with asthmatic and healthy 6-to-14-year-old children, all of whom performed a forced spirometry as well as a PIKO-6® test. The study included 82 subjects (58 asthmatics, 24 healthy children). Except for the functional parameters, the basal characteristics of the two groups were similar. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for FEV1 was 0.938 (P spirometry was lower in patients with partially controlled or uncontrolled asthma compared to controlled or healthy children. The broad limits of agreement show that the FEV1, FEV6, and FEV1/FEV6 obtained with the PIKO-6® are not interchangeable with spirometry results. Longitudinal evaluations of asthma patients are necessary to assess the utility of PIKO-6®. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Static end-expiratory and dynamic forced expiratory tracheal collapse in COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, C.R.; Bankier, A.A.; O'Donnell, D.H.; Loring, S.H.; Boiselle, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the range of tracheal collapse at end-expiration among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare the extent of tracheal collapse between static end-expiratory and dynamic forced-expiratory multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and methods: After institutional review board approval and obtaining informed consent, 67 patients meeting the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)/World Health Organization (WHO) Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria for COPD were sequentially imaged using a 64-detector-row CT machine at end-inspiration, during forced expiration, and at end-expiration. Standardized respiratory coaching and spirometric monitoring were employed. Mean percentage tracheal collapse at end-expiration and forced expiration were compared using correlation analysis, and the power of end-expiratory cross-sectional area to predict excessive forced-expiratory tracheal collapse was computed following construction of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: Mean percentage expiratory collapse among COPD patients was 17 ± 18% at end-expiration compared to 62 ± 16% during forced expiration. Over the observed range of end-expiratory tracheal collapse (approximately 10–50%), the positive predictive value of end-expiratory collapse to predict excessive (≥80%) forced expiratory tracheal collapse was <0.3. Conclusion: COPD patients demonstrate a wide range of end-expiratory tracheal collapse. The magnitude of static end-expiratory tracheal collapse does not predict excessive dynamic expiratory tracheal collapse

  7. Spirometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirometry Overview Spirometry (spy-ROM-uh-tree) is a common office test used to assess how well your lungs work by ... much you exhale and how quickly you exhale. Spirometry is used to diagnose asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  8. Comparison of forced expiratory spirometric flow changes following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group B received intrathecal anaesthesia 15 mgs of bupivacaine with 0.5 ml of normal saline and Group BF received 15 mgs of bupivacaine with 0.5 ml of fentanyl (25 μg) intrathecally. The patients were instructed about the performance of the spirometry on the previous evening of the surgery. Forced vital capacity, forced ...

  9. Noncontact spirometry with a webcam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenbin; Yang, Yuting; Tsow, Francis; Shao, Dangdang; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-05-01

    We present an imaging-based method for noncontact spirometry. The method tracks the subtle respiratory-induced shoulder movement of a subject, builds a calibration curve, and determines the flow-volume spirometry curve and vital respiratory parameters, including forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow rate. We validate the accuracy of the method by comparing the data with those simultaneously recorded with a gold standard reference method and examine the reliability of the noncontact spirometry with a pilot study including 16 subjects. This work demonstrates that the noncontact method can provide accurate and reliable spirometry tests with a webcam. Compared to the traditional spirometers, the present noncontact spirometry does not require using a spirometer, breathing into a mouthpiece, or wearing a nose clip, thus making spirometry test more easily accessible for the growing population of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  10. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis

    2016-01-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic...... in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care...

  11. Spirometry reference values in the Brazilian population.

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    Rufino, R; Costa, C H; Lopes, A J; Maiworm, A I; Maynard, K; Silva, L M R A; Dias, R M

    2017-03-02

    The aim of the present study was to provide new spirometry reference equations in a sample of the Brazilian population for the following parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, peak of expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow at 50% (FEF50%), 75% average vital capacity (FEF25-75%), and average forced expiratory flow time (FEFT). This was a prospective study using results from chest radiographs, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires to investigate the participants' respiratory symptoms, sedentarism, and comorbidities (Charlson comorbidity index). From December 2010 to July 2014, individuals were randomly selected from various locations in the state of Rio de Janeiro. All individuals were examined by a single technician in the morning at the laboratory, and performed the spirometry with the same spirometer. Spirometry values were tabulated for the creation of three equation models: linear regression, logarithmic regression, and logarithms through a method that incorporates the lambda, median, and coefficient of variation (LMS method). Initially, 7003 individuals from both genders were contacted, and 454 were recruited. The data from the new equations were compared with one Brazilian and eight international equations, resulting in a high correlation (r>0.9). The values derived from the LMS method and linear regression were very similar (P>0.5), and both could be used to acquire the reference values for Brazilian spirometry. Data derived from the equations of this study were different from the current Brazilian equation, which could be justified by the different method used.

  12. Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second over time in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Edwards, Lisa D; Scanlon, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    A key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an accelerated rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but data on the variability and determinants of this change in patients who have established disease are scarce.......A key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an accelerated rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but data on the variability and determinants of this change in patients who have established disease are scarce....

  13. A Simple Measure to Assess Hyperinflation and Air Trapping: 1-Forced Expiratory Volume in Three Second / Forced Vital Capacity

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    Sermin Börekçi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have suggested that 1 minus-forced expiratory volume expired in 3 seconds / forced vital capacity (1-FEV3/FVC may be an indicator of distal airway obstruction and a promising measure to evaluate small airways dysfunction. Aims: To investigate the associations of 1-FEV3/FVC with the spirometric measures and lung volumes that assess small airways dysfunction and reflects hyperinflation and air trapping. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Retrospective assessment of a total of 1110 cases who underwent body plethysmographic lung volume estimations between a time span from 2005 to 2012. Patients were assigned into two groups: firstly by FEV1/FVC (FEV1/FVC <70% vs. FEV1/FVC ≥70%; secondly by FEV3/FVC < lower limits of normal (LLN (FEV3/FVC < LLN vs. FEV3/FVC ≥ LLN. Spirometric indices and lung volumes measured by whole-body plethysmography were compared in groups. Also the correlation of spirometric indices with measured lung volumes were assessed in the whole-study population and in subgroups stratified according to FEV1/FVC and FEV3/FVC. Results: Six hundred seven (54.7% were male and 503 (45.3% were female, with a mean age of 52.5±15.6 years. Mean FEV3/FVC and 1-FEV3/FVC were 87.05%, 12.95%, respectively. The mean 1-FEV3/FVC was 4.9% in the FEV1/FVC ≥70% group (n=644 vs. 24.1% in the FEV1/FVC <70% group (n=466. A positive correlation was found between 1-FEV3/FVC and residual volume (r=0.70; p<0.0001, functional residual capacity-pleth (r=0.61; p<0.0001, and total lung capacity (r=0.47; p<0.0001. 1-FEV3/FVC was negatively correlated with forced expiratory flow25-75 (r=−0.84; p<0.0001. The upper limit of 95% confidence interval for 1-FEV3/FVC was 13.7%. 1-FEV3/FVC showed significant correlations with parameters of air trapping and hyperinflation measured by whole-body plethysmography. Importantly, these correlations were higher in study participants with FEV1/FVC <70% or FEV3/FVC

  14. Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second over time in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Edwards, Lisa D; Scanlon, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    A key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an accelerated rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but data on the variability and determinants of this change in patients who have established disease are scarce....

  15. Longitudinal spirometry among patients in a treatment program for community members with World Trade Center (WTC)-related illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengling; Qian, Meng; Cheng, Qinyi; Berger, Kenneth I.; Shao, Yongzhao; Turetz, Meredith; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Goldring, Roberta M.; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Marmor, Michael; Reibman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The course of lung function in community members exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust and fumes remains undefined. We studied longitudinal spirometry among patients in the WTC Environmental Health Center (WTCEHC) treatment program. Methods Observational study of 946 WTCEHC patients with repeated spirometry measures analyzed on the population as a whole and stratified by smoking status, initial spirometry pattern and WTC-related exposure category. Results Improvement in forced expiratory volume (FVC; 54.4 ml/year; 95% CI: 45.0-63.8) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; 36.8 ml/year; 95% CI: 29.3-44.3) was noted for the population as a whole. Heavy smokers did not improve. Spirometry changes differed depending on initial spirometry pattern and exposure category. Conclusions These data demonstrate spirometry improvement in select populations suggesting reversibility in airway injury and reinforcing the importance of continued treatment. PMID:22995806

  16. Spirometry reference values in the Brazilian population

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    R. Rufino

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to provide new spirometry reference equations in a sample of the Brazilian population for the following parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio, peak of expiratory flow (PEF, forced expiratory flow at 50% (FEF50%, 75% average vital capacity (FEF25-75%, and average forced expiratory flow time (FEFT. This was a prospective study using results from chest radiographs, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires to investigate the participants' respiratory symptoms, sedentarism, and comorbidities (Charlson comorbidity index. From December 2010 to July 2014, individuals were randomly selected from various locations in the state of Rio de Janeiro. All individuals were examined by a single technician in the morning at the laboratory, and performed the spirometry with the same spirometer. Spirometry values were tabulated for the creation of three equation models: linear regression, logarithmic regression, and logarithms through a method that incorporates the lambda, median, and coefficient of variation (LMS method. Initially, 7003 individuals from both genders were contacted, and 454 were recruited. The data from the new equations were compared with one Brazilian and eight international equations, resulting in a high correlation (r>0.9. The values derived from the LMS method and linear regression were very similar (P>0.5, and both could be used to acquire the reference values for Brazilian spirometry. Data derived from the equations of this study were different from the current Brazilian equation, which could be justified by the different method used.

  17. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

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    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  18. Reference values of inspiratory spirometry for Finnish adults.

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    Kainu, Annette; Timonen, Kirsi L; Vanninen, Esko; Sovijärvi, Anssi R

    2018-03-07

    Inspiratory spirometry is used in evaluation of upper airway disorders e.g. fixed or variable obstruction. There are, however, very few published data on normal values for inspiratory spirometry. The main aim of this study was to produce reference values for inspiratory spirometry for healthy Finnish adults. Inspiratory spirometry was preplanned to a sample of the Finnish spirometry reference values sample. Data was successfully retrieved from 368 healthy nonsmoking adults (132 males) between 19 and 83 years of age. Reference equations were produced for forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC), forced inspiratory volume in one second (FIV1), FIV1/FIVC, peak inspiratory flow (PIF) and the ratios of FIV1/forced expiratory volume in one second and PIF/peak expiratory flow. The present values were compared to PIF values from previously used Finnish study of Viljanen et al. (1982) reference values and Norwegian values for FIV1, FIVC and FIV1/FIVC presented by Gulsvik et al. (2001). The predicted values from the Gulsvik et al. (2001), provided a good fit for FIVC, but smaller values for FIV1 with mean 108.3 and 109.1% of predicted values for males and females, respectively. PIF values were 87.4 and 91.2% of Viljanen et al. (1982) predicted values in males and females, respectively. Differences in measurement methods and selection of results may contribute to the observed differences. Inspiratory spirometry is technically more demanding and needs repeatability criteria to improve validity. New reference values are suggested to clinical use in Finland when assessing inspiratory spirometry. Utility of inspiratory to expiratory values indices in assessment of airway collapse need further study.

  19. Should the diagnosis of COPD be based on a single spirometry test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.; Robberts, B.; Crockett, A.J.; Thoonen, B.P.; Lucas, A.; Grootens, J.; Smeele, I.J.; Thamrin, C.; Reddel, H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines indicate that a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis is made from a single spirometry test. However, long-term stability of diagnosis based on forced expiratory volume in 1 s over forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio has not been reported. In primary care

  20. Reference values for spirometry in preschool children.

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    Burity, Edjane F; Pereira, Carlos A C; Rizzo, José A; Brito, Murilo C A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2013-01-01

    Reference values for lung function tests differ in samples from different countries, including values for preschoolers. The main objective of this study was to derive reference values in this population. A prospective study was conducted through a questionnaire applied to 425 preschool children aged 3 to 6 years, from schools and day-care centers in a metropolitan city in Brazil. Children were selected by simple random sampling from the aforementioned schools. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volumes (FEV1, FEV0.50), forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75) and FEV1/FVC, FEV0.5/FVC and FEF25-75/FVC ratios were evaluated. Of the 425 children enrolled, 321 (75.6%) underwent the tests. Of these, 135 (42.0%) showed acceptable results with full expiratory curves and thus were included in the regression analysis to define the reference values. Height and gender significantly influenced FVC values through linear and logarithmic regression analysis. In males, R(2) increased with the logarithmic model for FVC and FEV1, but the linear model was retained for its simplicity. The lower limits were calculated by measuring the fifth percentile residues. Full expiratory curves are more difficult to obtain in preschoolers. In addition to height, gender also influences the measures of FVC and FEV1. Reference values were defined for spirometry in preschool children in this population, which are applicable to similar populations. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction equations for spirometry in four- to six-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Danielle Corrêa; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Martins, Jocimar Avelar; Vieira, Bruna da Silva Pinto Pinheiro; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio; de Mendonça, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto; Borja, Raíssa de Oliveira; Britto, Raquel Rodrigues; Parreira, Verônica Franco

    2016-01-01

    To generate prediction equations for spirometry in 4- to 6-year-old children. Forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 0.5s, forced expiratory volume in one second, peak expiratory flow, and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of the forced vital capacity were assessed in 195 healthy children residing in the town of Sete Lagoas, state of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. The least mean squares method was used to derive the prediction equations. The level of significance was established as p<0.05. Overall, 85% of the children succeeded in performing the spirometric maneuvers. In the prediction equation, height was the single predictor of the spirometric variables as follows: forced vital capacity=exponential [(-2.255)+(0.022×height)], forced expiratory volume in 0.5s=exponential [(-2.288)+(0.019×height)], forced expiratory volume in one second=exponential [(-2.767)+(0.026×height)], peak expiratory flow=exponential [(-2.908)+(0.019×height)], and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of the forced vital capacity=exponential [(-1.404)+(0.016×height)]. Neither age nor weight influenced the regression equations. No significant differences in the predicted values for boys and girls were observed. The predicted values obtained in the present study are comparable to those reported for preschoolers from both Brazil and other countries. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparação entre inspirometria de incentivo e pressão positiva expiratória na função pulmonar após cirurgia bariátrica Comparison between incentive spirometry and expiratory positive airway pressure on pulmonary function after bariatric surgery

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    Marcela C. Barbalho-Moulim

    2009-06-01

    prior to, and on the second post-operative day. Before surgery patients were divided into two groups, SG - spirometer group (n=13, and EG - EPAP group (n=15. Motor physical therapy was standardized for both groups; respiratory therapy (both modalities started on the day of surgery, in 15-minute sessions. Post-operative results showed similar reduction, in both groups, in the values of vital capacity, forced vital capacity, maximum voluntary ventilation, and inspiratory reserve volume. No changes were found in tidal volume values in SG, neither in expiratory reserve volume in EG. Diaphragmatic and thoracoabdominal motion were less harmed in SG. After bariatric surgery thus incentive spirometry had better effect in maintaining tidal volume, as well as on diaphragmatic and thoracoabdominal motion; while EPAP proved more efficient in re-establishing expiratory reserve volume in the postoperative period.

  3. Prediction of Spirometric Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) Data Using Support Vector Regression

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    Kavitha, A.; Sujatha, C. M.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, prediction of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) in pulmonary function test is carried out using the spirometer and support vector regression analysis. Pulmonary function data are measured with flow volume spirometer from volunteers (N=175) using a standard data acquisition protocol. The acquired data are then used to predict FEV1. Support vector machines with polynomial kernel function with four different orders were employed to predict the values of FEV1. The performance is evaluated by computing the average prediction accuracy for normal and abnormal cases. Results show that support vector machines are capable of predicting FEV1 in both normal and abnormal cases and the average prediction accuracy for normal subjects was higher than that of abnormal subjects. Accuracy in prediction was found to be high for a regularization constant of C=10. Since FEV1 is the most significant parameter in the analysis of spirometric data, it appears that this method of assessment is useful in diagnosing the pulmonary abnormalities with incomplete data and data with poor recording.

  4. Correlation between spirometry values and pulmonary artery pressure in young healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Alon; Benderly, Michal; Prokupetz, Alex; Gordon, Barak; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is frequently associated with parenchymal lung disease. We evaluated the association between spirometry values and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) in young subjects without lung disease : We studied applicants to the Israeli Air Force, who undergo routine evaluation that includes resting spirometry and echocardiography. Applicants with overt lung disease were excluded. All echocardiographic studies performed in the years 1994 through 2010 (n = 6,598) were screened, and files that included PASP and spirometry values were analyzed for the association between PASP and FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow, and forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC maneuver. Of the 647 air force applicants who underwent echocardiography in which PASP was measurable and had spirometry data, 607 (94%) were male, and their average age was 18.16 ± 0.73 years. Mean PASP was 26.4 ± 5.2 mm Hg (range 10-41 mm Hg). None of the spirometry values significantly correlated with PASP. PASP in young healthy subjects is not significantly associated with spirometry values. Lung mechanics probably do not contribute significantly to PASP in this population.

  5. Practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis by simple spirometry: an observational case-control study in primary care.

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    Shiota, Satomi; Ichikawa, Masako; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-03-26

    We see patients who present with spirometry airflow limitation despite their forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) as well as forced vital capacity (FVC) to be supernormal (FEV1/FVC spirometry conditions (results measured with spirometry) could be suitably used as a practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis: the condition of disproportionate but physiologically normal growth between airways and lung parenchyma. We compared the conventional surrogate marker of dysanapsis, maximum mid-expiratory flow to FVC (MMF/FVC), in SUBJECTS (FEV1/FVC spirometry results with SUBJECTS) (n = 55), and in CONTROLS (age- and height- matched, normal spirometry results) (n = 25). Next we added imaging analysis to evaluate the relationship between the cross sectional airway luminal area (X-Ai) and the lung volume results among the three groups. The MMF/FVC was significantly lower in SUBJECTS and in EMPHYSEMA compared to CONTROLS. However, percent predicted peak expiratory flow (%PEFR) was significantly lower only in SUBJECTS and not in EMPHYSEMA compared to CONTROLS. The ratio of the X-Ai of the trachea and right apical bronchus to lung volume was significantly lower in SUBJECTS compared to CONTROLS. The simple spirometry conditions in SUBJECTS are highly suggestive of practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis. Awareness of this concept would help to attenuate the risk of overdiagnosis of obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Quality assurance of spirometry in a population-based study -predictors of good outcome in spirometry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wan C; Bourbeau, Jean; O'Donnell, Denis; Aaron, Shawn; Maltais, Francois; Marciniuk, Darcy; Hernandez, Paul; Cowie, Robert; Chapman, Kenneth; Sonia Buist, A; Sin, Don; Mark Fitzgerald, J

    2014-04-01

    The assurance of high-quality spirometry testing remains a challenge. Spirometry training consisted of standardized coaching followed by certification for 35 spirometry-naïve and 9 spirometry-experienced research assistants. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator (BD) in random population samples of 5176 people aged 40 years and older from 9 sites in Canada. using the hand-held EasyOne spirometer (ndd Medical Technologies Inc., Andover, MA, USA). Pulmonary function quality assurance with over reading was conducted centrally in Vancouver: spirograms were reviewed and graded according to ATS/ERS standards with prompt feedback to the technician at each site. Descriptive statistics were calculated for manoeuvre acceptability and repeatability variables. A logistic regression model was constructed for the predictors of spirometry quality success. 95% of test sessions achieved pre-determined quality standards for back extrapolated volume (BEV), time to peak flow (PEFT) and end of test volume (EOTV). The mean forced expiratory time (FET) was 11.2 seconds. Then, 90% and 95% of all manoeuvres had FEV1 and FVC that were repeatable within 150 ml and 200 ml respectively. Test quality was slightly better for post-BD test sessions compared with pre-BD for both groups of research assistants. Independent predictors of acceptable test quality included participant characteristics: female sex, younger age, greater BD responsiveness; but not study site or prior experience in completing spirometry by the technologist. Good quality spirometry tests are attainable in large multicenter epidemiological studies by trained research assistants, irrespective of their prior experience in spirometry.

  7. Mismatch between asthma symptoms and spirometry: implications for managing asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifano, Elizabeth D; Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cloutier, Michelle M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in assessing asthma severity and beginning therapy by the general pediatrician. Between 2008 and 2012, spirometry testing was satisfactorily performed in 894 children (ages 5-19 years) whose asthma severity had been determined by their pediatrician using asthma guideline-based clinical criteria. Spirometry-determined asthma severity using national asthma guidelines and clinician-determined asthma severity were compared for concordance using weighted Kappa coefficients. Thirty percent of participants had clinically determined intermittent asthma; 32%, 33%, and 5% had mild, moderate, and severe, persistent asthma, respectively. Increasing disease severity was associated with decreases in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio (P spirometry-determined severity. Concordance was 0.16 (95% CI 0.10, 0.23), and when adjusted for bias and prevalence, was 0.20 (95% CI 0.17, 0.23). When accounting for age, sex, exposure to smoke, and insurance type, only spirometry-determined asthma severity was a significant predictor of agreement (P spirometry-determined severity increased. Concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in determining asthma severity is low even when guideline-based clinical assessment tools are used. Because appropriate therapy reduces asthma morbidity and is guided by disease severity, results from spirometry testing could better guide pediatricians in determining appropriate therapy for their patients with asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Validation of Global Lung Function Initiative and All Ages Reference Equations for Forced Spirometry in Healthy Spanish Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín de Vicente, Carlos; de Mir Messa, Inés; Rovira Amigo, Sandra; Torrent Vernetta, Alba; Gartner, Silvia; Iglesias Serrano, Ignacio; Carrascosa Lezcano, Antonio; Moreno Galdó, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Recent publication of multi-ethnic spirometry reference equations for subjects aged from 3-95 years aim to avoid age-related discontinuities and provide a worldwide standard for interpreting spirometric test results. To assess the agreement of the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI-2012) and All ages (FEV 0.5 ) reference equations with the Spanish preschool lung function data. To verify the appropriateness of these reference values for clinical use in Spanish preschool children. Spirometric measurements were obtained from children aged 3 to 6 years attending 10 randomly selected schools in Barcelona (Spain). Stanojevic's quality control criteria were applied. Z-scores were calculated for the spirometry outcomes based on the GLI equations. If the z-score (mean) of each parameter was close to 0, with a maximum variance of ± 0.5 from the mean and a standard deviation of 1, the GLI-2012 equations would be applicable in our population. Of 543 children recruited, 405 (74.6%) were 'healthy', and of these, 380 were Caucasians. Of these 380, 81.6% (169 females, 141 males) performed technically acceptable and reproducible maneuvers to assess FEVt, and 69.5% achieved a clear end-expiratory plateau. Z-scores for FVC, FEV 1 , FEV 1 /FVC, FEV 0.75 , FEV 0.75 /FVC, FEV 0.5 , FEF 75 and FEF 25-75 all fell within ± 0.5, except for FEV 1 /FVC (0.53 z-scores). GLI equations are appropriate for Spanish preschool children. These data provide further evidence to support widespread application of the GLI reference equations. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Overall and peripheral lung function assessment by spirometry and forced oscillation technique in relation to asthma diagnosis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijkenskjöld Rentzhog, C; Janson, C; Berglund, L; Borres, M P; Nordvall, L; Alving, K; Malinovschi, A

    2017-12-01

    Classic spirometry is effort dependent and of limited value in assessing small airways. Peripheral airway involvement, and relation to poor control, in asthma, has been highlighted recently. Forced oscillation technique (FOT) offers an effort-independent assessment of overall and peripheral lung mechanics. We studied the association between lung function variables, obtained either by spirometry or multifrequency (5, 11 and 19 Hz) FOT, and asthma diagnosis and control. Spirometry measures, resistance at 5 (R5) and 19 Hz (R19), reactance at 5 Hz (X5), resonant frequency (f res ), resistance difference between 5-19 Hz (R5-R19) and Asthma Control Test scores were determined in 234 asthmatic and 60 healthy subjects (aged 13-39 years). We used standardized lung function variables in logistic regression analyses, unadjusted and adjusted for age, height, gender and weight. Lower FEV 1 /FVC (OR [95% CI] 0.47 [0.32, 0.69]) and FEF 50 (0.62 [0.46, 0.85]) per standard deviation increase, and higher R5 (3.31 [1.95, 5.62]) and R19 (2.54 [1.65, 3.91]) were associated with asthma diagnosis. Independent predictive effects of FEV 1 /FVC and R5 or R19, respectively, were found for asthma diagnosis. Lower FEV 1 /FVC and altered peripheral FOT measures (X5, f res and R5-R19) were associated with uncontrolled asthma (P-values < .05). Resistance FOT measures were equally informative as spirometry, related to asthma diagnosis, and, furthermore, offered additive information to FEV 1 /FVC, supporting a complementary role for FOT. Asthma control was related to FOT measures of peripheral airways, suggesting a potential use in identifying such involvement. Further studies are needed to determine a clinical value and relevant reference values in children, for the multifrequency FOT measurements. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Correlation and Agreement of Handheld Spirometry with Laboratory Spirometry in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guang-Shing; Campbell, Angela P; Xie, Hu; Stednick, Zach; Callais, Cheryl; Leisenring, Wendy M; Englund, Janet A; Chien, Jason W; Boeckh, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Early detection of subclinical lung function decline may help identify allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who are at increased risk for late noninfectious pulmonary complications, including bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We evaluated the use of handheld spirometry in this population. Allogeneic HCT recipients enrolled in a single-center observational trial performed weekly spirometry with a handheld spirometer for 1 year after transplantation. Participants performed pulmonary function tests in an outpatient laboratory setting at 3 time points: before transplantation, at day 80 after transplantation, and at 1 year after transplantation. Correlation between the 2 methods was assessed by Pearson and Spearman correlations; agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. A total of 437 subjects had evaluable pulmonary function tests. Correlation for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was r = .954 (P spirometry correlated well with laboratory spirometry after allogeneic HCT and may be useful for self-monitoring of patients for early identification of airflow obstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  11. Spirometry use in children hospitalized with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Chun; McDowell, Karen M; Fenchel, Matthew; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder of childhood and continues to be a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) recommends that spirometry be obtained for asthma patients upon hospital admission, after bronchodilation during the acute phase of asthma symptoms, and at least one additional time before discharge from the hospital. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of spirometry in children hospitalized with asthma and to determine association of pulmonary function with future exacerbations. A retrospective cohort study design was utilized involving review of medical records of children ≥5 years old admitted with asthma to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from September 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011. Hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visits were identified by the ICD-9-CM codes of having either a primary diagnosis of asthma (493) or a respiratory illness (460-496) plus a secondary diagnosis of asthma. Asthma re-exacerbation was defined as either having an ED visit or hospitalization for asthma that occurred within 3 months after the index hospitalization. All spirometries were performed in a pediatric pulmonary function laboratory. Among 1,037 admissions included in this study, 89 (8.6%) had spirometry that was recommended by a consulting asthma specialist and usually performed on the day of discharge. Spirometries for forty-five of these patients (54.9%) met all acceptability and repeatability criteria of the American Thoracic Society. Patients who performed acceptable spirometry were significantly older (12.4 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 3.0 years; P = 0.041). The average forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) was 84.4 ± 19.7% predicted; forced vital capacity (FVC) was 98.1 ± 16.0% predicted; FEV1 /FVC was 74.6 ± 9.6%; forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75 ) was 61.2 ± 30.1% predicted. Ten patients (22%) who

  12. Reference values of spirometry for Finnish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainu, A; Timonen, K L; Toikka, J; Qaiser, B; Pitkäniemi, J; Kotaniemi, J T; Lindqvist, A; Vanninen, E; Länsimies, E; Sovijärvi, A R A

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic assessment of lung function necessitates up-to-date reference values. The aim of this study was to estimate reference values for spirometry for the Finnish population between 18 and 80 years and to compare them with the existing Finnish, European and the recently published global GLI2012 reference values. Spirometry was performed for 1380 adults in the population-based FinEsS studies and for 662 healthy non-smoking volunteer adults. Detailed predefined questionnaire screening of diseases and symptoms, and quality control of spirometry yielded a sample of 1000 native Finns (387 men) healthy non-smokers aged 18-83 years. Sex-specific reference values, which are estimated using the GAMLSS method and adjusted for age and height, are provided. The predicted values for lung volumes are larger than those obtained by GLI2012 prediction for the Caucasian subgroup for forced vital capacity (FVC) by an average 6·2% and 5·1% and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) by an average 4·2% and 3·0% in men and women, respectively. GLI2012 slightly overestimated the ratio FEV1/FVC with an age-dependent trend. Most reference equations from other European countries, with the exception of the Swiss SAPALDIA study, showed an underestimation of FVC and FEV1 to varying degrees, and a slight overestimation of FEV1/FVC. This study offers up-to-date reference values of spirometry for native Finns with a wide age range. The GLI2012 predictions seem not to be suitable for clinical use for native Finns due to underestimation of lung volumes. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  13. Interpretation of Spirometry: Selection of Predicted Values and Defining Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most frequently performed investigation to evaluate pulmonary function. It provides clinically useful information on the mechanical properties of the lung and the thoracic cage and aids in taking management-related decisions in a wide spectrum of diseases and disorders. Few measurements in medicine are so dependent on factors related to equipment, operator and the patient. Good spirometry requires quality assured measurements and a systematic approach to interpretation. Standard guidelines on the technical aspects of equipment and their calibration as well as the test procedure have been developed and revised from time-to-time. Strict compliance with standardisation guidelines ensures quality control. Interpretation of spirometry data is based only on two basic measurements--the forced vital capacity (FVC) and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and their ratio, FEV1/FVC. A meaningful and clinically useful interpretation of the measured data requires a systematic approach and consideration of several important issues. Central to interpretation is the understanding of the development and application of prediction equations. Selection of prediction equations that are appropriate for the ethnic origin of the patient is vital to avoid erroneous interpretation. Defining abnormal values is a debatable but critical aspect of spirometry. A statistically valid definition of the lower limits of normal has been advocated as the better method over the more commonly used approach of defining abnormality as a fixed percentage of the predicted value. Spirometry rarely provides a specific diagnosis. Examination of the flow-volume curve and the measured data provides information to define patterns of ventilatory impairment. Spirometry must be interpreted in conjunction with clinical information including results of other investigations.

  14. Risk of COPD with obstruction in active smokers with normal spirometry and reduced diffusion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ben-Gary; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Kaner, Robert J; Sanders, Abraham; Vincent, Thomas L; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2015-12-01

    Smokers are assessed for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using spirometry, with COPD defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as airflow limitation that is not fully reversible with bronchodilators. There is a subset of smokers with normal spirometry (by GOLD criteria), who have a low diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), a parameter linked to emphysema and small airway disease. The natural history of these "normal spirometry/low DLCO" smokers is unknown.From a cohort of 1570 smokers in the New York City metropolitian area, all of whom had normal spirometry, two groups were randomly selected for lung function follow-up: smokers with normal spirometry/normal DLCO (n=59) and smokers with normal spirometry/low DLCO (n=46). All had normal history, physical examination, complete blood count, urinalysis, HIV status, α1-antitrypsin level, chest radiography, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio and total lung capacity. Throughout the study, all continued to be active smokers.In the normal spirometry/normal DLCO group assessed over 45±20 months, 3% developed GOLD-defined COPD. In contrast, in the normal spirometry/low DLCO group, followed over 41±31 months, 22% developed GOLD-defined COPD.Despite appearing "normal" according to GOLD, smokers with normal spirometry but low DLCO are at significant risk of developing COPD with obstruction to airflow. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  15. Impulse oscillometry in acute and stable asthmatic children: a comparison with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Kuyucu, Semanur; Arıkoglu, Tugba; Tezol, Ozlem; Aydogdu, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Lung function tests have attracted interest for the diagnosis and follow-up of childhood asthma in recent years. For patients who cannot perform forced expiratory maneuvers, impulse oscillometry (IOS), performed during spontaneous breathing, may be an alternative tool. Thirty-five acute, 107 stable asthmatic and 103 healthy children who presented to our clinic performed IOS followed by spirometry before and after salbutamol inhalation. The mean baseline and reversibility of IOS and spirometry parameters were compared between the groups. Correlation analyses were undertaken within the asthmatics, and the healthy controls separately. To distinguish the three groups, the sensitivity and specificity of baseline and reversibility values of IOS and spirometry were computed. When spirometry was taken as the gold standard, the discriminating performance of IOS to detect the airway obstruction and reversibility was investigated. The mean absolute values of Zrs, R5, R5-R20, X5, X10, X15, Fres, AX, and all spirometric parameters, and the mean reversibility values of R5, R10, Fres, AX and forced expiratory volume in one second were different between the groups and the highest area under curve values to discriminate the groups was obtained from area of reactance (AX) and ΔAX. Zrs, all resistance (including R5-R20) and reactance parameters, Fres and AX were correlated with at least one spirometric parameter. Spirometric reversibility was detected by ≤-22.34 and ≤-39.05 cut-off values of ΔR5 and ΔAX, respectively. IOS has shown a highly significant association with spirometric indices and reversibility testing. It may be a substitute for spirometry in children who fail to perform forced expiratory maneuvers.

  16. [Spirometry interpretation feasibility among pre-school children according to the European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire, Roberto M; González, Scarlett A; Moya, Ana I; Fierro, Laura T; Brockmann, Pablo V; Caussade, Solange L

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most used test to evaluate pulmonary function. Guidelines that defined acceptability and repeatability criteria for its implementation and interpretation among preschoolers were published in 2007. Our objective was to quantify the actual compliance with these criteria among pre-school patients. A review was performed on the baseline spirometry measured in patients aged 2 to 5 years in the Pediatric Respiratory Laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, who were admitted due to recurrent or persistent coughing or wheezing. Only those results obtained in patients who took the test for the first time were considered. They were analyzed by international standards. A total of 93 spirometry results (mean age 57.4 ± 8.6 months, 48 males) were obtained, of which 44 (47%) met all acceptable criteria, 87 (93%) obtained expiratory time of ≥ 0.5seconds, and 67 (72%) of the patients had an end-expiratory flow of ≤10% from peak flow. The variation in the measurement of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was very low (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.9). It was possible to meet the acceptability and repeatability criteria for spirometry among pre-school children in our Center, which was similar to previous reports. As in older children, this test is fully recommended for pre-school children who require lung function studies. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  17. Prediction equations for spirometry in adults from northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K; Kumar, R; Gupta, U; Rahman, M; Dash, D J

    2014-01-01

    Most of the Indian studies on prediction equations for spirometry in adults are several decades old and may have lost their utility as these were carried out with equipment and standardisation protocols that have since changed. Their validity is further questionable as the lung health of the population is likely to have changed over time. To develop prediction equations for spirometry in adults of north Indian origin using the 2005 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) recommendations on standardisation. Normal healthy non-smoker subjects, both males and females, aged 18 years and above underwent spirometry using a non-heated Fleisch Pneumotach spirometer calibrated daily. The dataset was randomly divided into training (70%) and test (30%) sets and the former was used to develop the equations. These were validated on the test data set. Prediction equations were developed separately for males and females for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, and instantaneous expiratory flow rates using multiple linear regression procedure with different transformations of dependent and/or independent variables to achieve the best-fitting models for the data. The equations were compared with the previous ones developed in the same population in the 1960s. In all, 685 (489 males, 196 females) subjects performed spirometry that was technically acceptable and repeatable. All the spirometry parameters were significantly higher among males except the FEV1/FVC ratio that was significantly higher in females. Overall, age had a negative relationship with the spirometry parameters while height was positively correlated with each, except for the FEV1/FVC ratio that was related only to age. Weight was included in the models for FVC, forced expiratory flow (FEF75) and FEV1/FVC ratio in males, but its contribution was very small. Standard errors of estimate were provided to enable calculation of the lower

  18. Effect of a mixture of pyridostigmine and atropine on forced expiratory volume (FEV1), and serum cholinesterase activity in normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B F; Gefke, Kaj; Mosbech, H

    1985-01-01

    injection with a decrease to 27 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of the original activity. Forced expiratory volume in the first 1s (FEV1) was measured at fixed time intervals for 90 min. No decrease in FEV1 was observed; on the contrary, there was a small increase. We conclude that atropine effectively antagonizes...

  19. Novos valores de referência para espirometria forçada em brasileiros adultos de raça branca New reference values for forced spirometry in white adults in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Castro Pereira

    2007-08-01

    capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, FEV1/FVC and FEV1/forced expiratory volume in six seconds (FEV6 were best fitted by linear regression. Flows were best fitted using log equations. For both genders, greater height resulted in lower values for FEV1/FVC, FEV1/FEV6 and flow/FVC ratios. The reference values for FEV1 and FVC in the present study were higher than those derived for Brazilian adults in 1992. CONCLUSION: New predicted values for forced spirometry were obtained in a sample of white Brazilians. The values are greater than those obtained in 1992, probably due to technical factors.

  20. Spirometry and Impulse Oscillometry in Preschool Children: Acceptability and Relationship to Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Meyer; Bacharier, Leonard B; O'Connor, George T; Cohen, Robyn; Sorkness, Ronald L; Morgan, Wayne; Gergen, Peter J; Jaffee, Katy F; Visness, Cynthia M; Wood, Robert A; Bloomberg, Gordon R; Doyle, Susan; Burton, Ryan; Gern, James E

    2018-02-13

    Comparisons of the technical acceptability of spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) and clinical correlations of the measurements have not been well studied in young children. There are no large studies focused on African American and Hispanic children. We sought to (1) compare the acceptability of spirometry and IOS in 3- to 5-year-old children and (2) examine the relationship of maternal smoking during pregnancy to later lung function. Spirometry and IOS were attempted at 4 sites from the Urban Environmental and Childhood Asthma Study birth cohort at ages 3, 4, and 5 years (472, 471, and 479 children, respectively). We measured forced expiratory flow in 0.5 s (forced expiratory volume in 0.5 seconds [FEV 0.5 ]) with spirometry and area of reactance (A X ), resistance and reactance at 5 Hz (R 5 and X 5 , respectively) using IOS. Children were more likely to achieve acceptable maneuvers with spirometry than with IOS at age 3 (60% vs 46%, P < .001) and 5 years (89% vs 84%, P = .02). Performance was consistent among the 4 study sites. In children without recurrent wheeze, there were strong trends for higher FEV 0.5 and lower R 5 and A X over time. Maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher A X at ages 4 and 5 years (P < .01 for both years). There was no significant difference in FEV 0.5 between children with and without in utero exposure to smoking. There is a higher rate of acceptable maneuvers with spirometry compared with IOS, but IOS may be a better indicator of peripheral airway function in preschool children. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  1. Spirometry Changes in Cold Climatic Conditions of Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaya, Iyamanda B; Laxmi, Chettangada C; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function is one of the important physiological measures that is known to be affected during the changes in the altitude. There is dearth of literature on changes in the pulmonary function variables in the cold climate conditions of Antarctica. We carried out spirometry before, during and after one year stay at Antarctica in members of the Indian expedition. Spirometry was carried out on 23 members of the XXVI Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica at baseline, after six months of expedition and at the end of one year, using standard guidelines. The tests were carried out indoor in temperature controlled laboratory. The pulmonary function test parameters did not vary across the period. Although, both forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1) showed a decreasing trend but did not attain any statistical significance. However, peak expiratory flow (PEFR) rate was reduced significantly. Our study did not show consistently significant change in the pulmonary function parameters in the members of the Indian Antarctic expedition.

  2. COMBINED REDUCED FORCED EXPIRATORY VOLUME IN 1-SECOND (FEV1) AND PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE IN SEDENTARY ELDERS WITH FUNCTIONAL LIMITATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brinkley, Tina; Church, Timothy; Liu, Christine K.; Manini, Todd; Newman, Anne B.; Stafford, Randall S.; McDermott, Mary M.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Because they are potentially modifiable and may coexist, we evaluated the combined occurrence of a reduced forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1) and peripheral artery disease (PAD), including its association with exertional symptoms, physical inactivity, and impaired mobility, in sedentary elders with functional limitations. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Lifestyle Interventions and Independence in Elder (LIFE) Study. Participants 1307 sedentary community-dwelling persons, mean age 78.9, with functional limitations (Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] the San Diego Claudication Questionnaire. Physical inactivity was evaluated by percent of accelerometry wear-time with activity the 400MWT (gait-speed The two combined conditions were associated with exertional dyspnea (adjusted odds ratio [adjOR] 2.59 [1.20, 5.60]) and slow gait-speed (adjOR 3.15 [1.72, 5.75]) but not with exertional leg symptoms, high sedentary-time, and moderate-to-severe mobility impairment. Conclusions In sedentary community-dwelling elders with functional limitations, a reduced FEV1 and PAD frequently coexisted and, in combination, were strongly associated with exertional dyspnea and slow gait-speed (a frailty indicator that increases the risk of deleterious outcomes). PMID:24973990

  3. Spirometry and volumetric capnography in lung function assessment of obese and normal-weight individuals without asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Mariana S; Mendes, Roberto T; Marson, Fernando A L; Zambon, Mariana P; Antonio, Maria A R G M; Paschoal, Ilma A; Toro, Adyléia A D C; Severino, Silvana D; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Ribeiro, José D

    To analyze and compare lung function of obese and healthy, normal-weight children and adolescents, without asthma, through spirometry and volumetric capnography. Cross-sectional study including 77 subjects (38 obese) aged 5-17 years. All subjects underwent spirometry and volumetric capnography. The evaluations were repeated in obese subjects after the use of a bronchodilator. At the spirometry assessment, obese individuals, when compared with the control group, showed lower values of forced expiratory volume in the first second by forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC) and expiratory flows at 75% and between 25 and 75% of the FVC (p11 years (p<0.05). Even without the diagnosis of asthma by clinical criteria and without response to bronchodilator use, obese individuals showed lower FEV 1 /FVC values and forced expiratory flow, indicating the presence of an obstructive process. Volumetric capnography showed that obese individuals had higher alveolar tidal volume, with no alterations in ventilation homogeneity, suggesting flow alterations, without affecting lung volumes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Spirometry is underused in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wai Cho; Fu, Sau Nga; Tai, Emily Lai-bun; Yeung, Yiu Cheong; Kwong, Kwok Chu; Chang, Yui; Tam, Cheuk Ming; Yiu, Yuk Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry is important in the diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet it is a common clinical observation that it is underused though the extent is unclear. This survey aims to examine the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of COPD patients in a district in Hong Kong. It is a cross-sectional survey involving four clinic settings: hospital-based respiratory specialist clinic, hospital-based mixed medical specialist clinic, general outpatient clinic (primary care), and tuberculosis and chest clinic. Thirty physician-diagnosed COPD patients were randomly selected from each of the four clinic groups. All of them had a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity ratio less than 0.70 and had been followed up at the participating clinic for at least 6 months for COPD treatment. Of 126 patients who underwent spirometry, six (4.8%) did not have COPD. Of the 120 COPD patients, there were 111 males and mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 was 46.2% predicted. Only 22 patients (18.3%) had spirometry done during diagnostic workup, and 64 patients (53.3%) had spirometry done ever. The only independent factor predicting spirometry done ever was absence of old pulmonary tuberculosis and follow-up at respiratory specialist clinic. Age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, duration of COPD, percentage predicted FEV1, body mass index, 6-minute walking distance, and Medical Research Council dyspnea score were not predictive. We conclude that spirometry is underused in general but especially by nonrespiratory physicians and family physicians in the management of COPD patients. More effort at educating the medical community is urgently needed. PMID:24009418

  5. Feasibility of spirometry in primary care to screen for COPD: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Violaine; Beauchet, Alain; Gomis, Thierry; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a frequent but underdiagnosed disease whose diagnosis relies on the spirometric demonstration of bronchial obstruction. Spirometry use by general practitioners could represent the first line in COPD diagnosis. Because duration of spirometry is retarding its development in primary care, we decided to measure the time it requires in the primary-care context in France. Ten volunteer general practitioners were trained during two 3-hour theoretical and practical continuing education sessions. Then, from October 2013 to May 2014, they included patients without any known respiratory disease but at risk of developing COPD (age: ≥40 years, smoker: ≥20 pack-years). The duration of spirometry and its quality were evaluated according to the following acceptability criteria: 1) expiration ≥6 seconds or reaching a plateau; 2) good start with an early peak flow, curve peaked on top and not flat; 3) no artifacts; and 4) reproducibility criteria, ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity differences between the two best spirometry curves ≤0.15 L. Quality of the spirograms was defined as optimal when all the criteria were met and acceptable when all the criteria were satisfied except the reproducibility criterion, otherwise, it was unacceptable. For the 152 patients included, the 142 assessable spirometries lasted for 15.2±5.9 minutes. Acceptability criteria 1-3, respectively, were satisfied for 90.1%, 89.4%, and 91.5% of patients and reproducibility criterion 4 for 56.3%. Quality was considered optimal for 58.5% of the curves and acceptable for 30.2%. The duration of spirometry renders it poorly compatible with the current primary-care practice in France other than for dedicated consultations. Moreover, the quality of spirometry needs to be improved.

  6. [Value of forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV(6)) in the evaluation of pulmonary function in Chinese elderly males].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M M; Zhang, H S; Sun, T Y

    2017-05-30

    Objective: To evaluate the value of forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV(6)) in the evaluation of pulmonary function in Chinese elderly males. Methods: Pulmonary function tests of elderly who had received regular physical examination in Beijing Hospital from July 2003 to April 2015 were analyzed on subjects with the following characteristics: aged 60 years or older, completion of bronchial dilation test and able to exhale for at least six seconds. The included subjects were divided into 2 groups: 60-function in the study population was evaluated. Results: A total of 475 elderly men aged 60 years or older were enrolled, with a mean age of (77.13±9.53) years. Totally there were 269 subjects in 60-accounted for 56.6%; 206 subjects were in ≥80 years group, which accounted for 43.4%. There were 292 subjects with irreversible airflow obstruction, accounting for 61.5%. In all the included subjects, FEV(6) was significantly correlated with FVC and post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FEV(6) was significantly correlated with post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FVC( r =0.971, 0.978; both P function middle group, a total of 73 cases, which included 20 cases ≥80 years old. The proportion of middle group among ≥80 years group was significantly less than that of the 60-function middle group, FEV(1)/FEV(6) or FEV(1)/FVC had no correlation with inspiratory capacity or residual volume/total lung capacity (all P >0.05). Conclusions: FEV(6) and FEV(1)/FEV(6) are strongly correlated with FVC and FEV(1)/FVC, and there is excellent agreement between FEV(1)/FEV(6) and FEV(1)/FVC. FEV(6) is simple, easy to operate and with less influencing factors, which can be used as a valid alternative for FVC in diagnosing airflow obstruction in elderly males.

  7. Accuracy of spirometry for detection of asthma: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Andréa Cristina; Paulino, Ana Carolina Botto; Pereira, Luciano Penha; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease with airway hyperresponsiveness. Spirometry is the most commonly used test among asthmatic patients. Another functional test used for diagnosing asthma is the bronchial challenge test. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of spirometry for detecting asthma in the general population. Cross-sectional study with data analysis to evaluate the accuracy of spirometry through calculating sensitivity, specificity and predictive values and through the kappa agreement test. Subjects who constituted a birth cohort were enrolled at the age of 23 to 25 years. Spirometric abnormality was defined as reduced forced expiratory volume in one second, i.e. lower than 80% of the predicted value. Measurement of bronchial responsiveness was performed by means of the bronchial challenge test with methacholine. The gold-standard diagnosis of asthma was defined as the presence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in association with respiratory symptoms. Asthma was detected in 200 subjects (10.4%) out of the sample of 1922 individuals. Spirometric abnormality was detected in 208 subjects (10.9%) of the sample. The specificity of spirometric abnormality for detecting asthma was 90%, sensitivity was 23%, positive predictive value was 22%, and negative predictive value was 91%. The kappa test revealed weak agreement of 0.13 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.07-0.19) between spirometry and the diagnosis of asthma. Spirometry, as a single test, has limitations for detecting asthma in the general population.

  8. Assessment of spirometry and impulse oscillometry in relation to asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Arvind; Anderson, William J; Lipworth, Joseph; Lipworth, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Guidelines advocate the use of spirometry to assess pulmonary function in asthmatic patients. Commonly used measures include forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory ratio (FEV1/FVC), and forced mid-expiratory flow between 25 and 75 % of forced vital capacity (FEF25-75). Impulse oscillometry (IOS) is an effort-independent test performed during tidal breathing. IOS may be used to assess the total and central airway resistance at 5 Hz (R5) and 20 Hz (R20), respectively, and hence derive the peripheral airway resistance from the difference (R5-R20). We compared spirometry and IOS as tests of global airway function (i.e., FEV1, FEV1/FVC, R5) and putative measures of small airways function (i.e., FEF25-75, R5-R20) and their relationship to oral steroid and short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) use as surrogates for long-term asthma control. Spirometry and IOS measurements from physician-diagnosed asthmatics were linked to a health informatics database for oral steroid and SABA use 1 year prior to the index measurements. Four hundred forty-two patients had both spirometry and IOS, mean FEV1 = 86 % predicted, 94 % on ICS, median dose 800 µg/day. IOS and spirometry measures were equally predictive of impaired asthma control for both oral steroid and SABA use. For oral steroid use, the adjusted odds ratio, OR (95 % CI) is as follows: FEV1 150 %: 1.91(1.25-2.95), p = 0.003; and R5-R20 > 0.1 kPa L(-1) s 1.73(1.12-2.66), p = 0.013. For SABA use, the adjusted OR (95 % CI) is as follows: FEV1 150 %: 1.76(1.18-2.63), p = 0.006; and R5-R20 > 0.1 kPa L(-1) s: 2.94(1.94-4.46), p Spirometry or IOS measurements were equally useful as potential markers of asthma control in persistent asthmatic patients.

  9. Active case finding strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with handheld spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Kyung; Lee, Chang Min; Park, Ji Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Park, Sung-Hoon; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Yong Bum; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-12-01

    The early detection and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to providing appropriate and timely treatment. We explored a new active case-finding strategy for COPD using handheld spirometry.We recruited subjects over 40 years of age with a smoking history of more than 10 pack-years who visited a primary clinic complaining of respiratory symptoms. A total of 190 of subjects were enrolled. Medical information was obtained from historical records and physical examination by general practitioners. All subjects had their pulmonary function evaluated using handheld spirometry with a COPD-6 device. Because forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been suggested as an alternative to FVC, we measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/FEV6 for diagnosis of airflow limitation. All subjects were then referred to tertiary referral hospitals to complete a "Could it be COPD?" questionnaire, handheld spiromtery, and conventional spirometry. The results of each instrument were compared to evaluate the efficacy of both handheld spirometry and the questionnaire.COPD was newly diagnosed in 45 (23.7%) patients. According to our receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, sensitivity and specificity were maximal when the FEV1/FEV6 ratio was less than 77%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.759. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 72.7%, 77.1%, 50%, and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of respiratory symptoms listed on the questionnaire ranged from 0.5 to 0.65, which indicates that there is almost no difference compared with the results of handheld spirometry.The present study demonstrated the efficacy of handheld spirometry as an active case-finding tool for COPD in a primary clinical setting. This study suggested that physicians should recommend handheld spirometry for people over the age of 40, who have a smoking history of more than 10 pack

  10. Spirometry in Greenland: a cross-sectional study on patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse Overballe; Olsen, Sequssuna; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is globally increasing in frequency and is expected to be the third largest cause of death by 2020. Smoking is the main risk factor of developing COPD. In Greenland, more than half of the adult population are daily smokers, and COPD may be common. International guidelines recommend the usage of spirometry as a golden standard for diagnosing COPD. The current number of spirometries performed among patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease in Greenland remains unexplored. To estimate the prevalence of patients aged 50 years or above treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease and the extent to which spirometry was performed among them within 2 years. An observational, cross-sectional study based on the review of data obtained from electronic medical records in Greenland was performed. The inclusion criterion was that patients must have been permanent residents aged 50 years or above who had medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease prescribed within a period of 15 months prior to data extraction. A full review of electronic patient records was done on each of the identified users of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Information on age, gender, town and spirometry was registered for each patient within the period from October 2013 to October 2015. The prevalence of patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease aged 50 years or above was 7.9%. Of those, 34.8% had spirometry performed within 2 years and 50% had a forced expiratory volume (1 sec)/ forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) under 70% indicating obstructive pulmonary disease. The use of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease among patients over 50 years old is common in Greenland. About one third of the patients had a spirometry performed within 2 years. To further increase spirometry performance, it is recommended to explore possible barriers in health

  11. Impact of expiratory strength training in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Emily K; Watts, Stephanie A; Tabor, Lauren; Robison, Raele; Gaziano, Joy; Domer, Amanda S; Richter, Joel; Vu, Tuan; Gooch, Clifton

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and impact of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) on respiratory and bulbar function in persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Twenty-five ALS patients participated in this delayed intervention open-label clinical trial. Following a lead-in period, patients completed a 5-week EMST protocol. Outcome measures included: maximum expiratory pressure (MEP); physiologic measures of swallow and cough; and penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) scores. Of participants who entered the active phase of the study (n = 15), EMST was well tolerated and led to significant increases in MEPs and maximum hyoid displacement during swallowing post-EMST (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed for PAS scores or cough spirometry measures. EMST was feasible and well tolerated in this small cohort of ALS patients and led to improvements in expiratory force-generating pressures and swallow kinematics. Further investigation is warranted to confirm these preliminary findings. Muscle Nerve 54: 48-53, 2016. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Hyperpolarized 3helium magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of the lung in cystic fibrosis: comparison with high resolution CT and spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Colm J.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Skehan, Stephen J.; Masterson, James B.; Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Wild, Jim M.; Fichele, Stan; Gallagher, Charles G.; Beek, Edwin J.R. van

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hyperpolarized 3 helium magnetic resonance imaging ( 3 He MRI) of the lungs in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and spirometry. Eight patients with stable CF prospectively underwent 3 He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry within 1 week. Three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence was used during an 18-s breath-hold following inhalation of hyperpolarized 3 He. Each lung was divided into six zones; 3 He MRI was scored as percentage ventilation per lung zone. HRCT was scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Univariate (Spearman rank) and multivariate correlations were performed between 3 He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry. Results are expressed as mean±SD (range). Spirometry is expressed as percent predicted. There were four men and four women, mean age=31.9±9 (20-46). Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV) 1 =52%±29 (27-93). Mean 3 He MRI score=74%±25 (55-100). Mean HRCT score=48.8±24 (13.5-83). The correlation between 3 He MRI and HRCT was strong (R=±0.89, p 3 He MRI; 3 He MRI correlated better with FEV 1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) (R=0.86 and 0.93, p 3 He MRI correlates strongly with structural HRCT abnormalities and is a stronger correlate of spirometry than HRCT in CF. (orig.)

  13. Is preoperative spirometry a predictive marker for postoperative complications after colorectal cancer surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Yuki; Tsuruta, Masashi; Yahagi, Masashi; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Okabayashi, Koji; Shigeta, Kohei; Ishida, Takashi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2017-09-01

    Spirometry is a basic test that provides much information about pulmonary function; it is performed preoperatively in almost all patients undergoing colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery in our hospital. However, the value of spirometry as a preoperative test for CRC surgery remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether spirometry is useful to predict postoperative complications (PCs) after CRC surgery. The medical records of 1236 patients who had preoperative spirometry tests and underwent CRC surgery between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. Preoperative spirometry results, such as forced vital capacity (FVC), one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1), %VC (FVC/predicted VC) and FEV1/FVC (%FEV1), were analyzed with regard to PCs, including pneumonia. PCs were found in 383 (30.9%) patients, including 218 (56%) with surgical site infections, 67 (17%) with bowel obstruction, 62 (16%) with leakage and 20 (5.2%) with pneumonia. Of the spirometry results, %VC was correlated with PC according to logistic regression analysis (odds ratio, OR = 0.99, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.98-0.99; P = 0.034). Multivariate analysis after adjusting for male sex, age, laparoscopic surgery, tumor location, operation time and blood loss showed that a lower %VC tends to be a risk factor for PC (OR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98-1.002; P = 0.159) and %VC was an independent risk factor for postoperative pneumonia in PCs (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.94-0.99; P = 0.049). In CRC surgery, %VC may be a predictor of postoperative complications, especially pneumonia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Quantitative computed tomography versus spirometry in predicting air leak duration after major lung resection for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kazuhiro; Kaneda, Yoshikazu; Sudo, Manabu; Mitsutaka, Jinbo; Li, Tao-Sheng; Suga, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2005-11-01

    Emphysema is a well-known risk factor for developing air leak or persistent air leak after pulmonary resection. Although quantitative computed tomography (CT) and spirometry are used to diagnose emphysema, it remains controversial whether these tests are predictive of the duration of postoperative air leak. Sixty-two consecutive patients who were scheduled to undergo major lung resection for cancer were enrolled in this prospective study to define the best predictor of postoperative air leak duration. Preoperative factors analyzed included spirometric variables and area of emphysema (proportion of the low-attenuation area) that was quantified in a three-dimensional CT lung model. Chest tubes were removed the day after disappearance of the air leak, regardless of pleural drainage. Univariate and multivariate proportional hazards analyses were used to determine the influence of preoperative factors on chest tube time (air leak duration). By univariate analysis, site of resection (upper, lower), forced expiratory volume in 1 second, predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and area of emphysema ( 10%) were significant predictors of air leak duration. By multivariate analysis, site of resection and area of emphysema were the best independent determinants of air leak duration. The results were similar for patients with a smoking history (n = 40), but neither forced expiratory volume in 1 second nor predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second were predictive of air leak duration. Quantitative CT is superior to spirometry in predicting air leak duration after major lung resection for cancer. Quantitative CT may aid in the identification of patients, particularly among those with a smoking history, requiring additional preventive procedures against air leak.

  15. Effects of Hemibridge with Ball and Balloon Exercise on Forced Expiratory Volume and Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorida Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Suboptimal breathing patterns and impairments of posture and trunk stability are often associated with musculoskeletal complaints such as low back pain. Respiration is also affected by poor neuromuscular control of core muscles. Immediate effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise has been studied on chronic pain in athlete population. Objective: To evaluate the effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, forced expiratory volume and functional abilities in patients with chronic low back pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV and Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ. Methods: The present experimental study was conducted among 30 participants between the age of 21 to 55 years with chronic non-specific LBP. The participants were given a hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise. Pre-interventional and 3rd day Post-interventional outcome measurements were taken using VAS, FEV1 and FEV6 and MODQ. Results: The difference between pre-and post of VAS was statistically highly significant (p=0.0001. The p value of FEV6 and MODQ by paired t test was statistically significant with p value of 0.02 and 0.0007 respectively. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is an immediate effect of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, FEV6 and functional ability in patients with chronic LBP.

  16. A smart spirometry device for asthma diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, A; Hamad, M; El Moucary, C

    2015-08-01

    In this paper an innovative prototype for smart asthma spirometry device to be used by doctors and asthma patients is presented. The novelty in this prototype relies in the fact that it is destined to subtend not only adults but offers an efficient and attractive manner to accommodate children patients as well thus, making it efficient for doctors, patients and parents to detect and monitor such intricate cases at stages as early as six years old. Moreover, the apparatus used enables us to integrate a vital parameter representing the Forced Expiratory Volume to the final diagnosis. Besides, the presented device will automatically diagnose those patients, assess their asthma condition, and schedule their medication process without excessive visits to medical centers whilst providing doctors with accurate and pertinent and comprehensive medical data in a chronological fashion. Zooming into under the hood of the device, a fully reliable hardware digital system lies along with a flowmeter detector and a Bluetooth emitter to interface with a user-friendly GUI-based application installed on smartphones which incorporates appealing animated graphics to encourage children to take the test. Furthermore, the device offers the capability of storing chronological data and a relevant resourceful display for accurate tracking of patients' medical record, the evolvement of their asthma condition, and the administered medication. Finally, the entire device is aligned with the medical requirements as per doctors' and telemedicine specialists' recommendations; the experiments carried out demonstrated the effectiveness and sustainable use of such device.

  17. Differences in spirometry values between U.S. children 6-11 years and adolescents 12-19 years with current asthma, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Brian K; Simon, Alan E; Tilert, Timothy; Okelo, Sande; Akinbami, Lara J

    2016-03-01

    National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines recommend that periodic spirometry be performed in youth with asthma. NAEPP uses different spirometry criteria to define uncontrolled asthma for children (6-11 years) and adolescents (12+ years). To describe differences in spirometry between U.S. children and adolescents with current asthma. We examined cross-sectional spirometry data from 453 U.S. youth with current asthma age 6-19 years from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. The main outcomes were percentage predicted forced expiratory volume at 1 sec (FEV1%) ≤80 and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ≤0.80. We also examined the prevalence of youth with spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma, using NAEPP age-specific criteria, defined for children aged 6-11 years as FEV1% ≤80 or FEV1/FVC ≤0.80, and for adolescents aged 12-19 years as FEV1% ≤80. Children 6-11 years and adolescents 12-19 years did not differ in prevalence of FEV1% ≤80 (10.1% vs. 9.0%) or FEV1/FVC ≤0.80 (30.6% vs. 29.8%). However, based on the NAEPP age-specific criteria, 33.0% of children 6-11 years and 9.0% of adolescents 12-19 years had spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma (P spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma did differ. The difference appears to stem mainly from the different spirometry criteria for the two age groups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Spirometry in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Kana Ram

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory disorders are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in children. Spirometry is a useful investigation for diagnosing and monitoring a variety of paediatric respiratory diseases, but it is underused by primary care physicians and paediatricians treating children with respiratory disease. We now have a better understanding of respiratory physiology in children, and newer computerised spirometry equipment is available with updated regional reference values for the paediatric age group. This review evaluates the current literature for indications, test procedures, quality assessment, and interpretation of spirometry results in children. Spirometry may be useful for asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital or acquired airway malformations and many other respiratory diseases in children. The technique for performing spirometry in children is crucial and is discussed in detail. Most children, including preschool children, can perform acceptable spirometry. Steps for interpreting spirometry results include identification of common errors during the test by applying acceptability and repeatability criteria and then comparing test parameters with reference standards. Spirometry results depict only the pattern of ventilation, which may be normal, obstructive, restrictive, or mixed. The diagnosis should be based on both clinical features and spirometry results. There is a need to encourage primary care physicians and paediatricians treating respiratory diseases in children to use spirometry after adequate training.

  19. A Study of the Usability of Ergonomic Camera Vest Based on Spirometry Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirazeh Arghami

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a cameraman is one of those occupations that expose people to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. Therefore, control measures should be taken to protect cameramen’s health. To solve the given problem, a vest was designed for cameramen to prevent MSDs by reducing the pressure and contact stress while carrying the camera on their shoulder. However, the usability of vest had to be considered. The aim of this study was to determine the usability of the proposed vest using the spirometry parameters indicator. Methods: In this experimental study, 120 spirometry experiments were conducted with 40 male volunteer subjects with and without designed vest. Data were analyzed using SPSS- 16 with dependent t-test, at 0.05 significance level. Results: Based on the spirometry results, there is a significant difference between Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1 and heart rate in activity with and without vest (p<0.001. Conclusion: The results suggest that the promising impact of this invention on the health of cameramen makes this domestically designed camera vest a good option for mass production.

  20. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Tetzlaff, Kay; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel Fm; Disse, Bernd; Finnigan, Helen; Magnussen, Helgo; Calverley, Peter Ma

    2016-01-01

    The WISDOM study (NCT00975195) reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland-Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume in 1 second values recorded at home and in the clinic (mean difference of -0.05 L), which may be due to suboptimal patient effort in performing unsupervised recordings. However, this difference remained consistent over time. Overall, these data demonstrate that home-based and in-clinic spirometric measurements were equally valid and reliable for assessing lung function in patients with COPD, and suggest that home-based spirometry may be a useful tool to facilitate analysis of changes in lung function on a day-to-day basis.

  1. Spirometry in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Overballe; Olsen, Sequssuna; Jarbøl, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    be common. International guidelines recommend the usage of spirometry as a golden standard for diagnosing COPD. The current number of spirometries performed among patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease in Greenland remains unexplored. Objective. To estimate the prevalence...... of patients aged 50 years or above treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease and the extent to which spirometry was performed among them within 2 years. Design. An observational, cross-sectional study based on the review of data obtained from electronic medical records in Greenland...... of the identified users of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Information on age, gender, town and spirometry was registered for each patient within the period from October 2013 to October 2015. Results. The prevalence of patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease aged...

  2. Spirometry use: detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Thomas A; Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe a practical method for family practitioners to stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by the use of office spirometry. Methods: This is a review of the lessons learned from evaluations of the use of office spirometry in the primary care setting to identify best practices using the most recent published evaluations of office spirometry and the analysis of preliminary data from a recent spirometry mass screening project. A mass screening study by the American Association for Respiratory Care and the COPD Foundation was used to identify the most effective way for general practitioners to implement office spirometry in order to stage COPD. Results: A simple three-step method is described to identify people with a high pre-test probability in an attempt to detect moderate to severe COPD: COPD questionnaire, measurement of peak expiratory flow, and office spirometry. Clinical practice guidelines exist for office spirometry basics for safety, use of electronic peak flow devices, and portable spirometers. Conclusion: Spirometry can be undertaken in primary care offices with acceptable levels of technical expertise. Using office spirometry, primary care physicians can diagnose the presence and severity of COPD. Spirometry can guide therapies for COPD and predict outcomes when used in general practice. PMID:21472091

  3. Spirometry in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  4. Advantage of impulse oscillometry over spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and monitor pulmonary responses to bronchodilators: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine Saadeh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This retrospective study was a comparative analysis of sensitivity of impulse oscillometry and spirometry techniques for use in a mixed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease group for assessing disease severity and inhalation therapy. Methods: A total of 30 patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were monitored by impulse oscillometry, followed by spirometry. Lung function was measured at baseline after bronchodilation and at follow-up (3–18 months. The impulse oscillometry parameters were resistance in the small and large airways at 5 Hz (R5, resistance in the large airways at 15 Hz (R15, and lung reactance (area under the curve X; AX. Results: After the bronchodilator therapy, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 readings evaluated by spirometry were unaffected at baseline and at follow-up, while impulse oscillometry detected an immediate improvement in lung function, in terms of AX (p = 0.043. All impulse oscillometry parameters significantly improved at follow-up, with a decrease in AX by 37% (p = 0.0008, R5 by 20% (p = 0.0011, and R15 by 12% (p = 0.0097. Discussion: Impulse oscillometry parameters demonstrated greater sensitivity compared with spirometry for monitoring reversibility of airway obstruction and the effect of maintenance therapy. Impulse oscillometry may facilitate early treatment dose optimization and personalized medicine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

  5. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Roisin R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Rodriguez-Roisin,1 Kay Tetzlaff,2,3 Henrik Watz,4 Emiel FM Wouters,5 Bernd Disse,2 Helen Finnigan,6 Helgo Magnussen,4 Peter MA Calverley7 1Respiratory Institute, Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital Clínic IDIBAPS-CIBERES, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim, Germany; 3Department of Sports Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 4Pulmonary Research Institute at Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Center North, German Center for Lung Research, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 6Department of Biostatistics and Data Sciences, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bracknell, UK; 7Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool, UK Abstract: The WISDOM study (NCT00975195 reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland–Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume

  6. Computer assisted spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D J; Toy, V M; Deininger, R A; Collopy, T K

    1983-06-01

    Three of the most popular microcomputers, the TRS-80 Model I, the APPLE II+, and the IBM Personal Computer were connected to a spirometer for data acquisition and analysis. Simple programs were written which allow the collection, analysis and storage of the data produced during spirometry. Three examples demonstrate the relative ease for automating spirometers.

  7. Predictive Value of Different Expressions of Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 Second (FEV1) for Adverse Outcomes in a Cohort of Adults Aged 80 and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegendörfer, Eralda; Vaes, Bert; Andreeva, Elena; Matheï, Catharina; Van Pottelbergh, Gijs; Degryse, Jean-Marie

    2017-02-01

    Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) is proposed as a marker of healthy ageing and FEV 1 expressions that are independent of reference values have been reported to be better at predicting mortality in older adults. We assess and compare the predictive value of different FEV 1 expressions for mortality, hospitalization, and physical and mental decline in adults aged 80 and older. Population-based, prospective, cohort study. The BELFRAIL study, Belgium. A total of 501 community-dwelling adults aged 80 and older (mean age 84.7 years). Baseline FEV 1 expressed as percent predicted (FEV 1 PP) and z-score (FEV 1 Z) using the Global Lung Function Initiative 2012 reference values; over lowest sex-specific percentile (FEV 1 Q), and height squared (FEV 1 /Ht 2 ) and cubed (FEV 1 /Ht 3 ). Mortality data until 5.1 ± 0.2 years from baseline; hospitalization data until 3.0 ± 0.25 years. Activities of daily living, battery of physical performance tests, Mini-Mental State Examination, and 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and after 1.7 ± 0.2 years. Individuals in the lowest quartile of FEV 1 expressions had higher adjusted risk than the rest of study population for all-cause mortality (highest hazard ratio 2.05 [95% Confidence Interval 1.50-2.80] for FEV 1 Q and 2.01 [1.47-2.76] for FEV 1 /Ht 3 ), first hospitalization (highest hazard ratio 1.63 [1.21-2.16] for FEV 1 /Ht 2 and 1.61[1.20-2.16] for FEV 1 /Ht 3 ), mental decline (highest odds ratio 2.80 [1.61-4.89] for FEV 1 Q) and physical decline (only FEV 1 /Ht 3 with odds ratio 1.93 [1.13-3.30]). Based on risk classification improvement measures, FEV 1 /Ht 3 and FEV 1 Q performed better than FEV 1 PP. In a cohort of adults aged 80 and older, FEV 1 expressions that are independent of reference values (FEV 1 /Ht 3 and FEV 1 Q) were better at predicting adverse health outcomes than traditional expressions that depend on reference values, and should be used in further research on FEV 1 and aging

  8. Reference Values for Spirometry Derived Using Lambda, Mu, Sigma (LMS) Method in Korean Adults: in Comparison with Previous References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Bum Seak; Myong, Jun Pyo; Rhee, Chin Kook; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Koo, Jung Wan; Kim, Hyoung Ryoul

    2018-01-15

    The present study aimed to update the prediction equations for spirometry and their lower limits of normal (LLN) by using the lambda, mu, sigma (LMS) method and to compare the outcomes with the values of previous spirometric reference equations. Spirometric data of 10,249 healthy non-smokers (8,776 females) were extracted from the fourth and fifth versions of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV, 2007-2009; V, 2010-2012). Reference equations were derived using the LMS method which allows modeling skewness (lambda [L]), mean (mu [M]), and coefficient of variation (sigma [S]). The outcome equations were compared with previous reference values. Prediction equations were presented in the following form: predicted value = e{a + b × ln(height) + c × ln(age) + M - spline}. The new predicted values for spirometry and their LLN derived using the LMS method were shown to more accurately reflect transitions in pulmonary function in young adults than previous prediction equations derived using conventional regression analysis in 2013. There were partial discrepancies between the new reference values and the reference values from the Global Lung Function Initiative in 2012. The results should be interpreted with caution for young adults and elderly males, particularly in terms of the LLN for forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity in elderly males. Serial spirometry follow-up, together with correlations with other clinical findings, should be emphasized in evaluating the pulmonary function of individuals. Future studies are needed to improve the accuracy of reference data and to develop continuous reference values for spirometry across all ages. © 2018 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  9. Clinical Utility of Additional Measurement of Total Lung Capacity in Diagnosing Obstructive Lung Disease in Subjects With Restrictive Pattern of Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Chang, Boksoon; Kim, Kyunga; Song, Won Jun; Chon, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Jung Soo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-04-01

    Total lung capacity (TLC), forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% (FEF25-75%), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or post-bronchodilator volume response is recommended to detect obstructive abnormalities in the lung. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of these pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters to diagnose obstructive lung disease in subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry. A retrospective study was conducted in 64 subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry (normal FEV1/FVC and low FVC) out of 3,030 patients who underwent all pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry and lung volume measurement between April 2008 and December 2010. After subjects were clinically classified into those with obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, and mixed lung disease, the agreements between the clinical diagnosis and PFT classification according to TLC, FEF(25-75%), PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria were compared. Of 64 subjects, 18 (28.1%) were classified with obstructive lung disease, 39 (60.9%) had restrictive lung disease, 1 (1.6%) had mixed lung disease, and 6 (9.4%) had no clinical lung disease. Among the 58 subjects with clinical lung disease, 22 (37.9%), 37 (63.8%), 33 (56.9%), and 3 (5.2%) were classified as having obstructive pattern based on TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria, respectively. The kappa coefficients for the agreement between the clinical classification and PFT classification using TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria in 58 subjects were 0.59, 0.18, 0.17, and spirometry, when obstructive lung disease is clinically suspected. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. Hyperpolarized {sup 3}helium magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of the lung in cystic fibrosis: comparison with high resolution CT and spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Colm J.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Skehan, Stephen J.; Masterson, James B. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Wild, Jim M.; Fichele, Stan [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, The Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Gallagher, Charles G. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, Dublin (Ireland); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, The Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare hyperpolarized {sup 3}helium magnetic resonance imaging ({sup 3}He MRI) of the lungs in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and spirometry. Eight patients with stable CF prospectively underwent {sup 3}He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry within 1 week. Three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence was used during an 18-s breath-hold following inhalation of hyperpolarized {sup 3}He. Each lung was divided into six zones; {sup 3}He MRI was scored as percentage ventilation per lung zone. HRCT was scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Univariate (Spearman rank) and multivariate correlations were performed between {sup 3}He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry. Results are expressed as mean{+-}SD (range). Spirometry is expressed as percent predicted. There were four men and four women, mean age=31.9{+-}9 (20-46). Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV){sub 1}=52%{+-}29 (27-93). Mean {sup 3}He MRI score=74%{+-}25 (55-100). Mean HRCT score=48.8{+-}24 (13.5-83). The correlation between {sup 3}He MRI and HRCT was strong (R={+-}0.89, p<0.001). Bronchiectasis was the only independent predictor of {sup 3}He MRI; {sup 3}He MRI correlated better with FEV{sub 1} and forced vital capacity (FVC) (R=0.86 and 0.93, p<0.01, respectively) than HRCT (R={+-}0.72 and {+-}0.81, p<0.05, respectively). This study showed that {sup 3}He MRI correlates strongly with structural HRCT abnormalities and is a stronger correlate of spirometry than HRCT in CF. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of Flow and Volume Incentive Spirometry on Pulmonary Function and Exercise Tolerance in Open Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amaravadi Sampath; Augustine, Alfred Joseph; Pazhyaottayil, Zulfeequer Chundaanveetil; Ramakrishna, Anand; Krishnakumar, Shyam Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures in abdominal area lead to changes in pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics and impaired physical capacity leading to postoperative pulmonary complications, which can affect up to 80% of upper abdominal surgery. Aim To evaluate the effects of flow and volume incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in patients undergoing open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a hospital of Mangalore city in Southern India. Thirty-seven males and thirteen females who were undergoing abdominal surgeries were included and allocated into flow and volume incentive spirometry groups by block randomization. All subjects underwent evaluations of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF). Preoperative and postoperative measurements were taken up to day 5 for both groups. Exercise tolerance measured by Six- Minute Walk Test during preoperative period and measured again at the time of discharge for both groups. Pulmonary function was analysed by post-hoc analysis and carried out using Bonferroni’s ‘t’-test. Exercise tolerance was analysed by Paired ‘T’-test. Results Pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be significantly decreased in 1st, 2nd and 3rd postoperative day when compared with preoperative day. On 4th and 5th postoperative day the pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be better preserved in both flow and volume incentive spirometry groups. The Six-Minute Walk Test showed a statistically significant improvement in pulmonary function on the day of discharge than in the preoperative period. In terms of distance covered, the volume- incentive spirometry group showed a greater statistically significant improvement from the preoperative period to the time of discharge than was exhibited by the flow incentive spirometry group

  12. Development of a spirometry T-score in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Baek, Seunghee; Jung, Ji-Ye; Kim, Young Sam; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Do; Mannino, David M; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry values may be expressed as T-scores in standard deviation units relative to a reference in a young, normal population as an analogy to the T-score for bone mineral density. This study was performed to develop the spirometry T-score. T-scores were calculated from lambda-mu-sigma-derived Z-scores using a young, normal age reference. Three outcomes of all-cause death, respiratory death, and COPD death were evaluated in 9,101 US subjects followed for 10 years; an outcome of COPD-related health care utilization (COPD utilization) was evaluated in 1,894 Korean subjects followed for 4 years. The probability of all-cause death appeared to remain nearly zero until -1 of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) T-score but increased steeply where FEV1 T-score reached below -2.5. Survival curves for all-cause death, respiratory death, COPD death, and COPD utilization differed significantly among the groups when stratified by FEV1 T-score (Pspirometry T-score could predict all-cause death, respiratory death, COPD death, and COPD utilization.

  13. Effect of changing from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III spirometry reference range to that of the Global Lung Initiative 2012 at Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embling, Laura A K; Zagami, Debbie; Sriram, Krishna Bajee; Gordon, Robert J; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan

    2016-12-01

    The categorisation of lung disease into obstructive ventilatory defect (OVD) and tendency to a restrictive ventilatory defect (TRVD) patterns using spirometry is used to guide both prognostication and treatment. The effectiveness of categorisation depends upon having reference ranges that accurately represent the population they describe. The Global Lung Initiative 2012 (GLI 2012) has spirometry reference ranges drawn from the largest sample size to date. This study aimed to determine whether using spirometry reference ranges from the new GLI 2012 dataset, compared to the previously used National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III (NHANES III) dataset, resulted in a change in diagnosis between OVD, TRVD and normal ventilatory pattern (NVP). Spirometry data were collected from 301 patients, aged 18-80 years, undergoing investigation at the Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service (GCHHS) throughout February and March 2014. OVD was defined as a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) divided by forced vital capacity (FVC) less than lower limit of normal (LLN). TRVD was defined as FEV 1 /FVC ≥ LLN, FEV 1 reference range resulted in a change in diagnosis of lung disease in 5.9% of the individuals included in this study. This variance in diagnosis when changing reference ranges should be taken into account by clinicians as it may affect patient management.

  14. Deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure in patients with multiple sclerosis - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Wittrin, Anna; Kånåhols, Margareta; Gunnarsson, Martin; Nilsagård, Ylva

    2016-11-01

    Breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure are often recommended to patients with advanced neurological deficits, but the potential benefit in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with mild and moderate symptoms has not yet been investigated in randomized controlled trials. To study the effects of 2 months of home-based breathing exercises for patients with mild to moderate MS on respiratory muscle strength, lung function, and subjective breathing and health status outcomes. Forty-eight patients with MS according to the revised McDonald criteria were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Patients performing breathing exercises (n = 23) were compared with a control group (n = 25) performing no breathing exercises. The breathing exercises were performed with a positive expiratory pressure device (10-15 cmH 2 O) and consisted of 30 slow deep breaths performed twice a day for 2 months. Respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure at the mouth), spirometry, oxygenation, thoracic excursion, subjective perceptions of breathing and self-reported health status were evaluated before and after the intervention period. Following the intervention, there was a significant difference between the breathing group and the control group regarding the relative change in lung function, favoring the breathing group (vital capacity: P < 0.043; forced vital capacity: P < 0.025). There were no other significant differences between the groups. Breathing exercises may be beneficial in patients with mild to moderate stages of MS. However, the clinical significance needs to be clarified, and it remains to be seen whether a sustainable effect in delaying the development of respiratory dysfunction in MS can be obtained. © 2015 The Authors. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Accuracy of near-patient vs. inbuilt spirometry for monitoring tidal volumes in an in-vitro paediatric lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, S; Thomas, J; Cannizzaro, V; Weiss, M; Schmidt, A R

    2018-03-01

    Spirometric monitoring provides precise measurement and delivery of tidal volumes within a narrow range, which is essential for lung-protective strategies that aim to reduce morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients. Conventional anaesthesia ventilators include inbuilt spirometry to monitor inspiratory and expiratory tidal volumes. The GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilator allows additional near-patient spirometry via a sensor interposed between the proximal end of the tracheal tube and the respiratory tubing. Near-patient and inbuilt spirometry of two different GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilators were compared in an in-vitro study. Assessments were made of accuracy and variability in inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume measurements during ventilation of six simulated paediatric lung models using the ASL 5000 test lung. A total of 9240 breaths were recorded and analysed. Differences between inspiratory tidal volumes measured with near-patient and inbuilt spirometry were most significant in the newborn setting (p tidal volume measurements with near-patient spirometry were consistently more accurate than with inbuilt spirometry for all lung models (p tidal volumes decreased with increasing tidal volumes, and was smaller with near-patient than with inbuilt spirometry. The variability in measured tidal volumes was higher during expiration, especially with inbuilt spirometry. In conclusion, the present in-vitro study shows that measurements with near-patient spirometry are more accurate and less variable than with inbuilt spirometry. Differences between measurement methods were most significant in the smallest patients. We therefore recommend near-patient spirometry, especially for neonatal and paediatric patients. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. The effect of medical clowns on performance of spirometry among preschool aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Vered; Schichter-Konfino, Vered; Kassem, Eias; Klein, Adi

    2018-04-02

    Medical clowns (MCs) are known to assist in reducing pain and alleviating anxiety. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of MCs to assist preschoolers in performing spirometry. A prospective, randomized controlled trial. Children aged 3-6 years participated. After a first spirometry, children were divided into two groups: the first performed a second spirometry with an MC. The second repeated spirometry with the technician. Primary outcome was second spirometry values compared between the groups. Secondary outcome were change in spirometry values within groups, and difference between the groups. A total of 140 children participated. The groups did not differ in age, sex, mother tongue, or weight. Nor in mean FVC (MC 89.2% ± 16.7, control 89.5% ± 16.3) mean FEV1 (MC 91.3% ± 15.6, control 94.2% ± 16.8), and expiratory time (MC 1.58 ± 0.43, control 1.7 ± 0.44) in first spirometry. In second spirometry the control group had a similar FVC, FEV1, and expiratory time. The MC group had a significant improvement in all parameters: FVC: MC 95.3% ± 15.5, control 89.3% ± 19.1, FEV1: MC 98.0% ± 15.6, control 91.8% ± 19.3, and expiratory time MC 1.96 ± 0.55, control 1.84 ± 0.52. The differences between the groups between first and second attempt were significant (P-value FVC 0.000, FEV1 0.000, expiratory time 0.003). MCs improved performance of spirometry among preschoolers. It is possible that laughter and relief of stress had a physiological effect. Further studies are required to better establish the ability of MCs to improve active participation and to better understand whether the mechanism of the improvement is better cooperation or true physiological change. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Angle β of greater than 80° at the start of spirometry may identify high-quality flow volume curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Ningfang; Li, Li; Ren, Weiying; Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) emphasize a satisfactory start in maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves and highlight subjective parameters: performance without hesitation and expiration with maximum force. We described a new parameter, angle β for characterization of the start to the MEFV curve. Subjects completed the MEFV curve at least three times and at least two curves met ATS/ERS quality. Subjects were divided into normal, restrictive and obstructive groups according to pulmonary function test results. The tangent line was drawn at the start of the MEFV curve's ascending limb to the x-axis and the angle β between the tangent line and x-axis was obtained. The relationships between tangent of β, pulmonary function parameters (PFPs) and anthropometric data were assessed. The MEFV curves with insufficient explosion at the start were considered as poor-quality MEFV curves. In 998 subjects with high-quality spirometry, although PFP varied in relation to the three aspects: the angle β and its tangent were similar (P > 0.05), the tangent of β did not correlate with PFP or anthropometric measurements (P > 0.05) and the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the angle β was 80° in the group with high-quality spirometry (P < 0.05). Angle β derived from poor-quality MEFV curves was smaller than that from good quality one (P < 0.05). Angle β may function as a parameter to assess the expiratory efforts, which can be used to assess the quality of the MEFV curve start. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Automated Spirometry Quality Assurance: Supervised Learning From Multiple Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velickovski, Filip; Ceccaroni, Luigi; Marti, Robert; Burgos, Felip; Gistau, Concepcion; Alsina-Restoy, Xavier; Roca, Josep

    2018-01-01

    Forced spirometry testing is gradually becoming available across different healthcare tiers including primary care. It has been demonstrated in earlier work that commercially available spirometers are not fully able to assure the quality of individual spirometry manoeuvres. Thus, a need to expand the availability of high-quality spirometry assessment beyond specialist pulmonary centres has arisen. In this paper, we propose a method to select and optimise a classifier using supervised learning techniques by learning from previously classified forced spirometry tests from a group of experts. Such a method is able to take into account the shape of the curve as an expert would during visual inspection. We evaluated the final classifier on a dataset put aside for evaluation yielding an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.88 and specificities of 0.91 and 0.86 for sensitivities of 0.60 and 0.82. Furthermore, other specificities and sensitivities along the receiver operating characteristic curve were close to the level of the experts when compared against each-other, and better than an earlier rules-based method assessed on the same dataset. We foresee key benefits in raising diagnostic quality, saving time, reducing cost, and also improving remote care and monitoring services for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in the future if a clinical decision support system with the encapsulated classifier is to be integrated into the work-flow of forced spirometry testing.

  19. Analysis of spirometry results in hospitalized patients aged over 65 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wróblewska I

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Izabela Wróblewska,1 Piotr Oleśniewicz,2 Donata Kurpas,3 Mariusz Sołtysik,2 Jerzy Błaszczuk41Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, 2Institute of Tourism and Recreation, University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw, 3Department of Family Medicine, 4Faculty of Postgraduate Medical Training, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, PolandIntroduction and objective: The growing population of the elderly, as well as the occurrence of coexisting diseases and polypharmacy, is the reason why diseases of patients aged ≥65 years belong to the major issues of the contemporary medicine. Among the most frequent diseases of the elderly, there are respiratory system diseases. They are difficult to diagnose because of the patient group specificity, which is the reason for increased mortality among seniors, caused by underdiagnosis. The study objective was to assess the factors influencing spirometry results in hospitalized patients aged ≥65 years with respiratory system disorders.Material and methods: In the research, 217 (100% patients aged ≥65 years who underwent spirometry at the Regional Medical Center of the Jelenia Góra Valley Hospital in Poland were analyzed. In the statistical analysis, the STATISTICA 9.1 program, the t-test, the Shapiro–Wilk test, the ANOVA test, and the Scheffé’s test were applied.Results: The majority of the patients (59.4% were treated in the hospital. The most frequent diagnosis was malignant neoplasm (18%. The study showed a statistically significant dependence between the forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, and FEV1/FVC parameters and the time of hospitalization, as well as between the FVC and FEV1 parameters and the age of patients. The FVC parameter values turned out to be dependent on the main diagnosis. Highest results were noted in patients with the diagnosis of sleep apnea or benign neoplasm. A low FVC index can reflect restrictive

  20. CT-derived Biomechanical Metrics Improve Agreement Between Spirometry and Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Surya P; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Newell, John D; Hoffman, Eric A; Sieren, Jessica C; Han, Meilan K; Dransfield, Mark T; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2016-10-01

    Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have marked discordance between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and degree of emphysema on computed tomography (CT). Biomechanical differences between these patients have not been studied. We aimed to identify reasons for the discordance between CT and spirometry in some patients with COPD. Subjects with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I-IV from a large multicenter study (The Genetic Epidemiology of COPD) were arranged by percentiles of %predicted FEV1 and emphysema on CT. Three categories were created using differences in percentiles: Catspir with predominant airflow obstruction/minimal emphysema, CatCT with predominant emphysema/minimal airflow obstruction, and Catmatched with matched FEV1 and emphysema. Image registration was used to derive Jacobian determinants, a measure of lung elasticity, anisotropy, and strain tensors, to assess biomechanical differences between groups. Regression models were created with the previously mentioned categories as outcome variable, adjusting for demographics, scanner type, quantitative CT-derived emphysema, gas trapping, and airway thickness (model 1), and after adding biomechanical CT metrics (model 2). Jacobian determinants, anisotropy, and strain tensors were strongly associated with FEV1. With Catmatched as control, model 2 predicted Catspir and CatCT better than model 1 (Akaike information criterion 255.8 vs. 320.8). In addition to demographics, the strongest independent predictors of FEV1 were Jacobian mean (β = 1.60,95%confidence intervals [CI] = 1.16 to 1.98; P spirometry, offering the potential for new insights into the linkage between regional parenchymal destruction and global decrement in lung function in patients with COPD. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. New Danish reference values for spirometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke, Anders; Marott, Jacob Louis; Mortensen, Jann

    2013-01-01

    years of age or older with adequate lung function. Results:  We used sex-stratified multiple linear regression analysis to find prediction formulas for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1) ), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV(1) /FVC adjusted for age and height. The cutoff value of normal lung......Introduction:  International recommendations state that reference values for lung function should derive from cross-sectional studies of healthy nonsmokers and be renewed from time to time because of cohort effect and newer, more accurate, technical equipment. In 1986, the Danish Lung Society...

  2. Influence of the diving wetsuit on standard spirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Nico A. M.; Sterk, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A well-fitting wetsuit exerts a pressure on the body that may influence spirometry. This pressure is expected to reduce the forced vital capacity (FVC) due to hampered inspiration. Since the shape of the spirometric flow curve should not be changed by the pressure effects of the

  3. Spirometry improvement after muscular exercise in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro; Rizzato, Alex; Fava, Simone; Olivato, Nicola; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M; Bosco, Gerardo

    2017-12-01

    An increased sympathetic activity during muscular effort is a well established physiological response, whose intensity is known to increase with the muscular load. Spirometry was described to improve as an effect of swimming training in healthy and asthmatic subjects, suggesting a decrease in airway resistance The aim was to investigate the possible effect of muscular exercise (swimming) on spirometry, in particular searching for possible differences because of different swimming times. The measurements were performed on 9 highly trained male competitive swimmers (age: 41±12.79 years, height: 1.69±0.06 meters, weight: 66.14±14.28 kg, BMI: 22.8±3.61 kg/m2) during an official competition. The data were collected at the border of the swimming-pool before (control, C) and few minutes after the swimming sessions (exercise, E), which consisted either of 800 meter (7 subjects) or 1500 meter (5 subjects) free style. A general trend indicating a postexercise increase in spirometry was observed. We found post-exercise significant increments in FEV1 and in MEF75 for both the 800 and 1500 meter swimming sessions, and in FEF25-75 and in MEF25 for the shorter distance. We conclude that, as it may be expected, muscular exercise induces an improvement of spirometry both because of a smooth muscle relaxation-induced modulation of airway diameter and resistance to airflow, and because of an enhanced expiratory muscle contraction strength. Both of these mechanisms are related to an increased sympathetic activity which is well known to accompany muscular exercise.

  4. Telemedical Education: Teaching Spirometry on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Esther H.; Gross, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and evaluation of an Internet-based tutorial for teaching spirometry interpretation to nonpulmonologists. Concludes that computer-based tutorials can effectively train off-site practitioners in spirometry interpretation. Contains 23 references. (Author/WRM)

  5. Espirometria de incentivo com pressão positiva expiratória é benéfica após revascularização miocardio Espirometría incentivada con presión positiva espiratoria es beneficiosa después de revascularización de miocardio Incentive spirometry with expiratory positive airway pressure brings benefits after myocardial revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glória Menz Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    protocolo de EI+EPAP se realizó en el período postoperatorio inmediato y durante 4 semanas más en domicilio. Dieciocho meses después de la CRM se evaluaron la fuerza de la musculatura respiratoria, la capacidad funcional, la función pulmonar, la calidad de vida y el nivel de actividad física. RESULTADOS: Después del test de caminata de seis minutos (TC6, el score para disnea (1,6 ± 0,6 vs 0,6 ± 0,3, P BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery have higher risk to develop pulmonary complications (PCs such as atelectasis, pneumonia and pleural effusion. These complications could increase the length of hospital stay, resources utilization and also are associated with reduced quality of life and functional capacity a long term. OBJECTIVE: To test if the use of incentive spirometry (IS associated with expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP, after CABG surgery improves dyspnea, effort perceived and quality of life 18 months after CABG. METHODS: Sixteen patients submitted to a CABG, were randomized to a control group (n=8 or IS+EPAP group (n=8. The protocol of IS+EPAP was applied in the immediate postoperative period and following for more 4 weeks in the patient's home. Eighteen months after CABG, the strength of the respiratory muscle, the functional capacity, the lung function, the quality of life and the level of physical activity were evaluated. RESULTS: After six minute walk test (6-MWT, the score of the dyspnea (1.6±0.6 vs 0.6±0.3, P<0.05 and the perceived effort (13.4±1.2 vs 9.1±0.7, P<0.05 were higher in the control group, when compared with the IS+EPAP group. In quality of life evaluation, the domain related to the physical aspects limitations was better in IS+EPAP group (93.7±4.1 vs 50±17, P<0.02. CONCLUSION: Patients that were submitted to IS+EPAP present reduction of dyspnea and lower effort sensation after the 6-MWT, and also a better quality of life 18 months after CABG.

  6. Oscillometry complements spirometry in evaluation of subjects following toxic inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth I. Berger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Trade Center (WTC destruction released dust and fumes into the environment. Although many community members developed respiratory symptoms, screening spirometry was usually normal. We hypothesised that forced oscillation testing would identify functional abnormalities undetected by spirometry and that symptom severity would relate to magnitude of abnormalities measured by oscillometry. A symptomatic cohort (n=848 from the Bellevue Hospital WTC Environmental Health Center was evaluated and compared to an asymptomatic cohort (n=475 from the New York City Department of Health WTC Health Registry. Spirometry and oscillometry were performed. Oscillometry measurements included resistance (R5 and frequency dependence of resistance (R5−20. Spirometry was normal for the majority of subjects (73.2% symptomatic versus 87.6% asymptomatic, p<0.0001. In subjects with normal spirometry, R5 and R5−20 were higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects (median (interquartile range R5 0.436 (0.206 versus 0.314 (0.129 kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.001; R5−20 0.075 (0.085 versus 0.004 (0.042 kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.0001. In symptomatic subjects, R5 and R5−20 increased with increasing severity and frequency of wheeze (p<0.05. Measurement of R5–20 correlated with the presence and severity of symptoms even when spirometry was within normal limits. These findings are in accord with small airway abnormalities as a potential explanation of the respiratory symptoms.

  7. Oscillometry complements spirometry in evaluation of subjects following toxic inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kenneth I.; Turetz, Meredith; Liu, Mengling; Shao, Yongzhao; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee; Friedman, Stephen M.; Maslow, Carey B.; Marmor, Michael; Goldring, Roberta M.

    2015-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) destruction released dust and fumes into the environment. Although many community members developed respiratory symptoms, screening spirometry was usually normal. We hypothesised that forced oscillation testing would identify functional abnormalities undetected by spirometry and that symptom severity would relate to magnitude of abnormalities measured by oscillometry. A symptomatic cohort (n=848) from the Bellevue Hospital WTC Environmental Health Center was evaluated and compared to an asymptomatic cohort (n=475) from the New York City Department of Health WTC Health Registry. Spirometry and oscillometry were performed. Oscillometry measurements included resistance (R5) and frequency dependence of resistance (R5−20). Spirometry was normal for the majority of subjects (73.2% symptomatic versus 87.6% asymptomatic, p<0.0001). In subjects with normal spirometry, R5 and R5−20 were higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects (median (interquartile range) R5 0.436 (0.206) versus 0.314 (0.129) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.001; R5−20 0.075 (0.085) versus 0.004 (0.042) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.0001). In symptomatic subjects, R5 and R5−20 increased with increasing severity and frequency of wheeze (p<0.05). Measurement of R5–20 correlated with the presence and severity of symptoms even when spirometry was within normal limits. These findings are in accord with small airway abnormalities as a potential explanation of the respiratory symptoms. PMID:27730155

  8. Quantitative computed tomography analysis of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis using automated software: correlation with spirometry in the evaluation of severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Cruvinel, Danilo Lemos; Menezes, Marcelo Bezerra de; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Vianna, Elcio de Oliveira; Elias Junior, Jorge; Martinez, Jose Antonio Baddini

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform a quantitative analysis of the airways using automated software, in computed tomography images of patients with cystic fibrosis, correlating the results with spirometric findings. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients with cystic fibrosis were studied-20 males and 14 females; mean age 18 ± 9 years - divided into two groups according to the spirometry findings: group I (n = 21), without severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1] > 50% predicted), and group II (n = 13), with severe obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 50% predicted). The following tracheobronchial tree parameters were obtained automatically: bronchial diameter, area, thickness, and wall attenuation. Results: On average, 52 bronchi per patient were studied. The number of bronchi analyzed was higher in group II. The correlation with spirometry findings, especially between the relative wall thickness of third to eighth bronchial generation and predicted FEV1, was better in group I. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the airways by computed tomography can be useful for assessing disease severity in cystic fibrosis patients. In patients with severe airflow obstruction, the number of bronchi studied by the method is higher, indicating more bronchiectasis. In patients without severe obstruction, the relative bronchial wall thickness showed a good correlation with the predicted FEV1. (author)

  9. Quantitative computed tomography analysis of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis using automated software: correlation with spirometry in the evaluation of severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Cruvinel, Danilo Lemos; Menezes, Marcelo Bezerra de; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Vianna, Elcio de Oliveira; Elias Junior, Jorge; Martinez, Jose Antonio Baddini, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To perform a quantitative analysis of the airways using automated software, in computed tomography images of patients with cystic fibrosis, correlating the results with spirometric findings. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients with cystic fibrosis were studied-20 males and 14 females; mean age 18 ± 9 years - divided into two groups according to the spirometry findings: group I (n = 21), without severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1] > 50% predicted), and group II (n = 13), with severe obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 50% predicted). The following tracheobronchial tree parameters were obtained automatically: bronchial diameter, area, thickness, and wall attenuation. Results: On average, 52 bronchi per patient were studied. The number of bronchi analyzed was higher in group II. The correlation with spirometry findings, especially between the relative wall thickness of third to eighth bronchial generation and predicted FEV1, was better in group I. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the airways by computed tomography can be useful for assessing disease severity in cystic fibrosis patients. In patients with severe airflow obstruction, the number of bronchi studied by the method is higher, indicating more bronchiectasis. In patients without severe obstruction, the relative bronchial wall thickness showed a good correlation with the predicted FEV1. (author)

  10. Relationship of serum levels of interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and C-reactive protein with forced expiratory volume in first second in patients with mustard lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, Alireza; Panahi, Yunes; Shirali, Saeed; Rahmani, Hossein

    2017-06-01

    The chronic systemic inflammation is a result of releasing inflammatory cytokines from the cells relating to the body immunity system and chronic activation of the innate immunity system. To evaluate the relationship among serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), C-reactive protein (CRP) with forced expiratory volume in 1 st s (FEV 1 ) in patients with mustard lung (ML) and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). A published literature search was performed through SID, web of science, ISI, Science Direct, Scopus, Medline, and PubMed databases for articles published in English. The correlation coefficient ( r ) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using random or fixed effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using χ 2 and I 2 statistics. In total, 4 published studies were included in the final analysis. Using the random-effect model, meta-analysis showed that the r was -0.052 (95% CI: -0.14-0.049, p = 0.28) at serum level of IL-8, serum levels of CRP and FEV 1 in these results were r = -0.13, p = 0.012, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and FEV 1 levels were r = -0.39, p = 0.03 in the conducted studies on mustard lung patients. The IL-6 serum level was explored in COPD patients. The results of the given studies in these patients are r = -0.006, 95% CI: -0.37-0.15, and p = 0.44. In this meta-analysis, there was evidence that serum levels of CRP and TNF have been significantly increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases compared to the healthy control group, which signifies the presence of systemic inflammation in ML and COPD patients.

  11. Telemedicine spirometry training and quality assurance program in primary care centers of a public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina Malanda, Nuria; López de Santa María, Elena; Gutiérrez, Asunción; Bayón, Juan Carlos; Garcia, Larraitz; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2014-04-01

    Forced spirometry is essential for diagnosing respiratory diseases and is widely used across levels of care. However, several studies have shown that spirometry quality in primary care is not ideal, with risks of misdiagnosis. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and performance of a telemedicine-based training and quality assurance program for forced spirometry in primary care. The two phases included (1) a 9-month pilot study involving 15 centers, in which spirometry tests were assessed by the Basque Office for Health Technology Assessment, and (2) the introduction of the program to all centers in the Public Basque Health Service. Technicians first received 4 h of training, and, subsequently, they sent all tests to the reference laboratory using the program. Quality assessment was performed in accordance with clinical guidelines (A and B, good; C-F, poor). In the first phase, 1,894 spirometry tests were assessed, showing an improvement in quality: acceptable quality tests increased from 57% at the beginning to 78% after 6 months and 83% after 9 months (passessed after the inclusion of 36 additional centers, maintaining the positive trend (61%, 87%, and 84% at the same time points; pquality of spirometry tests improved in all centers. (2) The program provides a tool for transferring data that allows monitoring of its quality and training of technicians who perform the tests. (3) This approach is useful for improving spirometry quality in the routine practice of a public health system.

  12. Spirometry-Assisted High Resolution Chest Computed Tomography in Children: Is it Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otjen, Jeffrey Parke; Swanson, Jonathan Ogden; Oron, Assaf; DiBlasi, Robert M; Swortzel, Tim; van Well, Jade Adriana Marie; Gommers, Eva Anna Elisabeth; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    Image quality of high resolution chest computed tomographies (HRCTs) depends on adequate breath holds at end inspiration and end expiration. We hypothesized that implementation of spirometry-assisted breath holds in children undergoing HRCTs would improve image quality over that obtained with voluntary breath holds by decreasing motion artifact and atelectasis. This is a retrospective case-control study of HRCTs obtained at a tertiary care children's hospital before and after implementation of a spirometry-assisted CT protocol, in which children ≥8 years of age are first trained in supine slow vital capacity maneuvers and then repeat the maneuvers in the CT scanner, coached by a respiratory therapist. Spirometry-assisted CT scans (cases) were matched by age, gender and diagnosis (cystic fibrosis vs other) to CT scans obtained with voluntary breath holds in the 6 years before implementation of the spirometry assistance protocol (controls), and evaluated by 2 blinded pediatric radiologists. Among both cases and controls (N = 50 each), 10 carried the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and 40 had other diagnoses. Mean age was 12.9 years (range: 7.5-20.1) among cases and 13.0 (7.1-19.7) among controls. Mean (SD) inspiratory image density among cases was -852 (37) Hounsfield units (HU) and -828 (43) among controls (p = 0.006). Mean (SD) expiratory image density was -629 (95) HU among cases and -688 (83) HU among controls (p = 0.002). Mean (SD) change in image density between inspiratory and expiratory images was +222 (85) HU among cases and +140 (76) HU among controls (p 0.80). Atelectasis was present on inspiratory images in 8 cases and 9 controls and on expiratory images in 9 cases and 10 controls (p > 0.80). Spirometry-assisted CTs had a significantly greater difference in lung density between inspiratory and expiratory scans than those performed with voluntary breath holds, likely improving the ability to detect air trapping. No appreciable difference in image quality

  13. [Spirometry in the GP-Office].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Leander; Stolz, Daiana

    2016-02-17

    Spirometry is an important diagnostic tool, which, with correct implementation, detects possible obstructive or restrictive lung diseases. However, it is important to note that only part of the lung function is measured by spirometry. For instance, total lung volume and residual volume, both useful in detecting pulmonary emphysema, are not measured. Therefore, in case of pathological spirometry or suspected restrictive lung disease, further tests such as body plethysmography with diffusion measurement should be carried out.

  14. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Koulouris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD often exhale along the same flow–volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFLT. Therefore, EFLT, namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFLT leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFLT occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage, in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFLT are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  15. Age- and size-related reference ranges: a case study of spirometry through childhood and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, T J; Stanojevic, S; Stocks, J; Coates, A L; Hankinson, J L; Wade, A M

    2009-02-28

    Age-related reference ranges are useful for assessing growth in children. The LMS method is a popular technique for constructing growth charts that model the age-changing distribution of the measurement in terms of the median, coefficient of variation and skewness. Here the methodology is extended to references that depend on body size as well as age, by exploiting the flexibility of the generalised additive models for location, scale and shape (GAMLSS) technique. GAMLSS offers general linear predictors for each moment parameter and a choice of error distributions, which can handle kurtosis as well as skewness. A key question with such references is the nature of the age-size adjustment, additive or multiplicative, which is explored by comparing the identity link and log link for the median predictor.There are several measurements whose reference ranges depend on both body size and age. As an example, models are developed here for the first four moments of the lung function variables forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV(1)/FVC in terms of height and age, in a data set of 3598 children and adults aged 4 to 80 years. The results show a strong multiplicative association between spirometry, height and age, with a large and nonlinear age effect across the age range. Variability also depends nonlinearly on age and to a lesser extent on height. FEV(1) and FVC are close to normally distributed, while FEV(1)/FVC is appreciably skew to the left. GAMLSS is a powerful technique for the construction of such references, which should be useful in clinical medicine. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Five tips for good office spirometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirometry is critical for the correct diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is part of the severity classification. It ultimately guides treatment choices. When per forming spirometry on a COPD patient, one expects a flow volume loop to have some degree of obstruction. To obtain and confirm this result ...

  17. The objective evaluation of obstructive pulmonary diseases with spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkaya S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sevket Ozkaya,1 Adem Dirican,2 Tibel Tuna3 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Bahçes¸ehir University, Istanbul, 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Samsun Medical Park Hospital, 3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Samsun Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Hospital, Samsun, Turkey Abstract: Airway obstruction is variable in asthma, while it is progressive and persistent in chronic bronchitis and emphysema. However, some of the patients presenting with symptoms of chronic airway diseases have clinical features of both asthma and COPD. The group with “Asthma–COPD Overlap Syndrome” (ACOS phenotype was characterized by definitely irreversible airway obstruction accompanied by symptoms and signs of reversibility. In this study, we aimed to classify obstructive airway diseases by clinical, radiological, and pulmonary function tests. Patients at Samsun Medical Park Hospital Chest Diseases outpatient clinic were evaluated between January 2013 and April 2016, and a total of 235 patients were included in this study. Mean age of the patients was 55.3±14.5 (15–88 years, and the male/female ratio was 45/190. The baseline pulmonary function test results of the patients were as follows: mean forced vital capacity (FVC values 2,825±1,108 (710–6,870 mL and 74.3±22.4 (24–155%, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 values 1,789±774 (480–4,810 mL and 58.1±20.0 (20–130%, FEV1/FVC values 62.5±6.8 (39–70%. Reversibility criteria following bronchodilator treatment were present in 107 (45.5% patients. We specified five subgroups for patients according to their clinical, radiological, and pulmonary test findings, namely Group 1 (asthma, Group 2 (ACOS, Group 3 (chronic bronchitis, and Group 4 (emphysema. Additionally, a group of patients who had clinical and spirometric features of both asthma and chronic bronchitis in association with underlying emphysema (emphysema with chronic bronchitis and emphysema with asthma

  18. [Spirometry - basic examination of the lung function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociánová, Jana

    Spirometry is one of the basic internal examination methods, similarly as e.g. blood pressure measurement or ECG recording. It is used to detect or assess the extent of ventilatory disorders. Indications include respiratory symptoms or laboratory anomalies, smoking, inhalation risks and more. Its performance and evaluation should be among the basic skills of pulmonologists, internists, alergologists, pediatricians and sports physicians. The results essentially influence the correct diagnosing and treatment method. Therefore spirometry must be performed under standardized conditions and accurately and clearly assessed to enable answering clinical questions.Key words: acceptability - calibration - contraindication - evaluation - indication - parameters - spirometry - standardization.

  19. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. O volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo não é suficiente para avaliar resposta broncodilatadora em doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica Measuring forced expiratory volume in one second alone is not an accurate method of assessing response to bronchodilators in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felícia de Moraes Branco Tavares

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a freqüência de variação no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo após o uso de broncodilatador, em uma amostra de pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica. Correlacioná-la com dados clínicos e demográficos e avaliar a freqüência de resposta na capacidade vital forçada, capacidade vital lenta, capacidade inspiratória, volume residual, resistência das vias áreas e condutância das vias aéreas. MÉTODOS: Sessenta e quatro pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica foram submetidos a pletismografia de corpo inteiro e foi medida a reversibilidade da broncoconstrição após o uso de 400 µg de fenoterol. RESULTADOS: Tiveram resposta no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo 31% dos pacientes. Excluindo-se os pacientes com resposta no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo, 5% tiveram resposta em 5 dos demais parâmetros, 10% responderam em 4 parâmetros, 17,5% em 3, 27,5% em 2 e 25% em apenas 1 parâmetro. CONCLUSÃO: Os volumes pulmonares estáticos, a resistência e a condutância das vias aéreas, quando incluídos na avaliação da resposta ao broncodilatador juntamente com o volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo, permitem avaliar com maior amplitude o número de pacientes com resposta funcional à prova farmacodinâmica. Os resultados estão de acordo com a observação de que muitos pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, mesmo sem melhora no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo após o uso de broncodilatador, apresentam melhora clínica e alívio da dispnéia.OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of variation in forced expiratory volume in one second after bronchodilator use in a sample of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, correlating such variation with clinical and demographic variables and evaluating the frequency of response presented in forced vital capacity, slow vital capacity, inspiratory capacity

  1. Effects of dorsal and lateral decubitus on peak expiratory flow in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa H. Gianinis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the measures of the pulmonary function is the peak expiratory flow (PEF that can be defined as the major flow obtained in an expiratory pressure after a complete inspiration to the level of the total lung capacity. This measure depends on the effort and strength of expiratory muscles, the airway diameter and the lung volume. OBJECTIVE: To compare the results of the peak expiratory flow in healthy male and female obtained in a seated position and dorsal decubitus (DD, right lateral decubitus (RLD and left lateral decubitus (LLD. METHOD: Thirty young subjects with mean age 22.7 years, healthy and non-smokers were included at the study, 15 of male sex. They did spirometry and IPAQ questionnaire to check the normal pulmonary function and physical activity level. The measures of PEF were performed in four positions, being performed 3 measures in which position, in a random order. Statistical analysis was performed according to Student's t test, with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: There was a difference between the values obtained in sitting position(481±117.1 L/min with DD(453.2±116.3 L/min and RLD (454±112.9 L/min (p<0.05, however, did not find a significant difference between the sitting position and LLD (469±83 L/min. CONCLUSIONS: Body position affects the values of PEF, with decreasing values in DD and RLD. The LLD can be an alternative to optimize the expiratory flow in situations of constraint to the sitting position.

  2. Feasibility of spirometry testing in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschmidt, Jordan C; Brooks, Edward G; Cherry, Debra C; Guajardo, Jesus R; Wood, Pamela R

    2016-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of obtaining acceptable and reproducible spirometry data in preschool aged children (3-5 years) by technicians without prior experience with spirometry. Two technicians were trained to perform spirometry testing (ndd Easy on-PC) and to administer standardized questionnaires. Preschool aged children were enrolled from two Head Start centers and a local primary care clinic. Subjects were trained in proper spirometry technique and tested until at least two acceptable efforts were obtained or the subject no longer produced acceptable efforts. 200 subjects were enrolled: mean age 4.0 years (± 0.7 SD); age distribution: 51 (25.5%) 3 years old, 103 (51.5%) 4 years old, and 46 (23%) 5 years old. Fifty-six percent male and 75% Hispanic. One hundred thirty (65%) subjects produced at least one acceptable effort on their first visit: 23 (45%) for 3 years old, 67 (65%) for 4 years old, and 40 (87%) for 5 years old. The number of acceptable efforts correlated with age (r = 0.29, P spirometry results from the preschool aged children; the number of acceptable efforts correlated significantly with age. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure at a higher rate improve oxygenation in the early period after cardiac surgery--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urell, Charlotte; Emtner, Margareta; Hedenström, Hans; Tenling, Arne; Breidenskog, Marie; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2011-07-01

    In addition to early mobilisation, a variety of breathing exercises are used to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery. The optimal duration of the treatment is not well evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 30 versus 10 deep breaths hourly, while awake, with positive expiratory pressure on oxygenation and pulmonary function the first days after cardiac surgery. A total of 181 patients, undergoing cardiac surgery, were randomised into a treatment group, performing 30 deep breaths hourly the first postoperative days, or into a control group performing 10 deep breaths hourly. The main outcome measurement arterial blood gases and the secondary outcome pulmonary function, evaluated with spirometry, were determined on the second postoperative day. Preoperatively, both study groups were similar in terms of age, SpO(2), forced expiratory volume in 1s and New York Heart Association classification. On the second postoperative day, arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) was 8.9 ± 1.7 kPa in the treatment group and 8.1 ± 1.4 kPa in the control group (p = 0.004). Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) was 92.7 ± 3.7% in the treatment group and 91.1 ± 3.8% in the control group (p = 0.016). There were no differences in measured lung function between the groups or in compliance to the breathing exercises. Compliance was 65% of possible breathing sessions. A significantly increased oxygenation was found in patients performing 30 deep breaths the first two postoperative days compared with control patients performing 10 deep breaths hourly. These results support the implementation of a higher rate of deep breathing exercises in the initial phase after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Virtual respiratory system for interactive e-learning of spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tomalak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in computer simulation technology offers new possibilities for modern medicine. On one hand – virtual organs can help to create animal or human models for research, on the other hand – e-learning or distant learning through Internet is now possible. The aim of our work was to create a system for interactive learning of spirometry (SILS, enabling students or physicians to observe spirometric measurements (flow-volume modified by setting level and kind of abnormalities within the respiratory system. SILS is based on a virtual respiratory system presented previously in several papers. Its main features are: separation of the lungs and chest; anatomical division of the lungs; division of airway resistance into transmural pressure dependent (Rp and lung volume dependent (Rv parts. The one mathematical formula that represents Rp describes both flow limitation (forced expiration and dependence of Raw on lungs volume (small airflows. The output of system are spirometric parameters (as FEV1, FVC, FEV1%FVC and a flow–volume loop constructed according to results of simulation of forced expiration for the chosen abnormality kind and level. As a result – this system may be used in teaching process in medical schools and postgraduate education. We offer access to a basic version of SILS for students and physicians at: www.spirometry.ibib.waw.pl and www.zpigichp.edu.pl. As we expect feedback from users, it is possible to modify user interface or model features to comply with users' requests.

  5. [Quality scale for preschool spirometry interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Francisca; Bedregal, Paula; Ubilla, Carlos; Barrientos, Hortensia; Caussade, Solange

    2017-02-01

    Since 2007, there are international guidelines for implementation and interpretation of spirometry in preschool children. A percentage of these patients cannot obtain maneuvers that meet all eligibility criteria. The objective of this study was to develop a quality scale for interpreting these partially acceptable spirometry. Delphi methodology was used, which allows to reach consensus among experts analyzing a defined problem. We invited to participate pediatric pneumologists dedicated to lung function and who participated actively in scientific specialty societies in Chile. Successive rounds were conducted with questionnaires about criteria used to assess spirometry in preschool children. These criteria define the acceptability of spirometric maneuvers according to international guidelines. Proposed quality grades were “very good”, “good”, “fair” and “bad”. Thirteen of the 15 invited experts accepted our invitation. In the first round 9 disagreed with the degree of “regular” quality. In the second round this was removed and 11 experts answered, 9 of them agreed with the use of this new version. The most contentious criterion was the end of expiration. Most experts agreed with the final scale, using “very good”, “good” and “bad” judgments. This would help to improve the performance of spirometry in children between 2 and 5 years.

  6. The European Respiratory Society spirometry tent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maio, Sara; Sherrill, Duane L; MacNee, William

    2012-01-01

    In order to raise public awareness of the importance of early detection of airway obstruction and to enable many people who had not been tested previously to have their lung function measured, the European Lung Foundation and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) organised a spirometry testing...

  7. Is there an optimal level of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) to improve walking tolerance in patients with severe COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Davide; Simonelli, Carla; Paneroni, Mara; Saleri, Manuela; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Cardinale, Francesco; Vitacca, Michele; Nicolini, Antonello

    2016-07-01

    The application of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) devices during exercise had been proposed in order to counteract the pulmonary hyperinflation, reduce the dyspnea and thus increase the exercise tolerance in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This randomized controlled crossover trial investigated the effect of two different levels of PEP (1 cmH2O and 10 cmH2O) on distance covered at 6minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with severe COPD. Secondary outcomes were the evaluation of PEP effects on physiological and pulmonary function variables. Seventy-two severe COPD patients, referred to our hospitals as in and out patients, were recruited. A basal 6MWT without devices was performed on the first day, and then repeated with PEP 1 cmH2O (PEP1) and 10 cmH2O (PEP10), with a randomized crossover design. Slow and forced spirometries, including the inspiratory capacity measure, were repeated before and after each 6MWT. 50 patients (average age 69,92 year, mean FEV1 41,42% of predicted) concluded the trial. The 6MWT improved significantly among both PEP levels and baseline (323,8 mt at baseline vs. 337,8 PEP1 and 341,8 PEP10; p<.002 and p<.018, respectively). The difference between PEP10 and PEP1 did not reach the significance. No improvements were found in pulmonary function, symptoms and physiological variables after the 6MWT. In patients with severe COPD, the application of 1 cmH2O of PEP seems to improve the exercise tolerance as 10 cmH2O, with similar dyspnea. Further studies should investigate the effects of low levels of PEP on aerobic training programs. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Spirometry quality in adults with very severe lung function impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; García-Torrentera, Rogelio; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Enright, Paul; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2015-05-01

    Some technologists worry that patients with very severe lung disease are unable to complete several spirometry maneuvers, which require considerable effort. We retrospectively selected all spirometry tests with an FEV1 30,000 subjects tested during the 3-y period) had adequate quality spirometry. Subjects with airway obstruction were less likely to meet FVC repeatability goals. A poor spirometry quality grade was associated with a very low FVC and a low body mass index, but not older age. Severe lung disease should not be used as an excuse for not meeting spirometry quality goals. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. Inflammatory Responses, Spirometry, and Quality of Life in Subjects With Bronchiectasis Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Lin, Zhi-Min; Jiang, Mei; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2015-08-01

    Bronchiectasis exacerbations are critical events characterized by worsened symptoms and signs (ie, cough frequency, sputum volume, malaise). Our goal was to examine variations in airway and systemic inflammation, spirometry, and quality of life during steady state, bronchiectasis exacerbations, and convalescence (1 week following a 2-week antibiotic treatment) to determine whether potentially pathogenic microorganisms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were associated with poorer conditions during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to detect inflammatory mediators and bacterial densities. Spirometry and quality of life (St George Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ]) were assessed during the 3 stages. Forty-eight subjects with bronchiectasis (43.2 ± 14.2 y of age) were analyzed. No notable differences in species and density of potentially pathogenic microorganisms were found during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Except for CXCL8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), serum inflammation was heightened during bronchiectasis exacerbations and recovered during convalescence. Even though sputum TNF-α was markedly higher during bronchiectasis exacerbations and remained heightened during convalescence, the variations in miscellaneous sputum markers were unremarkable. Bronchiectasis exacerbations were associated with notably higher SGRQ symptom and total scores, which recovered during convalescence. FVC, FEV1, and maximum mid-expiratory flow worsened during bronchiectasis exacerbations (median change from baseline of -2.2%, -0.8%, and -1.3%) and recovered during convalescence (median change from baseline of 0.6%, 0.7%, and -0.7%). Compared with no bacterial isolation, potentially pathogenic microorganism or P. aeruginosa isolation at baseline did not result in poorer clinical condition during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Bronchiectasis exacerbations are characterized by heightened inflammatory responses and poorer quality of life and

  10. Agreement between spirometry and tracheal auscultation in assessing bronchial responsiveness in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprikkelman, AB; Schouten, JP; Lourens, MS; Heymans, HSA; van Aalderen, WMC

    We have recently found that changes in lung sounds correspond well with a 20% fall in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after methacholine challenge in asthmatic children. Up to now, little was known about the agreement between a 20% fall in FEV1 and a change in lung sounds after repeated

  11. Agreement between spirometry and tracheal auscultation in assessing bronchial responsiveness in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprikkelman, A. B.; Schouten, J. P.; Lourens, M. S.; Heymans, H. S.; van Aalderen, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    We have recently found that changes in lung sounds correspond well with a 20% fall in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after methacholine challenge in asthmatic children. Up to now, little was known about the agreement between a 20% fall in FEV1 and a change in lung sounds after repeated

  12. A new spirometry-based algorithm to predict occupational pulmonary restrictive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteis, S; Iridoy-Zulet, A A; Aaron, S; Swann, A; Cullinan, P

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry is often included in workplace-based respiratory surveillance programmes but its performance in the identification of restrictive lung disease is poor, especially when the prevalence of this condition is low in the tested population. To improve the specificity (Sp) and positive predictive value (PPV) of current spirometry-based algorithms in the diagnosis of restrictive pulmonary impairment in the workplace and to reduce the proportion of false positives findings and, as a result, unnecessary referrals for lung volume measurements. We re-analysed two studies of hospital patients, respectively used to derive and validate a recommended spirometry-based algorithm [forced vital capacity (FVC) 55%] for the recognition of restrictive pulmonary impairment. We used true lung restrictive cases as a reference standard in 2×2 contingency tables to estimate sensitivity (Sn), Sp and PPV and negative predictive values for each diagnostic cut-off. We simulated a working population aged spirometry-based algorithm may be adopted to accurately exclude pulmonary restriction and to possibly reduce unnecessary lung volume testing in an occupational health setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. [Accesibility and use of spirometry in primary care centers in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llauger, M Antònia; Rosas, Alba; Burgos, Felip; Torrente, Elena; Tresserras, Ricard; Escarrabill, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Examine the accessibility and use of forced spirometry (FS) in public primary care facilities centers in Catalonia. Cross-sectional study using a survey. Three hundred sixty-six Primary Care Teams (PCT) in Catalonia. Third quarter of 2010. Survey with information on spirometers, training, interpretation and quality control, and the priority that the quality of spirometry had for the team. Indicators FS/100 inhabitants/year, FS/month/PCT; FS/month/10,000 inhabitants. Response rate: 75%. 97.5% of PCT had spirometer and made an average of 2.01 spirometries/100 inhabitants (34.68 spirometry/PCT/month). 83% have trained professionals.>50% centers perform formal training but no information is available on the quality. 70% performed some sort of calibration. Interpretation was made by the family physician in 87.3% of cases. In 68% of cases not performed any quality control of exploration. 2/3 typed data manually into the computerized medical record.>50% recognized a high priority strategies for improving the quality. Despite the accessibility of EF efforts should be made to standardize training, increasing the number of scans test and promote systematic quality control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Expiratory timing in obstructive sleep apnoeas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibella, F; Marrone, O; Sanci, S; Bellia, V; Bonsignore, G

    1990-03-01

    Diaphragmatic electromyogram was recorded during NREM sleep in 4 patients affected by obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome in order to evaluate the behaviour of expiratory time (TE) in the course of the obstructive apnoea-ventilation cycle. The two components of TE, i.e. time of post-inspiratory inspiratory activity (TPIIA) and time of expiratory phase 2 (TE2) were separately analysed. TPIIA showed a short duration, with only minor variations, within the apnoea, while its duration was more variable and longer in the interapnoeic periods: the longest TPIIA values were associated with the highest inspiratory volumes in the same breaths. This behaviour seemed regulated according to the need of a more or less effective expiratory flow braking, probably as a result of pulmonary stretch receptors discharge. Conversely TE2 showed a continuous gradual modulation, progressively increasing in the pre-apnoeic period, decreasing during the apnoea and increasing in the post-apnoeic period: these TE2 variations seemed related to oscillations in chemical drive. These data show that TE in the obstructive apnoea-ventilation cycle results from a different modulation in its two components and suggest that both mechanical and chemical influences play a role in its overall duration.

  15. Spirometry in elderly laryngectomized patients: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Alessandro; Perrotta, Fabio; Cennamo, Antonio; Cerqua, Francesco Saverio; Rinaldi, Luca; Mazzella, Antonio; Grella, Edoardo; Tranfa, Carmelindo; Bianco, Andrea; Stefanelli, Francesco; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-09-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the second most common respiratory neoplasm after lung cancer. Laryngectomy is a well established treatment for larynx cancers which involve relevant anatomic alterations. Spirometry is an essential investigation tool for diagnosis and severity of respiratory diseases, difficult to perform in laryngectomees. 43 consecutive laryngectomized patients were enrolled from July 2014 to March 2015. Patients fulfilling inclusion criteria underwent spirometry at baseline assessment and after two days. During the examination, the spirometer was placed directly on the stoma of the patient, through mouthpiece "Spirometry Filter 74". At baseline, 26 eligible laryngectomees correctly performed the spirometry test with mouthpiece adhering to the stoma; 4 patients refused to perform the second spirometry after 2 days. The feasibility of spirometry examination in these patients was 100% despite difficulties in the execution of the test. The Pearson coefficient of reproducibility for FEV1, FVC and Tiffeneau Index was, respectively, 0.98, 0.94 and 0.77. Spirometry in laryngectomee patients is a feasible procedure for assessment of respiratory function; despite technical difficulties in the execution of the test, our results underline the reproducibility and repeatability of the spirometry. In conclusion, when performed within dedicated respiratory pathophysiology unit, spirometry is a reliable tool in the assessment and follow up of laryngectomees. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The use of spirometry in a primary care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Blain, Elizabeth A; Craig, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Elizabeth A Blain, Timothy J CraigPenn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USAObjective: To determine the use of spirometry in family practice, internal medicine, and pediatric outpatient settings.Methods: Data were collected from 45 outpatient offices in the central Pennsylvania area via phone survey that asked a set of four questions: 1) Do you have spirometry in your office? 2) Do you use spirometry for asthma patients? 3) In what situation do you use spirometry for? 4) Do you use s...

  17. Spirometry, Static Lung Volumes, and Diffusing Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Cain, Hilary C; Casaburi, Richard; Lee, Patty J; Iannone, Lynne; Leo-Summers, Linda S; Van Ness, Peter H

    2017-09-01

    Spirometric Z-scores from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI) rigorously account for age-related changes in lung function and are thus age-appropriate when establishing spirometric impairments, including a restrictive pattern and air-flow obstruction. However, GLI-defined spirometric impairments have not yet been evaluated regarding associations with static lung volumes (total lung capacity [TLC], functional residual capacity [FRC], and residual volume [RV]) and gas exchange (diffusing capacity). We performed a retrospective review of pulmonary function tests in subjects ≥40 y old (mean age 64.6 y), including pre-bronchodilator measures for: spirometry ( n = 2,586), static lung volumes by helium dilution with inspiratory capacity maneuver ( n = 2,586), and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( n = 2,508). Using multivariable linear regression, adjusted least-squares means (adj LS Means) were calculated for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity. The adj LS Means were expressed with and without height-cubed standardization and stratified by GLI-defined spirometry, including normal ( n = 1,251), restrictive pattern ( n = 663), and air-flow obstruction (mild, [ n = 128]; moderate, [ n = 150]; and severe, [ n = 394]). Relative to normal spirometry, restrictive-pattern had lower adj LS Means for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( P ≤ .001). Conversely, relative to normal spirometry, mild, moderate, and severe air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for FRC and RV ( P < .001). However, only mild and moderate air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for TLC ( P < .001), while only moderate and severe air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for RV/TLC ( P < .001) and lower adj LS Means for hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( P < .001). Notably, TLC (calculated as FRC + inspiratory capacity) was not increased in severe air-flow obstruction ( P ≥ .11

  18. Factors associated with abnormal spirometry among HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, M Bradley; Huang, Laurence; Diaz, Philip T; Kirk, Gregory D; Kleerup, Eric C; Morris, Alison; Rom, William; Weiden, Michael D; Zhao, Enxu; Thompson, Bruce; Crothers, Kristina

    2015-08-24

    HIV-infected individuals are susceptible to development of chronic lung diseases, but little is known regarding the prevalence and risk factors associated with different spirometric abnormalities in this population. We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors and performance characteristics of risk factors for spirometric abnormalities among HIV-infected individuals. Cross-sectional cohort study. We analyzed cross-sectional US data from the NHLBI-funded Lung-HIV consortium - a multicenter observational study of heterogeneous groups of HIV-infected participants in diverse geographic sites. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors statistically significantly associated with spirometry patterns. A total of 908 HIV-infected individuals were included. The median age of the cohort was 50 years, 78% were men and 68% current smokers. An abnormal spirometry pattern was present in 37% of the cohort: 27% had obstructed and 10% had restricted spirometry patterns. Overall, age, smoking status and intensity, history of Pneumocystis infection, asthma diagnosis and presence of respiratory symptoms were independently associated with an abnormal spirometry pattern. Regardless of the presence of respiratory symptoms, five HIV-infected participants would need to be screened with spirometry to diagnose two individuals with any abnormal spirometry pattern. Nearly 40% of a diverse US cohort of HIV-infected individuals had an abnormal spirometry pattern. Specific characteristics including age, smoking status, respiratory infection history and respiratory symptoms can identify those at risk for abnormal spirometry. The high prevalence of abnormal spirometry and the poor predictive capability of respiratory symptoms to identify abnormal spirometry should prompt clinicians to consider screening spirometry in HIV-infected populations.

  19. Restrictive pattern on spirometry: association with cardiovascular risk and level of physical activity in asymptomatic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine whether a restrictive pattern on spirometry is associated with the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL, as well as with cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, in asymptomatic adults. Methods : A total of 374 participants (mean age, 41 ± 14 years underwent spirometry, which included the determination of FVC and FEV1. A restrictive pattern on spirometry was defined as an FEV1/FVC ratio > 0.7 and an FVC < 80% of the predicted value. After conducting demographic, anthropometric, and CVD risk assessments, we evaluated body composition, muscle function, and postural balance, as well as performing cardiopulmonary exercise testing and administering the six-minute walk test. The PADL was quantified with a triaxial accelerometer. Results : A restrictive pattern on spirometry was found in 10% of the subjects. After multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for confounders (PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness, the following variables retained significance (OR; 95% CI as predictors of a restrictive pattern: systemic arterial hypertension (17.5; 1.65-184.8, smoking (11.6; 1.56-87.5, physical inactivity (8.1; 1.43-46.4, larger center-of-pressure area while standing on a force platform (1.34; 1.05-1.71; and dyslipidemia (1.89; 1.12-1.98. Conclusions : A restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be common in asymptomatic adults. We found that CVD risk factors, especially systemic arterial hypertension, smoking, and physical inactivity, were directly associated with a restrictive pattern, even when the analysis was adjusted for PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to improve understanding of the etiology of a restrictive pattern as well as to aid in the design of preventive strategies.

  20. The standard of spirometry in the RSA | Basson | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Standards for high-quality lung function testing have not yet been formally adopted in the RSA, despite the increase in the performance of spirometry. A study was undertaken to determine the standard of spirometry in clinical practice in this country. Forty-five spirometer users agreed to participate. Responses to a ...

  1. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  2. Pulmonary emphysema quantitation with Computed Tomography. Comparison between the visual score with high resolution CT, expiratory density mask with spiral CT and lung function studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zompatori, Maurizio; Battaglia, Milva; Rimondi, Maria Rita; Vivacqua, Donatella; Biscarini, Manuela; Fasano, Luca; Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Guerrieri, Aldo; Fabbri, Mario; Cavina, Mauro

    1997-01-01

    CT is the most accurate method to detect pulmonary emphysema in vivo. They compared prospectively two different methods for emphysema quantitation in 5 normal volunteers and 20 consecutive patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). All subjects were submitted to function tests and HRCT; three scans were acquired at preselected levels during inspiration. The type and extent of pulmonary emphysema were defined by two independent observers under blind conditions. Disagreements were subsequently settled by consent. All subjects were also examined with expiratory spiral CT using a density mask program, at two different cut-off levels (-850,-900 HU). Visual score and expiratory spiral density mask values (-850 HU) were significantly correlated (r = 0.86), but the visual extent of emphysema was always higher than shown by expiratory spiral CT. The emphysema extent assessed with both CT methods correlated with the function result of expiratory airflow obstruction and gas diffusion impairment (visual score versus forced expiratory volume in one second: r = -0.81, versus single breath carbon monoxide diffusion: r = -0.78. Spiral expiratory density mask -850 HU versus forced expiratory volume in one second: r = -0.85 versus single breath carbon monoxide diffusion: r = -0.77). When -900 HU was used as the cut-off value for the expiratory density mask, the correlation with single breath carbon monoxide diffusion worsened (r = -0.56). Visual score and expiratory density mask -850 HU gave similar results and permitted COPD patients to be clearly distinguished from normal controls (p < 0.01). They believe the true residual volume should lie somewhere in between the CT value and the function results with the helium dilution technique and conclude that the extent of pulmonary emphysema can be confidently assessed with CT methods. Finally, the simple visual score may be as reliable as such highly sophisticated new methods as the spiral expiratory density mask

  3. Hyperinflation and intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure: less room to breathe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Bruce P

    2009-01-01

    Clinically, the symptoms and limited exercise capabilities of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) correlate better with changes in lung volumes than with airflow measurements. The realization of the clinical importance of hyperinflation has been overshadowed for decades by the use of forced expiratory volume during 1 s (FEV(1)) and the ratio of the FEV(1) to the forced expiratory vital capacity (FEV(1)/FVC) to categorize the severity and progression of COPD. Hyperinflation is defined as an elevation in the end-expiratory lung volume or functional residual capacity. When severe hyperinflation encroaches upon inspiratory capacity and limits vital capacity, it results in elevated intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) that places the diaphragm at a mechanical disadvantage and increases the work of breathing. Severe hyperinflation is the major physiologic cause of the resulting hypercarbic respiratory failure and patients' inability to transition (i.e. wean) from mechanical ventilatory support to spontaneous breathing. This paper reviews the basic physiologic principles of hyperinflation and its clinical manifestations as demonstrated by PEEPi. Also reviewed are the adverse effects of hyperinflation and PEEPi in critically ill patients with COPD, and methods for minimizing or counterbalancing these effects. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Is forced oscillation technique the next respiratory function test of choice in childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alblooshi, Afaf; Alkalbani, Alia; Albadi, Ghaya; Narchi, Hassib; Hall, Graham

    2017-12-26

    Respiratory diseases, especially asthma, are common in children. While spirometry contributes to asthma diagnosis and management in older children, it has a limited role in younger children whom are often unable to perform forced expiratory manoeuvre. The development of novel diagnostic methods which require minimal effort, such as forced oscillation technique (FOT) is, therefore, a welcome and promising addition. FOT involves applying external, small amplitude oscillations to the respiratory system during tidal breathing. Therefore, it requires minimal effort and cooperation. The FOT has the potential to facilitate asthma diagnosis and management in pre-school children by faciliting the objective measurement of baseline lung function and airway reactivity in children unable to successfully perform spirometry. Traditionally the use of FOT was limited to specialised centres. However, the availability of commercial equipment resulted in its use both in research and in clinical practice. In this article, we review the available literature on the use of FOT in childhood asthma. The technical aspects of FOT are described followed by a discussion of its practical aspects in the clinical field including the measurement of baseline lung function and associated reference ranges, bronchodilator responsiveness and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. We also highlight the difficulties and limitations that might be encountered and future research directions.

  5. Volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2004-01-01

    We developed a volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol that provides combined inspiratory and expiratory volumetric imaging of the lung without increasing radiation exposure, and conducted a preliminary feasibility assessment of this protocol to evaluate diffuse lung disease with small airway abnormalities. The volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT increased the detectability of the conducting airway to the areas of air trapping (P<0.0001), and added significant information about extent and distribution of air trapping (P<0.0001)

  6. Spirometry in primary care for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiak, Nancy Cantey

    2014-01-01

    Spirometry is an essential part of diagnosing a child with asthma. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) expert panels recommend spirometry to be performed on children five years of age and older as an objective assessment of lung function, to diagnosis asthma, and for ongoing yearly management of asthma (GINA, 2012; NAEPP, 2007). According to the NAEPP expert panel, history and physical examination alone are not reliable to accurately diagnose asthma, exclude alternative diagnosis, or determine lung impairment (NAEPP, 2007 Dombkowski, Hassan, Wasilevich, and Clark (2010) found 52% of physicians who provide primary care to children used spirometry, but only 21% used spirometry according to the national guidelines, and only 35% of physicians surveyed were comfortable interpreting the test results. Zanconato, Meneghelli, Braga, Zacchello, and Baraldi (2005) found that 21% of spirometry readings were interpreted incorrectly, concluding that proper training and quality control were important to provide if spirometry in the primary care office setting is to be used. The purpose of this article is to review the appropriate use of spirometry in pediatric primary care.

  7. Spirometry reference values in Indigenous Australians: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Tamara L; Chang, Anne B; Petsky, Helen L; Rodwell, Leanne T; Brown, Michael G; Hill, Debra C; Thompson, Bruce; McElrea, Margaret S

    2016-07-04

    To evaluate published spirometry data for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) peoples to determine (i) whether their ethnicity influenced spirometry results; and (ii) if any reliable spirometry reference values exist for Indigenous Australians. Systematic review of published and grey literature. PubMed and Cochrane Library databases, references of included articles and appropriate grey literature. Last searches were conducted in April 2016. We included any study that performed spirometry on healthy Indigenous Australians and compared their results with those from people of European ancestry. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts and then reviewed potentially relevant full-text articles for possible inclusion. We used PRISMA systematic review reporting methods to collate data. Of a possible 125 studies, 18 full-text articles were reviewed, but only nine fulfilled the inclusion criteria. None specified Torres Strait Islander inclusion. All studies reported lower spirometry values (as much as 30% lower) for Aboriginal people compared with non-Indigenous people. Five studies developed spirometry reference values for Indigenous Australians; however, none adhered to all participant inclusion and exclusion criteria outlined by the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. Hence, reported results and subsequent reference values may not be a true representation of spirometry values in healthy Indigenous people. The lower spirometry values reported for Indigenous Australians may be due to study limitations. Furthermore, there are currently no reliable spirometry reference values for Indigenous Australians that adhere to current guidelines. Developing a set of Indigenous Australian reference values will improve the accuracy of test interpretation and aid in the diagnosis of respiratory disease in this population.

  8. Abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia restores expiratory lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Backer, Vibeke; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory complications secondary to intermittent intra-abdominal hypertension and/or atelectasis are common after abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernias. It is unknown if the respiratory function of this patient group is affected long term or impairs activities...... of daily living. We hypothesized that abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia would not lead to improved, long-term pulmonary function or respiratory quality of life. METHODS: Eighteen patients undergoing open abdominal wall reconstruction with mesh for a large incisional hernia...... (horizontal fascial defect width >10 cm) were compared with 18 patients with an intact abdominal wall who underwent colorectal resection. Patients were examined pre- and 1-year postoperatively. Examined measures included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in first second, peak expiratory flow...

  9. Influence Of Number Of Pregnancies In Peak Expiratory Flow And Body Composition Of Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Carla Brandao da Costa Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to describe and compare the mean values of the body composition and the peak expiratory flow (PEF in primigravidae and multigravidae and, to determine its correlation with obstetric, anthropometric and body composition variables. Method: it was performed a cross-sectional study of 120 healthy pregnant women at low risk, including 77 primigravidae and 43 multigravidae. The PEF was measured by spirometry and the body composition by multisegmental electrical impedance. The unpaired t test was used to compare the groups and the Pearson correlation test was used to determine the association between PEF and independent variables. A multiple linear regression was used to estimate the relationship between the dependent variable, the PEF and the independent variables. Results: the body composition variables in multigravidae women showed higher values compared to the primigravidae, being statistically significant, except for fat mass. In primigravidae, the PEF was correlated significantly with maternal age and height. In multigravidae, the PEF was correlated with maternal age, height, pre-pregnancy and current weight, total body water, extracellular water, fat mass, lean mass and fat-free mass. A Multiple linear regression analysis showed that, in primigravidae, height and maternal age were associated with PEF, being responsible for explaining 14.5% of its variability. The current weight and the maternal age explained 42.3% of peak flow variability in multigravidae. Conclusion: The PEF seemed to be influenced by the number of pregnancies. Changes were observed in relation to the body composition, as it was evidenced in correlation with the PEF in multigravidae women. Keywords: Pregnancy. Spirometry. Weight gain.

  10. Expiratory muscle control during vomiting - Role of brain stem expiratory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The neural mechanisms controlling the muscles involved during vomiting were examined using decerebrated cats. In one experiment, the activity of the ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons was recorded during induced 'fictive vomiting' (i.e., a series of bursts of coactivation of abdominal and phrenic nerves that would be expected to produce expulsion in unparalyzed animals) and vomiting. In a second, abdominal muscle electromyographic and nerve activity were compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons as they cross the midline between C1 and the obex (the procedure that is known to abolish expiratory modulation of internal intercostal muscle activity). The results of the study indicate that the abdominal muscles are controlled differently during respiration and vomiting.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis: Are Volumetric Ultra-Low-Dose Expiratory CT Scans Sufficient for Monitoring Related Lung Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Lequin, Maarten H; Bruijne, Marleen de

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether chest computed tomography (CT) scores from ultra-low-dose end-expiratory scans alone could suffice for assessment of all cystic fibrosis (CF)-related structural lung abnormalities. Materials and Methods: In this institutional review board–approved study, 20 patients...... with CF aged 6–20 years (eight males, 12 females) underwent low-dose end-inspiratory CT and ultra-low-dose end-expiratory CT. Informed consent was obtained. Scans were randomized and scored by using the Brody-II CT scoring system to assess bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, mucus plugging......-Altman plots. Results: Median age was 12.6 years (range, 6.3–20.3 years), median forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 100% (range, 46%–127%) of the predicted value, and median forced vital capacity was 99% (range, 61%–123%) of the predicted value. Very good agreement was observed between end...

  12. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate In Cigarette Smokers | Ukoli | Highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare lung function between smokers and non-smokers using Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR). Methods: This study examines the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of three hundred and forty cigarette smokers, age and sex-matched with PEFR of equal number of non-smokers. Results: The mean PEFR of ...

  13. Effect of Training Frequency on Maximum Expiratory Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Supraja; El-Bashiti, Nour; Sapienza, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) frequency on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP). Method: We assigned 12 healthy participants to 2 groups of training frequency (3 days per week and 5 days per week). They completed a 4-week training program on an EMST trainer (Aspire Products, LLC). MEP was the primary…

  14. Face mask spirometry and respiratory pressures in normal subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Spirometry and maximal respiratory pressures are pulmonary function parameters commonly used to evaluate respiratory function. Prediction values are available for conventional lung function devices using a standard tube or flanged type of mouthpiece connection. This equipment is not suitable for

  15. Spirometry in a population of coal miners in Paipa, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubia González

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Spirometry is a useful test for detecting the presence of respiratory disorders in the population of coal miners. The time of exposure was significantly associated with the respiratory disease exhibited by these miners.

  16. Pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing: an evidence based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Michael J; Warning, William J

    2015-10-01

    The scope of pharmacist services for patients with pulmonary disease has primarily focused on drug related outcomes; however pharmacists have the ability to broaden the scope of clinical services by performing diagnostic testing including quality spirometry testing. Studies have demonstrated that pharmacists can perform quality spirometry testing based upon international guidelines. The primary aim of this review was to assess the published evidence of pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing based upon American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines. In order to accomplish this, the description of evidence and type of outcome from these services were reviewed. A literature search was conducted using five databases [PubMed (1946-January 2015), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to January 2015), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews] with search terms including pharmacy, spirometry, pulmonary function, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to publications in English and reported in humans. In addition, Uniform Resource Locators and Google Scholar searches were implemented to include any additional supplemental information. Eight studies (six prospective multi-center trials, two retrospective single center studies) were included. Pharmacists in all studies received specialized training in performing spirometry testing. Of the eight studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 (100%) demonstrated acceptable repeatability of spirometry testing based upon standards set by the ATS/ERS guidelines. Acceptable repeatability of seven studies ranged from 70 to 99% consistent with published data. Available evidence suggests that quality spirometry testing can be performed by pharmacists. More prospective studies are needed to add to the current evidence of quality spirometry testing performed by

  17. Role of bronchodilation and pattern of breathing in increasing tidal expiratory flow with progressive induced hypercapnia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Kevin E; Singh, Bhajan

    2018-01-01

    Hypercapnia (HC) in vitro relaxes airway smooth muscle; in vivo, it increases respiratory effort, tidal expiratory flows (V̇ exp ), and, by decreasing inspiratory duration (Ti), increases elastic recoil pressure (Pel) via lung viscoelasticity; however, its effect on airway resistance is uncertain. We examined the contributions of bronchodilation, Ti, and expiratory effort to increasing V̇ exp with progressive HC in 10 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) 53% predicted. Lung volumes (Vl), V̇ exp , esophageal pressure (Pes), Ti, and end-tidal Pco 2 ([Formula: see text]) were measured during six tidal breaths followed by an inspiratory capacity (IC), breathing air, and at three levels of HC. V̇ exp and V̇ with submaximal forced vital capacities breathing air (V̇ sFVC ) were compared. Pulmonary resistance ( Rl) was measured from the Pes-V̇ relationship. V̇ exp and Pes at end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) + 0.3 tidal volume [V̇ (0.3Vt) and Pes (0.3Vt) , respectively], Ti, and Rl correlated with [Formula: see text] ( P pulmonary disease (COPD), progressive HC increases tidal expiratory flows by inducing bronchodilation and via an increased rate of inspiration and lung viscoelasticity, a probable increase in lung elastic recoil pressure, both changes increasing expiratory flows, promoting lung emptying and a stable end-expiratory volume. Bronchodilation with HC occurred despite optimal standard bronchodilator therapy, suggesting that in COPD further bronchodilation is possible.

  18. Integration of electronic nose technology with spirometry: validation of a new approach for exhaled breath analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R; Brinkman, P; van der Schee, M P; Fens, N; Dijkers, E; Bootsma, S K; de Jongh, F H C; Sterk, P J

    2015-10-15

    New 'omics'-technologies have the potential to better define airway disease in terms of pathophysiological and clinical phenotyping. The integration of electronic nose (eNose) technology with existing diagnostic tests, such as routine spirometry, can bring this technology to 'point-of-care'. We aimed to determine and optimize the technical performance and diagnostic accuracy of exhaled breath analysis linked to routine spirometry. Exhaled breath was collected in triplicate in healthy subjects by an eNose (SpiroNose) based on five identical metal oxide semiconductor sensor arrays (three arrays monitoring exhaled breath and two reference arrays monitoring ambient air) at the rear end of a pneumotachograph. First, the influence of flow, volume, humidity, temperature, environment, etc, was assessed. Secondly, a two-centre case-control study was performed using diagnostic and monitoring visits in day-to-day clinical care in patients with a (differential) diagnosis of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or lung cancer. Breathprint analysis involved signal processing, environment correction based on alveolar gradients and statistics based on principal component (PC) analysis, followed by discriminant analysis (Matlab2014/SPSS20). Expiratory flow showed a significant linear correlation with raw sensor deflections (R(2)  =  0.84) in 60 healthy subjects (age 43  ±  11 years). No correlation was found between sensor readings and exhaled volume, humidity and temperature. Exhaled data after environment correction were highly reproducible for each sensor array (Cohen's Kappa 0.81-0.94). Thirty-seven asthmatics (41  ±  14.2 years), 31 COPD patients (66  ±  8.4 years), 31 lung cancer patients (63  ±  10.8 years) and 45 healthy controls (41  ±  12.5 years) entered the cross-sectional study. SpiroNose could adequately distinguish between controls, asthma, COPD and lung cancer patients with cross-validation values

  19. Prevalence of Respiratory Diseases According to Spirometry Findings Among Patients Attending the Spirometry Department of Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, B K; Pradhan, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Spirometry is a standard test for screening and evaluation of patients with symptoms of cough and shortness of breath. Despite its easy availability, low cost and ease of performance it has not been widely used in clinical practice in Nepal. Objective To assess the prevalence of respiratory diseases in a regional referral centre in patients referred for spirometry. Method This is a descriptive cross-sectional study including patients referred for spirometry to the spirometry unit of Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital from 2014 July to 2015 October. The spirometry findings of the patients fulfilling the criteria of American Thoracic Society/European Respitatory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines were analyzed and categorized as normal, having obstructive lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma or restrictive lung disease. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0 software. Result Out of 821 patients, 755 patients (92%) fulfilled ATS/ERS criteria for satisfactory spirometry. The prevalence of COPD was 31.4%, bronchial asthma 24.2% and restrictive lung disease 8.1%. The mean age of patients diagnosed with COPD was 57.8±10.8 years; bronchial asthma 44.3±16.2 years; and restrictive lung disease 44.6±21.5 years. Both COPD and bronchial asthma were common in females. About twenty two percent of the COPD patients were non-smokers and 86.3% of these were females. The most common symptoms for referral was cough and shortness of breath: these symptoms were more likely to be associated with abnormal spirometry findings. Conclusion Spirometry is a crucial preliminary test for evaluation of patients with respiratory symptoms. It should be used more frequently to help stratify patients for appropriate treatment.

  20. The effect of incentive spirometry on postoperative pulmonary function following laparotomy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Anna F; Kendig, Claire E; Mabedi, Charles; Cairns, Bruce A; Charles, Anthony G

    2015-03-01

    Changes in pulmonary dynamics following laparotomy are well documented. Deep breathing exercises, with or without incentive spirometry, may help counteract postoperative decreased vital capacity; however, the evidence for the role of incentive spirometry in the prevention of postoperative atelectasis is inconclusive. Furthermore, data are scarce regarding the prevention of postoperative atelectasis in sub-Saharan Africa. To determine the effect of the use of incentive spirometry on pulmonary function following exploratory laparotomy as measured by forced vital capacity (FVC). This was a single-center, randomized clinical trial performed at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Study participants were adult patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy and were randomized into the intervention or control groups (standard of care) from February 1 to November 30, 2013. All patients received routine postoperative care, including instructions for deep breathing and early ambulation. We used bivariate analysis to compare outcomes between the intervention and control groups. Adult patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy participated in postoperative deep breathing exercises. Patients in the intervention group received incentive spirometers. We assessed pulmonary function using a peak flow meter to measure FVC in both groups of patients. Secondary outcomes, such as hospital length of stay and mortality, were obtained from the medical records. A total of 150 patients were randomized (75 in each arm). The median age in the intervention and control groups was 35 years (interquartile range, 28-53 years) and 33 years (interquartile range, 23-46 years), respectively. Men predominated in both groups, and most patients underwent emergency procedures (78.7% in the intervention group and 84.0% in the control group). Mean initial FVC did not differ significantly between the intervention and control groups (0.92 and 0.90 L, respectively; P=.82 [95% CI, 0.52-2.29]). Although

  1. Effectiveness of spirometry as a motivational tool for smoking cessation: a clinical trial, the ESPIMOAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizar-Aramburu, María Isabel; Martínez-Eizaguirre, Jose Manuel; Pacheco-Bravo, Petra; Diaz-Atienza, Maria; Aguirre-Arratibel, Iñigo; Peña-Peña, Maria Isabel; Alba-Latorre, Mercedes; Galparsoro-Goikoetxea, Mikel

    2013-12-05

    Smoking is the main preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in our region, it being the main causative agent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There still is no consensus on the use of spirometry as a strategy for smoking cessation, given that there is insufficient scientific evidence from high quality studies to recommend the use of this technique. This is to be a randomized, multicentre, open-label clinical trial. A total of 444 smokers over 40 years of age will be recruited by 39 general practitioners from 22 health centers. Primary objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of spirometry together with information regarding the test for smoking cessation after 1 year in smokers over 40 years of age with a more than 10 pack-year history and no previous diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Groups of 45 patients who smoke will be randomly selected from the lists of the participating doctors. The names will be sent to the corresponding doctors who will contact candidate patients and assess whether they meet the selection criteria. Patients who meet these criteria will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. For patients in both groups, a nurse will conduct an interview and perform a spirometry test to measure forced vital capacity. Then, all patients will be referred for an appointment with their doctor for brief anti-smoking intervention, patients from the intervention group additionally being informed about the result of the spirometry test. After 1 year, smoking status will be assessed and, in those who report that they have quit smoking, abstinence will be confirmed by co-oximetry. Data will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis using the chi-squared test for outcomes and binary logistic regression if it is considered to be necessary to adjust for confounding variables. Performing a spirometry test and providing information on pulmonary function may increase awareness of the effect of smoking among

  2. Multi-detector CT evaluation in patients suspected of tracheobronchomalacia: Comparison of end-expiratory with dynamic expiratory volumetric acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, Gilbert R. [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: gferretti@chu-grenoble.fr; Jankowski, Adrien [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: ajankowski@chu-grenoble.fr; Perrin, Marie Amelie [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: maperrin@chu-grenoble.fr; Chouri, Nathalie [Department of Respiratory Diseases (France)], E-mail: nchouri@chu-grenoble.fr; Arnol, Nathalie [Sleep Laboratory and EFCR, University Hospital, Grenoble (France); HP2 Laboratory, INSERM ERI 0017 (Hypoxia: Pathophysiology), Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: narnold@chu-grenoble.fr; Aubaud, Laurent [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: laubaud@chu-grenoble.fr; Pepin, Jean-Louis [Sleep Laboratory and EFCR, University Hospital, Grenoble (France); HP2 Laboratory, INSERM ERI 0017 (Hypoxia: Pathophysiology), Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: jlpepin@chu-grenoble.fr

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare dynamic expiratory imaging and end-expiratory imaging using multi-detector CT (MDCT) of the central airways in patients suspected of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). Methods: This study had local ethical committee approval. Seventy patients suspected of TBM were prospectively included. All patients underwent evaluation of central airways by three different low-dose MDCT acquisitions: end inspiration, end expiration, and dynamic expiration. Degree of airway collapse was measured by calculating the percentage change in the area and diameter of the airways between inspiratory and the two expiratory techniques at three levels of the trachea and in the sagittal diameter of the right and left main bronchi. Three threshold levels of percentage reduction in diameter or area (30%, 50%, and 70%) for defining TBM were evaluated. Results: In the entire population, the mean percentage of airway collapse was significantly greater with dynamic expiratory imaging than with the end-expiratory imaging at three different levels: lower thoracic trachea (26% vs. 16.6%, p < 0.009), right (25.2% vs. 14%, p < 0.01) and left main (24.7% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.01) bronchus. Whatever the threshold value for defining TBM, dynamic expiratory imaging always resulted in diagnosing TBM in more patients than end-expiratory imaging. Conclusions: Dynamic expiratory imaging shows a significantly greater degree and a significantly greater extent of airway collapse than standard end-expiratory imaging in patients suspected of TBM. Further evaluation of the clinical relevance of such findings is warranted.

  3. Correlation of single-breath count test and neck flexor muscle strength with spirometry in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikh, Bakri; Arnold, W David; Gharibshahi, Shahram; Reynolds, Jerold; Freimer, Miriam; Kissel, John T

    2016-01-01

    Although formal spirometry is the gold standard for monitoring respiratory function in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), such testing is often delayed or unavailable. There is a need for a simple bedside test that can accurately measure respiratory function. We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, single-blind study in adults with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive MG. Participants performed the single breath count test (SBCT) and underwent manual muscle strength testing, and a respiratory therapist performed spirometry blinded to SBCT and strength results. Thirty-one patients, aged 57 ± 19 years participated. SBCT showed significant correlations with forced vital capacity (FVC), negative inspiratory force, and neck flexor strength (P strength (P = 0.02) but no correlation with shoulder abductor strength. These data suggest that the SBCT and neck flexor strength testing are valuable tools for bedside assessment of respiratory function in MG patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. What's in a name? Expiratory tracheal narrowing in adults explained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, P.; Bardin, P.G.; Lau, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Tracheomalacia, tracheobronchomalacia, and excessive dynamic airway collapse are all terms used to describe tracheal narrowing in expiration. The first two describe luminal reduction from cartilage softening and the latter refers to luminal reduction from exaggerated posterior membrane movement. Expiratory tracheal narrowing is a frequent occurrence that can cause symptoms of airway obstruction, such as dyspnoea, wheeze, and exercise intolerance. The accurate diagnosis and quantification of expiratory tracheal narrowing has important aetiological, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. The reference standard for diagnosis has traditionally been bronchoscopy; however, this method has significant limitations. Expiratory tracheal disorders are readily detected by four-dimensional dynamic volume multidetector computed tomography (4D-CT), an emerging, non-invasive method that will potentially enable detection and quantification of these conditions. This review discusses the morphological forms of expiratory tracheal narrowing and demonstrates the utility of 4D-CT in the diagnosis, quantification, and treatment of these important conditions

  5. Pathway to Best Practice in Spirometry in the Ambulatory Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracchio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry performed in the ambulatory setting is an invaluable tool for diagnosis, monitoring, and evaluation of respiratory health in patients with chronic lung disease. If spirometry is not performed according to American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines, unnecessary repeated testing, increased expenditure of time and money, and increased patient and family anxiety may result. Two respiratory therapists at Mission Health System in Asheville, NC, identified an increase in patients arriving at the pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories with abnormal spirometry results obtained in the ambulatory setting. These abnormal results were due to incorrect testing procedure, not chronic lung disease. Three training methods were developed to increase knowledge of correct spirometry testing procedure in the ambulatory setting. The therapists also created a plan to educate offices that do not perform spirometry on the importance and availability of PFT services at our hospital for the population of patients with chronic lung disease. Notable improvements in posttraining test results were demonstrated. The education process was evaluated by a leading respiratory expert, with improvements suggested and implemented. Next steps are listed.

  6. High resolution CT in cystic fibrosis--the contribution of expiratory scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorloechter, Ludger; Nes, Harald; Fluge, Gjermund; Rosendahl, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The use of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is well accepted as an accurate method for evaluation of lung parenchyma in cystic fibrosis (CF). Several scoring methods exist and, in common, all are based on HRCT findings during inspiration alone. Objective: To examine whether expiratory HRCT scans could add information about the degree of mosaic perfusion in patients with CF. Methods and patients: Pulmonary HRCT was performed in 17 CF patients (median age of 12 years) with 1-mm thin sections and 10-mm intervals during inspiration, followed by 1-mm thin sections with 20-mm intervals during expiration. HRCT was scored by using a modified Bhalla method. Results: The mean HRCT score was 8.2. Out of 17 patients, 11 (65%) demonstrated a pathological mosaic perfusion in expiration, while only three patients showed mosaic perfusion in inspiration. The degree of expiratory mosaic perfusion was graded as severe in nine patients and moderate in two patients. There was a significant correlation between our modified HRCT score and lung function, as measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1% predicted, P<0.01). Conclusion: Mosaic perfusion in expiration was a common pathological HRCT finding in our study group. The clinical significance of this finding needs further evaluation

  7. Phenotype of normal spirometry in an aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; McAvay, Gail; Van Ness, Peter H; Casaburi, Richard; Jensen, Robert L; MacIntyre, Neil; Gill, Thomas M; Yaggi, H Klar; Concato, John

    2015-10-01

    In aging populations, the commonly used Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) may misclassify normal spirometry as respiratory impairment (airflow obstruction and restrictive pattern), including the presumption of respiratory disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). To evaluate the phenotype of normal spirometry as defined by a new approach from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI), overall and across GOLD spirometric categories. Using data from COPDGene (n = 10,131; ages 45-81; smoking history, ≥10 pack-years), we evaluated spirometry and multiple phenotypes, including dyspnea severity (Modified Medical Research Council grade 0-4), health-related quality of life (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score), 6-minute-walk distance, bronchodilator reversibility (FEV1 % change), computed tomography-measured percentage of lung with emphysema (% emphysema) and gas trapping (% gas trapping), and small airway dimensions (square root of the wall area for a standardized airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm). Among 5,100 participants with GLI-defined normal spirometry, GOLD identified respiratory impairment in 1,146 (22.5%), including a restrictive pattern in 464 (9.1%), mild COPD in 380 (7.5%), moderate COPD in 302 (5.9%), and severe COPD in none. Overall, the phenotype of GLI-defined normal spirometry included normal adjusted mean values for dyspnea grade (0.8), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (15.9), 6-minute-walk distance (1,424 ft [434 m]), bronchodilator reversibility (2.7%), % emphysema (0.9%), % gas trapping (10.7%), and square root of the wall area for a standardized airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (3.65 mm); corresponding 95% confidence intervals were similarly normal. These phenotypes remained normal for GLI-defined normal spirometry across GOLD spirometric categories. GLI-defined normal spirometry, even when classified as respiratory impairment by GOLD, included adjusted mean values in the

  8. Challenges in Collating Spirometry Reference Data for South-Asian Children: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Sooky; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Quanjer, Philip; Sonnappa, Samatha; Wade, Angela; Beardsmore, Caroline; Chhabra, Sunil K.; Chudasama, Rajesh K.; Cook, Derek G.; Harding, Seeromanie; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Prasad, K. V. V.; Whincup, Peter H.; Lee, Simon; Stocks, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Availability of sophisticated statistical modelling for developing robust reference equations has improved interpretation of lung function results. In 2012, the Global Lung function Initiative(GLI) published the first global all-age, multi-ethnic reference equations for spirometry but these lacked equations for those originating from the Indian subcontinent (South-Asians). The aims of this study were to assess the extent to which existing GLI-ethnic adjustments might fit South-Asian paediatric spirometry data, assess any similarities and discrepancies between South-Asian datasets and explore the feasibility of deriving a suitable South-Asian GLI-adjustment. Methods Spirometry datasets from South-Asian children were collated from four centres in India and five within the UK. Records with transcription errors, missing values for height or spirometry, and implausible values were excluded(n = 110). Results Following exclusions, cross-sectional data were available from 8,124 children (56.3% male; 5–17 years). When compared with GLI-predicted values from White Europeans, forced expired volume in 1s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) in South-Asian children were on average 15% lower, ranging from 4–19% between centres. By contrast, proportional reductions in FEV1 and FVC within all but two datasets meant that the FEV1/FVC ratio remained independent of ethnicity. The ‘GLI-Other’ equation fitted data from North India reasonably well while ‘GLI-Black’ equations provided a better approximation for South-Asian data than the ‘GLI-White’ equation. However, marked discrepancies in the mean lung function z-scores between centres especially when examined according to socio-economic conditions precluded derivation of a single South-Asian GLI-adjustment. Conclusion Until improved and more robust prediction equations can be derived, we recommend the use of ‘GLI-Black’ equations for interpreting most South-Asian data, although ‘GLI-Other’ may be more

  9. Superoxide dismutase levels and peak expiratory flow in asthmatic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Kurniasih

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory process which involve variety of cells such as inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and cytokines. The inflammatory process would be exacerbated in the presence of oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase (SOD is the first important enzyme to protect the respiratory tract against oxidative stress. The decreased of SOD has a correlation with increased of airway obstruction and bronchospasm. Objective To assess for a correlation between superoxide dismutase (SOD levels and peak expiratory flow, as well as to determine the impact of SOD levels for predicting asthma attacks. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study at Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, between February and April 2011 involving asthmatic children aged 5-18 years. Subjects’ serum SOD levels and peak expiratory flow were measured at the same time point. We then performed a prospective study following up on the same subjects to find out if they had a recurrent asthma attack within one month of the tests. We also reassessed their peak expiratory flow one month after blood specimens were obtained. Results Thirty-nine patients were enrolled in this study. There was no significant correlation between SOD level and peak expiratory flow [r=0.289; 95%CI -0.025 to 0.47; P=0.074]. However, older age was significantly associated with higher peak expiratory flow (=0.5; 95%CI 3.10 to 11.57; P=0.01. Lower levels of SOD increased the risk of asthma attacks in a month following the initial measurements (RR=5.5; 95%CI 1.6 to 18.9; P=0.009. Conclusion Superoxide dismutase (SOD level is not significantly associated with peak expiratory flow. However, we find a relationship between older age and higher peak expiratory flow and a relationship between lower SOD levels and risk of asthma attacks within one month following the tests.

  10. Variation in spirometry utilization between trained general practitioners in practices equipped with a spirometer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.E.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Jacobs, A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hartman, J.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore spirometry utilization among general practitioners and identify practitioner and practice-related factors associated with spirometry utilization. DESIGN: Multivariate multilevel cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey. SETTING: Some 61 general practices involved in a

  11. Prediction Equations for Spirometry for Children from Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Sunil K; Kumar, Rajeev; Mittal, Vikas

    2016-09-08

    To develop prediction equations for spirometry for children from northern India using current international guidelines for standardization. Re-analysis of cross-sectional data from a single school. 670 normal children (age 6-17 y; 365 boys) of northern Indian parentage. After screening for normal health, we carried out spirometry with recommended quality assurance according to current guidelines. We developed linear and nonlinear prediction equations using multiple regression analysis. We selected the final models on the basis of the highest coefficient of multiple determination (R2) and statistical validity. Spirometry parameters: FVC, FEV1, PEFR, FEF50, FEF75 and FEF25-75. The equations for the main parameters were as follows: Boys, Ln FVC = -1.687+0.016*height +0.022*age; Ln FEV1 = -1.748+0.015*height+0.031*age. Girls, Ln FVC = -9.989 +(2.018*Ln(height)) + (0.324*Ln(age)); Ln FEV1 = -10.055 +(1.990*Ln(height))+(0.358*Ln(age)). Nonlinear regression yielded substantially greater R2 values compared to linear models except for FEF50 for girls. Height and age were found to be the significant explanatory variables for all parameters on multiple regression with weight making no significant contribution. We developed prediction equations for spirometry for children from northern India. Nonlinear equations were superior to linear equations.

  12. Spirometry: a predictor of lung cancer among asbestos workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowska, Beata; Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, Neonila

    2017-01-01

    The significance of lung function as an independent risk factor for lung cancer remains unclear. The objective of the study is to answer the question if spirometry can identify patients at risk for lung cancer among people occupationally exposed to asbestos dust in the past. In order to identify a group of individuals with the highest risk of lung cancer incidence based on lung function levels of FEV 1 % predicted value, we examined 6882 subjects enrolled in the health surveillance program for asbestos related diseases over the years 2000-2014. We found a total of 110 cases confirmed as primary lung cancer. Using Cox's proportional hazards model after adjustment for age, gender, number of cigarettes, duration of smoking and cumulative asbestos exposure, we estimated that compared with the subjects with FEV 1 ≥90% pred, the HR of lung cancer was 1.40 (95%CI: 0.94-2.08) for the subjects with FEV 1 less than 90% and 1.95 (HR = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.12-3.08) for those with FEV 1 less than 70%. In addition, probability of the occurrence of lung cancer for FEV 1 spirometry and cancer diagnosis was three years or less. The results strongly support the hypothesis that spirometry can identify patients at a risk of lung cancer development. Regular spirometry should be offered to all patients with a history of asbestos exposure, at least once every three years.

  13. A Rwandan spirometry and resting ventilation study | Gahutu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To illustrate spirometric population variation and ventilatory adaptation to moderate altitude, we report the spirometric and resting ventilation values observed in a student population in Butare, Rwanda (altitude: 1 768 m; barometric pressure: 629 mm Hg). Spirometry was carried out with a Mijnhardt Volutest VT-3 ...

  14. A guide to spirometry as applied to occupational health | White ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the context of occupational health, spirometric testing of respiratory function has a number of important applications. These applications can be expected to become more widespread in view of extensive changes to occupational health and compensation legislation in South Africa. Spirometry is an essential component of ...

  15. Accuracy and Quality of Spirometry in Primary Care Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegewald, Matthew J; Gallo, Heather M; Wilson, Emily L

    2016-12-01

    Spirometry is necessary for the optimal management of patients with respiratory disease. The quality of spirometry performed in the primary care setting has been inconsistent. We aimed to evaluate spirometer accuracy, determine the clinical significance of inaccurate spirometers, and assess the quality of spirograms obtained in primary care offices. We tested 17 spirometers used in primary care offices with a waveform generator; accuracy and precision were assessed using American Thoracic Society criteria. The clinical significance of inaccurate instruments was determined by applying the FEV 1 /FVC error from an obstructed waveform to a clinical data set. Spirogram quality was determined by grading spirograms using acceptability and repeatability criteria. The relationship between the number of tests performed by a clinic and test quality was assessed. Only 1 of 17 spirometers met accuracy criteria, with mean errors for FVC, FEV 1 , and FEV 1 /FVC ranging from 1.7 to 3.1%. Applying the percentage error to a clinical data set resulted in 28% of tests being recategorized from obstructed to nonobstructed. Of the spirograms reviewed, 60% were considered acceptable for clinical use. There was no association between the number of tests performed by a clinic and spirometry quality. Most spirometers tested were not accurate. The magnitude of the errors resulted in significant changes in the categorization of patients with obstruction. Acceptable-quality tests were produced for only 60% of patients. Our results raise concerns regarding the utility of spirometry obtained in primary care offices without greater attention to quality assurance and training.

  16. Spirometry of healthy adult South African men | Louw | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An exhaustive questionnaire and radiographic screening process was used to identify a healthy population. Spirometry was performed using two calibrated instruments, a sleeve sealed piston spirometer (Autolink) and a bellows spirometer (Vitalograph). The methodological guidelines of the American Thoracic Society were ...

  17. Comparison of changes in tidal volume associated with expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to compare and clarify the relationship between expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, with a focus on tidal volume. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 18 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, who had undergone tracheostomy. Each patient received expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression; the order of implementation was randomized. Subjects ...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1860 Peak-flow meter for spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a patient's...

  19. Comparison of changes in tidal volume associated with expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to compare and clarify the relationship between expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, with a focus on tidal volume. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 18 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, who had undergone tracheostomy. Each patient received expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression; the order of implementation was randomized. Subjects were positioned in a 30° lateral recumbent position, and a 2-kgf compression was applied. For expiratory rib cage compression, the rib cage was compressed unilaterally; for expiratory abdominal compression, the area directly above the navel was compressed. Tidal volume values were the actual measured values divided by body weight. [Results] Tidal volume values were as follows: at rest, 7.2 ± 1.7 mL/kg; during expiratory rib cage compression, 8.3 ± 2.1 mL/kg; during expiratory abdominal compression, 9.1 ± 2.2 mL/kg. There was a significant difference between the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression and that at rest. The tidal volume in expiratory rib cage compression was strongly correlated with that in expiratory abdominal compression. [Conclusion] These results indicate that expiratory abdominal compression may be an effective alternative to the manual breathing assist procedure.

  20. Spirometry filters can be used to detect exhaled respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alicia B; Mourad, Bassel; Tovey, Euan; Buddle, Lachlan; Peters, Matthew; Morgan, Lucy; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-09-26

    Respiratory viruses are very common in the community and contribute to the burden of illness for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, including acute exacerbations. Traditional sampling methods are invasive and problematic to repeat. Accordingly, we explored whether respiratory viruses could be isolated from disposable spirometry filters and whether detection of viruses in this context represented presence in the upper or lower respiratory tract. Discovery (n  =  53) and validation (n  =  49) cohorts were recruited from a hospital outpatient department during two different time periods. Spirometry mouthpiece filters were collected from all participants. Respiratory secretions were sampled from the upper and lower respiratory tract by nasal washing (NW), sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). All samples were examined using RT-PCR to identify a panel of respiratory viruses (rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza virus 1, 2 & 3, and human metapneumovirus). Rhinovirus was quantified using qPCR. Paired filter-NW samples (n  =  29), filter-sputum samples (n  =  24), filter-BAL samples (n  =  39) and filter-NW-BAL samples (n  =  10) provided a range of comparisons. At least one virus was detected in any sample in 85% of participants in the discovery cohort versus 45% in the validation cohort. Overall, 72% of viruses identified in the paired comparator method matched those detected in spirometry filters. There was a high correlation between viruses identified in spirometry filters compared with viruses identified in both the upper and lower respiratory tract using traditional sampling methods. Our results suggest that examination of spirometry filters may be a novel and inexpensive sampling method for the presence of respiratory viruses in exhaled breath.

  1. Inspiratory and expiratory HRCT findings in healthy smokers' lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyeon Seon; Kwak, Byung Kook; Choi, Chi Hoon; Yang, Keun Mung; Lee, Chang Joon; Joo, Dong Il; Kim, Yang Soo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the lung changes in healthy smokers, as seen on inspiratory and expiratory high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Twenty-seven healthy smokers (light smokers, below 20 pack-years, n=16; heavy smokers, above 20 pack-years, n=11) and 25 nonsmokers underwent inspiratory and expiratory HRCT. All healthy smokers had normal pulmonary function and chest radiography. Parenchymal and subpleural micronodules, ground-glass attenuation, centrilobular and paraseptal emphysema, bronchial wall thickening, bronchiectasis and septal line were evaluated on inspiratory scan and by air-trapping on expiratory scan. According to the findings of HRCT, heavy smokers and higher frequency of parenchymal micronodules, ground-glass attenuation, centrilobular and paraseptal emphysema, and air-trapping than nonsmokers and light smokers. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  2. Pilot program on distance training in spirometry testing - the technology feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowiński, Adam; Romański, Emil; Bieleń, Przemysław; Bednarek, Michał; Puścińska, Elżbieta; Goljan-Geremek, Anna; Pływaczewski, Robert; Śliwinski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Office spirometry has been widely used in recent years by general practitioners in primary care setting, thus the need for stricter monitoring of the quality of spirometry has been recognized. A spirometry counseling network of outpatients clinics was created in Poland using portable spirometer Spirotel. The spirometry data were transferred to counseling centre once a week. The tests sent to the counseling centre were analyzed by doctors experienced in the analysis of spirometric data. In justified cases they sent their remarks concerning performed tests to the centres via e-mail. We received 878 records of spirometry tests in total. Data transmission via the telephone was 100% effective. The quality of spirometry tests performed by outpatients clinics was variable. The use of spirometers with data transfer for training purposes seems to be advisable. There is a need to proper face-to-face training of spirometry operators before an implementation of any telemedicine technology.

  3. Positive expiratory pressure - Common clinical applications and physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Lannefors, Louise; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    Breathing out against resistance, in order to achieve positive expiratory pressure (PEP), is applied by many patient groups. Pursed lips breathing and a variety of devices can be used to create the resistance giving the increased expiratory pressure. Effects on pulmonary outcomes have been discussed in several publications, but the expected underlying physiology of the effect is seldom discussed. The aim of this article is to describe the purpose, performance, clinical application and underlying physiology of PEP when it is used to increase lung volumes, decrease hyperinflation or improve airway clearance. In clinical practice, the instruction how to use an expiratory resistance is of major importance since it varies. Different breathing patterns during PEP increase or reduce expiratory flow, result in movement of EPP centrally or peripherally and can increase or decrease lung volume. It is therefore necessary to give the right instructions to obtain the desired effects. As the different PEP techniques are being used by diverse patient groups it is not possible to give standard instructions. Based on the information given in this article the instructions have to be adjusted to give the optimal effect. There is no consensus regarding optimal treatment frequency and number of cycles included in each treatment session and must also be individualized. In future research, more precise descriptions are needed about physiological aims and specific instructions of how the treatments have been performed to assure as good treatment quality as possible and to be able to evaluate and compare treatment effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. predicted peak expiratory flow in human and the clinical implication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    predicted PEF varied widely across formulae and choice of a particular formula may alter guideline- base care. This work has therefore accepted a recently published population-base equation proposed as the reference standard for future asthma guidelines. Keywords: Peak expiratory flow, Asthma, Practice guidelines, ...

  5. Knowledge, attitude and practice of nurses toward peak expiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Peak expiratory flow meter (PEFM) is an easy to use, relatively cheap device that can be used for guiding management of bronchial asthma by the patients at home according to a preset plan by health care workers. Objective: The aim of the study is to reveal the extent of knowledge and perception of nurses ...

  6. Factors influencing peak expiratory flow in teenage boys | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) is a useful measure of pulmonary health status and is frequently utilised in asthm, management. Reduction in PEF is usually indicative of onset (of asthma symptoms. However, use can be made of PEF values only if normal values are known. The definition of normal range is always ...

  7. Criteria for inhalation exposure systems utilizing concurrent flow spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, O.G.; Yeh, H.C.

    1974-01-01

    Principles are given for the design and operation of a new class of inhalation exposure systems utilizing concurrent flow spirometry (CFS), a simple method for providing realtime measurement of respiratory volumes and rates during inhalation exposure by mouth or nose of individual experimental animals or man to aerosols or gases. This technique is especially useful for inhalation exposure of larger experimental animals, such as horses, where whole-body plethysmography is usually impractical. Difficulties encountered with conventional exposure systems in maintenance of uniform aerosol or gas concentrations and prevention of large pressure excursions in the exposure chamber during breathing are obviated by systems utilizing the principles of concurrent flow spirometry. For illustration, two exposure units with CFS are described, one for exposure of Beagle dogs and one for ponies. (U.S.)

  8. The Use of Home Spirometry in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Shakkottai MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is poor among pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with adolescents having one of the lowest adherence rates. We wanted to identify an adherence intervention that would be acceptable to CF adolescents and assess its feasibility. We surveyed 40 adolescents with CF and asked about barriers to and motivators for their own adherence and to generate ideas for potential adherence interventions. Since most of the respondents chose frequent spirometry at home and medication reminders for interventions, we selected 5 subjects, 10 to 14 years of age, with CF to test the feasibility of home spirometry and medication reminders in pediatric CF patients. This article summarizes the results of both the survey and the feasibility pilot study.

  9. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation by radiography and spirometry *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawassaki, Alexandre Melo; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Uliana Kay, Fernando; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine whether simple diagnostic methods can yield relevant disease information in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA were randomly selected for inclusion in a cross-sectional study involving clinical evaluation of pulmonary function, including pulse oximetry (determination of SpO2, at rest), chest X-ray, and spirometry. Results: A total of 246 RA patients underwent complete assessments. Half of the patients in our sample reported a history of smoking. Spirometry was abnormal in 30% of the patients; the chest X-ray was abnormal in 45%; and the SpO2 was abnormal in 13%. Normal chest X-ray, spirometry, and SpO2 were observed simultaneously in only 41% of the RA patients. A history of smoking was associated with abnormal spirometry findings, including evidence of obstructive or restrictive lung disease, and with abnormal chest X-ray findings, as well as with an interstitial pattern on the chest X-ray. Comparing the patients in whom all test results were normal (n = 101) with those in whom abnormal test results were obtained (n = 145), we found a statistically significant difference between the two groups, in terms of age and smoking status. Notably, there were signs of airway disease in nearly half of the patients with minimal or no history of tobacco smoke exposure. Conclusions: Pulmonary involvement in RA can be identified through the use of a combination of diagnostic methods that are simple, safe, and inexpensive. Our results lead us to suggest that RA patients with signs of lung involvement should be screened for lung abnormalities, even if presenting with no respiratory symptoms. PMID:26398753

  10. Association between spirometry controlled chest CT scores using computer-animated biofeedback and clinical markers of lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Thomas; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) of the lungs is the gold standard for assessing the extent of structural changes in the lungs. Spirometry-controlled chest CT (SCCCT) has improved the usefulness of CT by standardising inspiratory and expiratory lung volumes during imaging. This was a single...... (expressed as % of maximum score) to quantify different aspects of structural lung changes including bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, mucus plugging, opacities, cysts, bullae and gas trapping. Clinical markers consisted of outcomes from pulmonary function tests, microbiological cultures from sputum......-centre cross-sectional study in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Using SCCCT we wished to investigate the association between the quantity and extent of structural lung changes and pulmonary function outcomes, and prevalence of known CF lung pathogens. Methods: CT images were analysed by CF-CT scoring...

  11. Spirometry. Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Río, Francisco; Calle, Myriam; Burgos, Felip; Casan, Pere; Del Campo, Félix; Galdiz, Juan B; Giner, Jordi; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Ortega, Francisco; Puente Maestu, Luis

    2013-09-01

    Spirometry is the main pulmonary function test and is essential for the evaluation and monitoring of respiratory diseases. Its utility transcends the field of Respiratory Medicine, is becoming increasingly important in primary care and applications have even been described outside the field of respiratory diseases. This document is therefore intended to serve as support for all health professionals who use spirometry, providing recommendations based on the best scientific evidence available. An update of the indications and contraindications of the test is proposed. The document sets out recommendations on the requirements necessary for conventional spirometers and portable office equipment, as well as on spirometer hygiene and quality control measures. Spirometric parameters that must be considered, performance of manoeuvres, criteria for acceptability and repeatability of measurements and their quality control are defined. A proposal is also established for presentation of the results and an evaluation and interpretation is proposed according to information generated in recent years. Finally, lines of adaptation and integration of spirometry in the field of new technologies are considered. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Incentive Spirometry in Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribadi, Rabbinu R; Singh, Gurmeet; Rumende, Cleopas M

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the presence of air in the pleural space. Its management consists of noninvasive and invasive therapies and it is determined based on clinical manifestations, type and size of pneumothorax. We present a case of a patient with diagnosis of primary spontaneous pneumothorax treated with incentive spirometry (noninvasive therapy). A 20 year old man came to respirology clinic with chief complaint of shortness of breath. He was recently diagnosed with left pneumothorax based on previous chest X-ray in another health care facilities and was advised to undergo tube thoracostomy but he refused the procedure. On physical examination, vital signs were normal. Chest X-ray showed 33% of pneumothorax or 1.2 cm. He was asked to perform incentive spirometry therapy at home. During 12 days of therapy, shortness of breath slowly disappeared and on repeated chest X-ray, it showed minimal pneumothorax in the left upper hemithorax. Noninvasive treatment such as incentive spirometry can be considered in patient with minimal symptoms and no signs of life-threatening respiratory distress.

  13. Unidirectional Expiratory Valve Method to Assess Maximal Inspiratory Pressure in Individuals without Artificial Airway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Torres Grams

    Full Text Available Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP is considered an effective method to estimate strength of inspiratory muscles, but still leads to false positive diagnosis. Although MIP assessment with unidirectional expiratory valve method has been used in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, no previous studies investigated the application of this method in subjects without artificial airway.This study aimed to compare the MIP values assessed by standard method (MIPsta and by unidirectional expiratory valve method (MIPuni in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. MIPuni reproducibility was also evaluated.This was a crossover design study, and 31 subjects performed MIPsta and MIPuni in a random order. MIPsta measured MIP maintaining negative pressure for at least one second after forceful expiration. MIPuni evaluated MIP using a unidirectional expiratory valve attached to a face mask and was conducted by two evaluators (A and B at two moments (Tests 1 and 2 to determine interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of MIP values. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1] was used to determine intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility.The mean values for MIPuni were 14.3% higher (-117.3 ± 24.8 cmH2O than the mean values for MIPsta (-102.5 ± 23.9 cmH2O (p<0.001. Interobserver reproducibility assessment showed very high correlation for Test 1 (ICC[2,1] = 0.91, and high correlation for Test 2 (ICC[2,1] = 0.88. The assessment of the intraobserver reproducibility showed high correlation for evaluator A (ICC[2,1] = 0.86 and evaluator B (ICC[2,1] = 0.77.MIPuni presented higher values when compared with MIPsta and proved to be reproducible in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway.

  14. Challenges in Collating Spirometry Reference Data for South-Asian Children: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooky Lum

    Full Text Available Spirometry datasets from South-Asian children were collated from four centres in India and five within the UK. Records with transcription errors, missing values for height or spirometry, and implausible values were excluded(n = 110.Following exclusions, cross-sectional data were available from 8,124 children (56.3% male; 5-17 years. When compared with GLI-predicted values from White Europeans, forced expired volume in 1s (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC in South-Asian children were on average 15% lower, ranging from 4-19% between centres. By contrast, proportional reductions in FEV1 and FVC within all but two datasets meant that the FEV1/FVC ratio remained independent of ethnicity. The 'GLI-Other' equation fitted data from North India reasonably well while 'GLI-Black' equations provided a better approximation for South-Asian data than the 'GLI-White' equation. However, marked discrepancies in the mean lung function z-scores between centres especially when examined according to socio-economic conditions precluded derivation of a single South-Asian GLI-adjustment.Until improved and more robust prediction equations can be derived, we recommend the use of 'GLI-Black' equations for interpreting most South-Asian data, although 'GLI-Other' may be more appropriate for North Indian data. Prospective data collection using standardised protocols to explore potential sources of variation due to socio-economic circumstances, secular changes in growth/predictors of lung function and ethnicities within the South-Asian classification are urgently required.

  15. Spirometry reference equations for central European populations from school age to old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Mascha K; Laubender, Ruediger P; Kuster, Daniela; Braendli, Otto; Moeller, Alexander; Mansmann, Ulrich; von Mutius, Erika; Wildhaber, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry reference values are important for the interpretation of spirometry results. Reference values should be updated regularly, derived from a population as similar to the population for which they are to be used and span across all ages. Such spirometry reference equations are currently lacking for central European populations. To develop spirometry reference equations for central European populations between 8 and 90 years of age. We used data collected between January 1993 and December 2010 from a central European population. The data was modelled using "Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape" (GAMLSS). The spirometry reference equations were derived from 118'891 individuals consisting of 60'624 (51%) females and 58'267 (49%) males. Altogether, there were 18'211 (15.3%) children under the age of 18 years. We developed spirometry reference equations for a central European population between 8 and 90 years of age that can be implemented in a wide range of clinical settings.

  16. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnberg, P O; de Villota, E D; Eklund, J; Granberg, P O

    1978-01-01

    The effects were studied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on renal function in eight patients with acute respiratory failure, requiring mechanical ventilation. On application of PEEP + 10 cm H2O, central venous pressure increased, systolic blood pressure decreased, urine flow and PAH-clearance were reduced, while inulin clearance remained stable. There was a marked increase in fractional sodium reabsorption and a concurrent decrease in fractional osmolal excretion. Fractional free-water clearance and the ratio UOsm/POsm did change.

  17. Diagnostic methods to assess inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Caruso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of (inspiratory and expiratory respiratory muscles is a common clinical finding, not only in patients with neuromuscular disease but also in patients with primary disease of the lung parenchyma or airways. Although such impairment is common, its recognition is usually delayed because its signs and symptoms are nonspecific and late. This delayed recognition, or even the lack thereof, occurs because the diagnostic tests used in the assessment of respiratory muscle strength are not widely known and available. There are various methods of assessing respiratory muscle strength during the inspiratory and expiratory phases. These methods are divided into two categories: volitional tests (which require patient understanding and cooperation; and non-volitional tests. Volitional tests, such as those that measure maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, are the most commonly used because they are readily available. Non-volitional tests depend on magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerve accompanied by the measurement of inspiratory mouth pressure, inspiratory esophageal pressure, or inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure. Another method that has come to be widely used is ultrasound imaging of the diaphragm. We believe that pulmonologists involved in the care of patients with respiratory diseases should be familiar with the tests used in order to assess respiratory muscle function.Therefore, the aim of the present article is to describe the advantages, disadvantages, procedures, and clinical applicability of the main tests used in the assessment of respiratory muscle strength.

  18. Normal expiratory flow rate and lung volumes in patients with combined emphysema and interstitial lung disease: a case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, Karen L; Cockcroft, Donald W; Fladeland, Derek A; Fenton, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern including small lung volumes and increased expiratory flow rates resulting from a reduction in pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. When the diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated, and a smaller than expected reduction or even normal lung volumes can be found. The present report describes 10 patients with progressive breathlessness, three of whom experienced severe limitation in their quality of life. All patients showed lung interstitial involvement and emphysema on computed tomography scan of the chest. The 10 patients showed normal spirometry and lung volumes with severe compromise of gas exchange. Normal lung volumes do not exclude diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in patients with concomitant emphysema. The relatively preserved lung volumes may underestimate the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and attenuate its effects on lung function parameters.

  19. Normal Expiratory Flow Rate and Lung Volumes in Patients with Combined Emphysema and Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Series and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Heathcote

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary function tests in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern including small lung volumes and increased expiratory flow rates resulting from a reduction in pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. When the diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated, and a smaller than expected reduction or even normal lung volumes can be found. The present report describes 10 patients with progressive breathlessness, three of whom experienced severe limitation in their quality of life. All patients showed lung interstitial involvement and emphysema on computed tomography scan of the chest. The 10 patients showed normal spirometry and lung volumes with severe compromise of gas exchange. Normal lung volumes do not exclude diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in patients with concomitant emphysema. The relatively preserved lung volumes may underestimate the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and attenuate its effects on lung function parameters.

  20. Risk for COPD with Obstruction of Active Smokers with Normal Spirometry and Reduced Diffusion Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, Robert J.; Sanders, Abraham; Vincent, Thomas L.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Smokers are assessed for COPD using spirometry, with COPD defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as airflow limitation not fully reversible with bronchodilators. There is a subset of smokers with normal spirometry (by GOLD criteria), who have a low diffusion capacity (DLCO), a parameter linked to emphysema and small airway disease. The natural history of these “normal spirometry/low DLCO” smokers is unknown. Methods From a cohort of 1570 smokers in the New York City metropolitian area, all of whom had normal spirometry, two groups were randomly selected for lung function follow-up: smokers with normal spirometry/normal DLCO (n=59) and smokers with normal spirometry/low DLCO (n=46). All had normal history, physical examination, CBC, urinalysis, HIV status, α1-antitrypsin level, chest X-ray, FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio and total lung capacity (TLC). Throughout the study, all continued to be active smokers. Findings In the normal spirometry/normal DLCO group assessed over 45 ± 20 months, 3% developed GOLD-defined COPD. In contrast, in the normal spirometry/low DLCO group, followed over 41 ± 31 months, 22% developed GOLD-defined COPD. Interpretation Despite appearing “normal” by GOLD, smokers with normal spirometry but low DLCO are at significant risk for developing COPD with obstruction to airflow. PMID:26541521

  1. On the respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillation technique in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Almeida Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary complications are the most common cause of death and morbidity in systemic sclerosis (SSc. The forced oscillation technique (FOT offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that SSc may introduce changes in the resistive and reactive properties of the respiratory system, and that FOT may help the diagnosis of these abnormalities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested these hypotheses in controls (n = 30 and patients with abnormalities classified using spirometry (n = 52 and pulmonary volumes (n = 29. Resistive data were interpreted with the zero-intercept resistance (Ri and the slope of the resistance (S as a function of frequency. Reactance changes were evaluated by the mean reactance between 4 and 32 Hz (Xm and the dynamic compliance (Crs,dyn. The mechanical load was evaluated using the absolute value of the impedance in 4 Hz (Z4Hz. A compartmental model was used to obtain central (R and peripheral (Rp resistances, and alveolar compliance (C. The clinical usefulness was evaluated by investigating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. The presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL was also evaluated. For the groups classified using spirometry, SSc resulted in increased values in Ri, R, Rp and Z4Hz (p0.90. In groups classified by pulmonary volume, SSc resulted in reductions in S, Xm, C and Crs,dyn (p0.80. It was also observed that EFL is not common in patients with SSc. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that the respiratory resistance and reactance are changed in SSc. This analysis provides a useful description that is of particular significance for understanding respiratory pathophysiology and to ease the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in these patients.

  2. Spirometry Use among Older Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: 1999–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Sharma, Gulshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Clinical practice guidelines recommend spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and facilitate management. National trends in spirometry use in older adults with newly diagnosed COPD are not known. Objectives: To examine the rate and beneficiary characteristics associated with spirometry use in subjects with newly diagnosed COPD between 1999 and 2008. Methods: We examined newly diagnosed beneficiaries with COPD using a 5% Medicare population from 1999 to 2008. A new COPD diagnosis required two outpatient visits or one hospitalization with primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code 491.xx, 492.xx, or 496 occurring at least 30 days apart with none in the prior 12 months. The primary measurement was spirometry performed within 365 days (±) of the first claim with a COPD diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Between 1999 and 2008, 64,985 subjects were newly diagnosed with COPD. Of these, 35,739 (55%) had spirometry performed within 1 year before or after the initial diagnosis of COPD. Spirometry use increased from 51.3% in 1999 to 58.3% in 2008 (P spirometry. In a multivariable analysis, compared with 1999, subjects diagnosed in 2008 had 10% higher odds (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–1.13) of having spirometry performed. Conclusions: Despite an increase in the use of spirometry over time in newly diagnosed older adults with COPD, spirometry use remains low. Clinical practice guidelines and educational efforts should focus on increasing the use of spirometry to diagnose and manage COPD. PMID:24053440

  3. Confirmatory spirometry for adults hospitalized with a diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Objective measurement of airflow obstruction by spirometry is an essential part of the diagnosis of asthma or COPD. During exacerbations, the feasibility and utility of spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unclear. Addressing these gaps in knowledge may help define the need for confirmatory testing in clinical care and quality improvement efforts. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of spirometry and to determine its utility to confirm the diagnosis in patients hospitalized with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Methods Multi-center study of four academic healthcare institutions. Spirometry was performed in 113 adults admitted to general medicine wards with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Two board-certified pulmonologists evaluated the spirometry tracings to determine the proportion of patients able to produce adequate quality spirometry data. Findings were interpreted to evaluate the utility of spirometry to confirm the presence of obstructive lung disease, according to the 2005 European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society recommendations. Results There was an almost perfect agreement for acceptability (κ = 0.92) and reproducibility (κ =0.93) of spirometry tracings. Three-quarters (73%) of the tests were interpreted by both pulmonologists as being of adequate quality. Of these adequate quality tests, 22% did not present objective evidence of obstructive lung disease. Obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) were more likely to produce spirometry tracings with no evidence of obstructive lung disease, compared to non-obese patients (33% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Conclusions Adequate quality spirometry can be obtained in most hospitalized adults with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Confirmatory spirometry could be a useful tool to help reduce overdiagnosis of obstructive lung disease, especially among obese

  4. Introduction of spirometry into clinical practice in Georgetown, Guyana: quality and diagnostic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J C; Rempel, C; Sanders, C; Piggott, E; Maxwell, Y; Jaipersaud, K; Luknauth, R; Persaud, D; Rambaran, M; Levy, R D

    2016-09-01

    Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC), a 600-bed publicly funded referral hospital in Georgetown, Guyana. To assess spirometry quality and diagnostic outcomes 2 years after the introduction of spirometry into routine clinical practice at GPHC. We performed a retrospective review of 476 consecutive spirometry assessments performed from November 2013 to November 2015. We assessed the proportion and trend of spirometry tests meeting acceptability criteria, along with diagnostic interpretations and spirometry laboratory referral patterns. Overall, 80.4% of the 454 initial spirometry measurements on unique patients met the acceptability criteria, with no significant change in the proportion of acceptable spirometry over the study period (P = 0.450). Of the 369 (81.3%) first tests considered interpretable, 139 (30.6%) were normal, 151 (33.3%) were obstructive, 54 (11.9%) were suggestive of a restrictive pattern, 25 (5.5%) were suggestive of a mixed disorder and 119 (26.2%) tests met the definition of reversibility. Over a 2-year period, high-quality spirometry was performed in GPHC, a publicly funded hospital in a middle-income country with no pre-existing specialised respiratory service.

  5. Lack of spirometry use in Danish patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette; Christensen, René Depont; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing.......Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing....

  6. Disease Severity Prediction by Spirometry in Adults with Visceral Leishmaniasis from Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Isabel A; Bezerra, Frank S; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira de; Andrade, Heitor F; Nicodemo, Antonio C; Amato, Valdir S

    2017-02-08

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is associated with interstitial pneumonitis according to histology and radiology reports. However, studies to address the functional impact on respiratory function in patients are lacking. We assessed pulmonary function using noninvasive spirometry in a cross-sectional study of hospitalized adult VL patients from Minas Gerais, Brazil, without unrelated lung conditions or acute infections. Lung conditions were graded as normal, restrictive, obstructive, or mixed patterns, according to Brazilian consensus standards for spirometry. To control for regional patterns of lung function, we compared spirometry of patients with regional paired controls. Spirometry detected abnormal lung function in most VL patients (70%, 14/20), usually showing a restrictive pattern, in contrast to regional controls and the standards for normal tests. Alterations in spirometry measurements correlated with hypoalbuminemia, the only laboratory value indicative of severity of parasitic disease. Abnormalities did not correlate with unrelated factors such as smoking or occupation. Clinical data including pulmonary symptoms and duration of therapy were also unrelated to abnormal spirometry findings. We conclude that the severity of VL is correlated with a restrictive pattern of lung function according to spirometry, suggesting that there may be interstitial lung involvement in VL. Further studies should address whether spirometry could serve as an index of disease severity in the management of VL. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Spirometry for patients in hospital and one month after admission with an acute exacerbation of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Harry; Kenealy, Timothy; Adair, Jacqui; Robinson, Elizabeth; Sheridan, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess whether spirometry done in hospital during an admission for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is clinically useful for long-term management. Methods Patients admitted to hospital with a clinical diagnosis of AECOPD had spirometry post-bronchodilator at discharge and approximately 4 weeks later. Results Spirometry was achieved in less than half of those considered to have AECOPD. Of 49 patients who had spirometry on both occasions, 41 met the GOLD criteria for COPD at discharge and 39 of these met the criteria at 1 month. For the 41, spirometry was not statistically different between discharge and 1 month but often crossed arbitrary boundaries for classification of severity based on FEV1. The eight who did not meet GOLD criteria at discharge were either misclassified due to comorbidities that reduce FVC, or they did not have COPD as a cause of their hospital admission. Conclusion Spirometry done in hospital at the time of AECOP is useful in patients with a high pre-test probability of moderate-to-severe COPD. Small changes in spirometry at 1 month could place them up or down one grade of severity. Spirometry at discharge may be useful to detect those who warrant further investigation. PMID:22069364

  8. Implications of the Transition From Zapletal to GLI Reference Values for Spirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, Lena; Zwitserloot, Annelies; Merkus, Peter; Gappa, Monika

    The current standard for monitoring lung function in children with asthma is spirometry. In Europe, results of these lung function tests have been related to Zapletal reference values published in 1977. Recently, the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) published predicted values of spirometry for

  9. Técnica de oscilações forçadas na análise da resposta broncodilatadora em voluntários sadios e indivíduos portadores de asma brônquica com resposta positiva Using the forced oscillation technique to evaluate bronchodilator response in healthy volunteers and in asthma patients presenting a verified positive response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Veiga Cavalcanti

    2006-04-01

    expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity. RESULTS: In the control group, bronchodilator use produced a significant alteration in the resistance extrapolated to the y axis (p < 0.001, although no significant differences were observed in the slope of resistance or in dynamic compliance. Analysis of the asthma patients revealed significant differences between the prebronchodilator and postbronchodilator values for all spirometry and forced oscillation technique parameters. Values of p < 0.001 were obtained for all comparisons between the two groups. CONCLUSION: The modifications provoked by use of the forced oscillation technique were in direct concordance with the pathophysiology of the bronchodilator response in asthma patients, indicating that the forced oscillation technique could be useful as a complement to spirometry in these patients.

  10. Differences in the use of spirometry between rural and urban primary care centers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Martín, Eduardo; Soriano, Joan B; Rubio, Myriam Calle; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability and practice of spirometry, training of technicians, and spirometry features in primary care centers in Spain, evaluating those located in a rural environment against those in urban areas. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 by a telephone survey in 970 primary health care centers in Spain. The centers were divided into rural or urban depending on the catchment population. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test that included the following topics: center resources, training doctors and technicians, using the spirometer, bronchodilator test, and the availability of spirometry and maintenance. Although the sample size was achieved in both settings, rural centers (RCs) gave a lower response rate than urban centers (UCs). The number of centers without spirometry in rural areas doubled those in the urban areas. Most centers had between one and two spirometers. However, the number of spirometry tests per week was significantly lower in RCs than in UCs (4 [4.1%] vs 6.9 [5.7%], Pspirometries was higher in RCs than in UCs (209 [73.0%] vs 207 [64.2%], P=0.003). RCs were more satisfied with the spirometries (7.8 vs 7.6, P=0.019) and received more training course for interpreting spirometry (41.0% vs 33.2%, P=0.004). The performance of the bronchodilator test showed a homogeneous measure in different ways. The spirometer type and the reference values were unknown to the majority of respondents. This study shows the differences between primary care RCs and UCs in Spain in terms of performing spirometry. The findings in the present study can be used to improve the performance of spirometry in these areas.

  11. Spirometry effects on conventional and multiple flow exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Sandrah P; Linn, William S; Salam, Muhammad T; Bastain, Theresa M; Zhang, Yue; Rappaport, Edward B; Liu, Meng; Berhane, Kiros

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and research settings often require sequencing multiple respiratory tests in a brief visit. Guidelines recommend measuring the concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) before spirometry, but evidence for a spirometry carryover effect on FeNO is mixed. Only one study has investigated spirometry carryover effects on multiple flow FeNO analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate evidence for carryover effects of recent spirometry on three exhaled NO summary measures: FeNO at 50 ml/s, airway wall NO flux [J'awNO] and alveolar NO concentration [CANO] in a population-based sample of schoolchildren. Participants were 1146 children (191 with asthma), ages 12-15, from the Southern California Children's Health Study who performed spirometry and multiple flow FeNO on the same day. Approximately, half the children performed spirometry first. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate differences in exhaled NO summary measures associated with recent spirometry testing, adjusting for potential confounders. In the population-based sample, we found no evidence of spirometry carryover effects. However, for children with asthma, there was a suggestion that exhaled NO summary measures assessed ≤6 min after spirometry were lower (FeNO: 25.8% lower, 95% CI: -6.2%, 48.2%; J'awNO: 15.1% lower 95% CI: -26.5%, 43.0%; and CANO 0.43 parts per billion lower, 95% CI: -0.12, 0.98). In clinical settings, it is prudent to assess multiple flow FeNO before spirometry. In studies of healthy subjects, it may not be necessary to assess FeNO first.

  12. Use of telehealth technology for home spirometry after lung transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengpiel, Juliane; Fuehner, Thomas; Kugler, Christiane; Avsar, Murat; Bodmann, Isabelle; Boemke, Annelies; Simon, Andre; Welte, Tobias; Gottlieb, Jens

    2010-12-01

    Complications often occur during the early phase after lung transplantation, and rapid diagnosis is vital. Home spirometry is used to detect early changes in graft function. Bluetooth-equipped cell phones are easy to use and facilitate data transfer from home spirometry. To explore use of home spirometry with Bluetooth data transfer in outpatient lung transplant recipients. Single-center prospective randomized controlled trial. Intervention-Fifty-six patients were randomized either to home spirometry with data transfer via Bluetooth-equipped cell phones or to home spirometry alone before discharge after lung transplantation. In the Bluetooth group, results were transferred to a database capable of generating alarm messages. Time from onset of symptoms to physician consultation during the first 6 months after lung transplantation was the primary end point. Adherence to home spirometry was 97.2% in the Bluetooth group and 95.3% in the home spirometry alone group (P = .73). Median time to first consultation (P = .60) and frequency of consultation (P = .06) did not differ significantly in the 2 groups. Mean scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were lower in patients in the Bluetooth group (1.5; range, 0.0-4.0) than in the home spirometry alone group (4.0; range, 2.0-6.0; P = .04). Home spirometry with data transfer is feasible and safe in lung transplant recipients. Compared with home spirometry alone, additional data transfer was equally effective regarding the time interval from symptom onset to consultation. Patients in the Bluetooth group reported less anxiety, which may improve emotional well-being.

  13. [The spirometry figures of bronchoobstructive syndrome in concomitant intestinal parasitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, K; Aliyeva, G; Gadjiyeva, N

    2010-02-01

    The aim of research is to study of the spirometry figures of bronchoobstructive syndrome in concomitant intestinal parasitosis. There are 81 patients aged from 5 to 61 years (male 43, female 38) were examined. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 group - patients treated only with bronchodilator therapy (14 patients with protozoa, 14 - with helminth, 12 - with combination of parasitosis); 2 group - patients treated with bronchodilator therapy in common with anti-parasitic therapy (14 patients with protozoa, 17 - with helminth, 10 - with combination of parasitosis). There are 22 patients with bronchoobstructive syndrome without parasites were included in control group. Functional disorders at the initial examination are not significantly distinguished between patients with protozoa, helminth, with combined parasitosis and patients without parasites. Considerable differences manifested in dynamics after treatment: only bronchodilator therapy of patients infected with parasites is not lead to sufficient increase of the indices of external respiration function, even the decreasing of the most parameters were observed in patients with helminth. The least growth of spirometric indices were observed in patients from group 1 - 2,17/ 5,09% predicted volumes (-6,81min; 10,54max), the highest growth were observed in patients from group 2 - 20,26/ 12,45% p.v. (2,77min; 43,85max). The spirographic indicators increase after treatment in the control group was more moderate in comparison with 1 and 2 groups - 5,96/ 2,97% p.v. (0,39min; 9,59max). Thus, using antiparasitic therapy in common with bronchodilator therapy in treatment of patients with intestinal parasitosis (group 2) is lead to the reliably significant positive dynamic of spirometry parameters in comparison not only to 1 group (<0,05 for many parameters) but also to control group (<0,01 for many parameters).

  14. Validity of peak expiratory flow measurement in assessing reversibility of airflow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, F W; Schrier, A C; Sterk, P J; Dijkman, J H

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing the reversibility of airflow obstruction by peak expiratory (PEF) measurements would be practicable in general practice, but its usefulness has not been investigated. METHODS: PEF measurements were performed (miniWright peak flow meter) in 73 general practice patients (aged 40 to 84) with a history of asthma or chronic obstructive lung disease before and after 400 micrograms inhaled sulbutamol. The change in PEF was compared with the change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Reversible airflow obstruction was analysed in two ways according to previous criteria. When defined as a 9% or greater increase in FEV1 expressed as a percentage of predicted values reversibility was observed in 42% of patients. Relative operating characteristic analysis showed that an absolute improvement in PEF of 60 l/min or more gave optimal discrimination between patients with reversible and irreversible airflow obstruction (the sensitivity and specificity of an increase of 60 l/min in detecting a 9% or more increase in FEV1 as a percentage of predicted values were 68% and 93% respectively, with a positive predictive value of 87%). When defined as an increase of 190 ml or more in FEV1, reversible airflow obstruction was observed in 53% of patients. Again an absolute improvement in PEF of 60 l/min or more gave optimal discrimination between patients with reversible and irreversible airflow obstruction (sensitivity 56%, specificity 94%, and positive predictive value 92%). CONCLUSION: Absolute changes in PEF can be used as a simple technique to diagnose reversible airflow obstruction in patients from general practice. PMID:1519192

  15. Use of spirometry among chest physicians and primary care physicians in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanjare, Nitin; Chhowala, Sushmeeta; Madas, Sapna; Kodgule, Rahul; Gogtay, Jaideep; Salvi, Sundeep

    2016-07-07

    Although spirometry is the gold-standard diagnostic test for obstructive airways diseases, it remains poorly utilised in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate the use of spirometry across India, the change in its usage over a period of time and to understand the reasons for its under-utilisation. Two nationwide surveys were conducted in the years 2005 and 2013, among four groups of doctors: chest physicians (CPs), general physicians (GenPs), general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians (Ps). A total of 1,000 physicians from each of the four groups were randomly selected from our database in the years 2005 and 2013. These surveys were conducted in 52 cities and towns across 15 states in India. A questionnaire was administered to the physicians, which captured information about their demographic details, type of practice and use of spirometry. The overall response rates of the physicians in 2005 and 2013 were 42.8% and 54.9%, respectively. Spirometry was reported to be used by 55% CPs, 20% GenPs, 10% GPs and 5% Ps in 2005, and this increased by 30.9% among CPs (P value spirometry varied between 2005 and 2013. In all, 32.2% of physicians were unaware of which predicted equation they were using. The use of spirometry in India is low, although it seems to have improved over the years. The reasons identified in this study for under-utilisation should be used to address initiatives to improve the use of spirometry in clinical practice.

  16. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain in postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David J; Hilliard, Paul E; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Brummett, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of postoperative incentive spirometry improves patient outcomes but is limited by pain after thoracic and upper abdominal surgery. Thoracic epidurals are frequently used to provide analgesia and attenuate postoperative pulmonary dysfunction. We hypothesized that, in patients with thoracic epidurals for thoracic and abdominal surgery, high pain scores would be associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance, even when accounting for other variables. Retrospective study of 468 patients who underwent upper abdominal or thoracic surgery using postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between June 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013, at a single tertiary academic center. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain was assessed as the primary outcome. Other independent predictors of incentive spirometry performance were also identified. Postoperative incentive spirometry performance was found to be inversely proportional to pain score, which correlated significantly stronger with deep breathing pain compared with pain at rest (-0.33 vs -0.14 on postoperative day 1; -0.23 vs -0.12 on postoperative day 2). Pain with deep breathing was independently associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance in the multivariable linear regression model (P spirometry performance could be used as another indicator of thoracic epidural efficacy. This may be particularly useful in patients reporting high pain scores postoperatively.

  17. Incidence of tracheobronchomalacia associated with pulmonary emphysema. Detection with paired inspiratory-expiratory multidetector computed tomography using a low-dose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masanori; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Nakano, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) associated with pulmonary emphysema with paired inspiratory-expiratory multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) using a low-dose technique. This study included 56 consecutive patients (55 men, 1 woman; mean age 68.9 years) with pulmonary emphysema who had undergone paired inspiratory-expiratory CT scanning with a low-dose technique (40 mA). All images were retrospectively examined by two thoracic radiologists in a blinded fashion. The diagnosis of TBM was based on the standard criterion of >50% reduction in the cross-sectional area of the tracheobronchial lumen at the end-expiratory phase. A mild TBM criterion of >30% reduction was also reviewed. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests. The relation between the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1.0% ) and TBM was statistically analyzed. Four (7.1%) and eight (14.3%) patients were diagnosed as TBM based on the standard and mild criteria, respectively. In four patients, the percentages of luminal narrowing were 63.4% and 51.2%, respectively for tracheomalacia and 59.2% and 62.0%, respectively, for bronchomalacia. The FEV 1.0% values between patients with and without TBM showed no statistical difference. The incidence of TBM associated with pulmonary emphysema was 7.1% with the standard criterion. It is possible that TBM has been underdiagnosed in a number of patients with pulmonary emphysema. (author)

  18. Relationship between spontaneous expiratory flow-volume curve pattern and air-flow obstruction in elderly COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozoe, Masafumi; Mase, Kyoshi; Murakami, Shigefumi; Okada, Makoto; Ogino, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Kazuhiro; Takashima, Sachie; Yamamoto, Noriyasu; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2013-10-01

    Assessment of the degree of air-flow obstruction is important for determining the treatment strategy in COPD patients. However, in some elderly COPD patients, measuring FVC is impossible because of cognitive dysfunction or severe dyspnea. In such patients a simple test of airways obstruction requiring only a short run of tidal breathing would be useful. We studied whether the spontaneous expiratory flow-volume (SEFV) curve pattern reflects the degree of air-flow obstruction in elderly COPD patients. In 34 elderly subjects (mean ± SD age 80 ± 7 y) with stable COPD (percent-of-predicted FEV(1) 39.0 ± 18.5%), and 12 age-matched healthy subjects, we measured FVC and recorded flow-volume curves during quiet breathing. We studied the SEFV curve patterns (concavity/convexity), spirometry results, breathing patterns, and demographics. The SEFV curve concavity/convexity prediction accuracy was examined by calculating the receiver operating characteristic curves, cutoff values, area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity. Fourteen subjects with COPD had a concave SEFV curve. All the healthy subjects had convex SEFV curves. The COPD subjects who had concave SEFV curves often had very severe airway obstruction. The percent-of-predicted FEV(1)% (32.4%) was the most powerful SEFV curve concavity predictor (area under the curve 0.92, 95% CI 0.83-1.00), and had the highest sensitivity (0.93) and specificity (0.88). Concavity of the SEFV curve obtained during tidal breathing may be a useful test for determining the presence of very severe obstruction in elderly patients unable to perform a satisfactory FVC maneuver.

  19. Diaphragmatic thickness ratio (inspiratory/expiratory) as a diagnostic method of diaphragmatic palsy associated with interescalene block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Escárraga, V M; Dubos España, K; Castillo Bustos, R H; Peidró, L; Sastre, S; Sala-Blanch, X

    2018-02-01

    Diaphragmatic paralysis is a side-effect associated with interscalene block. Thickness index of the diaphragm muscle (inspiratory thickness/expiratory thickness) obtained by ultrasound has recently been introduced in clinical practice for diagnosis of diaphragm muscle atrophy. Our objective was to evaluate this index for the diagnosis of acute phrenic paresis associated with interscalene block. We designed an observational study in 22 patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy. Spirometry was performed (criteria of phrenic paresis was a decrease in FVC and FEV1 ≥20%). Ultrasound apposition zone was assessed in anterior axillary line and diaphragmatic displacement was evaluated on inspiration and expiration (number of intercostal spaces; phrenic paresis considered a reduction ≥25%) and thickness of the diaphragm muscle (a phrenic paresis was considered an index block at C5-C6 with 20ml of 0.5% ropivacaine. Twenty-one patients (95%) presented phrenic nerve block according to one or more of the methods used. One patient did not show any symptoms or signs suggestive of phrenic paralysis and was excluded. All the patients presented phrenic paresis based on the diaphragmatic thickness index, with the pre-block index being 1.8±0.5 and post-block of 1.05±0.06 (Pblock (from 1.9±0.5 intercostal spaces to 0.5±0.3; Pblock. This index does not require a baseline pre-assessment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on pulse pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on pulse pressure variation. FJ Smith, M Geyser, I Schreuder, PJ Becker. Abstract. Objectives: To determine the effect of different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on pulse pressure variation (PPV). Design: An observational study. Setting: Operating theatres of a ...

  1. Parameters affecting the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify physical parameters affecting the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation. [Methods] Eighteen patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation were included in this study. Expiratory abdominal compression was performed on patients lying in a supine position. The abdomen above the navel was vertically compressed in synchronization with expiration and released with inspiration. We measured the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression. [Results] The mean tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was higher than that at rest (430.6 ± 127.1 mL vs. 344.0 ± 94.3 mL). The tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was correlated with weight, days of ventilator support, dynamic compliance and abdominal expansion. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that weight (β = 0.499), dynamic compliance (β = 0.387), and abdominal expansion (β = 0.365) were factors contributing to the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression. [Conclusion] Expiratory abdominal compression increased the tidal volume in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation. The tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was influenced by each of the pulmonary conditions and the physical characteristics.

  2. Spirometry utilisation among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette Marie

    2015-02-01

    This PhD thesis was written during my employment at the Research Unit of General Practice in Odense, University of Southern Denmark. It comprises an overview and three papers, all published or submitted for publication in international peer-reviewed scientific journals.   Non-infectious dyspnoea, chronic cough and wheezing are common symptoms in the population. Patients often present with these symptoms in general practice and have a high probability of having obstructive lung diseases. However, there is an indication that the majority of these patients are treated empirically with pharmacotherapy targeting obstructive lung disease and only few have additional tests conducted, although the predictive value of respiratory symptoms for diagnosing obstructive lung disease has proven to be low. Spirometry is recommended as the gold standard for confirming obstructive lung disease, and testing can also rule out airway obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms caused by other illnesses, such as heart failure or lung cancer. Initiating medication for obstructive lung disease without spirometry entails the risk of these patients experiencing unnecessary delay in the diagnostic process and being exposed to unnecessary economic costs and medication risks. The literature has indicated that many users of medication targeting obstructive lung medication have not had spirometry performed and do not actually have obstructive lung disease. This potential quality gap needs to be assessed. Also, in order to target interventions enhancing earlier spirometry utilisation among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease, improved knowledge on patient and practice factors associated with spirometry testing is needed.   Among first time users of obstructive lung medication we aimed: - To assess to what extent spirometry was performed within the first year of medication use (Study I) - To assess if patient characteristics like socioeconomic and demographic

  3. The reliability and utility of spirometry performed on people with asthma in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei Burton, Deborah; LeMay, Kate S; Saini, Bandana; Smith, Lorraine; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Southwell, Phillipa; Cooke, Julie; Emmerton, Lynne; Stewart, Kay; Krass, Ines; Reddel, Helen; Armour, Carol

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability and the utility of spirometry generated by community pharmacists participating in two large asthma intervention trials of 892 people. The Pharmacy Asthma Care Program (PACP) and the Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS) involved up to four visits to the pharmacy over 6 months for counseling and goal setting. Pharmacists performed spirometry according to ATS/ERS guidelines to inform management. The proportion of A-E, F quality tests, as per EasyOne QC grades, were recorded. Lung function results between visits and for participants referred/not referred to their general practitioner on the basis of spirometry were compared. Complete data from 2593 spirometry sessions were recorded, 68.5% of spirometry sessions achieved three acceptable tests with between-test repeatability of 150 ml or less (A or B quality), 96% of spirometry sessions included at least one test that met ATS/ERS acceptability criteria. About 39.1% of participants had FEV1/FVC values below the lower limit of normal (LNN), indicating a respiratory obstruction. As a result of the service, there was a significant increase in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC and asthma control. Lung function values were significantly poorer for participants referred to their general practitioner, compared with those not referred, on the basis of spirometry. Community pharmacists are able to reliably achieve spirometry results meeting ATS/ERS guidelines in people with asthma. Significant improvements in airway obstruction were demonstrated with the pharmacy services. Pharmacists interpreted lung function results to identify airway obstruction for referral, making this a useful technique for review of people with asthma in the community.

  4. Official American Thoracic Society technical standards: spirometry in the occupational setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Carrie A; Tarlo, Susan M; Hankinson, John L; Townsend, Mary C; Eschenbacher, William L; Von Essen, Susanna G; Sigsgaard, Torben; Weissman, David N

    2014-04-15

    This document addresses aspects of the performance and interpretation of spirometry that are particularly important in the workplace, where inhalation exposures can affect lung function and cause or exacerbate lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or fibrosis. Issues that previous American Thoracic Society spirometry statements did not adequately address with respect to the workplace were identified for systematic review. Medline 1950-2012 and Embase 1980-2012 were searched for evidence related to the following: training for spirometry technicians; testing posture; appropriate reference values to use for Asians in North America; and interpretative strategies for analyzing longitudinal change in lung function. The evidence was reviewed and technical recommendations were developed. Spirometry performed in the work setting should be part of a comprehensive workplace respiratory health program. Effective technician training and feedback can improve the quality of spirometry testing. Posture-related changes in FEV1 and FVC, although small, may impact interpretation, so testing posture should be kept consistent and documented on repeat testing. Until North American Asian-specific equations are developed, applying a correction factor of 0.88 to white reference values is considered reasonable when testing Asian American individuals in North America. Current spirometry should be compared with previous tests. Excessive loss in FEV1 over time should be evaluated using either a percentage decline (15% plus loss expected due to aging) or one of the other approaches discussed, taking into consideration testing variability, worker exposures, symptoms, and other clinical information. Important aspects of workplace spirometry are discussed and recommendations are provided for the performance and interpretation of workplace spirometry.

  5. Use of spirometry in detecting airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangash, M.H.; Zaidi, S.B.H.; Zaidi, S.M.A.; Khan, I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To detect spirometric abnormalities in asymptomatic smokers in relation to duration of smoking. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at PNS Shifa from Oct 2006 to June 2007. Subjects and Methods: Hundred individuals were included in this study who fulfilled the required criteria. Spirometry was done after briefing the patient about the procedure. Smokers were divided into two groups. Group I (5 to 9 pack years) and group II (= 10 pack years). All relevant information were recorded on Performa (Annex-A). The data was analyzed through SPSS-10, in terms of Mean +- SD (Standard Deviation) for numeric response variables and independent sample T test was applied to compare significance of proportion for numeric response variables at p < 0.05. Categorical variables were compared by applying Chi-square test at p < 0.05 level of significance. Results: Significant statistical difference was found between the mean age in the two groups with p-value of 0.011. This may be due to the longer duration of smoking history in Group II. Strong association was found between number of cigarette smoked and the pattern of airway obstruction as significant statistical difference of airway obstruction and early airflow limitation was found between the two groups of smokers at p value of 0.004. Conclusion: There is strong association between duration of smoking and development of airway obstruction even before the smoker become symptomatic. (author)

  6. Impulse Oscillometry and Spirometry Small-Airway Parameters in Mild to Moderate Bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Jing-Jing; Gao, Yong-Hua; Li, Hui-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2016-11-01

    Both impulse oscillometry and spirometry can reflect small-airway disorders. The objective of this work was to investigate the diagnostic value of impulse oscillometry and spirometry small-airway parameters and their correlation with radiology, disease severity, and sputum bacteriology in mild to moderate bronchiectasis (bronchiectasis severity index spirometry, and sputum culture were performed. Correlation between small-airway parameters and clinical indices was determined, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and smoking history. Sensitivity analyses were repeated when excluding subjects with bronchiectasis severity index ≥9 or HRCT score ≥13. Impulse oscillometry and spirometry small-airway parameters could discriminate mild to moderate bronchiectasis from healthy subjects and correlated significantly with HRCT score and the number of bronchiectatic lobes and the bronchiectasis severity index (all P Spirometry, but not impulse oscillometry, small-airway parameters differed statistically between subjects with isolated peripheral-airway bronchiectasis and those with peripheral plus central-airway bronchiectasis (all P spirometry small-airway parameters have similar diagnostic value in reflecting peripheral-airway disorders and correlate with the HRCT scores, the bronchiectasis severity index, and the number of bronchiectatic lobes in mild to moderate bronchiectasis. Assessment of small-airway parameters should be incorporated in future lung function investigations in bronchiectasis. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. Spirometry reference equations for central European populations from school age to old age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascha K Rochat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spirometry reference values are important for the interpretation of spirometry results. Reference values should be updated regularly, derived from a population as similar to the population for which they are to be used and span across all ages. Such spirometry reference equations are currently lacking for central European populations. OBJECTIVE: To develop spirometry reference equations for central European populations between 8 and 90 years of age. MATERIALS: We used data collected between January 1993 and December 2010 from a central European population. The data was modelled using "Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape" (GAMLSS. RESULTS: The spirometry reference equations were derived from 118'891 individuals consisting of 60'624 (51% females and 58'267 (49% males. Altogether, there were 18'211 (15.3% children under the age of 18 years. CONCLUSION: We developed spirometry reference equations for a central European population between 8 and 90 years of age that can be implemented in a wide range of clinical settings.

  8. Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René Depont

    2013-01-01

    a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data...... on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008. RESULTS: A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years...... spirometry performed among men (OR = 0.78, CI = 0.69-0.88). CONCLUSION: Social inequity in spirometry testing among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease was confirmed in this study. Increased focus on spirometry testing among elderly men living alone, among the unemployed...

  9. PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION INCREASE PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE ON CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintin Sukartini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limited progressive air flow in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD can caused by small airway disease (bronchiolitis obstructive and loss of elasticity of the lung (emphysema. Further it can be decreasing the quality of life in COPD patients because dyspnea and uncomfortable in activity. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR is one of the relaxation technique that can repair pulmonary ventilation by decreasing chronic constriction of the respiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on raised peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR. Method: A pre-experimental one group pre-post test design was used in this study. Population was all of the COPD patients at Pulmonary Specialist Polyclinic Dr Mohamad Soewandhie Surabaya. There were 8 respondents taken by using purposive sampling. PEFR was counted by using peak flow meter every six day. Data were analyzed by using Paired t-Test with significance level  p≤0.05. Result: The result showed that PMR had significance level on increasing of PEFR (p=0.012. Discussion: It can be concluded that PMR has an effect on raise PEFR. Further studies are recommended to measure the effect of PMR on respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR subjective dyspnoe symptoms, forced expiration volume on the first minute (FEV1 and mid maximum flow rate (MMFR in COPD patients.

  10. Expiratory flow limitation and operating lung volumes during exercise in older and younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Meskimen, Kayla; Harms, Craig A

    2017-06-01

    We determined the effect of aging on expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and operating lung volumes when matched for lung size. We hypothesized that older adults will exhibit greater EFL and increases in EELV during exercise compared to younger controls. Ten older (5M/5W; >60years old) and nineteen height-matched young adults (10M/9W) were recruited. Young adults were matched for%predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) (Y-matched%Pred FVC; n=10) and absolute FVC (Y-matched FVC; n=10). Tidal flow-volume loops were recorded during the incremental exercise test with maximal flow-volume loops measured pre- and post-exercise. Compared to younger controls, older adults exhibited more EFL at ventilations of 26, 35, 51, and 80L/min. The older group had higher end-inspiratory lung volume compared to Y-matched%Pred FVC group during submaximal ventilations. The older group increased EELV during exercise, while EELV stayed below resting in the Y-matched%Pred FVC group. These data suggest older adults exhibit more EFL and increase EELV earlier during exercise compared to younger adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 Quality Improvement Program for Improving Asthma Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione-Smith, Rita; Zhou, Chuan; Corwin, Michael J; Taylor, James A; Rice, Fiona; Stout, James W

    To determine the effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 distance learning quality improvement (QI) program for enhancing the processes and outcomes of care for children with asthma. Cluster randomized controlled trial involving 25 matched pairs of pediatric primary care practices. Practices were recruited from 2 practice-based research networks: the Slone Center Office-based Research Network at Boston University, Boston, Mass, and the Puget Sound Pediatric Research Network, Seattle, Wash. Study participants included providers from one of the 50 enrolled pediatric practices and 626 of their patients with asthma. Process measures assessed included spirometry test quality and appropriate prescription of asthma controller medications. Outcome measures included asthma-specific health-related quality of life, and outpatient, emergency department, and inpatient utilization for asthma. At baseline, 25.4% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 50.4% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. During the 6-month postintervention period, 28.7% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 49.9% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. The adjusted difference-of-differences analysis revealed no intervention effect on spirometry test quality. Adjusted differences-of-differences analysis also revealed no intervention effect on appropriate use of controller medications or any of the parent- or patient-reported outcomes examined. In this study, the Spirometry 360 distance learning QI program was ineffective in improving spirometry test quality or parent- or patient-reported outcomes. QI programs like the one assessed here may need to focus on practices with lower baseline performance levels or may need to be tailored for those with higher baseline performance. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spirometry-related pain and distress in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis: the role of acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casier, Annabelle; Goubert, Liesbet; Vervoort, Tine; Theunis, Marleen; Huse, Danielle; De Baets, Frans; Matthys, Dirk; Crombez, Geert

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of spirometry-related pain and distress in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF), and to investigate the role of acceptance of illness in spirometry-related pain and distress. A total of 36 adolescents and young adults with CF (12 to 22 years of age) completed a questionnaire assessing acceptance of illness. Spirometry-related distress was assessed using self-report (ie, anxiety⁄worry about the procedure) and physiological outcomes (ie, heart rate and heart rate variability) before spirometry. Spirometry-related pain was assessed using self-report (ie, expected pain and pain-related thoughts). Self-reported distress and pain during spirometry were also assessed. Eighty-nine per cent of subjects reported distress before spirometry, 67% experienced distress during spirometry, 28% expected pain during spirometry and 22% actually experienced pain. Interestingly, partial correlations revealed that more acceptance was related to less expected pain and pain-related thoughts. Acceptance, however, was unrelated to distress, anxiety and pain during spirometry. The present study suggests that a non-negligible number of adolescents and young adults with CF experience pain and distress during spirometry. Furthermore, results indicate that acceptance may play a protective role in the more indirect consequences of CF such as expected pain and pain-related thoughts during medical procedures. Acceptance, however, was not related to distress before and during spirometry, nor to experienced pain. These findings contribute to the increasing evidence that acceptance may play a protective role in managing the consequences of living with CF.

  13. A clinical study of COPD severity assessment by primary care physicians and their patients compared with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, Douglas W; Dalal, Anand A; Johnson, Phaedra; Becker, Laura; Hunter, Alyssa Goolsby

    2015-06-01

    Primary care physicians often do not use spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This project was designed to see how well physicians' impressions about their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity correlate with the severity of airflow obstruction measured by spirometry and to assess whether spirometry results subsequently changed the physicians' opinions about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity and treatment. We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study conducted in 83 primary care clinics from across the United States. A total of 899 patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed a questionnaire and spirometry testing. Physicians completed a questionnaire and case report forms. Concordance among physician ratings, patient ratings, and spirometry results was evaluated. Physicians' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity ratings before spirometry were accurate for only 30% of patients with evaluable spirometry results, and disease severity in 41% of patients was underestimated. Physicians also underestimated severity compared with patients' self-assessment among 42% of those with evaluable results. After spirometry, physicians changed their opinions on the severity for 30% of patients and recommended treatment changes for 37%. Only 75% of patients performed at least 1 high-quality spirometry test; however, the physicians' opinions and treatment decisions were similar regardless of suboptimal test results. Without performing spirometry, physicians are likely to underestimate their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity or inadequately characterize their patients' lung disease. Spirometry changed the physicians' clinical impressions and treatments for approximately one third of these patients; thus, spirometry is a valuable tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management in primary care. Copyright © 2015

  14. Choosing wisely: adherence by physicians to recommended use of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of adult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Kristin C; Sharma, Gulshan; Lin, Yu-Li; Goldblum, Randall M

    2015-05-01

    The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) and the American Thoracic Society provide guidelines stating that physicians should use spirometry in the diagnosis and management of asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the trends, over a 10-year period, in the utilization of spirometry in patients newly diagnosed with asthma. We hypothesized that spirometry use would increase in physicians who care for asthma patients, especially since 2007, when the revised NAEPP guidelines were published. This retrospective cohort analysis of spirometry use in subjects newly diagnosed with asthma used a privately insured adult population for the years 2002-2011. Our primary outcome of interest was spirometry performed within a year (± 365 days) of the initial date of asthma diagnosis. We also examined the type of asthma medications prescribed. In all, 134,208 patients were found to have a diagnosis of asthma. Only 47.6% had spirometry performed within 1 year of diagnosis. Younger patients, males, and those residing in the Northeast were more likely to receive spirometry. Spirometry use began to decline in 2007. Patients cared for by specialists were more likely to receive spirometry than those cared for by primary care physicians; 80.1% vs 23.3%, respectively. Lastly, even without spirometry, a significant portion of patients (78.3%) was prescribed asthma drugs. Our study suggests that spirometry is underutilized in newly diagnosed asthma patients. Moreover, the use of controller medications in those diagnosed with asthma without spirometry remains high. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transport of expiratory droplets in an aircraft cabin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jitendra K; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-02-01

    The droplets exhaled by an index patient with infectious disease such as influenza or tuberculosis may be the carriers of contagious agents. Indoor environments such as the airliner cabins may be susceptible to infection from such airborne contagious agents. The present investigation computed the transport of the droplets exhaled by the index patient seated in the middle of a seven-row, twin-aisle, fully occupied cabin using the CFD simulations. The droplets exhaled were from a single cough, a single breath, and a 15-s talk of the index patient. The expiratory droplets were tracked by using Lagrangian method, and their evaporation was modeled. It was found that the bulk airflow pattern in the cabin played the most important role on the droplet transport. The droplets were contained in the row before, at, and after the index patient within 30 s and dispersed uniformly to all the seven rows in 4 minutes. The total airborne droplet fraction reduced to 48, 32, 20, and 12% after they entered the cabin for 1, 2, 3, and 4 min, respectively, because of the ventilation from the environmental control system. It is critical to predict the risk of airborne infection to take appropriate measures to control and mitigate the risk. Most of the studies in past either assume a homogenous distribution of contaminants or use steady-state conditions. The present study instead provides information on the transient movement of the droplets exhaled by an index passenger in an aircraft cabin. These droplets may contain active contagious agents and can be potent enough to cause infection. The findings can be used by medical professionals to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of risk of infection to various passengers in the cabin. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Spirometry in Asthma Care: A Review of the Trends and Challenges in Pediatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuk, Adaeze C; Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Ndukwu, Chizalu I; Ndu, Ikenna K; Iloh, Kenechukwu K; Okoli, Chinyere V

    2017-01-01

    Background: Given the rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally, especially bronchial asthma, there is the need to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality by adopting an objective means of diagnosis and monitoring. Aim: This article aims to review the trends and challenges in the use of spirometry for managing childhood bronchial asthma especially in developing countries. Methods: We conducted a literature search of published data on the use of spirometry for the diagnosis of childhood bronchial asthma with special emphasis resource-poor countries. Results: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma recommend the use of spirometry, but this is currently underused in both tertiary and primary care settings especially in developing countries. Lack of spirometers and proper training in their use and interpretation of findings as well as a dearth of asthma guidelines remains core to the underuse of spirometry in managing children with asthma. Targeting education of health care staff was, however, observed to improve its utility, and practical implementable strategies are highlighted. Conclusions: Spirometry is not frequently used for asthma diagnosis in pediatric practice especially in resource-poor countries where the NCD burden is higher. Strategies to overcome the obstacles are implementable and can make a difference in reducing the burden of NCD. PMID:28781518

  17. Physiological and morphological determinants of maximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive lung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); H.O. Coxson (Harvey); P.D. Pare

    1996-01-01

    textabstractMaximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could be reduced by three different mechanisms; loss of lung elastic recoil, decreased airway conductance upstream of flow-limiting segments; and increased collapsibility of airways.

  18. Evaluation of Peak Expiratory Flow Rates (PEFR) of Workers in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    and knowledge of occupational health associated with the ... the respiratory system with significant. 5 ... Peak Expiratory Flow Rates (PEFR) of workers in a cement factory — Douglas K. E, Alasia D. D. ... history of cigarette smoking and chronic.

  19. Peak expiratory flow variability, bronchial responsiveness, and susceptibility to ambient air pollution in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boezen, M; Schouten, Jan; Rijcken, B; Vonk, J; Gerritsen, J; Hoek, G; Brunekreef, B; Postma, D

    1998-01-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) variability are associated expressions of airway lability, yet probably reflect different underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. We investigated whether both measures can be used interchangeably to identify subjects who are

  20. Lung volume and expiratory flow rates from pre- to post-puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Emerson, Sam R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Gandhi, Kirti; Harms, Craig A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose was to determine if the airways and lungs grow disproportionately from pre- to post-puberty in boys and girls. We hypothesized that the airways grow at a slower rate than lung volume (i.e. dysanapsis growth) during puberty and boys would exhibit more dysanaptic growth compared to girls. Twenty-one pre-pubescent children [11 boys (pre 10.1 ± 0.5 years, post 15.3 ± 0.5 years); 10 girls (pre 9.4 ± 1.0 years, post 14.1 ± 1.0 years)] performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs) ~5 years ago from an original cohort of 40 children. These 21 children performed PFTs, which included forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow at 50 % FVC (FEF50). Static pressure at 50 % of FVC [Pst(L)50 %] was estimated based on age. Dysanapsis ratio (DR) was calculated [FEF50 × FVC(-1) × Pst(L) 50 % (-1) ]. Maturation status was determined via Tanner stages. Stage of maturation was not different (p > 0.05) between boys and girls (4.2 ± 0.6 stage vs. 3.7 ± 0.7 stage, respectively). FVC and FEF50 increased (p 0.05) from pre- to post-puberty. FEF50 and FVC significantly increased and DR decreased (p puberty for both sexes. Post-puberty, boys had a significantly larger FVC, but FEF50, DR, and FEF50/FVC were not different (p > 0.05) compared to girls. These data suggest that dysanaptic growth occurs during puberty and that it is not different between boys and girls.

  1. Use of tidal breathing curves for evaluating expiratory airway obstruction in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevroni, Avigdor; Goldman, Aliza; Blank-Brachfeld, Miriam; Abu Ahmad, Wiessam; Ben-Dov, Lior; Springer, Chaim

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate tidal breathing (TB) flow-volume and flow-time curves for identification of expiratory airway obstruction in infants. Pulmonary function tests were analyzed retrospectively in 156 infants aged 3-24 months with persistent or recurrent respiratory complaints. Parameters derived from TB curves were compared to maximal expiratory flow at functional residual capacity ([Formula: see text]maxFRC) measured by rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique. Analyzed parameters were: inspiratory time (t I ), expiratory time (t E ), tidal volume, peak tidal expiratory flow (PTEF), time to peak tidal expiratory flow (t PTEF ), expiratory flow when 50% and 25% of tidal volume remains in the lungs (FEF 50 , FEF 25 , respectively), and the ratios t PTEF /t E , t I /t E , FEF 50 /PTEF, and FEF 25 /PTEF. Statistical comparisons between flow indices and TB parameters were performed using mean squared error and Pearson's sample correlation coefficient. The study population was also divided into two groups based on severity of expiratory obstruction (above or below z-score for [Formula: see text]maxFRC of -2) to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and calculate discriminatory values between the groups. TB parameters that were best correlated to [Formula: see text]maxFRC were: t PTEF /t E , FEF 50 /PTEF, and FEF 25 /PTEF, with r = 0.61, 0.67, 0.65, respectively (p < 0.0001 for all). ROC curves for FEF 50 /PTEF, FEF 25 /PTEF and t PTEF /t E showed areas under the curve of 0.813, 0.797, and 0.796, respectively. Cutoff value z-scores of -0.35, -0.34, and -0.43 for these three parameters, respectively, showed an 86% negative predictive value for severe airway obstructions. TB curves can assist in ruling out severe expiratory airway obstruction in infants.

  2. Decreased peak expiratory flow in pediatric passive smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Yanti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Indonesia ranks fifth among countries with the highest aggregate levels of tobacco consumption in the world. Infants and children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke have increased rates of asthma, respiratory and ear infections, as well as reduced lung function. The effects of tobacco smoke exposure on lung function in children have been reported to be dependent on the source of smoke and the length and dose of exposure. Lung function may also be affected by a child’s gender and asthma status. Objective To compare peak expiratory flow (PEF in pediatric passive smokers to that of children not exposed to second hand smoke, and to define factors that may affect PEF in passive smokers. Methods In August 2009 we conducted a cross-sectional study at an elementary school in the Langkat district. Subjects were aged 6 to 12 years, and divided into two groups: passive smokers and those not exposed to secondhand smoke. Subjects’ PEFs were measured with a Mini-Wright peak flow meter. Measurements were performed in triplicate with the highest value recorded as the PEF. Demographic data including age, sex, weight, height, family income, parental education levels and occupations were obtained through questionnaires. Results Of the 170 participants, 100 were passive smokers and 70 were not exposed to secondhand smoke. Age distribution, weight and height were similar in both groups. We observed a significant difference in PEFs between the group of passive smokers and the group not exposed to secondhand smoke, 211.3 L/minute (SD 61.08 and 242.7 L/minute (SD 77.09, respectively (P < 0.005. The number of years of exposure to smoke (P = 0.079 and the number of cigarettes smoked daily in the household (P = 0.098 did not significantly influence PEF. Conclusion The PEF in pediatric passive smokers was significantly lower than that of children not exposed to secondhand smoke. PEF in passive smokers was not influenced by the number of years of smoke

  3. The majority of participants with abnormal spirometry at walk-in consult their general practitioner as recommended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kølner-Augustson, Line; Thøgersen, Niels; Faaborg, Thea Heide; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2015-11-01

    A number of studies inviting citizens to perform spirometry without need for a previous appointment have been performed to determine the need for general screening of the population for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Yet, no studies have examined how many of the participants follow the advice given to consult their general practitioner (GP) afterwards. A walk-in spirometry was carried out on the island of Laesoe. All habitants above the age of 18 years were invited. In total, 142 were eligible for the study. Participants with an abnormal spirometry were recommended to consult their GP immediately, whereas smokers with symptoms, but with a normal spirometry, were recommended to consult their GP within a year for another spirometry. A follow-up was performed to investigate whether the participants had followed this advice. In total, 52% (74/142) of the participants were advised to contact their GP: 34 due to an abnormal spirometry and 40 due to smoking and respiratory symptoms. Among the participants with an abnormal spirometry, 79% saw their GP within three months, whereas 30% of the current smokers saw their GP within 9-15 months. Lung disease was diagnosed in 56% (19/34) of the participants who initially had an abnormal spirometry. Among the participants who had an abnormal spirometry at screening, 79% consulted their GP as recommended. Furthermore, 52% of the participants who had an abnormal spirometry were subsequently diagnosed with pulmonary disease by their GP. We conclude that walk-in spirometry is a useful tool for early diagnosis of COPD. none. not relevant.

  4. The impact of spirometry in the Ebeltoft Health Promotion Study (EHPS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Ottesen, Anders Løkke; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    Background: It has been stressed that early detection of impaired lung function can be useful in prevention of lung diseases. It is unknown whether spirometry as an integrated part of preventive health checks including a questionnaire regarding risk factors and exposure, can be used for early...... detection of lung diseases.The aim of the study is to describe exposure characteristics and spirometry parameters 15 years ahead of a diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD*)*Defined by FEV1/FVC ... (n=573), aged 30-49 years at baseline, attended in 1991 and 2006 a health check and a follow-up consultation at their own general practitioner. The characteristics of the citizens are described according to sex, age, smoking history, exposure, lung symptoms and spirometry values. Register information...

  5. The value of including spirometry in health checks - a randomized controlled study in primary health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Ottesen, Anders Løkke; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    Background Lung diseases are among the most frequent and most serious ailments in Denmark. Preventive health checks including spirometry can be used to detect lung diseases earlier. Over time the attendance at preventive health checks has decreased and at present the response rate is approximately...... 50%. Little is known about initiatives that can influence the attendance rate. Objectives To examine whether focused information on spirometry in the invitation material will influence the attendance in preventive health checks. Materiel/Methods Design: A randomized controlled study on information...... on spirometry embedded in “Check your health Prevention Program, CHPP” from 2015-16. CHPP is a house-hold cluster randomized controlled trial offering a preventive health check to 30-49 year olds in a Danish municipality during the years 2012 through to 2017 (n= 26,216), carried out in collaboration between...

  6. Forced Expiratory Volume in 6 s (FEV 6 ) and FEV 1 /FEV 6 Values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Values were recorded as mean (standard deviation), and also median and interquartile ranges. The one‑way analysis of variance, Mann–Whitey U and the Kruskal–Wallis were used to test for significance where applicable. P <0.05 were considered to be significant. Results: All the values were within normal range, but the ...

  7. Evaluation of the Global Lung Initiative 2012 Reference Values for Spirometry in African Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigliani, Michele; Canciani, Mario C; Mottini, Giovanni; Altomare, Michele; Magnolato, Andrea; Loa Clemente, Sofia Vanda; Tshilolo, Leon; Cogo, Paola; Quanjer, Philip H

    2017-01-15

    Despite the high burden of respiratory disease, no spirometry reference values for African children are available. Investigate whether the Global Lung Initiative (GLI-2012) reference values for spirometry are appropriate for children in sub-Saharan Africa and assess the impact of malnutrition on lung function. Anthropometry and spirometry were obtained in children aged 6 to 12 years from urban and semiurban schools in three African countries. Spirometry z-scores were derived using the GLI-2012 prediction equations for African Americans. Thinness (body mass index z-score Spirometry outcomes were compared with those of African American children from the third National Health and Nutrition Survey. Spirometry data were analyzed from 1,082 schoolchildren (51% boys) aged 6.0 to 12.8 years in Angola (n = 306), Democratic Republic of the Congo (n = 377), and Madagascar (n = 399). GLI-2012 provided a good fit with mean (SD) z-scores of -0.11 (0.83) for FEV 1 , -0.08 (0.86) for FVC, and -0.07 (0.83) for FEV 1 /FVC. Because of low scatter, the fifth centile corresponded to -1.3 z-scores in boys and -1.5 z-scores in girls. Malnourished African children had a normal FEV 1 /FVC ratio but significant reductions of ∼0.5 z-scores (∼5%) in FEV 1 and FVC compared with African American peers from the third National Health and Nutrition Survey. Children in Angola had the lowest, and those in Madagascar had the highest, zFEV 1 and zFVC. The results of this study support the use of GLI-2012 reference values for schoolchildren in sub-Saharan Africa. Malnutrition affects body growth, leading to a proportionately smaller FEV 1 and FVC without respiratory impairment, as shown by the normal FEV 1 /FVC ratio.

  8. Daily Home Spirometry: An Effective Tool for Detecting Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anne-Marie; Adamali, Huzaifa; Molyneaux, Philip L; Lukey, Pauline T; Marshall, Richard P; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Wells, Athol U; Maher, Toby M

    2016-10-15

    Recent clinical trial successes have created an urgent need for earlier and more sensitive endpoints of disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Domiciliary spirometry permits more frequent measurement of FVC than does hospital-based assessment, which therefore affords the opportunity for a more granular insight into changes in IPF progression. To determine the feasibility and reliability of measuring daily FVC in individuals with IPF. Subjects with IPF were given handheld spirometers and instruction on how to self-administer spirometry. Subjects recorded daily FEV 1 and FVC for up to 490 days. Clinical assessment and hospital-based spirometry was undertaken at 6 and 12 months, and outcome data were collected for 3 years. Daily spirometry was recorded by 50 subjects for a median period of 279 days (range, 13-490 d). There were 18 deaths during the active study period. Home spirometry showed excellent correlation with hospital-obtained readings. The rate of decline in FVC was highly predictive of outcome and subsequent mortality when measured at 3 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.040; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.021-1.062; P ≤ 0.001), 6 months (HR, 1.024; 95% CI, 1.014-1.033; P spirometry in patients with IPF is highly clinically informative and is feasible to perform for most of these patients. The relationship between mortality and rate of change of FVC at 3 months suggests that daily FVC may be of value as a primary endpoint in short proof-of-concept IPF studies.

  9. Methacholine bronchial provocation measured by spirometry versus wheeze detection in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahav Yaacov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of PC20-FEV1 during Methacholine bronchial provocation test (MCT is considered to be impossible in preschool children, as it requires repetitive spirometry sets. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of determining PC20-FEV1 in preschool age children and compares the results to the wheeze detection (PCW method. Methods 55 preschool children (ages 2.8–6.4 years with recurrent respiratory symptoms were recruited. Baseline spirometry and MCT were performed according to ATS/ERS guidelines and the following parameters were determined at baseline and after each inhalation: spirometry-indices, lung auscultation at tidal breathing, oxygen saturation, respiratory and heart rate. Comparison between PCW and PC20-FEV1 and clinical parameters at these end-points was done by paired Student's t-tests. Results and discussion Thirty-six of 55 children (65.4% successfully performed spirometry-sets up to the point of PCW. PC20-FEV1 occurred at a mean concentration of 1.70+/-2.01 while PCW occurred at a mean concentration of 4.37+/-3.40 mg/ml (p 1 by 44.7+/-14.5%; PEFR by 40.5+/-14.5 and FEF25–75 by 54.7+/-14.4% (P Conclusion Determination of PC20-FEV1 by spirometry is feasible in many preschool children. PC20-FEV1 often appears at lower provocation dose than PCW. The lower dose may shorten the test and encourage participation. Significant decrease in spirometry indices at PCW suggests that PC20-FEV1 determination may be safer.

  10. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or both? Diagnostic labeling and spirometry in primary care patients aged 40 years or more

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, Hasse; Drivenes, Elin; Dalbak, Lene G; Leinan, Tone; Høegh-Henrichsen, Svein; Østrem, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Aims To describe symptoms and lung function in patients registered with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care and to examine how spirometry findings fit with general practitioners’ (GPs) diagnoses. Methods Patients aged ≥40 years with a diagnosis of asthma or COPD registered in the electronic medical record during the previous 5 years were recruited at seven GP offices in Norway in 2009–2010. Registered diagnosis, spirometry results, comorbidity, and reported symptoms were compared. Results Among 376 patients, 62% were women. Based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases criteria, a spirometry diagnosis of COPD could be made in 68.1% of the patients with a previous COPD diagnosis and in 17.1% of those diagnosed with asthma only (P spirometry was 0.50. A restrictive spirometry pattern was found in 19.4% and more frequently in patients diagnosed with both asthma and COPD (23.9%) than in patients diagnosed with COPD only (6.8%, P = 0.003). Conclusion The ability of GPs to differentiate between asthma and COPD seems to have considerably improved during the last decade, probably due to the dissemination of spirometry and guidelines for COPD diagnosis. A diagnosis of COPD that cannot be confirmed by spirometry represents a challenge in clinical practice, in particular when a restrictive pattern on spirometry is found. PMID:22135492

  11. Differences in the use of spirometry between rural and urban primary care centers in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márquez-Martín E

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Márquez-Martín,1 Joan B Soriano,2 Myriam Calle Rubio,3 Jose Luis Lopez-Campos1,4 On behalf of the 3E project 1Unidad Médico-Quirúrgica de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, 2Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario de la Princesa (IISP, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cátedra UAM-Linde, 3Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Clínico San Carlos, 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability and practice of spirometry, training of technicians, and spirometry features in primary care centers in Spain, evaluating those located in a rural environment against those in urban areas.Methods: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 by a telephone survey in 970 primary health care centers in Spain. The centers were divided into rural or urban depending on the catchment population. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test that included the following topics: center resources, training doctors and technicians, using the spirometer, bronchodilator test, and the availability of spirometry and maintenance.Results: Although the sample size was achieved in both settings, rural centers (RCs gave a lower response rate than urban centers (UCs. The number of centers without spirometry in rural areas doubled those in the urban areas. Most centers had between one and two spirometers. However, the number of spirometry tests per week was significantly lower in RCs than in UCs (4 [4.1%] vs 6.9 [5.7%], P<0.01. The availability of a specific schedule for conducting spirometries was higher in RCs than in UCs (209 [73.0%] vs 207 [64.2%], P=0.003. RCs were more satisfied with the spirometries (7.8 vs 7.6, P

  12. Peak Expiratory Flow as a Surrogate for Health Related Quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirometry was done using American Thoracic Society's standards and reference equations from African American norms of the US population. Quality of life was measured with the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) Results: Out of 50 patients recruited for the study, 48 provided complete data with acceptable ...

  13. Acute effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes in patients after a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Illia Ndf; Fregonezi, Guilherme Af; Melo, Rodrigo; Cabral, Elis Ea; Aliverti, Andrea; Campos, Tânia F; Ferreira, Gardênia Mh

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess how volume-oriented incentive spirometry applied to patients after a stroke modifies the total and compartmental chest wall volume variations, including both the right and left hemithoraces, compared with controls. Twenty poststroke patients and 20 age-matched healthy subjects were studied by optoelectronic plethysmography during spontaneous quiet breathing (QB), during incentive spirometry, and during the recovery period after incentive spirometry. Incentive spirometry was associated with an increased chest wall volume measured at the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage and abdominal compartment (P = .001) and under 3 conditions (P spirometry, and postincentive spirometry, respectively. Under all 3 conditions, the contribution of the abdominal compartment to VT was greater in the stroke subjects (54.1, 43.2, and 48.9%) than in the control subjects (43.7, 40.8, and 46.1%, P = .039). In the vast majority of subjects (13/20 and 18/20 during QB and incentive spirometry, respectively), abdominal expansion precedes rib cage expansion during inspiration. Greater asymmetry between the right and left hemithoracic expansions occurred in stroke subjects compared with control subjects, but it decreased during QB (62.5%, P = .002), during incentive spirometry (19.7%), and postincentive spirometry (67.6%, P = .14). Incentive spirometry promotes increased expansion in all compartments of the chest wall and reduces asymmetric expansion between the right and left parts of the pulmonary rib cage; therefore, it should be considered as a tool for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Functional Magnetic Stimulation of Inspiratory and Expiratory Muscles in Subjects With Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Plow, Ela; Ranganthan, Vinoth; Huang, Honglian; Schmitt, Melissa; Nemunaitis, Gregory; Kelly, Clay; Frost, Frederick; Lin, Vernon

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality in persons with a spinal cord injury, partly because of respiratory muscle paralysis. Earlier investigation has demonstrated that functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) can be used as a noninvasive technology for activating expiratory muscles, thus producing useful expiratory functions (simulated cough) in subjects with spinal cord injury. To evaluate the effectiveness of FMS for conditioning inspiratory and expiratory muscles in persons with tetraplegia. A prospective before and after trial. FMS Laboratory, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH. Six persons with tetraplegia. Each subject participated in a 6-week FMS protocol for conditioning the inspiratory and expiratory muscles. A magnetic stimulator was used with the center of a magnetic coil placed at the C7-T1 and T9-T10 spinous processes, respectively. Pulmonary function tests were performed before, during, and after the protocol. Respiratory variables included maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), peak inspiratory flow (PIF), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), and peak expiratory flow (PEF). After 6 weeks of conditioning, the main outcome measurements (mean ± standard error) were as follows: MIP, 89.6 ± 7.3 cm H2O; IRV, 1.90 ± 0.34 L; PIF, 302.4 ± 36.3 L/min; MEP, 67.4 ± 11.1 cm H2O; ERV, 0.40 ± 0.06 L; and PEF, 372.4 ± 31.9 L/min. These values corresponded to 117%, 107%, 136%, 109%, 130%, and 124% of pre-FMS conditioning values, respectively. Significant improvements were observed in MIP (P = .022), PIF (P = .0001), and PEF (P = .0006), respectively. When FMS was discontinued for 4 weeks, these values showed decreases from their values at the end of the conditioning protocol, which suggests that continual FMS may be necessary to maintain improved respiratory functions. FMS conditioning of the inspiratory and expiratory muscles improved

  15. Semiautomatic assessment of respiratory motion in dynamic MRI. Comparison with simultaneously acquired spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M. [Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P. [Medizinische und Biologische Informatik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Diagnostische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: supplementing global spirometry with regional information could allow for earlier and more specific diagnosis of lung disease. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) makes it possible to derive functional parameters from the visualization of the pulmonary motion of single lungs. The aim of this study was to compare high temporal resolution measurements of left and right thoracic diameters to simultaneously acquired spirometry. Materials and methods: 10 healthy volunteers underwent 2-dimensional dMRI of both lungs at 1.5 T. Spirometry was performed simultaneously with an MRI-compatible spirometer. Thoracic diameters were measured semiautomatically and compared to simultaneously measured spirometric volumes. A dMRI surrogate for the Tiffeneau Index was compared to the spirometric Tiffeneau. Results: The volume-time and flow-volume curves from dMRI were very similar to the spirometric curves. The semiautomatically measured diameters correlated well with the spirometric volumes (r > = 0.8, p < 10-15). Agreement between the methods at full temporal resolution was not as convincing (width of 95% limits of agreement interval up to 56%). Good agreement was found between the Tiffenau surrogate and spirometry (width of 95% limits of agreement interval of 14.5%). (orig.)

  16. The Vital Capacity Is Vital: Epidemiology and Clinical Significance of the Restrictive Spirometry Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Mark S; Jankowich, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic research has revealed a substantial portion of the general population with abnormal spirometry results that are characterized by decreased FEV1 and FVC but a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio. This restrictive spirometry pattern (RSP) is inconsistently defined in the literature and not well addressed by current guidelines; there is an accumulating body of evidence, however, that RSP is prevalent to a similar degree as airflow obstruction. Genetic and other risk factors for RSP, such as inhalational injuries and early life exposures, continue to be actively described. Although it seems that RSP is closely associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and systemic inflammation, it is not a simple marker of obesity. RSP is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as well as mortality, and it may be an underappreciated cause of functional impairments and respiratory symptoms. Improvement in outcomes in this population will require that clinicians have an appreciation for the significance of this spirometry pattern; additional research into the clinical and radiologic phenotype of these subjects is also needed. This article provides an overview of the recent developments in our understanding of this prevalent and highly morbid spirometry pattern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. General practitioners' needs for ongoing support for the interpretation of spirometry tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.P.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Akkermans, R.P.; Jacobs, A.; Bogart-Jansen, M.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although one out of three general practitioners (GPs) carries out spirometry, the diagnostic interpretation of spirometric test results appears to be a common barrier for GPs towards its routine application. METHODS: Multivariate cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey among

  18. Integration of electronic nose technology with spirometry: validation of a new approach for exhaled breath analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.; Brinkman, P.; van der Schee, M. P.; Fens, N.; Dijkers, E.; Bootsma, S. K.; de Jongh, F. H. C.; Sterk, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    New 'omics'-technologies have the potential to better define airway disease in terms of pathophysiological and clinical phenotyping. The integration of electronic nose (eNose) technology with existing diagnostic tests, such as routine spirometry, can bring this technology to 'point-of-care'. We

  19. Spirometry utilization among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette

    2013-01-01

    litteraturen, at mange af disse patienter får medicinsk behandling for deres symptomer uden yderligere undersøgelser, selvom symptomer og klinisk undersøgelse ikke med tilstrækkelig sikkerhed kan prædiktere, hvem der har astma og eller KOL. Spirometri er anbefalet som Gold Standard for at bekræfte eller...... den diagnostiske proces og at blive udsat for unødig medicinsk behandling. Litteraturen tyder på, at mange medicinbrugere ikke bliver undersøgt med spirometri og muligvis ikke har obstruktive lungelidelser. Dette kvalitetsproblem bør afdækkes, og associationer med manglende spirometri i denne gruppe...... bør klarlægges, så interventioner kan målrettes. Formål: Blandt nye brugere af obstruktiv lungemedicin var formålet at: • Afdække i hvor høj grad spirometri var udført indenfor det første år, efter at medicineringen var påbegyndt • Afdække om patientkarakteristika såsom socioøkonomisk og demografisk...

  20. Semiautomatic assessment of respiratory motion in dynamic MRI. Comparison with simultaneously acquired spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M.; Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P.; Kauczor, H.U.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: supplementing global spirometry with regional information could allow for earlier and more specific diagnosis of lung disease. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) makes it possible to derive functional parameters from the visualization of the pulmonary motion of single lungs. The aim of this study was to compare high temporal resolution measurements of left and right thoracic diameters to simultaneously acquired spirometry. Materials and methods: 10 healthy volunteers underwent 2-dimensional dMRI of both lungs at 1.5 T. Spirometry was performed simultaneously with an MRI-compatible spirometer. Thoracic diameters were measured semiautomatically and compared to simultaneously measured spirometric volumes. A dMRI surrogate for the Tiffeneau Index was compared to the spirometric Tiffeneau. Results: The volume-time and flow-volume curves from dMRI were very similar to the spirometric curves. The semiautomatically measured diameters correlated well with the spirometric volumes (r > = 0.8, p < 10-15). Agreement between the methods at full temporal resolution was not as convincing (width of 95% limits of agreement interval up to 56%). Good agreement was found between the Tiffenau surrogate and spirometry (width of 95% limits of agreement interval of 14.5%). (orig.)

  1. Is Home Spirometry Useful in Diagnosing Asthma in Children With Nonspecific Respiratory Symptoms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Alwin F. J.; Visser, Chantal A. N.; Duiverman, Eric J.; Roorda, Ruurd Jan; Brand, Paul L. P.

    Background: Variation of lung function is considered to be a hallmark of asthma. Although guidelines recommend measuring it as a diagnostic tool for asthma, the usefulness of this approach has not been studied in children. Aim: To assess the usefulness of home spirometry in children with nonspecific

  2. Respiratory symptoms necessitating spirometry among soldiers with Iraq/Afghanistan war lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szema, Anthony M; Salihi, Walid; Savary, Khalil; Chen, John J

    2011-09-01

    New-onset asthma rates are higher among US soldiers deployed to Iraq/Afghanistan than stateside, but overall respiratory symptom and spirometry rates among soldiers returning from Iraq/Afghanistan have not yet been addressed. We determined these rates in soldiers deployed to Iraq/Afghanistan versus troops stationed elsewhere. Retrospective review of active-duty soldiers (2004 to 2010) registered at Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Northport, New York, with Long Island/New York City zip codes. Subjects were examined by physicians or physicians' assistants. We counted number of spirometries, which required respiratory symptoms, and the provider was required to submit a diagnosis as part of the request process. Twenty-five percent of 7151 troops went to Iraq/Afghanistan (n = 1816) and 75% went elsewhere (n = 5335), with more smokers in the Iraq/Afghanistan group (16.1% vs 3.3%). Rates of symptoms and spirometry were 14.5% and 1.8%, for Iraq/Afghanistan, versus troops deployed elsewhere, respectively (P Afghanistan war lung injury is common and rates of symptoms leading to a diagnosis requiring spirometry are high. (C)2011The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

  3. Cystic lung disease: a comparison of cystic size, as seen on expiratory and inspiratory HRCT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Nam; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Choi, Seok Jin; Goo, Jin Mo

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effects of respiration on the size of lung cysts by comparing inspiratory and expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans. The authors evaluated the size of cystic lesions, as seen on paired inspiratory and expiratory HRCT scans, in 54 patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (n = 3), pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis (n = 4), confluent centrilobular emphysema (n = 9), paraseptal emphysema and bullae (n = 16), cystic bronchiectasis (n = 13), and honeycombing (n = 9). Using paired inspiratory and expiratory HRCT scans obtained at the corresponding anatomic level, a total of 270 cystic lesions were selected simultaneously on the basis of five lesions per lung disease. Changes in lung cyst size observed during respiration were assessed by two radiologists. In a limited number of cases (n = 11), pathologic specimens were obtained by open lung biopsy or lobectomy. All cystic lesions in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis, lymphangiomyomatosis, cystic bronchiectasis, honeycombing, and confluent centrilobular emphysema became smaller on expiration, but in two cases of paraseptal emphysema and bullae there was no change. In cases in which expiratory CT scans indicate that cysts have become smaller, cystic lesions may communicate with the airways. To determine whether, for cysts and cystic lesions, this connection does in fact exist, paired inspiratory and expiratory HRCT scans are necessary

  4. Cystic lung disease: a comparison of cystic size, as seen on expiratory and inspiratory HRCT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Nam; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Nam, Kyung Jin [Donga University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seok Jin [Inje University College of Medicine, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To determine the effects of respiration on the size of lung cysts by comparing inspiratory and expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans. The authors evaluated the size of cystic lesions, as seen on paired inspiratory and expiratory HRCT scans, in 54 patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (n = 3), pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis (n = 4), confluent centrilobular emphysema (n = 9), paraseptal emphysema and bullae (n = 16), cystic bronchiectasis (n = 13), and honeycombing (n = 9). Using paired inspiratory and expiratory HRCT scans obtained at the corresponding anatomic level, a total of 270 cystic lesions were selected simultaneously on the basis of five lesions per lung disease. Changes in lung cyst size observed during respiration were assessed by two radiologists. In a limited number of cases (n = 11), pathologic specimens were obtained by open lung biopsy or lobectomy. All cystic lesions in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis, lymphangiomyomatosis, cystic bronchiectasis, honeycombing, and confluent centrilobular emphysema became smaller on expiration, but in two cases of paraseptal emphysema and bullae there was no change. In cases in which expiratory CT scans indicate that cysts have become smaller, cystic lesions may communicate with the airways. To determine whether, for cysts and cystic lesions, this connection does in fact exist, paired inspiratory and expiratory HRCT scans are necessary.

  5. Computer quantification of “angle of collapse” on maximum expiratory flow volume curve for diagnosing asthma-COPD overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang, Mengshuang Xie, Shuang Dou, Liwei Cui, Wei Xiao Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Background: In a previous study, we demonstrated that asthma patients with signs of emphysema on quantitative computed tomography (CT fulfill the diagnosis of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS. However, quantitative CT measurements of emphysema are not routinely available for patients with chronic airway disease, which limits their application. Spirometry was a widely used examination tool in clinical settings and shows emphysema as a sharp angle in the maximum expiratory flow volume (MEFV curve, called the “angle of collapse (AC”. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of the AC in the diagnosis of emphysema and ACOS. Methods: This study included 716 participants: 151 asthma patients, 173 COPD patients, and 392 normal control subjects. All the participants underwent pulmonary function tests. COPD and asthma patients also underwent quantitative CT measurements of emphysema. The AC was measured using computer models based on Matlab software. The value of the AC in the diagnosis of emphysema and ACOS was evaluated using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis. Results: The AC of COPD patients was significantly lower than that of asthma patients and control subjects. The AC was significantly negatively correlated with emphysema index (EI; r=-0.666, P<0.001, and patients with high EI had a lower AC than those with low EI. The ROC curve analysis showed that the AC had higher diagnostic efficiency for high EI (area under the curve =0.876 than did other spirometry parameters. In asthma patients, using the AC ≤137° as a surrogate criterion for the diagnosis of ACOS, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.5% and 89.1%, respectively. Conclusion: The AC on the MEFV curve quantified by computer models correlates with the extent of emphysema. The AC may become a

  6. A retrospective study of two populations to test a simple rule for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohar, Jill A; Yawn, Barbara P; Ruppel, Gregg L; Donohue, James F

    2016-06-04

    Chronic lung disease is common and often under-diagnosed. To test a simple rule for conducting spirometry we reviewed spirograms from two populations, occupational medicine evaluations (OME) conducted by Saint Louis and Wake Forest Universities at 3 sites (n = 3260, mean age 64.14 years, 95 % CI 58.94-69.34, 97 % men) and conducted by Wake Forest University preop clinic (POC) at one site (n = 845, mean age 62.10 years, 95 % CI 50.46-73.74, 57 % men). This retrospective review of database information that the first author collected prospectively identified rates, types, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive value for lung function abnormalities and associated mortality rate found when conducting spirometry based on the 20/40 rule (≥20 years of smoking in those aged ≥ 40 years) in the OME population. To determine the reproducibility of the 20/40 rule for conducting spirometry, the rule was applied to the POC population. A lung function abnormality was found in 74 % of the OME population and 67 % of the POC population. Sensitivity of the rule was 85 % for an obstructive pattern and 77 % for any abnormality on spirometry. Positive and negative predictive values of the rule for a spirometric abnormality were 74 and 55 %, respectively. Patients with an obstructive pattern were at greater risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.39 [confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.93] vs. normal) and death (hazard ratio (HR) 1.53, 95 % CI 1.20-1.84) than subjects with normal spirometry. Restricted spirometry patterns were also associated with greater risk of coronary disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.7 [CI 1.23-2.35]) and death (Hazard ratio 1.40, 95 % CI 1.08-1.72). Smokers (≥ 20 pack years) age ≥ 40 years are at an increased risk for lung function abnormalities and those abnormalities are associated with greater presence of coronary heart disease and increased all-cause mortality. Use of the 20/40 rule could provide a

  7. Inter-regional changes in the performance and interpretation of spirometry in Spain: 3E study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Campos, José Luis; Soriano, Joan B; Calle, Myriam

    2014-11-01

    This report shows the results of a nation-wide survey on spirometry to assess regional differences. Observational cross-sectional study conducted by means of a telephone survey in 805 primary care (PC) and specialized centers (SC) in all regions. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test. The results showed major differences between regions. Most centers had 1-2 spirometers. The number of spirometry tests per week ranged from 2 to 8.9 in PC and between 34.3 and 98.3 in SC. Some training had been given in most centers (63.6-100% in PC and 60.0-100% in SC) but not on a regular basis. Most centers used several short-acting bronchodilators for the bronchodilation test, but with insufficient inhalations (2.0-3.8 in PC and 2.0-3.3 in SC) and frequently incorrect waiting time (29.4-83.3% PC and 33.3-87.5% in SC). Daily calibration was not performed in all centers (0-100% in PC and 66.7-100% in SC). Significant inter-regional differences in spirometry quality criteria were observed, with 6 or more criteria met in 9.1-84.6% of PC centers and 37.5-100% in SC. Our results show the current situation of spirometry in primary and specialized care in Spain, highlighting considerable variability and areas for improvement. This information should be considered by health officials to improve the quality and accessibility of such tests. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Spirometry training courses: Content, delivery and assessment - a position statement from the Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanney, Maureen P; O'Dea, Christopher A; Ingram, Emily R; Rodwell, Leanne T; Borg, Brigitte M

    2017-10-01

    Spirometry training courses are provided by health services and training organizations to enable widespread use of spirometry testing for patient care or for monitoring health. The primary outcome of spirometry training courses should be to enable participants to perform spirometry to international best practice, including testing of subjects, quality assurance and interpretation of results. Where valid results are not achieved or quality assurance programmes identify errors in devices, participants need to be able to adequately manage these issues in accordance with best practice. It is important that potential participants are confident in the integrity of the course they attend and that the course meets their expectations in terms of training. This position statement lists the content that the Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science (ANZSRS) has identified as required in a spirometry training course to adequately meet the primary outcomes mentioned above. The content requirements outlined in this position statement are based on the current international spirometry standards set out by the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. Furthermore, recommendations around course delivery for theoretical and practical elements of spirometry testing and post-course assessment are outlined in this statement. © 2017 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  9. Pharmacologic Interventions to Improve Splanchnic Oxygenation During Ventilation with Positive End-Expiratory Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournell, A.; Scheeren, T. W. L.; Picker, O.; Schwarte, L. A.; Wolf, M; Bucher, HU; Rudin, M; VanHuffel, S; Wolf, U; Bruley, DF; Harrison, DK

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is an indispensable tool in the management of respiratory failure to preserve or improve lung function and systemic oxygenation. However, PEEP per se may also, as has been shown in experimental animals, impair regional

  10. Exogenous stimuli and circadian peak expiratory flow variation in allergic asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G. G.; Postma, D. S.; van der Heide, S.; de Reus, D. M.; Roorda, R. J.; Koëter, G. H.; van Aalderen, W. M.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of exogenous factors in the home on the circadian variation of airway obstruction has not been fully assessed in children with asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of exogenous stimuli to the degree of peak expiratory flow (PEF) variability during 24

  11. Seasonal variations in house dust mite influence the circadian peak expiratory flow amplitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, DS; vanderHeide, S; deReus, DM; Koeter, GH; vanAalderen, WMC; Meijer, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether seasonal differences in house dust mite (HDM) allergen exposure influence the circadian peak expiratory flow (PEF) amplitude in asthmatic children. Asthmatic children (n = 25) with a solitary allergy to HDM were studied in spring and in autumn. All

  12. Exogenous stimuli and circadian peak expiratory flow variation in allergic asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, DS; VanderHeide, S; DeReus, DM; Koeter, GH; VanAalderen, WMC; Meijer, G.

    The influence of exogenous factors in the home on the circadian variation of airway obstruction has not been fully assessed in children with asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of exogenous stimuli to the degree of peak expiratory flow (PEF) variability during 24

  13. Dead space and slope indices from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension-volume curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Kars (Alice); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); Th. Stijnen (Theo); J. de Vries; A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); C. Hilvering

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe slope of phase 3 and three noninvasively determined dead space estimates derived from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) versus volume curve, including the Bohr dead space (VD,Bohr), the Fowler dead space (VD,Fowler) and pre-interface expirate

  14. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Handoko, Maureen; Fooshee, David; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved

  15. Spirometry utilisation among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette

    2015-01-01

    performed. RESULTS: A total of 40,969 adults initiated medication targeting obstructive lung medication in 2008 in Denmark. The mean age of the cohort was 55.6 years (SD18.7) and approximately half of the mediations users had spirometry test performed. Initiating several types of medication targeting......UNLABELLED: This PhD thesis was written during my employment at the Research Unit of General Practice in Odense, University of Southern Denmark. It comprises an overview and three papers, all published or submitted for publication in international peer-reviewed scientific journals. BACKGROUND: Non...... with pharmacotherapy targeting obstructive lung disease and only few have additional tests conducted, although the predictive value of respiratory symptoms for diagnosing obstructive lung disease has proven to be low. Spirometry is recommended as the gold standard for confirming obstructive lung disease, and testing...

  16. [Further examination of COPD using spirometry, respiratory function test, and impulse oscillometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Masaru; Kitada, Junya

    2011-10-01

    Spirometry is essential for diagnosis and staging of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristic of physiological change of small airways in COPD is heterogeneous distribution of small airway narrowing, resulting in air-trapping and nonhomogeneous ventilation. FEF25-75, residual volume/total lung capacity, delta N2 in phase III slope of single breath N2 washout test, closing volume, static and dynamic compliance, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (transfer factor) are measured for detecting small airways disease. Impulse oscillometry is also useful for assessment of small airways disease, especially indices of frequent resonance (Fres) and frequent dependent of resistance change of R5-R20; resistance at 5 Hz minus resistance at 20 Hz. Impulse oscillometry seems to have a complemental role of spirometry in managing COPD.

  17. Spirometry Reference Equations from the HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVange, Lisa; Davis, Sonia M; Hankinson, John; Enright, Paul; Wilson, Rebbecca; Barr, R Graham; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kalhan, Ravi; Lemus, Hector; Ni, Ai; Smith, Lewis J; Talavera, Gregory A

    2017-10-15

    Accurate reference values for spirometry are important because the results are used for diagnosing common chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, estimating physiologic impairment, and predicting all-cause mortality. Reference equations have been established for Mexican Americans but not for others with Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. To develop spirometry reference equations for adult Hispanic/Latino background groups in the United States. The HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos) recruited a population-based probability sample of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 years living in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. Participants self-identified as being of Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, or Central or South American background. Spirometry was performed using standardized methods with central quality control monitoring. Spirometric measures from a subset of 6,425 never-smoking participants without respiratory symptoms or disease were modeled as a function of sex, age, height, and Hispanic/Latino background to produce background-specific reference equations for the predicted value and lower limit of normal. Dominican and Puerto Rican Americans had substantially lower predicted and lower limit of normal values for FVC and FEV 1 than those in other Hispanic/Latino background groups and also than Mexican American values from NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). For patients of Dominican and Puerto Rican background who present with pulmonary symptoms in clinical practice, use of background-specific spirometry reference equations may provide more appropriate predicted and lower limit of normal values, enabling more accurate diagnoses of abnormality and physiologic impairment.

  18. The value of spirometry and exercise challenge test to diagnose and monitor children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaart, Lara S; Roukema, Jolt; Merkus, Peter Jfm

    2015-03-01

    Asthma is defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways with characteristic symptoms including recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. It may result in abnormalities of ventilator function, which can be assessed by different pulmonary function tests. In this case report, we present a 15-year-old boy with asthma and illustrate the value and limitations of spirometry and exercise challenge test in daily practice.

  19. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or both? Diagnostic labeling and spirometry in primary care patients aged 40 years or more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melbye H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hasse Melbye1, Elin Drivenes1, Lene G Dalbak2, Tone Leinan1, Svein Høegh-Henrichsen2, Anders Østrem21General Practice Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 2General Practice Research Unit, Department of Health and Society, University of Oslo, NorwayAims: To describe symptoms and lung function in patients registered with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in primary care and to examine how spirometry findings fit with general practitioners’ (GPs diagnoses.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 years with a diagnosis of asthma or COPD registered in the electronic medical record during the previous 5 years were recruited at seven GP offices in Norway in 2009–2010. Registered diagnosis, spirometry results, comorbidity, and reported symptoms were compared.Results: Among 376 patients, 62% were women. Based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases criteria, a spirometry diagnosis of COPD could be made in 68.1% of the patients with a previous COPD diagnosis and in 17.1% of those diagnosed with asthma only (P < 0.001. The κ agreement between last clinical diagnosis of COPD and COPD based on spirometry was 0.50. A restrictive spirometry pattern was found in 19.4% and more frequently in patients diagnosed with both asthma and COPD (23.9% than in patients diagnosed with COPD only (6.8%, P = 0.003.Conclusion: The ability of GPs to differentiate between asthma and COPD seems to have considerably improved during the last decade, probably due to the dissemination of spirometry and guidelines for COPD diagnosis. A diagnosis of COPD that cannot be confirmed by spirometry represents a challenge in clinical practice, in particular when a restrictive pattern on spirometry is found.Keywords: asthma, COPD, diagnosis, primary care

  20. Modern Spirometry Supports Anesthetic Management in Small Animal Clinical Practice: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calice, Ivana; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Modern spirometry, like no other monitoring technique, allows insight into breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Spirometers continuously measure volume, airway pressure, and flow while calculating and continuously displaying respiratory system compliance and resistance in the form of loops. The aim of this case series is to show how observation of spirometric loops, similar to electrocardiogram or CO2 curve monitoring, can improve safety of anesthetic management in small animals. Spirometric monitoring cases described in this case series are based on use of the anaesthesia monitor Capnomac Ultima with a side stream spirometry sensor. The cases illustrate how recognition and understanding of spirometric loops allows for easy diagnosis of iatrogenic pneumothorax, incorrect ventilator settings, leaks in the system, kinked or partially obstructed endotracheal tube, and spontaneous breathing interfering with intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The case series demonstrates the potential of spirometry to improve the quality and safety of anesthetic management, and, hence, its use can be recommended during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation and procedures in which interference with ventilation can be expected.

  1. Measurement of total lung capacity : a comparison of spiral CT and spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Kyung Il; Park, Kyung Ju; Lee, Eh Hyung; Yune, Heun Young; Suh, Jung Ho; Choe, Kyu Ok; Lim, Tae Hwan; Chung, In Hyuk

    1996-01-01

    To determine the potential of spiral CT as a functional imaging modality of the lung aside from its proven value in morphological depiction. Spiral CT scan was performed in ten normal female and nine normal male adults (mean age: 39, height: 163 cm, weight: 62 kg ) after single full breath-holding. Three dimensional lung images were reconstructed(minimal threshold value: -1,000HU, maximal threshold values: -150, 250, -350, -450 HU) to obtain total lung volume(TLV) on a histogram. Total lung volume measured by spiral CT was compared with TLV obtained by spirometry. Mean TLV measured by spirometry was 5.62L and TLV measured by CT at maximal threshold values of -150, -250, -350, and -450 HU was 5.53, 5.33, 5.15, and 4.98L, respectively. Mean absolute differences between the modalities of 0.17L(3%), 0.32L(5.6%), 0.48L(8.5%), 0.65L(11.5%) were statistically significant(p<0.001). Linear regression coefficients between the modalities were 0.99, 0.97, 095, and 0.94 and no statistically significant differences in accuracy of threshold levels in the estimation of lung volume(r=0.99, standard error=0.034L in all) were seen. TLV measured by spiral CT closely approximated that measured by spirometry. Spiral CT may be useful as a means of evaluating lung function

  2. Effects of a 12-month multi-faceted mentoring intervention on knowledge, quality, and usage of spirometry in primary care: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Moosa, Dilshad; MacPherson, Ana; Allen, Christopher; Tamari, Itamar E

    2016-04-21

    Asthma is among the most common chronic diseases in adults. International guidelines have emphasized the importance of regular spirometry for asthma control evaluation. However, spirometry use in primary care remains low across jurisdictions. We sought to design and evaluate a knowledge translation intervention to address both the poor quality of spirometry and the underuse of spirometry in primary care. We designed a 1-year intervention consisting of initial interactive education and hands-on training followed by unstructured peer expert mentoring (through an online portal, email, telephone, videoconference, fax, and/or in-person). We recruited physician and allied health mentees from across primary care sites in Ontario, Canada. We compared spirometry-related knowledge immediately before and after the 1-year intervention period and the quality of spirometry testing and the usage of spirometry in patients with asthma in the year before and the year of the intervention. Seven of 10 (70 %) invited sites participated, including 25/90 (28 %) invited allied health mentees and 23/68 (34 %) invited physician mentees. We recruited 7 physician mentors and 4 allied health mentors to form 3 mentor-mentee pods. Spirometry knowledge scores increased from 21.4 +/- 3.1 pre- to 27.3 +/- 3.5 (out of 35) (p Spirometry acceptability and repeatability criteria were met by 59/191 (30.9 %) spirometries and 86/193 (44.6 %) spirometries [odds ratio 1.7 (1.0, 3.0)], in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Spirometry was ordered in 75/512 (14.6 %) and 129/336 (38.4 %) respiratory visits (p spirometry in real world primary care settings. A future controlled study should assess the impact of this intervention on patient outcomes, its cost-effectiveness, and its sustainability.

  3. Interaction between intra-abdominal pressure and positive-end expiratory pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamili Anbar Torquato

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantify the interaction between increased intra-abdominal pressure and Positive-End Expiratory Pressure. METHODS: In 30 mechanically ventilated ICU patients with a fixed tidal volume, respiratory system plateau and abdominal pressure were measured at a Positive-End Expiratory Pressure level of zero and 10 cm H2O. The measurements were repeated after placing a 5 kg weight on the patients' belly. RESULTS: After the addition of 5 kg to the patients' belly at zero Positive-End Expiratory Pressure, both intra-abdominal pressure (p<0.001 and plateau pressures (p=0.005 increased significantly. Increasing the Positive-End Expiratory Pressure levels from zero to 10 cm H2O without weight on the belly did not result in any increase in intra-abdominal pressure (p=0.165. However, plateau pressures increased significantly (p< 0.001. Increasing Positive-End Expiratory Pressure from zero to 10 cm H2O and adding 5 kg to the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 8.7 to 16.8 (p<0.001 and plateau pressure from 18.26 to 27.2 (p<0.001. Maintaining Positive-End Expiratory Pressure at 10 cm H2O and placing 5 kg on the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 12.3 +/- 1.7 to 16.8 +/- 1.7 (p<0.001 but did not increase plateau pressure (26.6+/-1.2 to 27.2 +/-1.1 -p=0.83. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of a 5kg weight onto the abdomen significantly increased both IAP and the airway plateau pressure, confirming that intra-abdominal hypertension elevates the plateau pressure. However, plateau pressure alone cannot be considered a good indicator for the detection of elevated intra-abdominal pressure in patients under mechanical ventilation using PEEP. In these patients, the intra-abdominal pressure must also be measured.

  4. Bronchodilator response cut-off points and FEV 0.75 reference values for spirometry in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burity, Edjane Figueiredo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; Andrade, Armèle Dornelas de; Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim de

    2016-01-01

    To determine the cut-off points for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% bronchodilator responses in healthy preschool children and to generate reference values for FEV0.75. This was a cross-sectional community-based study involving children 3-5 years of age. Healthy preschool children were selected by a standardized questionnaire. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator use. The cut-off point of the response was defined as the 95th percentile of the change in each parameter. We recruited 266 children, 160 (60%) of whom were able to perform acceptable, reproducible expiratory maneuvers before and after bronchodilator use. The mean age and height were 57.78 ± 7.86 months and 106.56 ± 6.43 cm, respectively. The success rate for FEV0.5 was 35%, 68%, and 70% in the 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, respectively. The 95th percentile of the change in the percentage of the predicted value in response to bronchodilator use was 11.6%, 16.0%, 8.5%, and 35.5% for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75%, respectively. Our results provide cut-off points for bronchodilator responsiveness for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% in healthy preschool children. In addition, we proposed gender-specific reference equations for FEV0.75. Our findings could improve the physiological assessment of respiratory function in preschool children. Determinar os pontos de corte de resposta ao broncodilatador do VEF1, VEF0,75, VEF0,5 e FEF25-75% em crianças pré-escolares saudáveis e gerar valores de referência para o VEF0,75. Foi realizado um estudo transversal de base comunitária em crianças de 3-5 anos de idade. Pré-escolares saudáveis foram selecionados por um questionário padronizado. Foi realizada espirometria antes e depois do uso de broncodilatador. Foram definidos os pontos de corte dessa resposta como o percentil 95 de variação em cada parâmetro. Foram recrutadas 266 crianças, e 160 (60,0%) foram capazes de gerar manobras expiratórias aceitáveis e reprodut

  5. Segmentation of expiratory and inspiratory sounds in baby cry audio recordings using hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucouturier, Jean-Julien; Nonaka, Yulri; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    The paper describes an application of machine learning techniques to identify expiratory and inspiration phases from the audio recording of human baby cries. Crying episodes were recorded from 14 infants, spanning four vocalization contexts in their first 12 months of age; recordings from three individuals were annotated manually to identify expiratory and inspiratory sounds and used as training examples to segment automatically the recordings of the other 11 individuals. The proposed algorithm uses a hidden Markov model architecture, in which state likelihoods are estimated either with Gaussian mixture models or by converting the classification decisions of a support vector machine. The algorithm yields up to 95% classification precision (86% average), and its ability generalizes over different babies, different ages, and vocalization contexts. The technique offers an opportunity to quantify expiration duration, count the crying rate, and other time-related characteristics of baby crying for screening, diagnosis, and research purposes over large populations of infants.

  6. Focal airtrapping at expiratory high-resolution CT: comparison with pulmonary function tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Hast, J.; Heussel, C.P.; Mildenberger, P.; Thelen, M.; Schlegel, J.

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine prevalence, extent, and severity of focal airtrapping at expiratory high-resolution CT, and to compare focal airtrapping with age, gender, pulmonary function tests, and blood gas analysis. Two-hundred seventeen patients with and without pulmonary disease underwent paired inspiratory/expiratory high-resolution CT. Six scan pairs with corresponding scan levels were visually assessed for focal - not diffuse - airtrapping using a four-point scale. Pulmonary function tests and blood gas analysis were available for correlation in all patients (mean interval 5 days). Focal airtrapping with lower lung predominance was observed in 80 % of patients. Twenty-six of 26 patients with restrictive lung function impairment exhibited focal airtrapping (mean score 2.4), whereas only 72 of 98 (74 %) patients with obstruction did (mean score 1.5; p < 0.05). Fifty-eight of 70 (83 %) patients with normal lung function (mean score 1.8) and 19 of 23 (83 %) patients with mixed impairment (mean score 1.8) had focal airtrapping. Focal airtrapping showed negative correlations with static lung volumes (-0.27 to -0.37; p < 0.001) in all patients and moderate positive correlations with dynamic parameters (0.3-0.4; p < 0.001) in patients with obstruction. No significant correlations were found with age, gender, and blood gas analysis. Visual assessment of focal - not diffuse - airtrapping at expiratory high-resolution CT does not correlate with physiological evidence of obstruction as derived from pulmonary function tests since the perception of focal airtrapping requires an adequate expiratory increase in lung density. (orig.)

  7. Dead space and slope indices from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension-volume curve

    OpenAIRE

    Kars, Alice; Bogaard, Jan; Stijnen, Theo; Vries, J.; Verbraak, Anton; Hilvering, C.

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe slope of phase 3 and three noninvasively determined dead space estimates derived from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) versus volume curve, including the Bohr dead space (VD,Bohr), the Fowler dead space (VD,Fowler) and pre-interface expirate (PIE), were investigated in 28 healthy control subjects, 12 asthma and 29 emphysema patients (20 severely obstructed and nine moderately obstructed) with the aim to establish diagnostic value. Because breath volume and frequenc...

  8. Thoracoabdominal mobility evaluation by photogrammetry in newborns after expiratory flow increase technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Isabel de Araújo Guerra

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Expiratory flow increase is a maneuver of respiratory physical therapy that promotes flow direction to the upper airways however, when applied in newborns, it may result in changes of thoracoabdominal mobility. Objective: To evaluate the thoracoabdominal mobility by photogrammetry in newborns after expiratory flow increase technique. Methods: Experimental blind study performed with newborns in supine position on a support table with upper limbs flexed, abducted and externally rotated and hip flexed at 110°. Adhesive markers were allocated for geometric delimitation of the thoracoabdominal compartment and expiratory flow increase technique was performed for 5 minutes with the therapist’s hands on the thorax and abdomen. Newborns were filmed before and after the maneuver and the frames were analyzed in AutoCAD® software by a blinded investigator at the time of the procedure. The largest and the smallest thoracoabdominal area were expressed in cm2 and the mean values were compared between two moments (pre and post maneuver by paired t test. Results: Twenty newborns with a mean age of 39 weeks were included. Before the maneuver, thoracoabdominal area was 56.1 cm2 during expiration and 59.7 cm2 during inspiration, and after the maneuver the value was 56.2 cm2 during expiration and 59.8 cm2 during inspiration, with no statistical difference between before and after (p = 0.97, p = 0.92, respectively. Conclusion: Results demonstrate that expiratory flow increase technique does not seem to change thoracoabdominal mobility of healthy newborns.

  9. Impact of humidification and nebulization during expiratory limb protection: an experimental bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnelier, Alexandre; Lellouche, François; Bouchard, Pierre Alexandre; L'Her, Erwan

    2013-08-01

    Different filtering devices are used during mechanical ventilation to avoid dysfunction of flow and pressure transducers or for airborne microorganisms containment. Water condensates, resulting from the use of humidifiers, but also residual nebulization particles may have a major influence on expiratory limb resistance. To evaluate the influence of nebulization and active humidification on the resistance of expiratory filters. A respiratory system analog was constructed using a test lung, an ICU ventilator, heated humidifiers, and a piezoelectric nebulizer. Humidifiers were connected to different types of circuits (unheated, mono-heated, new-generation and old-generation bi-heated). Five filter types were evaluated: electrostatic, heat-and-moisture exchanger, standard, specific, and internal heated high-efficiency particulate air [HEPA] filter. Baseline characteristics were obtained from each dry filter. Differential pressure measurements were carried out after 24 hours of continuous in vitro use for each condition, and after 24 hours of use with an old-generation bi-heated circuit without nebulization. While using unheated circuits, measurements had to be interrupted before 24 hours for all the filtering devices except the internal heated HEPA filter. The heat-and-moisture exchangers occluded before 24 hours with the unheated and mono-heated circuits. The circuit type, nebulization practice, and duration of use did not influence the internal heated HEPA filter resistance. Expiratory limb filtration is likely to induce several major adverse events. Expiratory filter resistance increase is due mainly to the humidification circuit type, rather than to nebulization. If filtration is mandatory while using an unheated circuit, a dedicated filter should be used for ≤ 24 hours, or a heated HEPA for a longer duration.

  10. Regional specific mean expiratory gas flow from Slmsub(Kr) equilibrium inhalation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.; Causer, D.A.; McIntosh, J.A.; Godfrey, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new method of analysing the data available from routine sup(81m) Kr equilibrium inhalation investigations has been developed. The data for analysis are acquired from a gamma camera in the form of a sequential series of images from which multiple breath activity-time curves are generated for eight regions in the lung. The method is based on a description of the behaviour of the radioactive gas in the lung using a mathematical model. Values of specific mean expiratory gas flow, that is mean expiratory gas flow per unit lung volume, are calculated from the application of the model to the expiratory phase only only of a single breath activity-time curve which is generated from the multiple breath activity-time curve using post-acquisition gating. This method overcomes the problem of non-uniform inspiratory concentration of tracer gas experienced in previously reported techniques of analysing inhalation data obtained using poorly soluble radioactive gases. The model is shown, in simulation studies, to be an adequate description of the behaviour of radioactive gas in the lung and the analysis technique is shown, in clinical studies, to be both reproducible and sensitive to disease state. (orig.)

  11. Inspiratory and expiratory computed tomographic volumetry for lung volume reduction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimura, Yuki; Chen, Fengshi; Sonobe, Makoto; Date, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) volumetry has been introduced into the field of thoracic surgery, and a combination of inspiratory and expiratory 3D-CT volumetry provides useful data on regional pulmonary function as well as the volume of individual lung lobes. We report herein a case of a 62-year-old man with severe emphysema who had undergone lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) to assess this technique as a tool for the evaluation of regional lung function and volume before and after LVRS. His postoperative pulmonary function was maintained in good condition despite a gradual slight decrease 2 years after LVRS. This trend was also confirmed by a combination of inspiratory and expiratory 3D-CT volumetry. We confirm that a combination of inspiratory and expiratory 3D-CT volumetry might be effective for the preoperative assessment of LVRS in order to determine the amount of lung tissue to be resected as well as for postoperative evaluation. This novel technique could, therefore, be used more widely to assess local lung function.

  12. A home monitoring program including real-time wireless home spirometry in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a pilot study on experiences and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, C C; Wapenaar, M; Miedema, J R; Geelhoed, J J M; Chandoesing, P P; Wijsenbeek, M S

    2018-05-29

    In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), home monitoring experiences are limited, not yet real-time available nor implemented in daily care. We evaluated feasibility and potential barriers of a new home monitoring program with real-time wireless home spirometry in IPF. Ten patients with IPF were asked to test this home monitoring program, including daily home spirometry, for four weeks. Measurements of home and hospital spirometry showed good agreement. All patients considered real-time wireless spirometry useful and highly feasible. Both patients and researchers suggested relatively easy solutions for the identified potential barriers regarding real-time home monitoring in IPF.

  13. The correlation between the paired inspiratory and expiratory three-dimensional quantitative CT and pulmonary function test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Xi; Song Wei; Xue Huadan; Song Lan; Yang Liang; Jin Zhengyu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between the paired inspiratory and expiratory quantitative CT and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: A total of 84 patients with COPD were enrolled. For each patient, CT scan was performed in deep inspiration and expiration. Using automatic post-processing software, a three-dimension quantitative measurement was employed to assess the CT parameters of emphysema and air trapping. The correlation between CT and PFT was evaluated by the Spearman rank correlation test and multivariate linear regression analysis. Results: The percent 1 [Perc_1, (-984.28 ± 17.93) HU] and percent 15 [Perc_1_5, (-948.35 ± 22.26) HU] from the CT parameters of emphysema were positively correlated with the forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted (FEV_1%, 48.69 ± 23, 47), the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second over forced vital capacity [FEV_1/FVC, (45.89 ± 15.36)%, r = 0.45-0.67, P < 0.01], was negatively correlated with the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity [RV/TLC, (61.32 ± 14.48)%]. The other CT parameters of emphysema index (EI) and the parameters of air trapping, the change in relative lung volume with attenuation values from -860 to -950 HU [RVC_-_8_6_0_-_-_9_5_0, (17.66 ± 22.36)%], the expiration to inspiration ratio of mean lung density (MLD_e_x_/_i_n, 0.93 ± 0.06), the expiration to inspiration ratio of lung volume (LV_e_x_/_i_n, 0.71 ± 0.14) had negative correlations with logFEV_1%, FEV_1/FVC (r = -0.48--0.69, P < 0.01) and positive correlations with RV/TLC (r = 0.41-0.66, P < 0.01). The further univariate linear regressions showed that EI, Perc_1, Pere_1_5, RVC_-_8_6_0_-_-_9_5_0, MLD_e_x_/_i_n, LV_e_x_/_i_n were correlated with the parameters of PFTs (R square values of the regression equation, ranged from 0.27 to 0.66, P < 0.01). After the pairwise combinations of the parameters of emphysema and air trapping, multivariate stepwise

  14. The diagnosis of COPD in primary care; gender differences and the role of spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N J; Patel, I S; Partridge, M R

    2016-02-01

    Females with exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease now account for one half of all hospital admissions for that condition and rates have been increasing over the last few decades. Differences in presentations of disease between genders have been shown in several conditions and this study explores whether there are inter gender biases in probable diagnoses in those suspected to have COPD. 445 individuals with a provisional diagnosis by their General Practitioner of "suspected COPD" or "definite COPD" were referred to a community Respiratory Assessment unit (CRAU) for tests including spirometry. Gender, demographics, respiratory symptoms and respiratory medical history were recorded. The provisional diagnoses were compared with the final diagnosis made after spirometry and respiratory specialist nurse review and the provisional diagnosis was either confirmed as correct or refuted as unlikely. Significantly more men (87.5%) had their diagnosis of "definite COPD" confirmed compared to 73.9% of women (p = 0.021). When the GP suggested a provisional diagnosis of "suspected COPD" (n = 265) at referral, this was confirmed in 60.9% of men and only 43.2% of women (p = 0.004). There was a different symptom pattern between genders with women being more likely to report allergies, symptoms starting earlier in life, and being less likely than men to report breathlessness as the main symptom. These results may suggest a difference between genders in some of the clinical features of COPD and a difference in likelihood of a GPs provisional diagnosis of COPD being correct. The study reiterates the absolute importance of spirometry in the diagnosis of COPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spirometry as a motivational tool to improve smoking cessation rates: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J; Niewoehner, Dennis; Kane, Robert L; MacDonald, Roderick; Joseph, Anne M

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining spirometric testing and providing those results to individuals who smoke has been advocated as a motivational tool to improve smoking cessation. However, its effectiveness is not known. We conducted a systematic review to determine if this approach improves rates of smoking cessation. Data sources included MEDLINE (1966 to October 2005), the Cochrane Library, and experts in the field. Eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) enrolled at least 25 smokers per arm, evaluated spirometry with associated counseling or in combination with other treatments, followed subjects at least 6 months, and provided smoking abstinence rates. Results from nonrandomized studies also were summarized. The primary outcome was patient-reported long-term (at least 6 months) sustained abstinence with biological validation. Additional outcomes included self-reported abstinence and point-prevalence abstinence. Seven RCTs (N = 6,052 subjects) met eligibility criteria. Follow-up duration ranged from 9 to 36 months. In six trials, the intervention group received concomitant treatments previously demonstrated to increase cessation independently. The range of abstinence was 3%-14% for control subjects and 7%-39% among intervention groups, statistically significantly in favor of intervention in four studies. The only RCT that assessed the independent contribution of spirometry in combination with counseling demonstrated a nonsignificant 1% improvement in patient-reported point-prevalence abstinence at 12 months in the group that received spirometry plus counseling versus counseling alone (6.5% versus 5.5%). Findings from observational studies were mixed, and the lack of controls makes interpretation problematic. Available evidence is insufficient to determine whether obtaining spirometric values and providing that information to patients improves smoking cessation compared with other smoking cessation methods. Spirometric values are of limited benefit as a predictor of smoking

  16. Short-term effects of positive expiratory airway pressure in patients being weaned from mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Mello Rieder

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility and the cardiorespiratory effects of using positive expiratory airway pressure, a physiotherapeutic tool, in comparison with a T-tube, to wean patients from mechanical ventilation. METHODS/DESIGN: A prospective, randomized, cross-over study. SETTING: Two intensive care units. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: We evaluated forty patients who met weaning criteria and had been mechanically-ventilated for more than 48 hours, mean age 59 years, including 23 males. All patients were submitted to the T-tube and Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure devices, at 7 cm H2O, during a 30-minute period. Cardiorespiratory variables including work of breathing, respiratory rate (rr, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, heart rate (hr, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (SAP, DAP, MAP were measured in the first and thirtieth minutes. The condition was analyzed as an entire sample set (n=40 and was also divided into subconditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=14 and non-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=26 categories. Comparisons were made using a t-test and Analysis of Variance. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: Our data showed an increase in work of breathing in the first and thirtieth minutes in the EPAP condition (0.86+ 0.43 and 1.02+1.3 as compared with the T-tube condition (0.25+0.26 and 0.26+0.35 (p<0.05, verified by the flow-sensor monitor (values in J/L. No statistical differences were observed when comparing the Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure and T-tube conditions with regard to cardiorespiratory measurements. The same result was observed for both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subconditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that, in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation, the use of a fixed level of Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure caused an increase in work of

  17. A Multiphase Non-Linear Mixed Effects Model: An Application to Spirometry after Lung Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2014-01-01

    In medical sciences, we often encounter longitudinal temporal relationships that are non-linear in nature. The influence of risk factors may also change across longitudinal follow-up. A system of multiphase non-linear mixed effects model is presented to model temporal patterns of longitudinal continuous measurements, with temporal decomposition to identify the phases and risk factors within each phase. Application of this model is illustrated using spirometry data after lung transplantation using readily available statistical software. This application illustrates the usefulness of our flexible model when dealing with complex non-linear patterns and time varying coefficients. PMID:24919830

  18. Experimental Study of Dispersion and Deposition of Expiratory Aerosols in Aircraft Cabins and Impact on Infectious Disease Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    To, G.N.S.; Wan, M.P.; Chao, C.Y.H.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion and deposition characteristics of polydispersed expiratory aerosols were investigated in an aircraft cabin mockup to study the transmission of infectious diseases. The airflow was characterized by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Aerosol dispersionwas measured...

  19. Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease: a population-based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic status is known to influence the prevalence, severity and mortality of obstructive lung diseases, but it is uncertain whether it affects the use of diagnostic spirometry in patients initiating treatment for these conditions. The objective of this paper was to examine a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008. Results A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years of age, being unemployed was significantly associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed, the strongest association was seen in men (OR = 0.82, CI = 0.73-0.91). Medium income was associated with increased odds of having spirometry performed in men (OR = 1.18, CI = 1.06-1.30) and high educational level (>12 years) was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed in women (OR = 0.86, CI = 0.78-0.94). Cohabitation status was not associated with having spirometry performed. Among medication users over 65 years of age, living alone was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed among men (OR = 0.78, CI = 0.69-0.88). Conclusion Social inequity in spirometry testing among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease was confirmed in this study. Increased focus on spirometry testing among elderly men living alone, among the unemployed and among women with higher education is required when initiating medication. PMID:23768408

  20. General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark: a population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont; Jarbøl, Dorte E

    2013-08-07

    Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease. A national register-based cohort study was performed. All patients over 18 years receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008 were identified and detailed patient-specific data on sociodemographic status and spirometry tests were extracted. Information on practice characteristics like number of doctors, number of patients per doctor, training practice status, as well as age and gender of the general practitioners was linked to each medication user. Partnership practices had a higher odds ratio (OR) of performing spirometry compared with single-handed practices (OR 1.24, CI 1.09-1.40). We found a significant association between increasing general practitioner age and decreasing spirometry testing. This tendency was most pronounced among partnership practices, where doctors over 65 years had the lowest odds of spirometry testing (OR 0.25, CI 0.10-0.61). Training practice status was significantly associated with spirometry testing among single-handed practices (OR 1.40, CI 1.10-1.79). Some of the variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving

  1. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme and spirometry: rewarding quality or just quantity? A cross-sectional study in Rotherham, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    South Gail

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate spirometry is important in the management of COPD. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme for general practitioners includes spirometry related indicators within its COPD domain. It is not known whether high achievement against QOF spirometry indicators is associated with spirometry to BTS standards. Methods Data were obtained from the records of 3,217 patients randomly sampled from 5,649 patients with COPD in 38 general practices in Rotherham, UK. Severity of airflow obstruction was categorised by FEV1 (% predicted according to NICE guidelines. This was compared with clinician recorded COPD severity. The proportion of patients whose spirometry met BTS standards was calculated in each practice using a random sub-sample of 761 patients. The Spearman rank correlation between practice level QOF spirometry achievement and performance against BTS spirometry standards was calculated. Results Spirometry as assessed by clinical records was to BTS standards in 31% of cases (range at practice level 0% to 74%. The categorisation of airflow obstruction according to the most recent spirometry results did not agree well with the clinical categorisation of COPD recorded in the notes (Cohen's kappa = 0.34, 0.30 – 0.38. 12% of patients on COPD registers had FEV1 (% predicted results recorded that did not support the diagnosis of COPD. There was no association between quality, as measured by adherence to BTS spirometry standards, and either QOF COPD9 achievement (Spearman's rho = -0.11, or QOF COPD10 achievement (rho = 0.01. Conclusion The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework currently assesses the quantity, but not the quality of spirometry.

  2. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% espirometria não têm CPT reduzida. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o papel da medida dos volumes pulmonares e da resistência das vias aéreas para a classificação correta de pacientes com possível restrição à espirometria. Estudo prospectivo de adultos com CVF e VEF1 reduzidos e relação VEF1/CV(F) na faixa prevista. Distúrbio ventilatório restritivo (DVR) foi definido por CPT espirometria. A obstrução ao fluxo aéreo é comum nesses casos.

  3. Effect of e-Learning and Repeated Performance Feedback on Spirometry Test Quality in Family Practice: A Cluster Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R.; Akkermans, Reinier P.; Crockett, Alan J.; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W.; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. METHODS Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. RESULTS We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. CONCLUSIONS In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices. PMID:21747104

  4. Effect of e-learning and repeated performance feedback on spirometry test quality in family practice: a cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R; Akkermans, Reinier P; Crockett, Alan J; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices.

  5. Hand grip strength and maximum peak expiratory flow: determinants of bone mineral density of adolescent students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Lee-Andruske, Cynthia; de Arruda, Miguel; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Almonacid-Fierro, Alejandro; Gómez-Campos, Rossana

    2018-03-02

    Maintaining and building healthy bones during the lifetime requires a complicated interaction between a number of physiological and lifestyle factors. Our goal of this study was to analyze the association between hand grip strength and the maximum peak expiratory flow with bone mineral density and content in adolescent students. The research team studied 1427 adolescent students of both sexes (750 males and 677 females) between the ages of 11.0 and 18.9 years in the Maule Region of Talca (Chile). Weight, standing height, sitting height, hand grip strength (HGS), and maximum peak expiratory flow (PEF) were measured. Furthermore, bone mineral density (BMD) and total body bone mineral content (BMC) were determined by using the Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA). Hand grip strength and PEF were categorized in tertiles (lowest, middle, and highest). Linear regression was performed in steps to analyze the relationship between the variables. Differences between categories were determined through ANOVA. In males, the hand grip strength explained 18-19% of the BMD and 20-23% of the BMC. For the females, the percentage of variation occurred between 12 and 13% of the BMD and 17-18% of the BMC. The variation of PEF for the males was observed as 33% of the BMD and 36% of the BMC. For the females, both the BMD and BMC showed a variation of 19%. The HGS and PEF were divided into three categories (lowest, middle, and highest). In both cases, significant differences occurred in bone density health between the three categories. In conclusion, the HGS and the PEF related positively to the bone density health of both sexes of adolescent students. The adolescents with poor values for hand grip strength and expiratory flow showed reduced values of BMD and BMC for the total body. Furthermore, the PEF had a greater influence on bone density health with respect to the HGS of the adolescents of both sexes.

  6. Effect of pilates method on inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mendes Tozim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With aging, the respiratory muscle strength decreases and the pilates method is a technique that uses respiration as one of its principles. The present study has the aim of analyzing the influence of the pilates method on respiratory muscle strength in older women. For the evaluation of respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory and expiratory, manovacuometer was used. Thirty-one older women were divided into two groups: 14 participated in the pilates group and 17 in the control group. Participants of the pilates group performed 16 sessions of pilates method with an hour of training, twice week for eight weeks. The control group participated in four educational lectures for eight weeks. For statistical analysis, Shapiro-Wilk, ANOVA for repeated measures (p <0.05 and Cohen’s D index were performed. The results showed significant difference and the mean effect for the Cohen’s D index expiratory muscle strength of the pilates group when comparing before (69.71 ± 25.48 and after (85.23 ± 22.21 training (p<0.05 with an increase of 23%. The results of inspiratory muscle strength were not significant but presented an average effect for the Cohen’s D index for the pilates group before (69.71 ± 35.46 and after (88.00 ± 34.87 training, with an increase of 27%. The control group did not present significant differences for the variables evaluated. It could be concluded that the pilates method is effective in improving expiratory muscle strength and provides positive effects on the increase in inspiratory muscle strength.

  7. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borlée, F.; Yzermans, C.J.; Krop, E.; Rooijackers, J.; Aalders, B.; Zock, J.P.; Dijk, C.E. van; Maassen, C.B.M.; Schellevis, F.; Heederik, D.; Smit, L.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their

  8. Modeling the Fate of Expiratory Aerosols and the Associated Infection Risk in an Aircraft Cabin Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, M.P.; To, G.N.S.; Chao, C.Y.H.

    2009-01-01

    to estimate the risk of infection by contact. The environmental control system (ECS) in a cabin creates air circulation mainly in the lateral direction, making lateral dispersions of aerosols much faster than longitudinal dispersions. Aerosols with initial sizes under 28 m in diameter can stay airborne......The transport and deposition of polydispersed expiratory aerosols in an aircraft cabin were simulated using a Lagrangian-based model validated by experiments conducted in an aircraft cabin mockup. Infection risk by inhalation was estimated using the aerosol dispersion data and a model was developed...

  9. General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung...... disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry...... testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease....

  10. Validation of a protocol to evaluate maximal expiratory pressure using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Soares

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory muscles can present fatigue and even chronic inability to generate force. So, reliable devices are necessary to their evaluation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the MEP (Maximal Expiratory Pressure values of individuals between 20 and 25 years old and to validate a protocol using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner comparing it with the digital manometer. We evaluated the MEP of 10 participants. They remained seated and made six respiratory maneuvers from Total Lung Capacity (TLC to Residual Volume (RV. The results in the study showed no statistically significant differences when compared to values reported in the literature, and that the pressure transducer provides reliable values for MEP.Os músculos respiratórios podem apresentar fadiga e até mesmo a incapacidade crônica na geração de força, sendo necessários dispositivos confiáveis para sua avaliação. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a pressão expiratória máxima (PeMáx de indivíduos entre 20 e 25 anos e validar um protocolo que utiliza um transdutor de pressão e um condicionador de sinais comparando-o com a manovacuometria. Foram avaliadas a PeMáx de 10 participantes. Estes permaneceram sentados e realizaram seis manobras respiratórias a partir da capacidade pulmonar total (CPT até o volume residual (VR. Os resultados do estudo não apresentaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas quando comparados com os valores de normalidade descritos na literatura e mostraram que o transdutor de pressão fornece valores confiáveis para Pe máx.

  11. Relationship of end-expiratory pressure, lung volume, and /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.A.; van der Zee, H.; Line, B.R.; Malik, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the dose-response effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and increased lung volume on the pulmonary clearance rate of aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA). Clearance of lung radioactivity was expressed as percent decrease per minute. Base-line clearance was measured while anesthetized sheep (n = 20) were ventilated with 0 cmH 2 O end-expiratory pressure. Clearance was remeasured during ventilation at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, or 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. Further studies showed stepwise increases in functional residual capacity (FRC) (P less than 0.05) measured at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. At 2.5 cmH 2 O PEEP, the clearance rate was not different from that at base line (P less than 0.05), although FRC was increased from base line. Clearance rate increased progressively with increasing PEEP at 5, 10, and 15 cmH 2 O (P less than 0.05). Between 15 and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP, clearance rate was again unchanged, despite an increase in FRC. The pulmonary clearance of aerosolized /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA shows a sigmoidal response to increasing FRC and PEEP, having both threshold and maximal effects. This relationship is most consistent with the hypothesis that alveolar epithelial permeability is increased by lung inflation

  12. Positive expiratory pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Breathing exercises against a resistance during expiration are often used as treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Controversy still exists regarding the clinical application and efficacy. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effects of chest physiotherapy techniques with positive expiratory pressure (PEP) for the prevention and treatment of pulmonary impairment in adults with COPD. The review was conducted on randomised, controlled clinical trials in which breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure were compared with other chest physical therapy techniques or with no treatment, in adult patients with COPD. A computer-assisted literature search of available databases from 1970 to January 2008 was performed. Two reviewers extracted data independently and assessed the trials systematically with an instrument for measuring methodological quality. In total, 11 trials met the inclusion criteria, of which 5 reached an adequate level of internal validity. Several kinds of PEP techniques with a diversity of intensities and durations of treatment have been evaluated with different outcome measures and follow-up periods. Benefits of PEP were found in isolated outcome measures in separate studies with a follow-up period <1 month. Concerning long-term effects, the results are contradictory. Prior to widespread prescription of long-term PEP treatment, more research is required to establish the benefit of the technique in patients with COPD. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Effect of the radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinate on expiratory nasal sound frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seren, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the short-term efficacy of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction (RFVTR) in treatment of inferior turbinate hypertrophy (TH) as measured by expiratory nasal sound spectra. In our study, we aimed to investigate the Odiosoft-rhino (OR) as a new diagnostic method to evaluate the nasal airflow of patients before and after RFVTR. In this study, we have analyzed and recorded the expiratory nasal sound in patients with inferior TH before and after RFVTR. This analysis includes the time expanded waveform, the spectral analysis with time averaged fast Fourier transform (FFT), and the waveform analysis of nasal sound. We found an increase in sound intensity at high frequency (Hf) in the sound analyses of the patients before RFVTR and a decrease in sound intensity at Hf was found in patients after RFVTR. This study indicates that RFVTR is an effective procedure to improve nasal airflow in the patients with nasal obstruction with inferior TH. We found significant decreases in the sound intensity level at Hf in the sound spectra after RFVTR. The OR results from the 2000- to 4000-Hz frequency (Hf) interval may be more useful in assessing patients with nasal obstruction than other frequency intervals. OR may be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to evaluate the nasal airflow.

  14. Control of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP for small animal ventilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leão Nunes Marcelo V

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP for the mechanical ventilation of small animals is frequently obtained with water seals or by using ventilators developed for human use. An alternative mechanism is the use of an on-off expiratory valve closing at the moment when the alveolar pressure is equal to the target PEEP. In this paper, a novel PEEP controller (PEEP-new and the PEEP system of a commercial small-animal ventilator, both based on switching an on-off valve, are evaluated. Methods The proposed PEEP controller is a discrete integrator monitoring the error between the target PEEP and the airways opening pressure prior to the onset of an inspiratory cycle. In vitro as well as in vivo experiments with rats were carried out and the PEEP accuracy, settling time and under/overshoot were considered as a measure of performance. Results The commercial PEEP controller did not pass the tests since it ignores the airways resistive pressure drop, resulting in a PEEP 5 cmH2O greater than the target in most conditions. The PEEP-new presented steady-state errors smaller than 0.5 cmH2O, with settling times below 10 s and under/overshoot smaller than 2 cmH2O. Conclusion The PEEP-new presented acceptable performance, considering accuracy and temporal response. This novel PEEP generator may prove useful in many applications for small animal ventilators.

  15. Airborne spread of expiratory droplet nuclei between the occupants of indoor environments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Z T; Melikov, A K

    2018-07-01

    This article reviews past studies of airborne transmission between occupants in indoor environments, focusing on the spread of expiratory droplet nuclei from mouth/nose to mouth/nose for non-specific diseases. Special attention is paid to summarizing what is known about the influential factors, the inappropriate simplifications of the thermofluid boundary conditions of thermal manikins, the challenges facing the available experimental techniques, and the limitations of available evaluation methods. Secondary issues are highlighted, and some new ways to improve our understanding of airborne transmission indoors are provided. The characteristics of airborne spread of expiratory droplet nuclei between occupants, which are influenced correlatively by both environmental and personal factors, were widely revealed under steady-state conditions. Owing to the different boundary conditions used, some inconsistent findings on specific influential factors have been published. The available instrumentation was too slow to provide accurate concentration profiles for time-dependent evaluations of events with obvious time characteristics, while computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies were mainly performed in the framework of inherently steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes modeling. Future research needs in 3 areas are identified: the importance of the direction of indoor airflow patterns, the dynamics of airborne transmission, and the application of CFD simulations. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Ayşın; Çakırgöz, Mensure; Ervatan, Zekeriya; Kıran, Özlem; Türkmen, Aygen; Esenyel, Cem Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Our study is a prospective, randomized study on patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach-chair position to evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on hemodynamic stability, providing a bloodless surgical field and surgical satisfaction. Fifty patients were divided into two groups. Group I (n=25) had zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) administered under general anesthesia, and group II (n=25) had +5 PEEP administered. During surgery, intraarticular hemorrhage and surgical satisfaction were evaluated on a scale of 0-10. During surgery, at the 5th, 30th, 60th, and 90th minutes and at the end of surgery, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and positive inspiratory pressure were recorded. At the end of the surgery, the amount of bleeding and duration of the operation were recorded. In group I, the duration of operation and amount of bleeding were found to be significantly greater than those in group II (pshoulder surgery in the beach-chair position reduces the amount of hemorrhage in the surgical field and thus increases surgical satisfaction without requiring the creation of controlled hypotension.

  17. Assessment of Air Pollution Effects on the Respiratory System Based on Pulmonary Function Tests Performed During Spirometry Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowiecki, Piotr; Mucha, Dominika; Gayer, Anna; Adamkiewicz, Łukasz; Badyda, Artur J

    2015-01-01

    The Polish Spirometry Day is an initiative aimed at increasing awareness of the causes, symptoms, course, and effects that accompany respiratory diseases, especially asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In 2013, the second edition of the Spirometry Day was held. It gathered 180 medical centers and other institution. The final analysis encompassed a total of 1187 persons from 26 different locations, including rural areas, and smaller and larger city agglomerations. Of this total, 755 persons (63.6 %) completed their spirometry tests for the first time in life. Each person fulfilled a questionnaire regarding the personal information, respiratory diseases, symptoms, lifestyle, and a place of residence. In the total group, 234 (19.7 %) cases of bronchial obstruction were diagnosed. A hundred and thirty four persons with obstruction, among those tested for the first time in life (17.8 %), were unaware of their disease. The lowest values of FEV1 and FEF(1)/FVC, corresponding to the highest percentage of persons with obstruction (27.9 %) were observed in small and medium cities (100,000-500,000 inhabitants). There were differences in the prevalence of obstruction depending on the distance of the place of residence from a busy traffic road. A significant decrease of both spirometric variables was observed among people living in cities above 100,000 inhabitants within a distance lower than 50 m from roads. In general, better spirometry results were observed among inhabitants living more than 150 m from main roads.

  18. COPD case finding by spirometry in high-risk customers of urban community pharmacies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, D; Guayta, R; Giner, J; Burgos, F; Capdevila, C; Soriano, J B; Barau, M; Casan, P

    2009-06-01

    COPD case finding is currently recommended at primary and tertiary care levels only. To evaluate the feasibility of a community pharmacy program for COPD case finding in high-risk customers by means of spirometry. Pilot cross-sectional descriptive study in 13 urban community pharmacies in Barcelona, Spain, from April to May 2007. Customers >40 years old with respiratory symptoms and/or a history of smoking were invited to participate in the study during pharmacists' routine work shifts. High-risk customers were identified by means of a 5-item COPD screening questionnaire based on criteria of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, and were invited to perform spirometry accordingly. Those with an FEV(1)/FVC ratio less than 0.70 were referred to the hospital for a repeat spirometry. Of the 161 pharmacy customers studied, 100 (62%) scored 3 or more items in the COPD screening questionnaire, and after spirometry, 21 (24%) had an FEV(1)/FVC ratiocustomers of urban community pharmacies is feasible. Similarly to primary care practitioners, pharmacists have access to high-risk, middle-aged subjects who have never been tested for COPD. Pharmacists can help with early detection of COPD if they are correctly trained.

  19. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gary E; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; El Naqa, Issam; Low, Daniel A

    2007-06-01

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log

  20. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; Naqa, Issam El; Low, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log

  1. Gated CT imaging using a free-breathing respiration signal from flow-volume spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Kwok, Young; Deyoung, Chad; Zacharapoulos, Nicholas; Pepelea, Mark; Klahr, Paul; Yu, Cedric X.

    2005-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is known to cause artifacts on free-breathing spiral CT images used in treatment planning. This leads to inaccurate delineation of target volumes on planning CT images. Flow-volume spirometry has been used previously for breath-holds during CT scans and radiation treatments using the active breathing control (ABC) system. We have developed a prototype by extending the flow-volume spirometer device to obtain gated CT scans using a PQ 5000 single-slice CT scanner. To test our prototype, we designed motion phantoms to compare image quality obtained with and without gated CT scan acquisition. Spiral and axial (nongated and gated) CT scans were obtained of phantoms with motion periods of 3-5 s and amplitudes of 0.5-2 cm. Errors observed in the volume estimate of these structures were as much as 30% with moving phantoms during CT simulation. Application of motion-gated CT with active breathing control reduced these errors to within 5%. Motion-gated CT was then implemented in patients and the results are presented for two clinical cases: lung and abdomen. In each case, gated scans were acquired at end-inhalation, end-exhalation in addition to a conventional free-breathing (nongated) scan. The gated CT scans revealed reduced artifacts compared with the conventional free-breathing scan. Differences of up to 20% in the volume of the structures were observed between gated and free-breathing scans. A comparison of the overlap of structures between the gated and free-breathing scans revealed misalignment of the structures. These results demonstrate the ability of flow-volume spirometry to reduce errors in target volumes via gating during CT imaging

  2. CT-derived Biomechanical Metrics Improve Agreement Between Spirometry and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Surya P.; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Newell, John D.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sieren, Jessica C.; Han, Meilan K.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Many COPD patients have marked discordance between FEV1 and degree of emphysema on CT. Biomechanical differences between these patients have not been studied. We aimed to identify reasons for the discordance between CT and spirometry in some patients with COPD. Materials and Methods Subjects with GOLD stage I–IV from a large multicenter study (COPDGene) were arranged by percentiles of %predicted FEV1 and emphysema on CT. Three categories were created using differences in percentiles: Catspir with predominant airflow obstruction/minimal emphysema, CatCT with predominant emphysema/minimal airflow obstruction, and Catmatched with matched FEV1 and emphysema. Image registration was used to derive Jacobian determinants, a measure of lung elasticity, anisotropy and strain tensors, to assess biomechanical differences between groups. Regression models were created with the above categories as outcome variable, adjusting for demographics, scanner type, quantitative CT-derived emphysema, gas trapping, and airway thickness (Model 1), and after adding biomechanical CT metrics (Model 2). Results Jacobian determinants, anisotropy and strain tensors were strongly associated with FEV1. With Catmatched as control, Model 2 predicted Catspir and CatCT better than Model 1 (Akaike Information Criterion, AIC 255.8 vs. 320.8). In addition to demographics, the strongest independent predictors of FEV1 were Jacobian mean (β= 1.60,95%CI = 1.16 to 1.98; p<0.001), coefficient of variation (CV) of Jacobian (β= 1.45,95%CI = 0.86 to 2.03; p<0.001) and CV strain (β= 1.82,95%CI = 0.68 to 2.95; p = 0.001). CVs of Jacobian and strain are both potential markers of biomechanical lung heterogeneity. Conclusions CT-derived measures of lung mechanics improve the link between quantitative CT and spirometry, offering the potential for new insights into the linkage between regional parenchymal destruction and global decrement in lung function in COPD patients. PMID:27055745

  3. Polynomial estimation of the smoothing splines for the new Finnish reference values for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainu, Annette; Timonen, Kirsi

    2016-07-01

    Background Discontinuity of spirometry reference values from childhood into adulthood has been a problem with traditional reference values, thus modern modelling approaches using smoothing spline functions to better depict the transition during growth and ageing have been recently introduced. Following the publication of the new international Global Lung Initiative (GLI2012) reference values also new national Finnish reference values have been calculated using similar GAMLSS-modelling, with spline estimates for mean (Mspline) and standard deviation (Sspline) provided in tables. The aim of this study was to produce polynomial estimates for these spline functions to use in lieu of lookup tables and to assess their validity in the reference population of healthy non-smokers. Methods Linear regression modelling was used to approximate the estimated values for Mspline and Sspline using similar polynomial functions as in the international GLI2012 reference values. Estimated values were compared to original calculations in absolute values, the derived predicted mean and individually calculated z-scores using both values. Results Polynomial functions were estimated for all 10 spirometry variables. The agreement between original lookup table-produced values and polynomial estimates was very good, with no significant differences found. The variation slightly increased in larger predicted volumes, but a range of -0.018 to +0.022 litres of FEV1 representing ± 0.4% of maximum difference in predicted mean. Conclusions Polynomial approximations were very close to the original lookup tables and are recommended for use in clinical practice to facilitate the use of new reference values.

  4. Effect on attendance by including focused information on spirometry in preventive health checks: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Løkke, Anders; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Sandbæk, Annelli

    2016-12-01

    Early detection of lung diseases can help to reduce their severity. Lung diseases are among the most frequently occurring and serious diseases worldwide; nonetheless, many patients remain undiagnosed. Preventive health checks including spirometry can detect lung diseases at early stages; however, recruitment for health checks remains a challenge, and little is known about what motivates the attendance. The aim of the study is to examine whether focused information on spirometry in the invitation compared to general information will impact the attendance rate in preventive health checks. This randomized, controlled trial tests the effect of information on spirometry embedded in the Check your Health Preventive Program (CHPP). The CHPP is an open-label, household cluster-randomized, controlled trial offering a preventive health check to 30- to -49-year-olds in a Danish municipality from 2012 to 2017 (n = 26,216). During 2015-2016, 4356 citizens aged 30-49 years will be randomized into two groups. The intervention group receives an invitation which highlights the value and contents of spirometry as part of a health check and information about lung diseases. The comparison group receives a standard invitation containing practical information and specifies the contents of the general health check. Outcomes are (1) differences in attendance rates measured by the proportion of citizens attending each of the two study groups and (2) proportion of persons at risk defined by smoking status and self-reported lung symptoms in the study groups. The proportion of participants with abnormal spirometry assessed at the preventive health check will be compared between the two study groups. The results from the present study will inform future recruitment strategies to health checks. The developed material on content, value, and information about lung disease is feasible and transferable to other populations, making it easy to implement if effective. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT

  5. Short- and long-term effectiveness of a supervised training program in spirometry use for primary care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represas-Represas, Cristina; Botana-Rial, Maribel; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; González-Silva, Ana Isabel; García-Martínez, Ana; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of spirometry, its use and quality are limited in the Primary Care setting. There are few accredited training programs that have demonstrated improvement in the quality of spirometric studies. In this paper, we analyze the short- and long-term effectiveness of a supervised training program for performing and interpreting spirometries. Ours is an intervention study with before and after measurements. The target population included teams of physicians and nursing staff at 26 health-care centers in the area of Vigo (Galicia, Spain). The structured training program involved 2 theoretical and practical training sessions (that were 2months apart), an intermediate period of 30 supervised spirometries performed in the respective centers and weekly e-mail exercises. Effectiveness was evaluated using exercises at the beginning (test 1) and the end (test 2) of the 1st day, 2nd day (test 3) and one year later (test 4), as well as the analysis of spirometries done in month1, month2 and one year later. Participants also completed a survey about their satisfaction. 74 participants initiated the program; 72 completed the program, but only 45 participated in the one-year evaluation. Mean test scores were: 4.1±1.9 on test 1; 7.5±1.6 on test 2; 8.9±1.3 on test 3, and 8.8±1.4 on test 4. During month1, the percentage of correctly done/interpreted tests was 71%, in month two it was 91% and after one year it was 83% (Ptraining program based on theoretical and practical workshops and a supervised follow-up of spirometries significantly improved the ability of Primary Care professionals to carry out and interpret spirometric testing, although the quality of the tests diminished over time. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. High altitude pulmonary edema and exercise at 4,400 meters on Mount McKinley. Effect of expiratory positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoene, R B; Roach, R C; Hackett, P H; Harrison, G; Mills, W J

    1985-03-01

    Breathing against positive expiratory pressure has been used to improve gas exchange in many forms of pulmonary edema, and forced expiration against resistance during exercise has been advocated for climbing at high altitude as a method to optimize performance. To evaluate the effect of expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) on climbers with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and on exercise at high altitude, we studied four climbers with HAPE at rest and 13 healthy climbers during exercise on a bicycle ergometer at 4400 m. We measured minute ventilation (VI, L/min), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2 percent), end-tidal carbon dioxide (PACO2, mm Hg), respiratory rate (RR), and heart rate (HR) during the last minute of a five minute interval at rest in the climbers with HAPE, and at rest, 300, and 600 kpm/minute workloads on a bicycle ergometer in the healthy subjects. The HAPE subjects demonstrated an increased SaO2 percent, no change in HR or VI, and a decrease in RR on EPAP as compared to control. In normal subjects, SaO2 percent, VI, and heart rate were significantly higher on EPAP 10 cm H2O than 0 cm H2O control (p less than 0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively). The RR and PaCO2 were not significantly different. In summary, EPAP improves gas exchange in HAPE subjects at rest. The EPAP in normal subjects at high altitude resulted in a higher SaO2 percent at the expense of a higher VI and higher HR. These results suggest that the work of breathing is higher and the stroke volume lower on EPAP. The positive pressure mask may be an effective temporizing measure for victims of HAPE who cannot immediately go to a lower altitude.

  7. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural techniques were conducted in the order of chin tucking, head rotation, head tilting, bending head back, and lying down, while expiratory muscle strength training was conducted at a resistance level of about 70% of the maximal expiratory pressure. Swallowing recovery was assessed by using the Functional Dysphagia Scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] The mean value obtained in the videofluoroscopic studies for both groups decreased after the treatment. In the postural techniques plus expiratory muscle strength training group, the decrease was significantly greater than that in the expiratory muscle strength training-only group. [Conclusion] The results imply that simultaneous performance of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training is more effective than expiratory muscle strength training alone when applied in the swallowing rehabilitation for patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease.

  8. TU-CD-BRA-11: Application of Bone Suppression Technique to Inspiratory/expiratory Chest Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, R; Sanada, S [Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sakuta, K; Kawashima, H [Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Kishitani, Y [TOYO Corporation, Chuoh-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images normally obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to investigate the usefulness of bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of pulmonary function in inspiratory/expiratory chest radiography. Methods: Commercial bone suppression image processing software (ClearRead; Riverain Technologies) was applied to paired inspiratory/expiratory chest radiographs of 107 patients (normal, 33; abnormal, 74) to create corresponding bone suppression images. The abnormal subjects had been diagnosed with pulmonary diseases, such as pneumothorax, pneumonia, emphysema, asthma, and lung cancer. After recognition of the lung area, the vectors of respiratory displacement were measured in all local lung areas using a cross-correlation technique. The measured displacement in each area was visualized as displacement color maps. The distribution pattern of respiratory displacement was assessed by comparison with the findings of lung scintigraphy. Results: Respiratory displacement of pulmonary markings (soft tissues) was able to be quantified separately from the rib movements on bone suppression images. The resulting displacement map showed a left-right symmetric distribution increasing from the lung apex to the bottom region of the lung in many cases. However, patients with ventilatory impairments showed a nonuniform distribution caused by decreased displacement of pulmonary markings, which were confirmed to correspond to area with ventilatory impairments found on the lung scintigrams. Conclusion: The bone suppression technique was useful for quantitative analysis of respiratory displacement of pulmonary markings without any interruption of the rib shadows. Abnormal areas could be detected as decreased displacement of pulmonary markings. Inspiratory/expiratory chest radiography combined

  9. An expiratory assist during spontaneous breathing can compensate for endotracheal tube resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Akinori; Chang, Cheng; Suzuki, Shinya; Mashimo, Takashi; Fujino, Yuji

    2009-08-01

    Although inspiratory assist of spontaneous breathing in intubated patients is common, expiratory assist functions have rarely been reported. Effective expiratory support (ES) could be used to compensate for endotracheal tube (ETT) resistance during spontaneous breathing. In this study, we examined the performance of a new system designed to provide both inspiratory support (IS) and ES during spontaneous breathing with the goal of reducing the effective resistance of the ETT. The ES system consisted of a ventilator demand valve and a computer-controlled piston cylinder, which aspirated gas from the respiratory circuit during the expiratory phase. The movement of the piston was synchronized with spontaneous breathing. We compared the pressures at the tip of the ETT and in the breathing circuit during spontaneous breathing through an ETT of internal diameter (ID) 5 mm with that of an ETT with ID 8 mm in nine healthy adult male volunteers. The ventilatory mode was set to maintain a continuous airway pressure of 0 cm H(2)O. Three ventilator settings (no support, IS only, and IS plus ES) were compared using ID 5 mm ETT. We monitored pressure in the breathing circuit (P(aw)), ETT tip pressure (P(tip)), and respiratory flow. The P(tip) of the ID 5 mm ETT showed a large negative deflection during inspiration and a positive deflection during expiration without support. IS alone did not improve the respiratory pattern through the small ETT. However, IS plus ES resulted in negative P(aw) during expiration in addition to positive deflection of P(aw) during inspiration, making the pressure characteristics of P(tip) similar to those of ID 8 mm ETT. Moreover, IS plus ES produced a respiratory pattern through the ID 5 mm ETT that was similar to that through the ID 8 mm ETT. In this study of healthy volunteers, IS plus ES compensated for the airway resistance imposed by a ID 5.0 mm ETT to create pressure changes at the tip of the ETT similar to those of an ID 8.0 mm ETT.

  10. Using an expiratory resistor, arterial pulse pressure variations predict fluid responsiveness during spontaneous breathing: an experimental porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Michael K; Vistisen, Simon T; Koefoed-Nielsen, Jacob; Larsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Fluid responsiveness prediction is difficult in spontaneously breathing patients. Because the swings in intrathoracic pressure are minor during spontaneous breathing, dynamic parameters like pulse pressure variation (PPV) and systolic pressure variation (SPV) are usually small. We hypothesized that during spontaneous breathing, inspiratory and/or expiratory resistors could induce high arterial pressure variations at hypovolemia and low variations at normovolemia and hypervolemia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that SPV and PPV could predict fluid responsiveness under these conditions. Eight prone, anesthetized and spontaneously breathing pigs (20 to 25 kg) were subjected to a sequence of 30% hypovolemia, normovolemia, and 20% and 40% hypervolemia. At each volemic level, the pigs breathed in a randomized order either through an inspiratory and/or an expiratory threshold resistor (7.5 cmH2O) or only through the tracheal tube without any resistor. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were measured during the breathing modes. Fluid responsiveness was defined as a 15% increase in stroke volume (DeltaSV) following fluid loading. Stroke volume was significantly lower at hypovolemia compared with normovolemia, but no differences were found between normovolemia and 20% or 40% hypervolemia. Compared with breathing through no resistor, SPV was magnified by all resistors at hypovolemia whereas there were no changes at normovolemia and hypervolemia. PPV was magnified by the inspiratory resistor and the combined inspiratory and expiratory resistor. Regression analysis of SPV or PPV versus DeltaSV showed the highest R2 (0.83 for SPV and 0.52 for PPV) when the expiratory resistor was applied. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity for prediction of fluid responsiveness were 100% and 100%, respectively, for SPV and 100% and 81%, respectively, for PPV. Inspiratory and/or expiratory threshold resistors magnified SPV and PPV in spontaneously breathing pigs during hypovolemia

  11. Airway wall thickness associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second decline and development of airflow limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoesein, Firdaus A. A. Mohamed; de Jong, Pim A.; Lammers, Jan-Willem J.; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; Schmidt, Michael; de Koning, Harry J.; van der Aalst, Carlijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Groen, Harry J. M.; van Ginneken, Bram; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; Zanen, Pieter

    Airway wall thickness and emphysema contribute to airflow limitation. We examined their association with lung function decline and development of airflow limitation in 2021 male smokers with and without airflow limitation. Airway wall thickness and emphysema were quantified on chest computed

  12. Gender and perception of dyspnea: The role of the variation in the forced expiratory volume in one second

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Nigro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available During bronchoconstriction women perceive more breathlessness than men. The aims of study were 1 to evaluate if quality of dyspnea in bronchoconstriction was different in women and men 2 to assess if gender difference in the perception of dyspnea could be related to the level of bronchoconstriction. 457 subjects (257 women inhaled methacholine to a 20% decrease in FEV1, or 32 mg/ml. Dyspnea was evaluated using the modified Borg scale and a list of expressions of dyspnea. Borg scores were recorded immediately before the challenge test baseline and at the maximum FEV1 decrease. The prevalence of descriptors of dyspnea reported by women and men was similar. Dyspnea was related to the level of FEV1 (ΔFEV1: OR 1.05, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0095, females (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.33-6.33, p 0.0072, younger subjects (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.89- 0.97, p 0.0013 and body mass index (BMI (OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. As the FEV1 fell less than 20% from baseline, only the ΔFEV1 was significantly associated with dyspnea (ΔFEV1:OR 1.15, 95%CI 1.07- 1.24, p 0.0002. Instead, if the FEV1 fell higher ≥ 20%, the presence of dyspnea was related to the degree of bronchoconstriction (ΔFEV1: OR 1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0187, females (OR 3.02, 95%CI 1.36-6.72, p 0.0067, younger subjects (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.88-0.96, p 0.0007 and BMI (OR 1.12, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. The quality of dyspnea during the bronchoconstriction was similar in women and men; women showed a higher perception of dyspnea than men only when the FEV1 fell more than 20% from baseline.

  13. Peak expiratory flow rate in healthy children aged 6-17 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A; Høst, A H; Ibsen, T

    1994-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured in a cross-sectional study in 861 healthy Danish schoolchildren aged 6-17 years using a Mini Wright peak flowmeter. We found a strong correlation between PEFR and height, age and sex. The results were comparable with those from previous studies using...... a Wright peak flowmeter. The equation for prediction of PEFR in boys was calculated as (3.8 x height) + (10.6 x age) - 313.2 (p age) - 143.9 (p ... coefficient in this large sample. Among healthy children without previous asthma, earlier episodes of recurrent wheezing were reported in 8.8% and a significantly lower PEFR was found in this group....

  14. [Playing of wind instruments is associated with an obstructive pattern in the spirometry of adolescents with a good aerobic resistance capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Javier; Granell, Jose; Ruiz, Diana; Tapias, Jose A

    2011-03-01

    There is controversy in the medical literature regarding the beneficial or detrimental effects of playing wind musical instruments on the respiratory system. The aim of this study is to analyse this relationship, taking the physical condition of the subjects into consideration. Cross-sectional observational study. Public institution with coordinated medium grade musical instruction and primary and secondary education. Young performers (between 13 and 17 years). We collected basic epidemiological parameters (gender, age, weight, size, heath status), and each subject underwent a fitness test ("course navette" cardiorespiratory fitness test) and a forced spirometry. We included 90 students, 53 females and 37 males. Thirty two were wind instrument players and 58 studied other instruments. The two groups were homogeneous with respect to gender, age and body mass index. The maximum oxygen uptake showed no significant difference (P=0.255), further demonstrating an adequate level of fitness compared to the general population. FVC was normal and similar in both groups (P=0.197). The FEV(1) percentage and the FEV(1)/FVC ratio were significantly lower (Pstudy of wind instruments was associated with an obstructive spirometric pattern in young musicians with a normal level of physical fitness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves survival in a rodent model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using high-dose epinephrine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaul, Conán

    2009-10-01

    Multiple interventions have been tested in models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to optimize drug use, chest compressions, and ventilation. None has studied the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on outcome. We hypothesized that because PEEP can reverse pulmonary atelectasis, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, and potentially improve cardiac output, its use during CPR would increase survival.

  16. Nebulized hypertonic saline via positive expiratory pressure versus via jet nebulizer in patients with severe cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, Oisin J

    2011-06-01

    Nebulized hypertonic saline is a highly effective therapy for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), yet 10% of patients are intolerant of hypertonic saline administered via jet nebulizer. Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) nebulizers splint open the airways and offers a more controlled rate of nebulization.

  17. Comparação entre exercícios de respiração profunda e espirometria de incentivo no pós-operatório de cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio Comparison between deep breathing exercises and incentive spirometry after CABG surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Alencar Renault

    2009-06-01

    - FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second - FEV1, maximal respiratory pressures and oxygen saturation. METHODS: Thirty six patients in CABG postoperative period underwent thirty minutes of non-invasive ventilation during the first 24 hours after extubation and were randomly shared into two groups as following: DBE (n=18 and IS (n=18. The spirometric variables were assessed on the preoperative period and seventh postoperative day (POD. The respiratory muscle strength and oxygen saturation were assessed on the preoperative period, first, second and seventh POD. RESULTS: The groups were considered homogeneous in relation to the demographic and surgical variables. It has been noted fall in the values of FVC and FEV1 between the preoperative period and the seventh POD, but without significant differences between groups. The maximal respiratory pressures showed drop in the first POD but with and partial recovery until the seventh POD, also without significant differences between groups. The oxygen saturation was the only variable that was completely recovered on the seventh POD, also without significant differences between groups. CONCLUSION: There were not observed significant differences in maximal respiratory pressures, spirometric variables and oxygen saturation in patients undergone deep breathing exercises and flow-oriented incentive spirometry after coronary artery bypass grafting.

  18. Respiratory System Mechanics During Low Versus High Positive End-Expiratory Pressure in Open Abdominal Surgery: A Substudy of PROVHILO Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Antini, Davide; Huhle, Robert; Herrmann, Jacob; Sulemanji, Demet S.; Oto, Jun; Raimondo, Pasquale; Mirabella, Lucia; Hemmes, Sabrine N. T.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Pelosi, Paolo; Kaczka, David W.; Vidal Melo, Marcos Francisco; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Cinnella, Gilda

    2018-01-01

    In the 2014 PROtective Ventilation using HIgh versus LOw positive end-expiratory pressure (PROVHILO) trial, intraoperative low tidal volume ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP = 12 cm H2O) and lung recruitment maneuvers did not decrease postoperative pulmonary complications

  19. Studies on the correlation between pre-and post-operative perfusion scintigraphy and differential spirometry in operated lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaseda, Shizuka; Ikeda, Takaaki; Sakai, Tadaaki; Tomaru, Hiroko; Ishihara, Tsuneo; Kikuchi, Keiichi.

    1982-01-01

    For the purpose of clarifying the relationship between the percentage of perfusion and that of vital capacity or oxygen uptake on the affected lung, perfusion scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-MAA and differential spirometry were performed in twenty patients including sixteen patients with lung cancer. Both examinations were performed before and after the operation. The results are as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between the percentage of perfusion and that of vital capacity or oxygen uptake of the affected lung before and after the operation. (2) The estimation of the percentage of vital capacity or oxygen uptake of the affected lung is possible by combining the spirometry and sup(99m)Tc-MAA pulmonary scintigraphy. (author)

  20. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new large animal spirometry device using mainstream CO2 flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, T D; Lammer, V; Schramel, J P; Moens, Y P S

    2014-07-01

    A spirometry device equipped with mainstream CO2 flow sensor is not available for large animal anaesthesia. To measure the resistance of a new large animal spirometry device and assess its agreement with reference methods for volume measurements. In vitro experiment and crossover study using anaesthetised horses. A flow partitioning device (FPD) equipped with 4 human CO2 flow sensors was tested. Pressure differences were measured across the whole FPD and across each sensor separately using air flows (range: 90-720 l/min). One sensor was connected to a spirometry monitor for in vitro volume (3, 5 and 7 l) measurements. These measurements were compared with a reference method. Five anaesthetised horses were used for tidal volume (VT) measurements using the FPD and a horse-lite sensor (reference method). Bland-Altman analysis, ANOVA and linear regression analysis were used for data analysis. Pressure differences across each sensor were similar suggesting equal flow partitioning. The resistance of the device increased with flow (range: 0.3-1.5 cmH2 O s/l) and was higher than that of the horse-lite. The limits of agreement for volume measurements were within -1 and 2% in vitro and -12 and 0% in vivo. Nine of 147 VT measurements in horses were outside of the ± 10% limits of acceptance but most of these erroneous measurements occurred with VTs lower than 4 l. The determined correction factor for volume measurements was 3.97 ± 0.03. The limits of agreement for volume measurements by the new device were within ± 10% using clinically relevant range of volumes. The new spirometry device can be recommended for measurement of VT in adult Warmblood horses. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  1. INCENTIVE SPIROMETRY AND BREATHING EXERCISES WERE NOT ABLE TO IMPROVE RESTRICTIVE PULMONARY CHARACTERISTICS INDUCED BY WATER IMMERSION IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Aline A. Vepo,; Caroline S. Martinez; Giulia A. Wiggers; Franck M. Peçanha

    2016-01-01

    pulmonary volumes and capacities which could be at least in part similar to that happen in healthy individuals during water immersion. Objectives: To investigate if respiratory effects of water immersion are partially due to enhanced return venous from legs and arms and if physiotherapeutic techniques incentive spirometry (IS) and breathing exercises (BE) are able to improve pulmonary volumes and capacities in healthy subjects during water immersion. Design: Randomised, within-partici...

  2. Dangerous Pressurization and Inappropriate Alarms during Water Occlusion of the Expiratory Circuit of Commonly Used Infant Ventilators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Hinder

    Full Text Available Non-invasive continuous positive airways pressure is commonly a primary respiratory therapy delivered via multi-purpose ventilators in premature newborns. Expiratory limb occlusion due to water accumulation or 'rainout' from gas humidification is a frequent issue. A case of expiratory limb occlusion due to rainout causing unexpected and excessive repetitive airway pressurisation in a Draeger VN500 prompted a systematic bench test examination of currently available ventilators.To assess neonatal ventilator response to partial or complete expiratory limb occlusion when set to non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure mode.Seven commercially available neonatal ventilators connected to a test lung using a standard infant humidifier circuit with partial and/or complete expiratory limb occlusion were examined in a bench test study. Each ventilator was set to deliver 6 cmH2O in non-invasive mode and respiratory mechanics data for 75%, 80% and 100% occlusion were collected.Several ventilators responded inappropriately with complete occlusion by cyclical pressurisation/depressurisation to peak pressures of between 19·4 and 64·6 cm H2O at rates varying between 2 to 77 inflations per minute. Tidal volumes varied between 10·1 and 24·3mL. Alarm responses varied from 'specific' (tube occluded to 'ambiguous' (Safety valve open. Carefusion Avea responded by continuing to provide the set distending pressure and displaying an appropriate alarm message. Draeger Babylog 8000 did not alarm with partial occlusions and incorrectly displayed airways pressure at 6·1cmH2O compared to the measured values of 13cmH2O.This study found a potential for significant adverse ventilator response due to complete or near complete expiratory limb occlusion in CPAP mode.

  3. Predictors of poor-quality spirometry in two cohorts of older adults in Russia and Belgium: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeshi, Eralda; Zelenukha, Dmitry; Vaes, Bert; Andreeva, Elena; Frolova, Elena; Degryse, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-23

    Spirometry is an important test for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases, yet it is underused especially in older adults. Several predictors of good-quality spirometry in this age group have been reported, based mainly on in/outpatients of geriatric and/or respiratory units. This study aims to assess predictors of poor-quality spirometry in community-dwelling older adults from two primary care cohorts in Russia and Belgium. Spirograms from two population-based cohort studies in Russia (CRYSTAL) and Belgium (BELFRAIL) were assessed in accordance with the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) acceptability and repeatability criteria and grouped into good and poor quality. Multivariable analysis assessed the association of poor-quality spirometry with socio-demographics, functional dependency, physical and mental functioning and co-morbidities. In all, 43.3% of the 522 BELFRAIL participants (84.71 ± 3.67 years old) and 57.7% of the 605 CRYSTAL participants (75.11 ± 5.97 years old) achieved all ATS/ERS acceptability and repeatability criteria. In both cohorts, those with poor-quality spirometry had lower cognitive function (mini-mental state examination (MMSE) ⩽ 24). After adjustment in multivariable analysis, MMSE ⩽ 24 had an odds ratio for poor-quality spirometry of 1.33 (95% CI = 0.78-2.28) in the BELFRAIL and 1.30 (95% CI = 0.88-1.91) in the CRYSTAL cohort. In community-dwelling older adults, including those over 80 years old, impaired cognition measured by the MMSE may not be an independent predictor of poor-quality spirometry. Further research is needed in this area, and spirometry should be used more often in older adults in primary care.

  4. Assessment of five different guideline indication criteria for spirometry, including modified GOLD criteria, in order to detect COPD: data from 5,315 subjects in the PLATINO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luize, Ana P; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Muiño, Adriana; López, Maria Victorina; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmem; Montes de Oca, Maria; Tálamo, Carlos; Celli, Bartolomé; Nascimento, Oliver A; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Jardim, José R

    2014-10-30

    Spirometry is the gold standard for diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although there are a number of different guideline criteria for deciding who should be selected for spirometric screening, to date it is not known which criteria are the best based on sensitivity and specificity. Firstly, to evaluate the proportion of subjects in the PLATINO Study that would be recommended for spirometry testing according to Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)-modified, American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), National Lung Health Education Program (NLHEP), GOLD and American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) criteria. Secondly, we aimed to compare the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive and negative predictive values, of these five different criteria. Data from the PLATINO study included information on respiratory symptoms, smoking and previous spirometry testing. The GOLD-modified spirometry indication criteria are based on three positive answers out of five questions: the presence of cough, phlegm in the morning, dyspnoea, age over 40 years and smoking status. Data from 5,315 subjects were reviewed. Fewer people had an indication for spirometry (41.3%) according to the GOLD-modified criteria, and more people had an indication for spirometry (80.4%) by the GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria. A low percentage had previously had spirometry performed: GOLD-modified (14.5%); ACCP (13.2%); NLHEP (12.6%); and GOLD and ATS/ERS (12.3%). The GOLD-modified criteria showed the least sensitivity (54.9) and the highest specificity (61.0) for detecting COPD, whereas GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria showed the highest sensitivity (87.9) and the least specificity (20.8). There is a considerable difference in the indication for spirometry according to the five different guideline criteria. The GOLD-modified criteria recruit less people with the greatest sum of sensitivity and specificity.

  5. The development of a community-based spirometry service in the Canterbury region of New Zealand: observations on new service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epton, Michael J; Stanton, Josh D; McGeoch, Graham R B; Shand, Brett I; Swanney, Maureen P

    2015-03-05

    In 2008, as part of the changes to develop integrated health care services in the Canterbury region of New Zealand, the local health board in collaboration with general practitioners, respiratory specialists and scientists introduced a programme for general practices to provide laboratory-quality spirometry in the community. The service adhered to the 2005 ATS/ERS international spirometry standards. The spirometry service was provided by trained practice nurses and community respiratory nurses, and was monitored and quality assured by certified respiratory scientists in the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Christchurch Hospital and CISO (Canterbury Initiative Services Organisation). These two organisations were responsible for organising training seminars and refresher courses on spirometry technique and interpretation of results. A total of 10 practices have now become approved spirometry providers, with the number of tests carried out in the primary care setting increasing gradually. Consistently high-quality spirometry tests have been obtained and are now presented on a centrally available results database for all hospital and community clinicians to review. Although the service has proved to be more convenient for patients, the tests have not been delivered as quickly as those carried out by the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory. However, the time scales for testing achieved by the community service is considered suitable for investigation of chronic disease. The success of the service has been dependent on several key factors including hospital and clinical support and a centralised quality assurance programme, a comprehensive training schedule and online clinical guidance and close integration between primary and secondary care clinicians.

  6. Assessment of serology and spirometry and the combination of both to complement microbiological isolation for earlier detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik Pirš, Ana; Krivec, Uroš; Simčič, Saša; Seme, Katja

    2016-11-25

    The aim of this study was to assess whether serology and spirometry and the combination of both can complement culture-based detection for earlier recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis. A 4 year longitudinal prospective study that included 67 Slovenian children with cystic fibrosis with a mean age of 10.5 years was conducted. Serology, spirometry and a scoring system combining serology and spirometry were assessed and compared. Infection was confirmed with isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from respiratory samples. There was a significantly positive correlation between serology and the combination of serology and spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry the highest sensitivity (0.90). Both had a high negative predictive value (0.93 and 0.79 respectively). Using serology and the combination of serology and lung function measurement can be beneficial for earlier detection of infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis when done simultaneously with standard culture-based detection from respiratory samples.

  7. Reference values for spirometry and their use in test interpretation: A Position Statement from the Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzale, Danny; Hall, Graham; Swanney, Maureen P

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, spirometry testing tended to be confined to the realm of hospital-based laboratories but is now performed in a variety of health care settings. Regardless of the setting in which the test is conducted, the fundamental basis of spirometry is that the test is both performed and interpreted according to the international standards. The purpose of this Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science (ANZSRS) statement is to provide the background and recommendations for the interpretation of spirometry results in clinical practice. This includes the benchmarking of an individual's results to population reference data, as well as providing the platform for a statistically and conceptually based approach to the interpretation of spirometry results. Given the many limitations of older reference equations, it is imperative that the most up-to-date and relevant reference equations are used for test interpretation. Given this, the ANZSRS recommends the adoption of the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) 2012 spirometry reference values throughout Australia and New Zealand. The ANZSRS also recommends that interpretation of spirometry results is based on the lower limit of normal from the reference values and the use of Z-scores where available. © 2016 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  8. Analysis of the influence of respiratory disorders observed in preoperative spirometry on the dynamics of early inflammatory response in patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szylińska, Aleksandra; Listewnik, Mariusz J; Rotter, Iwona; Rył, Aleksandra; Biskupski, Andrzej; Brykczyński, Mirosław

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative spirometry provides measurable information about the occurrence of respiratory disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the association between preoperative spirometry abnormalities and the intensification of early inflammatory responses in patients following coronary artery bypass graft in extracorporeal circulation. The study involved 810 patients (625 men and 185 women) aged 65.4±7.9 years who were awaiting isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. On the basis of spirometry performed on the day of admittance to the hospital, the patients were divided into three groups. Patients without respiratory problems constituted 78.8% of the entire group. Restricted breathing was revealed by spirometry in 14.9% and obstructive breathing in 6.3% of patients. Inter-group analysis showed statistically significant differences in C-reactive protein (CRP) between patients with restrictive spirometry abnormalities and patients without any pulmonary dysfunction. CRP concentrations differed before surgery ( P =0.006) and on the second ( P spirometry results from restrictive respiratory disorders have an elevated level of generalized inflammatory response both before and after the isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. Therefore, this group of patients should be given special postoperative monitoring and, in particular, intensive respiratory rehabilitation immediately after reconstitution.

  9. VARIABILITY OF FORCED OSCILLATION (SIEMENS SIREGNOST FD-5) MEASUREMENTS OF TOTAL RESPIRATORY RESISTANCE IN PATIENTS AND HEALTHY-SUBJECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIMENO, F; VANDERWEELE, LT; KOETER, GH; DEMONCHY, JGR; VANALTENA, R

    The reproducibility of total respiratory resistance (R(rs)) measured with a simplified forced oscillatory method (Siemens Siregnost FD 5) was measured and compared with that of slow inspiratory vital capacity (IVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). The former technique has the

  10. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) among Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay Rao, J.; Venkaiah, K.; Mohan Rao, N.

    2010-01-01

    At Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), employees are exposed to ammonia, hydrofluoric acid, acetone, etc., which are respiratory toxicants and inhalation of these pollutants may produce irritation and obstruction in airways. Due to nature of their occupation, tradesman working in plants are having longer duration of exposure (LDE) and others, such as supervisors, scientific officers, helpers, etc., that occasionally visit plants are having shorter duration of exposure (SDE) to these pollutants. The peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) is an index to diagnose obstruction in larger airways and this is metered with mini peak flow meter among 835 NFC employees. Using ANOVA test, PEFR value was compared according to age and smoking. The value was compared between LDE and SDE employees according to smoking and duration of employment. The multiple regression equation for prediction of PEFR was developed. Age, smokers and higher duration of LDE employees demonstrated significantly lower PEFR value. In comparison to 10 year duration, 30 and above year duration of employment, LDE employees showed a higher decline in PEFR, that is 95 L (17.6%) and in SDE employees, that is 41L (7.8%). This may be due to longer duration of employment of LD employees smoking prevention and follow up study is suggested. (author)

  11. Chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure breathing after abdominal and thoracic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, J; Westerdahl, E

    2010-03-01

    A variety of chest physiotherapy techniques are used following abdominal and thoracic surgery to prevent or reduce post-operative complications. Breathing techniques with a positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to increase airway pressure and improve pulmonary function. No systematic review of the effects of PEP in surgery patients has been performed previously. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effect of PEP breathing after an open upper abdominal or thoracic surgery. A literature search of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) was performed in five databases. The trials included were systematically reviewed by two independent observers and critically assessed for methodological quality. We selected six RCT evaluating the PEP technique performed with a mechanical device in spontaneously breathing adult patients after abdominal or thoracic surgery via thoracotomy. The methodological quality score varied between 4 and 6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database score. The studies were published between 1979 and 1993. Only one of the included trials showed any positive effects of PEP compared to other breathing techniques. Today, there is scarce scientific evidence that PEP treatment is better than other physiotherapy breathing techniques in patients undergoing abdominal or thoracic surgery. There is a lack of studies investigating the effect of PEP over placebo or no physiotherapy treatment.

  12. First characterization of the expiratory flow increase technique: method development and results analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maréchal, L; Barthod, C; Jeulin, J C

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an important contribution to the definition of the expiratory flow increase technique (EFIT). So far, no measuring means were suited to assess the manual EFIT performed on infants. The proposed method aims at objectively defining the EFIT based on the quantification of pertinent cognitive parameters used by physiotherapists when practicing. We designed and realized customized instrumented gloves endowed with pressure and displacement sensors, and the associated electronics and software. This new system is specific to the manoeuvre, to the user and innocuous for the patient. Data were collected and analysed on infants with bronchiolitis managed by an expert physiotherapist. The analysis presented is realized on a group of seven subjects (mean age: 6.1 months, SD: 1.1; mean chest circumference: 44.8 cm, SD: 1.9). The results are consistent with the physiotherapist's tactility. In spite of inevitable variability due to measurements on infants, repeatable quantitative data could be reported regarding the manoeuvre characteristics: the magnitudes of displacements do not exceed 10 mm on both hands; the movement of the thoracic hand is more vertical than the movement of the abdominal hand; the maximum applied pressure with the thoracic hand is about twice higher than with the abdominal hand; the thrust of the manual compression lasts (590 ± 62) ms. Inter-operators measurements are in progress in order to generalize these results

  13. Peak expiratory flow as a predictor for the effectiveness of sport for patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungblut, S; Frickmann, H; Klingler, J; Zimmermann, B; Bargon, Joachim

    2006-01-31

    This study intended to find simple parameters that were able to determine the increase in physical performance as a result of sport in a group of patients with COPD (lung sport). We regularly investigated pulse, oxygenation and peak expiratory flow in participants with COPD of a "lung sport group", who participated in a structured weekly training program under professional supervision. Ten volunteers (7 females, 3 males, median of age = 69) with COPD (grade II-III) took part in the study. - The relative changes after 3 and 6 months were compared with the values of the first month of exercise. Measurements were carried out before exercise, after stamina training and at the end of the program. - Pulse and oxygenation did not show any changes. However, there was a significant improvement of peak flow after 6 months. - These peak flow changes represent further evidence of positive effects of sport in COPD and provide a parameter which allows the patients themselves to measure and evaluate the success of their physical activity.

  14. Breath-by-breath analysis of expiratory gas concentration in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabisashi, T

    1981-01-01

    Expiratory oxygen and carbon-dioxide concentration were analysed breath by breath in order to examine their wave forms in adult awake hens restrained in various postural positions, including supine, prone and sitting positions. Expired gas was collected at the nostril in almost all the hens. In the sitting position free from vocalization, feeding, drinking, panting, and restlessness, hens showed various forms of stable pattern of oxygen-gas curves. These forms were classified into three types, or the ascending, flat and descending types, with respect to the plateau inclination. The waves of carbon-dioxide were not always a mirror image of those of oxygen. The rate of occurrence of each type varied with the hen's postural position. The wave form was altered with the experimental body-rotation of the hen. When placed between the deflections of stable pattern, the episodes of wave deformation resembling that seen at the time of uneven pulmonary ventilation in mammals could frequently be observed in any hen's posture examined. Cardiogenic oscillation appeared on the plateau of expired-gas curves.

  15. The effects of smokeless cookstoves on peak expiratory flow rates in rural Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, W P; Porras Blanco, R M; Muniz, G B

    2015-09-01

    The use of biomass fuel for cooking in traditional cookstove designs negatively affects respiratory health of communities in developing countries. Indoor pollution affects particularly women and children, who are participating in food preparation. The effects of smokeless cookstove designs on indoor pollution are well documented, but few studies exist to assess the effects of improved stove designs on the respiratory health of community members. This study uses peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements in a before-and-after format to assess respiratory function of inhabitants of all 30 houses of Buenas Noches in central Honduras. PEFRs are measured before and 6 months after the installation of Justa stoves in people's homes. Health behaviors, respiratory symptoms and fire wood use are evaluated in a door-to-door survey format. A total of 137 eligible women and children between 6 and 14 years participated in the study. PEFR improved by 9.9-18.5% (P < 0.001) depending on the participants' exposure to indoor pollution. Health complaints like cough and behaviors like clinic visits did not change with the introduction of smokeless cookstove technology. Smokeless stoves improve respiratory health in an environment of high levels of indoor pollution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The longitudinal relationship of work stress with peak expiratory flow: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Adrian; Karrasch, Stefan; Lunau, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Research has suggested that psychological stress is associated with reduced lung function and with the development of respiratory disease. Among the major potential sources of stress in adulthood are working conditions. We aimed to examine the relationship of work stress with lung function. We drew on 4-year prospective data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The analyzed sample comprised 2627 workers aged 50 years or older who were anamnestically free of respiratory disease. Work stress at baseline was operationalized by abbreviated instruments measuring the well-established effort-reward imbalance model (seven items) and the control component of the job-demand control (two items). Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was determined at baseline and at follow-up. Continuous and categorized (i.e., by the tertile) work stress variables were employed in multivariable linear regression models to predict PEF change. Work stress did not show statistically significant associations with PEF change. For instance, the unstandardized regression coefficient for PEF decline according to high versus low effort-reward imbalance was -1.41 (95% confidence interval = -3.75, 0.94). Our study is the first to examine prospective relationships between work stress and PEF. Overall, we did not observe meaningful associations. Future studies should consider a broader spectrum of spirometric parameters and should expand research to younger and possibly less-selected working populations (i.e., aged <50 years).

  17. Can Preoperative Peak Expiratory Flow Predict Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Lobectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun ZHOU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs, especially postoperative pneumonia (POP, directly affect the rapid recovery of lung cancer patients after surgery. Peak expiratory flow (PEF can reflect airway patency and cough efficiency. Moreover, cough impairment may lead to accumulation of pulmonary secretions which can increase the risk of PPCs. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of preoperative PEF on PPCs in patients with lung cancer. Methods Retrospective research was conducted on 433 lung cancer patients who underwent lobectomy at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2014 to December 2015. The associations between preoperative PEF and PPCs were analyzed based on patients’ basic characteristics and clinical data in hospital. Results Preoperative PEF value in PPCs group (280.93±88.99 L/min was significantly lower than that in non-PPCs group (358.38±93.69 L/min (P320 L/min group (9.4%(P<0.001. Conclusion Preoperative PEF and PPCs are correlated, and PEF may be used as a predictor of PPCs.

  18. A study of diurnal variation in peak expiratory flow rates in healthy adult female subjects in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Jayapal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR reflects the strength and condition of respiratory muscles and the degree of airflow limitation in large airways. PEFR shows hour to hour variation that follows a specific pattern in asthmatics and healthy individuals. Adequate data is not available for the diurnal variation in normal individuals who are students in professional courses and had a sedentary life style. Hence, this study was undertaken to study the diurnal variation in peak expiratory flow rates in healthy adult female subjects in South India. Materials and Methods: Peak expiratory flow rate was recorded in 50 adult healthy female students aged 18-23 years and studying in professional courses. Mini Wright′s peak flow meter was used to measure the peak expiratory flow rate. PEFR were recorded at 7-8 a.m., 10-11 a.m., 1-2 p.m., 4-5 p.m., and 7-8 p.m. for two consecutive days. Results: On analysis of PEFR records of individual subjects, it was seen that there was an overall dip in the morning at 7-8 h PEFR, which increased in the daytime, peaking in the afternoon at 1-2 p.m. and eventually decreased in the night. Subjects did not show the peak PEFR values at the same time point, 10% of subjects had a rise in PEFR in the early morning, afternoon (1-2 p.m. peak was observed in 48% subjects and evening (4-5 p.m. peak was observed in 16% subjects. 14% subjects showed a peak in the night time (7-8 p.m. PEFR values. Conclusion: This study provided the preliminary reference data of diurnal variation of peak expiratory flow rate in healthy adults. Since, there is a variation in the peak expiratory flow rate recorded during different time points of the day; hence, to compare the PEFR between individuals it is advisable to record the PEFR at the same time point.

  19. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  20. Prediction of lung tumour position based on spirometry and on abdominal displacement: Accuracy and reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoisak, Jeremy D.P.; Sixel, Katharina E.; Tirona, Romeo; Cheung, Patrick C.F.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: A simulation investigating the accuracy and reproducibility of a tumour motion prediction model over clinical time frames is presented. The model is formed from surrogate and tumour motion measurements, and used to predict the future position of the tumour from surrogate measurements alone. Patients and methods: Data were acquired from five non-small cell lung cancer patients, on 3 days. Measurements of respiratory volume by spirometry and abdominal displacement by a real-time position tracking system were acquired simultaneously with X-ray fluoroscopy measurements of superior-inferior tumour displacement. A model of tumour motion was established and used to predict future tumour position, based on surrogate input data. The calculated position was compared against true tumour motion as seen on fluoroscopy. Three different imaging strategies, pre-treatment, pre-fraction and intrafractional imaging, were employed in establishing the fitting parameters of the prediction model. The impact of each imaging strategy upon accuracy and reproducibility was quantified. Results: When establishing the predictive model using pre-treatment imaging, four of five patients exhibited poor interfractional reproducibility for either surrogate in subsequent sessions. Simulating the formulation of the predictive model prior to each fraction resulted in improved interfractional reproducibility. The accuracy of the prediction model was only improved in one of five patients when intrafractional imaging was used. Conclusions: Employing a prediction model established from measurements acquired at planning resulted in localization errors. Pre-fractional imaging improved the accuracy and reproducibility of the prediction model. Intrafractional imaging was of less value, suggesting that the accuracy limit of a surrogate-based prediction model is reached with once-daily imaging

  1. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23

  2. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S. [KNETEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23.

  3. About PF

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make scar tissue. Fibrosis : Scar tissue. Forced expiratory volume (FEV1): The amount of air you can blow out oin one second after filling up your lungs with as much air as possible. Measured by a test called spirometry. Forced vital capacity (FVC): The amount of air you can blow ...

  4. The respiratory drive to thoracic motoneurones in the cat and its relation to the connections from expiratory bulbospinal neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saywell, S A; Anissimova, N P; Ford, T W

    2007-01-01

    of connection revealed were related to the presence and size of central respiratory drive potentials in the same motoneurones. Intracellular recordings were made from motoneurones in segments T5-T9 of the spinal cord of anaesthetized cats. Spike-triggered averaging from expiratory bulbospinal neurones...... in the caudal medulla revealed monosynaptic EPSPs in all groups of motoneurones, with the strongest connections to expiratory motoneurones with axons in the internal intercostal nerve. In the latter, connection strength was similar irrespective of the target muscle (e.g. external abdominal oblique or internal...... intercostal) and the EPSP amplitude was positively correlated with the amplitude of the central respiratory drive potential of the motoneurone. For this group, EPSPs were found in 45/83 bulbospinal neurone/motoneurone pairs, with a mean amplitude of 40.5 microV. The overall strength of the connection supports...

  5. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: Comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlée, Floor; Yzermans, C Joris; Krop, Esmeralda; Aalders, Bernadette; Rooijackers, Jos; Zock, Jan-Paul; van Dijk, Christel E; Maassen, Catharina B M; Schellevis, François; Heederik, Dick; Smit, Lidwien A M

    2017-01-01

    COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their level of agreement, and to compare associations between COPD-definitions and risk factors. COPD-prevalence in 1,793 adults from the general Dutch population (aged 18-70 years) was assessed based on self-reported data, Electronic Medical Records (EMR), and post-BD spirometry: using the FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal (LLN) and GOLD fixed cut-off (FEV1/FVC spirometry as a reference, sensitivity was calculated for self-reported and EMR-based COPD. Associations between COPD and known risk factors were assessed with logistic regression. Data were collected as part of the cross-sectional VGO study (Livestock Farming and Neighboring Residents' Health Study). The highest prevalence was found based on spirometry (GOLD: 10.9%, LLN: 5.9%), followed by self-report (4.6%) and EMR (2.9%). Self-reported or EMR-based COPD identified less than 30% of all COPD-cases based on spirometry. The direction of association between known risk factors and COPD was similar across the four definitions, however, magnitude and significance varied. Especially indicators of allergy were more strongly associated with self-reported COPD compared to the other definitions. COPD-prevalence varied depending on the used definition. A substantial number of subjects with spirometry-based COPD cannot be identified with questionnaires or medical records which can cause underestimation of COPD-prevalence. The influence of the different COPD-definitions on associations with known risk factors was limited.

  6. Effects of one-hour training course and spirometry on the ability of physicians to diagnose and treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shan; Qin, Li; Tanoue, Lynn; Hu, Anmei; Jia, Xiujie; Luo, Hong; Chen, Yan; Chen, Ping; Peng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In China, the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in persons 40 years of age or older is estimated at 8.2%, but this is likely a substantial underestimate. Eight secondary hospitals which didn't have spirometries were chosen randomly in Hunan province of central south China. Physician subjects at these hospitals underwent a one-hour training course on the Chinese COPD guidelines. Physicians answered questionnaires assessing their knowledge of the guidelines before and after the training session. The mean correct scores of questionnaires were compared before and after training. Four out of the eight hospitals were given access to spirometry. Eligible patient subjects underwent spirometry testing prior to the physician visit. After seeing the patient, physicians were asked to answer a questionnaire relating to the diagnosis and severity of COPD. Physicians were then given the results of the spirometry, and asked to answer the same questionnaire. Physicians' responses before and after receiving the spirometry results were compared. 225 physicians participated in the training session. 207 questionnaires were completed. Mean scores (out of 100) before and after the training were 53.1 ± 21.7 and 93.3 ± 9.8, respectively. 18 physicians and 307 patient subjects participated in the spirometry intervention. Based on spirometric results, the prevalence of COPD was 38.8%. Physicians correctly identified the presence of COPD without spirometric data in 85 cases (76.6%); this increased to 117 cases (97.4%) once spirometric data were available. Without spirometric data, physicians incorrectly diagnosed COPD in 38 patients; this decreased to 6 patients once spirometric data were available. Spirometric data also improved the ability of physicians to correctly grade COPD severity. Simple educational training can substantially improve physicians' knowledge relating to COPD. Spirometry combined with education improves the ability of physicians to diagnose COPD

  7. The respiratory drive to thoracic motoneurones in the cat and its relation to the connections from expiratory bulbospinal neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saywell, S A; Anissimova, N P; Ford, T W; Meehan, C F; Kirkwood, P A

    2007-01-01

    The descending control of respiratory-related motoneurones in the thoracic spinal cord remains the subject of some debate. In this study, direct connections from expiratory bulbospinal neurones to identified motoneurones were investigated using spike-triggered averaging and the strengths of connection revealed were related to the presence and size of central respiratory drive potentials in the same motoneurones. Intracellular recordings were made from motoneurones in segments T5–T9 of the spinal cord of anaesthetized cats. Spike-triggered averaging from expiratory bulbospinal neurones in the caudal medulla revealed monosynaptic EPSPs in all groups of motoneurones, with the strongest connections to expiratory motoneurones with axons in the internal intercostal nerve. In the latter, connection strength was similar irrespective of the target muscle (e.g. external abdominal oblique or internal intercostal) and the EPSP amplitude was positively correlated with the amplitude of the central respiratory drive potential of the motoneurone. For this group, EPSPs were found in 45/83 bulbospinal neurone/motoneurone pairs, with a mean amplitude of 40.5 μV. The overall strength of the connection supports previous measurements made by cross-correlation, but is about 10 times stronger than that reported in the only previous similar survey to use spike-triggered averaging. Calculations are presented to suggest that this input alone is sufficient to account for all the expiratory depolarization seen in the recorded motoneurones. However, extra sources of input, or amplification of this one, are likely to be necessary to produce a useful motoneurone output. PMID:17204500

  8. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Cagle

    Full Text Available Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury.To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation.5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85 were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers.Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation.Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide

  9. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Jerold A.; Adams, Jason Y.; Harper, Richart W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Objectives To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. Methods 5–12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Results Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Conclusions Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points

  10. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Laura A; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; Last, Jerold A; Adams, Jason Y; Harper, Richart W; Kenyon, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. 5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide the frequency

  11. Difficulty in obtaining peak expiratory flow measurements in children with acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Marc H; Stevens, Molly W; Schultz, Theresa; Scribano, Philip V

    2004-01-01

    To determine the frequency with which children >or=6 years with acute asthma can perform peak expiratory flow rate measurements (PEFR) in an emergency department (ED). Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of children with acute asthma. All children (age 2-18 years old) treated in an urban pediatric ED for an acute exacerbation during randomly selected days over a 12-month period were prospectively evaluated. According to treatment protocols, PEFR was to be measured in all children age 6 years and older before therapy and after each treatment with inhaled bronchodilators. Registered respiratory therapists obtained PEFR and evaluated whether patients were able to perform the maneuver adequately. Four hundred and fifty-six children, 6 to 18 years old (median 10 years), were enrolled; 291 (64%) had PEFR measured at least once. Of those in whom PEFR was attempted at least once, only 190 (65%) were able to perform adequately. At the start of therapy, 54% (142/262) were able to perform PEFR. Of the 120 who were unable to perform initially, 76 had another attempt at the end of the ED treatment, and 55 (72%) were still unable to perform. A total of 149 patients had attempts at PEFR both at the start and end of treatment, of these, only 71 (48%) provided valid information on both attempts. Patients unable to perform PEFR were younger (mean +/- SD = 8.7 +/- 2.8 years) than those who were able to perform successfully (11.2 +/- 3.2 years) and those with no attempts (10.0 +/- 3.4 years). Children admitted to the hospital were more likely to be unable to perform PEFR (58/126 = 46%) than those discharged from the ED (43/330 = 13%, P < 0.0001). Adequate PEFR measurements are difficult to obtain in children with acute asthma. Treatment and research protocols cannot rely exclusively on PEFR for evaluation of severity.

  12. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves gas exchange and pulmonary mechanics during partial liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmse, M; Fujino, Y; Hess, D; Kacmarek, R M

    1998-11-01

    Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perflubron (PFB) has been proposed as an adjunct to the current therapies for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Because PFB has been also referred to as "liquid PEEP," distributing to the most gravity-dependent regions of the lung, less attention has been paid to the amount of applied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). We hypothesized that higher PEEP levels than currently applied are needed to optimize gas exchange, and that the lower inflection point (LIP) of the pressure-volume curve could be used to estimate the amount of PEEP needed when the lung is filled with PFB. Lung injury was induced in 23 sheep by repeated lung lavage with warmed saline until the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell below 150. Five sheep were used to investigate the change of the LIP when the lung was filled with PFB in increments of 5 ml/kg/body weight to a total of 30 ml/kg/body weight. To evaluate the impact of PEEP set at LIP +1 cm H2O we randomized an additional 15 sheep to three groups with different doses (7.5 ml, 15 ml, 30 ml/kg/body weight) of PFB. In random order a PEEP of 5 cm H2O or PEEP at LIP +1 cm H2O was applied. The LIP decreased with incremental filling of PFB to a minimum at 10 ml (p PFB shifts the LIP to the left, and that setting PEEP at LIP +1 cm H2O improves gas exchange at moderate to high doses of PFB.

  13. Asthma in pregnancy: association between the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and comparisons with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Georgia Véras; Leite, Débora F B; Rizzo, José A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible association between the assessment of clinical asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to perform comparisons with values of spirometry. Through this cross-sectional study, 103 pregnant women with asthma were assessed in the period from October 2010 to October 2013 in the asthma pregnancy clinic at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Questionnaires concerning the level of asthma control were administered using the Global Initiative for Asthma classification, the Asthma Control Test validated for asthmatic expectant mothers and spirometry; all three methods of assessing asthma control were performed during the same visit between the twenty-first and twenty-seventh weeks of pregnancy. There was a significant association between clinical asthma control assessment using the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification (pspirometry. This study shows that both the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and the Asthma Control Test can be used for asthmatic expectant mothers to assess the clinical control of asthma, especially at the end of the second trimester, which is assumed to be the period of worsening asthma exacerbations during pregnancy. We highlight the importance of the Asthma Control Test as a subjective instrument with easy application, easy interpretation and good reproducibility that does not require spirometry to assess the level of asthma control and can be used in the primary care of asthmatic expectant mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The recent multi-ethnic global lung initiative 2012 (GLI2012) reference values don't reflect contemporary adult's North African spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, Helmi; El Attar, Mohamed Nour; Hadj Mabrouk, Khaoula; Ben Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Abdelghani, Ahmed; Bousarssar, Mohamed; Limam, Khélifa; Maatoug, Chiraz; Bouslah, Hmida; Charrada, Ameur; Rouatbi, Sonia

    2013-12-01

    The applicability of the recent multi-ethnic reference equations derived by the ERS Global Lung Initiative (ERS/GLI) in interpreting spirometry data in North African adult subjects has not been studied. To ascertain how well the recent ERS/GLI reference equations fit contemporary adult Tunisian spirometric data. Spirometric data were recorded from 1192 consecutive spirometry procedures in adults aged 18-60 years. Reference values and lower limits of normality (LLN) were calculated using the local and the ERS/GLI reference equations. Applied definitions: large airway obstructive ventilatory defect (LAOVD): FEV1/FVC contemporary Tunisian spirometry. Using Tunisian reference equations, 71.31%, 6.71% and 19.04% of spirometry records were interpreted as normal, and as having, LAOVD and TRVD, respectively. Using the ERS/GLI reference equations, these figures were respectively, 85.82%, 4.19% and 8.39%. The mean ± SD Z-scores for the contemporary healthy North African subject's data were -0.55 ± 0.87 for FEV1, -0.62 ± 0.86 for FVC and 0.10 ± 0.73 for FEV1/FVC. The present study don't recommend the use of the recent ERS/GLI reference equations to interpret spirometry in North African adult population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Pressure Generated by Resistors From Different Positive Expiratory Pressure Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Carlsson, Maria; Olsén, Erik; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to improve pulmonary function and airway clearance. Different PEP devices are available, but there have been no studies that describe the pressure generated by different resistors. The purpose of this study was to compare pressures generated from the proprietary resistor components of 4 commercial flow-dependent PEP valves with all other parameters kept constant. Resistors from 4 flow-regulated PEP devices (Pep/Rmt system, Wellspect HealthCare; Pipe P breathing exerciser, Koo Medical Equipment; Mini-PEP, Philips Respironics [including resistors by Rüsch]; and 15-mm endo-adapter, VBM Medizintechnik) were tested randomly by a blinded tester at constant flows of 10 and 18 L/min from an external gas system. All resistors were tested 3 times. Resistors with a similar diameter produced statistically significant different pressures at the same flow. The differences were smaller when the flow was 10 L/min compared with 18 L/min. The differences were also smaller when the diameter of the resistor was increased. The pressures produced by the 4 resistors of the same size were all significantly different when measuring 1.5- and 2.0-mm resistors at a flow of 10 L/min and 2.0-mm resistors at a flow of 18 L/min (P < .001). There were no significant differences between any of the resistors when testing sizes of 4.5 and 5.0 mm at either flow. The Mini-PEP and adapter resistors gave the highest pressures. Pressures generated by the different proprietary resistor components of 4 commercial PEP devices were not comparable, even though the diameter of the resistors is reported to be the same. The pressures generated were significantly different, particularly when using small-diameter resistors at a high flow. Therefore, the resistors may not be interchangeable. This is important information for clinicians, particularly when considering PEP for patients who do not tolerate higher pressures. Copyright © 2015 by

  16. [Clinical research of using optimal compliance to determine positive end-expiratory pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Feng, Quan-sheng; Lian, Fu; Shao, Xin-hua; Li, Zhi-bo; Wang, Zhi-yong; Li, Jun

    2012-07-01

    To observe the availability and security of optimal compliance strategy to titrate the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), compared with quasi-static pressure-volume curve (P-V curve) traced by low-flow method. Fourteen patients received mechanical ventilation with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) of Tianjin Third Central Hospital from November 2009 to December 2010 were divided into two groups(n = 7). The quasi-static P-V curve method and the optimal compliance titration were used to set the optimal PEEP respectively, repeated 3 times in a row. The optimal PEEP and the consistency of repeated experiments were compared between groups. The hemodynamic parameters, oxygenation index (OI), lung compliance (C), cytokines and pulmonary surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) concentration in plasma before and 2, 4, and 6 hours after the experiment were observed in each group. (1) There were no significant differences in gender, age and severity of disease between two groups. (2)The optimal PEEP [cm H(2)O, 1 cm H(2)O=0.098 kPa] had no significant difference between quasi-static P-V curve method group and the optimal compliance titration group (11.53 ± 2.07 vs. 10.57 ± 0.87, P>0.05). The consistency of repeated experiments in quasi-static P-V curve method group was poor, the slope of the quasi-static P-V curve in repeated experiments showed downward tendency. The optimal PEEP was increasing in each measure. There was significant difference between the first and the third time (10.00 ± 1.58 vs. 12.80 ± 1.92, P vs. 93.71 ± 5.38, temperature: 38.05 ± 0.73 vs. 36.99 ± 1.02, IL-6: 144.84 ± 23.89 vs. 94.73 ± 5.91, TNF-α: 151.46 ± 46.00 vs. 89.86 ± 13.13, SP-D: 33.65 ± 8.66 vs. 16.63 ± 5.61, MAP: 85.47 ± 9.24 vs. 102.43 ± 8.38, CCI: 3.00 ± 0.48 vs. 3.81 ± 0.81, OI: 62.00 ± 21.45 vs. 103.40 ± 37.27, C: 32.10 ± 2.92 vs. 49.57 ± 7.18, all P safety and usability.

  17. Comparison of peak expiratory flow rate and lipid profile in asymptomatic smokers and non-smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, F.; Abbasi, M.A.; Jadoon, J.; Sohail, M.; Shah, J.; Afridi, U.; Noor, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco is the major risk factor for chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), other pulmonary diseases, cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The objective of study was to determine the mean Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) and serum lipid profile in apparently healthy male smokers and non-smokers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from 15th December, 2009 to 15th June, 2010. Apparently healthy smokers and non-smokers from population coming to Hospital as attendants of the patients or as employees of the hospital were inducted in the study. PEFR and lipid profile of all the subjects was accessed. Results: There were total of 300 male subjects, 150 smokers and 150 non-smokers. The mean age of study subjects was 26.60 ± 5.5 years. The mean PEFR of smokers was 450.62l/min and that of non-smokers was 494.81 L/min, the difference being statistically significant (p-value <0.05).The mean total cholesterol of smokers is 5.30 ± 0.86 mmol/l and it was 3.84 ± 0.54 mmol/l in non-smokers. Mean serum Triacyl Glycerols (TAGs) and Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol of smokers was 2.04 ± 0.38 and 3.5 ± 0.83 mmol/l whereas it was 1.44 ± 0.52 and 2.02 ± 0.66 mmol/l in non-smokers. Mean High Density Lipo-protein (HDL) of smokers was 0.86 ± 0.30 mmol/l and of non-smokers is 1.20 ± 0.41 mmo/l. There was statistically significant difference between serum lipid profile of smokers and non-smokers (p<0.05). the mean serum Total Cholesterol (TC), TAGs and LDL were significantly higher in smokers as compared to non-smokers. However HDL was significantly lower in smokers in comparison to non-smokers. Conclusion: There was statistically significant difference between PEFR of smokers and non-smokers. Higher and significant mean values of TC, TAG and LDL-C was observed in smokers as compared to non-smokers. (author)

  18. [The role of spirometry in encouraging smoking cessation in general practice. A pilot study using "lung age"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, A; Noël, F; Lorenzo, M; Van Den Broucke, J

    2017-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether spirometry, performed in general practitioners' offices would change non-motivated smokers' attitudes toward smoking cessation. We performed an interventional, prospective, before-after single-center study, approved by a research ethics committee. We included 74 smokers older than 18years old, who reported no intention to quit smoking, whatever they were visiting general practitioners for. We performed spirometry and gave them their results, FEV 1 /FVC and lung age together with a comment on it. Nine months later, we called them for another assessment. Fifty-six percent were women with an average-age of 46.5, who smoked 26.3 pack-years. Eighty-two percent of them had normal FEV 1 /FVC but lung age was pathological among 38% of them. Nine months later, 61.1% reported an increased motivation to quit smoking. They smoked 10.9 cigarettes per day versus 13,3 at baseline (P=0.0254). Increase in motivation was not statistically related to age, gender, previous smoking cessations, daily smoking, nicotine dependence or an abnormal FEV 1 /VC ratio (P>0.75) but was significantly related to the presence of an abnormal lung age status (Pspirometry in general practice, combined with the determination of the lung age, may increase motivation towards smoking cessation in smokers who lack motivation. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of functional residual capacity with 133-xenon radiospirometry. Comparison with body plethysmography and helium spirometry. Effect of body position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauppinen-Walin, K.; Sovijaervi, A.R.A.; Muittari, A.; Uusitalo, A.

    1980-01-01

    The accuracy of 133-xenon radiospirometry for determination of FRC in healthy subjects was studied. Forty volunteers, both smokers and non-smokers, were examined. The FRC of each subject was concurrently determined with radiospirometric, He-dilution in closed circuit, and body plethysmographic methods. The mean FRC measured by radiospirometry (FRCsub(RS)) was 0.72 1 larger than that measured by helium spirometry (FRCsub(He)) in sitting position (P<0.01). In supine position the FRCsub(RS) was 0.65 1 larger than the FRCsub(He) (P<0.01). The body plethysmography (sitting position) gave FRC (TGV) 0.35 1 larger than the FRCsub(He) sitting (P<0.01). The FRCsub(He) and the FRCsub(RS) in the sitting position were 0.48 and 0.55 1 larger than in the supine position (P<0.01), respectively. Trapped air correlated significantly (P<0.01) with the difference FRCsub(RS) - FRCsub(He), when sitting. The results indicated that the FRC determined radiospirometrically is significantly larger than the FRC determined with He-spirometry. The difference is systematic, suggesting that it is caused by 133-xenon dissolved in blood and accumulated in tissues of the thoracic cage and by dissimilar representation of trapped air in FRCsub(RS) and FRCsub(He). After correction for systematic error, the FRC obtained as a by-product of radiospirometry may be used. (author)

  20. COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) for selecting at-risk patients for spirometry: a cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Anthony J; Hasan, Iqbal; Crockett, Alan J; van Schayck, Onno C P; Zwar, Nicholas A

    2014-07-10

    Using the COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) as a selection tool for spirometry could potentially improve the efficiency and accuracy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis in at-risk patients. To identify an optimal single cut point for the CDQ that divides primary care patients into low or high likelihood of COPD, with the latter group undergoing spirometry. Former or current smokers aged 40-85 years with no prior COPD diagnosis were invited to a case-finding appointment with the practice nurse at various general practices in Sydney, Australia. The CDQ was collected and pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry was performed. Cases with complete CDQ data and spirometry meeting quality standards were analysed (1,054 out of 1,631 patients). CDQ cut points were selected from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the ROC curve was 0.713. A cut point of 19.5 had the optimal combination of sensitivity (63%) and specificity (70%) with two-thirds below this cut point. A cut point of 14.5 corresponded to a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 35% and negative predictive value of 96%, and 31% of patients below this cut point. The CDQ can be used to select patients at risk of COPD for spirometry using one cut point. We consider two possible cut points. The 19.5 cut point excludes a higher proportion of patients from undergoing spirometry with the trade-off of more false negatives. The 14.5 cut point has a high sensitivity and negative predictive value, includes more potential COPD cases but has a higher rate of false positives.

  1. Prevalence of Airflow Limitation Defined by Pre- and Post-Bronchodilator Spirometry in a Community-Based Health Checkup: The Hisayama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Satoru; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Kaneko, Yasuko; Kan-o, Keiko; Noda, Naotaka; Tajiri-Asai, Yukari; Nakano, Takako; Ishii, Yumiko; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-02-01

    Spirometry in health checkup may contribute to early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Although post-bronchodilator airflow limitation is essential for definite diagnosis of COPD and post-bronchodilator normalization of airflow is suggestive of asthma, this test has not been prevailed in health checkup. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of airflow limitation defined by pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry in health checkup. Post-bronchodilator spirometry was conducted for participants with airflow limitation in a town-wide health checkup for residents aged 40 years and older in Hisayama, a town in the western part of Japan. The prevalence of pre- and post-bronchodilator airway limitation defined by FEV1/FVC spirometry. In males, the age of current smokers was significantly younger than those of never smokers and former smokers. In females, the ages of current- and former smokers were significantly younger than never smokers. The values of %FEV1 and %FVC in current smokers were significantly lower than those in former smokers and never smokers. Two hundred sixty nine subjects, 85% of total subjects with a pre-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC spirometry. The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator airflow limitation was 14.6% in males and 13.7% in females, and the prevalence of post-bronchodilator airway limitation was 8.7% and 8.7%, respectively. Post-bronchodilator spirometry in health checkup would reduce the number of subjects with probable COPD to two-third. Recommendation for those examinees to take further evaluations may pave the way for early intervention.

  2. Viabilidade da realização de espirometria em pré-escolares Feasibility of spirometry in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Neves Veras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a taxa de sucesso na obtenção de resultados adequados de espirometria em pacientes pré-escolares. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os resultados de espirometrias de crianças menores que 6 anos. Todos os testes foram realizados no Laboratório de Função Pulmonar do Hospital Infantil Jeser Amarante Faria, em Joinville (SC entre junho de 2009 e fevereiro de 2010. O programa utilizado continha um incentivo de animação (bolhas de sabão.Os procedimentos foram realizados por um pneumologista infantil e obedeceram aos critérios de reprodutibilidade e aceitabilidade preconizados pela American Thoracic Society. Buscou-se atingir um tempo expiratório de pelo menos 1 s. Os seguintes parâmetros foram registrados: CVF, VEF0,5, VEF1 e relação VEF1/CVF. RESULTADOS: Nossa amostra consistiu de 74 crianças. A taxa de sucesso foi de 82%, com melhora no desempenho do teste em idades mais avançadas, mas sem significado estatístico (p > 0,05. Em média, foram necessárias 6,6 tentativas durante o exame para a obtenção de curvas aceitáveis e reprodutíveis. Todos os 61 testes bem sucedidos tiveram resultados de VEF0,5 e VEF1 satisfatórios. Através de escore Z, constatou-se que 21,6 % das crianças apresentavam com padrão obstrutivo. CONCLUSÕES: A taxa de sucesso da espirometria foi alta em nossa amostra, mostrando que esse é um método válido de avaliação da função pulmonar em pré-escolares. O uso de métodos de incentivo e a realização do teste por profissionais treinados no trabalho com crianças podem estar associados à elevada taxa de sucesso em nossa amostraOBJECTIVE: To determine the rate at which satisfactory spirometry results are obtained (spirometry success rate in preschool children. METHODS: We analyzed the spirometry results of children 0.05. An average of 6.6 attempts/test were needed in order to achieve acceptable, reproducible curves. All 61 successful tests produced satisfactory FEV0.5 and FEV1 values

  3. Impulse oscillometry, spirometry, and passive smoking in healthy children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I.S. Schivinski

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Children and adolescents exposed to PS had lower values for the spirometric variables and higher values for the oscillometric variables, indicating changes in forced and quiet parameters of lung function compared to the NPSG.

  4. An audit of spirometry at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    also be used in the detection of respiratory disease in patients ... obstructive and restrictive ventilatory defects. The test can be ... obstructive ventilatory defect if the ratio of Force ..... Johns DP, Burton D, Walters JA, Wood-Baker R. National.

  5. Forced Oscillation Technique and Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Mochizuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most infants and preschool children are not able to voluntarily perform the physiological maneuvers required to complete the pulmonary function tests that are used in adults and older children. Recently, commercial devices using forced oscillation technique (FOT suitable for young children have become available. In devices with FOT, an oscillation pressure wave is generated by a loud speaker, is applied to the respiratory system, usually at the mouth, and the resulting pressure-flow relationship is analyzed in terms of impedance (Zrs. Zrs encompasses both resistance (Rrs and reactance (Xrs. Rrs is calculated from pressure and flow signals, and is a measure of central and peripheral airway caliber. Xrs is derived from the pressure in the phase with volume and is related to compliance (Crs and inertance (Irs. These parameters individually indicate the condition of the small and large airways in each patient and indirectly suggest the presence of airway inflammation. It is agreed that the clinical diagnostic capacity of FOT is comparable to that of spirometry. One of the advantages of FOT is that minimal cooperation of the patient is needed and no respiratory maneuvers are required. The use of FOT should be considered in patients in whom spirometry or other pulmonary function tests cannot be performed or in cases where the results of other tests appear to be unreliable. In addition, this approach is effective in assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Considering these qualities, FOT is a useful method to study pulmonary function in preschool children with asthma.

  6. Effects of brief smoking cessation education with expiratory carbon monoxide measurement on level of motivation to quit smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Young; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Lee, Ok-Gyu

    2013-05-01

    Smoking rates among Korean adult males is still high despite multifaceted efforts to reduce it. In Korea, there have been several studies on the effectiveness of smoking cessation education for inpatients, health check-ups, and smoking cessation clinics. However, there haven't been any studies on the effectiveness of smoking cessation education conducted outside the hospital. This study investigated effectiveness of brief education on smoking cessation with an expiratory carbon monoxide (CO) measurement outside the hospital among adult male office-workers in Korea. From April 1st to May 10th, 2012, we conducted a controlled trial among 95 adult male office workers over the age of 19 who smoke outside, in a public place in Seoul by cluster sampling. For the education group, we provided smoking cessation education for about 5 to 10 minutes, measured the expiratory CO level, and made the subjects complete questionnaires, while only self-help materials on quitting smoking were given to the control group. After 4 weeks, we evaluated the change in the level of motivation or success to quit smoking in both groups via e-mail or mobile phone. In the education group, the level of motivation to quit smoking was improved significantly. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of improved motivation to quit smoking in the education group was 28.10 times higher than that of the control group. Brief education on smoking cessation with expiratory CO measurement conducted outside the hospital could enhance the level of motivation to quit smoking.

  7. Effects of recruitment maneuver and positive end-expiratory pressure on respiratory mechanics and transpulmonary pressure during laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinnella, Gilda; Grasso, Salvatore; Spadaro, Savino; Rauseo, Michela; Mirabella, Lucia; Salatto, Potito; De Capraris, Antonella; Nappi, Luigi; Greco, Pantaleo; Dambrosio, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that during laparoscopic surgery, Trendelenburg position and pneumoperitoneum may worsen chest wall elastance, concomitantly decreasing transpulmonary pressure, and that a protective ventilator strategy applied after pneumoperitoneum induction, by increasing transpulmonary pressure, would result in alveolar recruitment and improvement in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange. In 29 consecutive patients, a recruiting maneuver followed by positive end-expiratory pressure 5 cm H(2)O maintained until the end of surgery was applied after pneumoperitoneum induction. Respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, blood pressure, and cardiac index were measured before (T(BSL)) and after pneumoperitoneum with zero positive end-expiratory pressure (T(preOLS)), after recruitment with positive end-expiratory pressure (T(postOLS)), and after peritoneum desufflation with positive end-expiratory pressure (T(end)). Esophageal pressure was used for partitioning respiratory mechanics between lung and chest wall (data are mean ± SD): on T(preOLS), chest wall elastance (E(cw)) and elastance of the lung (E(L)) increased (8.2 ± 0.9 vs. 6.2 ± 1.2 cm H(2)O/L, respectively, on T(BSL); P = 0.00016; and 11.69 ± 1.68 vs. 9.61 ± 1.52 cm H(2)O/L on T(BSL); P = 0.0007). On T(postOLS), both chest wall elastance and E(L) decreased (5.2 ± 1.2 and 8.62 ± 1.03 cm H(2)O/L, respectively; P = 0.00015 vs. T(preOLS)), and Pao(2)/inspiratory oxygen fraction improved (491 ± 107 vs. 425 ± 97 on T(preOLS); P = 0.008) remaining stable thereafter. Recruited volume (the difference in lung volume for the same static airway pressure) was 194 ± 80 ml. Pplat(RS) remained stable while inspiratory transpulmonary pressure increased (11.65 + 1.37 cm H(2)O vs. 9.21 + 2.03 on T(preOLS); P = 0.007). All respiratory mechanics parameters remained stable after abdominal desufflation. Hemodynamic parameters remained stable throughout the study. In patients submitted to laparoscopic surgery in

  8. Subatomic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    1989-01-01

    Inside the atom, particles interact through two forces which are never felt in the everyday world. But they may hold the key to the Universe. These ideas on subatomic forces are discussed with respect to the strong force, the electromagnetic force and the electroweak force. (author)

  9. Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow in the case of major upper airway obstructions with fluid structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouly, F.; van Hirtum, A.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Pelorson, X.; Payan, Y.

    2008-02-01

    This study deals with the numerical prediction and experimental description of the flow-induced deformation in a rapidly convergent divergent geometry which stands for a simplified tongue, in interaction with an expiratory airflow. An original in vitro experimental model is proposed, which allows measurement of the deformation of the artificial tongue, in condition of major initial airway obstruction. The experimental model accounts for asymmetries in geometry and tissue properties which are two major physiological upper airway characteristics. The numerical method for prediction of the fluid structure interaction is described. The theory of linear elasticity in small deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical behaviour of the tongue. The main features of the flow are taken into account using a boundary layer theory. The overall numerical method entails finite element solving of the solid problem and finite differences solving of the fluid problem. First, the numerical method predicts the deformation of the tongue with an overall error of the order of 20%, which can be seen as a preliminary successful validation of the theory and simulations. Moreover, expiratory flow limitation is predicted in this configuration. As a result, both the physical and numerical models could be useful to understand this phenomenon reported in heavy snorers and apneic patients during sleep.

  10. Improved oxygenation during standing performance of deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure after cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Henrik; Faager, Gun; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    Breathing exercises after cardiac surgery are often performed in a sitting position. It is unknown whether oxygenation would be better in the standing position. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxygenation and subjective breathing ability during sitting vs standing performance of deep breathing exercises on the second day after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 189) were randomized to sitting (controls) or standing. Both groups performed 3 × 10 deep breaths with a positive expiratory pressure device. Peripheral oxygen saturation was measured before, directly after, and 15 min after the intervention. Subjective breathing ability, blood pressure, heart rate, and pain were assessed. Oxygenation improved significantly in the standing group compared with controls directly after the breathing exercises (p < 0.001) and after 15 min rest (p = 0.027). The standing group reported better deep breathing ability compared with controls (p = 0.004). A slightly increased heart rate was found in the standing group (p = 0.047). After cardiac surgery, breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure, performed in a standing position, significantly improved oxygenation and subjective breathing ability compared with sitting performance. Performance of breathing exercises in the standing position is feasible and could be a valuable treatment for patients with postoperative hypoxaemia.

  11. Echocardiography, spirometry, and systemic acute-phase inflammatory proteins in smokers with COPD or CHF: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Beghé

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic heart failure (CHF may coexist in elderly patients with a history of smoking. Low-grade systemic inflammation induced by smoking may represent the link between these 2 conditions. In this study, we investigated left ventricular dysfunction in patients primarily diagnosed with COPD, and nonreversible airflow limitation in patients primarily diagnosed with CHF. The levels of circulating high-sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP, pentraxin 3 (PTX3, interleukin-1β (IL-1 β, and soluble type II receptor of IL-1 (sIL-1RII were also measured as markers of systemic inflammation in these 2 cohorts. Patients aged ≥ 50 years and with ≥ 10 pack years of cigarette smoking who presented with a diagnosis of stable COPD (n=70 or stable CHF (n=124 were recruited. All patients underwent echocardiography, N-terminal pro-hormone of brain natriuretic peptide measurements, and post-bronchodilator spirometry. Plasma levels of Hs-CRP, PTX3, IL-1 β, and sIL-1RII were determined by using a sandwich enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay in all patients and in 24 healthy smokers (control subjects. Although we were unable to find a single COPD patient with left ventricular dysfunction, we found nonreversible airflow limitation in 34% of patients with CHF. On the other hand, COPD patients had higher plasma levels of Hs-CRP, IL1 β, and sIL-1RII compared with CHF patients and control subjects (p < 0.05. None of the inflammatory biomarkers was different between CHF patients and control subjects. In conclusion, although the COPD patients had no evidence of CHF, up to one third of patients with CHF had airflow limitation, suggesting that routine spirometry is warranted in patients with CHF, whereas echocardiography is not required in well characterized patients with COPD. Only smokers with COPD seem to have evidence of systemic inflammation.

  12. Effect of volume-oriented versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Adriana C; Porras, Desiderio C; Barbosa, Renata Cc; Paisani, Denise M; Marques da Silva, Cibele C B; Tanaka, Clarice; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2014-03-01

    Aging causes physiological and functional changes that impair pulmonary function. Incentive spirometry is widely used for lung expansion, but the effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry (VIS) versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry (FIS) on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly are poorly understood. We compared VIS and FIS in elderly subjects and healthy adult subjects. Sixteen elderly subjects (9 women, mean ± SD age 70.6 ± 3.9 y, mean ± SD body mass index 23.8 ± 2.5 kg/m(2)) and 16 healthy adults (8 women, mean ± age 25.9 ± 4.3 y, mean ± body mass index 23.6 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) performed quiet breathing, VIS, and FIS in randomized sequence. Chest wall kinematics (via optoelectronic plethysmography) and inspiratory muscle activity (via surface electromyography) were assessed simultaneously. Synchrony between the superior thorax and abdominal motion was calculated (phase angle). In the elderly subjects both types of incentive spirometry increased chest wall volumes similarly, whereas in the healthy adult subjects VIS increased the chest wall volume more than did FIS. FIS and VIS triggered similar lower thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly subjects, whereas in the healthy adults FIS induced lower synchrony than did VIS. FIS required more muscle activity in the elderly subjects to create an increase in chest wall volume. Incentive spirometry performance is influenced by age, and the differences between elderly and healthy adults response should be considered in clinical practice.

  13. Semi-Quantitative Assessment of the Health Risk of Occupational Exposure to Chemicals and Evaluation of Spirometry Indices on the Staff of Petrochemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Dazi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Petrochemical industry is an important industry in the economic development of the country that causes employees have exposure with several kinds of contamination. The aim of this study was Semi-quantitative assessment of the health risk of occupational exposure to chemical materials and investigation of spirometry indices between employees of petrochemical industry. Material & Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the petrochemical industry complex in a special area of Assaluyeh in Iran in 2016. Health risk assessment of exposure to harmful chemical agents was performed in all of units and during three stages (identification of harmful material, determination of hazard rate of the chemical material, exposure rate and estimate of risk rate. Spirometry indices were measured using spirometry. Results: The results of chemical materials risk assessment showed that Raffinate in Butadiene unit has identified the highest amount of risk rank among 27 chemical materials in investigated units. In comparison with spirometry indices in Olefine unit between age with FVC parameter and history work with FVC and FEV1 parameters has observed a significant and negative correlation (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of risk assessment in all of the petrochemical units showed that 48.14% of materials were at low risk level, 29.62% medium risk, 18.51% high risk and 3.7% had very high risk level. The variables affecting on spirometry employees such as age and work experience play an important role in reducing the pulmonary function tests in exposed subjects.

  14. Impediment in upper airway stabilizing forces assessed by phrenic nerve stimulation in sleep apnea patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vérin E

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The forces developed during inspiration play a key role in determining upper airway stability and the occurrence of nocturnal breathing disorders. Phrenic nerve stimulation applied during wakefulness is a unique tool to assess Upper airway dynamic properties and to measure the overall mechanical effects of the inspiratory process on UA stability. Objectives To compare the flow/pressure responses to inspiratory and expiratory twitches between sleep apnea subjects and normal subjects. Methods Inspiratory and expiratory twitches using magnetic nerve stimulation completed in eleven untreated sleep apnea subjects and ten normal subjects. Results In both groups, higher flow and pressure were reached during inspiratory twitches. The two groups showed no differences in expiratory twitch parameters. During inspiration, the pressure at which flow-limitation occurred was more negative in normals than in apneic subjects, but not reaching significance (p = 0.07. The relationship between pharyngeal pressure and flow adequately fitted with a polynomial regression model providing a measurement of upper airway critical pressure during twitch. This pressure significantly decreased in normals from expiratory to inspiratory twitches (-11.1 ± 1.6 and -15.7 ± 1.0 cm H2O respectively, 95% CI 1.6–7.6, p Conclusion Inspiratory-related upper airway dilating forces are impeded in sleep apnea patients.

  15. Positive expiratory pressure therapy versus other airway clearance techniques for bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Holland, Anne E

    2017-09-27

    People with bronchiectasis experience chronic cough and sputum production and require the prescription of airway clearance techniques (ACTs). A common type of ACT prescribed is positive expiratory pressure (PEP) therapy. A previous review has suggested that ACTs including PEP therapy are beneficial compared to no treatment in people with bronchiectasis. However, the efficacy of PEP therapy in a stable clinical state or during an acute exacerbation compared to other ACTs in bronchiectasis is unknown. The primary aim of this review was to determine the effects of PEP therapy compared with other ACTs on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), rate of acute exacerbations, and incidence of hospitalisation in individuals with stable or an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis.Secondary aims included determining the effects of PEP therapy upon physiological outcomes and clinical signs and symptoms compared with other ACTs in individuals with stable or an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of Trials, PEDro and clinical trials registries from inception to February 2017 and we handsearched relevant journals. Randomised controlled parallel and cross-over trials that compared PEP therapy versus other ACTs in participants with bronchiectasis. We used standard methodological procedures as outlined by Cochrane. Nine studies involving 213 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which seven were cross-over in design. All studies included adults with bronchiectasis, with eight including participants in a stable clinical state and one including participants experiencing an acute exacerbation. Eight studies used oscillatory PEP therapy, using either a Flutter or Acapella device and one study used Minimal PEP therapy. The comparison intervention differed between studies. The methodological quality of studies was poor, with cross-over studies including suboptimal or no washout period, and a lack of blinding of

  16. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson?s disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural t...

  17. Setting individualized positive end-expiratory pressure level with a positive end-expiratory pressure decrement trial after a recruitment maneuver improves oxygenation and lung mechanics during one-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Mugarra, Ana; Gutierrez, Andrea; Carbonell, Jose Antonio; García, Marisa; Soro, Marina; Tusman, Gerardo; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2014-03-01

    We investigated whether individualized positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves oxygenation, ventilation, and lung mechanics during one-lung ventilation compared with standardized PEEP. Thirty patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomly allocated to the study or control group. Both groups received an alveolar recruitment maneuver at the beginning and end of one-lung ventilation. After the alveolar recruitment maneuver, the control group had their lungs ventilated with a 5 cm·H2O PEEP, while the study group had their lungs ventilated with an individualized PEEP level determined by a PEEP decrement trial. Arterial blood samples, lung mechanics, and volumetric capnography were recorded at multiple timepoints throughout the procedure. The individualized PEEP values in study group were higher than the standardized PEEP values (10 ± 2 vs 5 cm·H2O; P decrement trial than with a standardized 5 cm·H2O of PEEP.

  18. Physiologic Evaluation of Ventilation Perfusion Mismatch and Respiratory Mechanics at Different Positive End-expiratory Pressure in Patients Undergoing Protective One-lung Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, Savino; Grasso, Salvatore; Karbing, Dan Stieper; Fogagnolo, Alberto; Contoli, Marco; Bollini, Giacomo; Ragazzi, Riccardo; Cinnella, Gilda; Verri, Marco; Cavallesco, Narciso Giorgio; Rees, Stephen Edward; Volta, Carlo Alberto

    2018-03-01

    Arterial oxygenation is often impaired during one-lung ventilation, due to both pulmonary shunt and atelectasis. The use of low tidal volume (VT) (5 ml/kg predicted body weight) in the context of a lung-protective approach exacerbates atelectasis. This study sought to determine the combined physiologic effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and low VT during one-lung ventilation. Data from 41 patients studied during general anesthesia for thoracic surgery were collected and analyzed. Shunt fraction, high V/Q and respiratory mechanics were measured at positive end-expiratory pressure 0 cm H2O during bilateral lung ventilation and one-lung ventilation and, subsequently, during one-lung ventilation at 5 or 10 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure. Shunt fraction and high V/Q were measured using variation of inspired oxygen fraction and measurement of respiratory gas concentration and arterial blood gas. The level of positive end-expiratory pressure was applied in random order and maintained for 15 min before measurements. During one-lung ventilation, increasing positive end-expiratory pressure from 0 cm H2O to 5 cm H2O and 10 cm H2O resulted in a shunt fraction decrease of 5% (0 to 11) and 11% (5 to 16), respectively (P ventilation, high positive end-expiratory pressure levels improve pulmonary function without increasing high V/Q and reduce driving pressure.

  19. Surface electromyography activity of the rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles during forced expiration in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenichi; Nonaka, Koji; Ogaya, Shinya; Ogi, Atsushi; Matsunaka, Chiaki; Horie, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to characterize rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscle activity in healthy adults under expiratory resistance using surface electromyography. We randomly assigned 42 healthy adult subjects to 3 groups: 30%, 20%, and 10% maximal expiratory intraoral pressure (PEmax). After measuring 100% PEmax and muscle activity during 100% PEmax, the activity and maximum voluntary contraction of each muscle during the assigned experimental condition were measured. At 100% PEmax, the external oblique (pinternal oblique (pexternal oblique (pinternal oblique (pexternal oblique: pinternal oblique: p<0.01). The abdominal oblique muscles are the most active during forced expiration. Moreover, 30% PEmax is the minimum intensity required to achieve significant, albeit very slight, muscle activity during expiratory resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Valor de la espirometría para el diagnostico de restricción pulmonar Accuracy of spirometry in the diagnosis of pulmonary restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Quadrelli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Un defecto ventilatorio restrictivo está caracterizado por una reducción en la capacidad pulmonar total. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la utilidad de la espirometría para determinar la presencia de restricción en pacientes con y sin obstrucción bronquial. Fueron incluídos 520 pacientes. Se definieron los valores normales mediante el intervalo de confianza del 95% (IC utilizando la ecuación de Morris para la espirometría, y la de la European Respiratory Society (ERS para capacidad pulmonar. Las espirometrías fueron clasificadas como obstructivas cuando mostraban relación volumen espiratorio forzado en 1 segundo (VEF1/capacidad vital forzada (CVF A restrictive ventilatory defect is characterized by a decreased total lung capacity (TLC. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of spirometry to detect pulmonary restriction in patients with or without airflow obstruction in the spirometry. Five hundred and twenty patients were included. Normal values for lung function were determined by using the 95% confidence interval (CI with Morris reference equation for spirometry and European Respiratory Society equation for lung volume. Spirometries were considered obstructive when FEV1/FVC ratio was <70% and FEV1 was below 95%CI. In patients without obstruction in the spirometry (n = 357 sensitivity and specificity were 42.2% and 94.3% respectively, negative predictive value (NPP was 86.6% and positive PV (PPV was 65.2%. In patients with an obstructive spirometry (n = 66 sensitivity increased to 75.8% but specificity decreased to 65.9%. PPV was only 57.8% and NPV 81.5%. Patients showing obstruction in the spirometry and false positives of a low FVC (n = 22 had similar values of FVC (57.36 ± 13.45 vs. 58.82 ± 8.71%, p = 0.6451, FEV1 (44.73 ± 19.24 vs. 44.0 ± 13.08%, p = 0.8745 and DLCO (67.50 ±27.23 vs. 77.00 ±16.00%, p = 0.1299 than true positives. Residual volume (RV (125.72 ± 64. vs. 77.96 ± 29.98%, p = 0

  1. Differential Effects of Intraoperative Positive End-expiratory Pressure (PEEP) on Respiratory Outcome in Major Abdominal Surgery Versus Craniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Myrthe A C; Ladha, Karim S; Melo, Marcos F Vidal

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we examined whether (1) positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has a protective effect on the risk of major postoperative respiratory complications in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries and craniotomies, and (2) the effect of PEEP is differed......: Within the entire study population (major abdominal surgeries and craniotomies), we found an association between application of PEEP ≥5 cmH2O and a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications compared with PEEP 5 cmH2O was associated with a significant lower...... undergoing major abdominal surgery. Our data suggest that default mechanical ventilator settings should include PEEP of 5-10 cmH2O during major abdominal surgery....

  2. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Yukiko; Kawata, Naoko; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Sakurai, Yoriko; Sato, Misuzu; Iesato, Ken; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tada, Yuji; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Yoichi; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm 2 as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers

  3. ERGONOMIC CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECT OF FLOUR DUST ON PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE OF BAKERS IN ABEOKUTA, OGUN STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekunle Ibrahim MUSA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Flour dusts are one of the most harmful chemicals in the bakery industries which could lead to serious heart and lung diseases. This study investigated the effect of flour dust on Peak Expiratory Flow Rate of male bakers in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria with the relationship to the anthropometrical parameters. A total of One hundred Eighty (180 male participants were investigated, where ninety (90 participants were bakers and ninety (90 individuals as control group. The Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR and anthropometrical parameters of the participant were measured using mini-Wright peak flow meter (PFM 20, OMRON and Detecto PD300MDHR (Cardinal Scale manufacturing company, USA column scale with digital height rod was used to measure body mass [kg] and height (cm respectively. The PEFR and anthropometrical parameters of the bakers and control groups were analysed using descriptive statistics and T-test with SPSS. The results showed that lower PEFR, 182.67 ± 16.34 L/min existed in bakers compared to 287.67 ± 17.02 L/min in the control study. The result also showed that a significant correlation exist between body mass, height and age (P < 0.01, PEFR, height (P < 0.05 and years of exposure (P < 0.01 of the bakers respectively. Furthermore, the results also showed that workers in the dusting and mixing of flour are at a risk of developing related pulmonary function impairment such as asthma. The study concluded that there is need to develop an effective intervention strategy, treatment seeking behaviour through awareness programs to prevent lung impairment diseases among the bakery workers.

  4. Effects of nasal positive expiratory pressure on dynamic hyperinflation and 6-minute walk test in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Thomas; Rüdiger, Stefan; Heitner, Claudia; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Blanta, Ioanna; Stoiber, Kathrin M; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Schumann, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation is an important target in the treatment of COPD. There is increasing evidence that positive expiratory pressure (PEP) could reduce dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. PEP application through a nasal mask and a flow resistance device might have the potential to be used during daily physical activities as an auxiliary strategy of ventilatory assistance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nasal PEP on lung volumes during physical exercise in patients with COPD. Twenty subjects (mean ± SD age 69.4 ± 6.4 years) with stable mild-to-severe COPD were randomized to undergo physical exercise with nasal PEP breathing, followed by physical exercise with habitual breathing, or vice versa. Physical exercise was induced by a standard 6-min walk test (6 MWT) protocol. PEP was applied by means of a silicone nasal mask loaded with a fixed-orifice flow resistor. Body plethysmography was performed immediately pre-exercise and post-exercise. Differences in mean pre- to post-exercise changes in total lung capacity (-0.63 ± 0.80 L, P = .002), functional residual capacity (-0.48 ± 0.86 L, P = .021), residual volume (-0.56 ± 0.75 L, P = .004), S(pO2) (-1.7 ± 3.4%, P = .041), and 6 MWT distance (-30.8 ± 30.0 m, P = .001) were statistically significant between the experimental and the control interventions. The use of flow-dependent expiratory pressure, applied with a nasal mask and a PEP device, might promote significant reduction of dynamic hyperinflation during walking exercise. Further studies are warranted addressing improvements in endurance performance under regular application of nasal PEP during physical activities.

  5. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Yukiko, E-mail: matsuyuki_future@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Kawata, Naoko, E-mail: chumito_03@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Yanagawa, Noriyuki, E-mail: yanagawa@ho.chiba-u.ac.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@js3.so-net.ne.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakurai, Yoriko, E-mail: yoliri@nifty.com [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sato, Misuzu, E-mail: mis_misuzu@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Iesato, Ken, E-mail: iesato_k@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Terada, Jiro, E-mail: jirotera@chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakao, Seiichiro, E-mail: sakao@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tada, Yuji, E-mail: ytada@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tanabe, Nobuhiro, E-mail: ntanabe@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Suzuki, Yoichi, E-mail: ysuzuki@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tatsumi, Koichiro, E-mail: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm{sup 2} as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers.

  6. [Modification of expiratory peak flow (EPF) in 14 asthmatic subjects from Benin by short duration exercise training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawani, M M; Hounkpatin, S; Akplogan, B

    2006-01-01

    Asthma is a world wide public health problem. It is the most commom chronic disease of school age children. Its severity is in constant increase. The frequency of the hospitalizations for asthma increased in practically all countries. Physical exercises and sport are used more and more as therapeutic means, in northern deveopped countries of where it was very early understood that it is necessary to integrate the asthmatic subjects into a program of specific physical training. This study undertaken in south saharian african country considers also assiduity in a physical training program as the factor of increase in the expiratory peak flow, of reinforcement of some principal muscles necessary to the improvement, and of the respiratory function of the asthmatic subject. Physical exercise is used as a non pharmacological therapy of asthma. This transversal study was carried out on fourteen asthmatic subjects of colleges in Porto-Novo's town, aged 15 years old to 25 years, of the two sexes. The results showed that: the Expiratory Peak Flow of Point (EPF) of the subjects at the beginning of the program is lower than the minimal average value of the group whatever the sex; the subjects average EPF increased from approximately 35% compared to the average at the beginning of the program; the subjects from family with asthmatic line, are much more inclined with respiratory embarrassments post-exercises than those who did not come from it; the respiratory embarrassments post-exercises noticed in the first weeks, grew blurred before the end of the program. This study suggests physical exercise adapted to the asthmatic subjects for the improvement of their health.

  7. Inspiratory and expiratory HRCT findings in Behcet's disease and correlation with pulmonary function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezer, Caner [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey)]. E-mail: cozer@mersin.edu.tr; Duce, Meltem Nass [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Ulubas, Bahar [Department of Respiratory Disease, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Bicer, Ali [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Tuersen, Uemit [Department of Dermatology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Apaydin, F. Demir [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Yildiz, Altan [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Camdeviren, Handan [Department of Biostatistics, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey)

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to describe the pulmonary parenchymal changes of Behcet's disease using high-resolution computed tomography and to correlate them with pulmonary function tests. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients with Behcet's disease (18 men, 16 women), 3 of whom were symptomatic, were included as the study group. Four of 34 patients were smokers. Twenty asymptomatic volunteers (12 men, 8 women), 4 of whom were smokers, constituted the control group. The pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography were performed for both groups. Results: Inspiratory high-resolution computed tomography findings were abnormal in nine patients (26.5%) of the study group. In eight patients, there were multiple abnormalities, whereas one patient had only one abnormality. Pleural thickening and irregularities, major fissure thickening, emphysematous changes, bronchiectasis, parenchymal bands, and irregular densities, and parenchymal nodules were the encountered abnormalities. Inspiratory high-resolution computed tomography scans were normal in the control group. On expiratory scans, there was statistically significant difference between study group and control group when air trapping, especially grades 3 and 4, was compared (P < 0.01). Pulmonary function tests of both the study and the control groups were in normal ranges, and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups according to pulmonary function tests (P > 0.05). Discussion and conclusion: High-resolution computed tomography is sensitive in the demonstration of pulmonary changes in patients with Behcet's disease. End-expiratory high-resolution computed tomography examination is very useful and necessary to show the presence of air trapping, thus the presence of small airway disease, even if the patient is asymptomatic or has normal pulmonary function tests.

  8. Influence of Changing the Diameter of the Bubble Generator Bottle and Expiratory Limb on Bubble CPAP: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Shan Wu

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: The size and submergence depth of an expiratory limb of a CPAP circuit, the diameter of the bubble generator bottle, and the compliance of the model lung all influence the magnitude and frequency of the transmitted pressure waveform. Therefore, these factors may affect lung volume recruitment and breathing efficiency in bubble CPAP.

  9. Lung-protective ventilation in intensive care unit and operation room : Tidal volume size, level of positive end-expiratory pressure and driving pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpa Neto, A.

    2017-01-01

    Several investigations have shown independent associations between three ventilator settings – tidal volume size, positive end–expiratory pressure (PEEP) and driving pressure – and outcomes in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There is an increasing notion that similar

  10. Distribution of peak expiratory flow variability by age, gender and smoking habits in a random population sample aged 20-70 yrs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boezen, H M; Schouten, J. P.; Postma, D S; Rijcken, B

    1994-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow (PEF) variability can be considered as an index of bronchial lability. Population studies on PEF variability are few. The purpose of the current paper is to describe the distribution of PEF variability in a random population sample of adults with a wide age range (20-70 yrs),

  11. Effects of Inhaled Fenoterol and Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on the Respiratory Mechanics of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Guerin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During acute ventilatory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, applying external positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPe will reopen small airways and, thus, may enhance peripheral deposition as well as the physiological effects of inhaled beta-2 agonists.

  12. Associations between positive end-expiratory pressure and outcome of patients without ARDS at onset of ventilation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Filho, Roberto Rabello; Cherpanath, Thomas; Determann, Rogier; Dongelmans, Dave A.; Paulus, Frederique; Tuinman, Pieter Roel; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare ventilation at different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) with regard to clinical important outcomes of intensive care unit (ICU) patients without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) at onset of ventilation. Meta-analysis of

  13. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  14. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  15. Economic Assessment and Budgetary Impact of a Telemedicine Procedure and Spirometry Quality Control in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Nuria; Bayón, Juan Carlos; López de Santa María, Elena; Gutiérrez, Asunción; Inchausti, Marta; Bustamante, Victor; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the economic impact of a telemedicine procedure designed to improve the quality of lung function testing (LFT) in primary care in a public healthcare system, compared with the standard method. The economic impact of 9,039 LFTs performed in 51 health centers (2010-2013) using telespirometry (TS) compared to standard spirometry (SS) was studied. TS costs more per unit than SS (€47.80 vs. €39.70) (2013), but the quality of the TS procedure is superior (84% good quality, compared to 61% using the standard procedure). Total cost of TS was €431,974 (compared with €358,306€ for SS), generating an economic impact of €73,668 (2013). The increase in cost for good quality LFT performed using TS was €34,030 (2010) and €144,295 (2013), while the costs of poor quality tests fell by €15,525 (2010) and 70,627€ (2013). The cost-effectiveness analysis concludes that TS is 23% more expensive and 46% more effective. Healthcare costs consequently fall as the number of LFTs performed by TS rises. Avoiding poor quality, invalid LFTs generates savings that compensate for the increased costs of performing LFTs with TS, making it a cost-effective method. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Spirometry Findings Following Treatment with Oral and Inhalant Corticosteroids in Mild to Moderate Asthma Exacerbation in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat Bilan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Asthma exacerbation is common in children. Treatment with oral corticosteroids (OCS and inhaled corticosteroids are suggested for asthma exacerbation. It is shown that inhaled corticosteroids has similar outcome in reducing asthma symptoms compared to OCS. But few studies have evaluated the pulmonary function changes in these two treatments. In this study, we evaluated the changes in pulmonary function tests in children with mild-to-moderate asthma exacerbation receiving oral prednisolone and inhaled Budesonide. Methods and Materials: Forty-four children with mild-to-moderate asthma exacerbation were randomly assigned to receive oral prednisolone (2 mg/kg or Budesonide spray (2 puffs every 12 hours, each puff contains 200 microgram Budesonide using a spacer for one week. The first dose of the treatment was given in the emergency department. Children were followed for seven days and spirometry findings before and after treatment were evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between pulmonary function tests before and after treatment between groups. Children receiving oral prednisolone had significantly more improvement in PEF (p=0.01. There was significant improvement in all respiratory parameters after treatment in both groups (p

  17. Spirometry and regular follow-up do not improve quality of life in children or adolescents with asthma: Cluster randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael J; Schattner, Rosa L; Holton, Christine; Simpson, Pam; Briggs, Nancy; Beilby, Justin; Nelson, Mark R; Wood-Baker, Richard; Thien, Francis; Sulaiman, Nabil D; Colle, Eleonora Del; Wolfe, Rory; Crockett, Alan J; Massie, R John

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether spirometry and regular medical review improved quality of life or other outcomes in children and adolescents with asthma. We conducted two cluster randomized controlled trials. We recruited 238 asthma patients aged between 7 and 17 years from 56 general practices in South Eastern Australia. Participants were randomized to receive an intervention that included spirometry or usual care. The main outcome measure was asthma related quality of life. Baseline characteristics were well matched between the intervention and control groups. Neither trial found any difference in asthma related quality of life between groups. However because of measurement properties, a formal meta-analysis could not be performed. Nor were there any significant effects of the intervention upon asthma attacks, limitation to usual activities, nocturnal cough, bother during physical activity, worry about asthma, or written asthma action plans. The findings do not support more widespread use of spirometry for the management of childhood asthma in general practice, unless it is integrated into a complete management model. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A pilot study to monitor changes in spirometry and lung volume, following an exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), as part of a supported discharge program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushen, Breda; McCormack, Niamh; Hennigan, Kerrie; Sulaiman, Imran; Costello, Richard W; Deering, Brenda

    2016-10-01

    One-third of patients with an exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease(COPD) are re-hospitalised at 90 days. Exacerbation recovery is associated with reductions in lung hyperinflation and improvements in symptoms and physical activity. We assessed the feasibility of monitoring these clinical parameters in the home. We hypothesised that the degree of change in spirometry and lung volumes differs between those who had an uneventful recovery and those who experienced a further exacerbation. Hospitalised patients with an acute exacerbation of COPD referred for a supported discharge program participated in the study. Spirometry and Inspiratory Vital Capacity(IVC) were measured in the home at Days 1, 14 and 42 post-discharge. Patients also completed Medical Research Council(MRC), Borg and COPD Assessment Test(CAT) scores and were provided with a tri-axial accelerometer. Any new exacerbation events were recorded. Sixty-five patients with 72 exacerbation episodes were recruited. Fifty percent experienced a second exacerbation. Adequate IVC measurements were achieved by 90%, while only 70% completed spirometry. Uneventful recovery was accompanied by significant improvements in physiological measurements at day14, improved symptom scores and step count, p volumes, symptoms and step count following a COPD exacerbation may help to identify patients at risk of re-exacerbation. It is feasible to carry out these assessments in the home as part of a supported discharge programme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Linearity of electrical impedance tomography during maximum effort breathing and forced expiration maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Chuong; Leonhardt, Steffen; Zhang, Tony; Lüken, Markus; Misgeld, Berno; Vollmer, Thomas; Tenbrock, Klaus; Lehmann, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) provides global and regional information about ventilation by means of relative changes in electrical impedance measured with electrodes placed around the thorax. In combination with lung function tests, e.g. spirometry and body plethysmography, regional information about lung ventilation can be achieved. Impedance changes strictly correlate with lung volume during tidal breathing and mechanical ventilation. Initial studies presumed a correlation also during forced expiration maneuvers. To quantify the validity of this correlation in extreme lung volume changes during forced breathing, a measurement system was set up and applied on seven lung-healthy volunteers. Simultaneous measurements of changes in lung volume using EIT imaging and pneumotachography were obtained with different breathing patterns. Data was divided into a synchronizing phase (spontaneous breathing) and a test phase (maximum effort breathing and forced maneuvers). The EIT impedance changes correlate strictly with spirometric data during slow breathing with increasing and maximum effort ([Formula: see text]) and during forced expiration maneuvers ([Formula: see text]). Strong correlations in spirometric volume parameters [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), [Formula: see text]/FVC ([Formula: see text]), and flow parameters PEF, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) were observed. According to the linearity during forced expiration maneuvers, EIT can be used during pulmonary function testing in combination with spirometry for visualisation of regional lung ventilation.

  20. Paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory plain chest radiographs for assessment of airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Takashi, E-mail: tkino@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kawayama, Tomotaka, E-mail: kawayama_tomotaka@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Imamura, Youhei, E-mail: mamura_youhei@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Sakazaki, Yuki, E-mail: sakazaki@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hirai, Ryo, E-mail: hirai_ryou@kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Ishii, Hidenobu, E-mail: shii_hidenobu@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Suetomo, Masashi, E-mail: jin_t_f_c@yahoo.co.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Matsunaga, Kazuko, E-mail: kmatsunaga@kouhoukai.or.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Azuma, Koichi, E-mail: azuma@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori, E-mail: kimichan@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hoshino, Tomoaki, E-mail: hoshino@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •It is often to use computed tomography (CT) scan for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. •CT scan is more expensive and higher. •A plane chest radiography more simple and cheap. Moreover, it is useful as detection of pulmonary emphysema, but not airflow limitation. •Our study demonstrated that the maximum inspiratory and expiratory plane chest radiography technique could detect severe airflow limitations. •We believe that the technique is helpful to diagnose the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. -- Abstract: Background: The usefulness of paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory (I/E) plain chest radiography (pCR) for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is still unclear. Objectives: We examined whether measurement of the I/E ratio using paired I/E pCR could be used for detection of airflow limitation in patients with COPD. Methods: Eighty patients with COPD (GOLD stage I = 23, stage II = 32, stage III = 15, stage IV = 10) and 34 control subjects were enrolled. The I/E ratios of frontal and lateral lung areas, and lung distance between the apex and base on pCR views were analyzed quantitatively. Pulmonary function parameters were measured at the same time. Results: The I/E ratios for the frontal lung area (1.25 ± 0.01), the lateral lung area (1.29 ± 0.01), and the lung distance (1.18 ± 0.01) were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in COPD patients compared with controls (1.31 ± 0.02 and 1.38 ± 0.02, and 1.22 ± 0.01, respectively). The I/E ratios in frontal and lateral areas, and lung distance were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in severe (GOLD stage III) and very severe (GOLD stage IV) COPD as compared to control subjects, although the I/E ratios did not differ significantly between severe and very severe COPD. Moreover, the I/E ratios were significantly correlated with pulmonary function parameters. Conclusions: Measurement of I/E ratios on paired I/E pCR is simple and

  1. Paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory plain chest radiographs for assessment of airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Kawayama, Tomotaka; Imamura, Youhei; Sakazaki, Yuki; Hirai, Ryo; Ishii, Hidenobu; Suetomo, Masashi; Matsunaga, Kazuko; Azuma, Koichi; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •It is often to use computed tomography (CT) scan for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. •CT scan is more expensive and higher. •A plane chest radiography more simple and cheap. Moreover, it is useful as detection of pulmonary emphysema, but not airflow limitation. •Our study demonstrated that the maximum inspiratory and expiratory plane chest radiography technique could detect severe airflow limitations. •We believe that the technique is helpful to diagnose the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. -- Abstract: Background: The usefulness of paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory (I/E) plain chest radiography (pCR) for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is still unclear. Objectives: We examined whether measurement of the I/E ratio using paired I/E pCR could be used for detection of airflow limitation in patients with COPD. Methods: Eighty patients with COPD (GOLD stage I = 23, stage II = 32, stage III = 15, stage IV = 10) and 34 control subjects were enrolled. The I/E ratios of frontal and lateral lung areas, and lung distance between the apex and base on pCR views were analyzed quantitatively. Pulmonary function parameters were measured at the same time. Results: The I/E ratios for the frontal lung area (1.25 ± 0.01), the lateral lung area (1.29 ± 0.01), and the lung distance (1.18 ± 0.01) were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in COPD patients compared with controls (1.31 ± 0.02 and 1.38 ± 0.02, and 1.22 ± 0.01, respectively). The I/E ratios in frontal and lateral areas, and lung distance were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in severe (GOLD stage III) and very severe (GOLD stage IV) COPD as compared to control subjects, although the I/E ratios did not differ significantly between severe and very severe COPD. Moreover, the I/E ratios were significantly correlated with pulmonary function parameters. Conclusions: Measurement of I/E ratios on paired I/E pCR is simple and

  2. Efecto del tabaquismo, los síntomas respiratorios y el asma sobre la espirometría de adultos de la Ciudad de México Effect of tobacco smoking, respiratory symptoms and asthma on spirometry among adults attending a check-up clinic in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justino Regalado-Pineda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar el efecto del tabaquismo, los síntomas respiratorios y el asma sobre la función pulmonar espirométrica en población adulta mexicana. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se generaron ecuaciones de predicción basadas en modelos de regresión lineal múltiple para la capacidad vital forzada (FVC, el vollumen espiratorio forzado al primer segundo (FEV1 y FEV1/FVC de espirometrías obtenidas de adultos que acuden a evaluación de salud y se determinó el efecto del tabaquismo, los síntomas respiratorios y el asma sobre los modelos de estos parámetros. RESULTADOS: Se estudiaron 919 sujetos de entre 14 y 86 años de edad. El asma disminuye la FVC y el FEV1 en hombres con un cambio en la R² OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of tobacco smoking, respiratory symptoms, and asthma on lung function among Mexican adults who were evaluated during a medical exam in a private health clinic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Reference prediction equations were generated for spirometry parameters [forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expired volume in one second (FEV1 and FEV1/FVC] based on multiple linear regression models. The effect of tobacco smoking, respiratory symptoms and asthma on these equations were explored. RESULTS: Spirometry tests were performed on 919 subjects from 14 to 86 years of age. Asthma decreased FVC and FEV1 in men with a R² change <1%. Respiratory symptoms decreased the FEV1/FVC ratio in both sexes. Tobacco smoking was associated with a significant reduction in FEV1 in women. CONCLUSIONS: Asthma lightly reduced lung function in males while tobacco smoking decreased FEV1, particularly in females.

  3. Intratidal recruitment/derecruitment persists at low and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Steffen; Artner, Lisa; Broß, Tobias; Lozano-Zahonero, Sara; Spaeth, Johannes; Schumann, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    In paediatric patients positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is traditionally set lower than in adults. We investigated whether moderately higher PEEP improves respiratory mechanics and regional ventilation. Therefore, 40 children were mechanically ventilated with PEEP 2 and 5cmH 2 O. Volume-dependent compliance profiles were analysed as a measure of intratidal recruitment/derecruitment. Regional ventilation was assessed using electrical impedance tomography. Mean compliance was 17.9±9.9mLcmH 2 O -1 (PEEP 2cmH 2 O), and 19.0±10.9mLcmH 2 O -1 (PEEP 5 cmH 2 O, pventilation. In conclusion, mechanically ventilated paediatric patients undergo intratidal recruitment/derecruitment which occurs more prominently in younger than in older children. A PEEP of 5cmH 2 O does not fully prevent intratidal recruitment/derecruitment but homogenizes regional ventilation in comparison to 2cmH 2 O. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Expiratory CT in cigarette smokers: correlation between areas of decreased lung attenuation, pulmonary function tests and smoking history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verschakelen, J.A.; Scheinbaum, K.; Bogaert, J.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Demedts, M.; Lacquet, L.L. [Department of Pneumology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between cigarette-smoke-related bronchial disease and air trapping as assessed by expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans. Thirty healthy subjects (11 non-smokers, 7 ex-smokers for > 2 years, 12 current smokers; age range 35-55 years) with a smoking history between 0 and 28.5 pack-years underwent pulmonary function tests (PFT) and HRCT in inspiration and expiration in supine and prone position. The extent of air trapping was scored in ventral and dorsal aspects of the upper, middle and lower lung portions. In 24 subjects (7 non-smokers, 7 ex-smokers, 10 current smokers) areas of focal air trapping were found, and were present significantly more often in dependent lung portions (p < 0.05) compared with non-dependent portions. No significant differences were found between apical and basal lung zones. Scores of focal air trapping were not significantly different between smokers and ex-smokers, but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in non-smokers and showed a significant (p < 0.0005) correlation with pack-years. The degree of air trapping was also associated with several lung function tests, especially RV, DLCO, FRC, FEV1 and FEV1/VC. Air trapping is seen in smokers with normal PFT and correlates with the severity of the smoking history, independently of current smoking status. (orig.) (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 59 refs.

  5. Influence of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Myocardial Strain Assessed by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The effects of mechanical ventilation (MV on speckle tracking echocardiography- (STE-derived variables are not elucidated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP ventilation on 4-chamber longitudinal strain (LS analysis by STE. Methods. We studied 20 patients admitted to a mixed intensive care unit who required intubation for MV and PEEP titration due to hypoxia. STE was performed at three times: (T1 PEEP = 5 cmH2O; (T2 PEEP = 10 cmH2O; and (T3 PEEP = 15 cmH2O. STE analysis was performed offline using a dedicated software (XStrain MyLab 70 Xvision, Esaote. Results. Left peak atrial-longitudinal strain (LS was significantly reduced from T1 to T2 and from T2 to T3 (. Right peak atrial-LS and right ventricular-LS showed a significant reduction only at T3 (. Left ventricular-LS did not change significantly during titration of PEEP. Cardiac chambers’ volumes showed a significant reduction at higher levels of PEEP (. Conclusions. We demonstrated for the first time that incremental PEEP affects myocardial strain values obtained with STE in intubated critically ill patients. Whenever performing STE in mechanically ventilated patients, care must be taken when PEEP is higher than 10 cmH2O to avoid misinterpreting data and making erroneous decisions.

  6. Studying forced expiratory volume at 1 second over menstrual segments in asthmatic and non-asthmatic women: assessing protocol feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegienka Ganesa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex hormones may play an important role in observed gender differences in asthma incidence and severity, as well as in the observed changes in asthma symptoms during times of hormonal fluctuation (i.e.; premenstrual, pregnancy, etc.. This pilot study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of data collection methods to investigate the effects of sex hormones on lung function in women. Findings A cohort of 13 women (6 with and 7 without prior asthma diagnoses who were having menstrual periods and were not taking hormones collected urine samples daily for measurement of estrogen (estrone E1C and progesterone (Pregnanediol-glucuronide PDG metabolites over the course of a menstrual segment (bleeding episode plus the following bleeding-free interval. Hormones were used to estimate menstrual segment phase (follicular versus luteal based on a published algorithm. Daily bleeding and FEV1 measurements were recorded and percent predicted FEV1 was calculated. Percent predicted FEV1 decreased over the course of the follicular but not the luteal phase. More specifically, among women without a prior asthma diagnosis, the E1C/PDG ratio and E1C and PDG were individually associated with FEV1 in the follicular phase. No associations were found between hormones and percent predicted FEV1 in the luteal phase or among asthmatic women. E1C was associated with FEV1 in the five days before bleeding onset only among non-asthmatic women. Discussion A study of contiguous daily hormones and symptoms over menstrual segments from a large group of women with and without asthma is needed to better determine within-woman cyclicity of the observed patterns.

  7. Different forces

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The different forces, together with a pictorial analogy of how the exchange of particles works. The table lists the relative strength of the couplings, the quanta associated with the force fields and the bodies or phenomena in which they have a dominant role.

  8. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  9. Effect of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction on Quality of Life (SF-36) and Spirometry Parameters, in Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefnasab, Zahra; Ghanei, Mostafa; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Alipour, Ahmad; Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Salehi, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    Studies have shown that Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) has positive effect on physical and psychological dimensions of chronic illnesses. In this study for the first time we examine the effect of this new technique on quality of life and pulmonary function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans who have chronic pulmonary problem, psychological problems and low quality of life. Forty male pulmonary injured veterans were randomly replaced in two groups with 20 participants (MBSR and control Wait List (WL)). Then MBSR group received 8-weekly sessions intervention. We evaluate quality of life (used SF-36 questionnaire) and Spirometry parameters two times; before and after intervention in two group. We used "mixed factorial analyses of variance" test for analyzing data in each dependent variables. Then if we have significant interactional effect, we used -paired- sample t-test" for comparing before and after intervention data of each group, and "Independent-Sample t-test" for comparing after intervention data of two groups. The MBSR compare to WL group improved SF-36 total score, (F (1, 38) =12.09, P=0.001), "Role limitations due to physical problems"(F(1,38)= 6.92, P=0.01), "Role limitations due to emotional problems"(F(1,38)= 7.75, P=0.008), "Social functioning"(F(1,38)= 9.89, P=0.003), "Mental health"(F(1,38)= 15.93, P=0), "Vitality"(F(1,38)= 40.03, P≤0.001), and "Pain"(F(1,38)= 27.60, P≤0.001). MBSR had no significant effect on "FEV1" (F (1, 38) = 0.03, P=0.85),"FVC" (F (1, 38) = 0.16, P=0.69) and "FEV1/FVC" (F (1, 38) = 2.21, P=0.14). MBSR can improve individual's quality of life but not lung function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans.

  10. Impulse oscillometry at preschool age is a strong predictor of lung function by flow-volume spirometry in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauhkonen, Eero; Riikonen, Riikka; Törmänen, Sari; Koponen, Petri; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Helminen, Merja; Toikka, Jyri; Korppi, Matti

    2018-05-01

    The transition from early childhood wheezing to persistent asthma is linked to lung function impairment over time. Little is known how the methods used to study lung function at different ages correlate longitudinally. Sixty-four children with a history of hospitalization for bronchiolitis before 6 months of age were prospectively studied with impulse oscillometry (IOS) at the mean age of 6.3 years and these preschool IOS results were compared with flow-volume spirometry (FVS) measurements at mean age of 11.4 years. The baseline respiratory system resistance at 5 Hz (Rrs5) showed a modest statistically significant correlation with all baseline FVS parameters except FVC. The post-bronchodilator (post-BD) Rrs5 showed a modest statistically significant correlation with post-BD FEV 1 and FEV 1 /FVC. The bronchodilator-induced decrease in Rrs5 showed a modest statistically significant correlation with the percent increase in FEV 1 . Baseline and post-BD respiratory reactance at 5 Hz (Xrs5) showed a modest statistically significant correlation with baseline and post-BD FVS parameters except post-BD FEV 1 /FVC, respectively, and post-BD Xrs5 showed a strong correlation with post-BD FVC (ρ = 0.61) and post-BD FEV 1 (ρ = 0.59). In adjusted linear regression, preschool Xrs5 remained as a statistically significant independent predictor of FVS parameters in adolescence; the one-unit decrease in the Z-score of preschool post-BD Xrs5 predicted 9.6% lower post-BD FEV 1 , 9.3% lower post-BD FVC, and 9.7% lower post-BD MEF 50 when expressed as %-predicted parameters. Persistent post-BD small airway impairment in children with a history of bronchiolitis detected with IOS at preschool age predicted FVS results measured in early adolescence. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Whole-lung volume and density in spirometrically-gated inspiratory and expiratory CT in systemic sclerosis: correlation with static volumes at pulmonary function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camiciottoli, G; Diciotti, S; Bartolucci, M; Orlandi, I; Bigazzi, F; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Pistolesi, M; Mascalchi, M

    2013-03-01

    Spiral low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) permits to measure whole-lung volume and density in a single breath-hold. To evaluate the agreement between static lung volumes measured with LDCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) and the correlation between the LDCT volumes and lung density in restrictive lung disease. Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) with (n = 24) and without (n = 16) pulmonary involvement on sequential thin-section CT and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)(n = 29) underwent spirometrically-gated LDCT at 90% and 10% of vital capacity to measure inspiratory and expiratory lung volumes and mean lung attenuation (MLA). Total lung capacity and residual volume were measured the same day of CT. Inspiratory [95% limits of agreement (95% LoA)--43.8% and 39.2%] and expiratory (95% LoA -45.8% and 37.1%) lung volumes measured on LDCT and PFT showed poor agreement in SSc patients with pulmonary involvement, whereas they were in substantial agreement (inspiratory 95% LoA -14.1% and 16.1%; expiratory 95% LoA -13.5% and 23%) in SSc patients without pulmonary involvement and in inspiratory scans only (95% LoA -23.1% and 20.9%) of COPD patients. Inspiratory and expiratory LDCT volumes, MLA and their deltas differentiated both SSc patients with or without pulmonary involvement from COPD patients. LDCT lung volumes and density were not correlated in SSc patients with pulmonary involvement, whereas they did correlate in SSc without pulmonary involvement and in COPD patients. In restrictive lung disease due to SSc there is poor agreement between static lung volumes measured using LDCT and PFT and the relationship between volume and density values on CT is altered.

  12. Is increased positive end-expiratory pressure the culprit? Autoresuscitation in a 44-year-old man after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hagmann, Henning; Oelmann, Katrin; Stangl, Robert; Michels, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of autoresuscitation is rare, yet it is known to most emergency physicians. However, the pathophysiology of the delayed return of spontaneous circulation remains enigmatic. Among other causes hyperinflation of the lungs and excessively high positive end-expiratory pressure have been suggested, but reports including cardiopulmonary monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are scarce to support this hypothesis. Case presentation We report a case of autoresuscita...

  13. [A comparative study between inflation and deflation pressure-volume curve in determining the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Li; Sun, Xiao-yi; Xu, Jin-quan; Zhang, Xin-li; Kou, Lu-xin; Jiang, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Lei

    2012-02-01

    To determine the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) according to inflation and deflation pressure-volume curve (P-V curve) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS models were reproduced in 20 dogs, and they were randomly divided into two groups. In both groups, Levenberg-Marquardt iterative algorithm was employed using software to explore parameters fitting with Boltzmann formula, by which the real inflection point of pressure (Pinf d) in deflation limb or lower inflection point pressure (PLip) in inflation limb on P-V curve were defined. For the control group (inflation curve) P-V curve of PLip + 2 cm H(2)O [1 cm H(2)O = 0.098 kPa] was applied as the best PEEP value. In the experimental group (deflation curve) the Pinf d was taken as the best PEEP value. The heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), fingertip pulse oxygen saturation [SpO(2)], static lung compliance (Cst), arterial partial pressure of oxygen [PaO(2)] and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PaCO(2)] were monitored at 0, 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Oxygenation index increased significantly both in control and experimental groups. In experimental group, oxygenation index (mm Hg, 1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa) of 12, 24 and 48 hours was respectively significantly higher than that of the control group (12 hours: 177.63 ± 8.94 vs. 165.60 ± 8.90, 24 hours: 194.19 ± 10.67 vs. 168.70 ± 10.60, 48 hours: 203.15 ± 13.21 vs. 171.26 ± 9.21, all P deflation P-V curve was better than that of inflation curve.

  14. Peripheral chemoreceptors tune inspiratory drive via tonic expiratory neuron hubs in the medullary ventral respiratory column network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, L S; Nuding, S C; Ott, M M; Dean, J B; Bolser, D C; O'Connor, R; Morris, K F; Lindsey, B G

    2015-01-01

    Models of brain stem ventral respiratory column (VRC) circuits typically emphasize populations of neurons, each active during a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. We have proposed that "tonic" pericolumnar expiratory (t-E) neurons tune breathing during baroreceptor-evoked reductions and central chemoreceptor-evoked enhancements of inspiratory (I) drive. The aims of this study were to further characterize the coordinated activity of t-E neurons and test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreceptors also modulate drive via inhibition of t-E neurons and disinhibition of their inspiratory neuron targets. Spike trains of 828 VRC neurons were acquired by multielectrode arrays along with phrenic nerve signals from 22 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated adult cats. Forty-eight of 191 t-E neurons fired synchronously with another t-E neuron as indicated by cross-correlogram central peaks; 32 of the 39 synchronous pairs were elements of groups with mutual pairwise correlations. Gravitational clustering identified fluctuations in t-E neuron synchrony. A network model supported the prediction that inhibitory populations with spike synchrony reduce target neuron firing probabilities, resulting in offset or central correlogram troughs. In five animals, stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors evoked changes in the firing rates of 179 of 240 neurons. Thirty-two neuron pairs had correlogram troughs consistent with convergent and divergent t-E inhibition of I cells and disinhibitory enhancement of drive. Four of 10 t-E neurons that responded to sequential stimulation of peripheral and central chemoreceptors triggered 25 cross-correlograms with offset features. The results support the hypothesis that multiple afferent systems dynamically tune inspiratory drive in part via coordinated t-E neurons. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Application of dead space fraction to titrate optimal positive end-expiratory pressure in an ARDS swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Weishuai; Chen, Wei; Chao, Yangong; Wang, Lan; Li, Liming; Guan, Jian; Zang, Xuefeng; Zhen, Jie; Sheng, Bo; Zhu, Xi

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to apply the dead space fraction [ratio of dead space to tidal volume (VD/VT)] to titrate the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in a swine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Twelve swine models of ARDS were constructed. A lung recruitment maneuver was then conducted and the PEEP was set at 20 cm H 2 O. The PEEP was reduced by 2 cm H 2 O every 10 min until 0 cm H 2 O was reached, and VD/VT was measured after each decrement step. VD/VT was measured using single-breath analysis of CO 2 , and calculated from arterial CO 2 partial pressure (PaCO 2 ) and mixed expired CO 2 (PeCO 2 ) using the following formula: VD/VT = (PaCO 2 - PeCO 2 )/PaCO 2 . The optimal PEEP was identified by the lowest VD/VT method. Respiration and hemodynamic parameters were recorded during the periods of pre-injury and injury, and at 4 and 2 cm H 2 O below and above the optimal PEEP (Po). The optimal PEEP in this study was found to be 13.25±1.36 cm H 2 O. During the Po period, VD/VT decreased to a lower value (0.44±0.08) compared with that during the injury period (0.68±0.10) (P<0.05), while the intrapulmonary shunt fraction reached its lowest value. In addition, a significant change of dynamic tidal respiratory compliance and oxygenation index was induced by PEEP titration. These results indicate that minimal VD/VT can be used for PEEP titration in ARDS.

  16. Comparison of intermittent positive pressure breathing and temporary positive expiratory pressure in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Mollar, Elena; Grecchi, Bruna; Landucci, Norma

    2014-01-01

    Results supporting the use and the effectiveness of positive expiratory, pressure devices in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are still controversial, We have tested the hypothesis that adding TPEP or IPPB to standard pharmacological therapy may provide additional clinical benefit over, pharmacological therapy only in patients with severe COPD. Fourty-five patients were randomized in three groups: a group was treated; with IPPB,a group was treated with TPEP and a group with pharmacological; therapy alone (control group). Primary outcome measures included the measurement of scale or, questionnaire concerning dyspnea (MRC scale),dyspnea,cough, and, sputum (BCSS) and quality of life (COPD assessment test) (CAT). Secondary, outcome measures were respiratory function testing,arterial blood gas,analysis,and hematological examinations. Both patients in the IPPB group and in the TPEP group showed a significant, improvement in two of three tests (MRC,CAT) compared to the control, group.However,in the group comparison analysis for, the same variables between IPPB group and TPEP group we observed a, significant improvement in the IPPB group (P≤.05 for MRC and P≤.01 for, CAT). The difference of action of the two techniques are evident in the results of, pulmonary function testing: IPPB increases FVC, FEV1, and MIP; this reflects, its capacity to increase lung volume. Also TPEP increases FVC and FEV1 (less, than IPPB), but increases MEP, while decreasing total lung capacity and, residual volume. The two techniques (IPPB and TPEP) improves significantly dyspnea; quality of; life tools and lung function in patients with severe COPD. IPPB demonstrated a greater effectiveness to improve dyspnea and quality of life tools (MRC, CAT) than TPEP. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of positive expiratory pressure on pulmonary clearance of aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Martins de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effects of positive expiratory pressure (PEP on pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability in healthy subjects. Methods: We evaluated a cohort of 30 healthy subjects (15 males and 15 females with a mean age of 28.3 ± 5.4 years, a mean FEV1/FVC ratio of 0.89 ± 0.14, and a mean FEV1 of 98.5 ± 13.1% of predicted. Subjects underwent technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy in two stages: during spontaneous breathing; and while breathing through a PEP mask at one of three PEP levels-10 cmH2O (n = 10, 15 cmH2O (n = 10, and 20 cmH2O (n = 10. The 99mTc-DTPA was nebulized for 3 min, and its clearance was recorded by scintigraphy over a 30-min period during spontaneous breathing and over a 30-min period during breathing through a PEP mask. Results: The pulmonary clearance of 99mTc-DTPA was significantly shorter when PEP was applied-at 10 cmH2O (p = 0.044, 15 cmH2O (p = 0.044, and 20 cmH2O (p = 0.004-in comparison with that observed during spontaneous breathing. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that PEP, at the levels tested, is able to induce an increase in pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability and lung volume in healthy subjects.

  18. Differing responses in right and left ventricular filling, loading and volumes during positive end-expiratory pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, D.S.; Biondi, J.W.; Matthay, R.A.; Zaret, B.L.; Soufer, R.

    1989-01-01

    Using a combined hemodynamic and radionuclide technique, 20 patients with varied ventricular function were evaluated during positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) application. Left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) ejection fractions and cardiac output were measured, and ventricular volumes were derived. Seven patients (group 1) who had an increase in LV end-diastolic volume with PEEP and 13 patients (group 2) who had the more typical response, a decrease in LV end-diastolic volume with PEEP, were identified. Compared with group 2, group 1 patients had a higher incidence of coronary artery disease (5 of 7 vs 1 of 13, p less than 0.005) and lower cardiac output (3.9 +/- 1.6 vs 9.1 +/- 3.2 liters/min, p less than 0.005), LV ejection fraction (27 +/- 13 vs 51 +/- 21%, p less than 0.05), RV ejection fraction (15 +/- 6 vs 32 +/- 8%, p less than 0.005) and peak filling rate (1.32 +/- 0.43 vs 3.51 +/- 1.70 end-diastolic volumes/s, p less than 0.05). LV and RV volumes increased and peak filling rate decreased with PEEP in group 1, whereas in group 2 LV volume decreased and RV volume and peak filling rate remained unchanged. Using stepwise regression analysis, the change in LV volume with PEEP was related directly to baseline systemic vascular resistance and inversely to baseline blood pressure. Similarly, the change in peak filling rate with PEEP was inversely related to the change in RV end-diastolic volume. Thus, the hemodynamic response to PEEP is heterogeneous and may be related to LV ischemia

  19. Effect of bedding control on amount of house dust mite allergens, asthma symptoms, and peak expiratory flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inn-Sook

    2003-04-30

    This quasi-experimental study was designed to investigate the effect of bedding control on the amount of house dust mite (HDM) allergens, asthma symptoms, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) in asthmatics sensitive to HDMs. The subjects in the study were drawn from patients receiving treatment at the allergy clinics of three university-affiliated hospitals in Seoul. Forty-two patients without prior practice of the bedding control used in this study were selected. They commonly showed bronchial asthma caused by HDMs, and exhibited strong positive points (more than 3 points) in skin prick test (D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus), and positive response in both fluoro-allergosorbent test (FAST), and PC20 methacholine test. Of the subjects, alternatively, 22 were assigned to the experimental group and 20 to control group. Bedding control consisted of the use of outer cotton covers, boiling them for 10 minutes fortnightly, and disinfecting bedding by sunlight fortnightly. The experimental group was under bedding control for 4 weeks. The data were collected from October 2000 to January 2001. The results were as follows: 1. After bedding control, the total amount of HDM allergens decreased significantly in the experimental group. However there was no significant difference in the decrease of the amount of HDM allergens between the two groups. 2. Of the asthma symptoms, there was significant difference only in the decrease of the frequency of dyspnea, and in the increase of sleeping disturbance between the two groups after bedding control. 3. After bedding control, PEFR increased in the experimental group whereas it decreased in the control group. However, neither change was significant. The above findings indicate that bedding control improved several asthma symptoms in asthmatics sensitive to HDMs. Accordingly, we suggest that bedding control is adopted as a useful nursing intervention in the field.

  20. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intraoperative core temperature in patients undergoing posterior spine surgery: prospective randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyungseok; Do Son, Je; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Oh, Hyung-Min; Jung, Chul-Woo; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2018-03-01

    Objective Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes carotid baroreceptor unloading, which leads to thermoregulatory peripheral vasoconstriction. However, the effects of PEEP on intraoperative thermoregulation in the prone position remain unknown. Methods Thirty-seven patients undergoing spine surgery in the prone position were assigned at random to receive either 10 cmH 2 O PEEP (Group P) or no PEEP (Group Z). The primary endpoint was core temperature 180 minutes after intubation. Secondary endpoints were delta core temperature (difference in core temperature between 180 minutes and immediately after tracheal intubation), incidence of intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature of peripheral vasoconstriction-related data. Results The median [interquartile range] core temperature 180 minutes after intubation was 36.1°C [35.9°C-36.2°C] and 36.0°C [35.9°C-36.4°C] in Groups Z and P, respectively. The delta core temperature and incidences of intraoperative hypothermia and peripheral vasoconstriction were not significantly different between the two groups. The peripheral vasoconstriction threshold (36.2°C±0.5°C vs. 36.7°C±0.6°C) was lower and the onset of peripheral vasoconstriction (66 [60-129] vs. 38 [28-70] minutes) was slower in Group Z than in Group P. Conclusions Intraoperative PEEP did not reduce the core temperature decrease in the prone position, although it resulted in an earlier onset and higher threshold of peripheral vasoconstriction.

  1. Effectiveness of a structured motivational intervention including smoking cessation advice and spirometry information in the primary care setting: the ESPITAP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Lujan Francisco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is current controversy about the efficacy of smoking cessation interventions that are based on information obtained by spirometry. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness in the primary care setting of structured motivational intervention to achieve smoking cessation, compared with usual clinical practice. Methods Design Multicentre randomized clinical trial with an intervention and a control group. Setting 12 primary care centres in the province of Tarragona (Spain. Subjects of study 600 current smokers aged between 35 and 70 years with a cumulative habit of more than 10 packs of cigarettes per year, attended in primary care for any reason and who did not meet any of the exclusion criteria for the study, randomly assigned to structured intervention or standard clinical attention. Intervention Usual advice to quit smoking by a general practitioner as well as a 20-minute personalized visit to provide detailed information about spirometry results, during which FEV1, FVC, FEF 25-75% and PEF measurements were discussed and interpreted in terms of theoretical values. Additional information included the lung age index (defined as the average age of a non-smoker with the same FEV1 as the study participant, comparing this with the chronological age to illustrate the pulmonary deterioration that results from smoking. Measurements Spirometry during the initial visit. Structured interview questionnaire administered at the primary care centre at the initial visit and at 12-month follow-up. Telephone follow-up interview at 6 months. At 12-month follow-up, expired CO was measured in patients who claimed to have quit smoking. Main variables Smoking cessation at 12 months. Analysis Data will be analyzed on the basis of "intention to treat" and the unit of analysis will be the individual smoker. Expected results Among active smokers treated in primary care we anticipate significantly higher smoking cessation in the

  2. Genetic Influences on Pulmonary Function: A Large Sample Twin Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Thomsen, Simon F; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Heritability of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) has not been previously addressed in large twin studies. We evaluated the genetic contribution to individual differences observed in FEV(1), FVC, and PEF using data from...... the largest population-based twin study on spirometry. Specially trained lay interviewers with previous experience in spirometric measurements tested 4,314 Danish twins (individuals), 46-68 years of age, in their homes using a hand-held spirometer, and their flow-volume curves were evaluated. Modern variance...

  3. OPTIMUM LEVEL OF POSITIVE END-EXPIRATORY PRESSURE IN ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME CAUSED BY INFLUENZA A(H1NI)PDM09: BALANCE BETWEEN MAXIMAL END-EXPIRATORY VOLUME AND MINIMAL ALVEOLAR OVERDISTENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshetskiym A I; Protsenko, D N; Boytsov, P V; Chentsov, V B; Nistratov, S L; Kudlyakov, O N; Solov'ev, V V; Banova, Zh I; Shkuratova, N V; Rezenov, N A; Gel'fand, B R

    2016-11-01

    to determine optimum level ofpositive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) according to balance between maxi- mal end-expiratory lung volume (EEL V)(more than predicted) and minimal decrease in exhaled carbon dioxide volume (VCO) and then to develop the algorithm of gas exchange correction based on prognostic values of EEL K; alveolar recruitability, PA/FiO2, static compliance (C,,,) and VCO2. 27 mechanically ventilatedpatients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by influenza A (HINJ)pdm09 in Moscow Municipal Clinics ICU's from January to March 2016 were included in the trial. At the beginning of the study patients had the following characteristic: duration offlu symptoms 5 (3-10) days, p.0/FiO2 120 (70-50) mmHg. SOFA 7 (5-9), body mass index 30.1 (26.4-33.8) kg/m², static compliance of respiratory system 35 (30-40) ml/mbar: Under sedation and paralysis we measured EELV, C VCO and end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO) (for CO₂ measurements we fixed short-term values after 2 min after PEEP level change) at PEEP 8, 11,13,15,18, 20 mbar consequently, and incase of good recruitability, at 22 and 24 mbar. After analyses of obtained data we determined PEEP value in which increase in EELV was maximal (more than predicted) and depression of VCO₂ was less than 20%, change in mean blood pressure and heart rate were both less than 20% (measured at PEEP 8 mbar). After that we set thus determined level of PEEP and didn't change it for 5 days. Comparision of predicted and measured EELV revealed two typical points of alveloar recruiment: the first at PEEP 11-15 mbar, the second at PEEP 20-22 mbar. EELV measured at PEEP 18 mbar appeared to be higher than predicted at PEEP 8 mbar by 400 ml (approx.), which was the sign of alveolar recruitment-1536 (1020-1845) ml vs 1955 (1360-2320) ml, p=0,001, Friedman test). we didn't found significant changes of VCO₂ when increased PEEP in the range from 8 to 15 mbar (p>0.05, Friedman test). PEEP increase from 15 to

  4. Nuclear forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holinde, K.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the present status of the meson theory of nuclear forces is reviewed. After some introductory remarks about the relevance of the meson exchange concept in the era of QCD and the empirical features of the NN interaction, the exciting history of nuclear forces is briefly outlined. In the main part, the author gives the basic physical ideas and sketch the derivation of the one-boson-exchange model of the nuclear force, in the Feynman approach. Secondly we describe, in a qualitative way, various necessary extensions, leading to the Bonn model of the N interaction. Finally, points to some interesting pen questions connected with the extended quark structure of the hadrons, which are topics of current research activity

  5. Comparative evaluation of ventilatory function through pre and postoperative peak expiratory flow in patients submitted to elective upper abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeren, Caio Fernando Cavanus; Gonçalves, José Júlio Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the ventilatory function by Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) in the immediate pre and postoperative periods of patients undergoing elective surgical procedures in the upper abdomen. we conducted a prospective cohort study including 47 patients admitted to the Hospital Regional de Mato Grosso do Sul from July to December 2014, who underwent elective surgeries of the upper abdomen, and submiited to spirometric evaluation and measurement of PEF immediately before and after surgery. of the 47 patients, 22 (46.8%) were male and 25 (53.20%) female. The mean preoperative PEF was 412.1±91.7, and postoperative, 331.0±87.8, indicating significant differences between the two variables. Men had higher PEF values than women, both in the pre and postoperative periods. There was a reasonable inverse correlation between age and decreased PEF. Both situations showed statistical significance (pvalores de PFE do que o feminino, tanto no pré-cirúrgico quanto no pós-cirúrgico. Observou-se razoável correlação inversamente proporcional entre as variáveis idade e diminuição do PFE. Ambas as situações mostraram significância estatística (pvalores de PFE tanto no pré como no pós-operatório. O grupo composto por portadores de co-morbidades (HAS e/ou DM) apresentou menores valores de PFE tanto no pré como no pós-operatório (p=0,005). Em ambos os grupos, o pós-operatório determinou uma diminuição significativa do PFE (p<0,001). O tipo de cirurgia realizada e o tipo de anestesia não mostraram diferenças significantes em relação ao PFE. as variáveis mais implicadas na diminuição da função ventilatória, avaliadas através da PFE, foram: idade avançada, tabagismo e presença de comorbidades.

  6. Evaluation of image quality and patient safety: paired inspiratory and expiratory MDCT assessment of tracheobronchomalacia in paediatric patients under general anaesthesia with breath-hold technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Bastos, Maria d' Almeida; Stark, Cynthia; Carrier, Maureen; Zurakowski, David; Mason, Keira P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate image quality and patient safety in infants and young children who required general anaesthesia with breath-hold technique for paired inspiratory and expiratory multidetector CT (MDCT) assessment of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). Our hospital's institutional review board approved the review of radiological and clinical data of a consecutive series of 20 paediatric patients who underwent MDCT under general anaesthesia with breath-hold technique for evaluation of TBM from May 2006 to December 2008. For each MDCT study, two fellowship-trained paediatric radiologists reviewed the inspiratory and expiratory MDCT images in an independent, randomised and blinded fashion for the presence of motion artefact at three anatomic levels (upper, middle and lower central airways). The clinical history and anaesthesia outcome, including the occurrence of any adverse events during or following the MDCT examinations until discharge, were also reviewed and recorded. The study population consisted of 20 infants and young children (13 boys/seven girls, mean age 1.7 ± 1.4 years, age range 11 days to 4 years). The imaging quality of all 20 MDCT studies was diagnostic with no motion artefact in 16 studies (80%) and minimal motion artefact in the remaining four studies (20%). Minor adverse events occurred in three patients (15%) that included one patient (5%) with a brief (<60 s) oxygen desaturation during MDCT study, which resolved with oxygen, and two patients (5%) with either a brief (<60 s) oxygen desaturation (n = 1, 5%) or cough (n = 1, 5%) during recovery period, which were completely resolved with oxygen and dexamethasone, respectively. Diagnostic quality paired inspiratory and expiratory MDCT imaging with breath-hold technique can be safely performed in infants and young children under general anaesthesia for evaluation of TBM.

  7. An asthma patient with steroid-resistant decrease in peak expiratory flow after the Great East Japan earthquake showing spontaneous recovery after 1 month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Haida, Michiko; Suko, Matsunobu

    2012-01-01

    People living in Japan were affected in various ways after the Great East Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011. A 52-year-old female asthma patient not directly affected by the disaster experienced a decrease in peak expiratory flow (PEF) immediately after the earthquake. Despite increasing the inhaled and oral corticosteroid doses, her PEF did not recover. One month later, her PEF level abruptly returned to normal with minimal medications, which were previously ineffective, and the asthma-related symptoms vanished. The stabilization of her state of mind and actual social state seemed to be a part of the reason for the patient's recovery.

  8. Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation for prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications: a comprehensive review of the role of tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure, and lung recruitment maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldner, Andreas; Kiss, Thomas; Serpa Neto, Ary; Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Canet, Jaume; Spieth, Peter M; Rocco, Patricia R M; Schultz, Marcus J; Pelosi, Paolo; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are associated with increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and mortality after major surgery. Intraoperative lung-protective mechanical ventilation has the potential to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. This review discusses the relevant literature on definition and methods to predict the occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complication, the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury with emphasis on the noninjured lung, and protective ventilation strategies, including the respective roles of tidal volumes, positive end-expiratory pressure, and recruitment maneuvers. The authors propose an algorithm for protective intraoperative mechanical ventilation based on evidence from recent randomized controlled trials.

  9. ed quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... measures can capture the non-respiratory effects of. Chronic ... Key words: Peak expiratory flow, quality of life, spi- ... device. For spirometry, a minimum of three and a maximum of eight spirometry maneuvers were done.

  10. Forced oscillation technique in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Leanne M; Keeling, Lucy A; Shackleton, Claire E; Sly, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes respiratory compromise that is difficult to assess in young children. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is commercially available for children as young as 2 years of age and is nonvolitional. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FOT in young children with SMA. Children with SMA aged resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs8) (mean z score, +0.66; SD, 1.34; P = .12) were abnormal. Four children performed spirometry. Linear relationships to Xrs8 exist: FVC (R2, 0.54), unassisted PCF (R2, 0.33), assisted PCF (R2, 0.43), and AHI (R2, 0.32). Over 12 months, Xrs8z score worsened (rate of change of +1.08, P change +0.51, P .05) was found between clinical characteristics and FOT values. FOT is feasible in young children with SMA, with abnormal values of reactance and resistance on grouped data, worsening over 12 months. Xrs8 is related to respiratory tests used to monitor progress in SMA (FVC, PCF, AHI). Further research on the value of FOT in managing individuals is warranted.

  11. Respiratory System Mechanics During Low Versus High Positive End-Expiratory Pressure in Open Abdominal Surgery: A Substudy of PROVHILO Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antini, Davide; Huhle, Robert; Herrmann, Jacob; Sulemanji, Demet S; Oto, Jun; Raimondo, Pasquale; Mirabella, Lucia; Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Schultz, Marcus J; Pelosi, Paolo; Kaczka, David W; Vidal Melo, Marcos Francisco; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Cinnella, Gilda

    2018-01-01

    In the 2014 PROtective Ventilation using HIgh versus LOw positive end-expiratory pressure (PROVHILO) trial, intraoperative low tidal volume ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP = 12 cm H2O) and lung recruitment maneuvers did not decrease postoperative pulmonary complications when compared to low PEEP (0-2 cm H2O) approach without recruitment breaths. However, effects of intraoperative PEEP on lung compliance remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that higher PEEP leads to a dominance of intratidal overdistension, whereas lower PEEP results in intratidal recruitment/derecruitment (R/D). To test our hypothesis, we used the volume-dependent elastance index %E2, a respiratory parameter that allows for noninvasive and radiation-free assessment of dominant overdistension and intratidal R/D. We compared the incidence of intratidal R/D, linear expansion, and overdistension by means of %E2 in a subset of the PROVHILO cohort. In 36 patients from 2 participating centers of the PROVHILO trial, we calculated respiratory system elastance (E), resistance (R), and %E2, a surrogate parameter for intratidal overdistension (%E2 > 30%) and R/D (%E2 mechanical ventilation with protective tidal volumes in patients undergoing open abdominal surgery, lung recruitment followed by PEEP of 12 cm H2O decreased the incidence of intratidal R/D and did not worsen overdistension, when compared to PEEP ≤2 cm H2O.

  12. Peak expiratory flow rate in healthy rural school going children (5-16 years) of bellur region for construction of nomogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cb, Manjunath; Sc, Kotinatot; Babu, Manjunatha

    2013-12-01

    Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) recording is an essential measure in the management and evaluation of asthmatic children.It is helpful in monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. The PEFR can be measured by a simple instrument-peak expiratory flow meter. To construct nomogram of PEFR in healthy rural school going children from Mandya district of Karnataka state, India and to use these nomograms for comparison with that of children with obstructive lung diseases for this region. The study was conducted on Healthy rural school going children, both boys and girls between the age group of 5-16 years. For the determination of PEFR we used Mini Wright Peak Flow Meter. At three time measurement, the highest value of PEFR was recorded. Formula for prediction of PEFR was estimated by linear regression analysis after the correlation of PEFR with age and height for both boys and girls. PEFR was measured in 1028 children aged 5 to 16 years by using Wright's mini peak flow meter. Prediction equations were derived for PEFR with height in boys and girls. Normograms were plotted based on the observed values of PEFR in the study population. Significant linear correlation was seen of PEFR with height in boys (paffected by regional, environmental and anthropometric factors. Hence, it is necessary to have regional reference values for children. Among different factors affecting PEFR, height correlates better with PEFR than weight and sex. Hence nomograms constructed can be used for this region.

  13. Effects of non-fatiguing respiratory muscle loading induced by expiratory flow limitation during strenuous incremental cycle exercise on metabolic stress and circulating natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Debord, Camille; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Duranti, Roberto; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2017-12-01

    Exercise induces release of cytokines and increase of circulating natural killers (NK) lymphocyte during strong activation of respiratory muscles. We hypothesised that non-fatiguing respiratory muscle loading during exercise causes an increase in NK cells and in metabolic stress indices. Heart rate (HR), ventilation (VE), oesophageal pressure (Pes), oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), dyspnoea and leg effort were measured in eight healthy humans (five men and three women, average age of 31 ± 4 years and body weight of 68 ± 10 kg), performing an incremental exercise testing on a cycle ergometer under control condition and expiratory flow limitation (FL) achieved by putting a Starling resistor. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at peak of exercise and at iso-workload corresponding to that reached at the peak of FL exercise during control exercise. Diaphragmatic fatigue was evaluated by measuring the tension time index of the diaphragm. Respiratory muscle overloading caused an earlier interruption of exercise. Diaphragmatic fatigue did not occur in the two conditions. At peak of flow-limited exercise compared to iso-workload, HR, peak inspiratory and expiratory Pes, NK cells and norepinephrine were significantly higher. The number of NK cells was significantly related to ΔPes (i.e. difference between the most and the less negative Pes) and plasmatic catecholamines. Loading of respiratory muscles is able to cause an increase of NK cells provided that activation of respiratory muscles is intense enough to induce a significant metabolic stress.

  14. Positive end-expiratory pressure increases pulmonary clearance of inhaled 99mTc-DTPA in nonsmokers but not in healthy smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolop, K.B.; Braude, S.; Royston, D.; Maxwell, D.L.; Hughes, J.M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is widely used in the treatment of severe pulmonary oedema, although its effects on the clearance of water and small solutes from alveolus to blood are not well characterized. We studied the effect of the application of 10 cmH 2 O of PEEP on the flux of inhaled 99 mTc-diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid (DTPA) from lung to blood in six healthy smoking and six nonsmoking subjects. The rate of flux was corrected for possible changes in pulmonary blood volume during PEEP by use of an intravenous injection of 99m Tc-DTPA. The baseline clearance rate (K,%.min -1 ) for nonsmokers was 1.48±0.12 (mean±SE) and increased to 2.40±0.29 during PEEP (p<0.05). In contrast, the mean clearance rate for smokers was 3.26±0.82 at baseline and 3.03±0.82 during PEEP (p=NS). The application of positive end-expiratory pressure appears to increase alveolar solute flux in nonsmokers but not in smokers, suggesting that the pathway for solute clearance in smokers is governed by different rate-limiting steps to those of nonsmokers

  15. The predictive value of preoperative perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy, spirometry and x-ray of the lungs on postoperative pulmonary complications. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogh, J.; Wille-Joergensen, P.; Brynjolf, I.; Thorup, J.; Joergensen, T.; Bording, L.; Kjaergaard, J.

    1987-01-01

    Prospectively, 125 patients were examined with 99m Tc-perfusion scintigraphy, 89m Kr- or 127 Xe-ventilation scintigraphy and chest radiogram prior to major surgery. Postoperative therapy-demanding pulmonary complications occurred in 18% of the patients. A statistical association could be demonstrated between all the preoperative tests except ventilation scintigraphy and the frequency of complications. However, the predictive values of each of the tests, or even the combined results, were not significantly different from the frequency of complications among all the patients. It is concluded that the predictive values of perfusion-and ventilation scintigraphy, spirometry and radiogram of the chest are too low to be of any practical use. (author)

  16. Studying allergic inflammation and spirometry over menstrual cycles in well-controlled asthmatic women: Changes in progesterone and estradiol affect neither FENO levels nor lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittner-Marszalska, Marita; Dor-Wojnarowska, Anna; Wolańczyk-Mędrala, Anna; Rosner-Tenerowicz, Anna; Zimmer, Mariusz; Dobek, Julia; Gomułka, Krzysztof; Parużyńska, Anna; Panaszek, Bernard

    2018-05-01

    It has been reported that female sex hormones influence on allergic inflammation and ventilation parameters in asthma but conclusions drawn by different researchers are divergent. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of progesterone (Pg) and estradiol (E) on the dynamics of allergic inflammation and spirometry test results in regularly menstruating women with stable allergic asthma. 13 women (28 days menstrual cycle), aged 18-45, taking no hormonal contraceptives, with mild and moderate asthma, without reported exacerbations at the near-ovulation and/or menstruation time, were monitored during two consecutive menstrual cycles. They had 4 visits per cycle (the first day of menstruation was assumed to be day 1 of the cycle; visits were carried out on days: 3-4, 10-11, 13-14 and 23-24). At each visit asthma symptoms, asthma control test (ACT) results, asthma treatment, fractioned nitric oxide (FENO) levels, spirometry test results, Pg and E, levels were analyzed. As a result of the study, no essential variability in FENO values and ventilation parameters' values in the course of menstruation cycle were observed. Negative correlation between FENO values and Pg concentrations was demonstrated (r = 0.27), but no correlation between FENO values and E levels was shown. No relationship between the ACT values and ventilation parameters and the levels of the sex hormones under investigation was detected. We conclude that changing levels of estradiol and progesterone (regardless of the negative correlation of progesterone and FENO values) affect neither the dynamics of allergic inflammation nor pulmonary function in women with stable allergic mild/moderate asthma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Coriolis Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciuc, Daly; Solschi, Viorel

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the Coriolis effect is essential for explaining the movement of air masses and ocean currents. The lesson we propose aims to familiarize students with the manifestation of the Coriolis effect. Students are guided to build, using the GeoGebra software, a simulation of the motion of a body, related to a rotating reference system. The mathematical expression of the Coriolis force is deduced, for particular cases, and the Foucault's pendulum is presented and explained. Students have the opportunity to deepen the subject, by developing materials related to topics such as: • Global Wind Pattern • Ocean Currents • Coriolis Effect in Long Range Shooting • Finding the latitude with a Foucault Pendulum

  18. Invisible force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Astronomers have compiled evidence that what we always thought of as the actual universe- all the planets, stars, galaxies and matter in space -represents a mere 4% of what's out there. The rest is dark: 23% is called dark matter, 73% dark energy. Scientists have ideas about what dark matter is, but hardly any understanding about dark energy. This has led to rethinking traditional physics and cosmology. Assuming the existence of dark matter and that the law of gravitation is universal, two teams of astrophysicists, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Australian National University, analysed the universe's growth and to their surprise both concluded that the universe expansion is not slowing but speeding up. If the dominant force of evolution isn't gravity what is it?

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with end-stage kidney disease on hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Louis L; Warming, Peder E; Nielsen, Ture L

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in hemodialysis patients with spirometry and to examine the effects of fluid removal by hemodialysis on lung volumes. Patients ≥18 years at two Danish hemodialysis centers were included....... Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1 /FVC ratio were measured with spirometry before and after hemodialysis. The diagnosis of COPD was based on both the GOLD criteria and the lower limit of normal criteria. There were 372 patients in treatment at the two...... centers, 255 patients (69%) completed spirometry before dialysis and 242 of these (65%) repeated the test after. In the initial test, 117 subjects (46%) had airflow limitation indicative of COPD with GOLD criteria and 103 subjects (40.4%) with lower limit of normal criteria; COPD was previously diagnosed...

  20. Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Analyses of Lung Function in Toluene Diisocyanate Production Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei Lin; Storey, Eileen; Cassidy, Laura D; Doney, Brent; Conner, Patrick R; Collins, James J; Carson, Michael; Molenaar, Don

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate lung function among toluene diisocyanate (TDI) production workers. One hundred ninety-seven U.S workers performed spirometry from 2006 through 2012. Results were compared within the study cohort and with U.S. population measures. A mixed-effects model assessed factors affecting repeated forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) measurements. The cohort's mean FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) percent reference values, although greater than 90%, were significantly lower and the prevalence of abnormal spirometry (predominantly restrictive pattern) was significantly higher than in the U.S. Differences in lung function among workers with higher cumulative TDI exposure were in the direction of an exposure effect, but not significant. We found little evidence of an adverse effect of TDI exposure on longitudinal spirometry in these workers. The association between TDI exposure and the increasing prevalence of a restrictive pattern needs further exploration.

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of hypopnoea detection using nasal pressure in the presence of a nasal expiratory resistive device (Provent®)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milne, Stephen; Amis, Terence C; Wheatley, John R; Kairaitis, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Nasal expiratory resistive valves (Provent ® ) have been proposed as novel therapy for obstructive sleep apnea. We compared pressure measurements from a standard nasal pressure catheter used to assess nasal airflow during sleep with those from nasal expiratory resistive device with attached proprietary nasal pressure cannula. Nasal pressure cannula or Provent ® + proprietary nasal pressure cannula were attached to a bench model of human anterior nares and nasal passages, and pressure measured (P). Respiratory airflows generated by a subject breathing were applied to rear of model and airflow ( V-dot ) measured via pneumotachograph. Airflow amplitude (Δ V-dot ) was plotted against pressure amplitude (ΔP). Hypopnoea detection (<50% Δ V-dot ) sensitivity and specificity was tested by expressing ΔP in terms of two reference breaths: reference breath 1, Δ V-dot 0.55 L s −1  = 100%; and reference breath 2, Δ V-dot 0.45 L s −1  = 100%. ΔP/Δ V-dot relationships were linear for Δ V-dot  ≤ 0.55 L s −1 ; ΔP = 0.37ΔV + 0.16 (nasal pressure cannula), ΔP = 2.7ΔV + 0.12 (Provent ® + proprietary nasal pressure cannula); both R 2  > 0.65, p < 0.0001; p < 0.0001 for between slope difference). For nasal pressure cannula, specificity of hypopnoea detection differed between reference breaths one and two (80.2% and 40.0%, respectively), and Provent ® + proprietary nasal pressure cannula (30.3% and 74.2%, respectively). Quantification of airflow obstruction in the presence of Provent ® + proprietary nasal pressure cannula is greatly influenced by the reference breath chosen to determine a reduction in nasal airflow. Reported variability in therapeutic response to nasal expiratory resistive devices may relate to differences in measurement technique specificity used to quantify the severity of sleep disordered breathing. (paper)

  2. Intraoperative and postoperative evaluation of low tidal volume combined with low-level positive end-expiratory pressure ventilation in laparoscopic surgery in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Qiu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate intraoperative and postoperative condition of low tidal volume combined with low-level positive end-expiratory pressure ventilation in laparoscopic surgery in elderly patients. Methods: A total of 176 cases of elderly patients (more than 60 years old receiving laparoscopic surgery in our hospital from July 2013 to July 2015 were selected as research subjects and randomly divided into observation group and control group, each group included 88 cases, control group received conventional ventilation strategy, observation group received low tidal volume combined with low-level positive end-expiratory pressure ventilation strategy, and then levels of hemodynamic indexes, respiratory mechanical indexes, serology indexes and cerebral vessel related indexes, etc of two groups were compared. Results: Intraoperative and postoperative heart rate and mean arterial pressure levels of observation group were lower than those of control group, arterial partial pressure of oxygen and oxygenation index levels were higher than those of control group and differences had statistical significance (P<0.05; intraoperative APIP and Pplat values of observation group were lower than those of control group, Cs value was higher than that of control group and differences had statistical significance (P<0.05; intraoperative and postoperative serum IL-8 and TNF-α levels of observation group were lower than those of control group, IL-10 level was higher than that of control group and differences had statistical significance (P<0.05; intraoperative and postoperative PjvO2, SjvO2 and CjvO2 levels of observation group were higher than those of control group, Da-jvO2 level was lower than that of control group and differences had statistical significance (P<0.05. Conclusions: When elderly patients receive laparoscopic surgery, the use of low tidal volume combined with low-level positive end-expiratory pressure ventilation strategy can stabilize hemodynamic

  3. Changes in Cross-Sectional Area and Transverse Diameter of the Heart on Inspiratory and Expiratory Chest CT: Correlation with Changes in Lung Size and Influence on Cardiothoracic Ratio Measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Tomita

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate physiological changes in cardiac area and diameters between inspiratory and expiratory chest computed tomography (CT, and to assess their correlation with lung size change and influence on cardiothoracic ratio (CTR measurements.The institutional review board of our institution approved this study, and informed consent was waived. Forty-three subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory chest CT as part of routine clinical care. On both inspiratory and expiratory scans, lung volumes and maximum lung diameters (transverse and vertical directions were measured. The maximum cardiac cross-sectional area (CSA and the maximum transverse cardiac diameter were measured on both scans, and the CT-based CTR was calculated. Changes in the lung and cardiac measurements were expressed as the expiratory/inspiratory (E/I ratios. Comparisons between inspiratory and expiratory measurements were made by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Correlations between the E/I ratios of lung and heart measurements were evaluated by Spearman's rank correlation analysis.Cardiac CSA and transverse cardiac diameter was significantly larger on expiratory than on inspiratory CT (p < 0.0001. Significant negative correlations were found between the E/I ratios of these cardiac measurements and the E/I ratios of lung volume and vertical lung diameter (p < 0.01. CT-based CTR was significantly larger on expiration than on inspiration (p < 0.0001.Heart size on chest CT depends on the phase of ventilation, and is correlated with changes in lung volume and craniocaudal lung diameter. The CTR is also significantly influenced by ventilation.

  4. Lung recruitability is better estimated according to the Berlin definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome at standard 5 cm H2O rather than higher positive end-expiratory pressure: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caironi, Pietro; Carlesso, Eleonora; Cressoni, Massimo; Chiumello, Davide; Moerer, Onner; Chiurazzi, Chiara; Brioni, Matteo; Bottino, Nicola; Lazzerini, Marco; Bugedo, Guillermo; Quintel, Michael; Ranieri, V Marco; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    The Berlin definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome has introduced three classes of severity according to PaO2/FIO2 thresholds. The level of positive end-expiratory pressure applied may greatly affect PaO2/FIO2, thereby masking acute respiratory distress syndrome severity, which should reflect the underlying lung injury (lung edema and recruitability). We hypothesized that the assessment of acute respiratory distress syndrome severity at standardized low positive end-expiratory pressure may improve the association between the underlying lung injury, as detected by CT, and PaO2/FIO2-derived severity. Retrospective analysis. Four university hospitals (Italy, Germany, and Chile). One hundred forty-eight patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome according to the American-European Consensus Conference criteria. Patients underwent a three-step ventilator protocol (at clinical, 5 cm H2O, or 15 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure). Whole-lung CT scans were obtained at 5 and 45 cm H2O airway pressure. Nine patients did not fulfill acute respiratory distress syndrome criteria of the novel Berlin definition. Patients were then classified according to PaO2/FIO2 assessed at clinical, 5 cm H2O, or 15 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure. At clinical positive end-expiratory pressure (11±3 cm H2O), patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome had a greater lung tissue weight and recruitability than patients with mild or moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (pBerlin definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome assessed at 5 cm H2O allows a better evaluation of lung recruitability and edema than at higher positive end-expiratory pressure clinically set.

  5. Calculation of the capnographic index based on expiratory molar mass-volume-curves--a suitable tool to screen for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Junge, Sibylle; Ellemunter, Helmut; Ballmann, Manfred; Gappa, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Volumetric capnography reflecting the course of CO2-exhalation is used to assess ventilation inhomogeneity. Calculation of the slope of expiratory phase 3 and the capnographic index (KPIv) from expirograms allows quantification of extent and severity of small airway impairment. However, technical limitations have hampered more widespread use of this technique. Using expiratory molar mass-volume-curves sampled with a handheld ultrasonic flow sensor during tidal breathing is a novel approach to extract similar information from expirograms in a simpler manner possibly qualifying as a screening tool for clinical routine. The aim of the present study was to evaluate calculation of the KPIv based on molar mass-volume-curves sampled with an ultrasonic flow sensor in patients with CF and controls by assessing feasibility, reproducibility and comparability with the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath washout (MBW) used as the reference method. Measurements were performed in patients with CF and healthy controls during a single test occasion using the EasyOne Pro, MBW Module (ndd Medical Technologies, Switzerland). Capnography and MBW were performed in 87/96 patients with CF and 38/42 controls, with a success rate of 90.6% for capnography. Mean age (range) was 12.1 (4-25) years. Mean (SD) KPIv was 6.94 (3.08) in CF and 5.10 (2.06) in controls (p=0.001). Mean LCI (SD) was 8.0 (1.4) in CF and 6.2 (0.4) in controls (p=molar mass-volume-curves is feasible. KPIv is significantly different between patients with CF and controls and correlates with the LCI. However, individual data revealed a relevant overlap between patients and controls requiring further evaluation, before this method can be recommended for clinical use. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure during one-lung ventilation of patients with pulmonary hyperinflation. Influence of low respiratory rate with unchanged minute volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, L L; Barvais, L; Sokolow, Y; Yernault, J C; d'Hollander, A A

    2002-01-01

    We measured lung mechanics and gas exchange during one-lung ventilation (OLV) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, using three respiratory rates (RR) and unchanged minute volume. We studied 15 patients about to undergo lung surgery, during anaesthesia, and placed in the lateral position. Ventilation was with constant minute volume, inspiratory flow and FIO2. For periods of 15 min, RR of 5, 10, and 15 bpm were applied in a random sequence and recordings were made of lung mechanics and an arterial blood gas sample was taken. Data were analysed with the repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-test with Bonferroni correction. PaO2 changes were not significant. At the lowest RR, PaCO2 decreased (from 42 (SD 4) mm Hg at RR 15-41 (4) mm Hg at RR 10 and 39 (4) mm Hg at RR 5, P<0.01), and end-tidal carbon dioxide increased (from 33 (5) mm Hg at RR 15 to 35 (5) mm Hg at RR 10 and 36 (6) mm Hg at RR 5, P<0.01). Intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) was reduced even with larger tidal volumes (from 6 (4) cm H2O at RR 15-5 (4) cm H2O at RR 10, and 3 (3) cm H2O at RR 5, P<0.01), most probably caused by increased expiratory time at the lowest RR. A reduction in RR reduces PEEPi and hypercapnia during OLV in anaesthetized patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

  7. 12th Air Force > Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force AOR Travel Info News prevnext Slide show 76,410 pounds of food delivered to Haiti 12th Air Force the French Air Force, Colombian Air Force, Pakistan Air Force, Belgian Air Force, Brazilian Air Force

  8. Estimating the U.S. prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background During 2007–2010, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted a spirometry component which obtained pre-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data on a nationally representative sample of US adults aged 6–79 years and post-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data for the subset of adults with airflow limitation. The goals of this study were to 1) compute prevalence estimates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and fixed ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) diagnostic criteria and 2) examine the potential impact of nonresponse on the estimates. Methods This analysis was limited to those aged 40–79 years who were eligible for NHANES pre-bronchodilator spirometry (n=7,104). Examinees with likely airflow limitation were further eligible for post-bronchodilator testing (n=1,110). Persons were classified as having COPD based on FEV1/FVC spirometry but self-reporting both daytime supplemental oxygen therapy plus emphysema and/or current chronic bronchitis were also classified as having COPD. The final analytic samples for pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator analyses were 77.1% (n=5,477) and 50.8% (n=564) of those eligible, respectively. To account for non-response, NHANES examination weights were adjusted to the eligible pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator subpopulations. Results In 2007–2010, using the fixed ratio criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, COPD prevalence was 20.9% (SE 1.1) among US adults aged 40–79 years. Applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 14.0% (SE 1.0). Using the LLN criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, the COPD prevalence was 15.4% (SE 0.8), while applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 10.2% (SE 0.8). Conclusions The overall COPD prevalence among US adults aged 40–79 years varied from 10.2% to 20

  9. Diseño de un programa de formación básico para conseguir espirometrías de calidad Design of a basic training program to get quality spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Escarrabill

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La espirometría forzada es una manera sencilla y no invasiva de valorar la función pulmonar. La obtención de una espirometría de calidad requiere formación, condiciones técnicas adecuadas (calibración, mantenimiento y ubicación del aparato y colaboración del paciente. Diversos trabajos han constatado déficits formativos de los profesionales, relacionados en parte con la elevada rotación en un mismo puesto, la falta de sistemática en la incorporación de nuevos profesionales que realizan espirometrías y la ausencia de planes de evaluación periódica de competencias. Materiales y métodos. En el marco del Plan Director de Enfermedades del Aparato Respiratorio (PDMAR se ha diseñado un programa formativo mínimo teórico-práctico de 16 horas de duración, basado en el programa de formación del National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health y de las iniciativas que surgen en el marco de la European Respiratory Society. Durante el año 2010 se realizaron 13 cursos en los que participaron 307 profesionales. Resultados. Las diferencias observadas entre la evaluación de conocimientos previos y la evaluación final fue estadísticamente significativa (p Introduction. The spirometry is a simple and noninvasive test to assess lung function. Obtaining a spirometry of quality requires training, appropriate technical conditions (calibration, maintenance and location of the device, and patient cooperation. Several studies have found professional training deficits related to a high turnover in the same place, the lack of systematic training when new professionals performing spirometry are incorporated and the lack of competences' periodic evaluation. Materials and methods. The Master Plan for respiratory diseases (PDMAR has designed a minimum practical/theoretical training program (16 hours based on the training program of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the European Respiratory Society

  10. Handbook of force transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Part I introduces the basic ""Principles and Methods of Force Measurement"" acording to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ""(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components"", evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the inco

  11. Evaluation of a new fiber-grating vision sensor for assessing pulmonary functions in healthy and COPD subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, S; Tsuduki, K; Shirahata, T; Yoshida, S; Chubachi, S; Miyazaki, M; Nakamura, M; Takahashi, S; Nakajima, T; Minematsu, N; Tateno, H; Asano, K; Nakamura, H; Sato, I; Aoki, H

    2011-01-01

    Spirometry is practically the only tool to evaluate pulmonary functions. Other automatic systems comparable to spirometry are expected. A fiber-grating (FG) vision sensor is a non-contact respiratory monitoring system to detect changes in volumes by measuring the movement of laser spots on the body surface. We examined the contributions of the FG sensor to evaluating pulmonary functions. The FG sensor showed a linear correlation with spirometry in tidal volumes (TV) obtained from five controls (R = 0.98, P < 0.0001). We also showed agreement of TV between the two devices using Bland–Altman analysis. TV measured by the FG sensor were reproducible and applicable to distinct subjects. To detect airway obstruction, we performed forced expiration in controls (n = 16) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients (n = 18) with the FG sensor and spirometry. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) and FEV 1 /forced vital capacity in COPD patients were lower than those in controls by the FG sensor. In addition, prolonged expiration in natural breathing by the FG sensor was related to airflow limitation by spirometry. The FG sensor was helpful to measure volume changes and to evaluate pulmonary functions in controls and patients with COPD. Its upcoming clinical applications are promising for simplicity and feasibility

  12. FCT (functional computed tomography) evaluation of the lung volumes at different PEEP (positive-end expiratory pressure) ventilation pattern, in mechanical ventilated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papi, M.G.; Di Segni, R.; Mazzetti, G.; Staffa, F.; Conforto, F.; Calimici, R.; Salvi, A.; Matteucci, G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate with FCT (functional computed tomography) total lung volume and fractional lung volumes at different PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure) values in acute mechanically ventilated patients. Methods Nine ICU (intensive care unity) patients (1 lung pneumonia, 2 polytrauma, 2 sepsis, 3 brain surgery, 1 pulmonary embolism); mean age 48 ± 15 years, 6 male, 3 female; GE 16 MDCT scan was performed with acquisition from apex to diaphragma in seven seca at different PEEP values. Raw CT data were analysed by an advantage workstation to obtain volume density masks and histograms of both lungs and each lung and these density ranges were applied: - 1000 - 950 hyper-ventilated lung, -900 - 650 well aerated lung, -950 - 500 all aerated lung, -500 + 200 lung tissue. Total and fractional lung volumes, Hounsfield unit (HU) were calculated and compared at different PEEP values (0, 5, 10, 15 cm H 2 O). In four patients lung volumes were compared between the more and the less involved lung at increased PEEP. Statistic analysis: comparison means-medians tests. Results Data calculated at five PEEP showed unexpected decrease of total lung volume and increase of lung density (HU); proportionally no significant improvement of oxigenation. (orig.)

  13. FCT (functional computed tomography) evaluation of the lung volumes at different PEEP (positive-end expiratory pressure) ventilation pattern, in mechanical ventilated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papi, M.G.; Di Segni, R.; Mazzetti, G.; Staffa, F. [Dept. of Radiology, S. Giovanni HS, Rome (Italy); Conforto, F.; Calimici, R.; Salvi, A. [Dept. of Anesthesiology, S. Giovanni HS, Rome (Italy); Matteucci, G. [Dept. of Pneumology, S. Giovanni HS, Rome (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate with FCT (functional computed tomography) total lung volume and fractional lung volumes at different PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure) values in acute mechanically ventilated patients. Methods Nine ICU (intensive care unity) patients (1 lung pneumonia, 2 polytrauma, 2 sepsis, 3 brain surgery, 1 pulmonary embolism); mean age 48 {+-} 15 years, 6 male, 3 female; GE 16 MDCT scan was performed with acquisition from apex to diaphragma in seven seca at different PEEP values. Raw CT data were analysed by an advantage workstation to obtain volume density masks and histograms of both lungs and each lung and these density ranges were applied: - 1000 - 950 = hyper-ventilated lung, -900 - 650 well aerated lung, -950 - 500 all aerated lung, -500 + 200 lung tissue. Total and fractional lung volumes, Hounsfield unit (HU) were calculated and compared at different PEEP values (0, 5, 10, 15 cm H{sub 2}O). In four patients lung volumes were compared between the more and the less involved lung at increased PEEP. Statistic analysis: comparison means-medians tests. Results Data calculated at five PEEP showed unexpected decrease of total lung volume and increase of lung density (HU); proportionally no significant improvement of oxigenation. (orig.)

  14. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure prevents pulmonary inflammation in patients without preexisting lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthuis, Esther K; Choi, Goda; Dessing, Mark C; Bresser, Paul; Lutter, Rene; Dzoljic, Misa; van der Poll, Tom; Vroom, Margreeth B; Hollmann, Markus; Schultz, Marcus J

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes aggravates lung injury in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The authors sought to determine the effects of short-term mechanical ventilation on local inflammatory responses in patients without preexisting lung injury. Patients scheduled to undergo an elective surgical procedure (lasting > or = 5 h) were randomly assigned to mechanical ventilation with either higher tidal volumes of 12 ml/kg ideal body weight and no positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or lower tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg and 10 cm H2O PEEP. After induction of anesthesia and 5 h thereafter, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or blood was investigated for polymorphonuclear cell influx, changes in levels of inflammatory markers, and nucleosomes. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP (n = 21) attenuated the increase of pulmonary levels of interleukin (IL)-8, myeloperoxidase, and elastase as seen with higher tidal volumes and no PEEP (n = 19). Only for myeloperoxidase, a difference was found between the two ventilation strategies after 5 h of mechanical ventilation (P volumes and PEEP may limit pulmonary inflammation in mechanically ventilated patients without preexisting lung injury. The specific contribution of both lower tidal volumes and PEEP on the protective effects of the lung should be further investigated.

  15. Evaluation of changes in central airway dimensions, lung area and mean lung density at paired inspiratory/expiratory high-resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ederle, J.R.; Heussel, C.P.; Hast, J.; Ley, S.; Thelen, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Fischer, B.; Beek, E.J.R. van

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of interdependencies of dynamic changes in central airway dimensions, lung area and lung density on HRCT. The HRCT scans of 156 patients obtained at full inspiratory and expiratory position were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into four groups according to lung function tests: normal subjects (n=47); obstructive (n=74); restrictive (n=19); or mixed ventilatory impairment (n=16). Mean lung density (MLD) was correlated with cross-sectional area of the lung (CSA L ), cross-sectional area of the trachea (CSA T ) and diameter of main-stem bronchi (D B ). The CSA L was correlated with CSA T and D B . MLD correlated with CSA L in normal subjects (r=-0.66, p T in the control group (r=-0.50, p B was found (r=-0.52, p L and CSA T correlated in the control group (r=0.67, p L and D B correlated in the control group (r=0.42, p<0.0001) and in patients with obstructive lung disease (r=0.24, p<0.05). Correlations for patients with restrictive and mixed lung disease were constantly lower. Dependencies between central and peripheral airway dimensions and lung parenchyma are demonstrated by HRCT. Best correlations are observed in normal subjects and patients with obstructive lung disease. Based on these findings we postulate that the dependencies are the result of air-flow and pressure patterns. (orig.)

  16. Effects of positive end expiratory pressure administration during non-invasive ventilation in patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimanno, Grazia; Greco, Francesca; Arrisicato, Salvo; Morana, Noemi; Marrone, Oreste

    2016-10-01

    No studies have evaluated the impact of different settings of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We explored consequences of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) application on effectiveness of ventilation, sleep architecture and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with ALS naïve to ventilatory treatment. In two consecutive nights, 25 patients received in random order 0 or 4 cm H2 0 of PEEP during nocturnal NIV administration (Idea Ultra ResMed) with the same level of total positive inspiratory pressure. Polysomnographies were performed to evaluate sleep and NIV quality, as well as HRV. HRV was analyzed on 4-h periods and on 5-min segments of stable NREM sleep. We did not observe differences in gas exchanges during NIV with and without PEEP. Conversely, during PEEP application increases in leaks (41.4 ± 29.3% vs 31.0 ± 25.7%, P = 0.0007) and in autotriggerings (4.2 (IQR 1.3-10.0) vs 0.9 (IQR 0.0-3.0) events/h, P NIV was associated with worse NIV and sleep quality and with higher sympathetic activity. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. An advanced expiratory circuit for the recovery of perfluorocarbon liquid from non-saturated perfluorocarbon vapour during partial liquid ventilation: an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Mark W

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The loss of perfluorocarbon (PFC vapour in the expired gases during partial liquid ventilation should be minimized both to prevent perfluorocarbon vapour entering the atmosphere and to re-use the recovered PFC liquid. Using a substantially modified design of our previously described condenser, we aimed to determine how much perfluorocarbon liquid could be recovered from gases containing PFC and water vapour, at concentrations found during partial liquid ventilation, and to determine if the amount recovered differed with background flow rate (at flow rates suitable for use in neonates. Methods The expiratory line of a standard ventilator circuit set-up was mimicked, with the addition of two condensers. Perfluorocarbon (30 mL of FC-77 and water vapour, at concentrations found during partial liquid ventilation, were passed through the circuit at a number of flow rates and the percentage recovery of the liquids measured. Results From 14.2 mL (47% to 27.3 mL (91% of the infused 30 mL of FC-77 was recovered at the flow rates studied. Significantly higher FC-77 recovery was obtained at lower flow rates (ANOVA with Bonferroni's multiple comparison test, p -1 (ANOVA with Bonferroni's multiple comparison test, p -1, respectively. Conclusion Using two condensers in series 47% to 91% of perfluorocarbon liquid can be recovered, from gases containing perfluorocarbon and water vapour, at concentrations found during partial liquid ventilation.

  18. Effects of respiratory rate, plateau pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure on PaO2 oscillations after saline lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, James E; Markstaller, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Birgit; Doebrich, Marcus; Otto, Cynthia M

    2002-12-15

    One of the proposed mechanisms of ventilator-associated lung injury is cyclic recruitment of atelectasis. Collapse of dependent lung regions with every breath should lead to large oscillations in PaO2 as shunt varies throughout the respiratory cycle. We placed a fluorescence-quenching PO2 probe in the brachiocephalic artery of six anesthetized rabbits after saline lavage. Using pressure-controlled ventilation with oxygen, ventilator settings were varied in random order over three levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), respiratory rate (RR), and plateau pressure minus PEEP (Delta). Dependence of the amplitude of PaO2 oscillations on PEEP, RR, and Delta was modeled by multiple linear regression. Before lavage, arterial PO2 oscillations varied from 3 to 22 mm Hg. After lavage, arterial PO2 oscillations varied from 5 to 439 mm Hg. Response surfaces showed markedly nonlinear dependence of amplitude on PEEP, RR, and Delta. The large PaO2 oscillations observed provide evidence for cyclic recruitment in this model of lung injury. The important effect of RR on the magnitude of PaO2 oscillations suggests that the static behavior of atelectasis cannot be accurately extrapolated to predict dynamic behavior at realistic breathing frequencies.

  19. Peak expiratory flow mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and timed up and go performance in elderly women, but not men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; de Mello Franco, Fábio Gazelato; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Nasri, Fábio; Monteiro-Costa, Maria Luiza; de Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf; de Matos, Luciana Diniz Nagem Janot

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify if there is sex difference in the associations among handgrip strength, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and timed up and go (TUG) test results. The sample included 288 consecutive elderly men (n=93) and women (n=195). Functional capacity was measured using the TUG test, and muscle strength was measured based on handgrip. Moreover, as a measure of current health status, PEF was evaluated. Linear regression procedures were performed to analyze the relationships between handgrip and both PEF and TUG test results, with adjustment for confounders, and to identify the possible mediating role of PEF in the association between handgrip strength and TUG test results. In men, handgrip strength was associated with both PEF and TUG performance (prelationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance remained significant. In women, handgrip strength was also associated with both PEF and TUG performance (prelationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance was no longer significant. Mobility in the elderly is sex dependent. In particular, PEF mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance in women, but not in men.

  20. Influência da técnica de pressão expiratória positiva oscilante utilizando pressões expiratórias pré-determinadas na viscosidade e na transportabilidade do escarro em pacientes com bronquiectasia Influence that oscillating positive expiratory pressure using predetermined expiratory pressures has on the viscosity and transportability of sputum in patients with bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercy Mara Cipulo Ramos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a efetividade da técnica de pressão expiratória positiva oscilante (PEPO utilizando pressões expiratórias pré-determinadas sobre a viscosidade e a transportabilidade do escarro em pacientes com bronquiectasia. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 15 pacientes estáveis com bronquiectasia (7 homens; média de idade = 53 ± 16 anos, submetidos a duas intervenções PEPO consecutivas, com 24 h de intervalo entre si, utilizando pressões expiratórias de 15 cmH2O (P15 e 25 cmH2O (P25. O protocolo consistiu de tosse voluntária; nova expectoração voluntária após 20 min, denominado tempo zero (T0; repouso de 10 min; e utilização da técnica em duas séries de 10 min (S1 e S2 de PEPO em P15 e P25, com intervalo de 10 min entre si. A viscosidade e transportabilidade do escarro foram avaliadas pela viscosimetria, velocidade relativa de transporte no palato de rã, deslocamento em máquina simuladora de tosse e ângulo de adesão. As amostras de escarro foram coletadas em T0, após S1 e após S2. Testes estatísticos específicos foram aplicados de acordo com a distribuição dos dados. RESULTADOS: Houve diminuição significante da viscosidade do escarro após S1 em P15 e após S2 em P25. Não houve diferenças significantes entre todas as amostras para a transportabilidade. CONCLUSÕES: Houve diminuição da viscosidade do escarro quando a PEPO foi realizada em P15 e P25, o que sugere que não seja necessário gerar alta pressão expiratória para obter o resultado desejado.OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPEP using predetermined expiratory pressures on the viscosity and transportability of sputum in patients with bronchiectasis. METHODS: The study involved 15 stable patients with bronchiectasis (7 males; mean age = 53 ± 16 years, submitted to two consecutive OPEP interventions, with a 24-h interval between the two, using positive expiratory pressures set at 15 cmH2O

  1. Effects of a Period of Selected Activity on Lung Capacities in Children 5-10 Years with Asthma Caused by Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Sharifi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aasthma due to causing disruption in the work of breathing and obstruction of the pulmonary tract creates the physical restrictions in the social, emotional and psychological, aspects and performing daily life activities, hence the present study is conducted to determine the impact of a period of selected activity on some spirometry parameters of children from 5 to 10 years old suffering from asthma caused by exercise.Materials and Methods: In this half experimental respiratory research, respiratory indexes of 11 children including 5 boys under the age of 10 years old suffering from asthma caused by exercise were measured before and after eight weeks of selected exercises and pranayama by spirometry were measured.Results: The results showed that the selected exercise routine improves on the status of activities and being short of breath (Z=0/003. Also the average of spirometry indexes prior to a ten minutes exercise, before and after the intervention, compared with the average of spirometry indexes after a ten minute exercise, before and after intervention in the parameters: (fev1 the volume of the expiratory force in the first second, and (PEF the maximum expiratory flow, the results are statistically significant (p 0.05.Conclusions: The present study shows the impact of the selected exercises in improving mobility status and being short of breath and reducing asthma symptoms caused by exercise (EIA as well as strengthening the respiratory muscles significantly.

  2. Sensitivity of bronchial responsiveness measurements in young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, Lotte; Buchvald, Frederik F; Halkjaer, Liselotte Brydensholt

    2006-01-01

    of 402 infants (median age, 6 weeks). Forced flow-volume measurements were obtained by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique and were compared with indexes of tidal breathing, measurements of transcutaneous oxygen (Ptco(2)), and auscultation during methacholine challenge testing....... RESULTS: Ptco(2) was the most sensitive parameter to detect increasing airway obstruction during methacholine challenge, followed by forced expiratory volume at 0.5 s (FEV(0.5)). Both were superior to other indexes of forced spirometry as well as tidal breathing indexes and auscultation. Coefficients...

  3. Interfacial force measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)<