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Sample records for spirometry forced expiratory

  1. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711. Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  2. The Concave Shape of the Forced Expiratory Flow-Volume Curve in 3 Seconds Is a Practical Surrogate of FEV1/FVC for the Diagnosis of Airway Limitation in Inadequate Spirometry.

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    Li, Hao; Liu, Chunhong; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Spirometry is important for the differential diagnosis of dyspnea. However, some patients cannot exhale for ≥6 s to achieve the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the reliability of a new parameter that quantifies the degree of concavity in the first 3 s to define airway limitation as a surrogate for the FEV 1 /FVC. Four hundred spirometry test results were selected through complete random sampling. The new parameter, termed the AUC 3 /AT 3 , was calculated as the area under the descending limb of the expiratory flow-volume curve before the end of the first 3 s (AUC 3 ) divided by the area of the triangle before the end of the first 3 s (AT 3 ). The AUC 3 /AT 3 was compared with the FEV 1 /FVC using Pearson's correlation analysis. The level of agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of airway obstruction was analyzed using the kappa statistic. We also compared the diagnostic accuracy of the new index with that of the FEV 1 /forced expiratory volume in the first 3 s (FEV 3 ). There was a strong correlation (r = 0.88, P < .001) between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC. There was also strong agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of obstruction with kappa indices of 0.72 (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] criterion) and 0.67 (lower limit of normal criterion), and these values were greater than those obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 . The AUC 3 /AT 3 also exhibited acceptable sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. The diagnostic accuracies of the AUC 3 /AT 3 were 86.3% (GOLD criterion) and 83.8% (lower limit of normal criterion), which were greater than the 76.0 and 74.0% obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 , respectively. The AUC 3 /AT 3 can be utilized as a surrogate parameter for the FEV 1 /FVC when patients cannot complete a 6-s expiratory effort. Additionally, the

  3. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis

    2016-01-01

    fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness...... in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care...

  4. PIKO-6® vs. forced spirometry in asthmatic children.

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    Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Larios-Castañeda, Pablo José; Miguel-Reyes, José Luis; Briseño, David Martínez; Flores-Campos, Roberto; Sáenz-López, Juan Arturo; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2014-12-01

    The PIKO-6® is an electronic device that measures forced expiratory volume at seconds 1 (FEV1) and 6 (FEV6) of a forced vital capacity (FVC) maneuver. This device could aid in diagnosing obstructive respiratory diseases. To determine the concordance of FEV1, FEV6, and the FEV1/FEV6 quotient achieved with PIKO-6® versus spirometric values from asthmatic patients, and compare results with measures from healthy children. A cross-sectional study with asthmatic and healthy 6-to-14-year-old children, all of whom performed a forced spirometry as well as a PIKO-6® test. The study included 82 subjects (58 asthmatics, 24 healthy children). Except for the functional parameters, the basal characteristics of the two groups were similar. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for FEV1 was 0.938 (P spirometry was lower in patients with partially controlled or uncontrolled asthma compared to controlled or healthy children. The broad limits of agreement show that the FEV1, FEV6, and FEV1/FEV6 obtained with the PIKO-6® are not interchangeable with spirometry results. Longitudinal evaluations of asthma patients are necessary to assess the utility of PIKO-6®. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Spirometry

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    Spirometry Overview Spirometry (spy-ROM-uh-tree) is a common office test used to assess how well your lungs work by ... much you exhale and how quickly you exhale. Spirometry is used to diagnose asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  6. Comparison of forced expiratory spirometric flow changes following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group B received intrathecal anaesthesia 15 mgs of bupivacaine with 0.5 ml of normal saline and Group BF received 15 mgs of bupivacaine with 0.5 ml of fentanyl (25 μg) intrathecally. The patients were instructed about the performance of the spirometry on the previous evening of the surgery. Forced vital capacity, forced ...

  7. Noncontact spirometry with a webcam

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    Liu, Chenbin; Yang, Yuting; Tsow, Francis; Shao, Dangdang; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-05-01

    We present an imaging-based method for noncontact spirometry. The method tracks the subtle respiratory-induced shoulder movement of a subject, builds a calibration curve, and determines the flow-volume spirometry curve and vital respiratory parameters, including forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow rate. We validate the accuracy of the method by comparing the data with those simultaneously recorded with a gold standard reference method and examine the reliability of the noncontact spirometry with a pilot study including 16 subjects. This work demonstrates that the noncontact method can provide accurate and reliable spirometry tests with a webcam. Compared to the traditional spirometers, the present noncontact spirometry does not require using a spirometer, breathing into a mouthpiece, or wearing a nose clip, thus making spirometry test more easily accessible for the growing population of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  8. Use of the forced-oscillation technique to estimate spirometry values

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    Yamamoto S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shoichiro Yamamoto,1 Seigo Miyoshi,1 Hitoshi Katayama,1 Mikio Okazaki,2 Hisayuki Shigematsu,2 Yoshifumi Sano,2 Minoru Matsubara,3 Naohiko Hamaguchi,1 Takafumi Okura,1 Jitsuo Higaki1 1Department of Cardiology, Pulmonology, Hypertension, and Nephrology, 2Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Sumitomo Besshi Hospital, Niihama, Japan Purpose: Spirometry is sometimes difficult to perform in elderly patients and in those with severe respiratory distress. The forced-oscillation technique (FOT is a simple and noninvasive method of measuring respiratory impedance. The aim of this study was to determine if FOT data reflect spirometric indices.Patients and methods: Patients underwent both FOT and spirometry procedures prior to inclusion in development (n=1,089 and validation (n=552 studies. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to identify FOT parameters predictive of vital capacity (VC, forced VC (FVC, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1. A regression equation was used to calculate estimated VC, FVC, and FEV1. We then determined whether the estimated data reflected spirometric indices. Agreement between actual and estimated spirometry data was assessed by Bland–Altman analysis.Results: Significant correlations were observed between actual and estimated VC, FVC, and FEV1 values (all r>0.8 and P<0.001. These results were deemed robust by a separate validation study (all r>0.8 and P<0.001. Bias between the actual data and estimated data for VC, FVC, and FEV1 in the development study was 0.007 L (95% limits of agreement [LOA] 0.907 and -0.893 L, -0.064 L (95% LOA 0.843 and -0.971 L, and -0.039 L (95% LOA 0.735 and -0.814 L, respectively. On the other hand, bias between the actual data and estimated data for VC, FVC, and FEV1 in the validation study was -0.201 L (95% LOA 0.62 and -1.022 L, -0.262 L (95% LOA 0.582 and -1.106 L, and

  9. Spirometry reference values in the Brazilian population.

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    Rufino, R; Costa, C H; Lopes, A J; Maiworm, A I; Maynard, K; Silva, L M R A; Dias, R M

    2017-03-02

    The aim of the present study was to provide new spirometry reference equations in a sample of the Brazilian population for the following parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, peak of expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow at 50% (FEF50%), 75% average vital capacity (FEF25-75%), and average forced expiratory flow time (FEFT). This was a prospective study using results from chest radiographs, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires to investigate the participants' respiratory symptoms, sedentarism, and comorbidities (Charlson comorbidity index). From December 2010 to July 2014, individuals were randomly selected from various locations in the state of Rio de Janeiro. All individuals were examined by a single technician in the morning at the laboratory, and performed the spirometry with the same spirometer. Spirometry values were tabulated for the creation of three equation models: linear regression, logarithmic regression, and logarithms through a method that incorporates the lambda, median, and coefficient of variation (LMS method). Initially, 7003 individuals from both genders were contacted, and 454 were recruited. The data from the new equations were compared with one Brazilian and eight international equations, resulting in a high correlation (r>0.9). The values derived from the LMS method and linear regression were very similar (P>0.5), and both could be used to acquire the reference values for Brazilian spirometry. Data derived from the equations of this study were different from the current Brazilian equation, which could be justified by the different method used.

  10. A comparison of peak expiratory flow measured from forced vital capacity and peak flow meter manoeuvres in healthy volunteers

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    Agarwal Dipti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spirometry measures the mechanical function of lungs, chest wall and respiratory muscles by assessing the total volume of air exhaled from total lung capacity to residual volume. Spirometry and peak flow measurements have usually been carried out on separate equipments using different expiratory maneuvers. Aims: The present study was carried out to determine whether there is a significant difference between peak expiratory flow (PEF derived from a short sharp exhalation (PEF maneuver and that derived from a full forced vital capacity (FVC maneuver in healthy volunteers. Settings: A medical college and tertiary level hospital. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out during the period from January 2006 to July 2006. The study included 80 healthy volunteers with no coexisting illnesses, who were in the 15-45 years age group and belonging to either sex. They were asked to perform two sets of PEF and FVC maneuvers using the same turbine spirometer; the order was randomly assigned.th Statistical Analysis: The difference between PEF obtained from a peak flow maneuver (PEFPF and that obtained from a forced vital capacity maneuver (PEFVC in healthy volunteers was analyzed separately for males and females, as well as for both groups combined, and statistical significance of its correlations with study data parameters was analyzed.th Results: The difference between PEF obtained from a peak flow maneuver (PEFPF and that obtained from a forced vital capacity maneuver (PEFVC was statistically significant ( P < 0.001 in males and in females separately and also for both groups combined. PEFPF (517.25 ± 83.22 liters/min was significantly greater than PEFVC (511.09 ± 83.54 liters/min, as found on combined group mean analysis. However, the difference was small (6.16 + 7.09 liters/min. Conclusions: FVC maneuver can be used over spirometers to detect the PEF; and on follow-up subsequently, the same maneuver should be used to derive PEF

  11. Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second over time in COPD

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    Vestbo, Jørgen; Edwards, Lisa D; Scanlon, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    A key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an accelerated rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but data on the variability and determinants of this change in patients who have established disease are scarce....

  12. Longitudinal spirometry among patients in a treatment program for community members with World Trade Center (WTC)-related illness

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    Liu, Mengling; Qian, Meng; Cheng, Qinyi; Berger, Kenneth I.; Shao, Yongzhao; Turetz, Meredith; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Goldring, Roberta M.; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Marmor, Michael; Reibman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The course of lung function in community members exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust and fumes remains undefined. We studied longitudinal spirometry among patients in the WTC Environmental Health Center (WTCEHC) treatment program. Methods Observational study of 946 WTCEHC patients with repeated spirometry measures analyzed on the population as a whole and stratified by smoking status, initial spirometry pattern and WTC-related exposure category. Results Improvement in forced expiratory volume (FVC; 54.4 ml/year; 95% CI: 45.0-63.8) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; 36.8 ml/year; 95% CI: 29.3-44.3) was noted for the population as a whole. Heavy smokers did not improve. Spirometry changes differed depending on initial spirometry pattern and exposure category. Conclusions These data demonstrate spirometry improvement in select populations suggesting reversibility in airway injury and reinforcing the importance of continued treatment. PMID:22995806

  13. The association of forced expiratory volume in one second and forced expiratory flow at 50% of the vital capacity, peak expiratory flow parameters, and blood eosinophil counts in exercise-induced bronchospasm in children with mild asthma.

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    Akar, H Haluk; Tahan, Fulya; Gungor, Hatice Eke

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), which describes acute airway narrowing that occurs as a result of exercise, is associated with eosinophilic airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is the most commonly used spirometric test in the diagnosis of EIB in exercise challenge in asthma. Other parameters such as forced expiratory flow at 50% of the vital capacity (FEF50%) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) are used less often in the diagnosis of EIB. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of FEV1 and FEF50%, PEF parameters, blood eosinophil counts in EIB in children with mild asthma. Sixty-seven children (male: 39, female: 28) with mild asthma were included in this study. Pulmonary functions were assessed before and at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after exercise. The values of spirometric FEV1, FEF50%, PEF, and blood eosinophil counts were evaluated in EIB in children with mild asthma. There was a positive correlation between FEV1 with FEF50% and PEF values (p<0.05; FEF50%, r=0.68; PEF, r=0.65). Also, a positive correlation was found between blood eosinophil counts and the values of spirometric FEV1, FEF50%, and PEF (p<0.05; FEV1, r=0.54; FEF50%, r=0.42; PEF, r=0.26). In addition to these correlations, in the exercise negative group for FEV1, the FEF50% and PEF values decreased more than the cutoff values in 3, and 2 patients, respectively. According to the presented study, eosinophil may play a major role in the severity of EIB in mild asthma. FEF50% and PEF values can decrease in response to exercise without changes in FEV1 in mild asthmatic patients.

  14. Spirometry in convalescent hemiplegic patients.

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    Odia, G I

    1978-07-01

    The forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were determined in 20 patients with convalescent hemiplegia. The FVC and FEV1 were reduced and the PEFR was within normal range. These results indicate a restrictive ventilatory defect with an FEV% that approached the vital capacity. The physical ability of each patient was assessed on the basis of the time it took to walk a distance of 18.5 meters as quickly as possible. Although it appears from the results that physical ability did not bear any relationship to the degree of restrictive ventilatory defect, other parameters of spirometry may be needed to confirm this. The results suggest that the restrictive ventilatory defect will be of more clinical importance in exercise tolerance for strenuous exercise than in ordinary daily activities.

  15. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

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    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  16. CORRELATION OF SEVERITY OF APNOEA HYPOPNOEA INDEX (AHI WITH FORCED EXPIRATORY VOLUME 1 (FEV1 IN OVERLAP SYNDROME

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    Meenakshi Narasimhan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Overlap syndrome was first described by David Flenley in 1980 refers to the coexistence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA. The global prevalence of Overlap syndrome is 11-14% and 7.5% in India Overlap patients are at higher risk of developing Nocturnal desaturations, hypertension, congestive heart failure, stroke etc. resulting in greater mortality and morbidity. There are very few studies in India correlating factors like poor lung function, body mass index, high ESS score, MMRC dyspnea grading in COPD patients with OSA .Hence, this study was undertaken to correlate the association and severity of OSA using AHI with Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 sec (FEV1, Body Mass Index (BMI, Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea grade (MRC and high Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective observational study, done in 66 COPD patients in Department of Respiratory Medicine, CHRI, Chennai. The diagnosis of COPD was based upon GOLD guidelines 2016. The OSA was diagnosed based on the American Academy of Sleep Medicine guidelines (AASMA. All COPD patients were subjected to detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, ENT examination to rule out Upper airway obstruction. All patients were asked to fill up the Epworth sleepiness questionnaire. BMI was recorded. Dyspnea grading was done using MMRC scale. Patient was also subjected to Spirometry and overnight Polysomnography, RESULTS In patients with overlap syndrome, no correlation of statistical significance between the AHI and FEV1. Though, the grade of AHI showed an increase as the FEV1 decreased. Significant positive correlation was observed between AHI and MMRC as well as AHI and ESS. CONCLUSION In COPD patients FEV1 did not correlate with AHI grade and hence lung function cannot be used as predictor of OSA in COPD. However, simple clinical parameters like ESS and MMRC which show a positive correlation with AHI

  17. Comparison of abdominal muscle activity and peak expiratory flow between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise.

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    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Watanabe, Susumu

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this investigation was to compare the activities of the abdominal muscles and peak expiratory flow between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy male participated in this study. Peak expiratory flow and electromyographic activities of the rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique/transversus abdominis muscles were measured during forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise and then peak amplitude and its appearance time were obtained. [Results] Peak expiratory flow values were significantly higher during fast expiration exercise than during forced vital capacity. The internal oblique/transversus abdominis muscles showed significantly higher peak amplitude during fast expiration exercise than during forced vital capacity. However, there were no significant differences between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise in the rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. There was no difference in the appearance time of the peak amplitude between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise in any muscle. [Conclusion] Fast expiration exercise might be beneficial for increasing expiratory speed and neuromuscular activation of the internal oblique/transversus abdominis muscles compared to forced vital capacity. These findings could be considered when recommending a variation of expiratory muscle strength training as part of pulmonary rehabilitation programs.

  18. Exhaled nitric oxide and spirometry in respiratory health surveillance.

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    Bohadana, A B; Hannhart, B; Ghezzo, H; Teculescu, D; Zmirou-Navier, D

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to pollutants in bakeries and hairdressing salons can cause airway syndromes varying from bronchial irritation to asthma. Workplace respiratory health surveillance aims to identify possible cases requiring further investigation. To compare the performance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) and spirometry for health surveillance of apprentice bakers (ABs) and apprentice hairdressers (AHDs). Determinants of FE(NO) were also identified. Symptoms and physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated by questionnaire. FE(NO) was measured and spirometry was carried out. Subjects with elevated FE(NO) (FE(NO) > upper limit normal), airway obstruction [forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))/forced vital capacity (FVC) smokers compared with atopic smokers and non-atopic subjects (P spirometry were not overlapping dimensions in ABs and hairdressers, each test contributing unique information on the physiological status of the respiratory system. FE(NO) may provide added information on airway inflammation not provided by spirometry.

  19. Reference values of inspiratory spirometry for Finnish adults.

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    Kainu, Annette; Timonen, Kirsi L; Vanninen, Esko; Sovijärvi, Anssi R

    2018-03-07

    Inspiratory spirometry is used in evaluation of upper airway disorders e.g. fixed or variable obstruction. There are, however, very few published data on normal values for inspiratory spirometry. The main aim of this study was to produce reference values for inspiratory spirometry for healthy Finnish adults. Inspiratory spirometry was preplanned to a sample of the Finnish spirometry reference values sample. Data was successfully retrieved from 368 healthy nonsmoking adults (132 males) between 19 and 83 years of age. Reference equations were produced for forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC), forced inspiratory volume in one second (FIV1), FIV1/FIVC, peak inspiratory flow (PIF) and the ratios of FIV1/forced expiratory volume in one second and PIF/peak expiratory flow. The present values were compared to PIF values from previously used Finnish study of Viljanen et al. (1982) reference values and Norwegian values for FIV1, FIVC and FIV1/FIVC presented by Gulsvik et al. (2001). The predicted values from the Gulsvik et al. (2001), provided a good fit for FIVC, but smaller values for FIV1 with mean 108.3 and 109.1% of predicted values for males and females, respectively. PIF values were 87.4 and 91.2% of Viljanen et al. (1982) predicted values in males and females, respectively. Differences in measurement methods and selection of results may contribute to the observed differences. Inspiratory spirometry is technically more demanding and needs repeatability criteria to improve validity. New reference values are suggested to clinical use in Finland when assessing inspiratory spirometry. Utility of inspiratory to expiratory values indices in assessment of airway collapse need further study.

  20. Should the diagnosis of COPD be based on a single spirometry test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.; Robberts, B.; Crockett, A.J.; Thoonen, B.P.; Lucas, A.; Grootens, J.; Smeele, I.J.; Thamrin, C.; Reddel, H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines indicate that a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis is made from a single spirometry test. However, long-term stability of diagnosis based on forced expiratory volume in 1 s over forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio has not been reported. In primary care

  1. Should the diagnosis of COPD be based on a single spirometry test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Robberts, B.; Crockett, A.J.; Thoonen, B.P.A.; Lucas, A.; Grootens, J.; Smeele, I.J.; Thamrin, C.; Reddel, H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines indicate that a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis is made from a single spirometry test. However, long-term stability of diagnosis based on forced expiratory volume in 1 s over forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio has not been reported. In primary care

  2. Effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in sedentary, healthy adolescents.

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    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Navarro, Ximena; Gatica, Darwin; Manterola, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory muscle training is the most commonly used method to revert respiratory muscle weakness; however, the effect of protocols based on non-respiratory maneuvers has not been adequately studied in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in healthy adolescents. This was a quasi-experiment. The sample was made up of healthy adolescents divided into two groups: an experimental group who completed eight weeks of active abdominal muscle training, and an equivalent control group. The following indicators were measured: abdominal muscle strength, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), peak expiratory flow, and peak cough flow, before and after protocol completion. A value of p abdominal muscle training, MEP and peak expiratory flow increased in healthy (sedentary) adolescents. Such effects were associated with intervention-induced increases in cough peak flow. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  3. Longitudinal spirometry among patients in a treatment program for community members with World Trade Center-related illness.

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    Liu, Mengling; Qian, Meng; Cheng, Qinyi; Berger, Kenneth I; Shao, Yongzhao; Turetz, Meredith; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Goldring, Roberta M; Caplan-Shaw, Caraleess; Elena Fernandez-Beros, Maria; Marmor, Michael; Reibman, Joan

    2012-10-01

    The course of lung function in community members exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust and fumes remains undefined. We studied longitudinal spirometry among patients in the WTC Environmental Health Center (WTCEHC) treatment program. Observational study of 946 WTCEHC patients with repeated spirometry measures analyzed on the population as a whole and stratified by smoking status, initial spirometry pattern, and WTC-related exposure category. Improvement in forced vital capacity (54.4 mL/yr; 95% confidence interval, 45.0 to 63.8) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (36.8 mL/yr; 95% confidence interval, 29.3 to 44.3) was noted for the population as a whole. Heavy smokers did not improve. Spirometry changes differed depending on initial spirometry pattern and exposure category. These data demonstrate spirometry improvement in select populations suggesting reversibility in airway injury and reinforcing the importance of continued treatment.

  4. Reference values for spirometry in preschool children.

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    Burity, Edjane F; Pereira, Carlos A C; Rizzo, José A; Brito, Murilo C A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2013-01-01

    Reference values for lung function tests differ in samples from different countries, including values for preschoolers. The main objective of this study was to derive reference values in this population. A prospective study was conducted through a questionnaire applied to 425 preschool children aged 3 to 6 years, from schools and day-care centers in a metropolitan city in Brazil. Children were selected by simple random sampling from the aforementioned schools. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volumes (FEV1, FEV0.50), forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75) and FEV1/FVC, FEV0.5/FVC and FEF25-75/FVC ratios were evaluated. Of the 425 children enrolled, 321 (75.6%) underwent the tests. Of these, 135 (42.0%) showed acceptable results with full expiratory curves and thus were included in the regression analysis to define the reference values. Height and gender significantly influenced FVC values through linear and logarithmic regression analysis. In males, R(2) increased with the logarithmic model for FVC and FEV1, but the linear model was retained for its simplicity. The lower limits were calculated by measuring the fifth percentile residues. Full expiratory curves are more difficult to obtain in preschoolers. In addition to height, gender also influences the measures of FVC and FEV1. Reference values were defined for spirometry in preschool children in this population, which are applicable to similar populations. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction equations for spirometry in four- to six-year-old children.

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    França, Danielle Corrêa; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Martins, Jocimar Avelar; Vieira, Bruna da Silva Pinto Pinheiro; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio; de Mendonça, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto; Borja, Raíssa de Oliveira; Britto, Raquel Rodrigues; Parreira, Verônica Franco

    2016-01-01

    To generate prediction equations for spirometry in 4- to 6-year-old children. Forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 0.5s, forced expiratory volume in one second, peak expiratory flow, and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of the forced vital capacity were assessed in 195 healthy children residing in the town of Sete Lagoas, state of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. The least mean squares method was used to derive the prediction equations. The level of significance was established as p<0.05. Overall, 85% of the children succeeded in performing the spirometric maneuvers. In the prediction equation, height was the single predictor of the spirometric variables as follows: forced vital capacity=exponential [(-2.255)+(0.022×height)], forced expiratory volume in 0.5s=exponential [(-2.288)+(0.019×height)], forced expiratory volume in one second=exponential [(-2.767)+(0.026×height)], peak expiratory flow=exponential [(-2.908)+(0.019×height)], and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of the forced vital capacity=exponential [(-1.404)+(0.016×height)]. Neither age nor weight influenced the regression equations. No significant differences in the predicted values for boys and girls were observed. The predicted values obtained in the present study are comparable to those reported for preschoolers from both Brazil and other countries. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. A mixed methods study to compare models of spirometry delivery in primary care for patients at risk of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, J A; Hansen, E C; Johns, D P; Blizzard, E L; Walters, E H; Wood-Baker, R

    2008-05-01

    To increase recognition of airflow obstruction in primary care, we compared two models of spirometry delivery in a target group at risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A 6 month qualitative/quantitative cluster randomised study in eight practices compared opportunistic spirometry by "visiting trained nurses" (TN) with optimised "usual care" (UC) from general practitioners (GPs) for smokers and ex-smokers, aged over 35 years. Outcomes were: spirometry uptake and quality, new diagnoses of COPD and GPs' experiences of spirometry. In the eligible target population, 531/904 (59%) patients underwent spirometry in the TN model and 87/1130 (8%) patients in the UC model (p spirometry standards for acceptability and reproducibility were met by 76% and 44% of tests in the TN and UC models, respectively (p spirometry, when the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV(1)/FVC) was or = 0.7 was present in both models prior to and after spirometry. GPs valued high quality spirometry and increased testing of patients at risk of COPD in the TN model. They identified limitations, including the need for better systematic follow-up of abnormal spirometry and support with interpretation, which may explain persisting underdiagnosis of COPD in practice records. Although opportunistic testing by visiting trained nurses substantially increased and improved spirometry performance compared with usual care, translating increased detection of airflow obstruction into diagnosis of COPD requires further development of the model. Australian Clinical Trials Registry: registration No 12605000019606.

  7. Comparação entre inspirometria de incentivo e pressão positiva expiratória na função pulmonar após cirurgia bariátrica Comparison between incentive spirometry and expiratory positive airway pressure on pulmonary function after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela C. Barbalho-Moulim

    2009-06-01

    prior to, and on the second post-operative day. Before surgery patients were divided into two groups, SG - spirometer group (n=13, and EG - EPAP group (n=15. Motor physical therapy was standardized for both groups; respiratory therapy (both modalities started on the day of surgery, in 15-minute sessions. Post-operative results showed similar reduction, in both groups, in the values of vital capacity, forced vital capacity, maximum voluntary ventilation, and inspiratory reserve volume. No changes were found in tidal volume values in SG, neither in expiratory reserve volume in EG. Diaphragmatic and thoracoabdominal motion were less harmed in SG. After bariatric surgery thus incentive spirometry had better effect in maintaining tidal volume, as well as on diaphragmatic and thoracoabdominal motion; while EPAP proved more efficient in re-establishing expiratory reserve volume in the postoperative period.

  8. Correlation between spirometry values and pulmonary artery pressure in young healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Alon; Benderly, Michal; Prokupetz, Alex; Gordon, Barak; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is frequently associated with parenchymal lung disease. We evaluated the association between spirometry values and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) in young subjects without lung disease : We studied applicants to the Israeli Air Force, who undergo routine evaluation that includes resting spirometry and echocardiography. Applicants with overt lung disease were excluded. All echocardiographic studies performed in the years 1994 through 2010 (n = 6,598) were screened, and files that included PASP and spirometry values were analyzed for the association between PASP and FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow, and forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC maneuver. Of the 647 air force applicants who underwent echocardiography in which PASP was measurable and had spirometry data, 607 (94%) were male, and their average age was 18.16 ± 0.73 years. Mean PASP was 26.4 ± 5.2 mm Hg (range 10-41 mm Hg). None of the spirometry values significantly correlated with PASP. PASP in young healthy subjects is not significantly associated with spirometry values. Lung mechanics probably do not contribute significantly to PASP in this population.

  9. Practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis by simple spirometry: an observational case-control study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Satomi; Ichikawa, Masako; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-03-26

    We see patients who present with spirometry airflow limitation despite their forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) as well as forced vital capacity (FVC) to be supernormal (FEV1/FVC spirometry conditions (results measured with spirometry) could be suitably used as a practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis: the condition of disproportionate but physiologically normal growth between airways and lung parenchyma. We compared the conventional surrogate marker of dysanapsis, maximum mid-expiratory flow to FVC (MMF/FVC), in SUBJECTS (FEV1/FVC spirometry results with SUBJECTS) (n = 55), and in CONTROLS (age- and height- matched, normal spirometry results) (n = 25). Next we added imaging analysis to evaluate the relationship between the cross sectional airway luminal area (X-Ai) and the lung volume results among the three groups. The MMF/FVC was significantly lower in SUBJECTS and in EMPHYSEMA compared to CONTROLS. However, percent predicted peak expiratory flow (%PEFR) was significantly lower only in SUBJECTS and not in EMPHYSEMA compared to CONTROLS. The ratio of the X-Ai of the trachea and right apical bronchus to lung volume was significantly lower in SUBJECTS compared to CONTROLS. The simple spirometry conditions in SUBJECTS are highly suggestive of practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis. Awareness of this concept would help to attenuate the risk of overdiagnosis of obstructive pulmonary disease.

  10. Mismatch between asthma symptoms and spirometry: implications for managing asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifano, Elizabeth D; Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cloutier, Michelle M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in assessing asthma severity and beginning therapy by the general pediatrician. Between 2008 and 2012, spirometry testing was satisfactorily performed in 894 children (ages 5-19 years) whose asthma severity had been determined by their pediatrician using asthma guideline-based clinical criteria. Spirometry-determined asthma severity using national asthma guidelines and clinician-determined asthma severity were compared for concordance using weighted Kappa coefficients. Thirty percent of participants had clinically determined intermittent asthma; 32%, 33%, and 5% had mild, moderate, and severe, persistent asthma, respectively. Increasing disease severity was associated with decreases in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio (P spirometry-determined severity. Concordance was 0.16 (95% CI 0.10, 0.23), and when adjusted for bias and prevalence, was 0.20 (95% CI 0.17, 0.23). When accounting for age, sex, exposure to smoke, and insurance type, only spirometry-determined asthma severity was a significant predictor of agreement (P spirometry-determined severity increased. Concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in determining asthma severity is low even when guideline-based clinical assessment tools are used. Because appropriate therapy reduces asthma morbidity and is guided by disease severity, results from spirometry testing could better guide pediatricians in determining appropriate therapy for their patients with asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality assurance of spirometry in a population-based study -predictors of good outcome in spirometry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wan C; Bourbeau, Jean; O'Donnell, Denis; Aaron, Shawn; Maltais, Francois; Marciniuk, Darcy; Hernandez, Paul; Cowie, Robert; Chapman, Kenneth; Sonia Buist, A; Sin, Don; Mark Fitzgerald, J

    2014-04-01

    The assurance of high-quality spirometry testing remains a challenge. Spirometry training consisted of standardized coaching followed by certification for 35 spirometry-naïve and 9 spirometry-experienced research assistants. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator (BD) in random population samples of 5176 people aged 40 years and older from 9 sites in Canada. using the hand-held EasyOne spirometer (ndd Medical Technologies Inc., Andover, MA, USA). Pulmonary function quality assurance with over reading was conducted centrally in Vancouver: spirograms were reviewed and graded according to ATS/ERS standards with prompt feedback to the technician at each site. Descriptive statistics were calculated for manoeuvre acceptability and repeatability variables. A logistic regression model was constructed for the predictors of spirometry quality success. 95% of test sessions achieved pre-determined quality standards for back extrapolated volume (BEV), time to peak flow (PEFT) and end of test volume (EOTV). The mean forced expiratory time (FET) was 11.2 seconds. Then, 90% and 95% of all manoeuvres had FEV1 and FVC that were repeatable within 150 ml and 200 ml respectively. Test quality was slightly better for post-BD test sessions compared with pre-BD for both groups of research assistants. Independent predictors of acceptable test quality included participant characteristics: female sex, younger age, greater BD responsiveness; but not study site or prior experience in completing spirometry by the technologist. Good quality spirometry tests are attainable in large multicenter epidemiological studies by trained research assistants, irrespective of their prior experience in spirometry.

  12. Validation of Global Lung Function Initiative and All Ages Reference Equations for Forced Spirometry in Healthy Spanish Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín de Vicente, Carlos; de Mir Messa, Inés; Rovira Amigo, Sandra; Torrent Vernetta, Alba; Gartner, Silvia; Iglesias Serrano, Ignacio; Carrascosa Lezcano, Antonio; Moreno Galdó, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Recent publication of multi-ethnic spirometry reference equations for subjects aged from 3-95 years aim to avoid age-related discontinuities and provide a worldwide standard for interpreting spirometric test results. To assess the agreement of the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI-2012) and All ages (FEV 0.5 ) reference equations with the Spanish preschool lung function data. To verify the appropriateness of these reference values for clinical use in Spanish preschool children. Spirometric measurements were obtained from children aged 3 to 6 years attending 10 randomly selected schools in Barcelona (Spain). Stanojevic's quality control criteria were applied. Z-scores were calculated for the spirometry outcomes based on the GLI equations. If the z-score (mean) of each parameter was close to 0, with a maximum variance of ± 0.5 from the mean and a standard deviation of 1, the GLI-2012 equations would be applicable in our population. Of 543 children recruited, 405 (74.6%) were 'healthy', and of these, 380 were Caucasians. Of these 380, 81.6% (169 females, 141 males) performed technically acceptable and reproducible maneuvers to assess FEVt, and 69.5% achieved a clear end-expiratory plateau. Z-scores for FVC, FEV 1 , FEV 1 /FVC, FEV 0.75 , FEV 0.75 /FVC, FEV 0.5 , FEF 75 and FEF 25-75 all fell within ± 0.5, except for FEV 1 /FVC (0.53 z-scores). GLI equations are appropriate for Spanish preschool children. These data provide further evidence to support widespread application of the GLI reference equations. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation and Agreement of Handheld Spirometry with Laboratory Spirometry in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guang-Shing; Campbell, Angela P; Xie, Hu; Stednick, Zach; Callais, Cheryl; Leisenring, Wendy M; Englund, Janet A; Chien, Jason W; Boeckh, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Early detection of subclinical lung function decline may help identify allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who are at increased risk for late noninfectious pulmonary complications, including bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We evaluated the use of handheld spirometry in this population. Allogeneic HCT recipients enrolled in a single-center observational trial performed weekly spirometry with a handheld spirometer for 1 year after transplantation. Participants performed pulmonary function tests in an outpatient laboratory setting at 3 time points: before transplantation, at day 80 after transplantation, and at 1 year after transplantation. Correlation between the 2 methods was assessed by Pearson and Spearman correlations; agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. A total of 437 subjects had evaluable pulmonary function tests. Correlation for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was r = .954 (P spirometry correlated well with laboratory spirometry after allogeneic HCT and may be useful for self-monitoring of patients for early identification of airflow obstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  14. Spirometry use in children hospitalized with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Chun; McDowell, Karen M; Fenchel, Matthew; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder of childhood and continues to be a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) recommends that spirometry be obtained for asthma patients upon hospital admission, after bronchodilation during the acute phase of asthma symptoms, and at least one additional time before discharge from the hospital. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of spirometry in children hospitalized with asthma and to determine association of pulmonary function with future exacerbations. A retrospective cohort study design was utilized involving review of medical records of children ≥5 years old admitted with asthma to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from September 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011. Hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visits were identified by the ICD-9-CM codes of having either a primary diagnosis of asthma (493) or a respiratory illness (460-496) plus a secondary diagnosis of asthma. Asthma re-exacerbation was defined as either having an ED visit or hospitalization for asthma that occurred within 3 months after the index hospitalization. All spirometries were performed in a pediatric pulmonary function laboratory. Among 1,037 admissions included in this study, 89 (8.6%) had spirometry that was recommended by a consulting asthma specialist and usually performed on the day of discharge. Spirometries for forty-five of these patients (54.9%) met all acceptability and repeatability criteria of the American Thoracic Society. Patients who performed acceptable spirometry were significantly older (12.4 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 3.0 years; P = 0.041). The average forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) was 84.4 ± 19.7% predicted; forced vital capacity (FVC) was 98.1 ± 16.0% predicted; FEV1 /FVC was 74.6 ± 9.6%; forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75 ) was 61.2 ± 30.1% predicted. Ten patients (22%) who

  15. Forced oscillation technique in the detection of smoking-induced respiratory alterations: diagnostic accuracy and comparison with spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Camilo Dias Faria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Detection of smoking effects is of utmost importance in the prevention of cigarette-induced chronic airway obstruction. The forced oscillation technique offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. However, there have been no data concerning the use of the forced oscillation technique to evaluate respiratory mechanics in groups with different degrees of tobacco consumption. OBJECTIVES: (1 to evaluate the ability of the forced oscillation technique to detect smoking-induced respiratory alterations, with special emphasis on early alterations; and (2 to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. METHODS: One hundred and seventy subjects were divided into five groups according to the number of pack-years smoked: four groups of smokers classified as 60 pack-years and a control group. The four groups of smokers were compared with the control group using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. RESULTS: The early adverse effects of smoking in the group with 60 pack-years, the diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique was similar to that observed with spirometry. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that forced oscillation technique parameters were able to detect early smoking-induced respiratory involvement when pathologic changes are still potentially reversible. These findings support the use of the forced oscillation technique as a versatile clinical diagnostic tool in helping with chronic obstructive lung disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

  16. Reference values of spirometry for Finnish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainu, A; Timonen, K L; Toikka, J; Qaiser, B; Pitkäniemi, J; Kotaniemi, J T; Lindqvist, A; Vanninen, E; Länsimies, E; Sovijärvi, A R A

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic assessment of lung function necessitates up-to-date reference values. The aim of this study was to estimate reference values for spirometry for the Finnish population between 18 and 80 years and to compare them with the existing Finnish, European and the recently published global GLI2012 reference values. Spirometry was performed for 1380 adults in the population-based FinEsS studies and for 662 healthy non-smoking volunteer adults. Detailed predefined questionnaire screening of diseases and symptoms, and quality control of spirometry yielded a sample of 1000 native Finns (387 men) healthy non-smokers aged 18-83 years. Sex-specific reference values, which are estimated using the GAMLSS method and adjusted for age and height, are provided. The predicted values for lung volumes are larger than those obtained by GLI2012 prediction for the Caucasian subgroup for forced vital capacity (FVC) by an average 6·2% and 5·1% and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) by an average 4·2% and 3·0% in men and women, respectively. GLI2012 slightly overestimated the ratio FEV1/FVC with an age-dependent trend. Most reference equations from other European countries, with the exception of the Swiss SAPALDIA study, showed an underestimation of FVC and FEV1 to varying degrees, and a slight overestimation of FEV1/FVC. This study offers up-to-date reference values of spirometry for native Finns with a wide age range. The GLI2012 predictions seem not to be suitable for clinical use for native Finns due to underestimation of lung volumes. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  17. Risk of COPD with obstruction in active smokers with normal spirometry and reduced diffusion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ben-Gary; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Kaner, Robert J; Sanders, Abraham; Vincent, Thomas L; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2015-12-01

    Smokers are assessed for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using spirometry, with COPD defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as airflow limitation that is not fully reversible with bronchodilators. There is a subset of smokers with normal spirometry (by GOLD criteria), who have a low diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), a parameter linked to emphysema and small airway disease. The natural history of these "normal spirometry/low DLCO" smokers is unknown.From a cohort of 1570 smokers in the New York City metropolitian area, all of whom had normal spirometry, two groups were randomly selected for lung function follow-up: smokers with normal spirometry/normal DLCO (n=59) and smokers with normal spirometry/low DLCO (n=46). All had normal history, physical examination, complete blood count, urinalysis, HIV status, α1-antitrypsin level, chest radiography, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio and total lung capacity. Throughout the study, all continued to be active smokers.In the normal spirometry/normal DLCO group assessed over 45±20 months, 3% developed GOLD-defined COPD. In contrast, in the normal spirometry/low DLCO group, followed over 41±31 months, 22% developed GOLD-defined COPD.Despite appearing "normal" according to GOLD, smokers with normal spirometry but low DLCO are at significant risk of developing COPD with obstruction to airflow. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  18. Spirometry reference values for population aged 7-80 years in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingzhou; Hu, Xiao; Shan, Guangliang

    2017-11-01

    Lung function tests are widely used in clinical and public health practice; however, no valid spirometry reference values were available for the general population in China. This study aimed to provide valid spirometry predictive equations for the general population in China, and to evaluate the predictive performance of previously used equations. Data from the China National Health Survey 2012-2015 and the 'Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape' statistical modelling method were used to establish spirometry predictive equations for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV 1 /FVC. Paired t-tests were used to examine differences between spirometry measurements in this sample and predicted values of four previous spirometry predictive equations. This study included 3130 lifetime non-smokers (713 males and 2417 females) aged 7-80 years in China. Spirometry predictive equations with age and height as predictive variables plus age-specific splines were established separately by gender. Most previous spirometry predictive equations were found to significantly overestimate (maximum of 3.69% in FEV 1 , 1.87% in FVC and 4.19% in FEV 1 /FVC for males; 11.46% in FEV 1 , 7.28% in FVC and 3.78% in FEV 1 /FVC for females) or underestimate (maximum of 5.75% in FEV 1 and 8.12% in FVC for males; 7.89% in FEV 1 and 9.32% in FVC for females) lung function measurements when applied to this sample population. This study addressed the urgent need for valid and up-to-date spirometry reference values for the general population in China. Moreover, previous spirometry predictive equations showed unfavourable generalizability to this sample population. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. Interpretation of Spirometry: Selection of Predicted Values and Defining Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most frequently performed investigation to evaluate pulmonary function. It provides clinically useful information on the mechanical properties of the lung and the thoracic cage and aids in taking management-related decisions in a wide spectrum of diseases and disorders. Few measurements in medicine are so dependent on factors related to equipment, operator and the patient. Good spirometry requires quality assured measurements and a systematic approach to interpretation. Standard guidelines on the technical aspects of equipment and their calibration as well as the test procedure have been developed and revised from time-to-time. Strict compliance with standardisation guidelines ensures quality control. Interpretation of spirometry data is based only on two basic measurements--the forced vital capacity (FVC) and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and their ratio, FEV1/FVC. A meaningful and clinically useful interpretation of the measured data requires a systematic approach and consideration of several important issues. Central to interpretation is the understanding of the development and application of prediction equations. Selection of prediction equations that are appropriate for the ethnic origin of the patient is vital to avoid erroneous interpretation. Defining abnormal values is a debatable but critical aspect of spirometry. A statistically valid definition of the lower limits of normal has been advocated as the better method over the more commonly used approach of defining abnormality as a fixed percentage of the predicted value. Spirometry rarely provides a specific diagnosis. Examination of the flow-volume curve and the measured data provides information to define patterns of ventilatory impairment. Spirometry must be interpreted in conjunction with clinical information including results of other investigations.

  20. Forced oscillation technique in the detection of smoking-induced respiratory alterations: diagnostic accuracy and comparison with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Costa, Alessandra Alves da; Lopes, Agnaldo Jose; Jansen, Jose Manoel; Melo, Pedro Lopes de

    2010-01-01

    Detection of smoking effects is of utmost importance in the prevention of cigarette-induced chronic airway obstruction. The forced oscillation technique offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. However, there have been no data concerning the use of the forced oscillation technique to evaluate respiratory mechanics in groups with different degrees of tobacco consumption. (1) to evaluate the ability of the forced oscillation technique to detect smoking-induced respiratory alterations, with special emphasis on early alterations; and (2) to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. One hundred and seventy subjects were divided into five groups according to the number of pack-years smoked: four groups of smokers classified as 60 pack-years and a control group. The four groups of smokers were compared with the control group using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The early adverse effects of smoking in the group with technique parameters. In this group, the comparisons of the ROC curves showed significantly better diagnostic accuracy (p technique parameters. On the other hand, in groups of 20-39, 40-59, and > 60 pack-years, the diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique was similar to that observed with spirometry. This study revealed that forced oscillation technique parameters were able to detect early smoking-induced respiratory involvement when pathologic changes are still potentially reversible. These findings support the use of the forced oscillation technique as a versatile clinical diagnostic tool in helping with chronic obstructive lung disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

  1. Comparison of Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercise, Volume and Flow Incentive Spirometry, on Diaphragm Excursion and Pulmonary Function in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopala Krishna Alaparthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effects of diaphragmatic breathing exercises and flow and volume-oriented incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methodology. We selected 260 patients posted for laparoscopic abdominal surgery and they were block randomization as follows: 65 patients performed diaphragmatic breathing exercises, 65 patients performed flow incentive spirometry, 65 patients performed volume incentive spirometry, and 65 patients participated as a control group. All of them underwent evaluation of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR, and diaphragm excursion measurement by ultrasonography before the operation and on the first and second postoperative days. With the level of significance set at p<0.05. Results. Pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion showed a significant decrease on the first postoperative day in all four groups (p<0.001 but was evident more in the control group than in the experimental groups. On the second postoperative day pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity and diaphragm excursion were found to be better preserved in volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group than in the flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Pulmonary function (Forced Vital Capacity and diaphragm excursion showed statistically significant differences between volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise group (p<0.05 as compared to that flow incentive spirometry group and the control group. Conclusion. Volume incentive spirometry and diaphragmatic breathing exercise can be recommended as an intervention for all patients pre- and postoperatively, over flow-oriented incentive spirometry for the generation and sustenance of pulmonary function and diaphragm excursion in the management of

  2. Impulse oscillometry in acute and stable asthmatic children: a comparison with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Kuyucu, Semanur; Arıkoglu, Tugba; Tezol, Ozlem; Aydogdu, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Lung function tests have attracted interest for the diagnosis and follow-up of childhood asthma in recent years. For patients who cannot perform forced expiratory maneuvers, impulse oscillometry (IOS), performed during spontaneous breathing, may be an alternative tool. Thirty-five acute, 107 stable asthmatic and 103 healthy children who presented to our clinic performed IOS followed by spirometry before and after salbutamol inhalation. The mean baseline and reversibility of IOS and spirometry parameters were compared between the groups. Correlation analyses were undertaken within the asthmatics, and the healthy controls separately. To distinguish the three groups, the sensitivity and specificity of baseline and reversibility values of IOS and spirometry were computed. When spirometry was taken as the gold standard, the discriminating performance of IOS to detect the airway obstruction and reversibility was investigated. The mean absolute values of Zrs, R5, R5-R20, X5, X10, X15, Fres, AX, and all spirometric parameters, and the mean reversibility values of R5, R10, Fres, AX and forced expiratory volume in one second were different between the groups and the highest area under curve values to discriminate the groups was obtained from area of reactance (AX) and ΔAX. Zrs, all resistance (including R5-R20) and reactance parameters, Fres and AX were correlated with at least one spirometric parameter. Spirometric reversibility was detected by ≤-22.34 and ≤-39.05 cut-off values of ΔR5 and ΔAX, respectively. IOS has shown a highly significant association with spirometric indices and reversibility testing. It may be a substitute for spirometry in children who fail to perform forced expiratory maneuvers.

  3. [Spirometry interpretation feasibility among pre-school children according to the European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire, Roberto M; González, Scarlett A; Moya, Ana I; Fierro, Laura T; Brockmann, Pablo V; Caussade, Solange L

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most used test to evaluate pulmonary function. Guidelines that defined acceptability and repeatability criteria for its implementation and interpretation among preschoolers were published in 2007. Our objective was to quantify the actual compliance with these criteria among pre-school patients. A review was performed on the baseline spirometry measured in patients aged 2 to 5 years in the Pediatric Respiratory Laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, who were admitted due to recurrent or persistent coughing or wheezing. Only those results obtained in patients who took the test for the first time were considered. They were analyzed by international standards. A total of 93 spirometry results (mean age 57.4 ± 8.6 months, 48 males) were obtained, of which 44 (47%) met all acceptable criteria, 87 (93%) obtained expiratory time of ≥ 0.5seconds, and 67 (72%) of the patients had an end-expiratory flow of ≤10% from peak flow. The variation in the measurement of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was very low (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.9). It was possible to meet the acceptability and repeatability criteria for spirometry among pre-school children in our Center, which was similar to previous reports. As in older children, this test is fully recommended for pre-school children who require lung function studies. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Prediction equations for spirometry in adults from northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K; Kumar, R; Gupta, U; Rahman, M; Dash, D J

    2014-01-01

    Most of the Indian studies on prediction equations for spirometry in adults are several decades old and may have lost their utility as these were carried out with equipment and standardisation protocols that have since changed. Their validity is further questionable as the lung health of the population is likely to have changed over time. To develop prediction equations for spirometry in adults of north Indian origin using the 2005 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) recommendations on standardisation. Normal healthy non-smoker subjects, both males and females, aged 18 years and above underwent spirometry using a non-heated Fleisch Pneumotach spirometer calibrated daily. The dataset was randomly divided into training (70%) and test (30%) sets and the former was used to develop the equations. These were validated on the test data set. Prediction equations were developed separately for males and females for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, and instantaneous expiratory flow rates using multiple linear regression procedure with different transformations of dependent and/or independent variables to achieve the best-fitting models for the data. The equations were compared with the previous ones developed in the same population in the 1960s. In all, 685 (489 males, 196 females) subjects performed spirometry that was technically acceptable and repeatable. All the spirometry parameters were significantly higher among males except the FEV1/FVC ratio that was significantly higher in females. Overall, age had a negative relationship with the spirometry parameters while height was positively correlated with each, except for the FEV1/FVC ratio that was related only to age. Weight was included in the models for FVC, forced expiratory flow (FEF75) and FEV1/FVC ratio in males, but its contribution was very small. Standard errors of estimate were provided to enable calculation of the lower

  5. Novos valores de referência para espirometria forçada em brasileiros adultos de raça branca New reference values for forced spirometry in white adults in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Castro Pereira

    2007-08-01

    capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, FEV1/FVC and FEV1/forced expiratory volume in six seconds (FEV6 were best fitted by linear regression. Flows were best fitted using log equations. For both genders, greater height resulted in lower values for FEV1/FVC, FEV1/FEV6 and flow/FVC ratios. The reference values for FEV1 and FVC in the present study were higher than those derived for Brazilian adults in 1992. CONCLUSION: New predicted values for forced spirometry were obtained in a sample of white Brazilians. The values are greater than those obtained in 1992, probably due to technical factors.

  6. Spirometry and Impulse Oscillometry in Preschool Children: Acceptability and Relationship to Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Meyer; Bacharier, Leonard B; O'Connor, George T; Cohen, Robyn; Sorkness, Ronald L; Morgan, Wayne; Gergen, Peter J; Jaffee, Katy F; Visness, Cynthia M; Wood, Robert A; Bloomberg, Gordon R; Doyle, Susan; Burton, Ryan; Gern, James E

    2018-02-13

    Comparisons of the technical acceptability of spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) and clinical correlations of the measurements have not been well studied in young children. There are no large studies focused on African American and Hispanic children. We sought to (1) compare the acceptability of spirometry and IOS in 3- to 5-year-old children and (2) examine the relationship of maternal smoking during pregnancy to later lung function. Spirometry and IOS were attempted at 4 sites from the Urban Environmental and Childhood Asthma Study birth cohort at ages 3, 4, and 5 years (472, 471, and 479 children, respectively). We measured forced expiratory flow in 0.5 s (forced expiratory volume in 0.5 seconds [FEV 0.5 ]) with spirometry and area of reactance (A X ), resistance and reactance at 5 Hz (R 5 and X 5 , respectively) using IOS. Children were more likely to achieve acceptable maneuvers with spirometry than with IOS at age 3 (60% vs 46%, P < .001) and 5 years (89% vs 84%, P = .02). Performance was consistent among the 4 study sites. In children without recurrent wheeze, there were strong trends for higher FEV 0.5 and lower R 5 and A X over time. Maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher A X at ages 4 and 5 years (P < .01 for both years). There was no significant difference in FEV 0.5 between children with and without in utero exposure to smoking. There is a higher rate of acceptable maneuvers with spirometry compared with IOS, but IOS may be a better indicator of peripheral airway function in preschool children. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  7. Spirometry Changes in Cold Climatic Conditions of Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaya, Iyamanda B; Laxmi, Chettangada C; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function is one of the important physiological measures that is known to be affected during the changes in the altitude. There is dearth of literature on changes in the pulmonary function variables in the cold climate conditions of Antarctica. We carried out spirometry before, during and after one year stay at Antarctica in members of the Indian expedition. Spirometry was carried out on 23 members of the XXVI Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica at baseline, after six months of expedition and at the end of one year, using standard guidelines. The tests were carried out indoor in temperature controlled laboratory. The pulmonary function test parameters did not vary across the period. Although, both forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1) showed a decreasing trend but did not attain any statistical significance. However, peak expiratory flow (PEFR) rate was reduced significantly. Our study did not show consistently significant change in the pulmonary function parameters in the members of the Indian Antarctic expedition.

  8. Should the diagnosis of COPD be based on a single spirometry test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R; Robberts, Bas; Crockett, Alan J; Thoonen, Bart P; Lucas, Annelies; Grootens, Joke; Smeele, Ivo J; Thamrin, Cindy; Reddel, Helen K

    2016-09-29

    Clinical guidelines indicate that a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis is made from a single spirometry test. However, long-term stability of diagnosis based on forced expiratory volume in 1 s over forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC) ratio has not been reported. In primary care subjects at risk for COPD, we investigated shifts in diagnostic category (obstructed/non-obstructed). The data were from symptomatic 40+ years (ex-)smokers referred for diagnostic spirometry, with three spirometry tests, each 12±2 months apart. The obstruction was based on post-bronchodilator FEV 1 /FVC smokers or SABA users at year 1. Change from non-obstructed to obstructed was more likely for males, older subjects, current smokers and patients with lower baseline FEV 1 % predicted, and less likely for those with higher baseline BMI. Up to one-third of symptomatic (ex-)smokers with baseline obstruction on diagnostic spirometry had shifted to non-obstructed when routinely re-tested after 1 or 2 years. Given the implications for patients and health systems of a diagnosis of COPD, it should not be based on a single spirometry test.

  9. Spirometry and volumetric capnography in lung function assessment of obese and normal-weight individuals without asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Mariana S; Mendes, Roberto T; Marson, Fernando A L; Zambon, Mariana P; Antonio, Maria A R G M; Paschoal, Ilma A; Toro, Adyléia A D C; Severino, Silvana D; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Ribeiro, José D

    To analyze and compare lung function of obese and healthy, normal-weight children and adolescents, without asthma, through spirometry and volumetric capnography. Cross-sectional study including 77 subjects (38 obese) aged 5-17 years. All subjects underwent spirometry and volumetric capnography. The evaluations were repeated in obese subjects after the use of a bronchodilator. At the spirometry assessment, obese individuals, when compared with the control group, showed lower values of forced expiratory volume in the first second by forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC) and expiratory flows at 75% and between 25 and 75% of the FVC (p11 years (p<0.05). Even without the diagnosis of asthma by clinical criteria and without response to bronchodilator use, obese individuals showed lower FEV 1 /FVC values and forced expiratory flow, indicating the presence of an obstructive process. Volumetric capnography showed that obese individuals had higher alveolar tidal volume, with no alterations in ventilation homogeneity, suggesting flow alterations, without affecting lung volumes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of spirometry prediction equations in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D W; Lagat, D K; MacIntyre, N; Egger, J R; Murdoch, D M; Que, L G; Kussin, P S

    2018-01-01

    Community of Eldoret, Kenya. To test the performance of three commonly used spirometry prediction equations in a healthy Kenyan population. Cross-sectional assessment of healthy adults in Eldoret. Of the 331 subjects enrolled in the study, 282 subjects aged 18-85 years (45% males, 55% females) produced high-quality spirograms. Lung function predictions were made using the Global Lung Initiative 2012 (GLI 2012) prediction equations for African Americans, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III) prediction equations for African Americans, and the Crapo prediction equation. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to measure the agreement between observed and predicted spirometry parameters. Overall, the GLI 2012 and NHANES equations for African Americans performed similarly for forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), significantly overestimating FVC while accurately predicting observed FEV1 values. The study brings into question the utility of three major spirometry prediction equations in a Kenyan population. The significant overestimation of FVC by the best-performing equations despite accurate prediction of FEV1 suggests poor performance of these equations in our population.

  11. Elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity, reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and mortality in adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Labib Ghafuri, Djamila; Kassim, Adetola; Rodeghier, Mark; DeBaun, Michael R

    2017-02-01

    Cardiopulmonary disease is the leading cause of mortality in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRJV) and reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) %predicted are associated with early mortality in SCD; however their relationship and combined effect on survival is unknown. We investigated the relationship between TRJV and FEV 1 %predicted, and their combined effect on mortality, in a retrospective cohort of 189 adults with SCD who underwent both pulmonary function testing and echocardiography. Nineteen (9.9%) of 189 patients died over a median follow-up of 1.4 years; cardiopulmonary disease was the major cause of death in 52.6%. FEV 1 %predicted was negatively associated with TRJV (Spearman rho, -0.34, P 70% [45.8% versus 17.1%; odds ratio (OR) 4.1 (95% Confidence interval ([CI] 2.1-8.0); P = 0.001]. In a multivariable cox regression model, the combination of TRJV ≥2.5 m/second and FEV 1 %predicted ≤70% predicted earlier mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 4.97 (95% CI 1.30-18.91; P = 0.019)] after adjusting for age, sex, and nephropathy. Both FEV 1 %predicted ≤70% and TRJV ≥2.5 m/second were independently associated with nephropathy [OR 4.48 (95% CI 1.51-13.31); P = 0.004] and [OR 3.27 (95% CI 1.19-9.00); P = 0.017], respectively. In conclusion, pulmonary and cardiac impairment are associated with, and contribute to mortality in SCD. Therapies aimed at improving reduced FEV 1 %predicted and elevated TRJV could improve survival in patients with SCD. Am. J. Hematol. 92:125-130, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Spirometry is underused in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wai Cho; Fu, Sau Nga; Tai, Emily Lai-bun; Yeung, Yiu Cheong; Kwong, Kwok Chu; Chang, Yui; Tam, Cheuk Ming; Yiu, Yuk Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry is important in the diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet it is a common clinical observation that it is underused though the extent is unclear. This survey aims to examine the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of COPD patients in a district in Hong Kong. It is a cross-sectional survey involving four clinic settings: hospital-based respiratory specialist clinic, hospital-based mixed medical specialist clinic, general outpatient clinic (primary care), and tuberculosis and chest clinic. Thirty physician-diagnosed COPD patients were randomly selected from each of the four clinic groups. All of them had a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity ratio less than 0.70 and had been followed up at the participating clinic for at least 6 months for COPD treatment. Of 126 patients who underwent spirometry, six (4.8%) did not have COPD. Of the 120 COPD patients, there were 111 males and mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 was 46.2% predicted. Only 22 patients (18.3%) had spirometry done during diagnostic workup, and 64 patients (53.3%) had spirometry done ever. The only independent factor predicting spirometry done ever was absence of old pulmonary tuberculosis and follow-up at respiratory specialist clinic. Age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, duration of COPD, percentage predicted FEV1, body mass index, 6-minute walking distance, and Medical Research Council dyspnea score were not predictive. We conclude that spirometry is underused in general but especially by nonrespiratory physicians and family physicians in the management of COPD patients. More effort at educating the medical community is urgently needed. PMID:24009418

  13. Feasibility of spirometry in primary care to screen for COPD: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Violaine; Beauchet, Alain; Gomis, Thierry; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a frequent but underdiagnosed disease whose diagnosis relies on the spirometric demonstration of bronchial obstruction. Spirometry use by general practitioners could represent the first line in COPD diagnosis. Because duration of spirometry is retarding its development in primary care, we decided to measure the time it requires in the primary-care context in France. Ten volunteer general practitioners were trained during two 3-hour theoretical and practical continuing education sessions. Then, from October 2013 to May 2014, they included patients without any known respiratory disease but at risk of developing COPD (age: ≥40 years, smoker: ≥20 pack-years). The duration of spirometry and its quality were evaluated according to the following acceptability criteria: 1) expiration ≥6 seconds or reaching a plateau; 2) good start with an early peak flow, curve peaked on top and not flat; 3) no artifacts; and 4) reproducibility criteria, ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity differences between the two best spirometry curves ≤0.15 L. Quality of the spirograms was defined as optimal when all the criteria were met and acceptable when all the criteria were satisfied except the reproducibility criterion, otherwise, it was unacceptable. For the 152 patients included, the 142 assessable spirometries lasted for 15.2±5.9 minutes. Acceptability criteria 1-3, respectively, were satisfied for 90.1%, 89.4%, and 91.5% of patients and reproducibility criterion 4 for 56.3%. Quality was considered optimal for 58.5% of the curves and acceptable for 30.2%. The duration of spirometry renders it poorly compatible with the current primary-care practice in France other than for dedicated consultations. Moreover, the quality of spirometry needs to be improved.

  14. Feasibility of spirometry in primary care to screen for COPD: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Violaine; Beauchet, Alain; Gomis, Thierry; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is a frequent but underdiagnosed disease whose diagnosis relies on the spirometric demonstration of bronchial obstruction. Spirometry use by general practitioners could represent the first line in COPD diagnosis. Objective Because duration of spirometry is retarding its development in primary care, we decided to measure the time it requires in the primary-care context in France. Methods Ten volunteer general practitioners were trained during two 3-hour theoretical and practical continuing education sessions. Then, from October 2013 to May 2014, they included patients without any known respiratory disease but at risk of developing COPD (age: ≥40 years, smoker: ≥20 pack-years). The duration of spirometry and its quality were evaluated according to the following acceptability criteria: 1) expiration ≥6 seconds or reaching a plateau; 2) good start with an early peak flow, curve peaked on top and not flat; 3) no artifacts; and 4) reproducibility criteria, ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity differences between the two best spirometry curves ≤0.15 L. Quality of the spirograms was defined as optimal when all the criteria were met and acceptable when all the criteria were satisfied except the reproducibility criterion, otherwise, it was unacceptable. Results For the 152 patients included, the 142 assessable spirometries lasted for 15.2±5.9 minutes. Acceptability criteria 1–3, respectively, were satisfied for 90.1%, 89.4%, and 91.5% of patients and reproducibility criterion 4 for 56.3%. Quality was considered optimal for 58.5% of the curves and acceptable for 30.2%. Conclusion The duration of spirometry renders it poorly compatible with the current primary-care practice in France other than for dedicated consultations. Moreover, the quality of spirometry needs to be improved. PMID:26929617

  15. Assessment of spirometry and impulse oscillometry in relation to asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Arvind; Anderson, William J; Lipworth, Joseph; Lipworth, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Guidelines advocate the use of spirometry to assess pulmonary function in asthmatic patients. Commonly used measures include forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory ratio (FEV1/FVC), and forced mid-expiratory flow between 25 and 75 % of forced vital capacity (FEF25-75). Impulse oscillometry (IOS) is an effort-independent test performed during tidal breathing. IOS may be used to assess the total and central airway resistance at 5 Hz (R5) and 20 Hz (R20), respectively, and hence derive the peripheral airway resistance from the difference (R5-R20). We compared spirometry and IOS as tests of global airway function (i.e., FEV1, FEV1/FVC, R5) and putative measures of small airways function (i.e., FEF25-75, R5-R20) and their relationship to oral steroid and short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) use as surrogates for long-term asthma control. Spirometry and IOS measurements from physician-diagnosed asthmatics were linked to a health informatics database for oral steroid and SABA use 1 year prior to the index measurements. Four hundred forty-two patients had both spirometry and IOS, mean FEV1 = 86 % predicted, 94 % on ICS, median dose 800 µg/day. IOS and spirometry measures were equally predictive of impaired asthma control for both oral steroid and SABA use. For oral steroid use, the adjusted odds ratio, OR (95 % CI) is as follows: FEV1 150 %: 1.91(1.25-2.95), p = 0.003; and R5-R20 > 0.1 kPa L(-1) s 1.73(1.12-2.66), p = 0.013. For SABA use, the adjusted OR (95 % CI) is as follows: FEV1 150 %: 1.76(1.18-2.63), p = 0.006; and R5-R20 > 0.1 kPa L(-1) s: 2.94(1.94-4.46), p Spirometry or IOS measurements were equally useful as potential markers of asthma control in persistent asthmatic patients.

  16. Accuracy of spirometry for detection of asthma: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Andréa Cristina; Paulino, Ana Carolina Botto; Pereira, Luciano Penha; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease with airway hyperresponsiveness. Spirometry is the most commonly used test among asthmatic patients. Another functional test used for diagnosing asthma is the bronchial challenge test. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of spirometry for detecting asthma in the general population. Cross-sectional study with data analysis to evaluate the accuracy of spirometry through calculating sensitivity, specificity and predictive values and through the kappa agreement test. Subjects who constituted a birth cohort were enrolled at the age of 23 to 25 years. Spirometric abnormality was defined as reduced forced expiratory volume in one second, i.e. lower than 80% of the predicted value. Measurement of bronchial responsiveness was performed by means of the bronchial challenge test with methacholine. The gold-standard diagnosis of asthma was defined as the presence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in association with respiratory symptoms. Asthma was detected in 200 subjects (10.4%) out of the sample of 1922 individuals. Spirometric abnormality was detected in 208 subjects (10.9%) of the sample. The specificity of spirometric abnormality for detecting asthma was 90%, sensitivity was 23%, positive predictive value was 22%, and negative predictive value was 91%. The kappa test revealed weak agreement of 0.13 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.07-0.19) between spirometry and the diagnosis of asthma. Spirometry, as a single test, has limitations for detecting asthma in the general population.

  17. Active case finding strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with handheld spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Kyung; Lee, Chang Min; Park, Ji Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Park, Sung-Hoon; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Yong Bum; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-12-01

    The early detection and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to providing appropriate and timely treatment. We explored a new active case-finding strategy for COPD using handheld spirometry.We recruited subjects over 40 years of age with a smoking history of more than 10 pack-years who visited a primary clinic complaining of respiratory symptoms. A total of 190 of subjects were enrolled. Medical information was obtained from historical records and physical examination by general practitioners. All subjects had their pulmonary function evaluated using handheld spirometry with a COPD-6 device. Because forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been suggested as an alternative to FVC, we measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/FEV6 for diagnosis of airflow limitation. All subjects were then referred to tertiary referral hospitals to complete a "Could it be COPD?" questionnaire, handheld spiromtery, and conventional spirometry. The results of each instrument were compared to evaluate the efficacy of both handheld spirometry and the questionnaire.COPD was newly diagnosed in 45 (23.7%) patients. According to our receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, sensitivity and specificity were maximal when the FEV1/FEV6 ratio was less than 77%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.759. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 72.7%, 77.1%, 50%, and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of respiratory symptoms listed on the questionnaire ranged from 0.5 to 0.65, which indicates that there is almost no difference compared with the results of handheld spirometry.The present study demonstrated the efficacy of handheld spirometry as an active case-finding tool for COPD in a primary clinical setting. This study suggested that physicians should recommend handheld spirometry for people over the age of 40, who have a smoking history of more than 10 pack

  18. Spirometry in Greenland: a cross-sectional study on patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse Overballe; Olsen, Sequssuna; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is globally increasing in frequency and is expected to be the third largest cause of death by 2020. Smoking is the main risk factor of developing COPD. In Greenland, more than half of the adult population are daily smokers, and COPD may be common. International guidelines recommend the usage of spirometry as a golden standard for diagnosing COPD. The current number of spirometries performed among patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease in Greenland remains unexplored. To estimate the prevalence of patients aged 50 years or above treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease and the extent to which spirometry was performed among them within 2 years. An observational, cross-sectional study based on the review of data obtained from electronic medical records in Greenland was performed. The inclusion criterion was that patients must have been permanent residents aged 50 years or above who had medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease prescribed within a period of 15 months prior to data extraction. A full review of electronic patient records was done on each of the identified users of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Information on age, gender, town and spirometry was registered for each patient within the period from October 2013 to October 2015. The prevalence of patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease aged 50 years or above was 7.9%. Of those, 34.8% had spirometry performed within 2 years and 50% had a forced expiratory volume (1 sec)/ forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) under 70% indicating obstructive pulmonary disease. The use of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease among patients over 50 years old is common in Greenland. About one third of the patients had a spirometry performed within 2 years. To further increase spirometry performance, it is recommended to explore possible barriers in health

  19. Spirometry in Greenland: a cross-sectional study on patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Overballe Nielsen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is globally increasing in frequency and is expected to be the third largest cause of death by 2020. Smoking is the main risk factor of developing COPD. In Greenland, more than half of the adult population are daily smokers, and COPD may be common. International guidelines recommend the usage of spirometry as a golden standard for diagnosing COPD. The current number of spirometries performed among patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease in Greenland remains unexplored. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of patients aged 50 years or above treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease and the extent to which spirometry was performed among them within 2 years. Design: An observational, cross-sectional study based on the review of data obtained from electronic medical records in Greenland was performed. The inclusion criterion was that patients must have been permanent residents aged 50 years or above who had medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease prescribed within a period of 15 months prior to data extraction. A full review of electronic patient records was done on each of the identified users of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Information on age, gender, town and spirometry was registered for each patient within the period from October 2013 to October 2015. Results: The prevalence of patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease aged 50 years or above was 7.9%. Of those, 34.8% had spirometry performed within 2 years and 50% had a forced expiratory volume (1 sec/ forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC under 70% indicating obstructive pulmonary disease. Conclusion: The use of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease among patients over 50 years old is common in Greenland. About one third of the patients had a spirometry performed within 2 years. To further increase spirometry

  20. Comparison of spirometry criteria for the diagnosis of COPD: results from the BOLD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, W.M.; Gíslason, þ.; Burney, P.; Enright, P.L.; Gulsvik, A.; Kocabas, A.; Buist, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Published guidelines recommend spirometry to accurately diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, even spirometry-based COPD prevalence estimates can vary widely. We compared properties of several spirometry-based COPD definitions using data from the international Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD)study. 14 sites recruited population-based samples of adults aged ≥40 yrs. Procedures included standardised questionnaires and post-bronchodilator spirometry. 10,001 individuals provided usable data. Use of the lower limit of normal (LLN) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) to forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio reduced the age-related increases in COPD prevalence that are seen among healthy never-smokers when using the fixed ratio criterion (FEV1/FVC <0.7) recommended by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The added requirement of an FEV1 either <80% predicted or below the LLN further reduced age-related increases and also led to the least site-to-site variability in prevalence estimates after adjusting for potential confounders. Use of the FEV1/FEV6 ratio in place of the FEV1/FVC yielded similar prevalence estimates. Use of the FEV1/FVC

  1. Hyperpolarized 3helium magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of the lung in cystic fibrosis: comparison with high resolution CT and spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Colm J.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Skehan, Stephen J.; Masterson, James B.; Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Wild, Jim M.; Fichele, Stan; Gallagher, Charles G.; Beek, Edwin J.R. van

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hyperpolarized 3 helium magnetic resonance imaging ( 3 He MRI) of the lungs in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and spirometry. Eight patients with stable CF prospectively underwent 3 He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry within 1 week. Three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence was used during an 18-s breath-hold following inhalation of hyperpolarized 3 He. Each lung was divided into six zones; 3 He MRI was scored as percentage ventilation per lung zone. HRCT was scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Univariate (Spearman rank) and multivariate correlations were performed between 3 He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry. Results are expressed as mean±SD (range). Spirometry is expressed as percent predicted. There were four men and four women, mean age=31.9±9 (20-46). Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV) 1 =52%±29 (27-93). Mean 3 He MRI score=74%±25 (55-100). Mean HRCT score=48.8±24 (13.5-83). The correlation between 3 He MRI and HRCT was strong (R=±0.89, p 3 He MRI; 3 He MRI correlated better with FEV 1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) (R=0.86 and 0.93, p 3 He MRI correlates strongly with structural HRCT abnormalities and is a stronger correlate of spirometry than HRCT in CF. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative computed tomography versus spirometry in predicting air leak duration after major lung resection for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kazuhiro; Kaneda, Yoshikazu; Sudo, Manabu; Mitsutaka, Jinbo; Li, Tao-Sheng; Suga, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2005-11-01

    Emphysema is a well-known risk factor for developing air leak or persistent air leak after pulmonary resection. Although quantitative computed tomography (CT) and spirometry are used to diagnose emphysema, it remains controversial whether these tests are predictive of the duration of postoperative air leak. Sixty-two consecutive patients who were scheduled to undergo major lung resection for cancer were enrolled in this prospective study to define the best predictor of postoperative air leak duration. Preoperative factors analyzed included spirometric variables and area of emphysema (proportion of the low-attenuation area) that was quantified in a three-dimensional CT lung model. Chest tubes were removed the day after disappearance of the air leak, regardless of pleural drainage. Univariate and multivariate proportional hazards analyses were used to determine the influence of preoperative factors on chest tube time (air leak duration). By univariate analysis, site of resection (upper, lower), forced expiratory volume in 1 second, predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and area of emphysema ( 10%) were significant predictors of air leak duration. By multivariate analysis, site of resection and area of emphysema were the best independent determinants of air leak duration. The results were similar for patients with a smoking history (n = 40), but neither forced expiratory volume in 1 second nor predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second were predictive of air leak duration. Quantitative CT is superior to spirometry in predicting air leak duration after major lung resection for cancer. Quantitative CT may aid in the identification of patients, particularly among those with a smoking history, requiring additional preventive procedures against air leak.

  3. Is preoperative spirometry a predictive marker for postoperative complications after colorectal cancer surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Yuki; Tsuruta, Masashi; Yahagi, Masashi; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Okabayashi, Koji; Shigeta, Kohei; Ishida, Takashi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2017-09-01

    Spirometry is a basic test that provides much information about pulmonary function; it is performed preoperatively in almost all patients undergoing colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery in our hospital. However, the value of spirometry as a preoperative test for CRC surgery remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether spirometry is useful to predict postoperative complications (PCs) after CRC surgery. The medical records of 1236 patients who had preoperative spirometry tests and underwent CRC surgery between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. Preoperative spirometry results, such as forced vital capacity (FVC), one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1), %VC (FVC/predicted VC) and FEV1/FVC (%FEV1), were analyzed with regard to PCs, including pneumonia. PCs were found in 383 (30.9%) patients, including 218 (56%) with surgical site infections, 67 (17%) with bowel obstruction, 62 (16%) with leakage and 20 (5.2%) with pneumonia. Of the spirometry results, %VC was correlated with PC according to logistic regression analysis (odds ratio, OR = 0.99, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.98-0.99; P = 0.034). Multivariate analysis after adjusting for male sex, age, laparoscopic surgery, tumor location, operation time and blood loss showed that a lower %VC tends to be a risk factor for PC (OR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98-1.002; P = 0.159) and %VC was an independent risk factor for postoperative pneumonia in PCs (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.94-0.99; P = 0.049). In CRC surgery, %VC may be a predictor of postoperative complications, especially pneumonia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Effects of Hemibridge with Ball and Balloon Exercise on Forced Expiratory Volume and Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorida Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Suboptimal breathing patterns and impairments of posture and trunk stability are often associated with musculoskeletal complaints such as low back pain. Respiration is also affected by poor neuromuscular control of core muscles. Immediate effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise has been studied on chronic pain in athlete population. Objective: To evaluate the effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, forced expiratory volume and functional abilities in patients with chronic low back pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV and Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ. Methods: The present experimental study was conducted among 30 participants between the age of 21 to 55 years with chronic non-specific LBP. The participants were given a hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise. Pre-interventional and 3rd day Post-interventional outcome measurements were taken using VAS, FEV1 and FEV6 and MODQ. Results: The difference between pre-and post of VAS was statistically highly significant (p=0.0001. The p value of FEV6 and MODQ by paired t test was statistically significant with p value of 0.02 and 0.0007 respectively. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is an immediate effect of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, FEV6 and functional ability in patients with chronic LBP.

  5. Reference values for spirometry in Chinese aged 4-80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wenhua; Gao, Yi; Hao, Chuangli; Wang, Ning; Ai, Tao; Liu, Chuanhe; Xu, Yongjian; Kang, Jian; Yang, Lan; Shen, Huahao; Guan, Weijie; Jiang, Mei; Zhong, Nanshan; Zheng, Jinping

    2017-11-01

    Although there are over 1.34 billion Chinese in the world, nationwide spirometric reference values for Chinese are unavailable, which is usually based on Caucasian conversion. The aim of this study was to establish spirometric reference values for Chinese with a national wide sample. We enrolled healthy non-smokers in 24 centers in Northeast, North, Northwest, Southwest, South, East and Central China from January 2007 to June 2010. Spirometry was performed according to American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society guidelines. Reference equations were established using the Lambda-Mu-Sigma (LMS) method for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV 1 /FVC, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF). Popular Caucasian reference values adjusted with ethnic conversion factors were validated with Chinese measured spirometry data. The present study also compared with other published Chinese equations for spirometry. A total of 7,115 eligible individuals aged 4 to 80 years (50.9% females) were recruited. Reference equations against age and height by gender were established, including predicted values and lower limits of normal (LLNs). Validated with Chinese data, the mean percentage differences of Caucasian reference values adjusted with ethnic conversion factors were -10.2% to 1.8%, and the percentages of total subjects under LLNs were 0.1% to 8.9%. Compared with this study, the percentage differences of previous Chinese studies ranged from -17.8% to 11.4%, which were found to significantly overestimate or underestimate lung function. This study established new reference values for better interpretation of spirometry in Chinese aged 4 to 80 years, while Caucasian references with adjustment were inappropriate for Chinese.

  6. Normal spirometry values in healthy elderly: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Daan Willem; Ittermann, Till; Lahousse, Lies; Hofman, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert Gerardus Maria; Brusselle, Guy Gaston; Stricker, Bruno Hugo

    2013-04-01

    Although many different reference values for spirometry are available from various studies, the elderly are usually underrepresented. Therefore, our objective was to assess reference values in a sample of healthy participants from a prospective population-based cohort study, including a large proportion of elderly. We included spirometry measurements of healthy, never smokers, from the Rotterdam Study and excluded participants with respiratory symptoms or prescriptions for respiratory medication. Age- and height-specific curves for the 5th (lower limit of normal) and the 50th (median) percentile of Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 s (FEV1), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), and the ratio (FEV1/FVC) were calculated by quantile regression models. The group of healthy elderly study subjects consisted of 1,125 individuals, with a mean age of 68 years, ranging from 47 to 96 years of age. Sex stratified equations for the median and the lower limit of normal were calculated adjusted for age and height. In this study, we report age- and height-dependent reference limits for FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC in a large population, and prediction equations for the lower limit of normal and median values for a sample containing a large proportion of healthy elderly.

  7. Differences in spirometry values between U.S. children 6-11 years and adolescents 12-19 years with current asthma, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Brian K; Simon, Alan E; Tilert, Timothy; Okelo, Sande; Akinbami, Lara J

    2016-03-01

    National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines recommend that periodic spirometry be performed in youth with asthma. NAEPP uses different spirometry criteria to define uncontrolled asthma for children (6-11 years) and adolescents (12+ years). To describe differences in spirometry between U.S. children and adolescents with current asthma. We examined cross-sectional spirometry data from 453 U.S. youth with current asthma age 6-19 years from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. The main outcomes were percentage predicted forced expiratory volume at 1 sec (FEV1%) ≤80 and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ≤0.80. We also examined the prevalence of youth with spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma, using NAEPP age-specific criteria, defined for children aged 6-11 years as FEV1% ≤80 or FEV1/FVC ≤0.80, and for adolescents aged 12-19 years as FEV1% ≤80. Children 6-11 years and adolescents 12-19 years did not differ in prevalence of FEV1% ≤80 (10.1% vs. 9.0%) or FEV1/FVC ≤0.80 (30.6% vs. 29.8%). However, based on the NAEPP age-specific criteria, 33.0% of children 6-11 years and 9.0% of adolescents 12-19 years had spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma (P spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma did differ. The difference appears to stem mainly from the different spirometry criteria for the two age groups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of a mixture of pyridostigmine and atropine on forced expiratory volume (FEV1), and serum cholinesterase activity in normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B F; Gefke, Kaj; Mosbech, H

    1985-01-01

    Pyridostigmine 0.143 mg kg-1 (maximum 10 mg) and atropine 0.0143 mg kg-1 (maximum 1 mg) were administered i.v. to six healthy male volunteers. Peripheral venous blood samples were drawn for measurement of serum cholinesterase activity. Maximum inhibition of the enzyme was found 5 min after...... injection with a decrease to 27 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of the original activity. Forced expiratory volume in the first 1s (FEV1) was measured at fixed time intervals for 90 min. No decrease in FEV1 was observed; on the contrary, there was a small increase. We conclude that atropine effectively antagonizes...... the muscarinic side-effects of pyridostigmine on bronchial smooth muscle tone and bronchial secretions, when administered in clinical doses to normal human subjects....

  9. A Study of the Usability of Ergonomic Camera Vest Based on Spirometry Parameters

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    Shirazeh Arghami

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a cameraman is one of those occupations that expose people to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. Therefore, control measures should be taken to protect cameramen’s health. To solve the given problem, a vest was designed for cameramen to prevent MSDs by reducing the pressure and contact stress while carrying the camera on their shoulder. However, the usability of vest had to be considered. The aim of this study was to determine the usability of the proposed vest using the spirometry parameters indicator. Methods: In this experimental study, 120 spirometry experiments were conducted with 40 male volunteer subjects with and without designed vest. Data were analyzed using SPSS- 16 with dependent t-test, at 0.05 significance level. Results: Based on the spirometry results, there is a significant difference between Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1 and heart rate in activity with and without vest (p<0.001. Conclusion: The results suggest that the promising impact of this invention on the health of cameramen makes this domestically designed camera vest a good option for mass production.

  10. Spirometry in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Kana Ram

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory disorders are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in children. Spirometry is a useful investigation for diagnosing and monitoring a variety of paediatric respiratory diseases, but it is underused by primary care physicians and paediatricians treating children with respiratory disease. We now have a better understanding of respiratory physiology in children, and newer computerised spirometry equipment is available with updated regional reference values for the paediatric age group. This review evaluates the current literature for indications, test procedures, quality assessment, and interpretation of spirometry results in children. Spirometry may be useful for asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital or acquired airway malformations and many other respiratory diseases in children. The technique for performing spirometry in children is crucial and is discussed in detail. Most children, including preschool children, can perform acceptable spirometry. Steps for interpreting spirometry results include identification of common errors during the test by applying acceptability and repeatability criteria and then comparing test parameters with reference standards. Spirometry results depict only the pattern of ventilation, which may be normal, obstructive, restrictive, or mixed. The diagnosis should be based on both clinical features and spirometry results. There is a need to encourage primary care physicians and paediatricians treating respiratory diseases in children to use spirometry after adequate training.

  11. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Tetzlaff, Kay; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel Fm; Disse, Bernd; Finnigan, Helen; Magnussen, Helgo; Calverley, Peter Ma

    2016-01-01

    The WISDOM study (NCT00975195) reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland-Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume in 1 second values recorded at home and in the clinic (mean difference of -0.05 L), which may be due to suboptimal patient effort in performing unsupervised recordings. However, this difference remained consistent over time. Overall, these data demonstrate that home-based and in-clinic spirometric measurements were equally valid and reliable for assessing lung function in patients with COPD, and suggest that home-based spirometry may be a useful tool to facilitate analysis of changes in lung function on a day-to-day basis.

  12. Reference values for spirometry in elderly individuals: a cross-sectional study of different reference equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Joana; Palmeiro, Teresa; Caires, Iolanda; Papoila, Ana L; Alves, Marta; Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Botelho, Maria A; Neuparth, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    Spirometry is the single most important test for the evaluation of respiratory function. The results are interpreted by comparing measured data with predicted values previously obtained from a reference population. Reference equations for spirometry have been discussed previously. The aim of this study was to compare reference values based on National Health and Nutrition Assessment Survey (NHANES III), European Community of Steel and Coal (ECSC), and Global Lung Initiative (GLI) equations in an elderly sample population. Subjects from the Geriatric Study on Health Effects of Air Quality in elder care centres who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Spirometry was performed according to international guidelines. The forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and FEV 1 /FVC ratio were reported as percentages of the predicted value, and the lower limit of normality was calculated. Out of 260 elderly patients, 69.6% were women; the mean age was 83.0 ± 6.46 years with an age range of 65-95 years. The lowest %FVC and %FEV 1 values were obtained using the GLI reference equations. However, when NHANES III equations were used, the FEV 1 /FVC ratio was higher than ratios obtained from GLI and ECSC equations. The prevalence of airway obstruction was highest using ECSC equations, while GLI equations demonstrated more restrictive defects. The present study showed meaningful differences in the reference values, and consequently, in the results obtained using NHANES III, ECSC, and GLI reference equations. The spirometry interpretation was also influenced by the reference equations used.

  13. Spirometry use: detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Barnes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas A Barnes1, Len Fromer21Department of Cardiopulmonary Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAObjective: To describe a practical method for family practitioners to stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD by the use of office spirometry.Methods: This is a review of the lessons learned from evaluations of the use of office spirometry in the primary care setting to identify best practices using the most recent published evaluations of office spirometry and the analysis of preliminary data from a recent spirometry mass screening project. A mass screening study by the American Association for Respiratory Care and the COPD Foundation was used to identify the most effective way for general practitioners to implement office spirometry in order to stage COPD.Results: A simple three-step method is described to identify people with a high pre-test probability in an attempt to detect moderate to severe COPD: COPD questionnaire, measurement of peak expiratory flow, and office spirometry. Clinical practice guidelines exist for office spirometry basics for safety, use of electronic peak flow devices, and portable spirometers.Conclusion: Spirometry can be undertaken in primary care offices with acceptable levels of technical expertise. Using office spirometry, primary care physicians can diagnose the presence and severity of COPD. Spirometry can guide therapies for COPD and predict outcomes when used in general practice.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, spirometry, family practice, primary care physician

  14. Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 Second Variability Helps Identify Patients with Cystic Fibrosis at Risk of Greater Loss of Lung Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Wayne J; VanDevanter, Donald R; Pasta, David J; Foreman, Aimee J; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Konstan, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate several alternative measures of forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted (FEV1 %pred) variability as potential predictors of future FEV1 %pred decline in patients with cystic fibrosis. We included 13,827 patients age ≥6 years from the Epidemiologic Study of Cystic Fibrosis 1994-2002 with ≥4 FEV1 %pred measurements spanning ≥366 days in both a 2-year baseline period and a 2-year follow-up period. We predicted change from best baseline FEV1 %pred to best follow-up FEV1 %pred and change from baseline to best in the second follow-up year by using multivariable regression stratified by 4 lung-disease stages. We assessed 5 measures of variability (some as deviations from the best and some as deviations from the trend line) both alone and after controlling for demographic and clinical factors and for the slope and level of FEV1 %pred. All 5 measures of FEV1 %pred variability were predictive, but the strongest predictor was median deviation from the best FEV1 %pred in the baseline period. The contribution to explanatory power (R(2)) was substantial and exceeded the total contribution of all other factors excluding the FEV1 %pred rate of decline. Adding the other variability measures provided minimal additional value. Median deviation from the best FEV1 %pred is a simple metric that markedly improves prediction of FEV1 %pred decline even after the inclusion of demographic and clinical characteristics and the FEV1 %pred rate of decline. The routine calculation of this variability measure could allow clinicians to better identify patients at risk and therefore in need of increased intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spirometry in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Overballe; Olsen, Sequssuna; Jarbøl, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    be common. International guidelines recommend the usage of spirometry as a golden standard for diagnosing COPD. The current number of spirometries performed among patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease in Greenland remains unexplored. Objective. To estimate the prevalence...... of patients aged 50 years or above treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease and the extent to which spirometry was performed among them within 2 years. Design. An observational, cross-sectional study based on the review of data obtained from electronic medical records in Greenland...... of the identified users of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Information on age, gender, town and spirometry was registered for each patient within the period from October 2013 to October 2015. Results. The prevalence of patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease aged...

  16. Clinical and Radiologic Disease in Smokers With Normal Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Elizabeth A; Lynch, David A; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Austin, John H M; Grenier, Philippe A; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Bailey, William C; DeMeo, Dawn L; Casaburi, Richard H; Friedman, Paul; Van Beek, Edwin J R; Hokanson, John E; Bowler, Russell P; Beaty, Terri H; Washko, George R; Han, MeiLan K; Kim, Victor; Kim, Song Soo; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Washington, Lacey; McEvoy, Charlene E; Tanner, Clint; Mannino, David M; Make, Barry J; Silverman, Edwin K; Crapo, James D

    2015-09-01

    Airflow obstruction on spirometry is universally used to define chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and current or former smokers without airflow obstruction may assume that they are disease free. To identify clinical and radiologic evidence of smoking-related disease in a cohort of current and former smokers who did not meet spirometric criteria for COPD, for whom we adopted the discarded label of Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 0. Individuals from the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cross-sectional observational study completed spirometry, chest computed tomography (CT) scans, a 6-minute walk, and questionnaires. Participants were recruited from local communities at 21 sites across the United States. The GOLD 0 group (n = 4388) (ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration [FEV1] to forced vital capacity >0.7 and FEV1 ≥80% predicted) from the COPDGene study was compared with a GOLD 1 group (n = 794), COPD groups (n = 3690), and a group of never smokers (n = 108). Recruitment began in January 2008 and ended in July 2011. Physical function impairments, respiratory symptoms, CT abnormalities, use of respiratory medications, and reduced respiratory-specific quality of life. One or more respiratory-related impairments were found in 54.1% (2375 of 4388) of the GOLD 0 group. The GOLD 0 group had worse quality of life (mean [SD] St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score, 17.0 [18.0] vs 3.8 [6.8] for the never smokers; P smokers had greater emphysema and gas trapping. Advancing age was associated with smoking cessation and with more CT findings of disease. Individuals with respiratory impairments were more likely to use respiratory medications, and the use of these medications was associated with worse disease. Lung disease and impairments were common in smokers without spirometric COPD. Based on these results, we project that there are 35 million current and former smokers older

  17. An Investigation of Respiratory Symptoms and Spirometry Parameters of Welders in a Steel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangkooy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Fumes released form welding activities are capable of initiating several acute and chronic respiratory effects. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate respiratory symptoms and spirometry parameters in welders of a steel industry. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in a steel industry and involved 60 welders and 40 non-welders. A questionnaire was used to record participants’ details, and to determine pulmonary function values the spirometric test was used. Pearson correlation, paired and independent t test as statistic tests were used for data analysis. Results Comparison between pulmonary function values (PFV showed a significant relationship between forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and 25% - 75% forced expiratory flow (FEF25 - 75% of the two groups. These values in the welder group had a significant reduction and declines were from 6 to 11 mL. Age and work experience showed a significant correlation with PFV in the two groups. Conclusions All workers that participated in this study were relatively young and considering them being young and not having long history of work experience, our results revealed that welders had less respiratory capacity and this was related to increasing work experience and age, but inconsistent with smoking habits of the two groups.

  18. Spirometry use: detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Thomas A; Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe a practical method for family practitioners to stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by the use of office spirometry. Methods: This is a review of the lessons learned from evaluations of the use of office spirometry in the primary care setting to identify best practices using the most recent published evaluations of office spirometry and the analysis of preliminary data from a recent spirometry mass screening project. A mass screening study by the American Association for Respiratory Care and the COPD Foundation was used to identify the most effective way for general practitioners to implement office spirometry in order to stage COPD. Results: A simple three-step method is described to identify people with a high pre-test probability in an attempt to detect moderate to severe COPD: COPD questionnaire, measurement of peak expiratory flow, and office spirometry. Clinical practice guidelines exist for office spirometry basics for safety, use of electronic peak flow devices, and portable spirometers. Conclusion: Spirometry can be undertaken in primary care offices with acceptable levels of technical expertise. Using office spirometry, primary care physicians can diagnose the presence and severity of COPD. Spirometry can guide therapies for COPD and predict outcomes when used in general practice. PMID:21472091

  19. Advantage of impulse oscillometry over spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and monitor pulmonary responses to bronchodilators: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine Saadeh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This retrospective study was a comparative analysis of sensitivity of impulse oscillometry and spirometry techniques for use in a mixed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease group for assessing disease severity and inhalation therapy. Methods: A total of 30 patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were monitored by impulse oscillometry, followed by spirometry. Lung function was measured at baseline after bronchodilation and at follow-up (3–18 months. The impulse oscillometry parameters were resistance in the small and large airways at 5 Hz (R5, resistance in the large airways at 15 Hz (R15, and lung reactance (area under the curve X; AX. Results: After the bronchodilator therapy, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 readings evaluated by spirometry were unaffected at baseline and at follow-up, while impulse oscillometry detected an immediate improvement in lung function, in terms of AX (p = 0.043. All impulse oscillometry parameters significantly improved at follow-up, with a decrease in AX by 37% (p = 0.0008, R5 by 20% (p = 0.0011, and R15 by 12% (p = 0.0097. Discussion: Impulse oscillometry parameters demonstrated greater sensitivity compared with spirometry for monitoring reversibility of airway obstruction and the effect of maintenance therapy. Impulse oscillometry may facilitate early treatment dose optimization and personalized medicine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

  20. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Roisin R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Rodriguez-Roisin,1 Kay Tetzlaff,2,3 Henrik Watz,4 Emiel FM Wouters,5 Bernd Disse,2 Helen Finnigan,6 Helgo Magnussen,4 Peter MA Calverley7 1Respiratory Institute, Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital Clínic IDIBAPS-CIBERES, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim, Germany; 3Department of Sports Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 4Pulmonary Research Institute at Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Center North, German Center for Lung Research, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 6Department of Biostatistics and Data Sciences, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bracknell, UK; 7Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool, UK Abstract: The WISDOM study (NCT00975195 reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland–Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume

  1. Spirometry in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  2. Public spirometry for primary prevention of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirlik, Sabine; Wich, Christina; Frieser, Markus; Hildner, Kai; Kleye, Christin; Neurath, Markus F; Fuchs, Florian S

    2014-02-01

    The most effective action for primary prevention of chronic obstructive lung disease is smoking cessation early enough. In secondary prevention, smokers with airway obstruction were more likely to quit smoking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a public spirometry on smoking habits in terms of primary prevention. Spirometry with its medical analysis was offered to visitors of a local public event called 'Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften' ('Long night of sciences'). The impact of results on smoking habits was evaluated in all smokers with an anonymized questionnaire afterwards. Two hundred fifty-seven people with the median age of 30 years (interquartile range 22-46) were examined. Out of 44 current smokers (17.1%), only two individuals showed a prebronchodilator FEV1/forced vital capacity-value smokers stated to have an increased motivation to quit smoking whereas 28 smokers declared that their motivation to quit smoking was independent of spirometry result. These smokers were significantly younger (median age 28 vs. 40 years, P = 0.025) without differences in spirometry results or smoking habits. In an unselected population with a high amount of younger adults, normal spirometry did not show a short-term benefit for primary prevention of chronic obstructive lung disease in terms of increasing motivation to quit smoking. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Reference Values for Spirometry Derived Using Lambda, Mu, Sigma (LMS) Method in Korean Adults: in Comparison with Previous References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Bum Seak; Myong, Jun Pyo; Rhee, Chin Kook; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Koo, Jung Wan; Kim, Hyoung Ryoul

    2018-01-15

    The present study aimed to update the prediction equations for spirometry and their lower limits of normal (LLN) by using the lambda, mu, sigma (LMS) method and to compare the outcomes with the values of previous spirometric reference equations. Spirometric data of 10,249 healthy non-smokers (8,776 females) were extracted from the fourth and fifth versions of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV, 2007-2009; V, 2010-2012). Reference equations were derived using the LMS method which allows modeling skewness (lambda [L]), mean (mu [M]), and coefficient of variation (sigma [S]). The outcome equations were compared with previous reference values. Prediction equations were presented in the following form: predicted value = e{a + b × ln(height) + c × ln(age) + M - spline}. The new predicted values for spirometry and their LLN derived using the LMS method were shown to more accurately reflect transitions in pulmonary function in young adults than previous prediction equations derived using conventional regression analysis in 2013. There were partial discrepancies between the new reference values and the reference values from the Global Lung Function Initiative in 2012. The results should be interpreted with caution for young adults and elderly males, particularly in terms of the LLN for forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity in elderly males. Serial spirometry follow-up, together with correlations with other clinical findings, should be emphasized in evaluating the pulmonary function of individuals. Future studies are needed to improve the accuracy of reference data and to develop continuous reference values for spirometry across all ages. © 2018 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  4. Clinical Utility of Additional Measurement of Total Lung Capacity in Diagnosing Obstructive Lung Disease in Subjects With Restrictive Pattern of Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Chang, Boksoon; Kim, Kyunga; Song, Won Jun; Chon, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Jung Soo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-04-01

    Total lung capacity (TLC), forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% (FEF25-75%), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or post-bronchodilator volume response is recommended to detect obstructive abnormalities in the lung. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of these pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters to diagnose obstructive lung disease in subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry. A retrospective study was conducted in 64 subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry (normal FEV1/FVC and low FVC) out of 3,030 patients who underwent all pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry and lung volume measurement between April 2008 and December 2010. After subjects were clinically classified into those with obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, and mixed lung disease, the agreements between the clinical diagnosis and PFT classification according to TLC, FEF(25-75%), PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria were compared. Of 64 subjects, 18 (28.1%) were classified with obstructive lung disease, 39 (60.9%) had restrictive lung disease, 1 (1.6%) had mixed lung disease, and 6 (9.4%) had no clinical lung disease. Among the 58 subjects with clinical lung disease, 22 (37.9%), 37 (63.8%), 33 (56.9%), and 3 (5.2%) were classified as having obstructive pattern based on TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria, respectively. The kappa coefficients for the agreement between the clinical classification and PFT classification using TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria in 58 subjects were 0.59, 0.18, 0.17, and spirometry, when obstructive lung disease is clinically suspected. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  5. Hyperpolarized {sup 3}helium magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of the lung in cystic fibrosis: comparison with high resolution CT and spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Colm J.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Skehan, Stephen J.; Masterson, James B. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Wild, Jim M.; Fichele, Stan [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, The Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Gallagher, Charles G. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, Dublin (Ireland); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, The Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare hyperpolarized {sup 3}helium magnetic resonance imaging ({sup 3}He MRI) of the lungs in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and spirometry. Eight patients with stable CF prospectively underwent {sup 3}He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry within 1 week. Three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence was used during an 18-s breath-hold following inhalation of hyperpolarized {sup 3}He. Each lung was divided into six zones; {sup 3}He MRI was scored as percentage ventilation per lung zone. HRCT was scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Univariate (Spearman rank) and multivariate correlations were performed between {sup 3}He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry. Results are expressed as mean{+-}SD (range). Spirometry is expressed as percent predicted. There were four men and four women, mean age=31.9{+-}9 (20-46). Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV){sub 1}=52%{+-}29 (27-93). Mean {sup 3}He MRI score=74%{+-}25 (55-100). Mean HRCT score=48.8{+-}24 (13.5-83). The correlation between {sup 3}He MRI and HRCT was strong (R={+-}0.89, p<0.001). Bronchiectasis was the only independent predictor of {sup 3}He MRI; {sup 3}He MRI correlated better with FEV{sub 1} and forced vital capacity (FVC) (R=0.86 and 0.93, p<0.01, respectively) than HRCT (R={+-}0.72 and {+-}0.81, p<0.05, respectively). This study showed that {sup 3}He MRI correlates strongly with structural HRCT abnormalities and is a stronger correlate of spirometry than HRCT in CF. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of Flow and Volume Incentive Spirometry on Pulmonary Function and Exercise Tolerance in Open Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amaravadi Sampath; Augustine, Alfred Joseph; Pazhyaottayil, Zulfeequer Chundaanveetil; Ramakrishna, Anand; Krishnakumar, Shyam Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures in abdominal area lead to changes in pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics and impaired physical capacity leading to postoperative pulmonary complications, which can affect up to 80% of upper abdominal surgery. Aim To evaluate the effects of flow and volume incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in patients undergoing open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a hospital of Mangalore city in Southern India. Thirty-seven males and thirteen females who were undergoing abdominal surgeries were included and allocated into flow and volume incentive spirometry groups by block randomization. All subjects underwent evaluations of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF). Preoperative and postoperative measurements were taken up to day 5 for both groups. Exercise tolerance measured by Six- Minute Walk Test during preoperative period and measured again at the time of discharge for both groups. Pulmonary function was analysed by post-hoc analysis and carried out using Bonferroni’s ‘t’-test. Exercise tolerance was analysed by Paired ‘T’-test. Results Pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be significantly decreased in 1st, 2nd and 3rd postoperative day when compared with preoperative day. On 4th and 5th postoperative day the pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be better preserved in both flow and volume incentive spirometry groups. The Six-Minute Walk Test showed a statistically significant improvement in pulmonary function on the day of discharge than in the preoperative period. In terms of distance covered, the volume- incentive spirometry group showed a greater statistically significant improvement from the preoperative period to the time of discharge than was exhibited by the flow incentive spirometry group

  7. Development of a spirometry T-score in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Baek, Seunghee; Jung, Ji-Ye; Kim, Young Sam; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Do; Mannino, David M; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry values may be expressed as T-scores in standard deviation units relative to a reference in a young, normal population as an analogy to the T-score for bone mineral density. This study was performed to develop the spirometry T-score. T-scores were calculated from lambda-mu-sigma-derived Z-scores using a young, normal age reference. Three outcomes of all-cause death, respiratory death, and COPD death were evaluated in 9,101 US subjects followed for 10 years; an outcome of COPD-related health care utilization (COPD utilization) was evaluated in 1,894 Korean subjects followed for 4 years. The probability of all-cause death appeared to remain nearly zero until -1 of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) T-score but increased steeply where FEV1 T-score reached below -2.5. Survival curves for all-cause death, respiratory death, COPD death, and COPD utilization differed significantly among the groups when stratified by FEV1 T-score (Pspirometry T-score could predict all-cause death, respiratory death, COPD death, and COPD utilization.

  8. Effectiveness of incentive spirometry in patients following thoracotomy and lung resection including those at high risk for developing pulmonary complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Paula; Naidu, Babu; Cieslik, Hayley; Steyn, Richard; Rajesh, Pala Babu; Bishay, Ehab; Kalkat, Maninder Singh; Singh, Sally

    2013-06-01

    Following thoracotomy, patients frequently receive routine respiratory physiotherapy which may include incentive spirometry, a breathing technique characterised by deep breathing performed through a device offering visual feedback. This type of physiotherapy is recommended and considered important in the care of thoracic surgery patients, but high quality evidence for specific interventions such as incentive spirometry remains lacking. 180 patients undergoing thoracotomy and lung resection participated in a prospective single-blind randomised controlled trial. All patients received postoperative breathing exercises, airway clearance and early mobilisation; the control group performed thoracic expansion exercises and the intervention group performed incentive spirometry. No difference was observed between the intervention and control groups in the mean drop in forced expiratory volume in 1 s on postoperative day 4 (40% vs 41%, 95% CI -5.3% to 4.2%, p=0.817), the frequency of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) (12.5% vs 15%, 95% CI -7.9% to 12.9%, p=0.803) or in any other secondary outcome measure. A high-risk subgroup (defined by ≥2 independent risk factors; age ≥75 years, American Society of Anaesthesiologists score ≥3, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), smoking status, body mass index ≥30) also demonstrated no difference in outcomes, although a larger difference in the frequency of PPC was observed (14% vs 23%) with 95% CIs indicating possible benefit of intervention (-7.4% to 2.6%). Incentive spirometry did not improve overall recovery of lung function, frequency of PPC or length of stay. For patients at higher risk for the development of PPC, in particular those with COPD or current/recent ex-smokers, there were larger observed actual differences in the frequency of PPC in favour of the intervention, indicating that investigations regarding the physiotherapy management of these patients need to be developed further.

  9. Accuracy of near-patient vs. inbuilt spirometry for monitoring tidal volumes in an in-vitro paediatric lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, S; Thomas, J; Cannizzaro, V; Weiss, M; Schmidt, A R

    2018-03-01

    Spirometric monitoring provides precise measurement and delivery of tidal volumes within a narrow range, which is essential for lung-protective strategies that aim to reduce morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients. Conventional anaesthesia ventilators include inbuilt spirometry to monitor inspiratory and expiratory tidal volumes. The GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilator allows additional near-patient spirometry via a sensor interposed between the proximal end of the tracheal tube and the respiratory tubing. Near-patient and inbuilt spirometry of two different GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilators were compared in an in-vitro study. Assessments were made of accuracy and variability in inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume measurements during ventilation of six simulated paediatric lung models using the ASL 5000 test lung. A total of 9240 breaths were recorded and analysed. Differences between inspiratory tidal volumes measured with near-patient and inbuilt spirometry were most significant in the newborn setting (p tidal volume measurements with near-patient spirometry were consistently more accurate than with inbuilt spirometry for all lung models (p tidal volumes decreased with increasing tidal volumes, and was smaller with near-patient than with inbuilt spirometry. The variability in measured tidal volumes was higher during expiration, especially with inbuilt spirometry. In conclusion, the present in-vitro study shows that measurements with near-patient spirometry are more accurate and less variable than with inbuilt spirometry. Differences between measurement methods were most significant in the smallest patients. We therefore recommend near-patient spirometry, especially for neonatal and paediatric patients. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Measuring lung function using sound waves: role of the forced oscillation technique and impulse oscillometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashier, Bill; Salvi, Sundeep

    2015-03-01

    Measuring lung function is an important component in the decision making process for patients with obstructive airways disease (OAD). Not only does it help in arriving at a specific diagnosis, but it also helps in evaluating severity so that appropriate pharmacotherapy can be instituted, it helps determine prognosis and it helps evaluate response to therapy. Spirometry is currently the most commonly performed lung function test in clinical practice and is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for asthma and COPD. However, spirometry is not an easy test to perform because the forceful expiratory and inspiratory manoeuvres require good patient co-operation. Children aged <5 years, elderly people and those with physical and cognitive limitations cannot perform spirometry easily.

  11. The effect of medical clowns on performance of spirometry among preschool aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Vered; Schichter-Konfino, Vered; Kassem, Eias; Klein, Adi

    2018-04-02

    Medical clowns (MCs) are known to assist in reducing pain and alleviating anxiety. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of MCs to assist preschoolers in performing spirometry. A prospective, randomized controlled trial. Children aged 3-6 years participated. After a first spirometry, children were divided into two groups: the first performed a second spirometry with an MC. The second repeated spirometry with the technician. Primary outcome was second spirometry values compared between the groups. Secondary outcome were change in spirometry values within groups, and difference between the groups. A total of 140 children participated. The groups did not differ in age, sex, mother tongue, or weight. Nor in mean FVC (MC 89.2% ± 16.7, control 89.5% ± 16.3) mean FEV1 (MC 91.3% ± 15.6, control 94.2% ± 16.8), and expiratory time (MC 1.58 ± 0.43, control 1.7 ± 0.44) in first spirometry. In second spirometry the control group had a similar FVC, FEV1, and expiratory time. The MC group had a significant improvement in all parameters: FVC: MC 95.3% ± 15.5, control 89.3% ± 19.1, FEV1: MC 98.0% ± 15.6, control 91.8% ± 19.3, and expiratory time MC 1.96 ± 0.55, control 1.84 ± 0.52. The differences between the groups between first and second attempt were significant (P-value FVC 0.000, FEV1 0.000, expiratory time 0.003). MCs improved performance of spirometry among preschoolers. It is possible that laughter and relief of stress had a physiological effect. Further studies are required to better establish the ability of MCs to improve active participation and to better understand whether the mechanism of the improvement is better cooperation or true physiological change. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Positive end-expiratory pressure attenuates hemodynamic effects induced by an overload of inspiratory muscles in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaper-Magalhães F

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Flavia Schaper-Magalhães,1 José Felippe Pinho,1 Carolina Andrade Bragança Capuruço,2 Maria Glória Rodrigues-Machado1 1Medical Sciences Faculty of Minas Gerais, Post-Graduation Program in Health Sciences, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Department of Cardiology, Clinics Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil Background: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT using a Threshold® device is commonly used to improve the strength and endurance of inspiratory muscles. However, the effect of IMT, alone or with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP, on hemodynamic parameters in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD remains unknown.Objective: To assess the effects of an overload of inspiratory muscles using IMT fixed at 30% of the maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP, and IMT associated with 5 cmH2O of PEEP (IMT + PEEP, on the echocardiographic parameters in healthy subjects and patients with COPD.Methods: Twenty patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second 53.19±24.71 pred% and 15 age-matched healthy volunteers were evaluated using spirometry, MIP, the COPD assessment test (CAT, and the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC dyspnea scale. The E- (fast-filling phase and A- (atrial contraction phase waves were evaluated at the tricuspid and mitral valves during inspiration and expiration in the following sequence: at basal conditions, using IMT, and using IMT + PEEP.Results: Patients with COPD had reduced MIPs versus the control group. Ten patients had CAT scores <10 and 12 patients had mMRC scores <2. E-wave values at the mitral valve were significantly decreased with IMT during the inspiratory phase in both groups. These effects were normalized with IMT + PEEP. During the expiratory phase, use of IMT + PEEP normalized the reduction in E-wave values in the COPD group. During inspiration at the tricuspid valve, reduction in E-wave values during IMT was normalized by IMT + PEEP in COPD group. During the

  13. Validação de novos valores previstos brasileiros para a espirometria forçada na raça branca e comparação com os valores previstos obtidos por outras equações de referência Validation of new brazilian predicted values for forced spirometry in caucasians and comparison with predicted values obtained using other reference equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Araújo de Oliveira Duarte

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os novos valores previstos brasileiros de capacidade vital forçada e volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo para a espirometria obtidos em 2006 com os obtidos por outras equações de referência e validar os achados por meio da comparação com uma nova amostra de brasileiros normais. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se espirometria forçada, de acordo com as normas da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia, em 643 adultos brancos não-fumantes. Os valores previstos obtidos por pesquisadores brasileiros em 1992 e os obtidos por quatro grupos de pesquisadores estrangeiros foram comparados com os novos valores previstos brasileiros obtidos em 2006. Em uma segunda fase, os valores médios obtidos em 65 mulheres e 79 homens adultos foram comparados aos valores previstos obtidos pelas diversas equações de referência. RESULTADOS: O teste t para amostras pareadas revelou diferenças significativas entre os valores previstos obtidos pelas seis equações e os obtidos pela equação brasileira de 2006. Na segunda fase, observou-se que os valores previstos obtidos por Crapo et al. e os obtidos por Hankinson et al. para os méxico-americanos mostraram valores médios semelhantes aos observados na nova amostra. Porém, quando os valores previstos obtidos na nova amostra foram comparados com os obtidos por esses autores, discrepâncias foram observadas, com valores previstos altos e baixos. Os valores obtidos pela equação brasileira de 2006 mostraram as menores diferenças em comparação com os valores médios obtidos na nova amostra. CONCLUSÕES: Estes resultados sublinham a importância de se usar equações de predição para espirometria que sejam apropriadas para nossa população.OBJECTIVE: To compare the most recent (2006 predicted values of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second for spirometry in Brazilians with those obtained using other reference equations and to validate the findings

  14. Angle β of greater than 80° at the start of spirometry may identify high-quality flow volume curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Ningfang; Li, Li; Ren, Weiying; Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) emphasize a satisfactory start in maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves and highlight subjective parameters: performance without hesitation and expiration with maximum force. We described a new parameter, angle β for characterization of the start to the MEFV curve. Subjects completed the MEFV curve at least three times and at least two curves met ATS/ERS quality. Subjects were divided into normal, restrictive and obstructive groups according to pulmonary function test results. The tangent line was drawn at the start of the MEFV curve's ascending limb to the x-axis and the angle β between the tangent line and x-axis was obtained. The relationships between tangent of β, pulmonary function parameters (PFPs) and anthropometric data were assessed. The MEFV curves with insufficient explosion at the start were considered as poor-quality MEFV curves. In 998 subjects with high-quality spirometry, although PFP varied in relation to the three aspects: the angle β and its tangent were similar (P > 0.05), the tangent of β did not correlate with PFP or anthropometric measurements (P > 0.05) and the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the angle β was 80° in the group with high-quality spirometry (P < 0.05). Angle β derived from poor-quality MEFV curves was smaller than that from good quality one (P < 0.05). Angle β may function as a parameter to assess the expiratory efforts, which can be used to assess the quality of the MEFV curve start. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Automated Spirometry Quality Assurance: Supervised Learning From Multiple Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velickovski, Filip; Ceccaroni, Luigi; Marti, Robert; Burgos, Felip; Gistau, Concepcion; Alsina-Restoy, Xavier; Roca, Josep

    2018-01-01

    Forced spirometry testing is gradually becoming available across different healthcare tiers including primary care. It has been demonstrated in earlier work that commercially available spirometers are not fully able to assure the quality of individual spirometry manoeuvres. Thus, a need to expand the availability of high-quality spirometry assessment beyond specialist pulmonary centres has arisen. In this paper, we propose a method to select and optimise a classifier using supervised learning techniques by learning from previously classified forced spirometry tests from a group of experts. Such a method is able to take into account the shape of the curve as an expert would during visual inspection. We evaluated the final classifier on a dataset put aside for evaluation yielding an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.88 and specificities of 0.91 and 0.86 for sensitivities of 0.60 and 0.82. Furthermore, other specificities and sensitivities along the receiver operating characteristic curve were close to the level of the experts when compared against each-other, and better than an earlier rules-based method assessed on the same dataset. We foresee key benefits in raising diagnostic quality, saving time, reducing cost, and also improving remote care and monitoring services for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in the future if a clinical decision support system with the encapsulated classifier is to be integrated into the work-flow of forced spirometry testing.

  16. Analysis of spirometry results in hospitalized patients aged over 65 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wróblewska I

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Izabela Wróblewska,1 Piotr Oleśniewicz,2 Donata Kurpas,3 Mariusz Sołtysik,2 Jerzy Błaszczuk41Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, 2Institute of Tourism and Recreation, University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw, 3Department of Family Medicine, 4Faculty of Postgraduate Medical Training, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, PolandIntroduction and objective: The growing population of the elderly, as well as the occurrence of coexisting diseases and polypharmacy, is the reason why diseases of patients aged ≥65 years belong to the major issues of the contemporary medicine. Among the most frequent diseases of the elderly, there are respiratory system diseases. They are difficult to diagnose because of the patient group specificity, which is the reason for increased mortality among seniors, caused by underdiagnosis. The study objective was to assess the factors influencing spirometry results in hospitalized patients aged ≥65 years with respiratory system disorders.Material and methods: In the research, 217 (100% patients aged ≥65 years who underwent spirometry at the Regional Medical Center of the Jelenia Góra Valley Hospital in Poland were analyzed. In the statistical analysis, the STATISTICA 9.1 program, the t-test, the Shapiro–Wilk test, the ANOVA test, and the Scheffé’s test were applied.Results: The majority of the patients (59.4% were treated in the hospital. The most frequent diagnosis was malignant neoplasm (18%. The study showed a statistically significant dependence between the forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, and FEV1/FVC parameters and the time of hospitalization, as well as between the FVC and FEV1 parameters and the age of patients. The FVC parameter values turned out to be dependent on the main diagnosis. Highest results were noted in patients with the diagnosis of sleep apnea or benign neoplasm. A low FVC index can reflect restrictive

  17. CT-derived Biomechanical Metrics Improve Agreement Between Spirometry and Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Surya P; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Newell, John D; Hoffman, Eric A; Sieren, Jessica C; Han, Meilan K; Dransfield, Mark T; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2016-10-01

    Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have marked discordance between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and degree of emphysema on computed tomography (CT). Biomechanical differences between these patients have not been studied. We aimed to identify reasons for the discordance between CT and spirometry in some patients with COPD. Subjects with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I-IV from a large multicenter study (The Genetic Epidemiology of COPD) were arranged by percentiles of %predicted FEV1 and emphysema on CT. Three categories were created using differences in percentiles: Catspir with predominant airflow obstruction/minimal emphysema, CatCT with predominant emphysema/minimal airflow obstruction, and Catmatched with matched FEV1 and emphysema. Image registration was used to derive Jacobian determinants, a measure of lung elasticity, anisotropy, and strain tensors, to assess biomechanical differences between groups. Regression models were created with the previously mentioned categories as outcome variable, adjusting for demographics, scanner type, quantitative CT-derived emphysema, gas trapping, and airway thickness (model 1), and after adding biomechanical CT metrics (model 2). Jacobian determinants, anisotropy, and strain tensors were strongly associated with FEV1. With Catmatched as control, model 2 predicted Catspir and CatCT better than model 1 (Akaike information criterion 255.8 vs. 320.8). In addition to demographics, the strongest independent predictors of FEV1 were Jacobian mean (β = 1.60,95%confidence intervals [CI] = 1.16 to 1.98; P spirometry, offering the potential for new insights into the linkage between regional parenchymal destruction and global decrement in lung function in patients with COPD. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ventilation with high versus low peep levels during general anaesthesia for open abdominal surgery does not affect postoperative spirometry: A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treschan, Tanja A; Schaefer, Maximilian; Kemper, Johann; Bastin, Bea; Kienbaum, Peter; Pannen, Benedikt; Hemmes, Sabrine N; de Abreu, Marcelo G; Pelosi, Paolo; Schultz, Marcus J

    2017-08-01

    Invasive mechanical ventilation during general anaesthesia for surgery typically causes atelectasis and impairs postoperative lung function. We investigated the effect of intraoperative ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment manoeuvres (RMs) on postoperative spirometry. This was a preplanned, single-centre substudy of an international multicentre randomised controlled trial, the PROVHILO trial. University hospital from November 2011 to January 2013. Nonobese patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery at a high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). Intraoperative low tidal volume ventilation with PEEP levels of 12 cmH2O and RM (the high PEEP group) or with PEEP levels of 2 cmH2O or less without RM (the low PEEP group). Time-weighted averages (TWAs) of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) up to postoperative day five. Thirty-one patients were allocated to the high PEEP group and 32 to the low PEEP group. No postoperative spirometry test results were available for 6 patients. In both groups, TWA of FEV1 and FVC until postoperative day five were lower than preoperative values. Postoperative spirometry test results were not different between the high and low PEEP group; Data are median [interquartile range], TWA FVC 1.8 [1.6 to 2.4] versus 1.7 [1.2 to 2.4] l (P = NS) and TWA FEV1 1.2 [1.1 to 2.5] versus 1.2 [0.9 to 1.9] l (P = NS). Patients who developed PPCs had lower FEV1 and FVC on postoperative day five; 1.1 [0.9 to 1.6] versus 1.6 [1.4 to 1.9] l (P = 0.001) and 1.6 [1.2 to 2.6] versus 2.3 [1.7 to 2.6] l (P = 0.036), respectively. Postoperative spirometry is not affected by PEEP and RM during intraoperative ventilation for open abdominal surgery in nonobese patients at a high risk of PPCs, but rather is associated with the development of PPCs. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01441791.

  19. Maximum static inspiratory and expiratory pressures with different lung volumes

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    Johnson Monique M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maximum pressures developed by the respiratory muscles can indicate the health of the respiratory system, help to determine maximum respiratory flow rates, and contribute to respiratory power development. Past measurements of maximum pressures have been found to be inadequate for inclusion in some exercise models involving respiration. Methods Maximum inspiratory and expiratory airway pressures were measured over a range of lung volumes in 29 female and 19 male adults. A commercial bell spirometry system was programmed to occlude airflow at nine target lung volumes ranging from 10% to 90% of vital capacity. Results In women, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 39 to 61 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 66 to 28 cmH2O. In men, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 63 to 97 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 97 to 39 cmH2O. Equations describing pressures for both sexes are: Pe/Pmax = 0.1426 Ln( %VC + 0.3402 R2 = 0.95 Pi/Pmax = 0.234 Ln(100 - %VC - 0.0828 R2 = 0.96 Conclusion These results were found to be consistent with values and trends obtained by other authors. Regression equations may be suitable for respiratory mechanics models.

  20. Abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia restores expiratory lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Backer, Vibeke; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2017-01-01

    (horizontal fascial defect width >10 cm) were compared with 18 patients with an intact abdominal wall who underwent colorectal resection. Patients were examined pre- and 1-year postoperatively. Examined measures included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in first second, peak expiratory flow...

  1. Influence of the diving wetsuit on standard spirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Nico A. M.; Sterk, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A well-fitting wetsuit exerts a pressure on the body that may influence spirometry. This pressure is expected to reduce the forced vital capacity (FVC) due to hampered inspiration. Since the shape of the spirometric flow curve should not be changed by the pressure effects of the

  2. Spirometry improvement after muscular exercise in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro; Rizzato, Alex; Fava, Simone; Olivato, Nicola; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M; Bosco, Gerardo

    2017-12-01

    An increased sympathetic activity during muscular effort is a well established physiological response, whose intensity is known to increase with the muscular load. Spirometry was described to improve as an effect of swimming training in healthy and asthmatic subjects, suggesting a decrease in airway resistance The aim was to investigate the possible effect of muscular exercise (swimming) on spirometry, in particular searching for possible differences because of different swimming times. The measurements were performed on 9 highly trained male competitive swimmers (age: 41±12.79 years, height: 1.69±0.06 meters, weight: 66.14±14.28 kg, BMI: 22.8±3.61 kg/m2) during an official competition. The data were collected at the border of the swimming-pool before (control, C) and few minutes after the swimming sessions (exercise, E), which consisted either of 800 meter (7 subjects) or 1500 meter (5 subjects) free style. A general trend indicating a postexercise increase in spirometry was observed. We found post-exercise significant increments in FEV1 and in MEF75 for both the 800 and 1500 meter swimming sessions, and in FEF25-75 and in MEF25 for the shorter distance. We conclude that, as it may be expected, muscular exercise induces an improvement of spirometry both because of a smooth muscle relaxation-induced modulation of airway diameter and resistance to airflow, and because of an enhanced expiratory muscle contraction strength. Both of these mechanisms are related to an increased sympathetic activity which is well known to accompany muscular exercise.

  3. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and forced expiratory volumes in sedentary and trained children. [Absorciometria dual de rayos x y volúmenes espirométricos forzados en niños sedentarios y entrenados].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Fernández-Luna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Information regarding the influence of physical activity and fat mass in the human trunk on respiratory health is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of body composition and physical activity in forced expiratory volumes in children. The sample comprised 87 children between 8 and 13 years of age (9.62 ± 1.25, at Tanner stages I-III, participated in this study. Sixty played sports (trained children, TC and 27 were assigned to the sedentary children control group (SC. Body composition (DXA, anthropometric variables (weight and height, and forced expiratory volumes (FEV1 and FVC were determined in all subjects. Results showed that higher FEV1 and FVC values were found in the SC group compared to the TC group. Multiple regression analysis showed that physical activity, total fat mass, and android fat mass, had the highest predictive value for FVE1 as did height for the FVC. In SC group there was a positive association between FEV1/FVC ratio and Body Mass Index and trunk fat mass. We did not find any associations between forced respiratory volumes and the whole body and trunk region fat mass in trained and sedentary children. Resumen La información sobre los diferentes efectos de la actividad física y la masa grasa del tronco en la salud respiratoria es escasa. El objetivo fue evaluar la influencia de las variables de composición corporal y la práctica de actividad física en los volúmenes espirométricos forzados en edad infantil. 87 niños entre los 8 y 13 años (9,62 ± 1,25 (Tanner I-III participaron en el estudio. 60 practicaban diferentes deportes (niños entrenados, TC y 27 niños sedentarios fueron asignados al grupo control (SC. Se llevó a cabo la evaluación en todos los participantes de la composición corporal a través de DEXA, variables antropométricas (peso y altura y volúmenes espirométricos forzados (FEV1 and FVC. Los resultados mostraron que el grupo SC tenía unos volúmenes FEV1 y FVC superiores

  4. Telemedical Education: Teaching Spirometry on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Esther H.; Gross, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and evaluation of an Internet-based tutorial for teaching spirometry interpretation to nonpulmonologists. Concludes that computer-based tutorials can effectively train off-site practitioners in spirometry interpretation. Contains 23 references. (Author/WRM)

  5. Relationship of serum levels of interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and C-reactive protein with forced expiratory volume in first second in patients with mustard lung and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, Alireza; Panahi, Yunes; Shirali, Saeed; Rahmani, Hossein

    2017-06-01

    The chronic systemic inflammation is a result of releasing inflammatory cytokines from the cells relating to the body immunity system and chronic activation of the innate immunity system. To evaluate the relationship among serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), C-reactive protein (CRP) with forced expiratory volume in 1 st s (FEV 1 ) in patients with mustard lung (ML) and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). A published literature search was performed through SID, web of science, ISI, Science Direct, Scopus, Medline, and PubMed databases for articles published in English. The correlation coefficient ( r ) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using random or fixed effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using χ 2 and I 2 statistics. In total, 4 published studies were included in the final analysis. Using the random-effect model, meta-analysis showed that the r was -0.052 (95% CI: -0.14-0.049, p = 0.28) at serum level of IL-8, serum levels of CRP and FEV 1 in these results were r = -0.13, p = 0.012, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and FEV 1 levels were r = -0.39, p = 0.03 in the conducted studies on mustard lung patients. The IL-6 serum level was explored in COPD patients. The results of the given studies in these patients are r = -0.006, 95% CI: -0.37-0.15, and p = 0.44. In this meta-analysis, there was evidence that serum levels of CRP and TNF have been significantly increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases compared to the healthy control group, which signifies the presence of systemic inflammation in ML and COPD patients.

  6. Espirometria de incentivo com pressão positiva expiratória é benéfica após revascularização miocardio Espirometría incentivada con presión positiva espiratoria es beneficiosa después de revascularización de miocardio Incentive spirometry with expiratory positive airway pressure brings benefits after myocardial revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glória Menz Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    protocolo de EI+EPAP se realizó en el período postoperatorio inmediato y durante 4 semanas más en domicilio. Dieciocho meses después de la CRM se evaluaron la fuerza de la musculatura respiratoria, la capacidad funcional, la función pulmonar, la calidad de vida y el nivel de actividad física. RESULTADOS: Después del test de caminata de seis minutos (TC6, el score para disnea (1,6 ± 0,6 vs 0,6 ± 0,3, P BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery have higher risk to develop pulmonary complications (PCs such as atelectasis, pneumonia and pleural effusion. These complications could increase the length of hospital stay, resources utilization and also are associated with reduced quality of life and functional capacity a long term. OBJECTIVE: To test if the use of incentive spirometry (IS associated with expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP, after CABG surgery improves dyspnea, effort perceived and quality of life 18 months after CABG. METHODS: Sixteen patients submitted to a CABG, were randomized to a control group (n=8 or IS+EPAP group (n=8. The protocol of IS+EPAP was applied in the immediate postoperative period and following for more 4 weeks in the patient's home. Eighteen months after CABG, the strength of the respiratory muscle, the functional capacity, the lung function, the quality of life and the level of physical activity were evaluated. RESULTS: After six minute walk test (6-MWT, the score of the dyspnea (1.6±0.6 vs 0.6±0.3, P<0.05 and the perceived effort (13.4±1.2 vs 9.1±0.7, P<0.05 were higher in the control group, when compared with the IS+EPAP group. In quality of life evaluation, the domain related to the physical aspects limitations was better in IS+EPAP group (93.7±4.1 vs 50±17, P<0.02. CONCLUSION: Patients that were submitted to IS+EPAP present reduction of dyspnea and lower effort sensation after the 6-MWT, and also a better quality of life 18 months after CABG.

  7. Quantitative computed tomography analysis of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis using automated software: correlation with spirometry in the evaluation of severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Cruvinel, Danilo Lemos; Menezes, Marcelo Bezerra de; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Vianna, Elcio de Oliveira; Elias Junior, Jorge; Martinez, Jose Antonio Baddini

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform a quantitative analysis of the airways using automated software, in computed tomography images of patients with cystic fibrosis, correlating the results with spirometric findings. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients with cystic fibrosis were studied-20 males and 14 females; mean age 18 ± 9 years - divided into two groups according to the spirometry findings: group I (n = 21), without severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1] > 50% predicted), and group II (n = 13), with severe obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 50% predicted). The following tracheobronchial tree parameters were obtained automatically: bronchial diameter, area, thickness, and wall attenuation. Results: On average, 52 bronchi per patient were studied. The number of bronchi analyzed was higher in group II. The correlation with spirometry findings, especially between the relative wall thickness of third to eighth bronchial generation and predicted FEV1, was better in group I. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the airways by computed tomography can be useful for assessing disease severity in cystic fibrosis patients. In patients with severe airflow obstruction, the number of bronchi studied by the method is higher, indicating more bronchiectasis. In patients without severe obstruction, the relative bronchial wall thickness showed a good correlation with the predicted FEV1. (author)

  8. Quantitative computed tomography analysis of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis using automated software: correlation with spirometry in the evaluation of severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Cruvinel, Danilo Lemos; Menezes, Marcelo Bezerra de; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Vianna, Elcio de Oliveira; Elias Junior, Jorge; Martinez, Jose Antonio Baddini, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To perform a quantitative analysis of the airways using automated software, in computed tomography images of patients with cystic fibrosis, correlating the results with spirometric findings. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients with cystic fibrosis were studied-20 males and 14 females; mean age 18 ± 9 years - divided into two groups according to the spirometry findings: group I (n = 21), without severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1] > 50% predicted), and group II (n = 13), with severe obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 50% predicted). The following tracheobronchial tree parameters were obtained automatically: bronchial diameter, area, thickness, and wall attenuation. Results: On average, 52 bronchi per patient were studied. The number of bronchi analyzed was higher in group II. The correlation with spirometry findings, especially between the relative wall thickness of third to eighth bronchial generation and predicted FEV1, was better in group I. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the airways by computed tomography can be useful for assessing disease severity in cystic fibrosis patients. In patients with severe airflow obstruction, the number of bronchi studied by the method is higher, indicating more bronchiectasis. In patients without severe obstruction, the relative bronchial wall thickness showed a good correlation with the predicted FEV1. (author)

  9. Oscillometry complements spirometry in evaluation of subjects following toxic inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth I. Berger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Trade Center (WTC destruction released dust and fumes into the environment. Although many community members developed respiratory symptoms, screening spirometry was usually normal. We hypothesised that forced oscillation testing would identify functional abnormalities undetected by spirometry and that symptom severity would relate to magnitude of abnormalities measured by oscillometry. A symptomatic cohort (n=848 from the Bellevue Hospital WTC Environmental Health Center was evaluated and compared to an asymptomatic cohort (n=475 from the New York City Department of Health WTC Health Registry. Spirometry and oscillometry were performed. Oscillometry measurements included resistance (R5 and frequency dependence of resistance (R5−20. Spirometry was normal for the majority of subjects (73.2% symptomatic versus 87.6% asymptomatic, p<0.0001. In subjects with normal spirometry, R5 and R5−20 were higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects (median (interquartile range R5 0.436 (0.206 versus 0.314 (0.129 kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.001; R5−20 0.075 (0.085 versus 0.004 (0.042 kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.0001. In symptomatic subjects, R5 and R5−20 increased with increasing severity and frequency of wheeze (p<0.05. Measurement of R5–20 correlated with the presence and severity of symptoms even when spirometry was within normal limits. These findings are in accord with small airway abnormalities as a potential explanation of the respiratory symptoms.

  10. Oscillometry complements spirometry in evaluation of subjects following toxic inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kenneth I.; Turetz, Meredith; Liu, Mengling; Shao, Yongzhao; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee; Friedman, Stephen M.; Maslow, Carey B.; Marmor, Michael; Goldring, Roberta M.

    2015-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) destruction released dust and fumes into the environment. Although many community members developed respiratory symptoms, screening spirometry was usually normal. We hypothesised that forced oscillation testing would identify functional abnormalities undetected by spirometry and that symptom severity would relate to magnitude of abnormalities measured by oscillometry. A symptomatic cohort (n=848) from the Bellevue Hospital WTC Environmental Health Center was evaluated and compared to an asymptomatic cohort (n=475) from the New York City Department of Health WTC Health Registry. Spirometry and oscillometry were performed. Oscillometry measurements included resistance (R5) and frequency dependence of resistance (R5−20). Spirometry was normal for the majority of subjects (73.2% symptomatic versus 87.6% asymptomatic, p<0.0001). In subjects with normal spirometry, R5 and R5−20 were higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects (median (interquartile range) R5 0.436 (0.206) versus 0.314 (0.129) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.001; R5−20 0.075 (0.085) versus 0.004 (0.042) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.0001). In symptomatic subjects, R5 and R5−20 increased with increasing severity and frequency of wheeze (p<0.05). Measurement of R5–20 correlated with the presence and severity of symptoms even when spirometry was within normal limits. These findings are in accord with small airway abnormalities as a potential explanation of the respiratory symptoms. PMID:27730155

  11. Spirometry for detection of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals-Borrajo, Gema; Martínez-Andión, Blanca; Cigüenza-Fuster, María Luisa; Esteva, Magdalena; San Martín, María Angeles Llorente; Roman, Miguel; Góngora, Miguel

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the utility of family physicians' office spirometry, to detect previously undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in individuals who smoke. Furthermore, agreement between doctors with more or less experience in performing spirometry was assessed. Cross-sectional study. Smokers aged 40-69 years who attended a family practice centre were invited to participate. Variables considered were tobacco pack-years, time of tobacco use, smoking cessation, COPD symptoms, Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale values, pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry data, and acceptability of spirometry curves. 212 subjects underwent spirometry, and 179 yielded acceptable spirometry curves. Of these, 173 subjects underwent reversibility testing, of whom 39 (22.5%, 95% CI: 16.2-29.1%) were diagnosed as COPD. Of these, 48.7% were classified as COPD Stage I and 41.0% as Stage II following GOLD criteria. Age, gender, pack-years and cough were related to airflow obstruction levels. Symptom number was not related to presence of airflow obstruction. More than 80% of spirometry curves were acceptable. Agreement on curve acceptability between junior doctors and a family physician trainer was very good, but moderate between junior doctors and a pulmonologist. Forced spirometry data from smokers attending general practice doctors can be used to identify a significant number of previously undiagnosed COPD cases.

  12. Methods for Assessing Expiratory Flow Limitation during Tidal Breathing in COPD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolaos G. Koulouris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe COPD often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quite breathing as during forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as indicating expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFLT. Therefore, EFLT, namely, attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFLT leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFLT occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in GOLD III and IV stage in whom the latter symptoms are common. The existing up-to-date physiological methods for assessing expiratory flow limitation (EFLT are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure (NEP has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, non invasive, most practical, and accurate new technique.

  13. Association between spirometry controlled chest CT scores using computer-animated biofeedback and clinical markers of lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Thomas; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) of the lungs is the gold standard for assessing the extent of structural changes in the lungs. Spirometry-controlled chest CT (SCCCT) has improved the usefulness of CT by standardising inspiratory and expiratory lung volumes during imaging. This was a single...

  14. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Koulouris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD often exhale along the same flow–volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFLT. Therefore, EFLT, namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFLT leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFLT occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage, in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFLT are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  15. Spirometry-Assisted High Resolution Chest Computed Tomography in Children: Is it Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otjen, Jeffrey Parke; Swanson, Jonathan Ogden; Oron, Assaf; DiBlasi, Robert M; Swortzel, Tim; van Well, Jade Adriana Marie; Gommers, Eva Anna Elisabeth; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    Image quality of high resolution chest computed tomographies (HRCTs) depends on adequate breath holds at end inspiration and end expiration. We hypothesized that implementation of spirometry-assisted breath holds in children undergoing HRCTs would improve image quality over that obtained with voluntary breath holds by decreasing motion artifact and atelectasis. This is a retrospective case-control study of HRCTs obtained at a tertiary care children's hospital before and after implementation of a spirometry-assisted CT protocol, in which children ≥8 years of age are first trained in supine slow vital capacity maneuvers and then repeat the maneuvers in the CT scanner, coached by a respiratory therapist. Spirometry-assisted CT scans (cases) were matched by age, gender and diagnosis (cystic fibrosis vs other) to CT scans obtained with voluntary breath holds in the 6 years before implementation of the spirometry assistance protocol (controls), and evaluated by 2 blinded pediatric radiologists. Among both cases and controls (N = 50 each), 10 carried the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and 40 had other diagnoses. Mean age was 12.9 years (range: 7.5-20.1) among cases and 13.0 (7.1-19.7) among controls. Mean (SD) inspiratory image density among cases was -852 (37) Hounsfield units (HU) and -828 (43) among controls (p = 0.006). Mean (SD) expiratory image density was -629 (95) HU among cases and -688 (83) HU among controls (p = 0.002). Mean (SD) change in image density between inspiratory and expiratory images was +222 (85) HU among cases and +140 (76) HU among controls (p 0.80). Atelectasis was present on inspiratory images in 8 cases and 9 controls and on expiratory images in 9 cases and 10 controls (p > 0.80). Spirometry-assisted CTs had a significantly greater difference in lung density between inspiratory and expiratory scans than those performed with voluntary breath holds, likely improving the ability to detect air trapping. No appreciable difference in image quality

  16. Age- and size-related reference ranges: a case study of spirometry through childhood and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, T J; Stanojevic, S; Stocks, J; Coates, A L; Hankinson, J L; Wade, A M

    2009-02-28

    Age-related reference ranges are useful for assessing growth in children. The LMS method is a popular technique for constructing growth charts that model the age-changing distribution of the measurement in terms of the median, coefficient of variation and skewness. Here the methodology is extended to references that depend on body size as well as age, by exploiting the flexibility of the generalised additive models for location, scale and shape (GAMLSS) technique. GAMLSS offers general linear predictors for each moment parameter and a choice of error distributions, which can handle kurtosis as well as skewness. A key question with such references is the nature of the age-size adjustment, additive or multiplicative, which is explored by comparing the identity link and log link for the median predictor.There are several measurements whose reference ranges depend on both body size and age. As an example, models are developed here for the first four moments of the lung function variables forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV(1)/FVC in terms of height and age, in a data set of 3598 children and adults aged 4 to 80 years. The results show a strong multiplicative association between spirometry, height and age, with a large and nonlinear age effect across the age range. Variability also depends nonlinearly on age and to a lesser extent on height. FEV(1) and FVC are close to normally distributed, while FEV(1)/FVC is appreciably skew to the left. GAMLSS is a powerful technique for the construction of such references, which should be useful in clinical medicine. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Global Lung Function Initiative 2012 reference equations for spirometry in the Norwegian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhammer, Arnulf; Johannessen, Ane; Holmen, Turid L; Melbye, Hasse; Stanojevic, Sanja; Lund, May B; Melsom, Morten N; Bakke, Per; Quanjer, Philip H

    2016-12-01

    We studied the fit of the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) all-age reference values to Norwegians, compared them with currently used references (European Community for Steel and Coal (ECSC) and Zapletal) and estimated the prevalence of obstructive lung disease.Spirometry data collected in 30 239 subjects (51.7% females) aged 12-90 years in three population-based studies were converted to z-scores.We studied healthy non-smokers comprising 2438 adults (57.4% females) aged 20-90 years and 8725 (47.7% female) adolescents aged 12-19 years. The GLI-2012 prediction equations fitted the Norwegian data satisfactorily. Median±sd z-scores were respectively 0.02±1.03, 0.01±1.04 and -0.04±0.91 for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV 1 /FVC in males, and -0.01±1.02, 0.07±0.97 and -0.21±0.82 in females. The ECSC and Zapletal references significantly underestimated FEV 1 and FVC. Stricter criteria of obstruction (FEV 1 /FVC GLI-2012 LLN. Corresponding comparison regarding myocardial infarction showed a four-fold higher risk for women.The GLI-2012 reference values fit the Norwegian data satisfactorily and are recommended for use in Norway. Correspondingly, the FEV 1 /FVC GLI-2012 LLN identifies higher risk of obstructive characteristics than FEV 1 /FVC <0.7. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  18. [Spirometry in the GP-Office].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Leander; Stolz, Daiana

    2016-02-17

    Spirometry is an important diagnostic tool, which, with correct implementation, detects possible obstructive or restrictive lung diseases. However, it is important to note that only part of the lung function is measured by spirometry. For instance, total lung volume and residual volume, both useful in detecting pulmonary emphysema, are not measured. Therefore, in case of pathological spirometry or suspected restrictive lung disease, further tests such as body plethysmography with diffusion measurement should be carried out.

  19. The standard of spirometry in the RSA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-06

    Apr 6, 1991 ... Standards for high-quality lung function testing have not yet been formally adopted in the RSA, despite the increase in the performance of spirometry. A study was undertaken to deter- mine the standard of spirometry in clinical practice in this country. Forty-five spirometer users agreed to participate.

  20. Five tips for good office spirometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirometry is critical for the correct diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is part of the severity classification. It ultimately guides treatment choices. When per forming spirometry on a COPD patient, one expects a flow volume loop to have some degree of obstruction. To obtain and confirm this result ...

  1. Telemedicine spirometry training and quality assurance program in primary care centers of a public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina Malanda, Nuria; López de Santa María, Elena; Gutiérrez, Asunción; Bayón, Juan Carlos; Garcia, Larraitz; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2014-04-01

    Forced spirometry is essential for diagnosing respiratory diseases and is widely used across levels of care. However, several studies have shown that spirometry quality in primary care is not ideal, with risks of misdiagnosis. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and performance of a telemedicine-based training and quality assurance program for forced spirometry in primary care. The two phases included (1) a 9-month pilot study involving 15 centers, in which spirometry tests were assessed by the Basque Office for Health Technology Assessment, and (2) the introduction of the program to all centers in the Public Basque Health Service. Technicians first received 4 h of training, and, subsequently, they sent all tests to the reference laboratory using the program. Quality assessment was performed in accordance with clinical guidelines (A and B, good; C-F, poor). In the first phase, 1,894 spirometry tests were assessed, showing an improvement in quality: acceptable quality tests increased from 57% at the beginning to 78% after 6 months and 83% after 9 months (pspirometry tests were assessed after the inclusion of 36 additional centers, maintaining the positive trend (61%, 87%, and 84% at the same time points; pspirometry tests improved in all centers. (2) The program provides a tool for transferring data that allows monitoring of its quality and training of technicians who perform the tests. (3) This approach is useful for improving spirometry quality in the routine practice of a public health system.

  2. The Tiotropium Safety and Performance in Respimat® (TIOSPIR®) Trial: Spirometry Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzueto, Antonio; Wise, Robert; Calverley, Peter; Dusser, Daniel; Tang, Wenbo; Metzdorf, Norbert; Dahl, Ronald

    2015-09-15

    Tiotropium Safety and Performance in Respimat® (TIOSPIR®) compared the safety and efficacy of tiotropium Respimat® and tiotropium HandiHaler® in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A prespecified spirometry substudy compared the lung function efficacy between treatment groups. TIOSPIR® was a large-scale, long-term (2.3-year), event-driven, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial of 17,135 patients with COPD. In the spirometry substudy, trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured at baseline and every 24 weeks for the duration of the trial. The substudy included 1370 patients who received once-daily tiotropium Respimat® 5 μg (n = 461), 2.5 μg (n = 464), or tiotropium HandiHaler® 18 μg (n = 445). Adjusted mean trough FEV1 (average 24-120 weeks) was 1.285, 1.258, and 1.295 L in the Respimat® 5 μg, 2.5 μg, and HandiHaler® 18 μg groups (difference versus HandiHaler® [95 % CI]: -10 [-38, 18] mL for Respimat® 5 μg and, -37 [-65, -9] mL for Respimat® 2.5 μg); achieving noninferiority to tiotropium HandiHaler® 18 μg for tiotropium Respimat® 5 but not for 2.5 μg (prespecified analysis). Adjusted mean trough FVC was 2.590, 2.544, and 2.593 L in the Respimat® 5 μg, 2.5 μg, and HandiHaler® 18 μg groups. The rates of FEV1 decline over 24 to 120 weeks were similar for the three treatment arms (26, 40, and 34 mL/year for the tiotropium Respimat® 5-μg, 2.5-μg, and HandiHaler® 18-μg groups). The rate of FEV1 decline in GOLD I + II patients was greater than in GOLD III + IV patients (46 vs. 23 mL/year); as well as in current versus ex-smokers, in patients receiving combination therapies at baseline versus not, and in those experiencing an exacerbation during the study versus not. The TIOSPIR® spirometry substudy showed that tiotropium Respimat® 5 μg was noninferior to tiotropium HandiHaler® 18 μg for trough FEV1, but Respimat® 2.5 μg was not

  3. O volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo não é suficiente para avaliar resposta broncodilatadora em doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica Measuring forced expiratory volume in one second alone is not an accurate method of assessing response to bronchodilators in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felícia de Moraes Branco Tavares

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a freqüência de variação no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo após o uso de broncodilatador, em uma amostra de pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica. Correlacioná-la com dados clínicos e demográficos e avaliar a freqüência de resposta na capacidade vital forçada, capacidade vital lenta, capacidade inspiratória, volume residual, resistência das vias áreas e condutância das vias aéreas. MÉTODOS: Sessenta e quatro pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica foram submetidos a pletismografia de corpo inteiro e foi medida a reversibilidade da broncoconstrição após o uso de 400 µg de fenoterol. RESULTADOS: Tiveram resposta no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo 31% dos pacientes. Excluindo-se os pacientes com resposta no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo, 5% tiveram resposta em 5 dos demais parâmetros, 10% responderam em 4 parâmetros, 17,5% em 3, 27,5% em 2 e 25% em apenas 1 parâmetro. CONCLUSÃO: Os volumes pulmonares estáticos, a resistência e a condutância das vias aéreas, quando incluídos na avaliação da resposta ao broncodilatador juntamente com o volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo, permitem avaliar com maior amplitude o número de pacientes com resposta funcional à prova farmacodinâmica. Os resultados estão de acordo com a observação de que muitos pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, mesmo sem melhora no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo após o uso de broncodilatador, apresentam melhora clínica e alívio da dispnéia.OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of variation in forced expiratory volume in one second after bronchodilator use in a sample of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, correlating such variation with clinical and demographic variables and evaluating the frequency of response presented in forced vital capacity, slow vital capacity, inspiratory capacity

  4. [Spirometry - basic examination of the lung function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociánová, Jana

    Spirometry is one of the basic internal examination methods, similarly as e.g. blood pressure measurement or ECG recording. It is used to detect or assess the extent of ventilatory disorders. Indications include respiratory symptoms or laboratory anomalies, smoking, inhalation risks and more. Its performance and evaluation should be among the basic skills of pulmonologists, internists, alergologists, pediatricians and sports physicians. The results essentially influence the correct diagnosing and treatment method. Therefore spirometry must be performed under standardized conditions and accurately and clearly assessed to enable answering clinical questions.Key words: acceptability - calibration - contraindication - evaluation - indication - parameters - spirometry - standardization.

  5. INCIDENCE OF SUB - CLINICAL AIRFLOW OBSTRUCTION IN APPARENTLY HEALTHY MEDICAL PERSONNEL; DIAGNOSIS AND COMPARISION BY SPIROMETRY AND PEAK FLOW METRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subba Rao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM & OBJE CTIVES OF THE STUDY: To diagnose sub - clinical airflow obstruction in apparently healthy medical personnel, and to compare Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR by using Spirometry and by Wright’s peak flow meter. METHODOLOGY: About 80 apparently healthy medical students including Post Graduates, internees and medical technicians were taken in to the study, all of them had no past history of Bronchial Asthma or any allergies. Spirometry was performed by Spirowin version 0.2 and simultaneously peak expiratory flow rate by Wright’s peak flow meter was done and FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PEFR were recorded. RESULTS: About 13 subjects (16.25% showed moderate obstruction (FEV1 about 70%, and at that point a family history of atopies and allergies could be elicited in most of them. PEFR showed a variation - 3.42 to 2.76 ltrs/sec ( - 205.74 to 165.62 ltrs/min between Spirometry and Wright’s peak flow meter. INTERPRETATION AND C ONCLUSION : In spite of being medical personnel and having a family history of Bronchial Asthma and other atopies none of the 13 (16.25% subjects with sub clinical obstruction had ever approached us for a pulmonary function test. This shows that Spirometry has to be popularized in medical personnel as well as in lay men as a means to diagnose Bronchial Asthma and COPD. Also there is difference in PEFR measured by Spirometry and Wright’s peak flow metry though the difference is not significant with a p=0.5398 .

  6. STUDY OF SPIROMETRY FINDING IN SNORERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Dhawal Shah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Spirometry is indicated to detect whether a pulmonary dysfunction is present or not, to rate the severity of a known pulmonary disease, to follow up the pulmonary function. Snoring is the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound. Snoring during sleep may be the first sign of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. Common signs of OSA include unexplained daytime sleepiness, restless sleep, and loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps. With this high prevalence of OSA and the rising worldwide increase in morbidity and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, more research required comparing nocturnal respiratory disturbances with attention directed on the effect of body composition, severity of OSA and severity of airway obstruction. MATERIAL & METHODS A cross-sectional observational study was carried out in snorers at Department of Respiratory Medicine. All patients underwent spirometry and PSG. RESULTS There was no significant correlation between severity of snoring and any spirometry parameter. CONCLUSION In our study, there was no correlation between snoring and spirometry nor between spirometry and AHI. It may be because of less number of subjects in our study, so study with large numbers of subjects are required to bring out the correlation. KEYWORDS Spirometry, Snoring, Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

  7. Differences in regional air trapping in current smokers with normal spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Reza; Tornling, Göran; Forsslund, Helena; Mikko, Mikael; Wheelock, Åsa M; Nyrén, Sven; Sköld, C Magnus

    2017-01-01

    We investigated regional air trapping on computed tomography in current smokers with normal spirometry. It was hypothesised that presence of regional air trapping may indicate a specific manifestation of smoking-related changes.40 current smokers, 40 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 40 healthy never- smokers underwent computed tomography scans. Regional air trapping was assessed on end-expiratory scans and emphysema, micronodules and bronchial wall thickening on inspiratory scans. The ratio of expiratory and inspiratory mean lung attenuation (E/I) was calculated as a measure of static (fixed) air trapping.Regional air trapping was present in 63% of current smokers, in 45% of never smokers and in 8% of COPD patients (psmokers with and without regional air trapping had E/I ratio of 0.81 and 0.91, respectively (psmokers with regional air trapping.Current smokers with regional air trapping had higher FEV 1 and less emphysema on computed tomography. In contrast, current smokers without regional air trapping resembled COPD. Our results highlight heterogeneity among smokers with normal spirometry and may contribute to early detection of smoking related structural changes in the lungs. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  8. Feasibility of spirometry testing in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschmidt, Jordan C; Brooks, Edward G; Cherry, Debra C; Guajardo, Jesus R; Wood, Pamela R

    2016-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of obtaining acceptable and reproducible spirometry data in preschool aged children (3-5 years) by technicians without prior experience with spirometry. Two technicians were trained to perform spirometry testing (ndd Easy on-PC) and to administer standardized questionnaires. Preschool aged children were enrolled from two Head Start centers and a local primary care clinic. Subjects were trained in proper spirometry technique and tested until at least two acceptable efforts were obtained or the subject no longer produced acceptable efforts. 200 subjects were enrolled: mean age 4.0 years (± 0.7 SD); age distribution: 51 (25.5%) 3 years old, 103 (51.5%) 4 years old, and 46 (23%) 5 years old. Fifty-six percent male and 75% Hispanic. One hundred thirty (65%) subjects produced at least one acceptable effort on their first visit: 23 (45%) for 3 years old, 67 (65%) for 4 years old, and 40 (87%) for 5 years old. The number of acceptable efforts correlated with age (r = 0.29, P spirometry results from the preschool aged children; the number of acceptable efforts correlated significantly with age. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The European Respiratory Society spirometry tent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maio, Sara; Sherrill, Duane L; MacNee, William

    2012-01-01

    In order to raise public awareness of the importance of early detection of airway obstruction and to enable many people who had not been tested previously to have their lung function measured, the European Lung Foundation and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) organised a spirometry testing...... tent during the annual ERS Congresses in 2004-2009. Spirometry was performed during the ERS Congresses in volunteers; all participants answered a simple, brief questionnaire on their descriptive characteristics, smoking and asthma. Portable spirometers were freely provided by the manufacturer. Nurses......,395 (83.5%) performed acceptable spirometry (mean age 51.0 ± 18.4 yrs; 25.5% smokers; 5.5% asthmatic). Airway obstruction was present in 12.4% of investigated subjects according to LLN criteria and 20.3% according to GOLD criteria. Through multinomial logistic regression analysis, age, smoking habits...

  10. Virtual respiratory system for interactive e-learning of spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tomalak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in computer simulation technology offers new possibilities for modern medicine. On one hand – virtual organs can help to create animal or human models for research, on the other hand – e-learning or distant learning through Internet is now possible. The aim of our work was to create a system for interactive learning of spirometry (SILS, enabling students or physicians to observe spirometric measurements (flow-volume modified by setting level and kind of abnormalities within the respiratory system. SILS is based on a virtual respiratory system presented previously in several papers. Its main features are: separation of the lungs and chest; anatomical division of the lungs; division of airway resistance into transmural pressure dependent (Rp and lung volume dependent (Rv parts. The one mathematical formula that represents Rp describes both flow limitation (forced expiration and dependence of Raw on lungs volume (small airflows. The output of system are spirometric parameters (as FEV1, FVC, FEV1%FVC and a flow–volume loop constructed according to results of simulation of forced expiration for the chosen abnormality kind and level. As a result – this system may be used in teaching process in medical schools and postgraduate education. We offer access to a basic version of SILS for students and physicians at: www.spirometry.ibib.waw.pl and www.zpigichp.edu.pl. As we expect feedback from users, it is possible to modify user interface or model features to comply with users' requests.

  11. New Danish reference values for spirometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke, Anders; Marott, Jacob Louis; Mortensen, Jann

    2013-01-01

    published reference values for spirometry based on 570 individuals aged 30-70 years. Objectives:  To produce new reference values for lung function and to extend the existing values by including individuals between 20 and 30 years of age and older than 70 years of age. Methods:  Two similar but independent...... in the more extreme groups of age and height, and in general, our dataset shows that in most subgroups, the lung function level has improved during the last two decades. Please cite this paper as: Løkke A, Marott JL, Mortensen J, Nordestgaard BG, Dahl M and Lange P. New Danish reference values for spirometry...

  12. Limitation of measurements of expiratory tidal volume and expiratory compliance under conditions of endotracheal tube leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herber-Jonat, Susanne; von Bismarck, Philipp; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Nikischin, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Endotracheal tube leaks (ETTLs) occur in neonates ventilated with uncuffed tubes. Assuming that the influence of ETTLs might be neglected during expiration, only expiratory tidal volume is measured for calculation of expiratory compliance in cases of large ETTLs. However, expiratory ETTL might be substantial. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of ETTL size on expiratory tidal volume and compliance. Prospective laboratory study and retrospective clinical study. University research laboratory and neonatal intensive care unit. Sixty ventilated neonates (weight 640-2160 g, gestational age 25-33 wks) were investigated. The impact of increasing ETTLs on inspiratory and expiratory measured tidal volume (Vm), corrected tidal volume (Vc), and leak volume (Vl) was investigated in a ventilated neonatal lung model. The range of ETTLs (1% to 95%) was subdivided into five groups of 12 infants each. Furthermore, the relationships between standard ETTL size and inspiratory and expiratory ETTLs were evaluated using nonlinear regression. Standard ETTL size was defined as the difference between measured inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume (Vm) related to inspiratory Vm. The size of a standard ETTL was 40% when expiratory ETTL reached 10% and was 12% when the inspiratory ETTL reached 10%. In infants, the differences between Vm and Vc were statistically significant during inspiration in the group beginning at a standard ETTL of 41% and during expiration in the group beginning at a standard ETTL of 69% (p ETTL was 33% (95% confidence interval, 28% to 36%) when expiratory ETTL reached 10% and was 13% (95% confidence interval, 12% to 15%) when inspiratory ETTL reached 10%. Expiratory Vl has a relevant impact if a certain ETTL size is reached.

  13. Spirometry of healthy adult South African men

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-07-07

    Jul 7, 1996 ... radiographic screening process was used to identify a healthy population. Spirometry was performed using two calibrated instruments, a sleeve sealed piston spirometer. (Autolink) and a bellows spirometer (VitaJograph). The methodological guidelines of the American Thoracic. Society were observed.

  14. [Quality scale for preschool spirometry interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Francisca; Bedregal, Paula; Ubilla, Carlos; Barrientos, Hortensia; Caussade, Solange

    2017-02-01

    Since 2007, there are international guidelines for implementation and interpretation of spirometry in preschool children. A percentage of these patients cannot obtain maneuvers that meet all eligibility criteria. The objective of this study was to develop a quality scale for interpreting these partially acceptable spirometry. Delphi methodology was used, which allows to reach consensus among experts analyzing a defined problem. We invited to participate pediatric pneumologists dedicated to lung function and who participated actively in scientific specialty societies in Chile. Successive rounds were conducted with questionnaires about criteria used to assess spirometry in preschool children. These criteria define the acceptability of spirometric maneuvers according to international guidelines. Proposed quality grades were “very good”, “good”, “fair” and “bad”. Thirteen of the 15 invited experts accepted our invitation. In the first round 9 disagreed with the degree of “regular” quality. In the second round this was removed and 11 experts answered, 9 of them agreed with the use of this new version. The most contentious criterion was the end of expiration. Most experts agreed with the final scale, using “very good”, “good” and “bad” judgments. This would help to improve the performance of spirometry in children between 2 and 5 years.

  15. Abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia restores expiratory lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Backer, Vibeke; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2017-02-01

    Respiratory complications secondary to intermittent intra-abdominal hypertension and/or atelectasis are common after abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernias. It is unknown if the respiratory function of this patient group is affected long term or impairs activities of daily living. We hypothesized that abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia would not lead to improved, long-term pulmonary function or respiratory quality of life. Eighteen patients undergoing open abdominal wall reconstruction with mesh for a large incisional hernia (horizontal fascial defect width >10 cm) were compared with 18 patients with an intact abdominal wall who underwent colorectal resection. Patients were examined pre- and 1-year postoperatively. Examined measures included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in first second, peak expiratory flow, maximal in- and expiratory mouth pressure, and 2 validated questionnaires on respiratory quality of life. In order to decrease heterogeneity, objectively examined parameters were presented relative to the predicted values, which were normality adjusted pulmonary measures. At 1-year follow-up, the abdominal wall reconstruction group showed significant improvement in percent predicted peak expiratory flow and maximal expiratory mouth pressure, whereas all other measurements of lung function remained unchanged. Respiratory quality of life did not change significantly. Patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction showed a significantly greater improvement of percent predicted peak expiratory flow compared with patients undergoing colorectal resection. Abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia improved long-term expiratory lung function. Respiratory quality of life did not change significantly after abdominal wall reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of spirometry in primary care

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    Dinant Geert-Jan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of spirometry for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma in patients suspected of suffering from an obstructive airway disease (OAD in primary care. Methods Cross sectional diagnostic study of 219 adult patients attending 10 general practices for the first time with complaints suspicious for OAD. All patients underwent spirometry and structured medical histories were documented. All patients received whole-body plethysmography (WBP in a lung function laboratory. The reference standard was the Tiffeneau ratio (FEV1/VC received by the spirometric maneuver during examination with WBP. In the event of inconclusive results, bronchial provocation was performed to determine bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR. Asthma was defined as a PC20 fall after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 16 mg/ml. Results 90 (41.1% patients suffered from asthma, 50 (22.8% suffered from COPD, 79 (36.1% had no OAD. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in COPD was 92% (95%CI 80–97; specificity was 84% (95%CI 77–89. The positive predictive value (PPV was 63% (95%CI 51–73; negative predictive value (NPV was 97% (95%CI 93–99. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in asthma was 29% (95%CI 21–39; specificity was 90% (95%CI 81–95. PPV was 77% (95%CI 60–88; NPV was 53% (95%CI 45–61. Conclusion COPD can be estimated with high diagnostic accuracy using spirometry. It is also possible to rule in asthma with spirometry. However, asthma can not be ruled out only using spirometry. This diagnostic uncertainty leads to an overestimation of asthma presence. Patients with inconclusive spirometric results should be referred for nitric oxide (NO – measurement and/or bronchial provocation if possible to guarantee accurate diagnosis.

  17. Spirometry quality in adults with very severe lung function impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; García-Torrentera, Rogelio; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Enright, Paul; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2015-05-01

    Some technologists worry that patients with very severe lung disease are unable to complete several spirometry maneuvers, which require considerable effort. We retrospectively selected all spirometry tests with an FEV1 30,000 subjects tested during the 3-y period) had adequate quality spirometry. Subjects with airway obstruction were less likely to meet FVC repeatability goals. A poor spirometry quality grade was associated with a very low FVC and a low body mass index, but not older age. Severe lung disease should not be used as an excuse for not meeting spirometry quality goals. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  18. Peak expiratory flow rate and Pulse Pressure values during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the peak expiratory flow rate and pulse pressure during the luteal and menstruation phases of the menstrual cycle. The peak expiratory flow rate and pulse pressure were measured using the Wright's Peak Flow Meter and Mercury Sphygmomanometer respectively. The peak expiratory flow rate and ...

  19. Inflammatory Responses, Spirometry, and Quality of Life in Subjects With Bronchiectasis Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Lin, Zhi-Min; Jiang, Mei; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2015-08-01

    Bronchiectasis exacerbations are critical events characterized by worsened symptoms and signs (ie, cough frequency, sputum volume, malaise). Our goal was to examine variations in airway and systemic inflammation, spirometry, and quality of life during steady state, bronchiectasis exacerbations, and convalescence (1 week following a 2-week antibiotic treatment) to determine whether potentially pathogenic microorganisms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were associated with poorer conditions during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to detect inflammatory mediators and bacterial densities. Spirometry and quality of life (St George Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ]) were assessed during the 3 stages. Forty-eight subjects with bronchiectasis (43.2 ± 14.2 y of age) were analyzed. No notable differences in species and density of potentially pathogenic microorganisms were found during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Except for CXCL8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), serum inflammation was heightened during bronchiectasis exacerbations and recovered during convalescence. Even though sputum TNF-α was markedly higher during bronchiectasis exacerbations and remained heightened during convalescence, the variations in miscellaneous sputum markers were unremarkable. Bronchiectasis exacerbations were associated with notably higher SGRQ symptom and total scores, which recovered during convalescence. FVC, FEV1, and maximum mid-expiratory flow worsened during bronchiectasis exacerbations (median change from baseline of -2.2%, -0.8%, and -1.3%) and recovered during convalescence (median change from baseline of 0.6%, 0.7%, and -0.7%). Compared with no bacterial isolation, potentially pathogenic microorganism or P. aeruginosa isolation at baseline did not result in poorer clinical condition during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Bronchiectasis exacerbations are characterized by heightened inflammatory responses and poorer quality of life and

  20. A new spirometry-based algorithm to predict occupational pulmonary restrictive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteis, S; Iridoy-Zulet, A A; Aaron, S; Swann, A; Cullinan, P

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry is often included in workplace-based respiratory surveillance programmes but its performance in the identification of restrictive lung disease is poor, especially when the prevalence of this condition is low in the tested population. To improve the specificity (Sp) and positive predictive value (PPV) of current spirometry-based algorithms in the diagnosis of restrictive pulmonary impairment in the workplace and to reduce the proportion of false positives findings and, as a result, unnecessary referrals for lung volume measurements. We re-analysed two studies of hospital patients, respectively used to derive and validate a recommended spirometry-based algorithm [forced vital capacity (FVC) 55%] for the recognition of restrictive pulmonary impairment. We used true lung restrictive cases as a reference standard in 2×2 contingency tables to estimate sensitivity (Sn), Sp and PPV and negative predictive values for each diagnostic cut-off. We simulated a working population aged spirometry-based algorithm may be adopted to accurately exclude pulmonary restriction and to possibly reduce unnecessary lung volume testing in an occupational health setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [Accesibility and use of spirometry in primary care centers in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llauger, M Antònia; Rosas, Alba; Burgos, Felip; Torrente, Elena; Tresserras, Ricard; Escarrabill, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Examine the accessibility and use of forced spirometry (FS) in public primary care facilities centers in Catalonia. Cross-sectional study using a survey. Three hundred sixty-six Primary Care Teams (PCT) in Catalonia. Third quarter of 2010. Survey with information on spirometers, training, interpretation and quality control, and the priority that the quality of spirometry had for the team. Indicators FS/100 inhabitants/year, FS/month/PCT; FS/month/10,000 inhabitants. Response rate: 75%. 97.5% of PCT had spirometer and made an average of 2.01 spirometries/100 inhabitants (34.68 spirometry/PCT/month). 83% have trained professionals.>50% centers perform formal training but no information is available on the quality. 70% performed some sort of calibration. Interpretation was made by the family physician in 87.3% of cases. In 68% of cases not performed any quality control of exploration. 2/3 typed data manually into the computerized medical record.>50% recognized a high priority strategies for improving the quality. Despite the accessibility of EF efforts should be made to standardize training, increasing the number of scans test and promote systematic quality control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical inquiries. Does office spirometry improve quit rates in smokers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spata, Jennifer; Kelsberg, Gary; Safranek, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    It depends. Simply performing spirometry and offering cessation advice doesn't improve quit rates in patients who smoke (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, systematic review of randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). However, when the spirometry results are communicated in terms of "lung age", smokers are more likely to quit (SOR: B, large RCT). Patients with abnormal spirometry results may be more likely to quit than patients with normal results (SOR: B, cohort studies).

  3. Spirometry in elderly laryngectomized patients: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Alessandro; Perrotta, Fabio; Cennamo, Antonio; Cerqua, Francesco Saverio; Rinaldi, Luca; Mazzella, Antonio; Grella, Edoardo; Tranfa, Carmelindo; Bianco, Andrea; Stefanelli, Francesco; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-09-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the second most common respiratory neoplasm after lung cancer. Laryngectomy is a well established treatment for larynx cancers which involve relevant anatomic alterations. Spirometry is an essential investigation tool for diagnosis and severity of respiratory diseases, difficult to perform in laryngectomees. 43 consecutive laryngectomized patients were enrolled from July 2014 to March 2015. Patients fulfilling inclusion criteria underwent spirometry at baseline assessment and after two days. During the examination, the spirometer was placed directly on the stoma of the patient, through mouthpiece "Spirometry Filter 74". At baseline, 26 eligible laryngectomees correctly performed the spirometry test with mouthpiece adhering to the stoma; 4 patients refused to perform the second spirometry after 2 days. The feasibility of spirometry examination in these patients was 100% despite difficulties in the execution of the test. The Pearson coefficient of reproducibility for FEV1, FVC and Tiffeneau Index was, respectively, 0.98, 0.94 and 0.77. Spirometry in laryngectomee patients is a feasible procedure for assessment of respiratory function; despite technical difficulties in the execution of the test, our results underline the reproducibility and repeatability of the spirometry. In conclusion, when performed within dedicated respiratory pathophysiology unit, spirometry is a reliable tool in the assessment and follow up of laryngectomees. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of spirometry in a primary care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Blain, Elizabeth A; Craig, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Elizabeth A Blain, Timothy J CraigPenn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USAObjective: To determine the use of spirometry in family practice, internal medicine, and pediatric outpatient settings.Methods: Data were collected from 45 outpatient offices in the central Pennsylvania area via phone survey that asked a set of four questions: 1) Do you have spirometry in your office? 2) Do you use spirometry for asthma patients? 3) In what situation do you use spirometry for? 4) Do you use s...

  5. Restrictive pattern on spirometry: association with cardiovascular risk and level of physical activity in asymptomatic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine whether a restrictive pattern on spirometry is associated with the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL, as well as with cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, in asymptomatic adults. Methods : A total of 374 participants (mean age, 41 ± 14 years underwent spirometry, which included the determination of FVC and FEV1. A restrictive pattern on spirometry was defined as an FEV1/FVC ratio > 0.7 and an FVC < 80% of the predicted value. After conducting demographic, anthropometric, and CVD risk assessments, we evaluated body composition, muscle function, and postural balance, as well as performing cardiopulmonary exercise testing and administering the six-minute walk test. The PADL was quantified with a triaxial accelerometer. Results : A restrictive pattern on spirometry was found in 10% of the subjects. After multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for confounders (PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness, the following variables retained significance (OR; 95% CI as predictors of a restrictive pattern: systemic arterial hypertension (17.5; 1.65-184.8, smoking (11.6; 1.56-87.5, physical inactivity (8.1; 1.43-46.4, larger center-of-pressure area while standing on a force platform (1.34; 1.05-1.71; and dyslipidemia (1.89; 1.12-1.98. Conclusions : A restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be common in asymptomatic adults. We found that CVD risk factors, especially systemic arterial hypertension, smoking, and physical inactivity, were directly associated with a restrictive pattern, even when the analysis was adjusted for PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to improve understanding of the etiology of a restrictive pattern as well as to aid in the design of preventive strategies.

  6. Factors associated with abnormal spirometry among HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, M Bradley; Huang, Laurence; Diaz, Philip T; Kirk, Gregory D; Kleerup, Eric C; Morris, Alison; Rom, William; Weiden, Michael D; Zhao, Enxu; Thompson, Bruce; Crothers, Kristina

    2015-08-24

    HIV-infected individuals are susceptible to development of chronic lung diseases, but little is known regarding the prevalence and risk factors associated with different spirometric abnormalities in this population. We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors and performance characteristics of risk factors for spirometric abnormalities among HIV-infected individuals. Cross-sectional cohort study. We analyzed cross-sectional US data from the NHLBI-funded Lung-HIV consortium - a multicenter observational study of heterogeneous groups of HIV-infected participants in diverse geographic sites. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors statistically significantly associated with spirometry patterns. A total of 908 HIV-infected individuals were included. The median age of the cohort was 50 years, 78% were men and 68% current smokers. An abnormal spirometry pattern was present in 37% of the cohort: 27% had obstructed and 10% had restricted spirometry patterns. Overall, age, smoking status and intensity, history of Pneumocystis infection, asthma diagnosis and presence of respiratory symptoms were independently associated with an abnormal spirometry pattern. Regardless of the presence of respiratory symptoms, five HIV-infected participants would need to be screened with spirometry to diagnose two individuals with any abnormal spirometry pattern. Nearly 40% of a diverse US cohort of HIV-infected individuals had an abnormal spirometry pattern. Specific characteristics including age, smoking status, respiratory infection history and respiratory symptoms can identify those at risk for abnormal spirometry. The high prevalence of abnormal spirometry and the poor predictive capability of respiratory symptoms to identify abnormal spirometry should prompt clinicians to consider screening spirometry in HIV-infected populations.

  7. Circulatory effects of expiratory flow-limited exercise, dynamic hyperinflation and expiratory muscle pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Macklem

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research in normal subjects exercising with and without expiratory flow limitation at 1 L·s–1 imposed by a Starling resistor in the expiratory line, and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, using optoelectronic plethysmography to measure respiratory kinematics, combined with mouth, pleural and abdominal pressure measurements, to assess work of breathing and respiratory muscle performance. In normal subjects, flow-limited exercise resulted in the following: 1 Impaired exercise performance due to intolerable dyspnoea; 2 hypercapnia; 3 excessive respiratory muscle recruitment; 4 blood shifts from trunk to extremities; 5 a 10% reduction in cardiac output and a 5% reduction in arterial oxygen saturation, decreasing energy supplies to working respiratory and locomotor muscles. In both normal subjects and in COPD patients, dynamic hyperinflation did not always occur. Those patients that hyperinflated had worse lung function and less work of breathing, but better exercise performance than the others, in whom expiratory muscle recruitment prevented dynamic hyperinflation at the cost of increased work of breathing and excessive oxygen cost of breathing. This established an early competition between respiratory and locomotor muscles for available energy supplies. Dynamic hyperinflation is a better exercise strategy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than expiratory muscle recruitment, but the benefit it confers is small.

  8. Bronchial responsiveness in patients with restrictive spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddissi, Jean I; Elya, Marwan K; Farooq, Saif U; Youness, Houssein A; Jones, Kellie R; Awab, Ahmed; Kinasewitz, Gary T

    2013-01-01

    Improvement in PFT after bronchodilators is characteristic of obstructive airway diseases such as COPD. However, improvement in patients with restrictive pattern is occasionally seen. We aim to determine the clinical significance of a bronchodilator responsive restrictive defect. Patients with restrictive spirometry and a bronchodilator study were identified at the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma City VAMC between September 2003 and December 2009. Restriction was defined as a decreased FVC and FEV1, with normal FEV1/FVC. Responsiveness to bronchodilators was defined as an improvement in FEV1 and/or FVC of at least 12% and 200 mL. Patients with lung volume measurements had their clinical and radiographic records reviewed. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. Most were current or ex-smokers, with most being on bronchodilators. The average FVC and FEV1 were 65 ± 11% and 62 ± 10% of the predicted, respectively. Most patients (66%) had a normal TLC, averaging 90 ± 16% of the predicted. RV, RV/TLC, and the TLC-VA values strongly suggested an obstructive defect. Reversible restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be a variant of obstructive lung disease in which early airway closure results in air trapping and low FVC. In symptomatic patients, a therapeutic trial of bronchodilators may be beneficial.

  9. The standard of spirometry in the RSA | Basson | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Standards for high-quality lung function testing have not yet been formally adopted in the RSA, despite the increase in the performance of spirometry. A study was undertaken to determine the standard of spirometry in clinical practice in this country. Forty-five spirometer users agreed to participate. Responses to a ...

  10. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  11. Measurements of exhaled nitric oxide with the single-breath technique and positive expiratory pressure in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, J H; Hall, G L; Stick, S M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to adapt the single-breath technique with positive expiratory pressure to measure exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) in infants. We hypothesized that exhaled eNO was greater in wheezy than in healthy infants. We studied 30 infants (16 wheezy and 14 healthy). The forced expiratory volume in 0.5 s (FEV0.5) was determined with the raised volume rapid thoracic compression technique, and eNO was measured during constant expiratory flow with a rapid-response chemiluminescence analyzer. After passive inflation to a preset pressure of 20 cm H2O, thoracic compression with an inflatable jacket caused forced expiration to occur through a face-mask with an expiratory flow resistor attached. During the forced expiration, the jacket pressure was increased to maintain a constant driving mouth pressure and hence a constant expiratory flow (50 ml/s). The mean level of eNO in the wheezy infants (31.8 ppb) was significantly higher than the level in healthy infants (18.8 ppb) (p = 0.03). A family history of atopy in parents was associated with increased eNO levels (p history of atopy.

  12. Spirometry screening for airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnivesky, Juan; Skloot, Gwen; Rundle, Andrew; Revenson, Tracey A; Neugut, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    Screening spirometry might help identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at an earlier stage. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of airway obstruction in a cohort of asymptomatic smokers who underwent spirometry as part of a routine health maintenance examination. The study cohort consisted of a consecutive sample of 386 asymptomatic smokers (≥5 pack-years) without a history of COPD or asthma, who completed spirometry testing as part of a routine health maintenance examination. Overall, 9 study subjects (2.3%, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.4%) had evidence of airway obstruction on spirometry. Univariate and multiple regression analyses showed that the risk of airway obstruction was not significantly associated with age, sex, race, smoking history or past history of respiratory symptoms. Spirometry screening of asymptomatic smokers may help detect a small number of patients with airway obstruction who are at high risk for COPD.

  13. Negative expiratory pressure (NEP) parameters can predict obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in snoring patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouatbi, Sonia; Tabka, Zouhair; Dogui, Mohamed; Abdelghani, Ahmed; Guénard, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether parameters of the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique are able to detect obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in snoring patients. A cross-sectional study included 42 OSAS patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG), 34 simple snorers, and 32 healthy subjects. Lung function was measured by using a plethysmograph and the NEP technique was performed with the patient in the seated and supine positions in a random order. The depression was fixed to 5 cmH(2)O. All patients had normal forced expiratory flow/volume loops. Apneic patients had lower Dflow in both positions with a number of oscillations on the expiratory curve obtained with NEP and an expiratory flow limitation (EFL) in the supine position higher than that of other groups (p < 0.05). Changing from the sitting to the supine position raised the EFL of the three groups, with a significant decrease in Dflow and an increase in the number of oscillations in snoring and OSAS patients (p < 0.05). The analysis of variance showed that only the number of oscillations was significantly different between apneic and snoring patients. NEP constitutes a simple and useful tool for the screening OSAS by EFL, especially the number of oscillations obtained with NEP.

  14. Expiratory muscle control during vomiting - Role of brain stem expiratory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The neural mechanisms controlling the muscles involved during vomiting were examined using decerebrated cats. In one experiment, the activity of the ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons was recorded during induced 'fictive vomiting' (i.e., a series of bursts of coactivation of abdominal and phrenic nerves that would be expected to produce expulsion in unparalyzed animals) and vomiting. In a second, abdominal muscle electromyographic and nerve activity were compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons as they cross the midline between C1 and the obex (the procedure that is known to abolish expiratory modulation of internal intercostal muscle activity). The results of the study indicate that the abdominal muscles are controlled differently during respiration and vomiting.

  15. Spirometry in primary care for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiak, Nancy Cantey

    2014-01-01

    Spirometry is an essential part of diagnosing a child with asthma. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) expert panels recommend spirometry to be performed on children five years of age and older as an objective assessment of lung function, to diagnosis asthma, and for ongoing yearly management of asthma (GINA, 2012; NAEPP, 2007). According to the NAEPP expert panel, history and physical examination alone are not reliable to accurately diagnose asthma, exclude alternative diagnosis, or determine lung impairment (NAEPP, 2007 Dombkowski, Hassan, Wasilevich, and Clark (2010) found 52% of physicians who provide primary care to children used spirometry, but only 21% used spirometry according to the national guidelines, and only 35% of physicians surveyed were comfortable interpreting the test results. Zanconato, Meneghelli, Braga, Zacchello, and Baraldi (2005) found that 21% of spirometry readings were interpreted incorrectly, concluding that proper training and quality control were important to provide if spirometry in the primary care office setting is to be used. The purpose of this article is to review the appropriate use of spirometry in pediatric primary care.

  16. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate In Cigarette Smokers | Ukoli | Highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare lung function between smokers and non-smokers using Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR). Methods: This study examines the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of three hundred and forty cigarette smokers, age and sex-matched with PEFR of equal number of non-smokers. Results: The mean PEFR of ...

  17. Effect of Training Frequency on Maximum Expiratory Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Supraja; El-Bashiti, Nour; Sapienza, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) frequency on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP). Method: We assigned 12 healthy participants to 2 groups of training frequency (3 days per week and 5 days per week). They completed a 4-week training program on an EMST trainer (Aspire Products, LLC). MEP was the primary…

  18. Spirometry reference values in Indigenous Australians: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Tamara L; Chang, Anne B; Petsky, Helen L; Rodwell, Leanne T; Brown, Michael G; Hill, Debra C; Thompson, Bruce; McElrea, Margaret S

    2016-07-04

    To evaluate published spirometry data for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) peoples to determine (i) whether their ethnicity influenced spirometry results; and (ii) if any reliable spirometry reference values exist for Indigenous Australians. Systematic review of published and grey literature. PubMed and Cochrane Library databases, references of included articles and appropriate grey literature. Last searches were conducted in April 2016. We included any study that performed spirometry on healthy Indigenous Australians and compared their results with those from people of European ancestry. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts and then reviewed potentially relevant full-text articles for possible inclusion. We used PRISMA systematic review reporting methods to collate data. Of a possible 125 studies, 18 full-text articles were reviewed, but only nine fulfilled the inclusion criteria. None specified Torres Strait Islander inclusion. All studies reported lower spirometry values (as much as 30% lower) for Aboriginal people compared with non-Indigenous people. Five studies developed spirometry reference values for Indigenous Australians; however, none adhered to all participant inclusion and exclusion criteria outlined by the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. Hence, reported results and subsequent reference values may not be a true representation of spirometry values in healthy Indigenous people. The lower spirometry values reported for Indigenous Australians may be due to study limitations. Furthermore, there are currently no reliable spirometry reference values for Indigenous Australians that adhere to current guidelines. Developing a set of Indigenous Australian reference values will improve the accuracy of test interpretation and aid in the diagnosis of respiratory disease in this population.

  19. Role of bronchodilation and pattern of breathing in increasing tidal expiratory flow with progressive induced hypercapnia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Kevin E; Singh, Bhajan

    2018-01-01

    Hypercapnia (HC) in vitro relaxes airway smooth muscle; in vivo, it increases respiratory effort, tidal expiratory flows (V̇ exp ), and, by decreasing inspiratory duration (Ti), increases elastic recoil pressure (Pel) via lung viscoelasticity; however, its effect on airway resistance is uncertain. We examined the contributions of bronchodilation, Ti, and expiratory effort to increasing V̇ exp with progressive HC in 10 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) 53% predicted. Lung volumes (Vl), V̇ exp , esophageal pressure (Pes), Ti, and end-tidal Pco 2 ([Formula: see text]) were measured during six tidal breaths followed by an inspiratory capacity (IC), breathing air, and at three levels of HC. V̇ exp and V̇ with submaximal forced vital capacities breathing air (V̇ sFVC ) were compared. Pulmonary resistance ( Rl) was measured from the Pes-V̇ relationship. V̇ exp and Pes at end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) + 0.3 tidal volume [V̇ (0.3Vt) and Pes (0.3Vt) , respectively], Ti, and Rl correlated with [Formula: see text] ( P tidal expiratory flows by inducing bronchodilation and via an increased rate of inspiration and lung viscoelasticity, a probable increase in lung elastic recoil pressure, both changes increasing expiratory flows, promoting lung emptying and a stable end-expiratory volume. Bronchodilation with HC occurred despite optimal standard bronchodilator therapy, suggesting that in COPD further bronchodilation is possible.

  20. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  1. Estimating eligibility for lung cancer screening in an Australian cohort, including the effect of spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, David; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, Michael; James, Alan; Knuiman, Matthew W; McWilliams, Annette; Mulrennan, Siobhain; Musk, Arthur W Bill; Brims, Fraser Jh

    2016-06-20

    To estimate the proportion of ever-smokers who are eligible for lung cancer screening in an Australian cohort, and to evaluate the effect of spirometry in defining chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when assessing screening eligibility. Cross-sectional study of 3586 individuals aged 50-68 years who live in the Busselton Shire of Western Australia. Proportion of ever-smokers eligible for lung cancer screening based on United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) criteria, and PLCOm2012 lung cancer risk > 1.5%. The effect of using self-reported COPD, symptoms consistent with COPD, or spirometry to define COPD for screening eligibility according to the PLCOm2012 criteria. Of ever-smokers aged 55-68 years, 254 (20.1%) would be eligible for screening according to USPSTF criteria; fewer would be eligible according to PLCOm2012 criteria (225, 17.9%; P = 0.004). This is equivalent to 8.9-10.0% of the total population aged 55-68 years, which suggests about 450 000 individuals in Australia may be eligible for lung cancer screening. The proportions of eligible participants were not significantly different whether spirometry results or symptoms consistent with COPD were used to determine PLCOm2012 risk. The proportion of ever-smokers in this population who were eligible for lung cancer screening was 17.9-20.1%. Using symptoms to define COPD is an appropriate surrogate measure for spirometry when determining the presence of COPD in this population. There are significant challenges for policy makers on how to identify and recruit these eligible individuals from the wider population.

  2. Pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing: an evidence based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Michael J; Warning, William J

    2015-10-01

    The scope of pharmacist services for patients with pulmonary disease has primarily focused on drug related outcomes; however pharmacists have the ability to broaden the scope of clinical services by performing diagnostic testing including quality spirometry testing. Studies have demonstrated that pharmacists can perform quality spirometry testing based upon international guidelines. The primary aim of this review was to assess the published evidence of pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing based upon American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines. In order to accomplish this, the description of evidence and type of outcome from these services were reviewed. A literature search was conducted using five databases [PubMed (1946-January 2015), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to January 2015), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews] with search terms including pharmacy, spirometry, pulmonary function, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to publications in English and reported in humans. In addition, Uniform Resource Locators and Google Scholar searches were implemented to include any additional supplemental information. Eight studies (six prospective multi-center trials, two retrospective single center studies) were included. Pharmacists in all studies received specialized training in performing spirometry testing. Of the eight studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 (100%) demonstrated acceptable repeatability of spirometry testing based upon standards set by the ATS/ERS guidelines. Acceptable repeatability of seven studies ranged from 70 to 99% consistent with published data. Available evidence suggests that quality spirometry testing can be performed by pharmacists. More prospective studies are needed to add to the current evidence of quality spirometry testing performed by

  3. Correlation Between Abdominal Muscle Thickness and Maximal Expiratory Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Kurozumi, Chiharu; Ono, Koji; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    The activity of abdominal muscles mainly produces high expiratory pressure. These include the rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, and transverse abdominis muscles. The purpose of this study was to determine whether maximal expiratory pressure is associated with each abdominal muscle thickness at rest. Thirty-nine healthy male volunteers (mean age ± SD, 20.7 ± 2.7 years) participated in the study. The thickness of the right rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, and transverse abdominis muscles was measured by B-mode sonography in the supine position. The maximal expiratory pressure was obtained with a spirometer in the sitting position. The correlations between each abdominal muscle thickness and maximal expiratory pressure were determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. The correlation coefficient between the rectus abdominis muscle and maximal expiratory pressure was 0.571 (Pmuscles and maximal expiratory pressure were 0.297 (P = .066), 0.267 (P = .100), and 0.022 (P = .894), respectively. Our results indicate that the rectus abdominis muscle thickness might be more highly correlated with expiratory pressure production than the external oblique, internal oblique, and transverse abdominis muscle thickness. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  4. Integration of electronic nose technology with spirometry: validation of a new approach for exhaled breath analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R; Brinkman, P; van der Schee, M P; Fens, N; Dijkers, E; Bootsma, S K; de Jongh, F H C; Sterk, P J

    2015-10-15

    New 'omics'-technologies have the potential to better define airway disease in terms of pathophysiological and clinical phenotyping. The integration of electronic nose (eNose) technology with existing diagnostic tests, such as routine spirometry, can bring this technology to 'point-of-care'. We aimed to determine and optimize the technical performance and diagnostic accuracy of exhaled breath analysis linked to routine spirometry. Exhaled breath was collected in triplicate in healthy subjects by an eNose (SpiroNose) based on five identical metal oxide semiconductor sensor arrays (three arrays monitoring exhaled breath and two reference arrays monitoring ambient air) at the rear end of a pneumotachograph. First, the influence of flow, volume, humidity, temperature, environment, etc, was assessed. Secondly, a two-centre case-control study was performed using diagnostic and monitoring visits in day-to-day clinical care in patients with a (differential) diagnosis of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or lung cancer. Breathprint analysis involved signal processing, environment correction based on alveolar gradients and statistics based on principal component (PC) analysis, followed by discriminant analysis (Matlab2014/SPSS20). Expiratory flow showed a significant linear correlation with raw sensor deflections (R(2)  =  0.84) in 60 healthy subjects (age 43  ±  11 years). No correlation was found between sensor readings and exhaled volume, humidity and temperature. Exhaled data after environment correction were highly reproducible for each sensor array (Cohen's Kappa 0.81-0.94). Thirty-seven asthmatics (41  ±  14.2 years), 31 COPD patients (66  ±  8.4 years), 31 lung cancer patients (63  ±  10.8 years) and 45 healthy controls (41  ±  12.5 years) entered the cross-sectional study. SpiroNose could adequately distinguish between controls, asthma, COPD and lung cancer patients with cross-validation values

  5. SAJAA SepOct 33-38

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studio G5

    performance of the spirometry on the previous evening of the surgery. Forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, peak expiratory flow rate and maximum expiratory pressure (Forced expiratory flows) were measured in supine position before intrathecal block and at 10, 60 and 120 minutes, following the ...

  6. Prevalence of Respiratory Diseases According to Spirometry Findings Among Patients Attending the Spirometry Department of Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, B K; Pradhan, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Spirometry is a standard test for screening and evaluation of patients with symptoms of cough and shortness of breath. Despite its easy availability, low cost and ease of performance it has not been widely used in clinical practice in Nepal. Objective To assess the prevalence of respiratory diseases in a regional referral centre in patients referred for spirometry. Method This is a descriptive cross-sectional study including patients referred for spirometry to the spirometry unit of Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital from 2014 July to 2015 October. The spirometry findings of the patients fulfilling the criteria of American Thoracic Society/European Respitatory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines were analyzed and categorized as normal, having obstructive lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma or restrictive lung disease. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0 software. Result Out of 821 patients, 755 patients (92%) fulfilled ATS/ERS criteria for satisfactory spirometry. The prevalence of COPD was 31.4%, bronchial asthma 24.2% and restrictive lung disease 8.1%. The mean age of patients diagnosed with COPD was 57.8±10.8 years; bronchial asthma 44.3±16.2 years; and restrictive lung disease 44.6±21.5 years. Both COPD and bronchial asthma were common in females. About twenty two percent of the COPD patients were non-smokers and 86.3% of these were females. The most common symptoms for referral was cough and shortness of breath: these symptoms were more likely to be associated with abnormal spirometry findings. Conclusion Spirometry is a crucial preliminary test for evaluation of patients with respiratory symptoms. It should be used more frequently to help stratify patients for appropriate treatment.

  7. What's in a name? Expiratory tracheal narrowing in adults explained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, P.; Bardin, P.G.; Lau, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Tracheomalacia, tracheobronchomalacia, and excessive dynamic airway collapse are all terms used to describe tracheal narrowing in expiration. The first two describe luminal reduction from cartilage softening and the latter refers to luminal reduction from exaggerated posterior membrane movement. Expiratory tracheal narrowing is a frequent occurrence that can cause symptoms of airway obstruction, such as dyspnoea, wheeze, and exercise intolerance. The accurate diagnosis and quantification of expiratory tracheal narrowing has important aetiological, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. The reference standard for diagnosis has traditionally been bronchoscopy; however, this method has significant limitations. Expiratory tracheal disorders are readily detected by four-dimensional dynamic volume multidetector computed tomography (4D-CT), an emerging, non-invasive method that will potentially enable detection and quantification of these conditions. This review discusses the morphological forms of expiratory tracheal narrowing and demonstrates the utility of 4D-CT in the diagnosis, quantification, and treatment of these important conditions

  8. Estimation of expiratory time constants via fuzzy clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Lourens (M.S.); L. Ali (Lejla); B.W. van den Berg (Bart); A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); R. Babuška (R.)

    2001-01-01

    markdownabstractObjective. In mechanically ventilated patients the expiratorytime constant provides information about respiratory mechanics. In thepresent study a new method, fuzzy clustering, is proposed to determine expiratory time constants. Fuzzy clustering differs from other methods since it

  9. Correlation of single-breath count test and neck flexor muscle strength with spirometry in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikh, Bakri; Arnold, W David; Gharibshahi, Shahram; Reynolds, Jerold; Freimer, Miriam; Kissel, John T

    2016-01-01

    Although formal spirometry is the gold standard for monitoring respiratory function in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), such testing is often delayed or unavailable. There is a need for a simple bedside test that can accurately measure respiratory function. We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, single-blind study in adults with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive MG. Participants performed the single breath count test (SBCT) and underwent manual muscle strength testing, and a respiratory therapist performed spirometry blinded to SBCT and strength results. Thirty-one patients, aged 57 ± 19 years participated. SBCT showed significant correlations with forced vital capacity (FVC), negative inspiratory force, and neck flexor strength (P strength (P = 0.02) but no correlation with shoulder abductor strength. These data suggest that the SBCT and neck flexor strength testing are valuable tools for bedside assessment of respiratory function in MG patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effectiveness of spirometry as a motivational tool for smoking cessation: a clinical trial, the ESPIMOAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizar-Aramburu, María Isabel; Martínez-Eizaguirre, Jose Manuel; Pacheco-Bravo, Petra; Diaz-Atienza, Maria; Aguirre-Arratibel, Iñigo; Peña-Peña, Maria Isabel; Alba-Latorre, Mercedes; Galparsoro-Goikoetxea, Mikel

    2013-12-05

    Smoking is the main preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in our region, it being the main causative agent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There still is no consensus on the use of spirometry as a strategy for smoking cessation, given that there is insufficient scientific evidence from high quality studies to recommend the use of this technique. This is to be a randomized, multicentre, open-label clinical trial. A total of 444 smokers over 40 years of age will be recruited by 39 general practitioners from 22 health centers. Primary objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of spirometry together with information regarding the test for smoking cessation after 1 year in smokers over 40 years of age with a more than 10 pack-year history and no previous diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Groups of 45 patients who smoke will be randomly selected from the lists of the participating doctors. The names will be sent to the corresponding doctors who will contact candidate patients and assess whether they meet the selection criteria. Patients who meet these criteria will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. For patients in both groups, a nurse will conduct an interview and perform a spirometry test to measure forced vital capacity. Then, all patients will be referred for an appointment with their doctor for brief anti-smoking intervention, patients from the intervention group additionally being informed about the result of the spirometry test. After 1 year, smoking status will be assessed and, in those who report that they have quit smoking, abstinence will be confirmed by co-oximetry. Data will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis using the chi-squared test for outcomes and binary logistic regression if it is considered to be necessary to adjust for confounding variables. Performing a spirometry test and providing information on pulmonary function may increase awareness of the effect of smoking among

  11. The effect of incentive spirometry on postoperative pulmonary function following laparotomy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Anna F; Kendig, Claire E; Mabedi, Charles; Cairns, Bruce A; Charles, Anthony G

    2015-03-01

    Changes in pulmonary dynamics following laparotomy are well documented. Deep breathing exercises, with or without incentive spirometry, may help counteract postoperative decreased vital capacity; however, the evidence for the role of incentive spirometry in the prevention of postoperative atelectasis is inconclusive. Furthermore, data are scarce regarding the prevention of postoperative atelectasis in sub-Saharan Africa. To determine the effect of the use of incentive spirometry on pulmonary function following exploratory laparotomy as measured by forced vital capacity (FVC). This was a single-center, randomized clinical trial performed at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Study participants were adult patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy and were randomized into the intervention or control groups (standard of care) from February 1 to November 30, 2013. All patients received routine postoperative care, including instructions for deep breathing and early ambulation. We used bivariate analysis to compare outcomes between the intervention and control groups. Adult patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy participated in postoperative deep breathing exercises. Patients in the intervention group received incentive spirometers. We assessed pulmonary function using a peak flow meter to measure FVC in both groups of patients. Secondary outcomes, such as hospital length of stay and mortality, were obtained from the medical records. A total of 150 patients were randomized (75 in each arm). The median age in the intervention and control groups was 35 years (interquartile range, 28-53 years) and 33 years (interquartile range, 23-46 years), respectively. Men predominated in both groups, and most patients underwent emergency procedures (78.7% in the intervention group and 84.0% in the control group). Mean initial FVC did not differ significantly between the intervention and control groups (0.92 and 0.90 L, respectively; P=.82 [95% CI, 0.52-2.29]). Although

  12. The nasal provocation test combined with spirometry establishes paradoxical vocal fold motion in allergic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Celso Eduardo; Argentão, Daiana Guedes Pinto; Lima, Regiane Patussi dos Santos; da Silva, Mariana Dias; dos Santos, Raquel Acácia Pereira Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (also called paradoxical vocal cord motion) or paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) is an event elicited by specific and nonspecific triggers in which its diagnosis is limited by the restricted number of available functional tests. This study was designed to appreciate the contribution of the spirometric changes elicited by the allergen-specific nasal provocation test (NPT) performed with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus for the diagnosis of PVFM in subjects with known sensitization to this allergen. In total, 63 subjects with allergic rhinitis who had previously been shown to be sensitized to D. pteronyssinus and who had experienced one or more episodes of inspiratory shortness of breath underwent two spirometric tests, one before (pre-NPT) and another 15 minutes after the allergen-specific NPT (post-NPT). The forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC), forced inspiratory volume in 2 seconds (FIV2), and the ratio between the FIV in 1 second and FIVC (FIV1/FIVC) were measured by spirometry. The morphology of the post-NPT inspiratory loop was compared with the pre-NPT inspiratory loop. We found that 18 subjects (28.5%) showed alterations suggestive of PVFM on post-NPT spirometry (e.g., truncation and/or flattening of the inspiratory loop). The mean differences between the pre-NPT and post-NPT values for the whole group were significant using a two-tailed paired t-test for the FIVC (4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI95%], 1.4-6.8), FIV1/FIVC ratio (2.7; CI95%, 0.05-5.3), and FIV2 (7.2; CI95%, 3.4-11). Allergen-specific NPT combined with spirometry is useful to show allergen-specific laryngeal hyperresponsiveness in allergic subjects with PVFM. Brazilian clinical trial registry platform (Plataforma Brasil, CAAE 07971212.0.0000.5480).

  13. High resolution CT in cystic fibrosis--the contribution of expiratory scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorloechter, Ludger; Nes, Harald; Fluge, Gjermund; Rosendahl, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The use of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is well accepted as an accurate method for evaluation of lung parenchyma in cystic fibrosis (CF). Several scoring methods exist and, in common, all are based on HRCT findings during inspiration alone. Objective: To examine whether expiratory HRCT scans could add information about the degree of mosaic perfusion in patients with CF. Methods and patients: Pulmonary HRCT was performed in 17 CF patients (median age of 12 years) with 1-mm thin sections and 10-mm intervals during inspiration, followed by 1-mm thin sections with 20-mm intervals during expiration. HRCT was scored by using a modified Bhalla method. Results: The mean HRCT score was 8.2. Out of 17 patients, 11 (65%) demonstrated a pathological mosaic perfusion in expiration, while only three patients showed mosaic perfusion in inspiration. The degree of expiratory mosaic perfusion was graded as severe in nine patients and moderate in two patients. There was a significant correlation between our modified HRCT score and lung function, as measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1% predicted, P<0.01). Conclusion: Mosaic perfusion in expiration was a common pathological HRCT finding in our study group. The clinical significance of this finding needs further evaluation

  14. Pathway to Best Practice in Spirometry in the Ambulatory Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracchio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry performed in the ambulatory setting is an invaluable tool for diagnosis, monitoring, and evaluation of respiratory health in patients with chronic lung disease. If spirometry is not performed according to American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines, unnecessary repeated testing, increased expenditure of time and money, and increased patient and family anxiety may result. Two respiratory therapists at Mission Health System in Asheville, NC, identified an increase in patients arriving at the pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories with abnormal spirometry results obtained in the ambulatory setting. These abnormal results were due to incorrect testing procedure, not chronic lung disease. Three training methods were developed to increase knowledge of correct spirometry testing procedure in the ambulatory setting. The therapists also created a plan to educate offices that do not perform spirometry on the importance and availability of PFT services at our hospital for the population of patients with chronic lung disease. Notable improvements in posttraining test results were demonstrated. The education process was evaluated by a leading respiratory expert, with improvements suggested and implemented. Next steps are listed.

  15. Superoxide dismutase levels and peak expiratory flow in asthmatic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Kurniasih

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory process which involve variety of cells such as inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and cytokines. The inflammatory process would be exacerbated in the presence of oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase (SOD is the first important enzyme to protect the respiratory tract against oxidative stress. The decreased of SOD has a correlation with increased of airway obstruction and bronchospasm. Objective To assess for a correlation between superoxide dismutase (SOD levels and peak expiratory flow, as well as to determine the impact of SOD levels for predicting asthma attacks. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study at Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, between February and April 2011 involving asthmatic children aged 5-18 years. Subjects’ serum SOD levels and peak expiratory flow were measured at the same time point. We then performed a prospective study following up on the same subjects to find out if they had a recurrent asthma attack within one month of the tests. We also reassessed their peak expiratory flow one month after blood specimens were obtained. Results Thirty-nine patients were enrolled in this study. There was no significant correlation between SOD level and peak expiratory flow [r=0.289; 95%CI -0.025 to 0.47; P=0.074]. However, older age was significantly associated with higher peak expiratory flow (=0.5; 95%CI 3.10 to 11.57; P=0.01. Lower levels of SOD increased the risk of asthma attacks in a month following the initial measurements (RR=5.5; 95%CI 1.6 to 18.9; P=0.009. Conclusion Superoxide dismutase (SOD level is not significantly associated with peak expiratory flow. However, we find a relationship between older age and higher peak expiratory flow and a relationship between lower SOD levels and risk of asthma attacks within one month following the tests.

  16. Evaluation of interpretation strategies and substantial bronchodilator response in pediatric patients with normal baseline spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Daniel P; Ocampo, Thad F; DiGiovanni, Heather A; Gil, Eddie R

    2013-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the best method to interpret pediatric spirometry. There is also controversy regarding the benefit of performing post-bronchodilator spirometry after normal baseline spirometry. This study compares the use of lower limit of normal (LLN) against percent of predicted (PP) in the interpretation of spirometry. We also investigate the occurrence of a substantial bronchodilator response for patients who received post-bronchodilator spirometry. Spirometric tests performed in the pediatric clinic at San Antonio Military Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Results of spirometry were compared using LLN and PP for interpretation. Abnormal spirometry was defined as a low FEV1 or low FEV1/FVC, indicating evidence of airway obstruction. The presence of a substantial bronchodilator response was recorded and the results were analyzed. Of 242 tests, 212 normal and 30 abnormal tests were reported using the LLN interpretation strategy. Using the PP interpretation strategy, there was a significant difference in the number of normal (183) and abnormal (59) tests, when compared to the LLN (P spirometry, 10% (PP) and 12% (LLN) had a substantial bronchodilator response. An abnormal baseline spirometry was more likely to have a substantial response to bronchodilator, compared to normal baseline spirometry (P spirometry, 10-12% of subjects with normal baseline spirometry showed a substantial bronchodilator response. This suggests that normal baseline spirometry may miss reversible airway obstruction, which is a hallmark of asthma.

  17. Challenges in Collating Spirometry Reference Data for South-Asian Children: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Sooky; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Quanjer, Philip; Sonnappa, Samatha; Wade, Angela; Beardsmore, Caroline; Chhabra, Sunil K.; Chudasama, Rajesh K.; Cook, Derek G.; Harding, Seeromanie; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Prasad, K. V. V.; Whincup, Peter H.; Lee, Simon; Stocks, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Availability of sophisticated statistical modelling for developing robust reference equations has improved interpretation of lung function results. In 2012, the Global Lung function Initiative(GLI) published the first global all-age, multi-ethnic reference equations for spirometry but these lacked equations for those originating from the Indian subcontinent (South-Asians). The aims of this study were to assess the extent to which existing GLI-ethnic adjustments might fit South-Asian paediatric spirometry data, assess any similarities and discrepancies between South-Asian datasets and explore the feasibility of deriving a suitable South-Asian GLI-adjustment. Methods Spirometry datasets from South-Asian children were collated from four centres in India and five within the UK. Records with transcription errors, missing values for height or spirometry, and implausible values were excluded(n = 110). Results Following exclusions, cross-sectional data were available from 8,124 children (56.3% male; 5–17 years). When compared with GLI-predicted values from White Europeans, forced expired volume in 1s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) in South-Asian children were on average 15% lower, ranging from 4–19% between centres. By contrast, proportional reductions in FEV1 and FVC within all but two datasets meant that the FEV1/FVC ratio remained independent of ethnicity. The ‘GLI-Other’ equation fitted data from North India reasonably well while ‘GLI-Black’ equations provided a better approximation for South-Asian data than the ‘GLI-White’ equation. However, marked discrepancies in the mean lung function z-scores between centres especially when examined according to socio-economic conditions precluded derivation of a single South-Asian GLI-adjustment. Conclusion Until improved and more robust prediction equations can be derived, we recommend the use of ‘GLI-Black’ equations for interpreting most South-Asian data, although ‘GLI-Other’ may be more

  18. Phenotype of normal spirometry in an aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; McAvay, Gail; Van Ness, Peter H; Casaburi, Richard; Jensen, Robert L; MacIntyre, Neil; Gill, Thomas M; Yaggi, H Klar; Concato, John

    2015-10-01

    In aging populations, the commonly used Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) may misclassify normal spirometry as respiratory impairment (airflow obstruction and restrictive pattern), including the presumption of respiratory disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). To evaluate the phenotype of normal spirometry as defined by a new approach from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI), overall and across GOLD spirometric categories. Using data from COPDGene (n = 10,131; ages 45-81; smoking history, ≥10 pack-years), we evaluated spirometry and multiple phenotypes, including dyspnea severity (Modified Medical Research Council grade 0-4), health-related quality of life (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score), 6-minute-walk distance, bronchodilator reversibility (FEV1 % change), computed tomography-measured percentage of lung with emphysema (% emphysema) and gas trapping (% gas trapping), and small airway dimensions (square root of the wall area for a standardized airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm). Among 5,100 participants with GLI-defined normal spirometry, GOLD identified respiratory impairment in 1,146 (22.5%), including a restrictive pattern in 464 (9.1%), mild COPD in 380 (7.5%), moderate COPD in 302 (5.9%), and severe COPD in none. Overall, the phenotype of GLI-defined normal spirometry included normal adjusted mean values for dyspnea grade (0.8), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (15.9), 6-minute-walk distance (1,424 ft [434 m]), bronchodilator reversibility (2.7%), % emphysema (0.9%), % gas trapping (10.7%), and square root of the wall area for a standardized airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (3.65 mm); corresponding 95% confidence intervals were similarly normal. These phenotypes remained normal for GLI-defined normal spirometry across GOLD spirometric categories. GLI-defined normal spirometry, even when classified as respiratory impairment by GOLD, included adjusted mean values in the

  19. Comparison of changes in tidal volume associated with expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to compare and clarify the relationship between expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, with a focus on tidal volume. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 18 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, who had undergone tracheostomy. Each patient received expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression; the order of implementation was randomized. Subjects ...

  20. Variation in spirometry utilization between trained general practitioners in practices equipped with a spirometer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.E.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Jacobs, A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hartman, J.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore spirometry utilization among general practitioners and identify practitioner and practice-related factors associated with spirometry utilization. DESIGN: Multivariate multilevel cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey. SETTING: Some 61 general practices involved in a

  1. Comparison of changes in tidal volume associated with expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to compare and clarify the relationship between expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, with a focus on tidal volume. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 18 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, who had undergone tracheostomy. Each patient received expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression; the order of implementation was randomized. Subjects were positioned in a 30° lateral recumbent position, and a 2-kgf compression was applied. For expiratory rib cage compression, the rib cage was compressed unilaterally; for expiratory abdominal compression, the area directly above the navel was compressed. Tidal volume values were the actual measured values divided by body weight. [Results] Tidal volume values were as follows: at rest, 7.2 ± 1.7 mL/kg; during expiratory rib cage compression, 8.3 ± 2.1 mL/kg; during expiratory abdominal compression, 9.1 ± 2.2 mL/kg. There was a significant difference between the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression and that at rest. The tidal volume in expiratory rib cage compression was strongly correlated with that in expiratory abdominal compression. [Conclusion] These results indicate that expiratory abdominal compression may be an effective alternative to the manual breathing assist procedure.

  2. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section 868.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a patient's...

  3. Spirometry of healthy adult South African men | Louw | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An exhaustive questionnaire and radiographic screening process was used to identify a healthy population. Spirometry was performed using two calibrated instruments, a sleeve sealed piston spirometer (Autolink) and a bellows spirometer (Vitalograph). The methodological guidelines of the American Thoracic Society were ...

  4. A guide to spirometry as applied to occupational health | White ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the context of occupational health, spirometric testing of respiratory function has a number of important applications. These applications can be expected to become more widespread in view of extensive changes to occupational health and compensation legislation in South Africa. Spirometry is an essential component of ...

  5. Accuracy and Quality of Spirometry in Primary Care Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegewald, Matthew J; Gallo, Heather M; Wilson, Emily L

    2016-12-01

    Spirometry is necessary for the optimal management of patients with respiratory disease. The quality of spirometry performed in the primary care setting has been inconsistent. We aimed to evaluate spirometer accuracy, determine the clinical significance of inaccurate spirometers, and assess the quality of spirograms obtained in primary care offices. We tested 17 spirometers used in primary care offices with a waveform generator; accuracy and precision were assessed using American Thoracic Society criteria. The clinical significance of inaccurate instruments was determined by applying the FEV 1 /FVC error from an obstructed waveform to a clinical data set. Spirogram quality was determined by grading spirograms using acceptability and repeatability criteria. The relationship between the number of tests performed by a clinic and test quality was assessed. Only 1 of 17 spirometers met accuracy criteria, with mean errors for FVC, FEV 1 , and FEV 1 /FVC ranging from 1.7 to 3.1%. Applying the percentage error to a clinical data set resulted in 28% of tests being recategorized from obstructed to nonobstructed. Of the spirograms reviewed, 60% were considered acceptable for clinical use. There was no association between the number of tests performed by a clinic and spirometry quality. Most spirometers tested were not accurate. The magnitude of the errors resulted in significant changes in the categorization of patients with obstruction. Acceptable-quality tests were produced for only 60% of patients. Our results raise concerns regarding the utility of spirometry obtained in primary care offices without greater attention to quality assurance and training.

  6. Non-obstructive patterns of spirometry among obese patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, there is paucity of data regarding presentation of obese patients with non-obstructive patterns of spirometry. Methods: A sample of 295 known ... Measurements were carried out on presentation and then 15 minutes following inhalation of 0.5 mg salbutamol using a spacer. Results: Typical obstructive pattern was ...

  7. Prediction Equations for Spirometry for Children from Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Sunil K; Kumar, Rajeev; Mittal, Vikas

    2016-09-08

    To develop prediction equations for spirometry for children from northern India using current international guidelines for standardization. Re-analysis of cross-sectional data from a single school. 670 normal children (age 6-17 y; 365 boys) of northern Indian parentage. After screening for normal health, we carried out spirometry with recommended quality assurance according to current guidelines. We developed linear and nonlinear prediction equations using multiple regression analysis. We selected the final models on the basis of the highest coefficient of multiple determination (R2) and statistical validity. Spirometry parameters: FVC, FEV1, PEFR, FEF50, FEF75 and FEF25-75. The equations for the main parameters were as follows: Boys, Ln FVC = -1.687+0.016*height +0.022*age; Ln FEV1 = -1.748+0.015*height+0.031*age. Girls, Ln FVC = -9.989 +(2.018*Ln(height)) + (0.324*Ln(age)); Ln FEV1 = -10.055 +(1.990*Ln(height))+(0.358*Ln(age)). Nonlinear regression yielded substantially greater R2 values compared to linear models except for FEF50 for girls. Height and age were found to be the significant explanatory variables for all parameters on multiple regression with weight making no significant contribution. We developed prediction equations for spirometry for children from northern India. Nonlinear equations were superior to linear equations.

  8. Spirometry: a predictor of lung cancer among asbestos workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowska, Beata; Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, Neonila

    2017-01-01

    The significance of lung function as an independent risk factor for lung cancer remains unclear. The objective of the study is to answer the question if spirometry can identify patients at risk for lung cancer among people occupationally exposed to asbestos dust in the past. In order to identify a group of individuals with the highest risk of lung cancer incidence based on lung function levels of FEV 1 % predicted value, we examined 6882 subjects enrolled in the health surveillance program for asbestos related diseases over the years 2000-2014. We found a total of 110 cases confirmed as primary lung cancer. Using Cox's proportional hazards model after adjustment for age, gender, number of cigarettes, duration of smoking and cumulative asbestos exposure, we estimated that compared with the subjects with FEV 1 ≥90% pred, the HR of lung cancer was 1.40 (95%CI: 0.94-2.08) for the subjects with FEV 1 less than 90% and 1.95 (HR = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.12-3.08) for those with FEV 1 less than 70%. In addition, probability of the occurrence of lung cancer for FEV 1 spirometry and cancer diagnosis was three years or less. The results strongly support the hypothesis that spirometry can identify patients at a risk of lung cancer development. Regular spirometry should be offered to all patients with a history of asbestos exposure, at least once every three years.

  9. A Rwandan spirometry and resting ventilation study | Gahutu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To illustrate spirometric population variation and ventilatory adaptation to moderate altitude, we report the spirometric and resting ventilation values observed in a student population in Butare, Rwanda (altitude: 1 768 m; barometric pressure: 629 mm Hg). Spirometry was carried out with a Mijnhardt Volutest VT-3 ...

  10. Paediatric spirometry guideline of the South African Thoracic Society ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirometry forms an important component in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary diseases in children. In the paediatric setting, there are different challenges in terms of performance and interpretation of good quality and reliable tests. An awareness of the physiological and developmental aspects that exist in ...

  11. Five tips for good office spirometry | Maree | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 9 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Five tips for good office spirometry. DM Maree. Abstract. No Abstract.

  12. Spirometry filters can be used to detect exhaled respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alicia B; Mourad, Bassel; Tovey, Euan; Buddle, Lachlan; Peters, Matthew; Morgan, Lucy; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-09-26

    Respiratory viruses are very common in the community and contribute to the burden of illness for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, including acute exacerbations. Traditional sampling methods are invasive and problematic to repeat. Accordingly, we explored whether respiratory viruses could be isolated from disposable spirometry filters and whether detection of viruses in this context represented presence in the upper or lower respiratory tract. Discovery (n  =  53) and validation (n  =  49) cohorts were recruited from a hospital outpatient department during two different time periods. Spirometry mouthpiece filters were collected from all participants. Respiratory secretions were sampled from the upper and lower respiratory tract by nasal washing (NW), sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). All samples were examined using RT-PCR to identify a panel of respiratory viruses (rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza virus 1, 2 & 3, and human metapneumovirus). Rhinovirus was quantified using qPCR. Paired filter-NW samples (n  =  29), filter-sputum samples (n  =  24), filter-BAL samples (n  =  39) and filter-NW-BAL samples (n  =  10) provided a range of comparisons. At least one virus was detected in any sample in 85% of participants in the discovery cohort versus 45% in the validation cohort. Overall, 72% of viruses identified in the paired comparator method matched those detected in spirometry filters. There was a high correlation between viruses identified in spirometry filters compared with viruses identified in both the upper and lower respiratory tract using traditional sampling methods. Our results suggest that examination of spirometry filters may be a novel and inexpensive sampling method for the presence of respiratory viruses in exhaled breath.

  13. [Spirometry is a good method for detecting and monitoring chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in high-risk smokers in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clotet, J; Gómez-Arbonés, X; Ciria, C; Albalad, J M

    2004-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease, the early diagnosis of which allows effective management and treatment. The aim of the present study is to show the effectiveness of a screening and monitoring plan for COPD in high-risk patients in primary health care. The subjects in this prospective observational longitudinal study comprised 164 high-risk smokers aged between 40 and 76 years. Age, sex, weight, height, and smoking habit (pack-years) were recorded and spirometry was performed according to the guidelines of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR). Patients were informed of their results and given brief advice on how to stop smoking. After 3 years, the patients underwent the same evaluation. In 1999, 22% of the smokers were diagnosed with COPD. Three years later, an additional 16.3% were diagnosed as having COPD, and the disease had worsened in 38.8% of those already diagnosed. Of the patients with a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) less than 90%, 44.8% developed COPD (relative risk: 10.54). An accelerated decrease in FEV1 was found in 18.1% of the patients (20.7% with COPD and 9.0% without COPD). Mean tobacco consumption in 1999 was 28.1 pack-years in subjects without COPD and 31.7 pack-years in those with COPD, whereas in 2002, consumption was 30.6 pack-years in patients with COPD and 31.9 pack-years in those without. In 3 years, 22.8% had stopped smoking (20.5% without COPD and 30.3% with COPD). Many smokers managed to give up smoking after learning their spirometric results. FEV1 can identify smokers at greatest risk of developing COPD. Spirometric screening and monitoring of smokers at high risk in primary health care can identify those most susceptible to developing COPD while the disease is in an early phase. Therefore the most appropriate strategy can be adopted for each patient.

  14. Variant formula for predicting peak expiratory flow rate in pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Observed Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), Predicted and Variant PEFR values in 123 females at their reproductive ages, living in Kura local government area of Kano State, Nigeria and its environs were obtained. The prediction and variant formulae used were; PEFR= 0.36AGE – 0.47WT + 391.67 and K = mean CC x ...

  15. predicted peak expiratory flow in human and the clinical implication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    values using formula developed by (Gregg, 1973) at 50th percentile for age, height and weight obtained from our study (Salisu ... Keywords: Peak expiratory flow, Asthma, Practice guidelines, reference values. INTRODUCTION. The National ... that the personal best PEF may be estimated after a. 2-to-3-week period in which ...

  16. Peak expiratory flow rate and respiratory symptoms following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of 350 rural women aged (20-70 years) in Edo State, Nigeria who actively used wood as a source of fuel for cooking was measured. The height, chest circumference, weight and blood pressure of the women were also measured. Respiratory symptoms of cough with sputum production, ...

  17. Factors influencing peak expiratory flow in teenage boys | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) is a useful measure of pulmonary health status and is frequently utilised in asthm, management. Reduction in PEF is usually indicative of OIlS( of asthma symptoms. However, use can be made of PEF values only if normal values are known. The definition of normal range is always ...

  18. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Petroleum Depot Workers and Petrol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) values in litres per minute were determined in petrol depot loaders, petrol station attendants and in control subjects. The PEFR values were 315 ± 94, 386 + 91 and 529 + 94 litres/min. in depot workers, petrol attendants and control subjects respectively. The value in the control subjects ...

  19. variant formula for predicting peak expiratory flow rate in pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    The graph illustrates close association of variant formula with the observed values of PEFR obtained from the study. Variant formula may be useful in clinical setting to assess people with respiratory disorders especially asthma. Key words: Variant formula, Peak expiratory flow rate, Pregnancy, Kura local government area.

  20. Changes in Peak Expiratory Flow Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the effect of different concentrations of coffee on peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), blood pressure and pulse rate in an attempt to determine some physiological effects of coffee intake. 18 apparently healthy adult males, age range 20 to 30 years, were recruited for the study over a three day period. Varying ...

  1. Public spirometry campaign in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease screening - hope or hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyński, Piotr; Górska, Katarzyna; Jankowski, Piotr; Kosiński, Jakub; Kudas, Agata; Sułek, Katarzyna; Jankowska, Maria; Jaśkiewicz, Kaja; Krenke, Rafał

    2017-01-01

    Underdiagnosis of COPD seems to be a relevant clinical and social problem. We hypothesized that active public spirometry campaign may help identify subjects with airflow limitation consistent with COPD. The aim of the study was (1) to evaluate the willingness of random smokers to undergo public spirometry, (2) to assess the ability to obtain an acceptable quality spirometry during a public campaign, and (3) to assess the relationships between the presence and severity of respiratory symptoms and readiness to undergo spirometry. Pedestrians aged > 40 years and a smoking history >10 pack-years were recruited by medical students to fill a questionnaire and perform spirometry. Those with obstructive or borderline ventilatory insuffciency were invited and encouraged to undergo stationary spirometry in a pulmonary outpatient department. Nine hundred and five subjects meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to the study. Only 178 subjects agreed to complete the questionnaire and undergo spirometry. Airway obstruction and borderline spirometry result (classified as possible airway obstruction) were found in 22 and 37 subjects, respectively. Of these, only 15 patients attended follow-up visit to verify public spirometry results. Extrapolation of the limited data showed the incidence of newly diagnosed airway obstruction as 10.7%. Public spirometry campaign does not seem to be an effective way of COPD screening. Smokers are reluctant to undergo complimentary spirometry even in the presence of pronounced respiratory symptoms. Our observations may be helpful in elaborating future screening programs for COPD.

  2. Pilot program on distance training in spirometry testing - the technology feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowiński, Adam; Romański, Emil; Bieleń, Przemysław; Bednarek, Michał; Puścińska, Elżbieta; Goljan-Geremek, Anna; Pływaczewski, Robert; Śliwinski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Office spirometry has been widely used in recent years by general practitioners in primary care setting, thus the need for stricter monitoring of the quality of spirometry has been recognized. A spirometry counseling network of outpatients clinics was created in Poland using portable spirometer Spirotel. The spirometry data were transferred to counseling centre once a week. The tests sent to the counseling centre were analyzed by doctors experienced in the analysis of spirometric data. In justified cases they sent their remarks concerning performed tests to the centres via e-mail. We received 878 records of spirometry tests in total. Data transmission via the telephone was 100% effective. The quality of spirometry tests performed by outpatients clinics was variable. The use of spirometers with data transfer for training purposes seems to be advisable. There is a need to proper face-to-face training of spirometry operators before an implementation of any telemedicine technology.

  3. Quality of spirometry in primary care for case finding of airway obstruction in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuppi, J D; Miedinger, D; Chhajed, P N; Buess, C; Schafroth, S; Bucher, H C; Tamm, M

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its severity determination is based on spirometry. The quality of spirometry is crucial. Our aim was to assess the quality of spirometry performed using a spirometer with automated feedback and quality control in a general practice setting in Switzerland and to determine the prevalence of airflow limitation in smokers aged > or =40 years. Current smokers > or =40 years of age were consecutively recruited for spirometry testing by general practitioners. General practitioners received spirometry training and were provided with an EasyOne spirometer. Spirometry tests were assigned a quality grade from A to D and F, based on the criteria of the National Lung Health Education Program. Only spirometry tests graded A-C (reproducible measurements) were included in the analysis of airflow limitation. A total of 29,817 spirometries were analyzed. Quality grades A-D and F were assigned to 33.9, 7.1, 19.4, 27.8 and 11.8% of spirometries, respectively. 95% required spirometries assigned grade A. The prevalence of mild, moderate, severe and very severe airway obstruction in individuals with spirometries graded A-C was 6, 15, 5 and 1%, respectively. Spirometries in general practice are of acceptable quality with reproducible spirometry in 60% of measurements. Airway obstruction was found in 27% of current smokers aged > or =40 years. Office spirometry provides a simple and quick means of detecting airflow limitation, allowing earlier diagnosis and intervention in many patients with early COPD. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Unidirectional Expiratory Valve Method to Assess Maximal Inspiratory Pressure in Individuals without Artificial Airway.

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    Samantha Torres Grams

    Full Text Available Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP is considered an effective method to estimate strength of inspiratory muscles, but still leads to false positive diagnosis. Although MIP assessment with unidirectional expiratory valve method has been used in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, no previous studies investigated the application of this method in subjects without artificial airway.This study aimed to compare the MIP values assessed by standard method (MIPsta and by unidirectional expiratory valve method (MIPuni in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. MIPuni reproducibility was also evaluated.This was a crossover design study, and 31 subjects performed MIPsta and MIPuni in a random order. MIPsta measured MIP maintaining negative pressure for at least one second after forceful expiration. MIPuni evaluated MIP using a unidirectional expiratory valve attached to a face mask and was conducted by two evaluators (A and B at two moments (Tests 1 and 2 to determine interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of MIP values. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1] was used to determine intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility.The mean values for MIPuni were 14.3% higher (-117.3 ± 24.8 cmH2O than the mean values for MIPsta (-102.5 ± 23.9 cmH2O (p<0.001. Interobserver reproducibility assessment showed very high correlation for Test 1 (ICC[2,1] = 0.91, and high correlation for Test 2 (ICC[2,1] = 0.88. The assessment of the intraobserver reproducibility showed high correlation for evaluator A (ICC[2,1] = 0.86 and evaluator B (ICC[2,1] = 0.77.MIPuni presented higher values when compared with MIPsta and proved to be reproducible in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway.

  5. Effect of forced breathing on ventilatory functions of the lung.

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    Joshi L

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Ventilatory functions were studied in 36 male and 35 female subjects (mean age 18.5 years, who underwent six weeks course in forced breathing. Ventilatory functions were studied in the form of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume at the end of one second as % of FVC (FEV1%, Maximum Voluntary Ventilation (MVV, Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR and Breath Holding Time. Some of these ventilatory functions were found to be increased after a course of forced breathing.

  6. The Use of Home Spirometry in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

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    Aarti Shakkottai MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is poor among pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with adolescents having one of the lowest adherence rates. We wanted to identify an adherence intervention that would be acceptable to CF adolescents and assess its feasibility. We surveyed 40 adolescents with CF and asked about barriers to and motivators for their own adherence and to generate ideas for potential adherence interventions. Since most of the respondents chose frequent spirometry at home and medication reminders for interventions, we selected 5 subjects, 10 to 14 years of age, with CF to test the feasibility of home spirometry and medication reminders in pediatric CF patients. This article summarizes the results of both the survey and the feasibility pilot study.

  7. Criteria for inhalation exposure systems utilizing concurrent flow spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, O.G.; Yeh, H.C.

    1974-01-01

    Principles are given for the design and operation of a new class of inhalation exposure systems utilizing concurrent flow spirometry (CFS), a simple method for providing realtime measurement of respiratory volumes and rates during inhalation exposure by mouth or nose of individual experimental animals or man to aerosols or gases. This technique is especially useful for inhalation exposure of larger experimental animals, such as horses, where whole-body plethysmography is usually impractical. Difficulties encountered with conventional exposure systems in maintenance of uniform aerosol or gas concentrations and prevention of large pressure excursions in the exposure chamber during breathing are obviated by systems utilizing the principles of concurrent flow spirometry. For illustration, two exposure units with CFS are described, one for exposure of Beagle dogs and one for ponies. (U.S.)

  8. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation by radiography and spirometry *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawassaki, Alexandre Melo; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Uliana Kay, Fernando; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine whether simple diagnostic methods can yield relevant disease information in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA were randomly selected for inclusion in a cross-sectional study involving clinical evaluation of pulmonary function, including pulse oximetry (determination of SpO2, at rest), chest X-ray, and spirometry. Results: A total of 246 RA patients underwent complete assessments. Half of the patients in our sample reported a history of smoking. Spirometry was abnormal in 30% of the patients; the chest X-ray was abnormal in 45%; and the SpO2 was abnormal in 13%. Normal chest X-ray, spirometry, and SpO2 were observed simultaneously in only 41% of the RA patients. A history of smoking was associated with abnormal spirometry findings, including evidence of obstructive or restrictive lung disease, and with abnormal chest X-ray findings, as well as with an interstitial pattern on the chest X-ray. Comparing the patients in whom all test results were normal (n = 101) with those in whom abnormal test results were obtained (n = 145), we found a statistically significant difference between the two groups, in terms of age and smoking status. Notably, there were signs of airway disease in nearly half of the patients with minimal or no history of tobacco smoke exposure. Conclusions: Pulmonary involvement in RA can be identified through the use of a combination of diagnostic methods that are simple, safe, and inexpensive. Our results lead us to suggest that RA patients with signs of lung involvement should be screened for lung abnormalities, even if presenting with no respiratory symptoms. PMID:26398753

  9. Spirometry. Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Río, Francisco; Calle, Myriam; Burgos, Felip; Casan, Pere; Del Campo, Félix; Galdiz, Juan B; Giner, Jordi; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Ortega, Francisco; Puente Maestu, Luis

    2013-09-01

    Spirometry is the main pulmonary function test and is essential for the evaluation and monitoring of respiratory diseases. Its utility transcends the field of Respiratory Medicine, is becoming increasingly important in primary care and applications have even been described outside the field of respiratory diseases. This document is therefore intended to serve as support for all health professionals who use spirometry, providing recommendations based on the best scientific evidence available. An update of the indications and contraindications of the test is proposed. The document sets out recommendations on the requirements necessary for conventional spirometers and portable office equipment, as well as on spirometer hygiene and quality control measures. Spirometric parameters that must be considered, performance of manoeuvres, criteria for acceptability and repeatability of measurements and their quality control are defined. A proposal is also established for presentation of the results and an evaluation and interpretation is proposed according to information generated in recent years. Finally, lines of adaptation and integration of spirometry in the field of new technologies are considered. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Challenges in Collating Spirometry Reference Data for South-Asian Children: An Observational Study.

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    Sooky Lum

    Full Text Available Spirometry datasets from South-Asian children were collated from four centres in India and five within the UK. Records with transcription errors, missing values for height or spirometry, and implausible values were excluded(n = 110.Following exclusions, cross-sectional data were available from 8,124 children (56.3% male; 5-17 years. When compared with GLI-predicted values from White Europeans, forced expired volume in 1s (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC in South-Asian children were on average 15% lower, ranging from 4-19% between centres. By contrast, proportional reductions in FEV1 and FVC within all but two datasets meant that the FEV1/FVC ratio remained independent of ethnicity. The 'GLI-Other' equation fitted data from North India reasonably well while 'GLI-Black' equations provided a better approximation for South-Asian data than the 'GLI-White' equation. However, marked discrepancies in the mean lung function z-scores between centres especially when examined according to socio-economic conditions precluded derivation of a single South-Asian GLI-adjustment.Until improved and more robust prediction equations can be derived, we recommend the use of 'GLI-Black' equations for interpreting most South-Asian data, although 'GLI-Other' may be more appropriate for North Indian data. Prospective data collection using standardised protocols to explore potential sources of variation due to socio-economic circumstances, secular changes in growth/predictors of lung function and ethnicities within the South-Asian classification are urgently required.

  11. On the respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillation technique in patients with systemic sclerosis.

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    Ingrid Almeida Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary complications are the most common cause of death and morbidity in systemic sclerosis (SSc. The forced oscillation technique (FOT offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that SSc may introduce changes in the resistive and reactive properties of the respiratory system, and that FOT may help the diagnosis of these abnormalities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested these hypotheses in controls (n = 30 and patients with abnormalities classified using spirometry (n = 52 and pulmonary volumes (n = 29. Resistive data were interpreted with the zero-intercept resistance (Ri and the slope of the resistance (S as a function of frequency. Reactance changes were evaluated by the mean reactance between 4 and 32 Hz (Xm and the dynamic compliance (Crs,dyn. The mechanical load was evaluated using the absolute value of the impedance in 4 Hz (Z4Hz. A compartmental model was used to obtain central (R and peripheral (Rp resistances, and alveolar compliance (C. The clinical usefulness was evaluated by investigating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. The presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL was also evaluated. For the groups classified using spirometry, SSc resulted in increased values in Ri, R, Rp and Z4Hz (p0.90. In groups classified by pulmonary volume, SSc resulted in reductions in S, Xm, C and Crs,dyn (p0.80. It was also observed that EFL is not common in patients with SSc. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that the respiratory resistance and reactance are changed in SSc. This analysis provides a useful description that is of particular significance for understanding respiratory pathophysiology and to ease the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in these patients.

  12. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnberg, P O; de Villota, E D; Eklund, J; Granberg, P O

    1978-01-01

    The effects were studied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on renal function in eight patients with acute respiratory failure, requiring mechanical ventilation. On application of PEEP + 10 cm H2O, central venous pressure increased, systolic blood pressure decreased, urine flow and PAH-clearance were reduced, while inulin clearance remained stable. There was a marked increase in fractional sodium reabsorption and a concurrent decrease in fractional osmolal excretion. Fractional free-water clearance and the ratio UOsm/POsm did change.

  13. Diagnostic methods to assess inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, Pedro; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira de; Santana, Pauliane Vieira; Cardenas, Leticia Zumpano; Ferreira, Jeferson George; Prina, Elena; Trevizan, Patrícia Fernandes; Pereira, Mayra Caleffi; Iamonti, Vinicius; Pletsch, Renata; Macchione, Marcelo Ceneviva; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of (inspiratory and expiratory) respiratory muscles is a common clinical finding, not only in patients with neuromuscular disease but also in patients with primary disease of the lung parenchyma or airways. Although such impairment is common, its recognition is usually delayed because its signs and symptoms are nonspecific and late. This delayed recognition, or even the lack thereof, occurs because the diagnostic tests used in the assessment of respiratory muscle strength are not w...

  14. Diagnostic methods to assess inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Caruso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of (inspiratory and expiratory respiratory muscles is a common clinical finding, not only in patients with neuromuscular disease but also in patients with primary disease of the lung parenchyma or airways. Although such impairment is common, its recognition is usually delayed because its signs and symptoms are nonspecific and late. This delayed recognition, or even the lack thereof, occurs because the diagnostic tests used in the assessment of respiratory muscle strength are not widely known and available. There are various methods of assessing respiratory muscle strength during the inspiratory and expiratory phases. These methods are divided into two categories: volitional tests (which require patient understanding and cooperation; and non-volitional tests. Volitional tests, such as those that measure maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, are the most commonly used because they are readily available. Non-volitional tests depend on magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerve accompanied by the measurement of inspiratory mouth pressure, inspiratory esophageal pressure, or inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure. Another method that has come to be widely used is ultrasound imaging of the diaphragm. We believe that pulmonologists involved in the care of patients with respiratory diseases should be familiar with the tests used in order to assess respiratory muscle function.Therefore, the aim of the present article is to describe the advantages, disadvantages, procedures, and clinical applicability of the main tests used in the assessment of respiratory muscle strength.

  15. Abdominal expiratory muscle activity in anesthetized vagotomized neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Makito

    2009-05-01

    The pattern of respiratory activity in abdominal muscles was studied in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing, vagotomized neonatal rats at postnatal days 0-3. Anesthesia (2.0% isoflurane, 50% O(2)) depressed breathing and resulted in hypercapnia. Under this condition, abdominal muscles showed discharge late in the expiratory phase (E2 activity) in most rats. As the depth of anesthesia decreased, the amplitude of discharges in the diaphragm and abdominal muscles increased. A small additional burst frequently occurred in abdominal muscles just after the termination of diaphragmatic inspiratory activity (E1 or postinspiratory activity). Since this E1 activity is not often observed in adult rats, the abdominal respiratory pattern likely changes during postnatal development. Anoxia-induced gasping after periodic expiratory activity without inspiratory activity, and in most rats, abdominal expiratory activity disappeared before terminal apnea. These results suggest that a biphasic abdominal motor pattern (a combination of E2 and E1 activity) is a characteristic of vagotomized neonatal rats during normal respiration.

  16. Observational study on efficacy of negative expiratory pressure test proposed as screening for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome among commercial interstate bus drivers - protocol study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata Raquel P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a respiratory disease characterized by the collapse of the extrathoracic airway and has important social implications related to accidents and cardiovascular risk. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether the drop in expiratory flow and the volume expired in 0.2 s during the application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP are associated with the presence and severity of OSA in a population of professional interstate bus drivers who travel medium and long distances. Methods/Design An observational, analytic study will be carried out involving adult male subjects of an interstate bus company. Those who agree to participate will undergo a detailed patient history, physical examination involving determination of blood pressure, anthropometric data, circumference measurements (hips, waist and neck, tonsils and Mallampati index. Moreover, specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness will be administered. Data acquisition will be completely anonymous. Following the medical examination, the participants will perform a spirometry, NEP test and standard overnight polysomnography. The NEP test is performed through the administration of negative pressure at the mouth during expiration. This is a practical test performed while awake and requires little cooperation from the subject. In the absence of expiratory flow limitation, the increase in the pressure gradient between the alveoli and open upper airway caused by NEP results in an increase in expiratory flow. Discussion Despite the abundance of scientific evidence, OSA is still underdiagnosed in the general population. In addition, diagnostic procedures are expensive, and predictive criteria are still unsatisfactory. Because increased upper airway collapsibility is one of the main determinants of OSA, the response to the application of NEP could be a predictor of this disorder. With the

  17. Spirometry reference equations for central European populations from school age to old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Mascha K; Laubender, Ruediger P; Kuster, Daniela; Braendli, Otto; Moeller, Alexander; Mansmann, Ulrich; von Mutius, Erika; Wildhaber, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry reference values are important for the interpretation of spirometry results. Reference values should be updated regularly, derived from a population as similar to the population for which they are to be used and span across all ages. Such spirometry reference equations are currently lacking for central European populations. To develop spirometry reference equations for central European populations between 8 and 90 years of age. We used data collected between January 1993 and December 2010 from a central European population. The data was modelled using "Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape" (GAMLSS). The spirometry reference equations were derived from 118'891 individuals consisting of 60'624 (51%) females and 58'267 (49%) males. Altogether, there were 18'211 (15.3%) children under the age of 18 years. We developed spirometry reference equations for a central European population between 8 and 90 years of age that can be implemented in a wide range of clinical settings.

  18. Técnica de oscilações forçadas na análise da resposta broncodilatadora em voluntários sadios e indivíduos portadores de asma brônquica com resposta positiva Using the forced oscillation technique to evaluate bronchodilator response in healthy volunteers and in asthma patients presenting a verified positive response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Veiga Cavalcanti

    2006-04-01

    expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity. RESULTS: In the control group, bronchodilator use produced a significant alteration in the resistance extrapolated to the y axis (p < 0.001, although no significant differences were observed in the slope of resistance or in dynamic compliance. Analysis of the asthma patients revealed significant differences between the prebronchodilator and postbronchodilator values for all spirometry and forced oscillation technique parameters. Values of p < 0.001 were obtained for all comparisons between the two groups. CONCLUSION: The modifications provoked by use of the forced oscillation technique were in direct concordance with the pathophysiology of the bronchodilator response in asthma patients, indicating that the forced oscillation technique could be useful as a complement to spirometry in these patients.

  19. Spirometry in an unselected group of 6-year-old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Eller, Esben; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    This study presents reference equations for spirometric parameters in 6-year-old children and evaluates the ability of spirometry to discriminate healthy children from children with asthma. Baseline spirometry and respiratory symptoms were assessed in 404 children participating in a longitudinal...... in Delta FEV1(mean) between healthy children and children with asthma (3.1% vs. 6.1%, P Spirometry including bronchodilator measurements was demonstrated...... to be feasible in 6-year-old children and reference values were determined. Spirometry aids the diagnosis of asthma in young children, but knowledge on sensitivity and specificity of these measurements is a prerequisite....

  20. Risk for COPD with Obstruction of Active Smokers with Normal Spirometry and Reduced Diffusion Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, Robert J.; Sanders, Abraham; Vincent, Thomas L.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Smokers are assessed for COPD using spirometry, with COPD defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as airflow limitation not fully reversible with bronchodilators. There is a subset of smokers with normal spirometry (by GOLD criteria), who have a low diffusion capacity (DLCO), a parameter linked to emphysema and small airway disease. The natural history of these “normal spirometry/low DLCO” smokers is unknown. Methods From a cohort of 1570 smokers in the New York City metropolitian area, all of whom had normal spirometry, two groups were randomly selected for lung function follow-up: smokers with normal spirometry/normal DLCO (n=59) and smokers with normal spirometry/low DLCO (n=46). All had normal history, physical examination, CBC, urinalysis, HIV status, α1-antitrypsin level, chest X-ray, FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio and total lung capacity (TLC). Throughout the study, all continued to be active smokers. Findings In the normal spirometry/normal DLCO group assessed over 45 ± 20 months, 3% developed GOLD-defined COPD. In contrast, in the normal spirometry/low DLCO group, followed over 41 ± 31 months, 22% developed GOLD-defined COPD. Interpretation Despite appearing “normal” by GOLD, smokers with normal spirometry but low DLCO are at significant risk for developing COPD with obstruction to airflow. PMID:26541521

  1. Myelodysplastic syndrome patients present more severe respiratory muscle impairment and reduced forced vital capacity: Is disordered inflammatory signaling the culprit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Memória Okubo

    Full Text Available The ageing process is associated with gradual decline in respiratory system performance. Anemia is highly prevalent among older adults and usually associated with adverse outcomes. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies with increasing incidence with age and characterized by anemia and other cytopenias. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate respiratory muscle strength and lung function in elderly patients with anemia, compare data between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal anemias and evaluate the influence of serum IL-8 level and NF-kB activity on deteriorate pulmonary function in this specific population.Individuals aged 60 and older with anemia secondary to MDS, non-clonal anemia and healthy elderly individuals.Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, and FEV1/ FVC ratio were measured by spirometry. Respiratory muscle strength was evaluated by maximal static respiratory pressures measurement. IL-8 analysis was performed by ELISA and activity of NF-kB by chemiluminescent assay.Mean Hb concentration was comparable between patients with anemia. Significant differences were detected between all patients with anemia and controls for maximum-effort inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax and also for maximum-effort expiratory mouth pressure (PEmax. The MDS group recorded a significantly lower PImax and PEmax percent predicted when compared to non-clonal anemia group. For FVC and FEV1, a significant difference was found in anemic patients, with even significantly lower values for FVC and FEV1 in MDS group. No significant differences were detected for PImax and PEmax and spirometry parameters when anemic patients were stratified according to the degree of anemia. A significant negative impact in FVC (% pred, PImax (% pred and PEmax (% pred was observed in patients with MDS and higher levels of IL-8 or increased activity of NF-kB.A negative impact of anemia

  2. Bronchodilator responsiveness of peripheral airways in smokers with normal spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetmalani, Kanika; Chapman, David G; Thamrin, Cindy; Farah, Claude S; Berend, Norbert; Salome, Cheryl M; King, Gregory G

    2016-10-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure increases airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility. Abnormalities in peripheral airway function in smokers with normal spirometry could be due to the effects of ASM tone. We aimed to determine the contribution of ASM tone to peripheral airway function in smokers with normal spirometry from the response to bronchodilator (BD). Ventilation heterogeneity in peripheral conductive (Scond) and acinar (Sacin) airways were measured in 50 asymptomatic smokers and 20 never-smokers using multiple breath nitrogen washout, before and 20 min after inhalation of 200 µg salbutamol and 80 µg ipratropium bromide. Z-scores were calculated to define abnormality in Sacin and Scond. Nineteen smokers had abnormal Sacin, and 12 had abnormal Scond; 7 had abnormalities in both. After BD, Sacin improved in smokers with normal Sacin (6.5 ± 15.9%, P = 0.02), smokers with abnormal Sacin (9.2 ± 16.9%, P = 0.03) and in control subjects (11.7 ± 18.2%, P = 0.01), with no differences in improvements between groups. Sacin remained abnormal in 15/19 smokers and their post-BD values correlated with smoking exposure (r = 0.53, P = 0.02). After BD, Scond improved in smokers with abnormal Scond (28.3 ± 15.9%, P = 0.002) and normalized in 9/12 subjects, but not in those with normal Scond (0.25 ± 32.7%, P = 0.44) or control subjects (-1.7 ± 21.2%, P = 0.64). In smokers with normal spirometry, abnormal conductive airway function could be attributed to increased bronchomotor tone. In contrast, bronchomotor tone in acinar airways is unaffected by smoking and functional abnormality. There may be different causal mechanisms underlying acinar and conductive airway abnormalities in smokers with normal spirometry. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  3. Periodic leg movement, nasal CPAP, and expiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Won Hee; Guilleminault, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may appear during nasal CPAP titration, persisting despite the elimination of hypopneas. Systematic recordings of expiratory abdominal muscles on the right and left sides with surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes lateral to navel, and close from the lateral side of abdomen, were added during nasal CPAP titration for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Positive airway pressure was titrated during nocturnal polysomnography, based on analysis of the flow curve derived from the CPAP equipment and EEG analysis, including persistence of phases A2 and A3 of the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP). The requirement was to eliminate American Association of Sleep Medicine (AASM)-defined hypopnea and also flow limitation and abnormal EEG patterns. When CPAP reached valid results, it was lowered at the time of awakening by 2 or 3 cm H(2)O, and titration was performed again. Data collected during a 7-month period on adults with a prior diagnosis of OSA who had received treatment with nasal CPAP regardless of age and sex were rendered anonymous and were retrospectively rescored by a blinded investigator. Eighty-one successively seen patients with PLMs during CPAP titration were investigated. Elimination of AASM-defined hypopnea was not sufficient to eliminate the PLMs observed during the titration; higher CPAP eliminated flow limitation and CAP phases A2 and A3 and persisting PLMs. PLMs were associated with simultaneous EMG bursts in expiratory abdominal muscles. The presence of PLMs during CPAP titration indicates the persistence of sleep-disordered breathing. PLMs during CPAP titration are related to the presence of abdominal expiratory muscle activity.

  4. Spirometry Use among Older Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: 1999–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Sharma, Gulshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Clinical practice guidelines recommend spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and facilitate management. National trends in spirometry use in older adults with newly diagnosed COPD are not known. Objectives: To examine the rate and beneficiary characteristics associated with spirometry use in subjects with newly diagnosed COPD between 1999 and 2008. Methods: We examined newly diagnosed beneficiaries with COPD using a 5% Medicare population from 1999 to 2008. A new COPD diagnosis required two outpatient visits or one hospitalization with primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code 491.xx, 492.xx, or 496 occurring at least 30 days apart with none in the prior 12 months. The primary measurement was spirometry performed within 365 days (±) of the first claim with a COPD diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Between 1999 and 2008, 64,985 subjects were newly diagnosed with COPD. Of these, 35,739 (55%) had spirometry performed within 1 year before or after the initial diagnosis of COPD. Spirometry use increased from 51.3% in 1999 to 58.3% in 2008 (P spirometry. In a multivariable analysis, compared with 1999, subjects diagnosed in 2008 had 10% higher odds (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–1.13) of having spirometry performed. Conclusions: Despite an increase in the use of spirometry over time in newly diagnosed older adults with COPD, spirometry use remains low. Clinical practice guidelines and educational efforts should focus on increasing the use of spirometry to diagnose and manage COPD. PMID:24053440

  5. Confirmatory spirometry for adults hospitalized with a diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Objective measurement of airflow obstruction by spirometry is an essential part of the diagnosis of asthma or COPD. During exacerbations, the feasibility and utility of spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unclear. Addressing these gaps in knowledge may help define the need for confirmatory testing in clinical care and quality improvement efforts. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of spirometry and to determine its utility to confirm the diagnosis in patients hospitalized with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Methods Multi-center study of four academic healthcare institutions. Spirometry was performed in 113 adults admitted to general medicine wards with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Two board-certified pulmonologists evaluated the spirometry tracings to determine the proportion of patients able to produce adequate quality spirometry data. Findings were interpreted to evaluate the utility of spirometry to confirm the presence of obstructive lung disease, according to the 2005 European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society recommendations. Results There was an almost perfect agreement for acceptability (κ = 0.92) and reproducibility (κ =0.93) of spirometry tracings. Three-quarters (73%) of the tests were interpreted by both pulmonologists as being of adequate quality. Of these adequate quality tests, 22% did not present objective evidence of obstructive lung disease. Obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) were more likely to produce spirometry tracings with no evidence of obstructive lung disease, compared to non-obese patients (33% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Conclusions Adequate quality spirometry can be obtained in most hospitalized adults with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Confirmatory spirometry could be a useful tool to help reduce overdiagnosis of obstructive lung disease, especially among obese

  6. Mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: why spirometry is not sufficient!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbehairy, Amany F; Parraga, Grace; Webb, Katherine A; Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2017-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) - an inflammatory disease of the airways, alveoli and lung microvasculature - is a leading cause of death worldwide. Smokers with milder airway obstruction constitute the majority of patients with this disease. Many studies have shown increased morbidity, activity-related dyspnea, exercise intolerance and mortality in such patients, compared with age-matched healthy populations. Clinical evaluation of symptomatic smokers with ostensibly mild airway obstruction poses a challenge in clinical practice as spirometry can obscure extensive heterogeneous pathophysiological impairment. Areas covered: A detailed review of the evidence for complex biological, physiological and radiological abnormalities in smokers who barely fit arbitrary spirometric criteria for COPD diagnosis. A brief discussion of the debate about current diagnostic spirometric criteria for COPD that can lead to diagnostic confusion and, in-some-instances, to inappropriate management. Finally, we provide a review of the clinical implications of these structural and functional abnormalities and try to build a solid rationale for earlier detection and effective, timely management. Expert commentary: The prevalence of mild COPD among smokers is high, yet under-diagnosis remains a major problem and there is lack of evidence-based management recommendations for this sub-population. Further tests beyond spirometry are useful in uncovering patho-physiological derangements that are clinically relevant.

  7. Infant ventilator design: performance during expiratory limb occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M W; Peevy, K J

    1983-01-01

    We examined the specifications and design of the inspiratory pressure regulating valve of 8 continuous flow, pressure-limited infant ventilators. Two pressure regulating designs are currently available; one placing the primary pressure regulating valve on the inspiratory limb, the other placing it on the expiratory limb. Seven ventilators incorporate the latter design to limit inspiratory pressure and must have a safety pressure-relief valve located on the inspiratory limb to vent pressure in case of circuit occlusion. These pressure-relief valves are generally set by the manufacturer far in excess of pressures normally used for infant ventilation. Alarm systems are often absent or inadequate to warn of high pressure conditions during circuit obstruction. A case report detailing the fatal complication of prolonged excessive airway pressure during circuit occlusion is presented. Improvements in the pressure-relief valve designs currently available are possible, and may be necessary to provide adequate protection from barotrauma. The majority of infant ventilators currently available expose the patient to unnecessary excessive airway pressures in the case of expiratory limb occlusion, and the lack of alarm systems may leave the operator unaware of malfunction.

  8. Introduction of spirometry into clinical practice in Georgetown, Guyana: quality and diagnostic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J C; Rempel, C; Sanders, C; Piggott, E; Maxwell, Y; Jaipersaud, K; Luknauth, R; Persaud, D; Rambaran, M; Levy, R D

    2016-09-01

    Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC), a 600-bed publicly funded referral hospital in Georgetown, Guyana. To assess spirometry quality and diagnostic outcomes 2 years after the introduction of spirometry into routine clinical practice at GPHC. We performed a retrospective review of 476 consecutive spirometry assessments performed from November 2013 to November 2015. We assessed the proportion and trend of spirometry tests meeting acceptability criteria, along with diagnostic interpretations and spirometry laboratory referral patterns. Overall, 80.4% of the 454 initial spirometry measurements on unique patients met the acceptability criteria, with no significant change in the proportion of acceptable spirometry over the study period (P = 0.450). Of the 369 (81.3%) first tests considered interpretable, 139 (30.6%) were normal, 151 (33.3%) were obstructive, 54 (11.9%) were suggestive of a restrictive pattern, 25 (5.5%) were suggestive of a mixed disorder and 119 (26.2%) tests met the definition of reversibility. Over a 2-year period, high-quality spirometry was performed in GPHC, a publicly funded hospital in a middle-income country with no pre-existing specialised respiratory service.

  9. Lack of spirometry use in Danish patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette; Christensen, René Depont; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing.......Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing....

  10. Disease Severity Prediction by Spirometry in Adults with Visceral Leishmaniasis from Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Isabel A; Bezerra, Frank S; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira de; Andrade, Heitor F; Nicodemo, Antonio C; Amato, Valdir S

    2017-02-08

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is associated with interstitial pneumonitis according to histology and radiology reports. However, studies to address the functional impact on respiratory function in patients are lacking. We assessed pulmonary function using noninvasive spirometry in a cross-sectional study of hospitalized adult VL patients from Minas Gerais, Brazil, without unrelated lung conditions or acute infections. Lung conditions were graded as normal, restrictive, obstructive, or mixed patterns, according to Brazilian consensus standards for spirometry. To control for regional patterns of lung function, we compared spirometry of patients with regional paired controls. Spirometry detected abnormal lung function in most VL patients (70%, 14/20), usually showing a restrictive pattern, in contrast to regional controls and the standards for normal tests. Alterations in spirometry measurements correlated with hypoalbuminemia, the only laboratory value indicative of severity of parasitic disease. Abnormalities did not correlate with unrelated factors such as smoking or occupation. Clinical data including pulmonary symptoms and duration of therapy were also unrelated to abnormal spirometry findings. We conclude that the severity of VL is correlated with a restrictive pattern of lung function according to spirometry, suggesting that there may be interstitial lung involvement in VL. Further studies should address whether spirometry could serve as an index of disease severity in the management of VL. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Spirometry for patients in hospital and one month after admission with an acute exacerbation of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Harry; Kenealy, Timothy; Adair, Jacqui; Robinson, Elizabeth; Sheridan, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess whether spirometry done in hospital during an admission for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is clinically useful for long-term management. Methods Patients admitted to hospital with a clinical diagnosis of AECOPD had spirometry post-bronchodilator at discharge and approximately 4 weeks later. Results Spirometry was achieved in less than half of those considered to have AECOPD. Of 49 patients who had spirometry on both occasions, 41 met the GOLD criteria for COPD at discharge and 39 of these met the criteria at 1 month. For the 41, spirometry was not statistically different between discharge and 1 month but often crossed arbitrary boundaries for classification of severity based on FEV1. The eight who did not meet GOLD criteria at discharge were either misclassified due to comorbidities that reduce FVC, or they did not have COPD as a cause of their hospital admission. Conclusion Spirometry done in hospital at the time of AECOP is useful in patients with a high pre-test probability of moderate-to-severe COPD. Small changes in spirometry at 1 month could place them up or down one grade of severity. Spirometry at discharge may be useful to detect those who warrant further investigation. PMID:22069364

  12. Implications of the Transition From Zapletal to GLI Reference Values for Spirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, Lena; Zwitserloot, Annelies; Merkus, Peter; Gappa, Monika

    The current standard for monitoring lung function in children with asthma is spirometry. In Europe, results of these lung function tests have been related to Zapletal reference values published in 1977. Recently, the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) published predicted values of spirometry for

  13. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing and second-line pulmonary function tests to detect obstructive pattern in symptomatic smokers with borderline spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Fabiano; Terraneo, Silvia; Job, Sara; Rinaldo, Rocco Francesco; Sferrazza Papa, Giuseppe Francesco; Roggi, Maria Adelaide; Santus, Pierachille; Centanni, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    The need for additional research on symptomatic smokers with normal spirometry has been recently emphasized. Albeit not meeting criteria for Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis, symptomatic smokers may experience activity limitation, evidence of airway disease, and exacerbations. We, therefore, evaluated whether symptomatic smokers with borderline spirometry (post-bronchodilator FEV 1 /FVC ratio between 5th to 20th percentile of predicted values) have pulmonary function abnormalities at rest and ventilatory constraints during exercise. 48 subjects (aged 60 ± 8 years, mean ± SD, 73% males, 16 healthy, and 17 symptomatic smokers) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), body plethysmography, nitrogen single-breath washout test (N 2 SBW), lung diffusion for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and forced oscillation technique (FOT). Compared to healthy subjects, symptomatic smokers showed: 1) reduced breathing reserve (36 ± 17 vs. 49 ± 12%, P = 0.050); 2) exercise induced dynamic hyperinflation (-0.20 ± 0.17 vs. -0.03 ± 0.21 L, P = 0.043); 3) higher residual volume (158 ± 22 vs. 112 ± 22%, P spirometry, CPET and second-line pulmonary function tests may detect obstructive pattern. These subjects should be referred for second line testing, to obtain a diagnosis, or at least to clarify the mechanisms underlying symptoms. Whether the natural history of these patients is similar to COPD, and they deserve a similar therapeutic approach is worth investigating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differences in the use of spirometry between rural and urban primary care centers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Martín, Eduardo; Soriano, Joan B; Rubio, Myriam Calle; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability and practice of spirometry, training of technicians, and spirometry features in primary care centers in Spain, evaluating those located in a rural environment against those in urban areas. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 by a telephone survey in 970 primary health care centers in Spain. The centers were divided into rural or urban depending on the catchment population. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test that included the following topics: center resources, training doctors and technicians, using the spirometer, bronchodilator test, and the availability of spirometry and maintenance. Although the sample size was achieved in both settings, rural centers (RCs) gave a lower response rate than urban centers (UCs). The number of centers without spirometry in rural areas doubled those in the urban areas. Most centers had between one and two spirometers. However, the number of spirometry tests per week was significantly lower in RCs than in UCs (4 [4.1%] vs 6.9 [5.7%], Pspirometries was higher in RCs than in UCs (209 [73.0%] vs 207 [64.2%], P=0.003). RCs were more satisfied with the spirometries (7.8 vs 7.6, P=0.019) and received more training course for interpreting spirometry (41.0% vs 33.2%, P=0.004). The performance of the bronchodilator test showed a homogeneous measure in different ways. The spirometer type and the reference values were unknown to the majority of respondents. This study shows the differences between primary care RCs and UCs in Spain in terms of performing spirometry. The findings in the present study can be used to improve the performance of spirometry in these areas.

  15. Spirometry effects on conventional and multiple flow exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Sandrah P; Linn, William S; Salam, Muhammad T; Bastain, Theresa M; Zhang, Yue; Rappaport, Edward B; Liu, Meng; Berhane, Kiros

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and research settings often require sequencing multiple respiratory tests in a brief visit. Guidelines recommend measuring the concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) before spirometry, but evidence for a spirometry carryover effect on FeNO is mixed. Only one study has investigated spirometry carryover effects on multiple flow FeNO analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate evidence for carryover effects of recent spirometry on three exhaled NO summary measures: FeNO at 50 ml/s, airway wall NO flux [J'awNO] and alveolar NO concentration [CANO] in a population-based sample of schoolchildren. Participants were 1146 children (191 with asthma), ages 12-15, from the Southern California Children's Health Study who performed spirometry and multiple flow FeNO on the same day. Approximately, half the children performed spirometry first. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate differences in exhaled NO summary measures associated with recent spirometry testing, adjusting for potential confounders. In the population-based sample, we found no evidence of spirometry carryover effects. However, for children with asthma, there was a suggestion that exhaled NO summary measures assessed ≤6 min after spirometry were lower (FeNO: 25.8% lower, 95% CI: -6.2%, 48.2%; J'awNO: 15.1% lower 95% CI: -26.5%, 43.0%; and CANO 0.43 parts per billion lower, 95% CI: -0.12, 0.98). In clinical settings, it is prudent to assess multiple flow FeNO before spirometry. In studies of healthy subjects, it may not be necessary to assess FeNO first.

  16. Incidence of tracheobronchomalacia associated with pulmonary emphysema. Detection with paired inspiratory-expiratory multidetector computed tomography using a low-dose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masanori; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Nakano, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) associated with pulmonary emphysema with paired inspiratory-expiratory multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) using a low-dose technique. This study included 56 consecutive patients (55 men, 1 woman; mean age 68.9 years) with pulmonary emphysema who had undergone paired inspiratory-expiratory CT scanning with a low-dose technique (40 mA). All images were retrospectively examined by two thoracic radiologists in a blinded fashion. The diagnosis of TBM was based on the standard criterion of >50% reduction in the cross-sectional area of the tracheobronchial lumen at the end-expiratory phase. A mild TBM criterion of >30% reduction was also reviewed. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests. The relation between the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1.0% ) and TBM was statistically analyzed. Four (7.1%) and eight (14.3%) patients were diagnosed as TBM based on the standard and mild criteria, respectively. In four patients, the percentages of luminal narrowing were 63.4% and 51.2%, respectively for tracheomalacia and 59.2% and 62.0%, respectively, for bronchomalacia. The FEV 1.0% values between patients with and without TBM showed no statistical difference. The incidence of TBM associated with pulmonary emphysema was 7.1% with the standard criterion. It is possible that TBM has been underdiagnosed in a number of patients with pulmonary emphysema. (author)

  17. Observational practice of incentive spirometry in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Íllia N D F; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F; Florêncio, Rêncio B; Campos, Tânia F; Ferreira, Gardênia H

    Stroke may lead to several health problems, but positive effects can be promoted by learning to perform physical therapy techniques correctly. To compare two different types of observational practice (video instructions and demonstration by a physical therapist) during the use of incentive spirometry (IS). A total of 20 patients with diagnosis of stroke and 20 healthy individuals (56±9.7 years) were allocated into two groups: one with observational practice with video instructions for the use of IS and the other with observational practice with demonstration by a physical therapist. Ten attempts for the correct use of IS were carried out and the number of errors and the magnitude of response were evaluated. The statistic used to compare the results was the three-way ANOVA test. The stroke subjects showed less precision when compared to the healthy individuals (mean difference 1.80±0.38) 95%CI [1.02-2.52], pstroke subjects showed more errors with the video instructions (mean difference 1.5±0.5, 95%CI [0.43-2.56] (p=0.08)) and therapist demonstration (mean difference 2.40±0.52, 95%CI [1.29-3.50] (p=0.00)) when compared to the healthy individuals. The stroke subjects had a worse performance in learning the use of volume-oriented incentive spirometry when compared to healthy individuals; however, there was no difference between the types of observational practice, suggesting that both may be used to encourage the use of learning IS in patients with stroke. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. [The spirometry figures of bronchoobstructive syndrome in concomitant intestinal parasitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, K; Aliyeva, G; Gadjiyeva, N

    2010-02-01

    The aim of research is to study of the spirometry figures of bronchoobstructive syndrome in concomitant intestinal parasitosis. There are 81 patients aged from 5 to 61 years (male 43, female 38) were examined. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 group - patients treated only with bronchodilator therapy (14 patients with protozoa, 14 - with helminth, 12 - with combination of parasitosis); 2 group - patients treated with bronchodilator therapy in common with anti-parasitic therapy (14 patients with protozoa, 17 - with helminth, 10 - with combination of parasitosis). There are 22 patients with bronchoobstructive syndrome without parasites were included in control group. Functional disorders at the initial examination are not significantly distinguished between patients with protozoa, helminth, with combined parasitosis and patients without parasites. Considerable differences manifested in dynamics after treatment: only bronchodilator therapy of patients infected with parasites is not lead to sufficient increase of the indices of external respiration function, even the decreasing of the most parameters were observed in patients with helminth. The least growth of spirometric indices were observed in patients from group 1 - 2,17/ 5,09% predicted volumes (-6,81min; 10,54max), the highest growth were observed in patients from group 2 - 20,26/ 12,45% p.v. (2,77min; 43,85max). The spirographic indicators increase after treatment in the control group was more moderate in comparison with 1 and 2 groups - 5,96/ 2,97% p.v. (0,39min; 9,59max). Thus, using antiparasitic therapy in common with bronchodilator therapy in treatment of patients with intestinal parasitosis (group 2) is lead to the reliably significant positive dynamic of spirometry parameters in comparison not only to 1 group (<0,05 for many parameters) but also to control group (<0,01 for many parameters).

  19. Acu-TENS and Postexercise Expiratory Flow Volume in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley P. C. Ngai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation over acupoints (Acu-TENS facilitates recovery of resting heart rate after treadmill exercise in healthy subjects. Its effect on postexercise respiratory indices has not been reported. This study investigates the effect of Acu-TENS on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC in healthy subjects after a submaximal exercise. Eleven male subjects were invited to the laboratory twice, two weeks apart, to receive in random order either Acu-TENS or Placebo-TENS (no electrical output from the TENS unit over bilateral Lieque (LU7 and Dingchuan (EX-B1 for 45 minutes, before undergoing exercise following the Bruce protocol. Exercise duration, rate of perceived exertion (RPE, and peak heart rate (PHR were recorded. Between-group FEV1 and FVC, before, immediately after, at 15, 30, and 45minutes postexercise, were compared. While no between-group differences in PHR, RPE, and FVC were found, Acu-TENS was associated with a longer exercise duration (0.9 min (P=.026 and a higher percentage increase in FEV1 at 15 and 45 minutes postexercise (3.3 ± 3.7% (P=.013 and 5.1 ± 7.5% (P=.047, resp. compared to Placebo-TENS. We concluded that Acu-TENS was associated with a higher postexercise FEV1 and a prolongation of submaximal exercise.

  20. Use of spirometry among chest physicians and primary care physicians in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanjare, Nitin; Chhowala, Sushmeeta; Madas, Sapna; Kodgule, Rahul; Gogtay, Jaideep; Salvi, Sundeep

    2016-07-07

    Although spirometry is the gold-standard diagnostic test for obstructive airways diseases, it remains poorly utilised in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate the use of spirometry across India, the change in its usage over a period of time and to understand the reasons for its under-utilisation. Two nationwide surveys were conducted in the years 2005 and 2013, among four groups of doctors: chest physicians (CPs), general physicians (GenPs), general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians (Ps). A total of 1,000 physicians from each of the four groups were randomly selected from our database in the years 2005 and 2013. These surveys were conducted in 52 cities and towns across 15 states in India. A questionnaire was administered to the physicians, which captured information about their demographic details, type of practice and use of spirometry. The overall response rates of the physicians in 2005 and 2013 were 42.8% and 54.9%, respectively. Spirometry was reported to be used by 55% CPs, 20% GenPs, 10% GPs and 5% Ps in 2005, and this increased by 30.9% among CPs (P value spirometry varied between 2005 and 2013. In all, 32.2% of physicians were unaware of which predicted equation they were using. The use of spirometry in India is low, although it seems to have improved over the years. The reasons identified in this study for under-utilisation should be used to address initiatives to improve the use of spirometry in clinical practice.

  1. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain in postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David J; Hilliard, Paul E; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Brummett, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of postoperative incentive spirometry improves patient outcomes but is limited by pain after thoracic and upper abdominal surgery. Thoracic epidurals are frequently used to provide analgesia and attenuate postoperative pulmonary dysfunction. We hypothesized that, in patients with thoracic epidurals for thoracic and abdominal surgery, high pain scores would be associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance, even when accounting for other variables. Retrospective study of 468 patients who underwent upper abdominal or thoracic surgery using postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between June 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013, at a single tertiary academic center. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain was assessed as the primary outcome. Other independent predictors of incentive spirometry performance were also identified. Postoperative incentive spirometry performance was found to be inversely proportional to pain score, which correlated significantly stronger with deep breathing pain compared with pain at rest (-0.33 vs -0.14 on postoperative day 1; -0.23 vs -0.12 on postoperative day 2). Pain with deep breathing was independently associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance in the multivariable linear regression model (P spirometry performance could be used as another indicator of thoracic epidural efficacy. This may be particularly useful in patients reporting high pain scores postoperatively.

  2. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  3. Expiratory and expiratory plus inspiratory muscle training improves respiratory muscle strength in subjects with COPD: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Leonardo F; Reis, Manoela H; Plentz, Rodrigo D M; Matte, Darlan L; Coronel, Christian C; Sbruzzi, Graciele

    2014-09-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) produces beneficial effects in COPD subjects, but the effects of expiratory muscle training (EMT) and EMT plus IMT in ventilatory training are still unclear. The aim of this study was to systematically review the effects of EMT and EMT plus IMT compared to control groups of COPD subjects. This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis. The search strategy included MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, PEDro, and Cochrane CENTRAL and also manual search of references in published studies on the subject. Randomized trials comparing EMT and EMT plus IMT versus control groups of subjects with COPD were included. The outcomes analyzed were respiratory muscle strength and functional capacity. Two reviewers independently extracted the data. The search retrieved 609 articles. Five studies were included. We observed that EMT provided higher gain in maximum expiratory pressure (P(E(max)) 21.49 cm H2O, 95% CI 13.39-29.59) and maximum inspiratory pressure (P(I(max)) 7.68 cm H2O, 95% CI 0.90-14.45) compared to control groups. There was no significant difference in the 6-min walk test distance (29.01 m, 95% CI -39.62 to 97.65) and dyspnea (0.15, 95% CI -0.77 to 1.08). In relation to EMT plus IMT, we observed that P(E(max)) (31.98 cm H2O, 95% CI 26.93-37.03) and P(I(max)) (27.98 cm H2O, 95% CI 20.10-35.85) presented higher values compared to control groups. EMT and EMT plus IMT improve respiratory muscle strength and can be used as part of the treatment during pulmonary rehabilitation of subjects with severe to very severe COPD. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  4. Parameters affecting the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify physical parameters affecting the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation. [Methods] Eighteen patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation were included in this study. Expiratory abdominal compression was performed on patients lying in a supine position. The abdomen above the navel was vertically compressed in synchronization with expiration and released with inspiration. We measured the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression. [Results] The mean tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was higher than that at rest (430.6 ± 127.1 mL vs. 344.0 ± 94.3 mL). The tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was correlated with weight, days of ventilator support, dynamic compliance and abdominal expansion. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that weight (β = 0.499), dynamic compliance (β = 0.387), and abdominal expansion (β = 0.365) were factors contributing to the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression. [Conclusion] Expiratory abdominal compression increased the tidal volume in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation. The tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was influenced by each of the pulmonary conditions and the physical characteristics.

  5. The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on pulse pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on pulse pressure variation. FJ Smith, M Geyser, I Schreuder, PJ Becker. Abstract. Objectives: To determine the effect of different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on pulse pressure variation (PPV). Design: An observational study. Setting: Operating theatres of a ...

  6. Bronchodilator response cut-off points and FEV 0.75 reference values for spirometry in preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burity, Edjane Figueiredo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; de Andrade, Armèle Dornelas; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the cut-off points for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% bronchodilator responses in healthy preschool children and to generate reference values for FEV0.75. Methods: This was a cross-sectional community-based study involving children 3-5 years of age. Healthy preschool children were selected by a standardized questionnaire. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator use. The cut-off point of the response was defined as the 95th percentile of the change in each parameter. Results: We recruited 266 children, 160 (60%) of whom were able to perform acceptable, reproducible expiratory maneuvers before and after bronchodilator use. The mean age and height were 57.78 ± 7.86 months and 106.56 ± 6.43 cm, respectively. The success rate for FEV0.5 was 35%, 68%, and 70% in the 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, respectively. The 95th percentile of the change in the percentage of the predicted value in response to bronchodilator use was 11.6%, 16.0%, 8.5%, and 35.5% for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results provide cut-off points for bronchodilator responsiveness for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% in healthy preschool children. In addition, we proposed gender-specific reference equations for FEV0.75. Our findings could improve the physiological assessment of respiratory function in preschool children. PMID:27812631

  7. Accuracy of forced oscillation technique to assess lung function in geriatric COPD population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse HN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hoi Nam Tse,1 Cee Zhung Steven Tseng,1 King Ying Wong,2 Kwok Sang Yee,2 Lai Yun Ng1 1Medical and Geriatric Department, Respiratory Unit, Kwong Wah Hospital, 2Department of Tuberculosis and Chest Unit, Wong Tai Sin Hospital, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Performing lung function test in geriatric patients has never been an easy task. With well-established evidence indicating impaired small airway function and air trapping in patients with geriatric COPD, utilizing forced oscillation technique (FOT as a supplementary tool may aid in the assessment of lung function in this population. Aims: To study the use of FOT in the assessment of airflow limitation and air trapping in geriatric COPD patients. Study design: A cross-sectional study in a public hospital in Hong Kong. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01553812. Methods: Geriatric patients who had spirometry-diagnosed COPD were recruited, with both FOT and plethysmography performed. “Resistance” and “reactance” FOT parameters were compared to plethysmography for the assessment of air trapping and airflow limitation. Results: In total, 158 COPD subjects with a mean age of 71.9±0.7 years and percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 53.4±1.7 L were recruited. FOT values had a good correlation (r=0.4–0.7 to spirometric data. In general, X values (reactance were better than R values (resistance, showing a higher correlation with spirometric data in airflow limitation (r=0.07–0.49 vs 0.61–0.67, small airway (r=0.05–0.48 vs 0.56–0.65, and lung volume (r=0.12–0.29 vs 0.43–0.49. In addition, resonance frequency (Fres and frequency dependence (FDep could well identify the severe type (percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 second <50% of COPD with high sensitivity (0.76, 0.71 and specificity (0.72, 0.64 (area under the curve: 0.8 and 0.77, respectively. Moreover, X values could stratify different severities of air trapping, while R values could not

  8. Spirometry utilisation among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette Marie

    2015-02-01

    This PhD thesis was written during my employment at the Research Unit of General Practice in Odense, University of Southern Denmark. It comprises an overview and three papers, all published or submitted for publication in international peer-reviewed scientific journals.   Non-infectious dyspnoea, chronic cough and wheezing are common symptoms in the population. Patients often present with these symptoms in general practice and have a high probability of having obstructive lung diseases. However, there is an indication that the majority of these patients are treated empirically with pharmacotherapy targeting obstructive lung disease and only few have additional tests conducted, although the predictive value of respiratory symptoms for diagnosing obstructive lung disease has proven to be low. Spirometry is recommended as the gold standard for confirming obstructive lung disease, and testing can also rule out airway obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms caused by other illnesses, such as heart failure or lung cancer. Initiating medication for obstructive lung disease without spirometry entails the risk of these patients experiencing unnecessary delay in the diagnostic process and being exposed to unnecessary economic costs and medication risks. The literature has indicated that many users of medication targeting obstructive lung medication have not had spirometry performed and do not actually have obstructive lung disease. This potential quality gap needs to be assessed. Also, in order to target interventions enhancing earlier spirometry utilisation among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease, improved knowledge on patient and practice factors associated with spirometry testing is needed.   Among first time users of obstructive lung medication we aimed: - To assess to what extent spirometry was performed within the first year of medication use (Study I) - To assess if patient characteristics like socioeconomic and demographic

  9. The reliability and utility of spirometry performed on people with asthma in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei Burton, Deborah; LeMay, Kate S; Saini, Bandana; Smith, Lorraine; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Southwell, Phillipa; Cooke, Julie; Emmerton, Lynne; Stewart, Kay; Krass, Ines; Reddel, Helen; Armour, Carol

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability and the utility of spirometry generated by community pharmacists participating in two large asthma intervention trials of 892 people. The Pharmacy Asthma Care Program (PACP) and the Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS) involved up to four visits to the pharmacy over 6 months for counseling and goal setting. Pharmacists performed spirometry according to ATS/ERS guidelines to inform management. The proportion of A-E, F quality tests, as per EasyOne QC grades, were recorded. Lung function results between visits and for participants referred/not referred to their general practitioner on the basis of spirometry were compared. Complete data from 2593 spirometry sessions were recorded, 68.5% of spirometry sessions achieved three acceptable tests with between-test repeatability of 150 ml or less (A or B quality), 96% of spirometry sessions included at least one test that met ATS/ERS acceptability criteria. About 39.1% of participants had FEV1/FVC values below the lower limit of normal (LNN), indicating a respiratory obstruction. As a result of the service, there was a significant increase in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC and asthma control. Lung function values were significantly poorer for participants referred to their general practitioner, compared with those not referred, on the basis of spirometry. Community pharmacists are able to reliably achieve spirometry results meeting ATS/ERS guidelines in people with asthma. Significant improvements in airway obstruction were demonstrated with the pharmacy services. Pharmacists interpreted lung function results to identify airway obstruction for referral, making this a useful technique for review of people with asthma in the community.

  10. Official American Thoracic Society technical standards: spirometry in the occupational setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Carrie A; Tarlo, Susan M; Hankinson, John L; Townsend, Mary C; Eschenbacher, William L; Von Essen, Susanna G; Sigsgaard, Torben; Weissman, David N

    2014-04-15

    This document addresses aspects of the performance and interpretation of spirometry that are particularly important in the workplace, where inhalation exposures can affect lung function and cause or exacerbate lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or fibrosis. Issues that previous American Thoracic Society spirometry statements did not adequately address with respect to the workplace were identified for systematic review. Medline 1950-2012 and Embase 1980-2012 were searched for evidence related to the following: training for spirometry technicians; testing posture; appropriate reference values to use for Asians in North America; and interpretative strategies for analyzing longitudinal change in lung function. The evidence was reviewed and technical recommendations were developed. Spirometry performed in the work setting should be part of a comprehensive workplace respiratory health program. Effective technician training and feedback can improve the quality of spirometry testing. Posture-related changes in FEV1 and FVC, although small, may impact interpretation, so testing posture should be kept consistent and documented on repeat testing. Until North American Asian-specific equations are developed, applying a correction factor of 0.88 to white reference values is considered reasonable when testing Asian American individuals in North America. Current spirometry should be compared with previous tests. Excessive loss in FEV1 over time should be evaluated using either a percentage decline (15% plus loss expected due to aging) or one of the other approaches discussed, taking into consideration testing variability, worker exposures, symptoms, and other clinical information. Important aspects of workplace spirometry are discussed and recommendations are provided for the performance and interpretation of workplace spirometry.

  11. Spirometry reference equations for central European populations from school age to old age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascha K Rochat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spirometry reference values are important for the interpretation of spirometry results. Reference values should be updated regularly, derived from a population as similar to the population for which they are to be used and span across all ages. Such spirometry reference equations are currently lacking for central European populations. OBJECTIVE: To develop spirometry reference equations for central European populations between 8 and 90 years of age. MATERIALS: We used data collected between January 1993 and December 2010 from a central European population. The data was modelled using "Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape" (GAMLSS. RESULTS: The spirometry reference equations were derived from 118'891 individuals consisting of 60'624 (51% females and 58'267 (49% males. Altogether, there were 18'211 (15.3% children under the age of 18 years. CONCLUSION: We developed spirometry reference equations for a central European population between 8 and 90 years of age that can be implemented in a wide range of clinical settings.

  12. Impulse Oscillometry and Spirometry Small-Airway Parameters in Mild to Moderate Bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Jing-Jing; Gao, Yong-Hua; Li, Hui-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2016-11-01

    Both impulse oscillometry and spirometry can reflect small-airway disorders. The objective of this work was to investigate the diagnostic value of impulse oscillometry and spirometry small-airway parameters and their correlation with radiology, disease severity, and sputum bacteriology in mild to moderate bronchiectasis (bronchiectasis severity index spirometry, and sputum culture were performed. Correlation between small-airway parameters and clinical indices was determined, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and smoking history. Sensitivity analyses were repeated when excluding subjects with bronchiectasis severity index ≥9 or HRCT score ≥13. Impulse oscillometry and spirometry small-airway parameters could discriminate mild to moderate bronchiectasis from healthy subjects and correlated significantly with HRCT score and the number of bronchiectatic lobes and the bronchiectasis severity index (all P Spirometry, but not impulse oscillometry, small-airway parameters differed statistically between subjects with isolated peripheral-airway bronchiectasis and those with peripheral plus central-airway bronchiectasis (all P spirometry small-airway parameters have similar diagnostic value in reflecting peripheral-airway disorders and correlate with the HRCT scores, the bronchiectasis severity index, and the number of bronchiectatic lobes in mild to moderate bronchiectasis. Assessment of small-airway parameters should be incorporated in future lung function investigations in bronchiectasis. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. Economic Issues in the Use of Office Spirometry for Lung Health Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Krahn

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Lung Health Education Program (United States has recently recommended using office spirometry to screen for subclinical lung disease in adult smokers. No published studies evaluate the economic consequences of this recommendation. This review article outlines the issues that must be considered when evaluating the costs and health benefits of office spirometry. Much of the available data on the effectiveness of screening is from studies that included smoking cessation interventions, making it difficult to determine the effects of screening alone. The sensitivity and specificity of screening spirometry are not known, but may not be important in the economic model, because even false positive test results are beneficial if they lead to smoking cessation. Costs to be considered include those of spirometry itself, of implementing and maintaining screening and smoking cessation programs, and of their consequences, ie, reduced morbidity (lower short term health care costs and mortality (perhaps higher long term health care costs. Despite these unique challenges, data are available to perform economic analyses regarding screening spirometry. Such analyses should play a role in future clinical policy making. Even modest quit rates attributable to screening spirometry may result in highly favourable cost effectiveness ratios.

  14. Peripheral airway dysfunction and relationship with symptoms in smokers with preserved spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetmalani, Kanika; Thamrin, Cindy; Farah, Claude S; Bertolin, Amy; Chapman, David G; Berend, Norbert; Salome, Cheryl M; King, Gregory G

    2017-11-15

    Smokers develop respiratory symptoms and peripheral airway dysfunction even when spirometry is preserved. Multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) and impulse oscillometry system (IOS) are potentially useful measures of peripheral airway function but they have not been compared in such subjects. We hypothesized that MBNW and IOS are jointly abnormal in smokers with normal spirometry and that these abnormalities relate to respiratory symptoms. Eighty smokers with normal spirometry completed a symptom questionnaire, had ventilation heterogeneity in diffusion (Sacin) and convection-dependent (Scond) airways and trapped gas volume at functional residual capacity as a percentage of vital capacity (%VtrFRC/VC) measured by MBNW. Respiratory resistance and reactance at 5 and 20 Hz were measured using IOS. Respiratory symptoms were reported in 55 (68%) subjects. Forty (50%) subjects had at least one abnormal MBNW parameter, predominantly in Sacin. Forty-one (51%) subjects had at least one abnormal IOS parameter, predominantly in resistance. Sixty-one (76%) subjects had an abnormality in either MBNW or IOS. Chronic bronchitis symptoms were associated with an increased Scond, while wheeze was associated with lower spirometry and an increased resistance. Abnormalities in MBNW and IOS parameters were unrelated to each other. Respiratory symptoms and peripheral airway dysfunction are common in smokers with normal spirometry. Symptoms of chronic bronchitis related to conductive airway abnormalities, while wheeze was related to spirometry and IOS. The clinical significance of abnormalities in peripheral airway function in smokers remains undetermined. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Use of spirometry in detecting airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangash, M.H.; Zaidi, S.B.H.; Zaidi, S.M.A.; Khan, I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To detect spirometric abnormalities in asymptomatic smokers in relation to duration of smoking. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at PNS Shifa from Oct 2006 to June 2007. Subjects and Methods: Hundred individuals were included in this study who fulfilled the required criteria. Spirometry was done after briefing the patient about the procedure. Smokers were divided into two groups. Group I (5 to 9 pack years) and group II (= 10 pack years). All relevant information were recorded on Performa (Annex-A). The data was analyzed through SPSS-10, in terms of Mean +- SD (Standard Deviation) for numeric response variables and independent sample T test was applied to compare significance of proportion for numeric response variables at p < 0.05. Categorical variables were compared by applying Chi-square test at p < 0.05 level of significance. Results: Significant statistical difference was found between the mean age in the two groups with p-value of 0.011. This may be due to the longer duration of smoking history in Group II. Strong association was found between number of cigarette smoked and the pattern of airway obstruction as significant statistical difference of airway obstruction and early airflow limitation was found between the two groups of smokers at p value of 0.004. Conclusion: There is strong association between duration of smoking and development of airway obstruction even before the smoker become symptomatic. (author)

  16. Proposal Intensity Adequacy of Expiratory Effort and Heart Rate Behavior During the Valsalva Maneuver in Preadolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Augusto Paschoal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: When performing the Valsalva maneuver (VM, adults and preadolescents produce the same expiratory resistance values. Objective: To analyze heart rate (HR in preadolescents performing VM, and propose a new method for selecting expiratory resistance. Method: The maximal expiratory pressure (MEP was measured in 45 sedentary children aged 9-12 years who subsequently performed VM for 20 s using an expiratory pressure of 60%, 70%, or 80% of MEP. HR was measured before, during, and after VM. These procedures were repeated 30 days later, and the data collected in the sessions (E1, E2 were analyzed and compared in periods before, during (0-10 and 10-20 s, and after VM using nonparametric tests. Results: All 45 participants adequately performed VM in E1 and E2 at 60% of MEP. However, only 38 (84.4% and 25 (55.5% of the participants performed the maneuver at 70% and 80% of MEP, respectively. The HR delta measured during 0-10 s and 10-20 s significantly increased as the expiratory effort increased, indicating an effective cardiac autonomic response during VM. However, our findings suggest the VM should not be performed at these intensities. Conclusion: HR increased with all effort intensities tested during VM. However, 60% of MEP was the only level of expiratory resistance that all participants could use to perform VM. Therefore, 60% of MEP may be the optimal expiratory resistance that should be used in clinical practice.

  17. PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION INCREASE PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE ON CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATIENTS

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    Tintin Sukartini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limited progressive air flow in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD can caused by small airway disease (bronchiolitis obstructive and loss of elasticity of the lung (emphysema. Further it can be decreasing the quality of life in COPD patients because dyspnea and uncomfortable in activity. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR is one of the relaxation technique that can repair pulmonary ventilation by decreasing chronic constriction of the respiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on raised peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR. Method: A pre-experimental one group pre-post test design was used in this study. Population was all of the COPD patients at Pulmonary Specialist Polyclinic Dr Mohamad Soewandhie Surabaya. There were 8 respondents taken by using purposive sampling. PEFR was counted by using peak flow meter every six day. Data were analyzed by using Paired t-Test with significance level  p≤0.05. Result: The result showed that PMR had significance level on increasing of PEFR (p=0.012. Discussion: It can be concluded that PMR has an effect on raise PEFR. Further studies are recommended to measure the effect of PMR on respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR subjective dyspnoe symptoms, forced expiration volume on the first minute (FEV1 and mid maximum flow rate (MMFR in COPD patients.

  18. Expiratory flow limitation and operating lung volumes during exercise in older and younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Meskimen, Kayla; Harms, Craig A

    2017-06-01

    We determined the effect of aging on expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and operating lung volumes when matched for lung size. We hypothesized that older adults will exhibit greater EFL and increases in EELV during exercise compared to younger controls. Ten older (5M/5W; >60years old) and nineteen height-matched young adults (10M/9W) were recruited. Young adults were matched for%predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) (Y-matched%Pred FVC; n=10) and absolute FVC (Y-matched FVC; n=10). Tidal flow-volume loops were recorded during the incremental exercise test with maximal flow-volume loops measured pre- and post-exercise. Compared to younger controls, older adults exhibited more EFL at ventilations of 26, 35, 51, and 80L/min. The older group had higher end-inspiratory lung volume compared to Y-matched%Pred FVC group during submaximal ventilations. The older group increased EELV during exercise, while EELV stayed below resting in the Y-matched%Pred FVC group. These data suggest older adults exhibit more EFL and increase EELV earlier during exercise compared to younger adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exercise challenge in patients with asthma whose peak expiratory flow values are controlled within the green zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideko Kobayashi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent guidelines for the management of asthma recommend that peak expiratory flow (PEF should be measured to monitor the level of airflow limitation and to maintain PEF values within the green zone (80–100% of the patient's highest PEF value. Because no studies have evaluated the efficacy of PEF zone management on the basis of patients' physical activity, we studied the appearance of exercise-induced asthma (EIA using treadmill exercise challenging in asthma patients whose PEF values had been maintained in the green zone for at least 3 months. Exercise-induced asthma was induced in nine of 44 (20.5% asthma patients. The acetylcholine concentration required to cause a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (log PC20 was significantly lower in patients with EIA (2.39±0.21 μg/mL compared with patients without EIA (3.22±0.12 μg/mL; P <0.03. These results suggest that PEF green zone management alone does not ensure the ability to perform vigorous physical activity, especially in patients whose airway reactivity remains enhanced. Therefore, airway reactivity should be considered for asthma management.

  20. Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René Depont

    2013-01-01

    a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data...... on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008. RESULTS: A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years...... spirometry performed among men (OR = 0.78, CI = 0.69-0.88). CONCLUSION: Social inequity in spirometry testing among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease was confirmed in this study. Increased focus on spirometry testing among elderly men living alone, among the unemployed...

  1. Effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 Quality Improvement Program for Improving Asthma Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione-Smith, Rita; Zhou, Chuan; Corwin, Michael J; Taylor, James A; Rice, Fiona; Stout, James W

    To determine the effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 distance learning quality improvement (QI) program for enhancing the processes and outcomes of care for children with asthma. Cluster randomized controlled trial involving 25 matched pairs of pediatric primary care practices. Practices were recruited from 2 practice-based research networks: the Slone Center Office-based Research Network at Boston University, Boston, Mass, and the Puget Sound Pediatric Research Network, Seattle, Wash. Study participants included providers from one of the 50 enrolled pediatric practices and 626 of their patients with asthma. Process measures assessed included spirometry test quality and appropriate prescription of asthma controller medications. Outcome measures included asthma-specific health-related quality of life, and outpatient, emergency department, and inpatient utilization for asthma. At baseline, 25.4% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 50.4% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. During the 6-month postintervention period, 28.7% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 49.9% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. The adjusted difference-of-differences analysis revealed no intervention effect on spirometry test quality. Adjusted differences-of-differences analysis also revealed no intervention effect on appropriate use of controller medications or any of the parent- or patient-reported outcomes examined. In this study, the Spirometry 360 distance learning QI program was ineffective in improving spirometry test quality or parent- or patient-reported outcomes. QI programs like the one assessed here may need to focus on practices with lower baseline performance levels or may need to be tailored for those with higher baseline performance. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) for detection of respiratory abnormalities in metropolitan firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard; Malbon, Winifred; Newbury, Wendy; Holton, Christine; Smith, Michael; Morgan, Michael; Crockett, Alan

    2010-08-01

    As firefighters are at increased risk of adverse health effects, periodic examination of their respiratory health is important. The objective of this study was to establish whether the use of impulse oscillometry (IOS) reveals respiratory abnormalities in metropolitan firefighters that go undetected during routine respiratory health screening by spirometry and assessment of respiratory symptoms. This was a cross-sectional analysis of spirometry, IOS and questionnaire data from 488 male firefighters. Abnormal spirometry was defined as FEV(1), FEV(1)/FVC and/or FEF(50) below the lower limit of normal. Abnormal IOS was defined as resistance at 5 Hz (R5), frequency dependence of resistance (DeltaR5-R20) and/or reactance area (AX) above the upper limit of normal. Respiratory symptoms, smoking history, exposures and medical history were assessed. Data were analysed using logistic and linear regression models. The mean age of the firefighters was 43.8 (SD 8.4) years. There were 123 (25%) former smokers and 50 (10%) current smokers. Abnormal spirometry was detected in 12%, abnormal IOS in 9% and respiratory symptoms in 20% of firefighters. Current smoking was associated with all IOS parameters (OR for R5 = 3.1, OR for DeltaR5-R20 = 7.7, OR for AX = 4.3), and with FEF(50) (OR = 9.1), chronic productive cough (OR = 4.0) and breathlessness (OR = 5.4) (P spirometry or IOS parameters. Interaction terms in the linear regression models indicated associations between smoking and DeltaR5-R20, and also between smoking and AX, in the lowest and second lowest quartiles of spirometry parameters. Application of IOS for the assessment of respiratory health in firefighters identified airways dysfunction in some individuals, even when spirometry values were within the normal range and there were no respiratory symptoms.

  3. Physiological and morphological determinants of maximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive lung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); H.O. Coxson (Harvey); P.D. Pare

    1996-01-01

    textabstractMaximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could be reduced by three different mechanisms; loss of lung elastic recoil, decreased airway conductance upstream of flow-limiting segments; and increased collapsibility of airways.

  4. EFFECT OF POSITIVE EXPIRATORY PRESSURE ON BREATHING PATTERN IN HEALTHY-SUBJECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSCHANS, CP; DEJONG, W; DEVRIES, G; POSTMA, DS; KOETER, GH; VANDERMARK, TW

    The purpose of this study was to register breathing patterns, in healthy subjects, during breathing with a positive expiratory pressure. Integrated electromyographic (IEMG) activity of the following muscles was assessed: scalene muscle, parasternal muscle and abdominal muscles, using surface

  5. Spirometry-related pain and distress in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis: the role of acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casier, Annabelle; Goubert, Liesbet; Vervoort, Tine; Theunis, Marleen; Huse, Danielle; De Baets, Frans; Matthys, Dirk; Crombez, Geert

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of spirometry-related pain and distress in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF), and to investigate the role of acceptance of illness in spirometry-related pain and distress. A total of 36 adolescents and young adults with CF (12 to 22 years of age) completed a questionnaire assessing acceptance of illness. Spirometry-related distress was assessed using self-report (ie, anxiety⁄worry about the procedure) and physiological outcomes (ie, heart rate and heart rate variability) before spirometry. Spirometry-related pain was assessed using self-report (ie, expected pain and pain-related thoughts). Self-reported distress and pain during spirometry were also assessed. Eighty-nine per cent of subjects reported distress before spirometry, 67% experienced distress during spirometry, 28% expected pain during spirometry and 22% actually experienced pain. Interestingly, partial correlations revealed that more acceptance was related to less expected pain and pain-related thoughts. Acceptance, however, was unrelated to distress, anxiety and pain during spirometry. The present study suggests that a non-negligible number of adolescents and young adults with CF experience pain and distress during spirometry. Furthermore, results indicate that acceptance may play a protective role in the more indirect consequences of CF such as expected pain and pain-related thoughts during medical procedures. Acceptance, however, was not related to distress before and during spirometry, nor to experienced pain. These findings contribute to the increasing evidence that acceptance may play a protective role in managing the consequences of living with CF.

  6. A clinical study of COPD severity assessment by primary care physicians and their patients compared with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, Douglas W; Dalal, Anand A; Johnson, Phaedra; Becker, Laura; Hunter, Alyssa Goolsby

    2015-06-01

    Primary care physicians often do not use spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This project was designed to see how well physicians' impressions about their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity correlate with the severity of airflow obstruction measured by spirometry and to assess whether spirometry results subsequently changed the physicians' opinions about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity and treatment. We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study conducted in 83 primary care clinics from across the United States. A total of 899 patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed a questionnaire and spirometry testing. Physicians completed a questionnaire and case report forms. Concordance among physician ratings, patient ratings, and spirometry results was evaluated. Physicians' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity ratings before spirometry were accurate for only 30% of patients with evaluable spirometry results, and disease severity in 41% of patients was underestimated. Physicians also underestimated severity compared with patients' self-assessment among 42% of those with evaluable results. After spirometry, physicians changed their opinions on the severity for 30% of patients and recommended treatment changes for 37%. Only 75% of patients performed at least 1 high-quality spirometry test; however, the physicians' opinions and treatment decisions were similar regardless of suboptimal test results. Without performing spirometry, physicians are likely to underestimate their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity or inadequately characterize their patients' lung disease. Spirometry changed the physicians' clinical impressions and treatments for approximately one third of these patients; thus, spirometry is a valuable tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management in primary care. Copyright © 2015

  7. Choosing wisely: adherence by physicians to recommended use of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of adult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Kristin C; Sharma, Gulshan; Lin, Yu-Li; Goldblum, Randall M

    2015-05-01

    The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) and the American Thoracic Society provide guidelines stating that physicians should use spirometry in the diagnosis and management of asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the trends, over a 10-year period, in the utilization of spirometry in patients newly diagnosed with asthma. We hypothesized that spirometry use would increase in physicians who care for asthma patients, especially since 2007, when the revised NAEPP guidelines were published. This retrospective cohort analysis of spirometry use in subjects newly diagnosed with asthma used a privately insured adult population for the years 2002-2011. Our primary outcome of interest was spirometry performed within a year (± 365 days) of the initial date of asthma diagnosis. We also examined the type of asthma medications prescribed. In all, 134,208 patients were found to have a diagnosis of asthma. Only 47.6% had spirometry performed within 1 year of diagnosis. Younger patients, males, and those residing in the Northeast were more likely to receive spirometry. Spirometry use began to decline in 2007. Patients cared for by specialists were more likely to receive spirometry than those cared for by primary care physicians; 80.1% vs 23.3%, respectively. Lastly, even without spirometry, a significant portion of patients (78.3%) was prescribed asthma drugs. Our study suggests that spirometry is underutilized in newly diagnosed asthma patients. Moreover, the use of controller medications in those diagnosed with asthma without spirometry remains high. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Forced Expiratory Volume in 6 s (FEV 6 ) and FEV 1 /FEV 6 Values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Values were recorded as mean (standard deviation), and also median and interquartile ranges. The one‑way analysis of variance, Mann–Whitey U and the Kruskal–Wallis were used to test for significance where applicable. P <0.05 were considered to be significant. Results: All the values were within normal range, but the ...

  9. Use of tidal breathing curves for evaluating expiratory airway obstruction in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevroni, Avigdor; Goldman, Aliza; Blank-Brachfeld, Miriam; Abu Ahmad, Wiessam; Ben-Dov, Lior; Springer, Chaim

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate tidal breathing (TB) flow-volume and flow-time curves for identification of expiratory airway obstruction in infants. Pulmonary function tests were analyzed retrospectively in 156 infants aged 3-24 months with persistent or recurrent respiratory complaints. Parameters derived from TB curves were compared to maximal expiratory flow at functional residual capacity ([Formula: see text]maxFRC) measured by rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique. Analyzed parameters were: inspiratory time (t I ), expiratory time (t E ), tidal volume, peak tidal expiratory flow (PTEF), time to peak tidal expiratory flow (t PTEF ), expiratory flow when 50% and 25% of tidal volume remains in the lungs (FEF 50 , FEF 25 , respectively), and the ratios t PTEF /t E , t I /t E , FEF 50 /PTEF, and FEF 25 /PTEF. Statistical comparisons between flow indices and TB parameters were performed using mean squared error and Pearson's sample correlation coefficient. The study population was also divided into two groups based on severity of expiratory obstruction (above or below z-score for [Formula: see text]maxFRC of -2) to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and calculate discriminatory values between the groups. TB parameters that were best correlated to [Formula: see text]maxFRC were: t PTEF /t E , FEF 50 /PTEF, and FEF 25 /PTEF, with r = 0.61, 0.67, 0.65, respectively (p < 0.0001 for all). ROC curves for FEF 50 /PTEF, FEF 25 /PTEF and t PTEF /t E showed areas under the curve of 0.813, 0.797, and 0.796, respectively. Cutoff value z-scores of -0.35, -0.34, and -0.43 for these three parameters, respectively, showed an 86% negative predictive value for severe airway obstructions. TB curves can assist in ruling out severe expiratory airway obstruction in infants.

  10. Decreased peak expiratory flow in pediatric passive smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Yanti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Indonesia ranks fifth among countries with the highest aggregate levels of tobacco consumption in the world. Infants and children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke have increased rates of asthma, respiratory and ear infections, as well as reduced lung function. The effects of tobacco smoke exposure on lung function in children have been reported to be dependent on the source of smoke and the length and dose of exposure. Lung function may also be affected by a child’s gender and asthma status. Objective To compare peak expiratory flow (PEF in pediatric passive smokers to that of children not exposed to second hand smoke, and to define factors that may affect PEF in passive smokers. Methods In August 2009 we conducted a cross-sectional study at an elementary school in the Langkat district. Subjects were aged 6 to 12 years, and divided into two groups: passive smokers and those not exposed to secondhand smoke. Subjects’ PEFs were measured with a Mini-Wright peak flow meter. Measurements were performed in triplicate with the highest value recorded as the PEF. Demographic data including age, sex, weight, height, family income, parental education levels and occupations were obtained through questionnaires. Results Of the 170 participants, 100 were passive smokers and 70 were not exposed to secondhand smoke. Age distribution, weight and height were similar in both groups. We observed a significant difference in PEFs between the group of passive smokers and the group not exposed to secondhand smoke, 211.3 L/minute (SD 61.08 and 242.7 L/minute (SD 77.09, respectively (P < 0.005. The number of years of exposure to smoke (P = 0.079 and the number of cigarettes smoked daily in the household (P = 0.098 did not significantly influence PEF. Conclusion The PEF in pediatric passive smokers was significantly lower than that of children not exposed to secondhand smoke. PEF in passive smokers was not influenced by the number of years of smoke

  11. The efficacy of spirometry as a screening tool in detection of air flow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Nabeel; Haque, A Suleman; Manzar, Bushra; Irfan, Muhammad

    2010-09-23

    In developing countries, spirometry has not been considered a part of routine medical check-up. The purpose of the study was to establish the usefulness of spirometry as a primary screening tool in detecting air flow obstruction (AFO) during routine medical check-up (RMC). This was a hospital based, retrospective, non-randomized case series study of 3696 participants, who presented to hospital for routine medical check-up. All subjects were assisted at the Pulmonary Medicine Department, from January 2003 till December 2008 who, having met other inclusion criteria, underwent spirometry. Data were analyzed using proportion, group means, standard deviations and Pearson Chi Square test. The overall yield from spirometry in detecting AFO was 211 patients (5.7%); 174 males (6.1%) and 37 females (4.4%) (P=0.158, Pearson Chi Square test). Greater age at presentation and BMI correlated significantly with AFO in the target group (P=<0.001; P=<0.005) respectively. Dyspnoea was the most frequent symptomatology observed in those diagnosed with AFO. These results suggest that spirometry during RMC for all persons can detect a significant number of patients with AFO particularly among the middle and older age groups with a low BMI.

  12. Spirometry in Asthma Care: A Review of the Trends and Challenges in Pediatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuk, Adaeze C; Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Ndukwu, Chizalu I; Ndu, Ikenna K; Iloh, Kenechukwu K; Okoli, Chinyere V

    2017-01-01

    Background: Given the rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally, especially bronchial asthma, there is the need to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality by adopting an objective means of diagnosis and monitoring. Aim: This article aims to review the trends and challenges in the use of spirometry for managing childhood bronchial asthma especially in developing countries. Methods: We conducted a literature search of published data on the use of spirometry for the diagnosis of childhood bronchial asthma with special emphasis resource-poor countries. Results: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma recommend the use of spirometry, but this is currently underused in both tertiary and primary care settings especially in developing countries. Lack of spirometers and proper training in their use and interpretation of findings as well as a dearth of asthma guidelines remains core to the underuse of spirometry in managing children with asthma. Targeting education of health care staff was, however, observed to improve its utility, and practical implementable strategies are highlighted. Conclusions: Spirometry is not frequently used for asthma diagnosis in pediatric practice especially in resource-poor countries where the NCD burden is higher. Strategies to overcome the obstacles are implementable and can make a difference in reducing the burden of NCD. PMID:28781518

  13. Transpulmonary Pressure Describes Lung Morphology During Decremental Positive End-Expiratory Pressure Trials in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Jacopo; Berra, Lorenzo; Zhang, Changsheng; Pirrone, Massimiliano; Santiago, Roberta R De Santis; Gomes, Susimeire; Magni, Federico; Dos Santos, Glaucia A B; Bennett, Desmond; Torsani, Vinicius; Fisher, Daniel; Morais, Caio; Amato, Marcelo B P; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2017-08-01

    Atelectasis develops in critically ill obese patients when undergoing mechanical ventilation due to increased pleural pressure. The current study aimed to determine the relationship between transpulmonary pressure, lung mechanics, and lung morphology and to quantify the benefits of a decremental positive end-expiratory pressure trial preceded by a recruitment maneuver. Prospective, crossover, nonrandomized interventional study. Medical and Surgical Intensive Care Units at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA) and University Animal Research Laboratory (São Paulo, Brazil). Critically ill obese patients with acute respiratory failure and anesthetized swine. Clinical data from 16 mechanically ventilated critically ill obese patients were analyzed. An animal model of obesity with reversible atelectasis was developed by placing fluid filled bags on the abdomen to describe changes of lung mechanics, lung morphology, and pulmonary hemodynamics in 10 swine. In obese patients (body mass index, 48 ± 11 kg/m), 21.7 ± 3.7 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in the lowest elastance of the respiratory system (18.6 ± 6.1 cm H2O/L) after a recruitment maneuver and decremental positive end-expiratory pressure and corresponded to a positive (2.1 ± 2.2 cm H2O) end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure. Ventilation at lowest elastance positive end-expiratory pressure preceded by a recruitment maneuver restored end-expiratory lung volume (30.4 ± 9.1 mL/kg ideal body weight) and oxygenation (273.4 ± 72.1 mm Hg). In the swine model, lung collapse and intratidal recruitment/derecruitment occurred when the positive end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure decreased below 2-4 cm H2O. After the development of atelectasis, a decremental positive end-expiratory pressure trial preceded by lung recruitment identified the positive end-expiratory pressure level (17.4 ± 2.1 cm H2O) needed to restore poorly and nonaerated lung tissue

  14. The majority of participants with abnormal spirometry at walk-in consult their general practitioner as recommended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kølner-Augustson, Line; Thøgersen, Niels; Faaborg, Thea Heide; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2015-11-01

    A number of studies inviting citizens to perform spirometry without need for a previous appointment have been performed to determine the need for general screening of the population for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Yet, no studies have examined how many of the participants follow the advice given to consult their general practitioner (GP) afterwards. A walk-in spirometry was carried out on the island of Laesoe. All habitants above the age of 18 years were invited. In total, 142 were eligible for the study. Participants with an abnormal spirometry were recommended to consult their GP immediately, whereas smokers with symptoms, but with a normal spirometry, were recommended to consult their GP within a year for another spirometry. A follow-up was performed to investigate whether the participants had followed this advice. In total, 52% (74/142) of the participants were advised to contact their GP: 34 due to an abnormal spirometry and 40 due to smoking and respiratory symptoms. Among the participants with an abnormal spirometry, 79% saw their GP within three months, whereas 30% of the current smokers saw their GP within 9-15 months. Lung disease was diagnosed in 56% (19/34) of the participants who initially had an abnormal spirometry. Among the participants who had an abnormal spirometry at screening, 79% consulted their GP as recommended. Furthermore, 52% of the participants who had an abnormal spirometry were subsequently diagnosed with pulmonary disease by their GP. We conclude that walk-in spirometry is a useful tool for early diagnosis of COPD. none. not relevant.

  15. The impact of spirometry in the Ebeltoft Health Promotion Study (EHPS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Ottesen, Anders Løkke; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    Background: It has been stressed that early detection of impaired lung function can be useful in prevention of lung diseases. It is unknown whether spirometry as an integrated part of preventive health checks including a questionnaire regarding risk factors and exposure, can be used for early...... detection of lung diseases.The aim of the study is to describe exposure characteristics and spirometry parameters 15 years ahead of a diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD*)*Defined by FEV1/FVC ... (n=573), aged 30-49 years at baseline, attended in 1991 and 2006 a health check and a follow-up consultation at their own general practitioner. The characteristics of the citizens are described according to sex, age, smoking history, exposure, lung symptoms and spirometry values. Register information...

  16. The value of including spirometry in health checks - a randomized controlled study in primary health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Ottesen, Anders Løkke; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    Background Lung diseases are among the most frequent and most serious ailments in Denmark. Preventive health checks including spirometry can be used to detect lung diseases earlier. Over time the attendance at preventive health checks has decreased and at present the response rate is approximately...... 50%. Little is known about initiatives that can influence the attendance rate. Objectives To examine whether focused information on spirometry in the invitation material will influence the attendance in preventive health checks. Materiel/Methods Design: A randomized controlled study on information...... on spirometry embedded in “Check your health Prevention Program, CHPP” from 2015-16. CHPP is a house-hold cluster randomized controlled trial offering a preventive health check to 30-49 year olds in a Danish municipality during the years 2012 through to 2017 (n= 26,216), carried out in collaboration between...

  17. Spirometry utilisation among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette

    2015-01-01

    with pharmacotherapy targeting obstructive lung disease and only few have additional tests conducted, although the predictive value of respiratory symptoms for diagnosing obstructive lung disease has proven to be low. Spirometry is recommended as the gold standard for confirming obstructive lung disease, and testing...... can also rule out airway obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms caused by other illnesses, such as heart failure or lung cancer. Initiating medication for obstructive lung disease without spirometry entails the risk of these patients experiencing unnecessary delay in the diagnostic process...... and being exposed to unnecessary economic costs and medication risks. The literature has indicated that many users of medication targeting obstructive lung medication have not had spirometry performed and do not actually have obstructive lung disease. This potential quality gap needs to be assessed. Also...

  18. [Relationship between expiratory muscle dysfunction and dynamic hyperinflation in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Susana; Güell, Rosa; Barreiro, Esther; Casan, Pere; Gea, Joaquim; Sanchis, Joaquín

    2009-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) and expiratory flow limitation (EFL) are physiologically linked and seem to be involved in the genesis of dyspnea and the quality of life (QL) impairment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Advanced COPD patients often show expiratory muscles dysfunction that could be involved in DH development. Study the relationships between expiratory muscle dysfunction and DH, and their association with dyspnea and QL, in advanced COPD. In 25 patients we measured lung function, exercise capacity (incremental ergometry and walking test), EFL and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) at rest and during exercise, respiratory muscles strength and endurance, dyspnea and QL (Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire, SGRQ). The patients (mean FEV(1)=31% predicted) showed a moderate decrease of respiratory muscles strength and endurance. Nineteen patients exhibited EFL at rest and 24 at 70% of maximal workload (W(max)). The EELV increased from rest to 70% W(max) (9% of predicted FVC). At 70% W(max) EELV correlated inversely with the EFL amount (rho=-0.42), the inspiratory and expiratory muscles endurance (rho=-0.43 and -0.42 respectively) and y VO(2max) (rho=-0.52). The EELV increase from resting to 70% W(max) correlated with dyspnea (rho=0.53) and the amount of EFL at 70%W(max) with the activity score of SGRQ. The FEV(1,) expiratory muscles endurance and LFE amount were independent predictors of EELV at 70% W(max). In advanced COPD a poorer expiratory muscles endurance is related with higher DH during exercise (and lower EFL), which is correlated with higher dyspnea and worse QL.

  19. Evaluation of the Global Lung Initiative 2012 Reference Values for Spirometry in African Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigliani, Michele; Canciani, Mario C; Mottini, Giovanni; Altomare, Michele; Magnolato, Andrea; Loa Clemente, Sofia Vanda; Tshilolo, Leon; Cogo, Paola; Quanjer, Philip H

    2017-01-15

    Despite the high burden of respiratory disease, no spirometry reference values for African children are available. Investigate whether the Global Lung Initiative (GLI-2012) reference values for spirometry are appropriate for children in sub-Saharan Africa and assess the impact of malnutrition on lung function. Anthropometry and spirometry were obtained in children aged 6 to 12 years from urban and semiurban schools in three African countries. Spirometry z-scores were derived using the GLI-2012 prediction equations for African Americans. Thinness (body mass index z-score Spirometry outcomes were compared with those of African American children from the third National Health and Nutrition Survey. Spirometry data were analyzed from 1,082 schoolchildren (51% boys) aged 6.0 to 12.8 years in Angola (n = 306), Democratic Republic of the Congo (n = 377), and Madagascar (n = 399). GLI-2012 provided a good fit with mean (SD) z-scores of -0.11 (0.83) for FEV 1 , -0.08 (0.86) for FVC, and -0.07 (0.83) for FEV 1 /FVC. Because of low scatter, the fifth centile corresponded to -1.3 z-scores in boys and -1.5 z-scores in girls. Malnourished African children had a normal FEV 1 /FVC ratio but significant reductions of ∼0.5 z-scores (∼5%) in FEV 1 and FVC compared with African American peers from the third National Health and Nutrition Survey. Children in Angola had the lowest, and those in Madagascar had the highest, zFEV 1 and zFVC. The results of this study support the use of GLI-2012 reference values for schoolchildren in sub-Saharan Africa. Malnutrition affects body growth, leading to a proportionately smaller FEV 1 and FVC without respiratory impairment, as shown by the normal FEV 1 /FVC ratio.

  20. Daily Home Spirometry: An Effective Tool for Detecting Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anne-Marie; Adamali, Huzaifa; Molyneaux, Philip L; Lukey, Pauline T; Marshall, Richard P; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Wells, Athol U; Maher, Toby M

    2016-10-15

    Recent clinical trial successes have created an urgent need for earlier and more sensitive endpoints of disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Domiciliary spirometry permits more frequent measurement of FVC than does hospital-based assessment, which therefore affords the opportunity for a more granular insight into changes in IPF progression. To determine the feasibility and reliability of measuring daily FVC in individuals with IPF. Subjects with IPF were given handheld spirometers and instruction on how to self-administer spirometry. Subjects recorded daily FEV 1 and FVC for up to 490 days. Clinical assessment and hospital-based spirometry was undertaken at 6 and 12 months, and outcome data were collected for 3 years. Daily spirometry was recorded by 50 subjects for a median period of 279 days (range, 13-490 d). There were 18 deaths during the active study period. Home spirometry showed excellent correlation with hospital-obtained readings. The rate of decline in FVC was highly predictive of outcome and subsequent mortality when measured at 3 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.040; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.021-1.062; P ≤ 0.001), 6 months (HR, 1.024; 95% CI, 1.014-1.033; P spirometry in patients with IPF is highly clinically informative and is feasible to perform for most of these patients. The relationship between mortality and rate of change of FVC at 3 months suggests that daily FVC may be of value as a primary endpoint in short proof-of-concept IPF studies.

  1. Peak Expiratory Flow as a Surrogate for Health Related Quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirometry was done using American Thoracic Society's standards and reference equations from African American norms of the US population. Quality of life was measured with the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) Results: Out of 50 patients recruited for the study, 48 provided complete data with acceptable ...

  2. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or both? Diagnostic labeling and spirometry in primary care patients aged 40 years or more

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, Hasse; Drivenes, Elin; Dalbak, Lene G; Leinan, Tone; Høegh-Henrichsen, Svein; Østrem, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Aims To describe symptoms and lung function in patients registered with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care and to examine how spirometry findings fit with general practitioners’ (GPs) diagnoses. Methods Patients aged ≥40 years with a diagnosis of asthma or COPD registered in the electronic medical record during the previous 5 years were recruited at seven GP offices in Norway in 2009–2010. Registered diagnosis, spirometry results, comorbidity, and reported symptoms were compared. Results Among 376 patients, 62% were women. Based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases criteria, a spirometry diagnosis of COPD could be made in 68.1% of the patients with a previous COPD diagnosis and in 17.1% of those diagnosed with asthma only (P spirometry was 0.50. A restrictive spirometry pattern was found in 19.4% and more frequently in patients diagnosed with both asthma and COPD (23.9%) than in patients diagnosed with COPD only (6.8%, P = 0.003). Conclusion The ability of GPs to differentiate between asthma and COPD seems to have considerably improved during the last decade, probably due to the dissemination of spirometry and guidelines for COPD diagnosis. A diagnosis of COPD that cannot be confirmed by spirometry represents a challenge in clinical practice, in particular when a restrictive pattern on spirometry is found. PMID:22135492

  3. Effects of expiratory muscle training on the frail elderly's respiratory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Ikuri; Izumi, Masataka; Oda, Takahiro

    2018-02-01

    [Purpose] The present study examined the effects of expiratory muscle training on elderly day care service users, who had been classified into Care Grades 1 and 2 based on Japan's long-term care insurance system. [Subjects and Methods] Intervention was provided for 29 Care Grade 1 or 2 day care service users. During intervention, expiratory muscle training was performed by slowly expiring using the abdominal muscles and a device after maximal inspiration. Each intervention session lasted for approximately 10 minutes, and 2 sessions were held weekly for 3 months to compare respiratory function test values before and after intervention. [Results] The results were favorable. The vital capacity (VC) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) significantly varied between before and after intervention. [Conclusion] Expiratory muscle training generally improved their respiratory function, particularly their VC and PEF that significantly varied between before and after intervention. As both of these items influence the cough capacity, they may be key to the prevention of aspiration pneumonia. Expiratory muscle training may also contribute to activities of daily living (ADL) and the quality of life, and it is expected to play an important role in rehabilitation as a field of preventive medicine.

  4. Abdominal muscle activity during breathing with and without inspiratory and expiratory loads in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita Montes, António; Baptista, João; Crasto, Carlos; de Melo, Cristina Argel; Santos, Rita; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-10-01

    Central Nervous System modulates the motor activities of all trunk muscles to concurrently regulate the intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures. The study aims to evaluate the effect of inspiratory and expiratory loads on abdominal muscle activity during breathing in healthy subjects. Twenty-three higher education students (21.09±1.56years; 8males) breathed at a same rhythm (inspiration: two seconds; expiration: four seconds) without load and with 10% of the maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures, in standing. Surface electromyography was performed to assess the activation intensity of rectus abdominis, external oblique and transversus abdominis/internal oblique muscles, during inspiration and expiration. During inspiration, transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly lower with inspiratory load when compared to without load (p=0.009) and expiratory load (p=0.002). During expiration, the activation intensity of all abdominal muscles was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to without load (pactivation intensity of external oblique (p=0.036) and transversus abdominis/internal oblique (p=0.022) was significantly higher with inspiratory load when compared to without load. Transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to inspiratory load (pmuscle to modulate the intra-abdominal pressure for the breathing mechanics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Acu-TENS on post-exercise expiratory lung volume in subjects with asthma-A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Shirley P C; Jones, Alice Y M; Hui-Chan, Christina W Y; Ko, Fanny W S; Hui, David S C

    2009-07-31

    This study examined the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied over acupoints (Acu-TENS) on forced expiratory volume, in patients with asthma, after exercise. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to three groups. Group 1 received Acu-TENS over acupuncture points Lieque and Dingchuan for 45 min prior to a symptom-limited treadmill exercise test. Group 2 had Acu-TENS similarly applied prior to and throughout the exercise test. Group 3 mimicked Group 1 but without any electrical output from the device. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were recorded before, immediately after and at 20-min intervals post-exercise for 1h. Immediately after exercise, FEV(1) and FVC rose in Group 2 (p=0.015), but decreased in Group 1 and more so in Group 3. The differences became even more marked at 20, 40 and 60 min. Adjunctive Acu-TENS therapy appears to reduce decline of FEV(1) following exercise training in patients with asthma.

  6. Differences in the use of spirometry between rural and urban primary care centers in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márquez-Martín E

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Márquez-Martín,1 Joan B Soriano,2 Myriam Calle Rubio,3 Jose Luis Lopez-Campos1,4 On behalf of the 3E project 1Unidad Médico-Quirúrgica de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, 2Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario de la Princesa (IISP, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cátedra UAM-Linde, 3Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Clínico San Carlos, 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability and practice of spirometry, training of technicians, and spirometry features in primary care centers in Spain, evaluating those located in a rural environment against those in urban areas.Methods: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 by a telephone survey in 970 primary health care centers in Spain. The centers were divided into rural or urban depending on the catchment population. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test that included the following topics: center resources, training doctors and technicians, using the spirometer, bronchodilator test, and the availability of spirometry and maintenance.Results: Although the sample size was achieved in both settings, rural centers (RCs gave a lower response rate than urban centers (UCs. The number of centers without spirometry in rural areas doubled those in the urban areas. Most centers had between one and two spirometers. However, the number of spirometry tests per week was significantly lower in RCs than in UCs (4 [4.1%] vs 6.9 [5.7%], P<0.01. The availability of a specific schedule for conducting spirometries was higher in RCs than in UCs (209 [73.0%] vs 207 [64.2%], P=0.003. RCs were more satisfied with the spirometries (7.8 vs 7.6, P

  7. Acute effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes in patients after a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Illia Ndf; Fregonezi, Guilherme Af; Melo, Rodrigo; Cabral, Elis Ea; Aliverti, Andrea; Campos, Tânia F; Ferreira, Gardênia Mh

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess how volume-oriented incentive spirometry applied to patients after a stroke modifies the total and compartmental chest wall volume variations, including both the right and left hemithoraces, compared with controls. Twenty poststroke patients and 20 age-matched healthy subjects were studied by optoelectronic plethysmography during spontaneous quiet breathing (QB), during incentive spirometry, and during the recovery period after incentive spirometry. Incentive spirometry was associated with an increased chest wall volume measured at the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage and abdominal compartment (P = .001) and under 3 conditions (P spirometry, and postincentive spirometry, respectively. Under all 3 conditions, the contribution of the abdominal compartment to VT was greater in the stroke subjects (54.1, 43.2, and 48.9%) than in the control subjects (43.7, 40.8, and 46.1%, P = .039). In the vast majority of subjects (13/20 and 18/20 during QB and incentive spirometry, respectively), abdominal expansion precedes rib cage expansion during inspiration. Greater asymmetry between the right and left hemithoracic expansions occurred in stroke subjects compared with control subjects, but it decreased during QB (62.5%, P = .002), during incentive spirometry (19.7%), and postincentive spirometry (67.6%, P = .14). Incentive spirometry promotes increased expansion in all compartments of the chest wall and reduces asymmetric expansion between the right and left parts of the pulmonary rib cage; therefore, it should be considered as a tool for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Effect of variable circuit flow rate during the expiratory phase on CO2 elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keszler PA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Peter A Keszler,1 Pankaj Nagaraj,1 Kabir Abubakar,1 Martin Keszler21Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA; Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA; 2Brown University, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, RI, USABackground: Some continuous flow infant ventilators allow independent setting of inspiratory and expiratory circuit flow rate. In the Dräger Babylog 8000+ ventilator, this is called "variable inspiratory, variable expiratory flow" (VIVE. Some clinicians believe that lower expiratory flow decreases expiratory resistance. The minimum expiratory flow rate needed to avoid re-breathing of carbon dioxide (CO2 has never been established.Objective: We sought to determine if re-breathing becomes evident at the lowest possible expiratory flow rate setting of 1 L/min.Design/methods: We conducted a bench study using end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2 measurement and a 45 mL (90 mL for the "term" model test lung pre-filled with 100% CO2. We previously showed that the time needed for ETCO2 to be eliminated from the lung is a highly reproducible indicator of efficiency of ventilation. Re-breathing would thus be identified by an increase in the time required for the CO2 to be washed out from the test lung at stable settings of rate and tidal volume (VT. Using a Babylog 8000+ ventilator in volume guarantee mode with VIVE and a standard ventilator circuit, we tested the effect of decreasing expiratory flow rate under conditions simulating three sizes of patients: extremely low birth weight infant, wt = 600 g (VT = 3.5 mL, respiratory rate (RR = 60 breaths min-1, minute ventilation (MV = 210 mL/min, expiratory flow rate = 3 L/min, 2 L/min, and 1 L/min, very low birth weight infant, wt = 1.5 kg (VT= 7 mL, RR = 60 breaths min-1, MV = 420 mL/min, expiratory flow rate = 4 L/min, 3 L/min, 2 L/min, and 1 L/min, and term infant, wt = 3.6 kg (VT = 16 mL, RR = 60 breaths min-1, MV = 960 mL/min, expiratory flow rate = 5 L/min, 4 L/min, 3 L

  9. Adherence to acceptability and repeatability criteria for spirometry in complex lung function laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Brigitte M; Hartley, M Faizel; Bailey, Michael J; Thompson, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    Few published data exist for adherence rates to spirometry acceptability and repeatability criteria in clinical respiratory laboratories. This study quantified adherence levels in this setting and observed changes in adherence levels as a result of feedback and ongoing training. Two tertiary hospital-based, lung function laboratories (L1 and L2) participated. Approximately 100 consecutive, FVC spirometry sessions were reviewed for each year from 2004 to 2008 at L1 and for years 2004 and 2008 at L2. Each spirometric effort and session was interrogated for adherence to the acceptability and repeatability criteria of international spirometry standards of the time. Feedback of audit results and refresher training were provided at L1 throughout the study; in addition, a quality rating scale was implemented in 2006. No formal feedback or follow-up training was provided at L2. We reviewed 707 test sessions over the 5 years. There was no difference in adherence rates to acceptability and repeatability criteria between sites in 2004 (L1 61%, L2 59%, P = .89). There was, however, a significant difference between sites in 2008 (L1 92%, L2 65%, P audit period. This improved with regular review, feedback, and implementation of a rating scale. Auditing of spirometry quality, feedback, and implementation of test rating scales need to be incorporated as an integral component of laboratory quality assurance programs to improve adherence to international acceptability and repeatability criteria.

  10. An audit of spirometry at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correspondence to: Dr. Olufemi O. Desalu, Department of Medicine, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, ... Evaluation of bronchial asthma was the most common indication for spirometry (43 ... pourraient être étudiés par la spirométrie, manque de compétences dans l'interprétation des résultats, le manque de.

  11. Validation of the GLI-2012 spirometry reference equations in Argentinian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Luciano E; Sly, Peter D

    2018-02-01

    The Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) has produced spirometry reference equations for use in different ethnic groups. Previous reports have shown that the GLI equations do not adequately describe lung function in all populations and that adopting the new equations into clinical practice can increase the number of patients considered to have abnormal lung function. Therefore, before adopting these equations into local practice it is necessary to establish how well the equations represent the local population. The present study was conducted to determine how well the GLI spirometry reference equations represented the young children in Argentina, a population not included in the GLI dataset. Spirometry was measured in 2072 healthy children (50.9% males) aged 3.0-12.4 years (mean 6.64 ± SD 1.39), with a height range of 93.0-158.5 cm and weight range from 13.1 to 54.7 kg. We used the GLI "Caucasian" and "other/mixed" race equations to create Z-scores. The Z-scores predicted by the Caucasian GLI equations did not differ from zero and fitted the data well. Z-scores calculated using "other/mixed race" fit less well. Using the GLI definition of low lung function (Z-score equation. This compares well with the expected 5% below the lower limit of normal. We recommend the use of the GLI-2012 Caucasian equations for spirometry undertaken in Argentinian children. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Semiautomatic assessment of respiratory motion in dynamic MRI. Comparison with simultaneously acquired spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M. [Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P. [Medizinische und Biologische Informatik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Diagnostische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: supplementing global spirometry with regional information could allow for earlier and more specific diagnosis of lung disease. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) makes it possible to derive functional parameters from the visualization of the pulmonary motion of single lungs. The aim of this study was to compare high temporal resolution measurements of left and right thoracic diameters to simultaneously acquired spirometry. Materials and methods: 10 healthy volunteers underwent 2-dimensional dMRI of both lungs at 1.5 T. Spirometry was performed simultaneously with an MRI-compatible spirometer. Thoracic diameters were measured semiautomatically and compared to simultaneously measured spirometric volumes. A dMRI surrogate for the Tiffeneau Index was compared to the spirometric Tiffeneau. Results: The volume-time and flow-volume curves from dMRI were very similar to the spirometric curves. The semiautomatically measured diameters correlated well with the spirometric volumes (r > = 0.8, p < 10-15). Agreement between the methods at full temporal resolution was not as convincing (width of 95% limits of agreement interval up to 56%). Good agreement was found between the Tiffenau surrogate and spirometry (width of 95% limits of agreement interval of 14.5%). (orig.)

  13. The Vital Capacity Is Vital: Epidemiology and Clinical Significance of the Restrictive Spirometry Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Mark S; Jankowich, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic research has revealed a substantial portion of the general population with abnormal spirometry results that are characterized by decreased FEV1 and FVC but a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio. This restrictive spirometry pattern (RSP) is inconsistently defined in the literature and not well addressed by current guidelines; there is an accumulating body of evidence, however, that RSP is prevalent to a similar degree as airflow obstruction. Genetic and other risk factors for RSP, such as inhalational injuries and early life exposures, continue to be actively described. Although it seems that RSP is closely associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and systemic inflammation, it is not a simple marker of obesity. RSP is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as well as mortality, and it may be an underappreciated cause of functional impairments and respiratory symptoms. Improvement in outcomes in this population will require that clinicians have an appreciation for the significance of this spirometry pattern; additional research into the clinical and radiologic phenotype of these subjects is also needed. This article provides an overview of the recent developments in our understanding of this prevalent and highly morbid spirometry pattern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. General practitioners' needs for ongoing support for the interpretation of spirometry tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.P.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Akkermans, R.P.; Jacobs, A.; Bogart-Jansen, M.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although one out of three general practitioners (GPs) carries out spirometry, the diagnostic interpretation of spirometric test results appears to be a common barrier for GPs towards its routine application. METHODS: Multivariate cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey among

  15. Integration of electronic nose technology with spirometry: validation of a new approach for exhaled breath analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.; Brinkman, P.; van der Schee, M. P.; Fens, N.; Dijkers, E.; Bootsma, S. K.; de Jongh, F. H. C.; Sterk, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    New 'omics'-technologies have the potential to better define airway disease in terms of pathophysiological and clinical phenotyping. The integration of electronic nose (eNose) technology with existing diagnostic tests, such as routine spirometry, can bring this technology to 'point-of-care'. We

  16. Spirometry utilization among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette

    2013-01-01

    litteraturen, at mange af disse patienter får medicinsk behandling for deres symptomer uden yderligere undersøgelser, selvom symptomer og klinisk undersøgelse ikke med tilstrækkelig sikkerhed kan prædiktere, hvem der har astma og eller KOL. Spirometri er anbefalet som Gold Standard for at bekræfte eller...... den diagnostiske proces og at blive udsat for unødig medicinsk behandling. Litteraturen tyder på, at mange medicinbrugere ikke bliver undersøgt med spirometri og muligvis ikke har obstruktive lungelidelser. Dette kvalitetsproblem bør afdækkes, og associationer med manglende spirometri i denne gruppe...... bør klarlægges, så interventioner kan målrettes. Formål: Blandt nye brugere af obstruktiv lungemedicin var formålet at: • Afdække i hvor høj grad spirometri var udført indenfor det første år, efter at medicineringen var påbegyndt • Afdække om patientkarakteristika såsom socioøkonomisk og demografisk...

  17. Semiautomatic assessment of respiratory motion in dynamic MRI. Comparison with simultaneously acquired spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M.; Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P.; Kauczor, H.U.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: supplementing global spirometry with regional information could allow for earlier and more specific diagnosis of lung disease. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) makes it possible to derive functional parameters from the visualization of the pulmonary motion of single lungs. The aim of this study was to compare high temporal resolution measurements of left and right thoracic diameters to simultaneously acquired spirometry. Materials and methods: 10 healthy volunteers underwent 2-dimensional dMRI of both lungs at 1.5 T. Spirometry was performed simultaneously with an MRI-compatible spirometer. Thoracic diameters were measured semiautomatically and compared to simultaneously measured spirometric volumes. A dMRI surrogate for the Tiffeneau Index was compared to the spirometric Tiffeneau. Results: The volume-time and flow-volume curves from dMRI were very similar to the spirometric curves. The semiautomatically measured diameters correlated well with the spirometric volumes (r > = 0.8, p < 10-15). Agreement between the methods at full temporal resolution was not as convincing (width of 95% limits of agreement interval up to 56%). Good agreement was found between the Tiffenau surrogate and spirometry (width of 95% limits of agreement interval of 14.5%). (orig.)

  18. Is Home Spirometry Useful in Diagnosing Asthma in Children With Nonspecific Respiratory Symptoms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Alwin F. J.; Visser, Chantal A. N.; Duiverman, Eric J.; Roorda, Ruurd Jan; Brand, Paul L. P.

    Background: Variation of lung function is considered to be a hallmark of asthma. Although guidelines recommend measuring it as a diagnostic tool for asthma, the usefulness of this approach has not been studied in children. Aim: To assess the usefulness of home spirometry in children with nonspecific

  19. Spirometry expert support in family practice: a cluster-randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.P.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Thoonen, B.P.A.; Jacobs, J.E.; Akkermans, R.P.; Vries Robbe, P.F. de; Quanjer, P.H.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of two modes of spirometry expert support on Family physicians' (FPs') diagnoses and planned management in patients with apparent respiratory disease. METHOD: A cluster-randomised trial was performed with family practices as the unit of randomisation. FPs from 44 family

  20. A retrospective study of two populations to test a simple rule for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohar, Jill A; Yawn, Barbara P; Ruppel, Gregg L; Donohue, James F

    2016-06-04

    Chronic lung disease is common and often under-diagnosed. To test a simple rule for conducting spirometry we reviewed spirograms from two populations, occupational medicine evaluations (OME) conducted by Saint Louis and Wake Forest Universities at 3 sites (n = 3260, mean age 64.14 years, 95 % CI 58.94-69.34, 97 % men) and conducted by Wake Forest University preop clinic (POC) at one site (n = 845, mean age 62.10 years, 95 % CI 50.46-73.74, 57 % men). This retrospective review of database information that the first author collected prospectively identified rates, types, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive value for lung function abnormalities and associated mortality rate found when conducting spirometry based on the 20/40 rule (≥20 years of smoking in those aged ≥ 40 years) in the OME population. To determine the reproducibility of the 20/40 rule for conducting spirometry, the rule was applied to the POC population. A lung function abnormality was found in 74 % of the OME population and 67 % of the POC population. Sensitivity of the rule was 85 % for an obstructive pattern and 77 % for any abnormality on spirometry. Positive and negative predictive values of the rule for a spirometric abnormality were 74 and 55 %, respectively. Patients with an obstructive pattern were at greater risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.39 [confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.93] vs. normal) and death (hazard ratio (HR) 1.53, 95 % CI 1.20-1.84) than subjects with normal spirometry. Restricted spirometry patterns were also associated with greater risk of coronary disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.7 [CI 1.23-2.35]) and death (Hazard ratio 1.40, 95 % CI 1.08-1.72). Smokers (≥ 20 pack years) age ≥ 40 years are at an increased risk for lung function abnormalities and those abnormalities are associated with greater presence of coronary heart disease and increased all-cause mortality. Use of the 20/40 rule could provide a

  1. Peak expiratory flow rates produced with the Laerdal and Mapleson-C bagging circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A; Hutchinson, R; Lin, E; Oh, T

    1992-01-01

    This study compared the peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) at different inspiratory pause pressures (IPP) produced by the Mapleson-C circuit and the Laerdal self-inflating resuscitator. The difference in PEFR produced by the two circuits was significantly different at the lowest and the highest IPP studied (I3 and 38cm H20). The greatest differences in the mean expiratory flow rates produced was, however, only 0.07 litre sec(-7). The authors suggest that the choice of bagging circuit should depend on the experience and familiarity of the therapist with the circuit. Copyright © 1992 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  2. Inter-regional changes in the performance and interpretation of spirometry in Spain: 3E study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Campos, José Luis; Soriano, Joan B; Calle, Myriam

    2014-11-01

    This report shows the results of a nation-wide survey on spirometry to assess regional differences. Observational cross-sectional study conducted by means of a telephone survey in 805 primary care (PC) and specialized centers (SC) in all regions. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test. The results showed major differences between regions. Most centers had 1-2 spirometers. The number of spirometry tests per week ranged from 2 to 8.9 in PC and between 34.3 and 98.3 in SC. Some training had been given in most centers (63.6-100% in PC and 60.0-100% in SC) but not on a regular basis. Most centers used several short-acting bronchodilators for the bronchodilation test, but with insufficient inhalations (2.0-3.8 in PC and 2.0-3.3 in SC) and frequently incorrect waiting time (29.4-83.3% PC and 33.3-87.5% in SC). Daily calibration was not performed in all centers (0-100% in PC and 66.7-100% in SC). Significant inter-regional differences in spirometry quality criteria were observed, with 6 or more criteria met in 9.1-84.6% of PC centers and 37.5-100% in SC. Our results show the current situation of spirometry in primary and specialized care in Spain, highlighting considerable variability and areas for improvement. This information should be considered by health officials to improve the quality and accessibility of such tests. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Spirometry training courses: Content, delivery and assessment - a position statement from the Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanney, Maureen P; O'Dea, Christopher A; Ingram, Emily R; Rodwell, Leanne T; Borg, Brigitte M

    2017-10-01

    Spirometry training courses are provided by health services and training organizations to enable widespread use of spirometry testing for patient care or for monitoring health. The primary outcome of spirometry training courses should be to enable participants to perform spirometry to international best practice, including testing of subjects, quality assurance and interpretation of results. Where valid results are not achieved or quality assurance programmes identify errors in devices, participants need to be able to adequately manage these issues in accordance with best practice. It is important that potential participants are confident in the integrity of the course they attend and that the course meets their expectations in terms of training. This position statement lists the content that the Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science (ANZSRS) has identified as required in a spirometry training course to adequately meet the primary outcomes mentioned above. The content requirements outlined in this position statement are based on the current international spirometry standards set out by the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. Furthermore, recommendations around course delivery for theoretical and practical elements of spirometry testing and post-course assessment are outlined in this statement. © 2017 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  4. Carbon dioxide rebreathing caused by deformed silicon leaflet in the expiratory unidirectional valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebreathing of carbon dioxide caused by incompetent ′cage and disc′ unidirectional valves has been reported earlier. Some manufacturers have changed the design of unidirectional valves to ′flexible leaflets′. We report a series of cases where a deformed membrane leaflet in expiratory unidirectional valves led to rebreathing of carbon dioxide.

  5. Dead space and slope indices from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension-volume curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Kars (Alice); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); Th. Stijnen (Theo); J. de Vries; A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); C. Hilvering

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe slope of phase 3 and three noninvasively determined dead space estimates derived from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) versus volume curve, including the Bohr dead space (VD,Bohr), the Fowler dead space (VD,Fowler) and pre-interface expirate

  6. EFFECTS OF POSITIVE EXPIRATORY PRESSURE BREATHING DURING EXERCISE IN PATIENTS WITH COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSCHANS, GP; DEJONG, W; DEVRIES, G; KAAN, WA; POSTMA, DS; KOETER, GH; VANDERMARK, TW

    The effect of breathing with a positive expiratory pressure of 5 cm H2O was investigated in eight patients with COPD (mean [SD] FEV(1) = 54 [13] percent predicted). Specific work of breathing (Wsp) and myoelectrical activity of the following respiratory muscles were measured at rest: scalene muscle,

  7. EFFECT OF POSITIVE EXPIRATORY PRESSURE BREATHING IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC-FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSCHANS, CP; VANDERMARK, TW; DEVRIES, G; PIERS, DA; BEEKHUIS, H; DANKERTROELSE, JE; POSTMA, DS; KOETER, GH

    The effect of positive expiratory pressure breathing, alone and in combination with coughing, was investigated in eight patients with cystic fibrosis. Functional residual capacity and total lung capacity was measured with a body plethysmograph before, during, and immediately after breathing with

  8. Relative impact of respiratory muscle activity on tidal flow and end expiratory volume in healthy neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutten, Gerard J.; van Eykern, Leo A.; Latzin, Philipp; Kyburz, Manuela; van Aalderen, Wim M.; Frey, Urs

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: It has been suggested that infants dynamically regulate their tidal flow and end-expiratory volume level. The interaction between muscle activity, flow and lung volume in spontaneously sleeping neonates is poorly studied, since it requires the assessment of transcutaneous

  9. Pharmacologic Interventions to Improve Splanchnic Oxygenation During Ventilation with Positive End-Expiratory Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournell, A.; Scheeren, T. W. L.; Picker, O.; Schwarte, L. A.; Wolf, M; Bucher, HU; Rudin, M; VanHuffel, S; Wolf, U; Bruley, DF; Harrison, DK

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is an indispensable tool in the management of respiratory failure to preserve or improve lung function and systemic oxygenation. However, PEEP per se may also, as has been shown in experimental animals, impair regional

  10. Modeling the Fate of Expiratory Aerosols and the Associated Infection Risk in an Aircraft Cabin Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, M.P.; To, G.N.S.; Chao, C.Y.H.

    2009-01-01

    The transport and deposition of polydispersed expiratory aerosols in an aircraft cabin were simulated using a Lagrangian-based model validated by experiments conducted in an aircraft cabin mockup. Infection risk by inhalation was estimated using the aerosol dispersion data and a model was developed...

  11. Effects of midline laparotomy on expiratory muscle activation in anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, G A; De Troyer, A

    1989-08-01

    Abdominal surgery has a marked inhibitory influence on the diaphragm, but its effect on the expiratory muscles is not known. Therefore, we have recorded the electromyograms of the triangularis sterni, abdominal external oblique, and transversus abdominis before and after a midline laparotomy in 10 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs. Measurements were obtained during quiet breathing in the supine posture, during breathing against expiratory threshold loads, during head-up tilting, and during hyperoxic hypercapnia. Expiratory activation of the transversus abdominis in all conditions was considerably reduced after laparotomy. This reduction was real, as no change in the compound muscle action potential during single pulse stimulation was observed. In contrast, expiratory recruitment of either the triangularis sterni or the abdominal external oblique was maintained or increased. We therefore conclude that laparotomy inhibits not only activation of the diaphragm during inspiration but also activation of the transversus abdominis during expiration. Visceral afferents thus affect in concert the two respiratory muscles lining the peritoneum. The present findings also emphasize the important fact that the pattern of activation of a particular abdominal muscle is not necessarily representative of the entire abdominal musculature.

  12. Exogenous stimuli and circadian peak expiratory flow variation in allergic asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, DS; VanderHeide, S; DeReus, DM; Koeter, GH; VanAalderen, WMC; Meijer, G.

    The influence of exogenous factors in the home on the circadian variation of airway obstruction has not been fully assessed in children with asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of exogenous stimuli to the degree of peak expiratory flow (PEF) variability during 24

  13. Influence of inspiratory resistive loading on expiratory muscle fatigue in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Carli M; Welch, Joseph F; Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Romer, Lee M; McKenzie, Donald C; Sheel, A William

    2017-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? This study is the first to measure objectively both inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue after inspiratory resistive loading to determine whether the expiratory muscles are activated to the point of fatigue when specifically loading the inspiratory muscles. What is the main finding and its importance? The absence of abdominal muscle fatigue suggests that future studies attempting to understand the neural and circulatory consequences of diaphragm fatigue can use inspiratory resistive loading without considering the confounding effects of abdominal muscle fatigue. Expiratory resistive loading elicits inspiratory as well as expiratory muscle fatigue, suggesting parallel coactivation of the inspiratory muscles during expiration. It is unknown whether the expiratory muscles are likewise coactivated to the point of fatigue during inspiratory resistive loading (IRL). The purpose of this study was to determine whether IRL elicits expiratory as well as inspiratory muscle fatigue. Healthy male subjects (n = 9) underwent isocapnic IRL (60% maximal inspiratory pressure, 15 breaths min -1 , 0.7 inspiratory duty cycle) to task failure. Abdominal and diaphragm contractile function was assessed at baseline and at 3, 15 and 30 min post-IRL by measuring gastric twitch pressure (P ga,tw ) and transdiaphragmatic twitch pressure (P di,tw ) in response to potentiated magnetic stimulation of the thoracic and phrenic nerves, respectively. Fatigue was defined as a significant reduction from baseline in P ga,tw or P di,tw . Throughout IRL, there was a time-dependent increase in cardiac frequency and mean arterial blood pressure, suggesting activation of the respiratory muscle metaboreflex. The P di,tw was significantly lower than baseline (34.3 ± 9.6 cmH 2 O) at 3 (23.2 ± 5.7 cmH 2 O, P muscle fatigue. Agonist-antagonist interactions for the respiratory muscles appear to be more important during expiratory versus inspiratory

  14. Effects of duty cycle and positive end-expiratory pressure on mucus clearance during mechanical ventilation*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Saucedo, Lina; Marti, Joan-Daniel; Rigol, Montserrat; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Nestor; Ferrer, Miquel; Gabarrus, Albert; Fernandez, Laia; Kolobow, Theodor; Torres, Antoni

    2012-03-01

    During mechanical ventilation, air flows may play a role in mucus transport via two-phase gas liquid flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of duty cycles and positive end-expiratory pressure on mucus clearance in pigs using mechanical ventilation, and to assess their safety. Prospective randomized animal study. Animal research facility, University of Barcelona, Spain. Eight healthy pigs. Pigs were intubated and on volume-control mechanical ventilation for up to 84 hrs. After 4, 24, 48, and 72 hrs of mechanical ventilation, six levels of duty cycle (0.26, 0.33, 0.41, 0.50, 0.60, and 0.75) with no associated positive end-expiratory pressure or 5 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure were randomly applied. Surgical bed was oriented 30 degrees in the reverse Trendelenburg position, as in the semirecumbent position. Inspiratory and expiratory flows and hemodynamics were measured after each 30-min ventilation period. Mucus movement was assessed through fluoroscopy tracking of radio-opaque markers. Mucus velocity was described by a positive vector (toward the glottis) or negative vector (toward the lungs). No effect of positive end-expiratory pressure was found; however, as duty cycle was increasingly prolonged, a trend toward reduced velocity of mucus moving toward the lungs and increased outward mucus velocity was found (p = .064). Two clusters of mucus velocities were identified as duty cycle was prolonged beyond 0.41. Thus, duty cycle >0.41 increased mean expiratory-inspiratory flow bias from -4.1 ± 4.6 to 7.9 ± 5.9 L/min (p < .0001) and promoted outward mucus velocity from -0.22 ± 1.71 mm/min (range, -5.78 to 2.42) to 0.53 ± 1.06 mm/min (-1.91 to 3.88; p = .0048). Duty cycle of 0.75 resulted in intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (2.1 ± 1.1 cm H2O [p < .0001] vs. duty cycle 0.26-0.5), with no hemodynamic compromise. In the semirecumbent position, mucus clearance is improved with prolongation of the duty cycle. However, in clinical

  15. Expiratory rib cage compression in mechanically ventilated adults: systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lúcia Faria; Saraiva, Mateus Sasso; Saraiva, Marcos Ariel Sasso; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Kessler, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the effects of expiratory rib cage compression on ventilatory mechanics, airway clearance, and oxygen and hemodynamic indices in mechanically ventilated adults. Methods Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials in the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, PEDro, and LILACS. Studies on adult patients hospitalized in intensive care units and under mechanical ventilation that analyzed the effects of expiratory rib cage compression with respect to a control group (without expiratory rib cage compression) and evaluated the outcomes static and dynamic compliance, sputum volume, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation, and ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fraction of inspired oxygen were included. Experimental studies with animals and those with incomplete data were excluded. Results The search strategy produced 5,816 studies, of which only three randomized crossover trials were included, totaling 93 patients. With respect to the outcome of heart rate, values were reduced in the expiratory rib cage compression group compared with the control group [-2.81 bpm (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: -4.73 to 0.89; I2: 0%)]. Regarding dynamic compliance, there was no significant difference between groups [-0.58mL/cmH2O (95%CI: -2.98 to 1.82; I2: 1%)]. Regarding the variables systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, significant differences were found after descriptive evaluation. However, there was no difference between groups regarding the variables secretion volume, static compliance, ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fraction of inspired oxygen, and peripheral oxygen saturation. Conclusion There is a lack of evidence to support the use of expiratory rib cage compression in routine care, given that the literature on this topic offers low methodological quality and is inconclusive. PMID

  16. Expiratory Snoring Predicts Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Patients with Sleep-disordered Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alchakaki, Abdulrazak; Riehani, Anas; Shikh-Hamdon, Mulham; Mina, Nader; Badr, M Safwan; Sankari, Abdulghani

    2016-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are two common conditions that may present concomitantly. The effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the polysomnographic manifestation of sleep-disordered breathing have not been studied. We hypothesized that the presence of airflow obstruction could be predicted by the presence of expiratory upper airway narrowing during sleep in patients with sleep-disordered breathing. Ninety-three patients with sleep-disordered breathing (19 men; age, 51.6 yr; body mass index, 40.1 kg/m(2); apnea-hypopnea index, 37.4 events/h) were observed. Every patient had an in-lab polysomnography study and complete pulmonary function tests. Sleep and respiratory events were scored using American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommended scoring criteria. Expiratory snoring events were identified on polysomnography using microphone sensor and/or pressure flow sensor in each patient. The FEV1/FVC ratio less than 70 was used to define the presence of airflow obstruction. The proportion analysis demonstrated that patients with expiratory snoring have 11 times higher odds of having evidence of lower airway obstruction, defined as FEV1/FVC less than 70 (odds ratio [OR], 11.03; P snoring, smoking, 3% oxygen desaturation index, 2% oxygen desaturation index, and age (P snoring and smoking (OR, 11.76; confidence interval, 3.23-42.83; and OR, 9.95; confidence interval, 2.67-37.09), respectively. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the linear combination of mean SaO2 and expiratory snoring (P snoring predicts obstructive airway disorders. Patients with expiratory snoring and low mean oxygen saturation during sleep should be carefully assessed for pulmonary disorders such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  17. A study of experimental acute lung injury in pigs on zero end-expiratory pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Claude; Levrat, Albrice; Pontier, Sandrine; Annat, Guy

    2008-03-01

    Tidal expiratory flow limitation (EFL) has been reported in humans with acute lung injury (ALI) and assumed to be associated with small airway closure. Detection of EFL is important because by selecting positive end-expiratory pressure at such a level that EFL is no longer present in the tidal breath, the repeated opening and closure of small airways can be prevented. The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of EFL in two experimental models of ALI. Ten female piglets. Animals were anaesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated on zero end-expiratory pressure. Acute lung injury was induced by oleic acid (OA) (n = 5) or saline lavage (SL) (n = 5). Tidal EFL was assessed by the negative expiratory pressure test. Lung and chest wall mechanics were partitioned using an oesophageal balloon. Resistance and static elastance were assessed by a rapid airway occlusion technique at baseline ventilatory settings. There was no EFL at any time before and after ALI in both models. This may be due to an increased elastance which promoted higher expiratory flow after ALI and to a decreased chest wall to lung static elastance ratio which could favour small airways patency. The similar increase in total lung resistance, in the two models, after ALI was mostly due to an increased airway resistance in the OA model and to the lung tissue resistance in the SL model. Tidal EFL was not detected in experimental ALI. This finding casts some doubt about the usefulness of some experimental models of ALI to mimic some reported findings in human ALI.

  18. [Further examination of COPD using spirometry, respiratory function test, and impulse oscillometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Masaru; Kitada, Junya

    2011-10-01

    Spirometry is essential for diagnosis and staging of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristic of physiological change of small airways in COPD is heterogeneous distribution of small airway narrowing, resulting in air-trapping and nonhomogeneous ventilation. FEF25-75, residual volume/total lung capacity, delta N2 in phase III slope of single breath N2 washout test, closing volume, static and dynamic compliance, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (transfer factor) are measured for detecting small airways disease. Impulse oscillometry is also useful for assessment of small airways disease, especially indices of frequent resonance (Fres) and frequent dependent of resistance change of R5-R20; resistance at 5 Hz minus resistance at 20 Hz. Impulse oscillometry seems to have a complemental role of spirometry in managing COPD.

  19. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Handoko, Maureen; Fooshee, David; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved

  20. A Survey of Lung Health and COPD Awareness amongst Participants at a Mobile Spirometry Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajgopall, R; Migone, C; O'Connor, M; McDonnell, T; Peelo, D; McCormack, S

    2015-09-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death in Ireland. It affects over 440,000 people 10%of Ireland's population), but awareness of COPD is low. COPD Support Ireland is a national charity established to advocate for and support those with COPD. For World COPD Day 2013, a mobile clinic visited 5 locations to provide information about COPD and free spirometry testing. In this study, we evaluated participants' level of knowledge about COPD and whether this was correlated with a number of variables. Participants completed a questionnaire (352). Questionnaires were analysed to ascertain this self-presenting population's characteristics. Most (247, 70.2%) were smokers/ex-smokers, yet only 168 (47.7%) knew of COPD. Almost 18% (63, 17.9%) required referral to GPs with abnormal spirometry results. Our findings suggest the need for greater COPD education and awareness to increase earlier diagnosis, reduce health care costs and improve quality of life.

  1. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or both? Diagnostic labeling and spirometry in primary care patients aged 40 years or more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melbye H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hasse Melbye1, Elin Drivenes1, Lene G Dalbak2, Tone Leinan1, Svein Høegh-Henrichsen2, Anders Østrem21General Practice Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 2General Practice Research Unit, Department of Health and Society, University of Oslo, NorwayAims: To describe symptoms and lung function in patients registered with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in primary care and to examine how spirometry findings fit with general practitioners’ (GPs diagnoses.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 years with a diagnosis of asthma or COPD registered in the electronic medical record during the previous 5 years were recruited at seven GP offices in Norway in 2009–2010. Registered diagnosis, spirometry results, comorbidity, and reported symptoms were compared.Results: Among 376 patients, 62% were women. Based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases criteria, a spirometry diagnosis of COPD could be made in 68.1% of the patients with a previous COPD diagnosis and in 17.1% of those diagnosed with asthma only (P < 0.001. The κ agreement between last clinical diagnosis of COPD and COPD based on spirometry was 0.50. A restrictive spirometry pattern was found in 19.4% and more frequently in patients diagnosed with both asthma and COPD (23.9% than in patients diagnosed with COPD only (6.8%, P = 0.003.Conclusion: The ability of GPs to differentiate between asthma and COPD seems to have considerably improved during the last decade, probably due to the dissemination of spirometry and guidelines for COPD diagnosis. A diagnosis of COPD that cannot be confirmed by spirometry represents a challenge in clinical practice, in particular when a restrictive pattern on spirometry is found.Keywords: asthma, COPD, diagnosis, primary care

  2. The European Respiratory Society spirometry tent: a unique form of screening for airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, Sara; Sherrill, Duane L; MacNee, William; Lange, Peter; Costabel, Ulrich; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Sybrecht, Gerhard W; Burghuber, Otto C; Stevenson, Robin; Tønnesen, Philip; Haeussinger, Karl; Hedlin, Gunilla; Bauer, Torsten T; Riedler, Josef; Nicod, Laurent; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Viegi, Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    In order to raise public awareness of the importance of early detection of airway obstruction and to enable many people who had not been tested previously to have their lung function measured, the European Lung Foundation and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) organised a spirometry testing tent during the annual ERS Congresses in 2004-2009. Spirometry was performed during the ERS Congresses in volunteers; all participants answered a simple, brief questionnaire on their descriptive characteristics, smoking and asthma. Portable spirometers were freely provided by the manufacturer. Nurses and doctors from pulmonary departments of local hospitals/universities gave their service for free. Lower limit of normal (LLN) and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria for diagnosing and grading airway obstruction were used. Of 12,448 participants in six congress cities, 10,395 (83.5%) performed acceptable spirometry (mean age 51.0 ± 18.4 yrs; 25.5% smokers; 5.5% asthmatic). Airway obstruction was present in 12.4% of investigated subjects according to LLN criteria and 20.3% according to GOLD criteria. Through multinomial logistic regression analysis, age, smoking habits and asthma were significant risk factors for airway obstruction. Relative risk ratio and 95% confidence interval for LLN stage I, for example, was 2.9 (2.0-4.1) for the youngest age (≤ 19 yrs), 1.9 (1.2-3.0) for the oldest age (≥ 80 yrs), 2.4 (2.0-2.9) for current smokers and 2.8 (2.2-3.6) for reported asthma diagnosis. In addition to being a useful advocacy tool, the spirometry tent represents an unusual occasion for early detection of airway obstruction in large numbers of city residents with an important public health perspective.

  3. Spirometry for patients in hospital and one month after admission with an acute exacerbation of COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Kenealy, Timothy; Rea,; Adair,; Robinson,; Sheridan,Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Harry Rea1, Timothy Kenealy1, Jacqui Adair1, Elizabeth Robinson2, Nicolette Sheridan31Section of Integrated Care, South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, 2Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, 3Section of Integrated Care, South Auckland Clinical School and School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New ZealandAim: To assess whether spirometry done in hospital during an admission for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstr...

  4. The value of spirometry and exercise challenge test to diagnose and monitor children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaart, Lara S; Roukema, Jolt; Merkus, Peter Jfm

    2015-03-01

    Asthma is defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways with characteristic symptoms including recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. It may result in abnormalities of ventilator function, which can be assessed by different pulmonary function tests. In this case report, we present a 15-year-old boy with asthma and illustrate the value and limitations of spirometry and exercise challenge test in daily practice.

  5. Spirometry Reference Equations from the HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVange, Lisa; Davis, Sonia M; Hankinson, John; Enright, Paul; Wilson, Rebbecca; Barr, R Graham; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kalhan, Ravi; Lemus, Hector; Ni, Ai; Smith, Lewis J; Talavera, Gregory A

    2017-10-15

    Accurate reference values for spirometry are important because the results are used for diagnosing common chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, estimating physiologic impairment, and predicting all-cause mortality. Reference equations have been established for Mexican Americans but not for others with Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. To develop spirometry reference equations for adult Hispanic/Latino background groups in the United States. The HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos) recruited a population-based probability sample of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 years living in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. Participants self-identified as being of Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, or Central or South American background. Spirometry was performed using standardized methods with central quality control monitoring. Spirometric measures from a subset of 6,425 never-smoking participants without respiratory symptoms or disease were modeled as a function of sex, age, height, and Hispanic/Latino background to produce background-specific reference equations for the predicted value and lower limit of normal. Dominican and Puerto Rican Americans had substantially lower predicted and lower limit of normal values for FVC and FEV 1 than those in other Hispanic/Latino background groups and also than Mexican American values from NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). For patients of Dominican and Puerto Rican background who present with pulmonary symptoms in clinical practice, use of background-specific spirometry reference equations may provide more appropriate predicted and lower limit of normal values, enabling more accurate diagnoses of abnormality and physiologic impairment.

  6. [Spirometry as method of screening and intervention in high- risk smokers in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clotet, Joan; Real, Jordi; Lorente, Iñigo; Fuentes, Araceli; Paredes, Eugeni; Ciria, Carmen

    2012-06-01

    To show the effectiveness of screening in the detection of new cases of COPD in smokers of high-risk, and to describe the characteristics associated with COPD, as well as determine the predisposition to quit. A cross-sectional and multicentre study. Basic Primary Care Centres representing different rural and urban areas of Lleida. A total of 497 active smokers without COPD from 40 to 70 years selected from the database Primary Care Database (e-CAP). Spirometry was performed on all patients. The spirometry results were reported and brief counselling was given on quitting smoking and the readiness to stop smoking was determined. Age, gender, height, weight, smoking, respiratory symptoms and physical activity. The majority of patients (65.4%) were men, age 51± 7.6 years. They smoked an average of 32 packs/year; 40.4% performed moderate activity and 27.4% referred to some respiratory symptoms. Of the 25% who had an obstructive or mixed pattern, 75.8% of the cases had a moderate level of severity. A decision to quit was made by 38.8%. In the multivariate analysis, gender, age 50 to 59 years and a smoking index>40 were associated with COPD. Moderate or intense physical activity decreased the risk of COPD. To perform spirometry in high-risk smokers, to show the spirometry results and give brief anti-smoking counselling, enables not previously diagnosed cases of COPD to be detected. It also helps to determine the readiness to stop smoking and to establish individualised treatment and follow-up plans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of switching from Caucasian to Indian reference equations for spirometry interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K; Madan, M

    2018-03-01

    In the absence of ethnically appropriate prediction equations, spirometry data in Indian subjects are often interpreted using equations for other ethnic populations. To evaluate the impact of switching from Caucasian (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III [NHANES III] and Global Lung Function Initiative [GLI]) equations to the recently published North Indian equations on spirometric interpretation, and to examine the suitability of GLI-Mixed equations for this population. Spirometry data on 12 323 North Indian patients were analysed using the North Indian equations as well as NHANES III, GLI-Caucasian and GLI-Mixed equations. Abnormalities and ventilatory patterns were categorised and agreement in interpretation was evaluated. The NHANES III and GLI-Caucasian equations and, to a lesser extent, the GLI-Mixed equations, predicted higher values and labelled more measurements as abnormal. In up to one third of the patients, these differed from Indian equations in the categorisation of ventilatory patterns, with more patients classified as having restrictive and mixed disease. The NHANES III and GLI-Caucasian equations substantially overdiagnose abnormalities and misclassify ventilatory patterns on spirometry in Indian patients. Such errors of interpretation, although less common with the GLI-Mixed equations, remain substantial and are clinically unacceptable. A switch to Indian equations will have a major impact on interpretation.

  8. Modern Spirometry Supports Anesthetic Management in Small Animal Clinical Practice: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calice, Ivana; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Modern spirometry, like no other monitoring technique, allows insight into breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Spirometers continuously measure volume, airway pressure, and flow while calculating and continuously displaying respiratory system compliance and resistance in the form of loops. The aim of this case series is to show how observation of spirometric loops, similar to electrocardiogram or CO2 curve monitoring, can improve safety of anesthetic management in small animals. Spirometric monitoring cases described in this case series are based on use of the anaesthesia monitor Capnomac Ultima with a side stream spirometry sensor. The cases illustrate how recognition and understanding of spirometric loops allows for easy diagnosis of iatrogenic pneumothorax, incorrect ventilator settings, leaks in the system, kinked or partially obstructed endotracheal tube, and spontaneous breathing interfering with intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The case series demonstrates the potential of spirometry to improve the quality and safety of anesthetic management, and, hence, its use can be recommended during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation and procedures in which interference with ventilation can be expected.

  9. Measurement of total lung capacity : a comparison of spiral CT and spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Kyung Il; Park, Kyung Ju; Lee, Eh Hyung; Yune, Heun Young; Suh, Jung Ho; Choe, Kyu Ok; Lim, Tae Hwan; Chung, In Hyuk

    1996-01-01

    To determine the potential of spiral CT as a functional imaging modality of the lung aside from its proven value in morphological depiction. Spiral CT scan was performed in ten normal female and nine normal male adults (mean age: 39, height: 163 cm, weight: 62 kg ) after single full breath-holding. Three dimensional lung images were reconstructed(minimal threshold value: -1,000HU, maximal threshold values: -150, 250, -350, -450 HU) to obtain total lung volume(TLV) on a histogram. Total lung volume measured by spiral CT was compared with TLV obtained by spirometry. Mean TLV measured by spirometry was 5.62L and TLV measured by CT at maximal threshold values of -150, -250, -350, and -450 HU was 5.53, 5.33, 5.15, and 4.98L, respectively. Mean absolute differences between the modalities of 0.17L(3%), 0.32L(5.6%), 0.48L(8.5%), 0.65L(11.5%) were statistically significant(p<0.001). Linear regression coefficients between the modalities were 0.99, 0.97, 095, and 0.94 and no statistically significant differences in accuracy of threshold levels in the estimation of lung volume(r=0.99, standard error=0.034L in all) were seen. TLV measured by spiral CT closely approximated that measured by spirometry. Spiral CT may be useful as a means of evaluating lung function

  10. Interaction between intra-abdominal pressure and positive-end expiratory pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamili Anbar Torquato

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantify the interaction between increased intra-abdominal pressure and Positive-End Expiratory Pressure. METHODS: In 30 mechanically ventilated ICU patients with a fixed tidal volume, respiratory system plateau and abdominal pressure were measured at a Positive-End Expiratory Pressure level of zero and 10 cm H2O. The measurements were repeated after placing a 5 kg weight on the patients' belly. RESULTS: After the addition of 5 kg to the patients' belly at zero Positive-End Expiratory Pressure, both intra-abdominal pressure (p<0.001 and plateau pressures (p=0.005 increased significantly. Increasing the Positive-End Expiratory Pressure levels from zero to 10 cm H2O without weight on the belly did not result in any increase in intra-abdominal pressure (p=0.165. However, plateau pressures increased significantly (p< 0.001. Increasing Positive-End Expiratory Pressure from zero to 10 cm H2O and adding 5 kg to the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 8.7 to 16.8 (p<0.001 and plateau pressure from 18.26 to 27.2 (p<0.001. Maintaining Positive-End Expiratory Pressure at 10 cm H2O and placing 5 kg on the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 12.3 +/- 1.7 to 16.8 +/- 1.7 (p<0.001 but did not increase plateau pressure (26.6+/-1.2 to 27.2 +/-1.1 -p=0.83. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of a 5kg weight onto the abdomen significantly increased both IAP and the airway plateau pressure, confirming that intra-abdominal hypertension elevates the plateau pressure. However, plateau pressure alone cannot be considered a good indicator for the detection of elevated intra-abdominal pressure in patients under mechanical ventilation using PEEP. In these patients, the intra-abdominal pressure must also be measured.

  11. Effects of manual rib cage compressions on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joan Daniel; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Rigol, Montserrat; Saucedo, Lina; Ranzani, Otavio Tavares; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Nestor; Ferrer, Miquel; Vilaro, Jordi; Kolobow, Theodor; Torres, Antoni

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the effects of two different types of manual rib cage compression on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during prolonged mechanical ventilation in pigs. Prospective randomized animal study. Animal research facility, University of Barcelona, Spain. Nine healthy pigs. Pigs were tracheally intubated, sedated, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The animals were prone on a surgical bed in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The experiments were carried out at approximately 60 and 80 hrs from the beginning of mechanical ventilation. Two types of manual rib cage compressions were tested: Hard and brief rib cage compressions synchronized with early expiratory phase (hard manual rib cage compression) and soft and gradual rib cage compressions applied during the late expiratory phase (soft manual rib cage compression). The interventions were randomly applied for 15min with a 15-min interval between treatments. Respiratory flow and mucus movement were assessed during the interventions. Respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics were assessed prior to and after the interventions. Peak expiratory flow increased to 60.1±7.1L/min in comparison to 51.2±4.6L/min without treatment (p < 0.0015) and 48.7±4.3L/min with soft manual rib cage compression (p = 0.0002). Similarly, mean expiratory flow increased to 28.4±5.2L/min during hard manual rib cage compression vs. 15.9±2.2 and 16.6±2.8L/min without treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, respectively (p = 0.0006). During hard manual rib cage compression, mucus moved toward the glottis (1.01 ± 2.37mm/min); conversely, mucus moved toward the lungs during no treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, -0.28 ± 0.61 and -0.15±0.95mm/min, respectively (p = 0.0283). Soft manual rib cage compression slightly worsened static lung elastance and cardiac output (p = 0.0391). Hard manual rib cage compression improved mucus clearance in animals positioned in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The technique

  12. Effects of a 12-month multi-faceted mentoring intervention on knowledge, quality, and usage of spirometry in primary care: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Moosa, Dilshad; MacPherson, Ana; Allen, Christopher; Tamari, Itamar E

    2016-04-21

    Asthma is among the most common chronic diseases in adults. International guidelines have emphasized the importance of regular spirometry for asthma control evaluation. However, spirometry use in primary care remains low across jurisdictions. We sought to design and evaluate a knowledge translation intervention to address both the poor quality of spirometry and the underuse of spirometry in primary care. We designed a 1-year intervention consisting of initial interactive education and hands-on training followed by unstructured peer expert mentoring (through an online portal, email, telephone, videoconference, fax, and/or in-person). We recruited physician and allied health mentees from across primary care sites in Ontario, Canada. We compared spirometry-related knowledge immediately before and after the 1-year intervention period and the quality of spirometry testing and the usage of spirometry in patients with asthma in the year before and the year of the intervention. Seven of 10 (70 %) invited sites participated, including 25/90 (28 %) invited allied health mentees and 23/68 (34 %) invited physician mentees. We recruited 7 physician mentors and 4 allied health mentors to form 3 mentor-mentee pods. Spirometry knowledge scores increased from 21.4 +/- 3.1 pre- to 27.3 +/- 3.5 (out of 35) (p Spirometry acceptability and repeatability criteria were met by 59/191 (30.9 %) spirometries and 86/193 (44.6 %) spirometries [odds ratio 1.7 (1.0, 3.0)], in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Spirometry was ordered in 75/512 (14.6 %) and 129/336 (38.4 %) respiratory visits (p spirometry in real world primary care settings. A future controlled study should assess the impact of this intervention on patient outcomes, its cost-effectiveness, and its sustainability.

  13. Pico do fluxo expiratório na avaliação da função pulmonar na fibrose cística Peak expiratory flow rate in the management of cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A.M. Camargos

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: avaliar o valor do pico de fluxo expiratório, obtido através de medidores portáteis, como método alternativo de acompanhamento da função pulmonar na fibrose cística. Métodos: quarenta e nove pacientes, de 5 a 19 anos, clinicamente estáveis e aptos a realizar a manobra para obtenção do pico do fluxo foram incluídos no estudo. Na mesma visita, pontuou-se o escore de Shwachman-Kulczycki e registrou-se o valor do pico do fluxo expiratório. Analisou-se a correlação entre esses dois parâmetros pela regressão linear, com nível de significância de P = 0,05. Resultados: obteve-se uma correlação discreta, mas estatisticamente significante, entre os valores absolutos e percentuais desse parâmetro funcional com o escore clínico-radiológico (r = 0,31, P = 0,02 e r = 0,30, P = 0,03, respectivamente. Conclusões: conclui-se que a significância estatística observada não corresponde necessariamente a uma relevância clínica e, portanto, a função pulmonar na fibrose cística deve ser avaliada pela espirometria convencional.Objective: to verify the role of peak expiratory flow, measured through portable meters, as an alternative test to assess pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis. Methods: forty-nine patients aged five to 19 years old in stable health condition and able to perform the peak expiratory flow maneuver were included. In the same visit, Shwachman-Kulczycki score was recorded. Linear regression was used to assess the correlation between the Shwachman-Kulczycki score and the peak expiratory flow rate. A P value of 0.05 was considered to be significant.Results: a slight, but statistically significant correlation between absolute and percent values for this functional parameter and the Shwachman-Kulczycki score (r = 0.31, P = 0.02 and r = 0.30, P = 0.03, respectively was found. Conclusions: although this correlation was statistically significant, these findings are not clinically relevant, i.e., the lung involvement

  14. Segmentation of expiratory and inspiratory sounds in baby cry audio recordings using hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucouturier, Jean-Julien; Nonaka, Yulri; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    The paper describes an application of machine learning techniques to identify expiratory and inspiration phases from the audio recording of human baby cries. Crying episodes were recorded from 14 infants, spanning four vocalization contexts in their first 12 months of age; recordings from three individuals were annotated manually to identify expiratory and inspiratory sounds and used as training examples to segment automatically the recordings of the other 11 individuals. The proposed algorithm uses a hidden Markov model architecture, in which state likelihoods are estimated either with Gaussian mixture models or by converting the classification decisions of a support vector machine. The algorithm yields up to 95% classification precision (86% average), and its ability generalizes over different babies, different ages, and vocalization contexts. The technique offers an opportunity to quantify expiration duration, count the crying rate, and other time-related characteristics of baby crying for screening, diagnosis, and research purposes over large populations of infants.

  15. Impact of humidification and nebulization during expiratory limb protection: an experimental bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnelier, Alexandre; Lellouche, François; Bouchard, Pierre Alexandre; L'Her, Erwan

    2013-08-01

    Different filtering devices are used during mechanical ventilation to avoid dysfunction of flow and pressure transducers or for airborne microorganisms containment. Water condensates, resulting from the use of humidifiers, but also residual nebulization particles may have a major influence on expiratory limb resistance. To evaluate the influence of nebulization and active humidification on the resistance of expiratory filters. A respiratory system analog was constructed using a test lung, an ICU ventilator, heated humidifiers, and a piezoelectric nebulizer. Humidifiers were connected to different types of circuits (unheated, mono-heated, new-generation and old-generation bi-heated). Five filter types were evaluated: electrostatic, heat-and-moisture exchanger, standard, specific, and internal heated high-efficiency particulate air [HEPA] filter. Baseline characteristics were obtained from each dry filter. Differential pressure measurements were carried out after 24 hours of continuous in vitro use for each condition, and after 24 hours of use with an old-generation bi-heated circuit without nebulization. While using unheated circuits, measurements had to be interrupted before 24 hours for all the filtering devices except the internal heated HEPA filter. The heat-and-moisture exchangers occluded before 24 hours with the unheated and mono-heated circuits. The circuit type, nebulization practice, and duration of use did not influence the internal heated HEPA filter resistance. Expiratory limb filtration is likely to induce several major adverse events. Expiratory filter resistance increase is due mainly to the humidification circuit type, rather than to nebulization. If filtration is mandatory while using an unheated circuit, a dedicated filter should be used for ≤ 24 hours, or a heated HEPA for a longer duration.

  16. Physiological and morphological determinants of maximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tiddens, Harm; Bogaard, Jan; Jongste, Johan; Hop, Wim; Coxson, Harvey; Pare, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    textabstractMaximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could be reduced by three different mechanisms; loss of lung elastic recoil, decreased airway conductance upstream of flow-limiting segments; and increased collapsibility of airways. We hypothesized that decreased upstream conductance would be related to inflammation and thickening of the airway walls, increased collapsibility would be related to decreased airway cartilage volume, and decreased collapsibility ...

  17. Maximal hysteresis: a new method to set positive end-expiratory pressure in acute lung injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed-Nielsen, J; Andersen, G; Barklin, A; Bach, A; Lunde, S; Tønnesen, E; Larsson, A

    2008-05-01

    No methods are superior when setting positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute lung injury (ALI). In ALI, the vertical distance (hysteresis) between the inspiratory and expiratory limbs of a static pressure-volume (PV) loop mainly indicates lung recruitment. We hypothesized that PEEP set at the pressure where hysteresis is 90% of its maximum (90%MH) would give similar oxygenation, but less cardiovascular depression than PEEP set at the pressure at lower inflection point (LIP) on the inspiratory limb or at the point of maximal curvature (PMC) on the expiratory limb in ALI. In 12 mechanically ventilated pigs, ALI was induced in a randomized fashion by lung lavage, lung lavage plus injurious ventilation, or by oleic acid. From a static PV loop obtained by an interrupted low-flow method, the pressures at LIP [25 (25, 25) cmH(2)O, mean and 25, 75 percentiles], at PMC [24 (20, 24) cmH(2)O], and at 90% MH [19 (18, 19) cmH(2)O] were determined and used for the PEEP-settings. We measured lung inflation (by computed tomography), end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), airway pressures, compliance of the respiratory system (Crs), blood gases, cardiac output and arterial blood pressure. There were no differences between the PEEP settings in EELV or oxygenation, but the 90%MH setting gave lower end-inspiratory pause pressure (P<0.025), higher Crs (P<0.025), less hyper-aeration (P<0.025) and better maintained hemodynamics. In this porcine lung injury model, PEEP set at 90% MH gave better lung mechanics and hemodynamics, than PEEP set at PMC or LIP.

  18. Chest physiotherapy using passive expiratory techniques does not reduce bronchiolitis severity: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Isabelle; Leis, Patricia; Bouchardy, Marie; Oberli, Christine; Sourial, Hendrika; Friedli-Burri, Margrit; Perneger, Thomas; Barazzone Argiroffo, Constance

    2012-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CP) using passive expiratory manoeuvres is widely used in Western Europe for the treatment of bronchiolitis, despite lacking evidence for its efficacy. We undertook an open randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of CP in infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis by comparing the time to clinical stability, the daily improvement of a severity score and the occurrence of complications between patients with and without CP. Children bronchiolitis in a tertiary hospital during two consecutive respiratory syncytial virus seasons were randomised to group 1 with CP (prolonged slow expiratory technique, slow accelerated expiratory flow, rarely induced cough) or group 2 without CP. All children received standard care (rhinopharyngeal suctioning, minimal handling, oxygen for saturation ≥92%, fractionated meals). Ninety-nine eligible children (mean age, 3.9 months), 50 in group 1 and 49 in group 2, with similar baseline variables and clinical severity at admission. Time to clinical stability, assessed as primary outcome, was similar for both groups (2.9 ± 2.1 vs. 3.2 ± 2.8 days, P = 0.45). The rate of improvement of a clinical and respiratory score, defined as secondary outcome, only showed a slightly faster improvement of the respiratory score in the intervention group when including stethoacoustic properties (P = 0.044). Complications were rare but occurred more frequently, although not significantly (P = 0.21), in the control arm. In conclusion, this study shows the absence of effectiveness of CP using passive expiratory techniques in infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis. It seems justified to recommend against the routine use of CP in these patients.

  19. Thoracoabdominal mobility evaluation by photogrammetry in newborns after expiratory flow increase technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Isabel de Araújo Guerra

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Expiratory flow increase is a maneuver of respiratory physical therapy that promotes flow direction to the upper airways however, when applied in newborns, it may result in changes of thoracoabdominal mobility. Objective: To evaluate the thoracoabdominal mobility by photogrammetry in newborns after expiratory flow increase technique. Methods: Experimental blind study performed with newborns in supine position on a support table with upper limbs flexed, abducted and externally rotated and hip flexed at 110°. Adhesive markers were allocated for geometric delimitation of the thoracoabdominal compartment and expiratory flow increase technique was performed for 5 minutes with the therapist’s hands on the thorax and abdomen. Newborns were filmed before and after the maneuver and the frames were analyzed in AutoCAD® software by a blinded investigator at the time of the procedure. The largest and the smallest thoracoabdominal area were expressed in cm2 and the mean values were compared between two moments (pre and post maneuver by paired t test. Results: Twenty newborns with a mean age of 39 weeks were included. Before the maneuver, thoracoabdominal area was 56.1 cm2 during expiration and 59.7 cm2 during inspiration, and after the maneuver the value was 56.2 cm2 during expiration and 59.8 cm2 during inspiration, with no statistical difference between before and after (p = 0.97, p = 0.92, respectively. Conclusion: Results demonstrate that expiratory flow increase technique does not seem to change thoracoabdominal mobility of healthy newborns.

  20. Focal airtrapping at expiratory high-resolution CT: comparison with pulmonary function tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Hast, J.; Heussel, C.P.; Mildenberger, P.; Thelen, M.; Schlegel, J.

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine prevalence, extent, and severity of focal airtrapping at expiratory high-resolution CT, and to compare focal airtrapping with age, gender, pulmonary function tests, and blood gas analysis. Two-hundred seventeen patients with and without pulmonary disease underwent paired inspiratory/expiratory high-resolution CT. Six scan pairs with corresponding scan levels were visually assessed for focal - not diffuse - airtrapping using a four-point scale. Pulmonary function tests and blood gas analysis were available for correlation in all patients (mean interval 5 days). Focal airtrapping with lower lung predominance was observed in 80 % of patients. Twenty-six of 26 patients with restrictive lung function impairment exhibited focal airtrapping (mean score 2.4), whereas only 72 of 98 (74 %) patients with obstruction did (mean score 1.5; p < 0.05). Fifty-eight of 70 (83 %) patients with normal lung function (mean score 1.8) and 19 of 23 (83 %) patients with mixed impairment (mean score 1.8) had focal airtrapping. Focal airtrapping showed negative correlations with static lung volumes (-0.27 to -0.37; p < 0.001) in all patients and moderate positive correlations with dynamic parameters (0.3-0.4; p < 0.001) in patients with obstruction. No significant correlations were found with age, gender, and blood gas analysis. Visual assessment of focal - not diffuse - airtrapping at expiratory high-resolution CT does not correlate with physiological evidence of obstruction as derived from pulmonary function tests since the perception of focal airtrapping requires an adequate expiratory increase in lung density. (orig.)

  1. [Cerebral blood flow assessment of preterm infants during respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Mariana Almada; Caldas, Jamil Pedro Siqueira; Netto, Abimael Aranha; Marba, Sérgio Tadeu Martins

    2016-06-01

    To assess the impact of respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique on cerebral hemodynamics of premature newborns. This is an intervention study, which included 40 preterm infants (≤34 weeks) aged 8-15 days of life, clinically stable in ambient air or oxygen catheter use. Children with heart defects, diagnosis of brain lesion and/or those using vasoactive drugs were excluded. Ultrasonographic assessments with transcranial Doppler flowmetry were performed before, during and after the increase in expiratory flow session, which lasted 5minutes. Cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance and pulsatility indices in the pericallosal artery were assessed. Respiratory physical therapy did not significantly alter flow velocity at the systolic peak (p=0.50), the end diastolic flow velocity (p=0.17), the mean flow velocity (p=0.07), the resistance index (p=0.41) and the pulsatility index (p=0.67) over time. The expiratory flow increase technique did not affect cerebral blood flow in clinically-stable preterm infants. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Cerebral blood flow assessment of preterm infants during respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Almada Bassani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the impact of respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique on cerebral hemodynamics of premature newborns. Methods: This is an intervention study, which included 40 preterm infants (≤34 weeks aged 8-15 days of life, clinically stable in ambient air or oxygen catheter use. Children with heart defects, diagnosis of brain lesion and/or those using vasoactive drugs were excluded. Ultrasonographic assessments with transcranial Doppler flowmetry were performed before, during and after the increase in expiratory flow session, which lasted 5min. Cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance and pulsatility indices in the pericallosal artery were assessed. Results: Respiratory physical therapy did not significantly alter flow velocity at the systolic peak (p=0.50, the end diastolic flow velocity (p=0.17, the mean flow velocity (p=0.07, the resistance index (p=0.41 and the pulsatility index (p=0.67 over time. Conclusions: The expiratory flow increase technique did not affect cerebral blood flow in clinically-stable preterm infants.

  3. The correlation between the paired inspiratory and expiratory three-dimensional quantitative CT and pulmonary function test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Xi; Song Wei; Xue Huadan; Song Lan; Yang Liang; Jin Zhengyu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between the paired inspiratory and expiratory quantitative CT and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: A total of 84 patients with COPD were enrolled. For each patient, CT scan was performed in deep inspiration and expiration. Using automatic post-processing software, a three-dimension quantitative measurement was employed to assess the CT parameters of emphysema and air trapping. The correlation between CT and PFT was evaluated by the Spearman rank correlation test and multivariate linear regression analysis. Results: The percent 1 [Perc 1 , (-984.28 ± 17.93) HU] and percent 15 [Perc 15 , (-948.35 ± 22.26) HU] from the CT parameters of emphysema were positively correlated with the forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted (FEV 1 %, 48.69 ± 23, 47), the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second over forced vital capacity [FEV 1 /FVC, (45.89 ± 15.36)%, r = 0.45-0.67, P < 0.01], was negatively correlated with the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity [RV/TLC, (61.32 ± 14.48)%]. The other CT parameters of emphysema index (EI) and the parameters of air trapping, the change in relative lung volume with attenuation values from -860 to -950 HU [RVC -860--950 , (17.66 ± 22.36)%], the expiration to inspiration ratio of mean lung density (MLD ex/in , 0.93 ± 0.06), the expiration to inspiration ratio of lung volume (LV ex/in , 0.71 ± 0.14) had negative correlations with logFEV 1 %, FEV 1 /FVC (r = -0.48--0.69, P < 0.01) and positive correlations with RV/TLC (r = 0.41-0.66, P < 0.01). The further univariate linear regressions showed that EI, Perc 1 , Pere 15 , RVC -860--950 , MLD ex/in , LV ex/in were correlated with the parameters of PFTs (R square values of the regression equation, ranged from 0.27 to 0.66, P < 0.01). After the pairwise combinations of the parameters of emphysema and air trapping, multivariate stepwise regressions showed

  4. Bronchodilator response cut-off points and FEV 0.75 reference values for spirometry in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burity, Edjane Figueiredo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; Andrade, Armèle Dornelas de; Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim de

    2016-01-01

    To determine the cut-off points for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% bronchodilator responses in healthy preschool children and to generate reference values for FEV0.75. This was a cross-sectional community-based study involving children 3-5 years of age. Healthy preschool children were selected by a standardized questionnaire. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator use. The cut-off point of the response was defined as the 95th percentile of the change in each parameter. We recruited 266 children, 160 (60%) of whom were able to perform acceptable, reproducible expiratory maneuvers before and after bronchodilator use. The mean age and height were 57.78 ± 7.86 months and 106.56 ± 6.43 cm, respectively. The success rate for FEV0.5 was 35%, 68%, and 70% in the 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, respectively. The 95th percentile of the change in the percentage of the predicted value in response to bronchodilator use was 11.6%, 16.0%, 8.5%, and 35.5% for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75%, respectively. Our results provide cut-off points for bronchodilator responsiveness for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% in healthy preschool children. In addition, we proposed gender-specific reference equations for FEV0.75. Our findings could improve the physiological assessment of respiratory function in preschool children. Determinar os pontos de corte de resposta ao broncodilatador do VEF1, VEF0,75, VEF0,5 e FEF25-75% em crianças pré-escolares saudáveis e gerar valores de referência para o VEF0,75. Foi realizado um estudo transversal de base comunitária em crianças de 3-5 anos de idade. Pré-escolares saudáveis foram selecionados por um questionário padronizado. Foi realizada espirometria antes e depois do uso de broncodilatador. Foram definidos os pontos de corte dessa resposta como o percentil 95 de variação em cada parâmetro. Foram recrutadas 266 crianças, e 160 (60,0%) foram capazes de gerar manobras expiratórias aceitáveis e reprodut

  5. AANA journal course: new technologies in anesthesia: update for nurse anesthetists--monitoring ventilation and compliance with Side Stream Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L M

    1991-06-01

    A new anesthesia technology, Side Stream Spirometry, now allows clinicians to monitor pressure, volume, flow, compliance, and resistance during routine anesthesia practice. Continuous monitoring with Side Stream Spirometry is a major adjunct to patient safety because numerical and visual references show how change in one respiratory parameter affects the mechanics of the entire breath cycle. To optimize ventilation and ensure adequate oxygenation, it is common practice for clinicians to verify that the proper volume per breath is being delivered to the patient at the lowest possible pressure. For artificial ventilation to be most physiologic, each breath must be delivered with the most appropriate flow, at the required volume, under the pressure appropriate for each patient's pulmonary system, and at the correct respiratory breath rate. Side Stream Spirometry makes it possible to continuously measure lung mechanics and the gas dynamics of flow, volume and pressure. Using a simple sensor, the D-lite, Side Stream Spirometry is compatible with all common models of anesthesia machines, ventilators and breathing circuits. Side Stream Spirometry measures all parameters closest to the patient, at the tracheal tube or mask. This sensor location provides actual patient information which is not altered by the volume of gas compressed in the breathing circuit, the absorber system, or in the bellows of the ventilator. This installment of the AANA Journal Course will discuss the technology of Side Stream Spirometry and its application to monitoring pulmonary ventilation. Clinical evidence of ventilatory changes will be graphically demonstrated using the CAPNOMAC ULTIMA, a respiratory gas monitoring system, equipped with Side Stream Spirometry.

  6. Short-term effects of positive expiratory airway pressure in patients being weaned from mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Mello Rieder

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility and the cardiorespiratory effects of using positive expiratory airway pressure, a physiotherapeutic tool, in comparison with a T-tube, to wean patients from mechanical ventilation. METHODS/DESIGN: A prospective, randomized, cross-over study. SETTING: Two intensive care units. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: We evaluated forty patients who met weaning criteria and had been mechanically-ventilated for more than 48 hours, mean age 59 years, including 23 males. All patients were submitted to the T-tube and Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure devices, at 7 cm H2O, during a 30-minute period. Cardiorespiratory variables including work of breathing, respiratory rate (rr, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, heart rate (hr, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (SAP, DAP, MAP were measured in the first and thirtieth minutes. The condition was analyzed as an entire sample set (n=40 and was also divided into subconditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=14 and non-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=26 categories. Comparisons were made using a t-test and Analysis of Variance. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: Our data showed an increase in work of breathing in the first and thirtieth minutes in the EPAP condition (0.86+ 0.43 and 1.02+1.3 as compared with the T-tube condition (0.25+0.26 and 0.26+0.35 (p<0.05, verified by the flow-sensor monitor (values in J/L. No statistical differences were observed when comparing the Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure and T-tube conditions with regard to cardiorespiratory measurements. The same result was observed for both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subconditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that, in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation, the use of a fixed level of Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure caused an increase in work of

  7. The differential effects of inspiratory, expiratory, and combined resistive breathing on healthy lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loverdos K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Konstantinos Loverdos,1 Dimitrios Toumpanakis,1 Eleni Litsiou,1 Vassiliki Karavana,1 Constantinos Glynos,1 Christina Magkou,2 Stamatios Theocharis,3 Theodoros Vassilakopoulos1 1Department of Critical Care, Pulmonary Unit and Marianthi Simou Applied Biomedical Research and Training Center, Evangelismos General Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, 2Department of Pathology, Evangelismos General Hospital, 31st Department of Pathology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece Abstract: Combined resistive breathing (CRB is the hallmark of obstructive airway disease pathophysiology. We have previously shown that severe inspiratory resistive breathing (IRB induces acute lung injury in healthy rats. The role of expiratory resistance is unknown. The possibility of a load-dependent type of resistive breathing-induced lung injury also remains elusive. Our aim was to investigate the differential effects of IRB, expiratory resistive breathing (ERB, and CRB on healthy rat lung and establish the lowest loads required to induce injury. Anesthetized tracheostomized rats breathed through a two-way valve. Varying resistances were connected to the inspiratory, expiratory, or both ports, so that the peak inspiratory pressure (IRB was 20%–40% or peak expiratory (ERB was 40%–70% of maximum. CRB was assessed in inspiratory/expiratory pressures of 30%/50%, 40%/50%, and 40%/60% of maximum. Quietly breathing animals served as controls. At 6 hours, respiratory system mechanics were measured, and bronchoalveolar lavage was performed for measurement of cell and protein concentration. Lung tissue interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β levels were estimated, and a lung injury histological score was determined. ERB produced significant, load-independent neutrophilia, without mechanical or permeability derangements. IRB 30% was the lowest inspiratory load that provoked lung injury. CRB increased tissue elasticity, bronchoalveolar lavage total cell, macrophage

  8. The importance of the expiratory pause. Comparison of the Mapleson A, C and D breathing systems using a lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, L B

    1996-05-01

    A physical lung model simulating spontaneous respiration was used to investigate the influence of the respiratory pattern on the efficiency of the Mapleson A, C and D breathing systems. It is shown that the Mapleson A system is always the most efficient breathing system and that its performance is relatively independent of the respiratory pattern. When the expiratory pause is minimal, the Mapleson C system is almost as efficient as the Mapleson A, but becomes ever less efficient as the expiratory pause increases. The Mapleson D system is very inefficient when the expiratory pause is short. With a longer expiratory pause, this system's efficiency approaches that of the Mapleson A. The experimental results are compared with predictions generated by a mathematical model. There is good agreement between the two, validating the mathematics used.

  9. Experimental Study of Dispersion and Deposition of Expiratory Aerosols in Aircraft Cabins and Impact on Infectious Disease Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    To, G.N.S.; Wan, M.P.; Chao, C.Y.H.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion and deposition characteristics of polydispersed expiratory aerosols were investigated in an aircraft cabin mockup to study the transmission of infectious diseases. The airflow was characterized by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Aerosol dispersionwas measured...

  10. Test-retest reliability of expiratory abdominal compression with a handheld dynamometer in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to examine the test-retest reliability of expiratory abdominal compression with a handheld dynamometer in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation. [Subjects and Methods] We recruited 18 patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation. All patients had impaired consciousness. The mode of the ventilator was synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation. The abdomen above the navel was vertically compressed using a handheld dynamometer in synchronization with expiration. Expiratory abdominal compression was performed two times. We measured the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression. There was an interval of 5 minutes between the first and second measurements. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis were performed to examine the test-retest reliability of expiratory abdominal compression with a handheld dynamometer. [Results] The test-retest reliability of expiratory abdominal compression was excellent (ICC(1, 1): 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis showed that there was no fixed bias and no proportional bias. [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggest that expiratory abdominal compression with a handheld dynamometer is reliable and useful for patients with respiratory failure and prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  11. The diagnosis of COPD in primary care; gender differences and the role of spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N J; Patel, I S; Partridge, M R

    2016-02-01

    Females with exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease now account for one half of all hospital admissions for that condition and rates have been increasing over the last few decades. Differences in presentations of disease between genders have been shown in several conditions and this study explores whether there are inter gender biases in probable diagnoses in those suspected to have COPD. 445 individuals with a provisional diagnosis by their General Practitioner of "suspected COPD" or "definite COPD" were referred to a community Respiratory Assessment unit (CRAU) for tests including spirometry. Gender, demographics, respiratory symptoms and respiratory medical history were recorded. The provisional diagnoses were compared with the final diagnosis made after spirometry and respiratory specialist nurse review and the provisional diagnosis was either confirmed as correct or refuted as unlikely. Significantly more men (87.5%) had their diagnosis of "definite COPD" confirmed compared to 73.9% of women (p = 0.021). When the GP suggested a provisional diagnosis of "suspected COPD" (n = 265) at referral, this was confirmed in 60.9% of men and only 43.2% of women (p = 0.004). There was a different symptom pattern between genders with women being more likely to report allergies, symptoms starting earlier in life, and being less likely than men to report breathlessness as the main symptom. These results may suggest a difference between genders in some of the clinical features of COPD and a difference in likelihood of a GPs provisional diagnosis of COPD being correct. The study reiterates the absolute importance of spirometry in the diagnosis of COPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. Methods: This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% < 50% of predicted, together with a high RV/TLC ratio. Nonspecific lung disease (NLD) was characterized by TLC within the predicted range and no obstruction. Combined lung disease (CLD) was characterized by reduced TLC and findings indicative of airflow obstruction. Clinical diagnoses were based on clinical suspicion, a respiratory questionnaire, and the review of tests of interest. Results: We included 300 patients in the study, of whom 108 (36%) were diagnosed with RLD. In addition, 120 (40%) and 72 (24%) were diagnosed with OLD/CLD and NLD, respectively. Among the latter, 24 (33%) were clinically diagnosed with OLD. In this sample, 151 patients (50.3%) were obese, and obesity was associated with all patterns of lung disease. Conclusions: Measuring lung volumes and airway resistance is often necessary in order to provide an appropriate characterization of the pattern of lung disease in patients presenting with a spirometry pattern suggestive of restriction. Airflow obstruction is common in such cases. PMID:27812633

  13. Early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in asymptomatic smokers using spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthwal, M S; Singh, S

    2014-03-01

    Smokers with suspected COPD seek medical attention when they become dyspnoeic on mild to moderate exertion, but by than half of the ventilatory reserves are lost irreversibly. Hence it seems logical to diagnose COPD early before development of significant symptoms. Since smoking cessation in early COPD is found to reduce rapid decline of ventilatory function in smokers, its early detection in asymptomatic smokers is likely to motivate smokers to make an attempt to quit smoking thereby halting its progression to more advanced stage. The selection of subjects was done by high risk population screening in various military institutions in and around Pune city of Maharashtra. Inclusion criteria included regular smokers, 30 years of age and above with no significant respiratory symptoms except for occasional cough and willing to undergo spirometry. A total of 460 individuals were evaluated by spirometry. Overall airway obstruction was seen in 58 (12.60%) subjects. Mild obstruction was seen in 40 (68.9%) and moderate obstruction in 18 (31%) subjects. Airway obstruction was seen in 24 (8.82%) individuals who were less than 40 years of age and in 34 (18%) who were more than 40 years of age (p 200 and 16 (5.51%) out of 290 subjects with smoking index of smokers more than 40 years of age and with smoking index more than 200 (n = 184), 48 (26%) had obstruction and in smokers less than 40 years of age and smoking index less than 200 (n = 276), 15 (5.43%) had obstruction (p spirometry especially in smokers more than 40 years of age and with smoking index of more than 200 is likely to reduce the overall burden of disease.

  14. EFFECT OF INTRAMUSCULAR ADMINISTRATION OF THIAZINAMIUM AND INHALED HISTAMINE ON FORCED INSPIRATORY VOLUME IN 1 S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIMENO, F; VANALTENA, R

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with symptoms suggestive of asthma were evaluated clinically by allergy skin tests, pulmonary function, and histamine inhalation challenge. In addition to the forced expiratory manoeuvres (FEV1), forced inspiratory manoeuvres (FIV1), were performed before and after intramuscular

  15. Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease: a population-based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic status is known to influence the prevalence, severity and mortality of obstructive lung diseases, but it is uncertain whether it affects the use of diagnostic spirometry in patients initiating treatment for these conditions. The objective of this paper was to examine a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008. Results A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years of age, being unemployed was significantly associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed, the strongest association was seen in men (OR = 0.82, CI = 0.73-0.91). Medium income was associated with increased odds of having spirometry performed in men (OR = 1.18, CI = 1.06-1.30) and high educational level (>12 years) was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed in women (OR = 0.86, CI = 0.78-0.94). Cohabitation status was not associated with having spirometry performed. Among medication users over 65 years of age, living alone was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed among men (OR = 0.78, CI = 0.69-0.88). Conclusion Social inequity in spirometry testing among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease was confirmed in this study. Increased focus on spirometry testing among elderly men living alone, among the unemployed and among women with higher education is required when initiating medication. PMID:23768408

  16. General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark: a population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont; Jarbøl, Dorte E

    2013-08-07

    Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease. A national register-based cohort study was performed. All patients over 18 years receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008 were identified and detailed patient-specific data on sociodemographic status and spirometry tests were extracted. Information on practice characteristics like number of doctors, number of patients per doctor, training practice status, as well as age and gender of the general practitioners was linked to each medication user. Partnership practices had a higher odds ratio (OR) of performing spirometry compared with single-handed practices (OR 1.24, CI 1.09-1.40). We found a significant association between increasing general practitioner age and decreasing spirometry testing. This tendency was most pronounced among partnership practices, where doctors over 65 years had the lowest odds of spirometry testing (OR 0.25, CI 0.10-0.61). Training practice status was significantly associated with spirometry testing among single-handed practices (OR 1.40, CI 1.10-1.79). Some of the variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving

  17. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme and spirometry: rewarding quality or just quantity? A cross-sectional study in Rotherham, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    South Gail

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate spirometry is important in the management of COPD. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme for general practitioners includes spirometry related indicators within its COPD domain. It is not known whether high achievement against QOF spirometry indicators is associated with spirometry to BTS standards. Methods Data were obtained from the records of 3,217 patients randomly sampled from 5,649 patients with COPD in 38 general practices in Rotherham, UK. Severity of airflow obstruction was categorised by FEV1 (% predicted according to NICE guidelines. This was compared with clinician recorded COPD severity. The proportion of patients whose spirometry met BTS standards was calculated in each practice using a random sub-sample of 761 patients. The Spearman rank correlation between practice level QOF spirometry achievement and performance against BTS spirometry standards was calculated. Results Spirometry as assessed by clinical records was to BTS standards in 31% of cases (range at practice level 0% to 74%. The categorisation of airflow obstruction according to the most recent spirometry results did not agree well with the clinical categorisation of COPD recorded in the notes (Cohen's kappa = 0.34, 0.30 – 0.38. 12% of patients on COPD registers had FEV1 (% predicted results recorded that did not support the diagnosis of COPD. There was no association between quality, as measured by adherence to BTS spirometry standards, and either QOF COPD9 achievement (Spearman's rho = -0.11, or QOF COPD10 achievement (rho = 0.01. Conclusion The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework currently assesses the quantity, but not the quality of spirometry.

  18. Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont; Jarbøl, Dorte E

    2013-06-14

    Socioeconomic status is known to influence the prevalence, severity and mortality of obstructive lung diseases, but it is uncertain whether it affects the use of diagnostic spirometry in patients initiating treatment for these conditions. The objective of this paper was to examine a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008. A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years of age, being unemployed was significantly associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed, the strongest association was seen in men (OR = 0.82, CI = 0.73-0.91). Medium income was associated with increased odds of having spirometry performed in men (OR =1.18, CI = 1.06-1.30) and high educational level (>12 years) was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed in women (OR = 0.86, CI = 0.78-0.94). Cohabitation status was not associated with having spirometry performed. Among medication users over 65 years of age, living alone was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed among men (OR = 0.78, CI = 0.69-0.88). Social inequity in spirometry testing among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease was confirmed in this study. Increased focus on spirometry testing among elderly men living alone, among the unemployed and among women with higher education is required when initiating medication.

  19. Inspiratory and expiratory muscle training in subacute stroke: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaggi-Sartor, Monique; Guillen-Solà, Anna; Depolo, Marina; Duarte, Esther; Rodríguez, Diego A; Barrera, Maria-Camelia; Barreiro, Esther; Escalada, Ferran; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Marco, Ester

    2015-08-18

    To assess the effectiveness, feasibility, and safety of short-term inspiratory and expiratory muscle training (IEMT) in subacute stroke patients. Within 2 weeks of stroke onset, 109 patients with a first ischemic stroke event were randomly assigned to the IEMT (n = 56) or sham IEMT (n = 53) study group. The IEMT consisted of 5 sets of 10 repetitions, twice a day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, at a training workload equivalent to 30% of maximal respiratory pressures. Patients and researchers assessing outcome variables were blinded to the assigned study group. The main outcome was respiratory muscle strength assessed by maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax, PEmax). Respiratory complications at 6 months were also recorded. Both groups improved respiratory muscle strength during the study. IEMT was associated with significantly improved %PImax and %PEmax: effect size d = 0.74 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.20) and d = 0.56 (95% CI 0.11-1.02), respectively. No significant training effect was observed for peripheral muscle strength. Respiratory complications at 6 months occurred more frequently in the sham group (8 vs 2, p = 0.042), with an absolute risk reduction of 14%. The number needed to treat to prevent one lung infection event over a follow-up of 6 months was 7. No major adverse events or side effects were observed. IEMT induces significant improvement in inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength and could potentially offer an additional therapeutic tool aimed to reduce respiratory complications at 6 months in stroke patients. This study provides Class II evidence that short-term training may have the potential to improve respiratory muscle strength in patients with subacute stroke. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Effect of pilates method on inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mendes Tozim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With aging, the respiratory muscle strength decreases and the pilates method is a technique that uses respiration as one of its principles. The present study has the aim of analyzing the influence of the pilates method on respiratory muscle strength in older women. For the evaluation of respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory and expiratory, manovacuometer was used. Thirty-one older women were divided into two groups: 14 participated in the pilates group and 17 in the control group. Participants of the pilates group performed 16 sessions of pilates method with an hour of training, twice week for eight weeks. The control group participated in four educational lectures for eight weeks. For statistical analysis, Shapiro-Wilk, ANOVA for repeated measures (p <0.05 and Cohen’s D index were performed. The results showed significant difference and the mean effect for the Cohen’s D index expiratory muscle strength of the pilates group when comparing before (69.71 ± 25.48 and after (85.23 ± 22.21 training (p<0.05 with an increase of 23%. The results of inspiratory muscle strength were not significant but presented an average effect for the Cohen’s D index for the pilates group before (69.71 ± 35.46 and after (88.00 ± 34.87 training, with an increase of 27%. The control group did not present significant differences for the variables evaluated. It could be concluded that the pilates method is effective in improving expiratory muscle strength and provides positive effects on the increase in inspiratory muscle strength.

  1. The predictive value of spirometry. Identifying patients at risk for lung cancer in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, T L

    1997-03-01

    Spirometry can predict lung health and monitor disease and response to therapy. This noninvasive test can and should be done regularly by primary care providers. It can identify patients at risk for lung cancer as well as heart attack and stroke. Patients with abnormal spirometric findings can be warned that airflow obstruction has begun, which may provide the motivation to quit smoking. Abnormal spirometry measurements correlate with all-cause mortality. Approaches to early diagnosis of lung cancer continue to expand. For example, use of the new fluorescent bronchoscope can increase diagnostic accuracy in lung cancer by highlighting lesions that are malignant or likely to be malignant. For now, however, identification of airflow obstruction with spirometry and follow-up with sputum cytology provide the widest benefit.

  2. Peak expiratory flow rate in healthy children aged 6-17 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A; Høst, A H; Ibsen, T

    1994-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured in a cross-sectional study in 861 healthy Danish schoolchildren aged 6-17 years using a Mini Wright peak flowmeter. We found a strong correlation between PEFR and height, age and sex. The results were comparable with those from previous studies using...... a Wright peak flowmeter. The equation for prediction of PEFR in boys was calculated as (3.8 x height) + (10.6 x age) - 313.2 (p ... coefficient in this large sample. Among healthy children without previous asthma, earlier episodes of recurrent wheezing were reported in 8.8% and a significantly lower PEFR was found in this group....

  3. The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus orchestrates the timing of expiratory abdominal nerve bursting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William H; Jenkin, Sarah E M; Milsom, William K; Paton, Julian F R; Abdala, Ana P; Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B

    2018-02-01

    Coordination of respiratory pump and valve muscle activity is essential for normal breathing. A hallmark respiratory response to hypercapnia and hypoxia is the emergence of active exhalation, characterized by abdominal muscle pumping during the late one-third of expiration (late-E phase). Late-E abdominal activity during hypercapnia has been attributed to the activation of expiratory neurons located within the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG). However, the mechanisms that control emergence of active exhalation, and its silencing in restful breathing, are not completely understood. We hypothesized that inputs from the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) control the emergence of late-E activity during hypercapnia. Previously, we reported that reversible inhibition of the KF reduced postinspiratory (post-I) motor output to laryngeal adductor muscles and brought forward the onset of hypercapnia-induced late-E abdominal activity. Here we explored the contribution of the KF for late-E abdominal recruitment during hypercapnia by pharmacologically disinhibiting the KF in in situ decerebrate arterially perfused rat preparations. These data were combined with previous results and incorporated into a computational model of the respiratory central pattern generator. Disinhibition of the KF through local parenchymal microinjections of gabazine (GABA A receptor antagonist) prolonged vagal post-I activity and inhibited late-E abdominal output during hypercapnia. In silico, we reproduced this behavior and predicted a mechanism in which the KF provides excitatory drive to post-I inhibitory neurons, which in turn inhibit late-E neurons of the pFRG. Although the exact mechanism proposed by the model requires testing, our data confirm that the KF modulates the formation of late-E abdominal activity during hypercapnia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The pons is essential for the formation of the three-phase respiratory pattern, controlling the inspiratory-expiratory phase transition. We provide

  4. Effect of e-Learning and Repeated Performance Feedback on Spirometry Test Quality in Family Practice: A Cluster Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R.; Akkermans, Reinier P.; Crockett, Alan J.; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W.; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. METHODS Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. RESULTS We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. CONCLUSIONS In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices. PMID:21747104

  5. Inspiratory muscle training with threshold or incentive spirometry: Which is the most effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulciane Nunes Paiva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inspiratory muscular training (IMT increases the respiratory muscle strength, however, there is no data demonstrating its superiority over the incentive spirometry (IS in doing so. Values of muscle strength after IMT (Threshold IMT® and by the IS (Voldyne® in healthy females was compared. Subjects (n = 40 were randomly divided into control group (CG, n = 14, IS group (ISG, n = 13 and threshold group (TG, n = 13. PImax was measured before (pre-IMT, at 15 and 30 days of IMT. There was an increase in PImax of the TG at 15 days (p < 0.001 and 30 days of IMT (p < 0.001. The same occurred with the ISG, which increased the PImax at 15 days (p < 0.001 and 30 days of training (p < 0.001. After 30 days of IMT, the TG presented a PImax which was significantly higher than ISG and the CG (p = 0.045 and p < 0.001, respectively. It can be concluded that IMT by threshold was more effective in increasing muscle strength than the Voldyne. Keywords: Maximal inspiratory pressure, Inspiratory muscular training, Incentive spirometry

  6. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% espirometria não têm CPT reduzida. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o papel da medida dos volumes pulmonares e da resistência das vias aéreas para a classificação correta de pacientes com possível restrição à espirometria. Estudo prospectivo de adultos com CVF e VEF1 reduzidos e relação VEF1/CV(F) na faixa prevista. Distúrbio ventilatório restritivo (DVR) foi definido por CPT espirometria. A obstrução ao fluxo aéreo é comum nesses casos.

  7. Home spirometry as early detector of azithromycin refractory bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wall, Claudia; Sabine, Dettmer; Gregor, Warnecke; Mark, Greer; Axel, Haverich; Thomas, Fuehner; Tobias, Welte; Jens, Gottlieb

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the utility of home spirometry (HS) versus office spirometry (OS) in assessing treatment response to azithromycin in bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). 239 Lung transplant recipients were retrospectively studied. ΔFEV1 ± 10% from FEV1 at azithromycin initiation for ≥7 consecutive days in HS or ≥2 measures in OS were taken as cut-off for response or progression. Based upon HS, 161/239 (67%) patients were progressive despite macrolide, 19 of who exhibited transient improvement in FEV1 (11%). Time to progression was 29 (13-96) days earlier with HS than in OS. Forty-six (19%) recipients responded in HS after median 81 (22-343) days, whilst 22% remained stable. Concordance in azithromycin treatment response between OS and HS was observed in 210 of 239 patients (88%). Response or stabilization conferred significant improvement in survival (p = 0.005). Transient azithromycin responders demonstrated improved survival when compared to azithromycin refractory patients (p = 0.034). HS identified azithromycin refractory patients significantly earlier than OS, possibly facilitating aggressive treatment escalation that may improve long-term outcome. Treatment response to azithromycin should be assessed 4 weeks after initiation. Responders demonstrated best survival, with even transient response conferring benefit. Macrolide-refractory BOS carried the worst prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross-Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Stella E; Barker, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S

    2015-12-01

    An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23-infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00-22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86-589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cross‐Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Elizabeth A.; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Methods Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. Results We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23‐infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00‐22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86‐589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. Conclusions In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. PMID:26553118

  10. Validation of a protocol to evaluate maximal expiratory pressure using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Soares

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory muscles can present fatigue and even chronic inability to generate force. So, reliable devices are necessary to their evaluation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the MEP (Maximal Expiratory Pressure values of individuals between 20 and 25 years old and to validate a protocol using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner comparing it with the digital manometer. We evaluated the MEP of 10 participants. They remained seated and made six respiratory maneuvers from Total Lung Capacity (TLC to Residual Volume (RV. The results in the study showed no statistically significant differences when compared to values reported in the literature, and that the pressure transducer provides reliable values for MEP.Os músculos respiratórios podem apresentar fadiga e até mesmo a incapacidade crônica na geração de força, sendo necessários dispositivos confiáveis para sua avaliação. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a pressão expiratória máxima (PeMáx de indivíduos entre 20 e 25 anos e validar um protocolo que utiliza um transdutor de pressão e um condicionador de sinais comparando-o com a manovacuometria. Foram avaliadas a PeMáx de 10 participantes. Estes permaneceram sentados e realizaram seis manobras respiratórias a partir da capacidade pulmonar total (CPT até o volume residual (VR. Os resultados do estudo não apresentaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas quando comparados com os valores de normalidade descritos na literatura e mostraram que o transdutor de pressão fornece valores confiáveis para Pe máx.

  11. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borlée, F.; Yzermans, C.J.; Krop, E.; Rooijackers, J.; Aalders, B.; Zock, J.P.; Dijk, C.E. van; Maassen, C.B.M.; Schellevis, F.; Heederik, D.; Smit, L.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their

  12. Effect of the radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinate on expiratory nasal sound frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seren, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the short-term efficacy of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction (RFVTR) in treatment of inferior turbinate hypertrophy (TH) as measured by expiratory nasal sound spectra. In our study, we aimed to investigate the Odiosoft-rhino (OR) as a new diagnostic method to evaluate the nasal airflow of patients before and after RFVTR. In this study, we have analyzed and recorded the expiratory nasal sound in patients with inferior TH before and after RFVTR. This analysis includes the time expanded waveform, the spectral analysis with time averaged fast Fourier transform (FFT), and the waveform analysis of nasal sound. We found an increase in sound intensity at high frequency (Hf) in the sound analyses of the patients before RFVTR and a decrease in sound intensity at Hf was found in patients after RFVTR. This study indicates that RFVTR is an effective procedure to improve nasal airflow in the patients with nasal obstruction with inferior TH. We found significant decreases in the sound intensity level at Hf in the sound spectra after RFVTR. The OR results from the 2000- to 4000-Hz frequency (Hf) interval may be more useful in assessing patients with nasal obstruction than other frequency intervals. OR may be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to evaluate the nasal airflow.

  13. Control of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP for small animal ventilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leão Nunes Marcelo V

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP for the mechanical ventilation of small animals is frequently obtained with water seals or by using ventilators developed for human use. An alternative mechanism is the use of an on-off expiratory valve closing at the moment when the alveolar pressure is equal to the target PEEP. In this paper, a novel PEEP controller (PEEP-new and the PEEP system of a commercial small-animal ventilator, both based on switching an on-off valve, are evaluated. Methods The proposed PEEP controller is a discrete integrator monitoring the error between the target PEEP and the airways opening pressure prior to the onset of an inspiratory cycle. In vitro as well as in vivo experiments with rats were carried out and the PEEP accuracy, settling time and under/overshoot were considered as a measure of performance. Results The commercial PEEP controller did not pass the tests since it ignores the airways resistive pressure drop, resulting in a PEEP 5 cmH2O greater than the target in most conditions. The PEEP-new presented steady-state errors smaller than 0.5 cmH2O, with settling times below 10 s and under/overshoot smaller than 2 cmH2O. Conclusion The PEEP-new presented acceptable performance, considering accuracy and temporal response. This novel PEEP generator may prove useful in many applications for small animal ventilators.

  14. Benefit of educational feedback for the use of positive expiratory pressure device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reychler, Gregory; Jacquemart, Manon; Poncin, William; Aubriot, Anne-Sophie; Liistro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) is regularly used as a self-administered airway clearance technique. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the need to teach the correct use of the PEP device and to measure the progress of the success rate of the maneuver after training. METHOD: A PEP system (PariPEP-S Sytem) was used to generate PEP in 30 healthy volunteers. They were instructed by a qualified physical therapist to breathe correctly through the PEP device. Then they were evaluated during a set of ten expirations. Two other evaluations were performed at day 2 and day 8 (before and after feedback). The mean PEP and the success rate were calculated for each set of expirations. The number of maneuvers needed to obtain a correct use was calculated on the first session. RESULTS: An optimal PEP was reached after 7.5 SD 2.7 attempts by all subjects. Success rates and mean pressures were similar between the different sets of expirations (p=0.720 and p=0.326, respectively). Pressure variability was around 10%. After one week, 30% of subjects generated more than two non-optimal pressures in the set of ten expirations. No difference in success rate was observed depending on the evaluations. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that good initial training on the use of the PEP device and regular follow-up are required for the subject to reach optimal expiratory pressure. PMID:26647746

  15. Relationship of end-expiratory pressure, lung volume, and /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.A.; van der Zee, H.; Line, B.R.; Malik, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the dose-response effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and increased lung volume on the pulmonary clearance rate of aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA). Clearance of lung radioactivity was expressed as percent decrease per minute. Base-line clearance was measured while anesthetized sheep (n = 20) were ventilated with 0 cmH 2 O end-expiratory pressure. Clearance was remeasured during ventilation at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, or 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. Further studies showed stepwise increases in functional residual capacity (FRC) (P less than 0.05) measured at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. At 2.5 cmH 2 O PEEP, the clearance rate was not different from that at base line (P less than 0.05), although FRC was increased from base line. Clearance rate increased progressively with increasing PEEP at 5, 10, and 15 cmH 2 O (P less than 0.05). Between 15 and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP, clearance rate was again unchanged, despite an increase in FRC. The pulmonary clearance of aerosolized /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA shows a sigmoidal response to increasing FRC and PEEP, having both threshold and maximal effects. This relationship is most consistent with the hypothesis that alveolar epithelial permeability is increased by lung inflation

  16. Estimation of tracheal pressure and imposed expiratory work of breathing by the endotracheal tube, heat and moisture exchanger, and ventilator during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Akinori; Yoshida, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Hidenori; Fujino, Yuji

    2013-07-01

    The resistance of the endotracheal tube (ETT), the heat and moisture exchanger (HME), and the ventilator may affect the patient's respiratory status. Although previous studies examined the inspiratory work of breathing (WOB), investigation of WOB in the expiratory phase is rare. We estimated tracheal pressure at the tip of the ETT (Ptrach) and calculated expiratory WOB imposed by the ETT, the HME, and the expiratory valve. We examined imposed expiratory WOB in patients under a continuous mandatory ventilation (CMV) mode and during spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs). We hypothesized that imposed expiratory WOB would increase with heightened ventilatory demand. We measured airway pressure (Paw) and respiratory flow (V). We estimated Ptrach using the equation Ptrach = Paw - K1 × V(K2) - 2.70 × V(L/s)(1.42). K1 and K2 were determined by the inner diameter (ID) of the ETT. Imposed expiratory WOB was calculated from the area of Ptrach above PEEP versus lung volume. We examined imposed expiratory WOB and imposed expiratory resistance in relation to mean expiratory flow. We examined 28 patients under CMV mode, and 29 during SBT. During both CMV and SBT, as mean expiratory flow increased, imposed expiratory WOB increased. The regression curves between mean expiratory flow (x) (L/s) and imposed expiratory WOB (y) (J/L) were y = 1.35x(0.83) (R(2) = 0.79) for 7 mm ID ETT under CMV, y = 1.12x(0.82) (R(2) = 0.73) for 8 mm ID ETT under CMV, y = 1.07x(1.04) (R(2) = 0.85) for 7 mm ID ETT during SBT, and y = 0.84x(0.93) (R(2) = 0.75) for 8 mm ID ETT during SBT. Levels of imposed expiratory WOB were affected by ETT diameter and ventilator mode. The reason for increasing imposed expiratory WOB was an increase in expiratory resistance imposed by the ETT and HME. Under mechanical ventilation, imposed expiratory WOB should be considered in patients with higher minute ventilation.

  17. General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung...... disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry...... testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease....

  18. Effect of smoking on spirometry of African American and White subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Olivia F; Bhagat, Rajesh; Ajelabi, Akinyinka A; Petrini, Marcy F

    2008-12-01

    Smoking is the single most important risk factor for COPD, yet there is still disagreement about the differences in the effect of smoking between white and African-American people. We hypothesized that the results of spirometry between smokers of the two races are equivalent if reference equations and lower limits of normal appropriate for each race are used. We retrospectively analyzed all spirometry results in smokers over a 1-year period from the G.V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center and excluded those that did not meet American Thoracic Society standards, or those from patients with additional medical problems. The remaining patients were classified by race and then matched for age and smoking history; 108 patients in each group were included, which met the power analysis goal of 98. The two groups were similar in age (57.5 years vs 57.0 years), smoking history (46.1 pack-years vs 46.0 pack-years), and body mass index (27.0 kg/m(2) vs 28.3 kg/m(2)) for African Americans and whites, respectively. Data were analyzed using the unpaired t test, and p values were adjusted for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni factor. There were statistically significant differences between African American and white smokers in FVC (3.67 +/- 0.07 L vs 4.26 +/- 0.08 L, p = 0.001) and FEV(1) (2.33 +/- 0.07 L vs 2.72 +/- 0.08 L, p = 0.002), as expected from the normal populations; however, there were no differences in FVC as percentage of predicted (89.1 +/- 1.3% vs 86.7 +/- 1.5%, p = 0.71) and FEV(1) as percentage of predicted (71.9 +/- 2.1% vs 72.2 +/- 1.8%, p = 1.00) when the reference equations appropriate for race were used (third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). There were also no differences between the number of subject with abnormal FEV(1)/FVC results (56 African Americans vs 58 whites, p = 1.00) when the appropriate lower limits of normal were used. There are no differences in spirometry findings between African Americans and whites when

  19. Paired inspiratory/expiratory volumetric CT and deformable image registration for quantitative and qualitative evaluation of airflow limitation in smokers with or without copd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nishii, Tatsuya; Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate paired inspiratory/expiratory computed tomography (CT; iCT/eCT) and deformable image registration for quantitative and qualitative assessment of airflow limitation in smokers. Paired iCT/eCT images acquired from 35 smokers (30 men and 5 women) were coregistered and subtraction images (air trapping CT images [aCT]) generated. To evaluate emphysema quantitatively, the percentage of low-attenuation volume (LAV%) on iCT was calculated at -950 HU, as were mean and kurtosis on aCT for quantitative assessment of air trapping. Parametric response maps of emphysema (PRMe) and of functional small airways disease (PRMs) were also obtained. For qualitative evaluation of emphysema, low-attenuation areas on iCT were scored by consensus of two radiologists using Goddard classification. To assess air trapping qualitatively, the degree of air trapping on aCT was scored. For each quantitative and qualitative index, the Spearman rank correlation coefficient for forced expiratory flow in 1 second was calculated, and differences in correlation coefficients were statistically tested. The correlation coefficients for the indices were as follows: mean on aCT, 0.800; kurtosis on aCT, -0.726; LAV%, -0.472; PRMe, -0.570; PRMs, -0.565; addition of PRMe and PRMs, -0.653; emphysema score, -0.502; air trapping score, -0.793. The indices showing significant differences were as follows: mean on aCT and addition of PRMe and PRMs (P = 1.43 × 10(-8)); air trapping score and emphysema score (P = .0169). Air trapping images yielded more accurate quantitative and qualitative evaluation of airflow limitation than did LAV%, PRMe, PRMs, and Goddard classification. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gender and perception of dyspnea: The role of the variation in the forced expiratory volume in one second

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Nigro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available During bronchoconstriction women perceive more breathlessness than men. The aims of study were 1 to evaluate if quality of dyspnea in bronchoconstriction was different in women and men 2 to assess if gender difference in the perception of dyspnea could be related to the level of bronchoconstriction. 457 subjects (257 women inhaled methacholine to a 20% decrease in FEV1, or 32 mg/ml. Dyspnea was evaluated using the modified Borg scale and a list of expressions of dyspnea. Borg scores were recorded immediately before the challenge test baseline and at the maximum FEV1 decrease. The prevalence of descriptors of dyspnea reported by women and men was similar. Dyspnea was related to the level of FEV1 (ΔFEV1: OR 1.05, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0095, females (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.33-6.33, p 0.0072, younger subjects (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.89- 0.97, p 0.0013 and body mass index (BMI (OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. As the FEV1 fell less than 20% from baseline, only the ΔFEV1 was significantly associated with dyspnea (ΔFEV1:OR 1.15, 95%CI 1.07- 1.24, p 0.0002. Instead, if the FEV1 fell higher ≥ 20%, the presence of dyspnea was related to the degree of bronchoconstriction (ΔFEV1: OR 1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0187, females (OR 3.02, 95%CI 1.36-6.72, p 0.0067, younger subjects (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.88-0.96, p 0.0007 and BMI (OR 1.12, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. The quality of dyspnea during the bronchoconstriction was similar in women and men; women showed a higher perception of dyspnea than men only when the FEV1 fell more than 20% from baseline.

  1. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural techniques were conducted in the order of chin tucking, head rotation, head tilting, bending head back, and lying down, while expiratory muscle strength training was conducted at a resistance level of about 70% of the maximal expiratory pressure. Swallowing recovery was assessed by using the Functional Dysphagia Scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] The mean value obtained in the videofluoroscopic studies for both groups decreased after the treatment. In the postural techniques plus expiratory muscle strength training group, the decrease was significantly greater than that in the expiratory muscle strength training-only group. [Conclusion] The results imply that simultaneous performance of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training is more effective than expiratory muscle strength training alone when applied in the swallowing rehabilitation for patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease.

  2. Using an expiratory resistor, arterial pulse pressure variations predict fluid responsiveness during spontaneous breathing: an experimental porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Michael K; Vistisen, Simon T; Koefoed-Nielsen, Jacob; Larsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Fluid responsiveness prediction is difficult in spontaneously breathing patients. Because the swings in intrathoracic pressure are minor during spontaneous breathing, dynamic parameters like pulse pressure variation (PPV) and systolic pressure variation (SPV) are usually small. We hypothesized that during spontaneous breathing, inspiratory and/or expiratory resistors could induce high arterial pressure variations at hypovolemia and low variations at normovolemia and hypervolemia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that SPV and PPV could predict fluid responsiveness under these conditions. Eight prone, anesthetized and spontaneously breathing pigs (20 to 25 kg) were subjected to a sequence of 30% hypovolemia, normovolemia, and 20% and 40% hypervolemia. At each volemic level, the pigs breathed in a randomized order either through an inspiratory and/or an expiratory threshold resistor (7.5 cmH2O) or only through the tracheal tube without any resistor. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were measured during the breathing modes. Fluid responsiveness was defined as a 15% increase in stroke volume (DeltaSV) following fluid loading. Stroke volume was significantly lower at hypovolemia compared with normovolemia, but no differences were found between normovolemia and 20% or 40% hypervolemia. Compared with breathing through no resistor, SPV was magnified by all resistors at hypovolemia whereas there were no changes at normovolemia and hypervolemia. PPV was magnified by the inspiratory resistor and the combined inspiratory and expiratory resistor. Regression analysis of SPV or PPV versus DeltaSV showed the highest R2 (0.83 for SPV and 0.52 for PPV) when the expiratory resistor was applied. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity for prediction of fluid responsiveness were 100% and 100%, respectively, for SPV and 100% and 81%, respectively, for PPV. Inspiratory and/or expiratory threshold resistors magnified SPV and PPV in spontaneously breathing pigs during hypovolemia

  3. An expiratory assist during spontaneous breathing can compensate for endotracheal tube resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Akinori; Chang, Cheng; Suzuki, Shinya; Mashimo, Takashi; Fujino, Yuji

    2009-08-01

    Although inspiratory assist of spontaneous breathing in intubated patients is common, expiratory assist functions have rarely been reported. Effective expiratory support (ES) could be used to compensate for endotracheal tube (ETT) resistance during spontaneous breathing. In this study, we examined the performance of a new system designed to provide both inspiratory support (IS) and ES during spontaneous breathing with the goal of reducing the effective resistance of the ETT. The ES system consisted of a ventilator demand valve and a computer-controlled piston cylinder, which aspirated gas from the respiratory circuit during the expiratory phase. The movement of the piston was synchronized with spontaneous breathing. We compared the pressures at the tip of the ETT and in the breathing circuit during spontaneous breathing through an ETT of internal diameter (ID) 5 mm with that of an ETT with ID 8 mm in nine healthy adult male volunteers. The ventilatory mode was set to maintain a continuous airway pressure of 0 cm H(2)O. Three ventilator settings (no support, IS only, and IS plus ES) were compared using ID 5 mm ETT. We monitored pressure in the breathing circuit (P(aw)), ETT tip pressure (P(tip)), and respiratory flow. The P(tip) of the ID 5 mm ETT showed a large negative deflection during inspiration and a positive deflection during expiration without support. IS alone did not improve the respiratory pattern through the small ETT. However, IS plus ES resulted in negative P(aw) during expiration in addition to positive deflection of P(aw) during inspiration, making the pressure characteristics of P(tip) similar to those of ID 8 mm ETT. Moreover, IS plus ES produced a respiratory pattern through the ID 5 mm ETT that was similar to that through the ID 8 mm ETT. In this study of healthy volunteers, IS plus ES compensated for the airway resistance imposed by a ID 5.0 mm ETT to create pressure changes at the tip of the ETT similar to those of an ID 8.0 mm ETT.

  4. TU-CD-BRA-11: Application of Bone Suppression Technique to Inspiratory/expiratory Chest Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, R; Sanada, S [Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sakuta, K; Kawashima, H [Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Kishitani, Y [TOYO Corporation, Chuoh-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images normally obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to investigate the usefulness of bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of pulmonary function in inspiratory/expiratory chest radiography. Methods: Commercial bone suppression image processing software (ClearRead; Riverain Technologies) was applied to paired inspiratory/expiratory chest radiographs of 107 patients (normal, 33; abnormal, 74) to create corresponding bone suppression images. The abnormal subjects had been diagnosed with pulmonary diseases, such as pneumothorax, pneumonia, emphysema, asthma, and lung cancer. After recognition of the lung area, the vectors of respiratory displacement were measured in all local lung areas using a cross-correlation technique. The measured displacement in each area was visualized as displacement color maps. The distribution pattern of respiratory displacement was assessed by comparison with the findings of lung scintigraphy. Results: Respiratory displacement of pulmonary markings (soft tissues) was able to be quantified separately from the rib movements on bone suppression images. The resulting displacement map showed a left-right symmetric distribution increasing from the lung apex to the bottom region of the lung in many cases. However, patients with ventilatory impairments showed a nonuniform distribution caused by decreased displacement of pulmonary markings, which were confirmed to correspond to area with ventilatory impairments found on the lung scintigrams. Conclusion: The bone suppression technique was useful for quantitative analysis of respiratory displacement of pulmonary markings without any interruption of the rib shadows. Abnormal areas could be detected as decreased displacement of pulmonary markings. Inspiratory/expiratory chest radiography combined

  5. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; Naqa, Issam El; Low, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log

  6. Polynomial estimation of the smoothing splines for the new Finnish reference values for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainu, Annette; Timonen, Kirsi

    2016-07-01

    Background Discontinuity of spirometry reference values from childhood into adulthood has been a problem with traditional reference values, thus modern modelling approaches using smoothing spline functions to better depict the transition during growth and ageing have been recently introduced. Following the publication of the new international Global Lung Initiative (GLI2012) reference values also new national Finnish reference values have been calculated using similar GAMLSS-modelling, with spline estimates for mean (Mspline) and standard deviation (Sspline) provided in tables. The aim of this study was to produce polynomial estimates for these spline functions to use in lieu of lookup tables and to assess their validity in the reference population of healthy non-smokers. Methods Linear regression modelling was used to approximate the estimated values for Mspline and Sspline using similar polynomial functions as in the international GLI2012 reference values. Estimated values were compared to original calculations in absolute values, the derived predicted mean and individually calculated z-scores using both values. Results Polynomial functions were estimated for all 10 spirometry variables. The agreement between original lookup table-produced values and polynomial estimates was very good, with no significant differences found. The variation slightly increased in larger predicted volumes, but a range of -0.018 to +0.022 litres of FEV1 representing ± 0.4% of maximum difference in predicted mean. Conclusions Polynomial approximations were very close to the original lookup tables and are recommended for use in clinical practice to facilitate the use of new reference values.

  7. Gated CT imaging using a free-breathing respiration signal from flow-volume spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Kwok, Young; Deyoung, Chad; Zacharapoulos, Nicholas; Pepelea, Mark; Klahr, Paul; Yu, Cedric X.

    2005-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is known to cause artifacts on free-breathing spiral CT images used in treatment planning. This leads to inaccurate delineation of target volumes on planning CT images. Flow-volume spirometry has been used previously for breath-holds during CT scans and radiation treatments using the active breathing control (ABC) system. We have developed a prototype by extending the flow-volume spirometer device to obtain gated CT scans using a PQ 5000 single-slice CT scanner. To test our prototype, we designed motion phantoms to compare image quality obtained with and without gated CT scan acquisition. Spiral and axial (nongated and gated) CT scans were obtained of phantoms with motion periods of 3-5 s and amplitudes of 0.5-2 cm. Errors observed in the volume estimate of these structures were as much as 30% with moving phantoms during CT simulation. Application of motion-gated CT with active breathing control reduced these errors to within 5%. Motion-gated CT was then implemented in patients and the results are presented for two clinical cases: lung and abdomen. In each case, gated scans were acquired at end-inhalation, end-exhalation in addition to a conventional free-breathing (nongated) scan. The gated CT scans revealed reduced artifacts compared with the conventional free-breathing scan. Differences of up to 20% in the volume of the structures were observed between gated and free-breathing scans. A comparison of the overlap of structures between the gated and free-breathing scans revealed misalignment of the structures. These results demonstrate the ability of flow-volume spirometry to reduce errors in target volumes via gating during CT imaging

  8. Epidemiology, genetics, and subtyping of preserved ratio impaired spirometry (PRISm) in COPDGene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Emily S; Castaldi, Peter J; Cho, Michael H; Hokanson, John E; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Beaty, Terri H; Han, MeiLan K; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Lynch, David A; DeMeo, Dawn L; Crapo, James D; Silverman, Edwin K

    2014-08-06

    Preserved Ratio Impaired Spirometry (PRISm), defined as a reduced FEV1 in the setting of a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio, is highly prevalent and is associated with increased respiratory symptoms, systemic inflammation, and mortality. Studies investigating quantitative chest tomographic features, genetic associations, and subtypes in PRISm subjects have not been reported. Data from current and former smokers enrolled in COPDGene (n = 10,192), an observational, cross-sectional study which recruited subjects aged 45-80 with ≥10 pack years of smoking, were analyzed. To identify epidemiological and radiographic predictors of PRISm, we performed univariate and multivariate analyses comparing PRISm subjects both to control subjects with normal spirometry and to subjects with COPD. To investigate common genetic predictors of PRISm, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS). To explore potential subgroups within PRISm, we performed unsupervised k-means clustering. The prevalence of PRISm in COPDGene is 12.3%. Increased dyspnea, reduced 6-minute walk distance, increased percent emphysema and decreased total lung capacity, as well as increased segmental bronchial wall area percentage were significant predictors (p-value <0.05) of PRISm status when compared to control subjects in multivariate models. Although no common genetic variants were identified on GWAS testing, a significant association with Klinefelter's syndrome (47XXY) was observed (p-value < 0.001). Subgroups identified through k-means clustering include a putative "COPD-subtype", "Restrictive-subtype", and a highly symptomatic "Metabolic-subtype". PRISm subjects are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Future investigations into the pathophysiological mechanisms behind and potential treatment options for subgroups within PRISm are warranted. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT000608764.

  9. Effect on attendance by including focused information on spirometry in preventive health checks: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Løkke, Anders; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Sandbæk, Annelli

    2016-12-01

    Early detection of lung diseases can help to reduce their severity. Lung diseases are among the most frequently occurring and serious diseases worldwide; nonetheless, many patients remain undiagnosed. Preventive health checks including spirometry can detect lung diseases at early stages; however, recruitment for health checks remains a challenge, and little is known about what motivates the attendance. The aim of the study is to examine whether focused information on spirometry in the invitation compared to general information will impact the attendance rate in preventive health checks. This randomized, controlled trial tests the effect of information on spirometry embedded in the Check your Health Preventive Program (CHPP). The CHPP is an open-label, household cluster-randomized, controlled trial offering a preventive health check to 30- to -49-year-olds in a Danish municipality from 2012 to 2017 (n = 26,216). During 2015-2016, 4356 citizens aged 30-49 years will be randomized into two groups. The intervention group receives an invitation which highlights the value and contents of spirometry as part of a health check and information about lung diseases. The comparison group receives a standard invitation containing practical information and specifies the contents of the general health check. Outcomes are (1) differences in attendance rates measured by the proportion of citizens attending each of the two study groups and (2) proportion of persons at risk defined by smoking status and self-reported lung symptoms in the study groups. The proportion of participants with abnormal spirometry assessed at the preventive health check will be compared between the two study groups. The results from the present study will inform future recruitment strategies to health checks. The developed material on content, value, and information about lung disease is feasible and transferable to other populations, making it easy to implement if effective. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT

  10. Short- and long-term effectiveness of a supervised training program in spirometry use for primary care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represas-Represas, Cristina; Botana-Rial, Maribel; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; González-Silva, Ana Isabel; García-Martínez, Ana; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of spirometry, its use and quality are limited in the Primary Care setting. There are few accredited training programs that have demonstrated improvement in the quality of spirometric studies. In this paper, we analyze the short- and long-term effectiveness of a supervised training program for performing and interpreting spirometries. Ours is an intervention study with before and after measurements. The target population included teams of physicians and nursing staff at 26 health-care centers in the area of Vigo (Galicia, Spain). The structured training program involved 2 theoretical and practical training sessions (that were 2months apart), an intermediate period of 30 supervised spirometries performed in the respective centers and weekly e-mail exercises. Effectiveness was evaluated using exercises at the beginning (test 1) and the end (test 2) of the 1st day, 2nd day (test 3) and one year later (test 4), as well as the analysis of spirometries done in month1, month2 and one year later. Participants also completed a survey about their satisfaction. 74 participants initiated the program; 72 completed the program, but only 45 participated in the one-year evaluation. Mean test scores were: 4.1±1.9 on test 1; 7.5±1.6 on test 2; 8.9±1.3 on test 3, and 8.8±1.4 on test 4. During month1, the percentage of correctly done/interpreted tests was 71%, in month two it was 91% and after one year it was 83% (Ptraining program based on theoretical and practical workshops and a supervised follow-up of spirometries significantly improved the ability of Primary Care professionals to carry out and interpret spirometric testing, although the quality of the tests diminished over time. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Properties of end-expiratory breath hold responses measured with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jaakko; Noponen, Tommi; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2011-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to assess the cerebrovascular response to breath hold. We measured eight healthy subjects during voluntary end-expiratory breath hold to study inter- and intraindividual variability of the deoxy- (HbR) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) response curves for the scalp and cerebral cortex. Although cortical [HbO2] behaves qualitatively similarly in all subjects, there is large inter- and intraindividual variability, and in the case of [HbR] also qualitative variability. However, the linearity of [HbO2] increase during the breath hold has encouraging measurement repeatability, and it may even indicate an individual's CO2 tolerance. This result may help understand why breath hold duration varies between subjects more than the total [HbO2] increase during breath hold.

  12. Vagal afferent control of abdominal expiratory activity in response to hypoxia and hypercapnia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Eduardo V; Zoccal, Daniel B

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that vagal afferent information modulates the pattern of expiratory response to hypercapnia and hypoxia. Simultaneous recordings of airflow, diaphragmatic (DIA) and oblique abdominal muscle (ABD) activities were performed in anesthetized (urethane, 1.2g/kg), tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing male Wistar rats (290-320g, n=12). The animals were exposed to hypercapnia (7 and 10% CO2 for 5min) and hypoxia (7% O2 for 1min) before and after bilateral vagotomy. We verified that the percentage increase in DIA burst amplitude elicited by hypercapnia and hypoxia episodes was similar between intact and vagotomized rats (P>0.05). In contrast, hypercapnia and hypoxia promoted a marked increase in ABD activity in vagotomized, but not in intact rats (Phypoxia in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Typical patterns of expiratory flow and carbon dioxide in mechanically ventilated patients with spontaneous breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, S E; Larraza, S; Dey, N; Spadaro, S; Brohus, J B; Winding, R W; Volta, C A; Karbing, D S

    2017-08-01

    Incomplete expiration of tidal volume can lead to dynamic hyperinflation and auto-PEEP. Methods are available for assessing these, but are not appropriate for patients with respiratory muscle activity, as occurs in pressure support. Information may exist in expiratory flow and carbon dioxide measurements, which, when taken together, may help characterize dynamic hyperinflation. This paper postulates such patterns and investigates whether these can be seen systematically in data. Two variables are proposed summarizing the number of incomplete expirations quantified as a lack of return to zero flow in expiration (IncExp), and the end tidal CO 2 variability (varETCO 2 ), over 20 breaths. Using these variables, three patterns of ventilation are postulated: (a) few incomplete expirations (IncExp  18) and small varETCO 2 . IncExp and varETCO 2 were calculated from data describing respiratory flow and CO 2 signals in 11 patients mechanically ventilated at 5 levels of pressure support. Data analysis showed that the three patterns presented systematically in the data, with periods of IncExp  18 having significantly lower variability in end-tidal CO 2 than periods with 2 ≤ IncExp ≤ 18 (p  18 to 2 ≤ IncExp ≤ 18 results in significant, rapid, change in the variability of end-tidal CO 2 p < 0.05. This study illustrates that systematic patterns of expiratory flow and end-tidal CO 2 are present in patients in supported mechanical ventilation, and that changes between these patterns can be identified. Further studies are required to see if these patterns characterize dynamic hyperinflation. If so, then their combination may provide a useful addition to understanding the patient at the bedside.

  14. End expiratory oxygen concentrations to predict central venous oxygen saturation: an observational pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steuerwald Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A non-invasive surrogate measurement for central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2 would be useful in the ED for assessing therapeutic interventions in critically ill patients. We hypothesized that either linear or nonlinear mathematical manipulation of the partial pressure of oxygen in breath at end expiration (EtO2 would accurately predict ScVO2. Methods Prospective observational study of a convenience sample of hemodialysis patients age > 17 years with existing upper extremity central venous catheters were enrolled. Using a portable respiratory device, we collected both tidal breathing and end expiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations, volume and flow on each patient. Simultaneous ScVO2 measurements were obtained via blood samples collected from the hemodialysis catheter. Two models were used to predict ScVO2: 1 Best-fit multivariate linear regression equation incorporating all respiratory variables; 2 MathCAD to model the decay curve of EtO2 versus expiratory volume using the least squares method to estimate the pO2 that would occur at Results From 21 patients, the correlation between EtO2 and measured ScVO2 yielded R2 = 0.11. The best fit multivariate equation included EtCO2 and EtO2 and when solved for ScVO2, the equation yielded a mean absolute difference from the measured ScVO2 of 8 ± 6% (range -18 to +17%. The predicted ScVO2 value was within 10% of the actual value for 57% of the patients. Modeling of the EtO2 curve did not accurately predict ScVO2 at any lung volume. Conclusion We found no significant correlation between EtO2 and ScVO2. A linear equation incorporating EtCO2 and EtO2 had at best modest predictive accuracy for ScVO2.

  15. THE KÖLLIKER–FUSE NUCLEUS ACTS AS A TIMEKEEPER FOR LATE-EXPIRATORY ABDOMINAL ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    JENKIN, SARAH E. M.; MILSOM, WILLIAM K.; ZOCCAL, DANIEL B.

    2018-01-01

    While the transition from the inspiratory to the post-inspiratory (post-I) phase is dependent on the pons, little attention has been paid to understanding the role of the pontine respiratory nuclei, specifically the Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF), in transitioning from post-I to the late expiratory (late-E) activity seen with elevated respiratory drive. To elucidate this, we used the in situ working heart-brainstem preparation of juvenile male Holtzman rats and recorded from the vagus (cVN), phrenic (PN) and abdominal nerves (AbN) during baseline conditions and during chemoreflex activation [with potassium cyanide (KCN; n = 13) or hypercapnia (8% CO2; n = 10)] to recruit active expiration. Chemoreflex activation with KCN increased PN frequency and cVN post-I and AbN activities. The inhibition of KF with isoguvacine microinjections (10 mM) attenuated the typical increase in PN frequency and cVN post-I activity, and amplified the AbN response. During hypercapnia, AbN late-E activity emerged in association with a significant reduction in expiratory time. KF inhibition during hypercapnia significantly decreased PN frequency and reduced the duration and amplitude of post-I cVN activity, while the onset of the AbN late-E bursts occurred significantly earlier. Our data reveal a negative relationship between KF-induced post-I and AbN late-E activities, suggesting that the KF coordinates the transition between post-I to late-E activity during conditions of elevated respiratory drive. PMID:28188852

  16. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on the sigmoid equation in experimental acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayle, Frederique; Guerin, Claude; Viale, Jean-Paul; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Annat, Guy

    2004-11-01

    To describe inflation and deflation volume-pressure (V-P) curves of the respiratory system by the sigmoidal equation at different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute lung injury. Experimental study. Physiological laboratory in a university setting. Six pigs of 25 kg each. Acute lung injury was induced by oleic acid. PEEP was applied from 0 to 15 cm H(2)O and from 15 to 0 cm H(2)O for 10 min in steps of 5 cmH(2)O. Inflation and deflation V-P curves were constructed from an automated super-syringe that delivers a constant flow of 7 l/min in both inspiratory and expiratory directions. V-P curves were obtained at each level of PEEP without disconnecting the animal from the ventilator. The experimental data were fitted to the sigmoid equation which provided the true inflection point (c), the point of maximal compliance increase (Pmci) reflecting opening/closure and the point of maximal compliance decrease (Pmcd) reflecting end of recruitment/onset of de-recruitment. The sigmoid equation provided an excellent fit. The values of the coefficients of determination were greater than 0.970 (median 0.996, IQR 0.994-0.997 for the 84 determinations). Negative values of Pmci in the deflation limb of the V-P curve were recorded in five pigs, suggesting closure below the volume range studied. Inflation and deflation V-P curves at different PEEPs can be fitted by the sigmoid equation. However, further work is needed to investigate the meaning of negative values for Pmci.

  17. Does phase 2 of the expiratory PCO2 versus volume curve have diagnostic value in emphysema patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Kars (Alice); G. Goorden; Th. Stijnen (Theo); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); C. Hilvering

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIt has been postulated that serial inhomogeneity of ventilation in the peripheral airways in emphysema is represented by the shape of expiratory carbon dioxide tension versus volume curve. We examined the diagnostic value of this test in patients with various degrees of emphysema. The

  18. Does phase 2 of the expiratory PCO2 versus volume curve have diagnostic value in emphysema patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Kars (Alice); G. Goorden; Th. Stijnen (Theo); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); C. Hilvering

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIt has been postulated that serial inhomogeneity of ventilation in the peripheral airways in emphysema is represented by the shape of expiratory carbon dioxide tension versus volume curve. We examined the diagnostic value of this test in patients with various degrees of

  19. Nebulized hypertonic saline via positive expiratory pressure versus via jet nebulizer in patients with severe cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, Oisin J

    2011-06-01

    Nebulized hypertonic saline is a highly effective therapy for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), yet 10% of patients are intolerant of hypertonic saline administered via jet nebulizer. Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) nebulizers splint open the airways and offers a more controlled rate of nebulization.

  20. The respiratory drive to thoracic motoneurones in the cat and its relation to the connections from expiratory bulbospinal neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saywell, S A; Anissimova, N P; Ford, T W

    2007-01-01

    of connection revealed were related to the presence and size of central respiratory drive potentials in the same motoneurones. Intracellular recordings were made from motoneurones in segments T5-T9 of the spinal cord of anaesthetized cats. Spike-triggered averaging from expiratory bulbospinal neurones...

  1. Improvement of lung mechanics by exogenous surfactant: effect of prior application of high positive end-expiratory pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hartog (Anneke); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); J.J. Haitsma (Jack); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe use of a ventilation strategy with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that is intended to recruit collapsed alveoli and to prevent recurrent collapse can reduce alveolar protein influx in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). This could affect

  2. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves survival in a rodent model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using high-dose epinephrine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaul, Conán

    2009-10-01

    Multiple interventions have been tested in models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to optimize drug use, chest compressions, and ventilation. None has studied the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on outcome. We hypothesized that because PEEP can reverse pulmonary atelectasis, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, and potentially improve cardiac output, its use during CPR would increase survival.

  3. Levels of maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide and certain cardiovascular parameters following hubble-bubble smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafagoj, Yanal A; Mohammed, Faisal I

    2002-08-01

    The physiological effects of cigarette smoking have been widely studied, however, little is known regarding the effects of smoking hubble-bubble. We examined the acute effects of hubble-bubble smoking on heart rate, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide. This study was carried out in the student laboratory, School of Medicine, Department of Physiology, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, during the summer of 1999. In 18 healthy habitual hubble-bubble smokers, heart rate, blood pressure, and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide was measured before, during and post smoking of one hubble-bubble run (45 minutes). Compared to base line (time zero), at the end of smoking heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide were increased 16 2.4 beats per minute, 6.7 2.5 mm Hg, 4.4 1.6 mm Hg, 5.2 1.7 mm Hg, and 14.2 1.8 ppm, (mean standard error of mean, Phubble-bubble smoking elicits a modest increase in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and maximum end-expiratory carbon monoxide in healthy hubble-bubble smokers.

  4. Effects of the positive end-expiratory pressure increase on sublingual microcirculation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaly Fonseca Nunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of increased positive end-expiratory pressure on the sublingual microcirculation. Methods: Adult patients who were sedated, under mechanical ventilation, and had a diagnosis of circulatory shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome were included. The positive end-expiratory pressure level was settled to obtain a plateau pressure of 30 cm H2O and then maintained at this level for 20 minutes. Microcirculatory (obtained by videomicroscopy and hemodynamic variables were collected at baseline and compared with those at the end of 20 min. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled. Overall, the microcirculation parameters did not significantly change after increasing the positive end-expiratory pressure. However, there was considerable interindividual variability. There was a negative, moderate correlation between the changes in the De Backer score (r = -0.58, p = 0.048, total vessel density (r = -0.60, p = 0.039 and baseline values. The changes in total vessel density (r = 0.54, p = 0.07 and perfused vessel density (r = 0.52, p = 0.08 trended toward correlating with the changes in the mean arterial pressure. Conclusion: Overall, the microcirculation parameters did not significantly change after increasing the positive end-expiratory pressure. However, at individual level, such response was heterogeneous. The changes in the microcirculation parameters could be correlated with the baseline values and changes in the mean arterial pressure.

  5. Comparação entre exercícios de respiração profunda e espirometria de incentivo no pós-operatório de cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio Comparison between deep breathing exercises and incentive spirometry after CABG surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Alencar Renault

    2009-06-01

    - FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second - FEV1, maximal respiratory pressures and oxygen saturation. METHODS: Thirty six patients in CABG postoperative period underwent thirty minutes of non-invasive ventilation during the first 24 hours after extubation and were randomly shared into two groups as following: DBE (n=18 and IS (n=18. The spirometric variables were assessed on the preoperative period and seventh postoperative day (POD. The respiratory muscle strength and oxygen saturation were assessed on the preoperative period, first, second and seventh POD. RESULTS: The groups were considered homogeneous in relation to the demographic and surgical variables. It has been noted fall in the values of FVC and FEV1 between the preoperative period and the seventh POD, but without significant differences between groups. The maximal respiratory pressures showed drop in the first POD but with and partial recovery until the seventh POD, also without significant differences between groups. The oxygen saturation was the only variable that was completely recovered on the seventh POD, also without significant differences between groups. CONCLUSION: There were not observed significant differences in maximal respiratory pressures, spirometric variables and oxygen saturation in patients undergone deep breathing exercises and flow-oriented incentive spirometry after coronary artery bypass grafting.

  6. [Playing of wind instruments is associated with an obstructive pattern in the spirometry of adolescents with a good aerobic resistance capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Javier; Granell, Jose; Ruiz, Diana; Tapias, Jose A

    2011-03-01

    There is controversy in the medical literature regarding the beneficial or detrimental effects of playing wind musical instruments on the respiratory system. The aim of this study is to analyse this relationship, taking the physical condition of the subjects into consideration. Cross-sectional observational study. Public institution with coordinated medium grade musical instruction and primary and secondary education. Young performers (between 13 and 17 years). We collected basic epidemiological parameters (gender, age, weight, size, heath status), and each subject underwent a fitness test ("course navette" cardiorespiratory fitness test) and a forced spirometry. We included 90 students, 53 females and 37 males. Thirty two were wind instrument players and 58 studied other instruments. The two groups were homogeneous with respect to gender, age and body mass index. The maximum oxygen uptake showed no significant difference (P=0.255), further demonstrating an adequate level of fitness compared to the general population. FVC was normal and similar in both groups (P=0.197). The FEV(1) percentage and the FEV(1)/FVC ratio were significantly lower (Pstudy of wind instruments was associated with an obstructive spirometric pattern in young musicians with a normal level of physical fitness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Dangerous Pressurization and Inappropriate Alarms during Water Occlusion of the Expiratory Circuit of Commonly Used Infant Ventilators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Hinder

    Full Text Available Non-invasive continuous positive airways pressure is commonly a primary respiratory therapy delivered via multi-purpose ventilators in premature newborns. Expiratory limb occlusion due to water accumulation or 'rainout' from gas humidification is a frequent issue. A case of expiratory limb occlusion due to rainout causing unexpected and excessive repetitive airway pressurisation in a Draeger VN500 prompted a systematic bench test examination of currently available ventilators.To assess neonatal ventilator response to partial or complete expiratory limb occlusion when set to non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure mode.Seven commercially available neonatal ventilators connected to a test lung using a standard infant humidifier circuit with partial and/or complete expiratory limb occlusion were examined in a bench test study. Each ventilator was set to deliver 6 cmH2O in non-invasive mode and respiratory mechanics data for 75%, 80% and 100% occlusion were collected.Several ventilators responded inappropriately with complete occlusion by cyclical pressurisation/depressurisation to peak pressures of between 19·4 and 64·6 cm H2O at rates varying between 2 to 77 inflations per minute. Tidal volumes varied between 10·1 and 24·3mL. Alarm responses varied from 'specific' (tube occluded to 'ambiguous' (Safety valve open. Carefusion Avea responded by continuing to provide the set distending pressure and displaying an appropriate alarm message. Draeger Babylog 8000 did not alarm with partial occlusions and incorrectly displayed airways pressure at 6·1cmH2O compared to the measured values of 13cmH2O.This study found a potential for significant adverse ventilator response due to complete or near complete expiratory limb occlusion in CPAP mode.

  8. Symptoms, physical findings and bronchial hypersensitivity in patients with bronchial asthma and normal spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aćimović Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The diagnosis of bronchial asthma, a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract, is made on the basis of anamnesis, pathologic auscultatory findings of the lungs, lung function disturbances, skin tests, as well as the basic indices of immunologic condition in bronchial trunk. The aim of the study was to find out correlation of objective indices of the disease and than relation with the symptoms in the patients with bronchial asthma. Methods. The study included 60 young male non smokers with long lasting symptoms of bronchial asthma including shortness of breath, wheezing, hard breathing, nonproductive or productive cough, weakness and night hard breathing. There were no symptoms of respiratory infection over the past two months and lung radiography and spirometry were normal. Based on the results of nonspecific bronchoprovocative test two groups of the patients were formed, group I (n = 30 with positive histamine test (average value of the inhaled histamine concentration with FEV1 drop by 20% in regard with the initial value (PC20 = 2.99 ± 0.51 mg/ml of histamine and group II (n = 30 with negative histamine test (PC20(a = 14.58 ± 6.34 mg/ml of histamine. Results. The obtained spirometry results revealed a statistically significant difference in values of FEV1 between groups: I group - FEV1 = 93.2%; II group - FEV1 = 101.8%; (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon test, although all the FEV1 values were normal. Regarding the presence of the most common symptoms there was not statistically significant difference between the groups (p > 0. 05, chisquare test. Pathologic auscultatory lung findings were found in 73.4% of the patients in the group I and 27.5% of the patients in the group II. There was statistically significant difference (p < 0.05, chi-squared test. A positive correlation between the degree of hypersensitivity and lung physical findings was confirmed (p < 0.05 Spearman's rho, but there was no correlation with FEV1 values

  9. Studies on the correlation between pre-and post-operative perfusion scintigraphy and differential spirometry in operated lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaseda, Shizuka; Ikeda, Takaaki; Sakai, Tadaaki; Tomaru, Hiroko; Ishihara, Tsuneo; Kikuchi, Keiichi.

    1982-01-01

    For the purpose of clarifying the relationship between the percentage of perfusion and that of vital capacity or oxygen uptake on the affected lung, perfusion scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-MAA and differential spirometry were performed in twenty patients including sixteen patients with lung cancer. Both examinations were performed before and after the operation. The results are as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between the percentage of perfusion and that of vital capacity or oxygen uptake of the affected lung before and after the operation. (2) The estimation of the percentage of vital capacity or oxygen uptake of the affected lung is possible by combining the spirometry and sup(99m)Tc-MAA pulmonary scintigraphy. (author)

  10. Predictors of poor-quality spirometry in two cohorts of older adults in Russia and Belgium: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeshi, Eralda; Zelenukha, Dmitry; Vaes, Bert; Andreeva, Elena; Frolova, Elena; Degryse, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-23

    Spirometry is an important test for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases, yet it is underused especially in older adults. Several predictors of good-quality spirometry in this age group have been reported, based mainly on in/outpatients of geriatric and/or respiratory units. This study aims to assess predictors of poor-quality spirometry in community-dwelling older adults from two primary care cohorts in Russia and Belgium. Spirograms from two population-based cohort studies in Russia (CRYSTAL) and Belgium (BELFRAIL) were assessed in accordance with the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) acceptability and repeatability criteria and grouped into good and poor quality. Multivariable analysis assessed the association of poor-quality spirometry with socio-demographics, functional dependency, physical and mental functioning and co-morbidities. In all, 43.3% of the 522 BELFRAIL participants (84.71 ± 3.67 years old) and 57.7% of the 605 CRYSTAL participants (75.11 ± 5.97 years old) achieved all ATS/ERS acceptability and repeatability criteria. In both cohorts, those with poor-quality spirometry had lower cognitive function (mini-mental state examination (MMSE) ⩽ 24). After adjustment in multivariable analysis, MMSE ⩽ 24 had an odds ratio for poor-quality spirometry of 1.33 (95% CI = 0.78-2.28) in the BELFRAIL and 1.30 (95% CI = 0.88-1.91) in the CRYSTAL cohort. In community-dwelling older adults, including those over 80 years old, impaired cognition measured by the MMSE may not be an independent predictor of poor-quality spirometry. Further research is needed in this area, and spirometry should be used more often in older adults in primary care.

  11. Assessment of five different guideline indication criteria for spirometry, including modified GOLD criteria, in order to detect COPD: data from 5,315 subjects in the PLATINO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luize, Ana P; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Muiño, Adriana; López, Maria Victorina; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmem; Montes de Oca, Maria; Tálamo, Carlos; Celli, Bartolomé; Nascimento, Oliver A; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Jardim, José R

    2014-10-30

    Spirometry is the gold standard for diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although there are a number of different guideline criteria for deciding who should be selected for spirometric screening, to date it is not known which criteria are the best based on sensitivity and specificity. Firstly, to evaluate the proportion of subjects in the PLATINO Study that would be recommended for spirometry testing according to Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)-modified, American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), National Lung Health Education Program (NLHEP), GOLD and American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) criteria. Secondly, we aimed to compare the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive and negative predictive values, of these five different criteria. Data from the PLATINO study included information on respiratory symptoms, smoking and previous spirometry testing. The GOLD-modified spirometry indication criteria are based on three positive answers out of five questions: the presence of cough, phlegm in the morning, dyspnoea, age over 40 years and smoking status. Data from 5,315 subjects were reviewed. Fewer people had an indication for spirometry (41.3%) according to the GOLD-modified criteria, and more people had an indication for spirometry (80.4%) by the GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria. A low percentage had previously had spirometry performed: GOLD-modified (14.5%); ACCP (13.2%); NLHEP (12.6%); and GOLD and ATS/ERS (12.3%). The GOLD-modified criteria showed the least sensitivity (54.9) and the highest specificity (61.0) for detecting COPD, whereas GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria showed the highest sensitivity (87.9) and the least specificity (20.8). There is a considerable difference in the indication for spirometry according to the five different guideline criteria. The GOLD-modified criteria recruit less people with the greatest sum of sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Aerobic Exercise Training and Incentive Spirometry Can Control Age-related respiratory muscles performance Changes in Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kader, Shehab Mahmoud Abd; Ashmawy, Eman Mohamed Salah El-Den

    2015-01-01

    As aging occurs, the respiratory system undergoes a measurable decline in physiological functions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of walking exercise and incentive spirometry in controlling age related respiratory muscles function changes in elderly. Forty elderly subjects of both sexes their age ranged from 65 to 74 years and included into two equal groups; group (A) received walking exercise and incentive spirometery three times a week for 3 months, where group (B) receiv...

  13. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new large animal spirometry device using mainstream CO2 flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, T D; Lammer, V; Schramel, J P; Moens, Y P S

    2014-07-01

    A spirometry device equipped with mainstream CO2 flow sensor is not available for large animal anaesthesia. To measure the resistance of a new large animal spirometry device and assess its agreement with reference methods for volume measurements. In vitro experiment and crossover study using anaesthetised horses. A flow partitioning device (FPD) equipped with 4 human CO2 flow sensors was tested. Pressure differences were measured across the whole FPD and across each sensor separately using air flows (range: 90-720 l/min). One sensor was connected to a spirometry monitor for in vitro volume (3, 5 and 7 l) measurements. These measurements were compared with a reference method. Five anaesthetised horses were used for tidal volume (VT) measurements using the FPD and a horse-lite sensor (reference method). Bland-Altman analysis, ANOVA and linear regression analysis were used for data analysis. Pressure differences across each sensor were similar suggesting equal flow partitioning. The resistance of the device increased with flow (range: 0.3-1.5 cmH2 O s/l) and was higher than that of the horse-lite. The limits of agreement for volume measurements were within -1 and 2% in vitro and -12 and 0% in vivo. Nine of 147 VT measurements in horses were outside of the ± 10% limits of acceptance but most of these erroneous measurements occurred with VTs lower than 4 l. The determined correction factor for volume measurements was 3.97 ± 0.03. The limits of agreement for volume measurements by the new device were within ± 10% using clinically relevant range of volumes. The new spirometry device can be recommended for measurement of VT in adult Warmblood horses. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23

  15. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S. [KNETEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23.

  16. The development of a community-based spirometry service in the Canterbury region of New Zealand: observations on new service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epton, Michael J; Stanton, Josh D; McGeoch, Graham R B; Shand, Brett I; Swanney, Maureen P

    2015-03-05

    In 2008, as part of the changes to develop integrated health care services in the Canterbury region of New Zealand, the local health board in collaboration with general practitioners, respiratory specialists and scientists introduced a programme for general practices to provide laboratory-quality spirometry in the community. The service adhered to the 2005 ATS/ERS international spirometry standards. The spirometry service was provided by trained practice nurses and community respiratory nurses, and was monitored and quality assured by certified respiratory scientists in the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Christchurch Hospital and CISO (Canterbury Initiative Services Organisation). These two organisations were responsible for organising training seminars and refresher courses on spirometry technique and interpretation of results. A total of 10 practices have now become approved spirometry providers, with the number of tests carried out in the primary care setting increasing gradually. Consistently high-quality spirometry tests have been obtained and are now presented on a centrally available results database for all hospital and community clinicians to review. Although the service has proved to be more convenient for patients, the tests have not been delivered as quickly as those carried out by the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory. However, the time scales for testing achieved by the community service is considered suitable for investigation of chronic disease. The success of the service has been dependent on several key factors including hospital and clinical support and a centralised quality assurance programme, a comprehensive training schedule and online clinical guidance and close integration between primary and secondary care clinicians.

  17. Assessment of serology and spirometry and the combination of both to complement microbiological isolation for earlier detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik Pirš, Ana; Krivec, Uroš; Simčič, Saša; Seme, Katja

    2016-11-25

    The aim of this study was to assess whether serology and spirometry and the combination of both can complement culture-based detection for earlier recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis. A 4 year longitudinal prospective study that included 67 Slovenian children with cystic fibrosis with a mean age of 10.5 years was conducted. Serology, spirometry and a scoring system combining serology and spirometry were assessed and compared. Infection was confirmed with isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from respiratory samples. There was a significantly positive correlation between serology and the combination of serology and spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry the highest sensitivity (0.90). Both had a high negative predictive value (0.93 and 0.79 respectively). Using serology and the combination of serology and lung function measurement can be beneficial for earlier detection of infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis when done simultaneously with standard culture-based detection from respiratory samples.

  18. Reference values for spirometry and their use in test interpretation: A Position Statement from the Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzale, Danny; Hall, Graham; Swanney, Maureen P

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, spirometry testing tended to be confined to the realm of hospital-based laboratories but is now performed in a variety of health care settings. Regardless of the setting in which the test is conducted, the fundamental basis of spirometry is that the test is both performed and interpreted according to the international standards. The purpose of this Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science (ANZSRS) statement is to provide the background and recommendations for the interpretation of spirometry results in clinical practice. This includes the benchmarking of an individual's results to population reference data, as well as providing the platform for a statistically and conceptually based approach to the interpretation of spirometry results. Given the many limitations of older reference equations, it is imperative that the most up-to-date and relevant reference equations are used for test interpretation. Given this, the ANZSRS recommends the adoption of the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) 2012 spirometry reference values throughout Australia and New Zealand. The ANZSRS also recommends that interpretation of spirometry results is based on the lower limit of normal from the reference values and the use of Z-scores where available. © 2016 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. Analysis of the influence of respiratory disorders observed in preoperative spirometry on the dynamics of early inflammatory response in patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szylińska, Aleksandra; Listewnik, Mariusz J; Rotter, Iwona; Rył, Aleksandra; Biskupski, Andrzej; Brykczyński, Mirosław

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative spirometry provides measurable information about the occurrence of respiratory disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the association between preoperative spirometry abnormalities and the intensification of early inflammatory responses in patients following coronary artery bypass graft in extracorporeal circulation. The study involved 810 patients (625 men and 185 women) aged 65.4±7.9 years who were awaiting isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. On the basis of spirometry performed on the day of admittance to the hospital, the patients were divided into three groups. Patients without respiratory problems constituted 78.8% of the entire group. Restricted breathing was revealed by spirometry in 14.9% and obstructive breathing in 6.3% of patients. Inter-group analysis showed statistically significant differences in C-reactive protein (CRP) between patients with restrictive spirometry abnormalities and patients without any pulmonary dysfunction. CRP concentrations differed before surgery ( P =0.006) and on the second ( P spirometry results from restrictive respiratory disorders have an elevated level of generalized inflammatory response both before and after the isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. Therefore, this group of patients should be given special postoperative monitoring and, in particular, intensive respiratory rehabilitation immediately after reconstitution.

  20. Smoking cessation and development of respiratory health in smokers screened with normal spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Daniel; Wesseling, Geertjan; Aveyard, Paul; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2011-02-01

    Case-finding of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using spirometry may deter people with normal lung function from stopping smoking. The objective of this study was to observe the percentage of smokers screened with normal lung function that quit smoking. As part of a study on early detection of COPD, 518 smokers were screened with normal lung function (post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FVC ≥ 70%). They were invited for a follow-up measurement after an average of 2.4 years. Non-smoking was validated by carbon monoxide (smokers. This rate was not lower than the expected rate of quitting in the Dutch population (8-9%) and primary "care as usual" in smokers screened with abnormal lung function (10%; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). The average decline in post-bronchodilator FEV(1) was 26 mL/year, which was unrelated to smoking status at follow-up. Non-smokers showed a clinically meaningful and statistically significant (p smokers shown to have normal lung function. Such smokers should be advised to quit smoking on the grounds that they are likely to improve their respiratory health in the short term and reduce their risk for smoking related diseases in the long term. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of repeated spirometry and smoking cessation advice on smokers with mild COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratelis, Georgios; Mölstad, Sigvard; Jakobsson, Per; Zetterström, Olle

    2006-09-01

    Smoking cessation is the most important therapeutic intervention in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and the health benefits are immediate and substantial. Major efforts have been made to develop methods with high smoking cessation rates. To study whether a combination of spirometry and brief smoking cessation advice to smokers with COPD, annually for three years, increased their smoking cessation rate in comparison with groups of smokers with normal lung function. Prospective, randomized study in primary care. Smoking cessation rates were compared between smokers with COPD followed-up yearly over a period of three years and smokers with normal lung function followed-up yearly for three years or followed-up only once after three years. The point-prevalence abstinence rate and prolonged abstinence rate at 6 and 12 months increased yearly and in smokers with COPD at year 3 was 29%, 28%, and 25%, respectively. The abstinence rates were significantly higher in smokers with COPD than in smokers with normal lung function. Smoking cessation rates among smokers with normal lung function did not increase with increasing number of follow-ups. Smokers diagnosed with COPD stopped smoking significantly more often than those with normal lung function.

  2. Can Peak Expiratory Flow Measurements Differentiate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease from Congestive Heart Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Gough

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspneic patients are commonly encountered by Emergency Medical Service (EMS. Frequent causes include Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Congestive Heart Failure (CHF. Measurement of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR has been proposed to help differentiate COPD from CHF. This prospective, cohort, pilot study was conducted to determine if PEFR in patients with an exacerbation of COPD were significantly different than CHF. Included were patients presenting with dyspnea plus a history of COPD and/or CHF. A PEFR was measured, values were compared to predicted average, and a percentage was calculated. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. Six had a diagnosis of COPD, 12 CHF; 3 had other diagnoses. Mean percentage of predicted PEFR with COPD was 26.36%, CHF 48.9% (=0.04. Patients presenting with acute COPD had significantly lower percentage of predicted PEFR than those with CHF. These results suggest that PEFR may be useful in differentiating COPD from CHF. This study should be expanded to the prehospital setting with a larger number of subjects.

  3. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) among Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay Rao, J.; Venkaiah, K.; Mohan Rao, N.

    2010-01-01

    At Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), employees are exposed to ammonia, hydrofluoric acid, acetone, etc., which are respiratory toxicants and inhalation of these pollutants may produce irritation and obstruction in airways. Due to nature of their occupation, tradesman working in plants are having longer duration of exposure (LDE) and others, such as supervisors, scientific officers, helpers, etc., that occasionally visit plants are having shorter duration of exposure (SDE) to these pollutants. The peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) is an index to diagnose obstruction in larger airways and this is metered with mini peak flow meter among 835 NFC employees. Using ANOVA test, PEFR value was compared according to age and smoking. The value was compared between LDE and SDE employees according to smoking and duration of employment. The multiple regression equation for prediction of PEFR was developed. Age, smokers and higher duration of LDE employees demonstrated significantly lower PEFR value. In comparison to 10 year duration, 30 and above year duration of employment, LDE employees showed a higher decline in PEFR, that is 95 L (17.6%) and in SDE employees, that is 41L (7.8%). This may be due to longer duration of employment of LD employees smoking prevention and follow up study is suggested. (author)

  4. Short hypobaric hypoxia and breathing pattern: effect of positive end expiratory pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savourey, G; Besnard, Y; Launay, J C; Guinet, A; Hanniquet, A M; Caterini, R; Bittel, J

    1999-09-01

    The ventilatory effects of a 5-cm H2O positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and its influence on the breathing pattern during short hypoxic exposure both at rest and during physical exercise were studied. There were 22 healthy subjects who were submitted to normoxia and to 4-h of hypoxia in a hypobaric chamber (4500 m, PB = 589 hPa) both at rest and during an 8-min cycle ergometer exercise (100 W) without and with a 5 cm H2O PEEP. The results show that hypoxia compared with normoxia induces increases in tidal volume (VT) (+28.5%, p breathing pattern expressed as duty cycle (tI/tt) is unchanged, whereas an increased mean inspiratory flow (VT/tI) is observed (p hypoxia significantly increases VT (+22.2% p breathing pattern in hypoxia since VT/tI and tI/tt are unchanged. Heart rate and arterial O2 saturation are also unaffected by PEEP. In conclusion, this study shows that a 4-h hypoxia modifies ventilatory parameters and mean inspiratory flow (VT/tI) at rest and during exercise (100 W), whereas a 5-cm H2O PEEP does not alter the breathing pattern despite changes in ventilatory parameters are observed.

  5. A Comprehensive Breath Plume Model for Disease Transmission via Expiratory Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, S. K.; Wexler, A. S.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2012-11-01

    The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime represents a longstanding unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at low humidity and temperature, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent experiments with guinea pigs suggest that transmission is indeed maximized at low humidity and temperature, a finding which has been widely interpreted in terms of airborne influenza virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects the effect of the airflow on the transmission probability. Here we provide a comprehensive model for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting ``Gaussian breath plume'' are calculated as functions of downstream position. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the guinea pig experiments, without invoking airborne virus survivability. Moreover, the results highlight the need for careful characterization of the airflow in airborne transmission experiments.

  6. First characterization of the expiratory flow increase technique: method development and results analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maréchal, L; Barthod, C; Jeulin, J C

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an important contribution to the definition of the expiratory flow increase technique (EFIT). So far, no measuring means were suited to assess the manual EFIT performed on infants. The proposed method aims at objectively defining the EFIT based on the quantification of pertinent cognitive parameters used by physiotherapists when practicing. We designed and realized customized instrumented gloves endowed with pressure and displacement sensors, and the associated electronics and software. This new system is specific to the manoeuvre, to the user and innocuous for the patient. Data were collected and analysed on infants with bronchiolitis managed by an expert physiotherapist. The analysis presented is realized on a group of seven subjects (mean age: 6.1 months, SD: 1.1; mean chest circumference: 44.8 cm, SD: 1.9). The results are consistent with the physiotherapist's tactility. In spite of inevitable variability due to measurements on infants, repeatable quantitative data could be reported regarding the manoeuvre characteristics: the magnitudes of displacements do not exceed 10 mm on both hands; the movement of the thoracic hand is more vertical than the movement of the abdominal hand; the maximum applied pressure with the thoracic hand is about twice higher than with the abdominal hand; the thrust of the manual compression lasts (590 ± 62) ms. Inter-operators measurements are in progress in order to generalize these results

  7. Can Preoperative Peak Expiratory Flow Predict Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Lobectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun ZHOU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs, especially postoperative pneumonia (POP, directly affect the rapid recovery of lung cancer patients after surgery. Peak expiratory flow (PEF can reflect airway patency and cough efficiency. Moreover, cough impairment may lead to accumulation of pulmonary secretions which can increase the risk of PPCs. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of preoperative PEF on PPCs in patients with lung cancer. Methods Retrospective research was conducted on 433 lung cancer patients who underwent lobectomy at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2014 to December 2015. The associations between preoperative PEF and PPCs were analyzed based on patients’ basic characteristics and clinical data in hospital. Results Preoperative PEF value in PPCs group (280.93±88.99 L/min was significantly lower than that in non-PPCs group (358.38±93.69 L/min (P320 L/min group (9.4%(P<0.001. Conclusion Preoperative PEF and PPCs are correlated, and PEF may be used as a predictor of PPCs.

  8. The effects of smokeless cookstoves on peak expiratory flow rates in rural Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, W P; Porras Blanco, R M; Muniz, G B

    2015-09-01

    The use of biomass fuel for cooking in traditional cookstove designs negatively affects respiratory health of communities in developing countries. Indoor pollution affects particularly women and children, who are participating in food preparation. The effects of smokeless cookstove designs on indoor pollution are well documented, but few studies exist to assess the effects of improved stove designs on the respiratory health of community members. This study uses peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements in a before-and-after format to assess respiratory function of inhabitants of all 30 houses of Buenas Noches in central Honduras. PEFRs are measured before and 6 months after the installation of Justa stoves in people's homes. Health behaviors, respiratory symptoms and fire wood use are evaluated in a door-to-door survey format. A total of 137 eligible women and children between 6 and 14 years participated in the study. PEFR improved by 9.9-18.5% (P < 0.001) depending on the participants' exposure to indoor pollution. Health complaints like cough and behaviors like clinic visits did not change with the introduction of smokeless cookstove technology. Smokeless stoves improve respiratory health in an environment of high levels of indoor pollution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A study of diurnal variation in peak expiratory flow rates in healthy adult female subjects in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Jayapal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR reflects the strength and condition of respiratory muscles and the degree of airflow limitation in large airways. PEFR shows hour to hour variation that follows a specific pattern in asthmatics and healthy individuals. Adequate data is not available for the diurnal variation in normal individuals who are students in professional courses and had a sedentary life style. Hence, this study was undertaken to study the diurnal variation in peak expiratory flow rates in healthy adult female subjects in South India. Materials and Methods: Peak expiratory flow rate was recorded in 50 adult healthy female students aged 18-23 years and studying in professional courses. Mini Wright′s peak flow meter was used to measure the peak expiratory flow rate. PEFR were recorded at 7-8 a.m., 10-11 a.m., 1-2 p.m., 4-5 p.m., and 7-8 p.m. for two consecutive days. Results: On analysis of PEFR records of individual subjects, it was seen that there was an overall dip in the morning at 7-8 h PEFR, which increased in the daytime, peaking in the afternoon at 1-2 p.m. and eventually decreased in the night. Subjects did not show the peak PEFR values at the same time point, 10% of subjects had a rise in PEFR in the early morning, afternoon (1-2 p.m. peak was observed in 48% subjects and evening (4-5 p.m. peak was observed in 16% subjects. 14% subjects showed a peak in the night time (7-8 p.m. PEFR values. Conclusion: This study provided the preliminary reference data of diurnal variation of peak expiratory flow rate in healthy adults. Since, there is a variation in the peak expiratory flow rate recorded during different time points of the day; hence, to compare the PEFR between individuals it is advisable to record the PEFR at the same time point.

  10. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  11. Cystic Fibrosis: Are Volumetric Ultra-Low-Dose Expiratory CT Scans Sufficient for Monitoring Related Lung Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Lequin, Maarten H; Bruijne, Marleen de

    2009-01-01

    with CF aged 6–20 years (eight males, 12 females) underwent low-dose end-inspiratory CT and ultra-low-dose end-expiratory CT. Informed consent was obtained. Scans were randomized and scored by using the Brody-II CT scoring system to assess bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, mucus plugging......-inspiratory and end-expiratory CT scores for Brody-II total score (ICC = 0.96), bronchiectasis (ICC = 0.98), airway wall thickening (ICC = 0.94), mucus plugging (ICC = 0.96), and opacities (ICC = 0.90). Intra- and interobserver agreement were good to very good (ICC range, 0.70–0.98). Bland-Altman plots showed...

  12. An experimental study on the impacts of inspiratory and expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in ARDS animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Xianming Zhang; Juan Du; Weiliang Wu; Yongcheng Zhu; Ying Jiang; Rongchang Chen

    2017-01-01

    In spite of intensive investigations, the role of spontaneous breathing (SB) activity in ARDS has not been well defined yet and little has been known about the different contribution of inspiratory or expiratory muscles activities during mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS. In present study, oleic acid-induced beagle dogs? ARDS models were employed and ventilated with the same level of mean airway pressure. Respiratory mechanics, lung volume, gas exchange and inflammatory cytokines w...

  13. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Laura A; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; Last, Jerold A; Adams, Jason Y; Harper, Richart W; Kenyon, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. 5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide the frequency

  14. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Cagle

    Full Text Available Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury.To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation.5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85 were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers.Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation.Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide

  15. Expiratory flow rate, breath hold and anatomic dead space influence electronic nose ability to detect lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikov, Andras; Hernadi, Marton; Korosi, Beata Zita; Kunos, Laszlo; Zsamboki, Gabriella; Sutto, Zoltan; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Horvath, Ildiko

    2014-12-16

    Electronic noses are composites of nanosensor arrays. Numerous studies showed their potential to detect lung cancer from breath samples by analysing exhaled volatile compound pattern ("breathprint"). Expiratory flow rate, breath hold and inclusion of anatomic dead space may influence the exhaled levels of some volatile compounds; however it has not been fully addressed how these factors affect electronic nose data. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate these effects. 37 healthy subjects (44 ± 14 years) and 27 patients with lung cancer (60 ± 10 years) participated in the study. After deep inhalation through a volatile organic compound filter, subjects exhaled at two different flow rates (50 ml/sec and 75 ml/sec) into Teflon-coated bags. The effect of breath hold was analysed after 10 seconds of deep inhalation. We also studied the effect of anatomic dead space by excluding this fraction and comparing alveolar air to mixed (alveolar + anatomic dead space) air samples. Exhaled air samples were processed with Cyranose 320 electronic nose. Expiratory flow rate, breath hold and the inclusion of anatomic dead space significantly altered "breathprints" in healthy individuals (p 0.05). These factors also influenced the discrimination ability of the electronic nose to detect lung cancer significantly. We have shown that expiratory flow, breath hold and dead space influence exhaled volatile compound pattern assessed with electronic nose. These findings suggest critical methodological recommendations to standardise sample collections for electronic nose measurements.

  16. Functional electrical stimulation to the abdominal wall muscles synchronized with the expiratory flow does not induce muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Yukako; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Sewa, Yoko; Ohse, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Continuous electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles is known to induce mild muscle fatigue. However, it is not clear whether this is also true for functional electrical stimulation delivered only during the expiratory phase of breathing. This study aimed to examine whether or not intermittent electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal wall muscles induces muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were nine healthy adults. Abdominal electrical stimulation was applied for 1.5 seconds from the start of expiration and then turned off during inspiration. The electrodes were attached to both sides of the abdomen at the lower margin of the 12th rib. Abdominal electrical stimulation was delivered for 15 minutes with the subject in a seated position. Expiratory flow was measured during stimulus. Trunk flexor torque and electromyography activity were measured to evaluate abdominal muscle fatigue. [Results] The mean stimulation on/off ratio was 1:2.3. The declining rate of abdominal muscle torque was 61.1 ± 19.1% before stimulus and 56.5 ± 20.9% after stimulus, not significantly different. The declining rate of mean power frequency was 47.8 ± 11.7% before stimulus and 47.9 ± 10.2% after stimulus, not significantly different. [Conclusion] It was found that intermittent electrical stimulation to abdominal muscles synchronized with the expiratory would not induce muscle fatigue.

  17. Fluctuation Analysis of Peak Expiratory Flow and Its Association with Treatment Failure in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, David A; Wang, Lucy L; Bates, Jason H T; Thamrin, Cindy; Shade, David M; Dixon, Anne E; Wise, Robert A; Peters, Stephen; Irvin, Charles G

    2017-04-15

    Temporal fluctuations have been demonstrated in lung function and asthma control, but the effect of controller therapy on these fluctuations is unknown. To determine if fluctuations in peak expiratory flow (PEF) are predictive of subsequent treatment failure and may be modified by controller therapy. We applied detrended fluctuation analysis to once-daily PEF data from 493 participants in the LOCCS (Leukotriene Modifier Corticosteroid or Corticosteroid-Salmeterol) trial of the American Lung Association Airways Clinical Research Centers. We evaluated the coefficient of variation of PEF (CVpef) and the scaling exponent α, reflecting self-similarity of PEF, in relation to treatment failure from the run-in period of open-label inhaled fluticasone, and the treatment periods for subjects randomized to (1) continued twice daily fluticasone (F), (2) once daily fluticasone plus salmeterol (F + S), or (3) once daily oral montelukast (M). The CVpef was higher in those with treatment failure in the F and F + S groups in the run-in phase, and all three groups in the treatment phase. α was similar between those with and without treatment failure in all three groups during the run-in phase but was higher among those with treatment failure in the F and F + S groups during the treatment phase. Participants in all three groups showed variable patterns of change in α leading up to treatment failure. We conclude that increased temporal self-similarity (α) of more variable lung function (CVpef) is associated with treatment failure, but the pattern of change in self-similarity leading up to treatment failure is variable across individuals.

  18. Difficulty in obtaining peak expiratory flow measurements in children with acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Marc H; Stevens, Molly W; Schultz, Theresa; Scribano, Philip V

    2004-01-01

    To determine the frequency with which children >or=6 years with acute asthma can perform peak expiratory flow rate measurements (PEFR) in an emergency department (ED). Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of children with acute asthma. All children (age 2-18 years old) treated in an urban pediatric ED for an acute exacerbation during randomly selected days over a 12-month period were prospectively evaluated. According to treatment protocols, PEFR was to be measured in all children age 6 years and older before therapy and after each treatment with inhaled bronchodilators. Registered respiratory therapists obtained PEFR and evaluated whether patients were able to perform the maneuver adequately. Four hundred and fifty-six children, 6 to 18 years old (median 10 years), were enrolled; 291 (64%) had PEFR measured at least once. Of those in whom PEFR was attempted at least once, only 190 (65%) were able to perform adequately. At the start of therapy, 54% (142/262) were able to perform PEFR. Of the 120 who were unable to perform initially, 76 had another attempt at the end of the ED treatment, and 55 (72%) were still unable to perform. A total of 149 patients had attempts at PEFR both at the start and end of treatment, of these, only 71 (48%) provided valid information on both attempts. Patients unable to perform PEFR were younger (mean +/- SD = 8.7 +/- 2.8 years) than those who were able to perform successfully (11.2 +/- 3.2 years) and those with no attempts (10.0 +/- 3.4 years). Children admitted to the hospital were more likely to be unable to perform PEFR (58/126 = 46%) than those discharged from the ED (43/330 = 13%, P < 0.0001). Adequate PEFR measurements are difficult to obtain in children with acute asthma. Treatment and research protocols cannot rely exclusively on PEFR for evaluation of severity.

  19. Unintentional variation in positive end expiratory pressure during resuscitation with a T-piece resuscitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Neil N; Rich, Wade D

    2011-06-01

    The ability of T-piece resuscitators to deliver consistent peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) and positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) during real and simulated neonatal resuscitation has been well described. The Neopuff (Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Auckland, New Zealand) has been the device used for nearly all of these comparisons. All high risk resuscitations were carried out in our dedicated resuscitation room, and were recorded on video tape for quality assurance purposes.(1) In addition to the audio and video recording, physiologic signals and resuscitation parameters, including oxygen saturation, pulse rate, airway pressure, FiO(2), and others signals as appropriate were also captured. These recordings were reviewed on a biweekly basis as part of a continuing quality review process. Resuscitations were graded for standard of care and the resuscitation checklist was reviewed to determine if the team had any unresolved issues that needed to be addressed. In the year between April of 2009 and March 2010, a period when we fully reviewed approximately 120 videos, we recognized visually obvious PEEP changes on 8 different occasions in ELBW infants. Our target PEEP was 5 cm H20. We observed rapid changes in the PEEP to as high as 15 cm H20 during resuscitation. Based on our single-center experience, a T-piece resuscitation device which has the adjustment for the PEEP level and the orifice which is occluded to deliver a breath in the same location has the potential to cause an inadvertent and potentially toxic increase of PEEP which might not be noticed by the operator. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Positive expiratory pressure improves oxygenation in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Nespoulet

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP is commonly used in critical care medicine to improve gas exchange. Altitude sickness is associated with exaggerated reduction in arterial oxygenation. We assessed the effect of PEEP and pursed lips breathing (PLB on arterial and tissue oxygenation under normobaric and hypobaric hypoxic conditions. METHODS: Sixteen healthy volunteers were exposed to acute normobaric hypoxia (Laboratory study, FiO₂=0.12. The protocol consisted in 3-min phases with PEEPs of 0, 5 or 10 cmH₂O, PLB or similar ventilation than with PEEP-10, interspaced with 3-min phases of free breathing. Arterial (pulse oximetry and quadriceps (near-infrared spectroscopy oxygenation, ventilation, cardiac function, esophageal and gastric pressures and subjects' subjective perceptions were recorded continuously. In addition, the effect of PEEP on arterial oxygenation was tested at 4,350 m of altitude in 9 volunteers breathing for 20 min with PEEP-10 (Field study. RESULTS: During the laboratory study, PEEP-10 increased arterial and quadriceps oxygenation (arterial oxygen saturation +5.6±5.0% and quadriceps oxyhemoglobin +58±73 µmol.cm compared to free breathing; p0.05 compared to PEEP-0. During the field study, PEEP-10 increased arterial oxygen saturation by +6.7±6.0% after the 3(rd minute with PEEP-10 without further significant increase until the 20(th minute with PEEP-10. Subjects did not report any significant discomfort with PEEP. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that 10-cmH₂O PEEP significantly improves arterial and muscle oxygenation under both normobaric and hypobaric hypoxic conditions in healthy subjects. PEEP-10 could be an attractive non-pharmacological tool to limit blood oxygen desaturation and possibly symptoms at altitude.

  1. Positive expiratory pressure improves oxygenation in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespoulet, Hugo; Rupp, Thomas; Bachasson, Damien; Tamisier, Renaud; Wuyam, Bernard; Lévy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is commonly used in critical care medicine to improve gas exchange. Altitude sickness is associated with exaggerated reduction in arterial oxygenation. We assessed the effect of PEEP and pursed lips breathing (PLB) on arterial and tissue oxygenation under normobaric and hypobaric hypoxic conditions. Sixteen healthy volunteers were exposed to acute normobaric hypoxia (Laboratory study, FiO₂=0.12). The protocol consisted in 3-min phases with PEEPs of 0, 5 or 10 cmH₂O, PLB or similar ventilation than with PEEP-10, interspaced with 3-min phases of free breathing. Arterial (pulse oximetry) and quadriceps (near-infrared spectroscopy) oxygenation, ventilation, cardiac function, esophageal and gastric pressures and subjects' subjective perceptions were recorded continuously. In addition, the effect of PEEP on arterial oxygenation was tested at 4,350 m of altitude in 9 volunteers breathing for 20 min with PEEP-10 (Field study). During the laboratory study, PEEP-10 increased arterial and quadriceps oxygenation (arterial oxygen saturation +5.6±5.0% and quadriceps oxyhemoglobin +58±73 µmol.cm compared to free breathing; pbreathing pattern, end-tidal CO₂ or cardiac function (all p>0.05) compared to PEEP-0. During the field study, PEEP-10 increased arterial oxygen saturation by +6.7±6.0% after the 3(rd) minute with PEEP-10 without further significant increase until the 20(th) minute with PEEP-10. Subjects did not report any significant discomfort with PEEP. These data indicate that 10-cmH₂O PEEP significantly improves arterial and muscle oxygenation under both normobaric and hypobaric hypoxic conditions in healthy subjects. PEEP-10 could be an attractive non-pharmacological tool to limit blood oxygen desaturation and possibly symptoms at altitude.

  2. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves gas exchange and pulmonary mechanics during partial liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmse, M; Fujino, Y; Hess, D; Kacmarek, R M

    1998-11-01

    Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perflubron (PFB) has been proposed as an adjunct to the current therapies for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Because PFB has been also referred to as "liquid PEEP," distributing to the most gravity-dependent regions of the lung, less attention has been paid to the amount of applied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). We hypothesized that higher PEEP levels than currently applied are needed to optimize gas exchange, and that the lower inflection point (LIP) of the pressure-volume curve could be used to estimate the amount of PEEP needed when the lung is filled with PFB. Lung injury was induced in 23 sheep by repeated lung lavage with warmed saline until the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell below 150. Five sheep were used to investigate the change of the LIP when the lung was filled with PFB in increments of 5 ml/kg/body weight to a total of 30 ml/kg/body weight. To evaluate the impact of PEEP set at LIP +1 cm H2O we randomized an additional 15 sheep to three groups with different doses (7.5 ml, 15 ml, 30 ml/kg/body weight) of PFB. In random order a PEEP of 5 cm H2O or PEEP at LIP +1 cm H2O was applied. The LIP decreased with incremental filling of PFB to a minimum at 10 ml (p PFB shifts the LIP to the left, and that setting PEEP at LIP +1 cm H2O improves gas exchange at moderate to high doses of PFB.

  3. Effect of end-expiratory lung volume on upper airway collapsibility in sleeping men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, Samuel B; Patil, Susheel P; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R

    2010-10-01

    The relationship between changes in absolute end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and collapsibility has not been rigorously quantified. We hypothesized that pharyngeal collapsibility varies inversely with absolute lung volume in sleeping humans during 1) conventional and 2) isovolume measurements of passive critical pressure (Pcrit). Eighteen healthy subjects (11 male, 7 female) slept in a negative pressure ventilator for measurements of pharyngeal collapsibility (Pcrit) during non-rapid eye movement sleep. EELV was 1) allowed to vary with changes in nasal pressure for conventional Pcrit measurements and 2) controlled by maintaining a fixed pressure difference across the respiratory system (P(RS)) from the nose to the body surface for isovolume Pcrit measurements at elevated EELV (P(RS) = +10 cmH(2)O), reduced EELV (P(RS) = -5 cmH(2)O), and functional residual capacity (FRC; P(RS) = 0 cmH(2)O). In each condition, the absolute EELV was determined and the corresponding Pcrit was derived from upper airway pressure-flow relationships. In the entire group, Pcrit varied inversely with EELV (P cmH(2)O/l (P cmH(2)O exhibited greater reductions in EELV and correspondingly greater decreases in the FRC isovolume compared with the conventional Pcrit (P cmH(2)O/l (P cmH(2)O, P < 0.05), implying that the men had larger lungs and more collapsible airways than the women. The ΔPcrit/ΔEELV response was independent of sex, conventional Pcrit, body mass index, and neck, waist, and hip circumferences. We conclude that Pcrit varies inversely with absolute EELV, which may lead to 1) an underestimation of the magnitude of quantitative differences in Pcrit across the spectrum from health (negative Pcrit) to disease (positive Pcrit) and 2) increases in sleep apnea susceptibility in obesity.

  4. Pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome: positive end-expiratory pressure titration needs stress index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yingzi; Yang, Yi; Chen, Qiuhua; Liu, Songqiao; Liu, Ling; Pan, Chun; Yang, Congshan; Qiu, Haibo

    2013-11-01

    The heterogeneity of lung injury in pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may have contributed to the greater response of hyperinflated area with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). PEEP titrated by stress index can reduce the risk of alveolar hyperinflation in patients with pulmonary ARDS. The authors sought to investigate the effects of PEEP titrated by stress index on lung recruitment and protection after recruitment maneuver (RM) in pulmonary ARDS patients. Thirty patients with pulmonary ARDS were enrolled. After RM, PEEP was randomly set according to stress index, oxygenation, static pulmonary compliance (Cst), or lower inflection point (LIP) + 2 cmH2O strategies. Recruitment volume, gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and hemodynamic parameters were collected. PEEP titrated by stress index (15.1 ± 1.8 cmH2O) was similar to the levels titrated by oxygenation (14.5 ± 2.9 cmH2O), higher than that titrated by Cst (11.3 ± 2.5 cmH2O) and LIP (12.9 ± 1.6 cmH2O) (P stress index and oxygenation but higher than that titrated by Cst and LIP. Compared with baseline, lung compliance increased significantly when PEEP determined by Cst, but there was no difference of Cst in these four strategies. There was no influence of PEEP titration with the four strategies on hemodynamic parameters. PEEP titration by stress index might be more beneficial for pulmonary ARDS patients after RM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Myles D; Jinadasa, Sayuri P; Mueller, Ariel; Shaefi, Shahzad; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Hanafy, Khalid A; O'Gara, Brian P; Talmor, Daniel S

    2017-04-01

    Lung protective ventilation has not been evaluated in patients with brain injury. It is unclear whether applying positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) adversely affects intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). We aimed to evaluate the effect of PEEP on ICP and CPP in a large population of patients with acute brain injury and varying categories of acute lung injury, defined by PaO 2 /FiO 2 . Retrospective data were collected from 341 patients with severe acute brain injury admitted to the ICU between 2008 and 2015. These patients experienced a total of 28,644 paired PEEP and ICP observations. Demographic, hemodynamic, physiologic, and ventilator data at the time of the paired PEEP and ICP observations were recorded. In the adjusted analysis, a statistically significant relationship between PEEP and ICP and PEEP and CPP was found only among observations occurring during periods of severe lung injury. For every centimeter H 2 O increase in PEEP, there was a 0.31 mmHg increase in ICP (p = 0.04; 95 % CI [0.07, 0.54]) and a 0.85 mmHg decrease in CPP (p = 0.02; 95 % CI [-1.48, -0.22]). Our results suggest that PEEP can be applied safely in patients with acute brain injury as it does not have a clinically significant effect on ICP or CPP. Further prospective studies are required to assess the safety of applying a lung protective ventilation strategy in brain-injured patients with lung injury.

  6. A comprehensive breath plume model for disease transmission via expiratory aerosols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan K Halloran

    Full Text Available The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime in temperate regions represents a longstanding, unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at lower humidities and temperatures, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent work with a guinea pig model by Lowen et al. indicated that humidity and temperature do modulate airborne influenza virus transmission, and several investigators have interpreted the observed humidity dependence in terms of airborne virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects two key observations: the effect of ambient temperature on the viral growth kinetics within the animals, and the strong influence of the background airflow on transmission. Here we provide a comprehensive theoretical framework for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting "Gaussian breath plume" are calculated as functions of position, humidity, and temperature. The overall transmission probability is modeled with a combination of the time-dependent viral concentration in the infected animal and the probability of droplet inhalation by the exposed animal downstream. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the results of Lowen et al., without invoking airborne virus survivability. The results also suggest that, at least for guinea pigs, variation in viral kinetics within the infected animals is the dominant factor explaining the increased transmission probability observed at lower temperatures.

  7. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI in 345 patients decreased from 27.32±22.24 to 12.78±16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%. Random effects modeling mean difference (MD was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI in 247 patients decreased from 21.2±19.3 to 12.4±14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001. Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2±6.8% to 86.2±11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS M ± SD improved (359 patients from 9.9±5.3 to 7.4±5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent.

  8. Forced Oscillation Technique and Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Mochizuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most infants and preschool children are not able to voluntarily perform the physiological maneuvers required to complete the pulmonary function tests that are used in adults and older children. Recently, commercial devices using forced oscillation technique (FOT suitable for young children have become available. In devices with FOT, an oscillation pressure wave is generated by a loud speaker, is applied to the respiratory system, usually at the mouth, and the resulting pressure-flow relationship is analyzed in terms of impedance (Zrs. Zrs encompasses both resistance (Rrs and reactance (Xrs. Rrs is calculated from pressure and flow signals, and is a measure of central and peripheral airway caliber. Xrs is derived from the pressure in the phase with volume and is related to compliance (Crs and inertance (Irs. These parameters individually indicate the condition of the small and large airways in each patient and indirectly suggest the presence of airway inflammation. It is agreed that the clinical diagnostic capacity of FOT is comparable to that of spirometry. One of the advantages of FOT is that minimal cooperation of the patient is needed and no respiratory maneuvers are required. The use of FOT should be considered in patients in whom spirometry or other pulmonary function tests cannot be performed or in cases where the results of other tests appear to be unreliable. In addition, this approach is effective in assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Considering these qualities, FOT is a useful method to study pulmonary function in preschool children with asthma.

  9. Spirometry in Healthy Subjects: Do Technical Details of the Test Procedure Affect the Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipoli, Luciana; Martinez, Larissa; Donária, Leila; Probst, Vanessa Suziane; Moreira, Graciane Laender; Pitta, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Spirometry should follow strict quality criteria. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) recommends the use of a noseclip; however there are controversies about its need. ATS also indicates that tests should be done in the sitting position, but there are no recommendations neither about position of the upper limbs and lower limbs nor about who should hold the mouthpiece while performing the maneuvers: evaluated subject or evaluator. Objectives To compare noseclip use or not, different upper and lower limbs positions and who holds the mouthpiece, verifying if these technical details affect spirometric results in healthy adults. Methods One hundred and three healthy individuals (41 men; age: 47 [33–58] years; normal lung function: FEV1/FVC = 83±5, FEV1 = 94 [88–104]%predicted, FVC = 92 [84–102]%predicted) underwent a protocol consisting of four spirometric comparative analysis in the sitting position: 1) maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) with vs without noseclip; 2) FVC performed with vs without upper limbs support; 3) FVC performed with lower limbs crossed vs lower limbs in neutral position; 4) FVC, slow vital capacity and MVV comparing the evaluated subject holding the mouthpiece vs evaluator holding it. Results Different spirometric variables presented statistically significant difference (p<0.05) when analysing the four comparisons; however, none of them showed any variation larger than those considered as acceptable according to the ATS reproducibility criteria. Conclusions There was no relevant variation in spirometric results when analyzing technical details such as noseclip use during MVV, upper and lower limb positions and who holds the mouthpiece when performing the tests in healthy adults. PMID:25244437

  10. Exhaled nitric oxide: Not associated with asthma, symptoms, or spirometry in children with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robyn T; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J; Rosen, Carol L; Kirkby, Jane; DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    The significance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno) levels in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) is unclear, but increased levels can be associated with features of asthma and thus increased morbidity. We sought to determine factors associated with Feno and whether Feno levels are associated with increased rates of acute chest syndrome (ACS) and pain. All participants had SCA, were part of the prospective observational Sleep and Asthma Cohort study, and had the following assessments: Feno levels, spirometry, blood samples analyzed for hemoglobin, white blood cell counts, eosinophil counts and total serum IgE levels, questionnaires about child medical and family history, and review of medical records. The analytic sample included 131 children with SCA (median age, 11.2 years; age range, 6-18 years) followed for a mean of 16.2 years, including a mean of 5.1 years after baseline Feno data measurements. In multivariable analyses higher Feno levels were associated with ln(IgE) levels (P symptoms, baseline spirometric indices, or response to bronchodilator. Multivariable analyses identified that the incident rate of ACS was associated with ln(Feno) levels (P = .03), as well as male sex (P = .025), wheezing causing shortness of breath (P = .002), and ACS at less than 4 years of age (P symptoms, lung function measures, or prior sickle cell morbidity but were associated with markers of atopy and increased risk of future ACS events. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction of lung tumour position based on spirometry and on abdominal displacement: Accuracy and reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoisak, Jeremy D.P.; Sixel, Katharina E.; Tirona, Romeo; Cheung, Patrick C.F.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: A simulation investigating the accuracy and reproducibility of a tumour motion prediction model over clinical time frames is presented. The model is formed from surrogate and tumour motion measurements, and used to predict the future position of the tumour from surrogate measurements alone. Patients and methods: Data were acquired from five non-small cell lung cancer patients, on 3 days. Measurements of respiratory volume by spirometry and abdominal displacement by a real-time position tracking system were acquired simultaneously with X-ray fluoroscopy measurements of superior-inferior tumour displacement. A model of tumour motion was established and used to predict future tumour position, based on surrogate input data. The calculated position was compared against true tumour motion as seen on fluoroscopy. Three different imaging strategies, pre-treatment, pre-fraction and intrafractional imaging, were employed in establishing the fitting parameters of the prediction model. The impact of each imaging strategy upon accuracy and reproducibility was quantified. Results: When establishing the predictive model using pre-treatment imaging, four of five patients exhibited poor interfractional reproducibility for either surrogate in subsequent sessions. Simulating the formulation of the predictive model prior to each fraction resulted in improved interfractional reproducibility. The accuracy of the prediction model was only improved in one of five patients when intrafractional imaging was used. Conclusions: Employing a prediction model established from measurements acquired at planning resulted in localization errors. Pre-fractional imaging improved the accuracy and reproducibility of the prediction model. Intrafractional imaging was of less value, suggesting that the accuracy limit of a surrogate-based prediction model is reached with once-daily imaging

  12. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: Comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlée, Floor; Yzermans, C Joris; Krop, Esmeralda; Aalders, Bernadette; Rooijackers, Jos; Zock, Jan-Paul; van Dijk, Christel E; Maassen, Catharina B M; Schellevis, François; Heederik, Dick; Smit, Lidwien A M

    2017-01-01

    COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their level of agreement, and to compare associations between COPD-definitions and risk factors. COPD-prevalence in 1,793 adults from the general Dutch population (aged 18-70 years) was assessed based on self-reported data, Electronic Medical Records (EMR), and post-BD spirometry: using the FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal (LLN) and GOLD fixed cut-off (FEV1/FVC spirometry as a reference, sensitivity was calculated for self-reported and EMR-based COPD. Associations between COPD and known risk factors were assessed with logistic regression. Data were collected as part of the cross-sectional VGO study (Livestock Farming and Neighboring Residents' Health Study). The highest prevalence was found based on spirometry (GOLD: 10.9%, LLN: 5.9%), followed by self-report (4.6%) and EMR (2.9%). Self-reported or EMR-based COPD identified less than 30% of all COPD-cases based on spirometry. The direction of association between known risk factors and COPD was similar across the four definitions, however, magnitude and significance varied. Especially indicators of allergy were more strongly associated with self-reported COPD compared to the other definitions. COPD-prevalence varied depending on the used definition. A substantial number of subjects with spirometry-based COPD cannot be identified with questionnaires or medical records which can cause underestimation of COPD-prevalence. The influence of the different COPD-definitions on associations with known risk factors was limited.

  13. Effects of one-hour training course and spirometry on the ability of physicians to diagnose and treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shan; Qin, Li; Tanoue, Lynn; Hu, Anmei; Jia, Xiujie; Luo, Hong; Chen, Yan; Chen, Ping; Peng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In China, the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in persons 40 years of age or older is estimated at 8.2%, but this is likely a substantial underestimate. Eight secondary hospitals which didn't have spirometries were chosen randomly in Hunan province of central south China. Physician subjects at these hospitals underwent a one-hour training course on the Chinese COPD guidelines. Physicians answered questionnaires assessing their knowledge of the guidelines before and after the training session. The mean correct scores of questionnaires were compared before and after training. Four out of the eight hospitals were given access to spirometry. Eligible patient subjects underwent spirometry testing prior to the physician visit. After seeing the patient, physicians were asked to answer a questionnaire relating to the diagnosis and severity of COPD. Physicians were then given the results of the spirometry, and asked to answer the same questionnaire. Physicians' responses before and after receiving the spirometry results were compared. 225 physicians participated in the training session. 207 questionnaires were completed. Mean scores (out of 100) before and after the training were 53.1 ± 21.7 and 93.3 ± 9.8, respectively. 18 physicians and 307 patient subjects participated in the spirometry intervention. Based on spirometric results, the prevalence of COPD was 38.8%. Physicians correctly identified the presence of COPD without spirometric data in 85 cases (76.6%); this increased to 117 cases (97.4%) once spirometric data were available. Without spirometric data, physicians incorrectly diagnosed COPD in 38 patients; this decreased to 6 patients once spirometric data were available. Spirometric data also improved the ability of physicians to correctly grade COPD severity. Simple educational training can substantially improve physicians' knowledge relating to COPD. Spirometry combined with education improves the ability of physicians to diagnose COPD

  14. A Comparison between Venables Standardized Respiratory Questionnaire and Pre-Shift Spirometry in Screening of Occupational Asthma in a Steel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SJ Mirmohammadi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational asthma (OA is the most common occupational lung disease in developed countries. One of the causative agents is metal fume that may be encountered in steel industries. Screening for the OA is mainly performed by questionnaire but in our country spirometry is used more commonly. Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of the Venables standardized respiratory questionnaire and pre-shift spirometry as screening tools for OA. Method: In a cross-sectional study, we investigated 450 workers of a steel industry by the Venables standardized questionnaire. We also performed a pre-shift spirometry as the screening spirometry and a post-shift spirometry. A person with 10% drop in post-shift FEV1 compared with the pre-shift value was considered as asthmatic (our gold-standard. The results of the questionnaire and the pre-shift spirometry were then examined against the gold-standard test results. For each test, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Results: The overall prevalence of OA among our studied workers was 3.9% (95% CI: 1.9%–5.9%. The highest rate was seen in those working in catering (25% and welding (10% units. Pre-shift spirometry and the questionnaire had low sensitivity (42.9% and 28.6%, respectively and positive predictive values (16.7% and 3.6%, respectively; moderate specificity (92.4% and 71.6%, respectively and high negative predictive values (97.9% and 96.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Taking into account the ease of use of the questionnaire, it seems that it is more feasible to use questionnaire as the primary screening tool for the diagnosis of OA.

  15. Protective intraoperative ventilation with higher versus lower levels of positive end-expiratory pressure in obese patients (PROBESE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluth, T.; Teichmann, R.; Kiss, T.; Bobek, I.; Canet, J.; Cinnella, G.; de Baerdemaeker, L.; Gregoretti, C.; Hedenstierna, G.; Hemmes, S. N.; Hiesmayr, M.; Hollmann, M. W.; Jaber, S.; Laffey, J. G.; Licker, M. J.; Markstaller, K.; Matot, I.; Müller, G.; Mills, G. H.; Mulier, J. P.; Putensen, C.; Rossaint, R.; Schmitt, J.; Senturk, M.; Serpa Neto, A.; Severgnini, P.; Sprung, J.; Vidal Melo, M. F.; Wrigge, H.; Schultz, M. J.; Pelosi, P.; Gama de Abreu, M.; Güldner, Andreas; Huhle, Robert; Uhlig, Christopher; Vivona, Luigi; Bergamaschi, Alice; Rossaint, Rolf; Stevanovic, Ana; Treschan, Tanja; Schaefer, Maximilian; Kienbaum, Peter; Laufenberg-Feldmann, Rita; Bergmann, Lars; Ebner, Felix; Robitzky, Luisa; Mölders, Patrick; Unterberg, Matthias; Busch, Cornelius; Achilles, Marc; Menzen, Angelika; Freesemann, Harbert; Putensen, Christian; Machado, Humberto; Cavaleiro, Carla; Ferreira, Cristina; Pinho, Daniela; Carvalho, Marta; Pinho, Sílvia; Soares, Maria; Castro, Diogo Sousa; Abelha, Fernando; Rabico, Rui; Delphin, Ellise; Sprung, Juraj; Weingarten, Toby N.; Kellogg, Todd A.; Martin, Yvette N.; McKenzie, Travis J.; Brull, Sorin J.; Renew, J. Ross; Ramakrishna, Harish; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Balonov, Konstantin; Baig, Harris R.; Kacha, Aalok; Pedemonte, Juan C.; Altermatt, Fernando; Corvetto, Marcia A.; Paredes, Sebastian; Carmona, Javiera; Rolle, Augusto; Bos, Elke; Beurskens, Charlotte; Veering, B.; Zonneveldt, Harry; Boer, Christa; Godfried, Marc; Thiel, Bram; Kabon, Barbara; Reiterer, Christian; Canet, Jaume; Tolós, Raquel; Sendra, Mar; González, Miriam; Gómez, Noemí; Ferrando, Carlos; Socorro, Tania; Izquierdo, Ana; Soro, Marina; Granell Gil, Manuel; Hernández Cádiz, María José; Biosca Pérez, Elena; Suarez-de-la-Rica, Alejandro; Lopez-Martinez, Mercedes; Huercio, Iván; Maseda, Emilio; Yagüe, Julio; Cebrian Moreno, Alba; Rivas, Eva; Lopez-Baamonde, Manuel; Elgendy, Hamed; Sayedalahl, Mohamed; SIibai, Abdul Razak; Yavru, Aysen; Sivrikoz, Nukhet; Karadeniz, Meltem; Corman Dincer, Pelin; Ayanoglu, Hilmi Omer; Tore Altun, Gulbin; Kavas, Ayse Duygu; Dinc, Bora; Kuvaki, Bahar; Ozbilgin, Sule; Erdogan, Dilek; Koksal, Ceren; Abitagaglu, Suheyla; Aurilio, Caterina; Sansone, Pasquale; Pace, Caterina Maria; Donatiello, Valerio; Mattera, Silvana; Nazareno, Palange; Di Colandrea, Salvatore; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo Alberto; Ragazzi, Riccardo; Ciardo, Stefano; Gobbi, Luca; Severgnini, Paolo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Brugnoni, Elisa; Gratarola, Angelo; Micalizzi, Camilla; Simonassi, Francesca; Malerbi, Patrizia; Carboni, Adrea; Licker, Marc-Joseph; Dullenkopf, Alexander; Goettel, Nicolai; Nesek Adam, Visnja; Karaman Ilić, Maja; Klaric, Vlasta; Vitkovic, Bibiana; Milic, Morena; Miro, Zupcic; de Baerdemaeker, Luc; de Hert, Stefan; Heyse, Bjorn; van Limmen, Jurgen; van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Mertens, Els; Neyrinck, Arne; Mulier, Jan; Kahn, David; Godoroja, Daniela; Martin-Loeches, Martin; Vorotyntsev, Sergiy; Fronchko, Valentyna; Matot, Idit; Goren, Or; Zac, Lilach; Gaszynski, Thomasz; Laffey, Jon; Mills, Gary; Nalwaya, Pramod; Mac Gregor, Mark; Paddle, Jonathan; Balaji, Packianathaswamy; Rubulotta, Francesca; Adebesin, Afeez; Margarson, Mike; Davies, Simon; Rangarajan, Desikan; Newell, Christopher; Shosholcheva, Mirjana; Papaspyros, Fotios; Skandalou, Vasiliki; Dzurňáková, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) increase the morbidity and mortality of surgery in obese patients. High levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) with lung recruitment maneuvers may improve intraoperative respiratory function, but they can also compromise

  16. A quasi-3D compartmental multi-scale approach to detect and quantify diseased regional lung constriction using spirometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Ravishekar Ravi; Singh, Narender; Przekwas, Andrzej

    2018-02-27

    Spirometry is a widely used pulmonary function test to detect the airflow limitations associated with various obstructive lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and even obesity-related complications. These conditions arise due to the change in the airway resistance, alveolar compliance, and inductance values. Currently, zero-dimensional (0D) compartmental models are commonly used for calibrating these resistance, compliance, and inductance values, i.e., solving the inverse spirometry problem. However, 0D compartments cannot capture the flow physics or the spatial geometry effects, thereby generating a low fidelity prediction of the diseased lung. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models offer higher fidelity solutions but may be impractical for certain applications due to the duration of these simulations. Recently, a novel, fast-running and robust Quasi-3D (Q3D) wire model for simulating the airflow in the human lung airway was developed by CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC). This Q3D method preserved the 3D spatial nature of the airways and was favorably validated against CFD solutions. In the present study, the Q3D compartmental multi-scale combination is further improved to predict regional lung constriction of diseased lungs using spirometry data. The Q3D mesh is resolved up to the eighth lung airway generation. The remainder of the airways and the alveoli sections are modeled using a compartmental approach. The Q3D geometry is then split into different spatial sections and the resistance values in these regions are obtained using parameter inversion. Finally, the airway diameter values are then reduced to create the actual diseased lung model, corresponding to these resistance values. This diseased lung model can be used for patient-specific drug deposition predictions and the subsequent optimization of the orally inhaled drug products. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Asthma in pregnancy: association between the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and comparisons with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Georgia Véras; Leite, Débora F B; Rizzo, José A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible association between the assessment of clinical asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to perform comparisons with values of spirometry. Through this cross-sectional study, 103 pregnant women with asthma were assessed in the period from October 2010 to October 2013 in the asthma pregnancy clinic at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Questionnaires concerning the level of asthma control were administered using the Global Initiative for Asthma classification, the Asthma Control Test validated for asthmatic expectant mothers and spirometry; all three methods of assessing asthma control were performed during the same visit between the twenty-first and twenty-seventh weeks of pregnancy. There was a significant association between clinical asthma control assessment using the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification (pspirometry. This study shows that both the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and the Asthma Control Test can be used for asthmatic expectant mothers to assess the clinical control of asthma, especially at the end of the second trimester, which is assumed to be the period of worsening asthma exacerbations during pregnancy. We highlight the importance of the Asthma Control Test as a subjective instrument with easy application, easy interpretation and good reproducibility that does not require spirometry to assess the level of asthma control and can be used in the primary care of asthmatic expectant mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The recent multi-ethnic global lung initiative 2012 (GLI2012) reference values don't reflect contemporary adult's North African spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, Helmi; El Attar, Mohamed Nour; Hadj Mabrouk, Khaoula; Ben Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Abdelghani, Ahmed; Bousarssar, Mohamed; Limam, Khélifa; Maatoug, Chiraz; Bouslah, Hmida; Charrada, Ameur; Rouatbi, Sonia

    2013-12-01

    The applicability of the recent multi-ethnic reference equations derived by the ERS Global Lung Initiative (ERS/GLI) in interpreting spirometry data in North African adult subjects has not been studied. To ascertain how well the recent ERS/GLI reference equations fit contemporary adult Tunisian spirometric data. Spirometric data were recorded from 1192 consecutive spirometry procedures in adults aged 18-60 years. Reference values and lower limits of normality (LLN) were calculated using the local and the ERS/GLI reference equations. Applied definitions: large airway obstructive ventilatory defect (LAOVD): FEV1/FVC contemporary Tunisian spirometry. Using Tunisian reference equations, 71.31%, 6.71% and 19.04% of spirometry records were interpreted as normal, and as having, LAOVD and TRVD, respectively. Using the ERS/GLI reference equations, these figures were respectively, 85.82%, 4.19% and 8.39%. The mean ± SD Z-scores for the contemporary healthy North African subject's data were -0.55 ± 0.87 for FEV1, -0.62 ± 0.86 for FVC and 0.10 ± 0.73 for FEV1/FVC. The present study don't recommend the use of the recent ERS/GLI reference equations to interpret spirometry in North African adult population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Smoking cessation in COPD causes a transient improvement in spirometry and decreases micronodules on high-resolution CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhariwal, Jaideep; Tennant, Rachel C; Hansell, David M; Westwick, John; Walker, Christoph; Ward, Simon P; Pride, Neil; Barnes, Peter J; Kon, Onn Min; Hansel, Trevor T

    2014-05-01

    Smoking cessation is of major importance for all smokers; however, in patients with COPD, little information exists on how smoking cessation influences lung function and high-resolution CT (HRCT) scan appearances. In this single-center study, we performed screening spirometry in a group of heavy smokers aged 40 to 80 years (N = 358). We then studied the effects of smoking cessation in two groups of selected subjects: smokers with COPD (n = 38) and smokers with normal spirometry (n = 55). In parallel to subjects undergoing smoking cessation, we studied a control group of nonsmokers (n = 19). Subjects with COPD who quit smoking had a marked, but transient improvement in FEV1 at 6 weeks (184 mL, n = 17, P < .01) that was still present at 12 weeks (81 mL, n = 17, P < .05) and only partially maintained at 1 year. In contrast, we saw improvement in the transfer factor of lung for carbon monoxide at 6 weeks in both subjects with COPD who quit smoking (0.47 mmol/min/kPa, n = 17, P < .01) and subjects who quit smoking with normal spirometry (0.40 mmol/min/kPa, n = 35, P < .01). An upper-zone single HRCT image slice reliably identified emphysema at baseline in 74% of smokers with COPD (28 of 38) and 29% of healthy smokers (16 of 55). Smoking cessation had no significant effect on the appearances of emphysema but decreased the presence of micronodules on HRCT imaging. Cigarette smoking causes extensive lung function and HRCT image abnormalities, even in patients with normal spirometry. Smoking cessation has differential effects on lung function (FEV1 and gas transfer) and features on HRCT images (emphysema and micronodules). Cessation of smoking in patients with COPD causes a transient improvement in FEV1 and decreases the presence of micronodules, offering an opportunity for concomitant therapy during smoking cessation to augment these effects. Smoking cessation at the earliest possible opportunity is vital to minimize permanent damage to the lungs.

  20. [Clinical research of using optimal compliance to determine positive end-expiratory pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Feng, Quan-sheng; Lian, Fu; Shao, Xin-hua; Li, Zhi-bo; Wang, Zhi-yong; Li, Jun

    2012-07-01

    To observe the availability and security of optimal compliance strategy to titrate the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), compared with quasi-static pressure-volume curve (P-V curve) traced by low-flow method. Fourteen patients received mechanical ventilation with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) of Tianjin Third Central Hospital from November 2009 to December 2010 were divided into two groups(n = 7). The quasi-static P-V curve method and the optimal compliance titration were used to set the optimal PEEP respectively, repeated 3 times in a row. The optimal PEEP and the consistency of repeated experiments were compared between groups. The hemodynamic parameters, oxygenation index (OI), lung compliance (C), cytokines and pulmonary surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) concentration in plasma before and 2, 4, and 6 hours after the experiment were observed in each group. (1) There were no significant differences in gender, age and severity of disease between two groups. (2)The optimal PEEP [cm H(2)O, 1 cm H(2)O=0.098 kPa] had no significant difference between quasi-static P-V curve method group and the optimal compliance titration group (11.53 ± 2.07 vs. 10.57 ± 0.87, P>0.05). The consistency of repeated experiments in quasi-static P-V curve method group was poor, the slope of the quasi-static P-V curve in repeated experiments showed downward tendency. The optimal PEEP was increasing in each measure. There was significant difference between the first and the third time (10.00 ± 1.58 vs. 12.80 ± 1.92, P vs. 93.71 ± 5.38, temperature: 38.05 ± 0.73 vs. 36.99 ± 1.02, IL-6: 144.84 ± 23.89 vs. 94.73 ± 5.91, TNF-α: 151.46 ± 46.00 vs. 89.86 ± 13.13, SP-D: 33.65 ± 8.66 vs. 16.63 ± 5.61, MAP: 85.47 ± 9.24 vs. 102.43 ± 8.38, CCI: 3.00 ± 0.48 vs. 3.81 ± 0.81, OI: 62.00 ± 21.45 vs. 103.40 ± 37.27, C: 32.10 ± 2.92 vs. 49.57 ± 7.18, all P safety and usability.