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Sample records for spiritual moral emotional

  1. Moral Emotions and Morals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Orsi Portalo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available My aim in this paper is to explore the ambivalent role played by the so called moral emotions in moral thinking, overall when the concept of responsibility is concerned. In the first part of this paper I show how moral emotions such as guilt and shame can appear in circumstances that are not under the agent’s control, and therefore the agent could be though of free or responsibility for them. By contrast, in the second part of this essay I put how the absence of moral emotions, or their twisted development, makes as well the flourishing of individual morality impossible.

  2. Emotion and moral judgment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avramova, Y.R.; Inbar, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychology and cognitive science has consistently demonstrated the importance of emotion in a wide range of everyday judgments, including moral judgment. Most current accounts of moral judgment hold that emotion plays an important role, but the nature and extent of this role are still

  3. Moral Appearances: Emotions, Robots, and Human Morality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Can we build ‘moral robots’? If morality depends on emotions, the answer seems negative. Current robots do not meet standard necessary conditions for having emotions: they lack consciousness, mental states, and feelings. Moreover, it is not even clear how we might ever establish whether robots

  4. Crime fiction and moral emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2011-01-01

    typology of moral systems and how different stages relate to different social systems. Further, a functional description of the various moral emotions is used to characterize crime fictions. The use of moral emotions in crime fiction is exemplified in Oplev’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009), angry...

  5. Spiritual and Moral Education: Where Does Responsibility Lie?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Contends that teachers have an essential part to play in the moral and spiritual education of students. Discusses a white paper on moral education issued by the British government. Concludes that there is no conflict between spiritual and moral education and teaching the knowledge and skills necessary for employment. (CFR)

  6. Emotions and the moral order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend; Musaeus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    to demonstrate that specific moral orders are associated with specific forms of emotionality. If properly cultivated, moral emotions become “orientation guides” that enable persons to respond adequately to what happens in their local, moral worlds, and, as researchers, we can only grasp what such emotions......In this paper, we follow Averill, who tells us that emotions reflect “the thought of an epoch, the secret of a civilization”. In this light, to understand the meaning of an emotion is to understand the relevant aspects of the sociocultural systems of which the emotion is a part. We argue...... that a number of the most central emotions in human lives are identified with reference to the moral order of the sociocultural system rather than with reference to physiological conditions or body states. We present a normative theory of emotions and refer to research on “emotionologies” of different cultures...

  7. Educating Moral Emotions or Moral Selves: A False Dichotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2010-01-01

    In the post-Kohlbergian era of moral education, a "moral gap" has been identified between moral cognition and moral action. Contemporary moral psychologists lock horns over how this gap might be bridged. The two main contenders for such bridge-building are moral emotions and moral selves. I explore these two options from an Aristotelian…

  8. Crime fiction and moral emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2011-01-01

    The article first discusses how crime fiction centrally activates moral emotions related to feelings of social trust and social conflicts. The article uses psychological theory to analyse audio-visual fiction, and it takes an evolutionary stance in relation to morality; within film studies......, and especially within literary studies, the inspiration from evolutionary studies has been strong in the last decade. Humans are adapted to group living, and emotions linked to fairness have an innate basis. The article then shows how different crime stories activate different stages in Kohlberg’s functional...... typology of moral systems and how different stages relate to different social systems. Further, a functional description of the various moral emotions is used to characterize crime fictions. The use of moral emotions in crime fiction is exemplified in Oplev’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009), angry...

  9. Psychiatry, religion, positive emotions and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, George E

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes that eight positive emotions: awe, love/attachment, trust/faith, compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, joy and hope constitute what we mean by spirituality. These emotions have been grossly ignored by psychiatry. The two sciences that I shall employ to demonstrate this definition of spirituality will be ethology and neuroscience. They are both very new. I will argue that spirituality is not about ideas, sacred texts and theology. Rather, spirituality is all about emotion and social connection that are more dependent on the limbic system than the cortex. Specific religions, for all their limitations, are often the portal through which positive emotions are brought into conscious attention. Neither Freud nor psychiatric textbooks ever mention emotions like joy and gratitude. Hymns and psalms give these emotions pride of place. Our whole concept of psychotherapy might change, if clinicians set about enhancing positive emotions, rather than focusing only on the negative ones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Children's Moral Emotions and Moral Cognition: Towards an Integrative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Latzko, Brigitte

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a brief introduction to the developmental and educational literature linking children's moral emotions to cognitive moral development. A central premise of the chapter is that an integrative developmental perspective on moral emotions and moral cognition provides an important conceptual framework for understanding children's…

  11. Testing Moral Foundation Theory: Are Specific Moral Emotions Elicited by Specific Moral Transgressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmann, Helen; Hess, Ursula

    2018-01-01

    Moral foundation theory posits that specific moral transgressions elicit specific moral emotions. To test this claim, participants (N = 195) were asked to rate their emotions in response to moral violation vignettes. We found that compassion and disgust were associated with care and purity respectively as predicted by moral foundation theory.…

  12. Emotion and Morality in Psychopathy and Paraphilias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harenski, Carla L.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the role of emotion in moral judgment has been an active area of investigation and debate. Here we comment on this topic by examining the interaction between emotion and moral judgment in certain psychopathological groups that are characterized by abnormalities in emotion processing, such as psychopaths and sexual offenders with paraphilic disorders. PMID:24899928

  13. The Everyday Moral Judge – Autobiographical Recollections of Moral Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscharaktschiew, Nadine; Schindler, Rose; Schulz, Katrin; Rudolph, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Moral emotions are typically elicited in everyday social interactions and regulate social behavior. Previous research in the field of attribution theory identified ought (the moral standard of a given situation or intended goal), goal-attainment (a goal can be attained vs. not attained) and effort (high vs. low effort expenditure) as cognitive antecedents of moral emotions. In contrast to earlier studies, mainly relying on thought experiments, we investigated autobiographical recollections of N = 312 participants by means of an online study. We analyzed a diverse range of moral emotions, i.e., admiration, anger, contempt, indignation, pride, respect, schadenfreude, and sympathy, by using a mixed-method approach. Qualitative and quantitative methods clearly corroborate the important role of ought, goal-attainment, and effort as eliciting conditions of moral emotions. Furthermore, we built categorical systems based on our participants’ descriptions of real-life situations, allowing for more fine-grained distinctions between seemingly similar moral emotions. We thus identify additional prerequisites explaining more subtle differences between moral emotion clusters as they emerge from our analyses (i.e., cluster 1: admiration, pride, and respect; cluster 2: anger, contempt, and indignation; cluster 3: schadenfreude and sympathy). Results are discussed in the light of attributional theories of moral emotions, and implications for future research are derived. PMID:27977699

  14. The Everyday Moral Judge - Autobiographical Recollections of Moral Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, André; Tscharaktschiew, Nadine; Schindler, Rose; Schulz, Katrin; Rudolph, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Moral emotions are typically elicited in everyday social interactions and regulate social behavior. Previous research in the field of attribution theory identified ought (the moral standard of a given situation or intended goal), goal-attainment (a goal can be attained vs. not attained) and effort (high vs. low effort expenditure) as cognitive antecedents of moral emotions. In contrast to earlier studies, mainly relying on thought experiments, we investigated autobiographical recollections of N = 312 participants by means of an online study. We analyzed a diverse range of moral emotions, i.e., admiration, anger, contempt, indignation, pride, respect, schadenfreude, and sympathy, by using a mixed-method approach. Qualitative and quantitative methods clearly corroborate the important role of ought, goal-attainment, and effort as eliciting conditions of moral emotions. Furthermore, we built categorical systems based on our participants' descriptions of real-life situations, allowing for more fine-grained distinctions between seemingly similar moral emotions. We thus identify additional prerequisites explaining more subtle differences between moral emotion clusters as they emerge from our analyses (i.e., cluster 1: admiration, pride, and respect; cluster 2: anger, contempt, and indignation; cluster 3: schadenfreude and sympathy). Results are discussed in the light of attributional theories of moral emotions, and implications for future research are derived.

  15. The Everyday Moral Judge - Autobiographical Recollections of Moral Emotions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Körner

    Full Text Available Moral emotions are typically elicited in everyday social interactions and regulate social behavior. Previous research in the field of attribution theory identified ought (the moral standard of a given situation or intended goal, goal-attainment (a goal can be attained vs. not attained and effort (high vs. low effort expenditure as cognitive antecedents of moral emotions. In contrast to earlier studies, mainly relying on thought experiments, we investigated autobiographical recollections of N = 312 participants by means of an online study. We analyzed a diverse range of moral emotions, i.e., admiration, anger, contempt, indignation, pride, respect, schadenfreude, and sympathy, by using a mixed-method approach. Qualitative and quantitative methods clearly corroborate the important role of ought, goal-attainment, and effort as eliciting conditions of moral emotions. Furthermore, we built categorical systems based on our participants' descriptions of real-life situations, allowing for more fine-grained distinctions between seemingly similar moral emotions. We thus identify additional prerequisites explaining more subtle differences between moral emotion clusters as they emerge from our analyses (i.e., cluster 1: admiration, pride, and respect; cluster 2: anger, contempt, and indignation; cluster 3: schadenfreude and sympathy. Results are discussed in the light of attributional theories of moral emotions, and implications for future research are derived.

  16. The emotional foundations of high moral intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez, Darcia

    2010-01-01

    Moral intelligence is grounded in emotion and reason. Neuroscientific and clinical research illustrate how early life co-regulation with caregivers influences emotion, cognition, and moral character. Triune ethics theory (Narvaez, 2008) integrates neuroscientific, evolutionary, and developmental findings to explain differences in moral functioning, identifying security, engagement, and imagination ethics that can be dispositionally fostered by experience during sensitive periods, but also situationally triggered. Mature moral functioning relies on the integration of emotion, intuition, and reasoning, which come together in adaptive ethical expertise. Moral expertise can be cultivated in organizations using the integrative ethical education model. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The role of emotions for moral judgments depends on the type of emotion and moral scenario.

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    Ugazio, Giuseppe; Lamm, Claus; Singer, Tania

    2012-06-01

    Emotions seem to play a critical role in moral judgment. However, the way in which emotions exert their influence on moral judgments is still poorly understood. This study proposes a novel theoretical approach suggesting that emotions influence moral judgments based on their motivational dimension. We tested the effects of two types of induced emotions with equal valence but with different motivational implications (anger and disgust), and four types of moral scenarios (disgust-related, impersonal, personal, and beliefs) on moral judgments. We hypothesized and found that approach motivation associated with anger would make moral judgments more permissible, while disgust, associated with withdrawal motivation, would make them less permissible. Moreover, these effects varied as a function of the type of scenario: the induced emotions only affected moral judgments concerning impersonal and personal scenarios, while we observed no effects for the other scenarios. These findings suggest that emotions can play an important role in moral judgment, but that their specific effects depend upon the type of emotion induced. Furthermore, induced emotion effects were more prevalent for moral decisions in personal and impersonal scenarios, possibly because these require the performance of an action rather than making an abstract judgment. We conclude that the effects of induced emotions on moral judgments can be predicted by taking their motivational dimension into account. This finding has important implications for moral psychology, as it points toward a previously overlooked mechanism linking emotions to moral judgments.

  18. The Emotional Foundations of High Moral Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez, Darcia

    2010-01-01

    Moral intelligence is grounded in emotion and reason. Neuroscientific and clinical research illustrate how early life co-regulation with caregivers influences emotion, cognition, and moral character. Triune ethics theory (Narvaez, 2008) integrates neuroscientific, evolutionary, and developmental findings to explain differences in moral…

  19. The rise of moral emotions in neuropsychiatry.

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    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Clinical psychopathology has largely ignored the developments in the field of social neuroscience. The so-called moral emotions are a group of affective experiences thought to promote cooperation, group cohesion, and reorganization. In this review, we: (i) briefly describe a provisional taxonomy of a limited set of moral emotions and their neural underpinnings; and (ii) discuss how disgust, guilt, anger/indignation, and shame/embarrassment can be conceptualized as key affective experiences in different neuropsychiatric disorders. Based on a concise review of the literature linking moral emotions, psychopathology, and neuropsychiatry, we have devised a simple and preliminary scheme where we conjecture how specific moral emotions can be implicated in some categories of DSM-5 diagnoses, potentially helping to bridge psychopathology and neurobiologically plausible variables, in line with the Research Domain Criteria initiative. We hope this stimulates new empirical work exploring how moral emotional changes and their underlying neurobiology can help elucidating the neural underpinnings of mental disorders.

  20. Emotional Eating and Spiritual Well-Being: A Possible Connection?

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    Hawks, Steven R.; Goudy, Marylynn B.; Gast, Julie A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to evaluate the relationship between emotional eating and spiritual well-being. It was found that among college women lower levels of spiritual well-being correlated with higher levels of emotional eating (r = -0.22, p = 0.0015). In other studies emotional eating has been found to contribute to higher…

  1. Incidental emotions in moral dilemmas: the influence of emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Raluca D; Miu, Andrei C

    2015-01-01

    Recent theories have argued that emotions play a central role in moral decision-making and suggested that emotion regulation may be crucial in reducing emotion-linked biases. The present studies focused on the influence of emotional experience and individual differences in emotion regulation on moral choice in dilemmas that pit harming another person against social welfare. During these "harm to save" moral dilemmas, participants experienced mostly fear and sadness but also other emotions such as compassion, guilt, anger, disgust, regret and contempt (Study 1). Fear and disgust were more frequently reported when participants made deontological choices, whereas regret was more frequently reported when participants made utilitarian choices. In addition, habitual reappraisal negatively predicted deontological choices, and this effect was significantly carried through emotional arousal (Study 2). Individual differences in the habitual use of other emotion regulation strategies (i.e., acceptance, rumination and catastrophising) did not influence moral choice. The results of the present studies indicate that negative emotions are commonly experienced during "harm to save" moral dilemmas, and they are associated with a deontological bias. By efficiently reducing emotional arousal, reappraisal can attenuate the emotion-linked deontological bias in moral choice.

  2. Moral and spiritual education of the youth in the heritage of N. Pirigov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorozhbit V.V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analyze of aims, content and forms of moral and spiritual education of the youth in N. Pirogov's pedagogical texts. It is stated that the ideal of educator the scientist discovered in the sincere person, who is ready for duty for the motherland, is self confident, sees the freedom as a basic moral imperative. As a means of moral and spiritual education the scientist pointed out the example of educator, pedagogue, tutor. The content of moral and spiritual education was seen in a unity of humanistic and scientific courses. The main form is self knowledge. The condition of the moral and spiritual bringing up is inspiration. It is stated that the success of moral and spiritual bringing up depends on the educator's ability to study everyday life and aspiration of the youth.

  3. Positive emotions, spirituality and the practice of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, George E

    2008-01-01

    THIS PAPER PROPOSES THAT EIGHT POSITIVE EMOTIONS: awe, love (attachment), trust (faith), compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, joy and hope constitute what we mean by spirituality. These emotions have been grossly ignored by psychiatry. The two sciences that I shall employ to demonstrate this definition of spirituality will be ethology and neuroscience. They are both very new. I will argue that spirituality is not about ideas, sacred texts and theology; rather, spirituality is all about emotion and social connection.Specific religions, for all their limitations, are often the portal through which positive emotions are brought into conscious attention. Neither Freud nor psychiatric textbooks ever mention emotions like joy and gratitude. Hymns and psalms give these emotions pride of place. Our whole concept of psychotherapy might change if clinicians set about enhancing positive emotions rather than focusing only on negative emotions.

  4. Moral dilemmas and moral principles: when emotion and cognition unite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrinati, Andrea; Lotto, Lorella; Sarlo, Michela; Palomba, Daniela; Rumiati, Rino

    2013-01-01

    Traditional studies on moral judgement used resolutions of moral dilemmas that were framed in terms of acceptability of the consequentialist action promoting a greater good, thus overlooking the deontological implications (choices cannot be justified by their consequences). Recently, some authors have suggested a parallelism between automatic, unreflective emotional responses and deontological moral judgements. In this study, we developed a novel experimental paradigm in which participants were required to choose between two resolutions of a moral dilemma (consequentialist and deontological). To assess whether emotions are engaged in each of the two resolutions, we asked participants to evaluate their emotional experience through the ratings of valence and arousal. Results showed that emotion is involved not only in deontological but also in consequentialist resolutions. Moreover, response times pointed out a different interplay between emotion and cognition in determining a conflict in the dilemma's resolution. In particular, when people were faced with trolley-like dilemmas we found that decisions leading to deontological resolutions were slower than decisions leading to consequentialist resolutions. We propose that this finding reflects the special (but not accepted) permission provided by the doctrine of the double effect for incidentally causing death for the sake of a good end.

  5. Possibilities of Extracurricular Activities in the Student's Spiritual and Moral Formation

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    Sadykova, Saule A.; Yergazina, Aliya A.; Yeshpanov, Vladimir S.; Korvyakov, Valeriy A.; Aitzhanova, Akmaral B.

    2016-01-01

    With the purpose of substantiating pedagogical terms of the student's spiritually-moral becoming it is necessary to expose possibilities of extracurricular activities during this process. Its intrinsic characteristics are described as a factor of the student's spiritually-moral becoming. The main idea of the article is to reveal possibilities of…

  6. Active Teaching Methods: Personal Experience of Integrating Spiritual and Moral Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Tengku Sarina Aini Tengku; Yusoff, Yusmini Md

    2014-01-01

    Islamic education has always recognized spiritual and moral values as significant elements in developing a "balanced" human being. One way of demonstrating spiritual and moral concepts is through effective teaching methods that integrate and forefront these values. This article offers an investigation of how the authors' teaching…

  7. Spirituality and negative emotions in individuals with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Becker, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) experience disease-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anger. Spirituality may be helpful to cope with these negative emotions. Research findings on the role of spirituality in dealing with negative emotions are inconsistent. In this study, we

  8. Comparing spiritual intelligence and emotional expressiveness in psychosomatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedeh Norouzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The most important issues of psychology is psychosomatic disease. This study aimed to compare spiritual intelligence and emotional expression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, coronary heart disease and asthma. This research was a post-event descriptive study. The statistical population included patients with coronary heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome and asthma that attended Imam Khomeini hospital, Tehran. The participants consisted of 150 participants (86 women, 64 men with irritable bowel syndrome (n=50, coronary heart disease (n=50 and asthma (n=50. They answered King and Emmons’ emotional expressiveness questionnaire and King’s spiritual intelligence questionnaire. The results showed a significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and emotional expressiveness subscales and a low level of spiritual intelligence and emotional expressiveness in all three groups of patients. Comparing the three groups showed that spiritual intelligence and emotional expression were low in all of them and coronary heart disease was the lowest in three group of patient.

  9. Moral Injury and Definitional Clarity: Betrayal, Spirituality and the Role of Chaplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Timothy J; Carey, Lindsay B

    2017-08-01

    This article explores the developing definition of moral injury within the current key literature. Building on the previous literature regarding 'Moral Injury, Spiritual Care and the role of Chaplains' (Carey et al. in JORH 55(4):1218-1245, 2016b. doi: 10.1007/s10943-016-0231-x ), this article notes the complexity that has developed due to definitional variations regarding moral injury-particularly with respect to the concepts of 'betrayal' and 'spirituality'. Given the increasing recognition of moral injury and noting the relevance and importance of utilizing a bio-psycho-social-spiritual model, this article argues that betrayal and spirituality should be core components for understanding, defining and addressing moral injury. It also supports the role of chaplains being involved in the holistic care and rehabilitation of those affected by moral injury.

  10. Rationale for Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy for Moral Injury in Active Duty Military and Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Harold G; Boucher, Nathan A; Oliver, Rev John P; Youssef, Nagy; Mooney, Scott R; Currier, Joseph M; Pearce, Michelle

    2017-02-01

    Wartime experiences have long been known to cause ethical conflict, guilt, self-condemnation, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, lack of meaning and purpose, and spiritual struggles. "Moral injury" (MI) (also sometimes called "inner conflict") is the term used to capture this emotional, cognitive, and behavioral state. In this article, we provide rationale for developing and testing Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy, a version of standard cognitive processing therapy for the treatment of MI in active duty and veteran service members (SMs) with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms who are spiritual or religious (S/R). Many SMs have S/R beliefs that could increase vulnerability to MI. Because the injury is to deeply held moral standards and ethical values and often adversely affects spiritual beliefs and worldview, we believe that those who are S/R will respond more favorably to a therapy that directly targets this injury from a spiritually oriented perspective. An evidence-based treatment for MI in posttraumatic stress disorder that not only respects but also utilizes SMs' spiritual beliefs/behaviors may open the door to treatment for many S/R military personnel.

  11. Emotions and the moral order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend; Musaeus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we follow Averill, who tells us that emotions reflect “the thought of an epoch, the secret of a civilization”. In this light, to understand the meaning of an emotion is to understand the relevant aspects of the sociocultural systems of which the emotion is a part. We argue that a n...

  12. SOCIOCULTURAL ACTIVITY YOUTH CENTERS: THE SPIRITUAL AND MORAL CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Petrovna Shtumpf

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The reality of life today is set the challenge and create the preconditions for youth associations in the diverse groups and movements. Such unity is a unifying factor in shaping the collective consciousness of the group, the basic concepts of the spiritual and moral values of shared responsibility on the individual, group and societal levels. In this work the motives of familiarizing young people to the activities of such organizations, the specifics of the youth socialization issues of leadership in them. Peculiarities of organizational core movement – the youth center, its structural composition, mechanism of operation, providing the main areas of work - organizational, methodical and information. Is proposed the collection practices, subjects, activities implemented in the work of youth organizations. We discuss the possible risks related to the status of the leader and worker center, with a possible negative impact of group on the individual participant. Attention is drawn to the importance of personal competences of worker of youth centers.

  13. Workplace Spirituality, Computer Self-Efficacy And Emotional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There should therefore, be an ongoing facilitation of self-development for lecturers through opportunities for computer skills acquisition, role identification and role performance to manage emotional labour and the cold fact that spirituality is a key player in human functioning. Keywords: Workplace Spirituality, Computer ...

  14. The Shiver-Shimmer Factor: Musical Spirituality, Emotion, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Deanne

    2010-01-01

    This article offers one approach to exploring the question of in what sense music educators can speak of music and its moving power as spiritual by inquiring into what might count as a "musical spiritual experience" in emotional terms. The essay's analytic framework employs the distinction between two related concepts which I call the "shiver" and…

  15. Emotions and clinical ethics support. A moral inquiry into emotions in moral case deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molewijk, Bert; Kleinlugtenbelt, Dick; Pugh, Scott M; Widdershoven, Guy

    2011-12-01

    Emotions play an important part in moral life. Within clinical ethics support (CES), one should take into account the crucial role of emotions in moral cases in clinical practice. In this paper, we present an Aristotelian approach to emotions. We argue that CES can help participants deal with emotions by fostering a joint process of investigation of the role of emotions in a case. This investigation goes beyond empathy with and moral judgment of the emotions of the case presenter. In a moral case deliberation, the participants are invited to place themselves in the position of the case presenter and to investigate their own emotions in the situation. It is about critically assessing the facts in the case that cause the emotion and the related (moral) thoughts that accompany the emotion. It is also about finding the right emotion in a given situation and finding the right balance in dealing with that emotion. These steps in the moral inquiry give rise to group learning. It is a process of becoming open towards the perspectives of others, leading to new insights into what is an appropriate emotion in the specific situation. We show how this approach works in moral case deliberation. A physician presents a situation in which he is faced with a pregnant woman who is about to deliver multiple extremely premature infants at the threshold of viability. The moral deliberation of the case and the emotions therein leads to the participants' conclusion that "compassion" is a more adequate emotion than "sadness". The emotion "sadness" is pointed towards the tragedy that is happening to the woman. The emotion "compassion" is pointed towards the woman; it combines consideration and professional responsibility. Through the shift towards compassion, participants experienced more creativity and freedom to deal with the sad situation and to support the woman. The paper ends with an analysis and reflection on the deliberation process. In the conclusion we argue for more attention to

  16. Moral emotions, conscience, and cognitive dissonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breslavs, Gershon M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the central topics in the studies of O. K. Tikhomirov and his collaborators was the link between cognitive and emotional processes. It is important not only how emotions are involved in the process of the productive performance of thinking tasks but also how cognitive processes mediate the involvement of the emotions in the regulation of activity. The efficacy of this regulation is represented through goal achievement and also through the correction of one’s actions in the case of wrongdoing. Reformation of one’s errors is the best way to improve one’s abilities and skills. In moral philosophy the central instance of this reformation is conscience, which ensures positive or negative self-appraisal of one’s own and others’ actions. Unfortunately, in psychology this concept remains unclear. The goal of this article is to clarify it in the context of the contemporary psychology of emotion. Studies of emotions have shown the significance of appraisal in determining particular feelings. The special role of moral emotions, mainly guilt and shame, in the self-correction of one’s actions is emphasized. According to this model, guilt and shame in particular can represent twinges of conscience in the mind because the cognitive dissonance between our (or others’ actions and values shapes the basis of all these phenomena.

  17. Anthropological Methods of Formation of University Students' Spiritual and Moral Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanov, Rashad A.; Nikonova, Elina I.; Gurbanov, Ramin A.; Svechnikova, Natalia V.; Tumarov, Konstantin B.; Marin, Evgeniy M.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is reasoned by the increasing complexity of life activity in modern society, which results in distortion of the moral and value criteria and norms. The purpose of the article is to reveal anthropological methods of formation of university students' spiritual and moral culture. The leading approach to the study is the…

  18. Spiritual and Moral Friendships: How Campuses Can Encourage a Search for Meaning and Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushok, Frank, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Helping students understand and cultivate moral and spiritual friends is perhaps one of the most important gifts a college or university can give a student. Having meaningful relationships contributes significant energy to students' inner lives--their values, moral commitments, and self-understandings. The topic of friendship, and all that it…

  19. Modern tendencies and problems of the theory of spiritual-moral processes management in higher school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Sidanich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article were analyzed the modern tendencies and problems of the theory of spiritual-moral processes management in the higher school. There were defined the node tasks of reformation of higher education: ensuring its quality, construction of effective educational system of the higher school institutions with effective economy and management. There was characterized the problem of ensuring axiological direction of spiritual-humanitarian component of educational process in the system of higher education. There were defined priorities of national interests in spiritual-moral education of junior generation in the state educational activity: national self-consciousness, spiritual-cultural unity of nation, patriotism, humanism, tolerance, responsibility.There was analyzed the system of higher education in the aspect of interaction of spiritual and secular components in coordinates of moral sanitation and spiritual enlightenment of nation, elaboration of democratic principles of society and construction of the modern theory of spiritual-moral processes management in higher school.There were defined the new directions of the theory of spiritual-moral processes management in higher school in the aspect of development of innovations and commercialization, attraction of employers to collaboration with scientists in separate work groups for creation of the new educational programs and modernization of existing ones, mentor support and training of students for job placement and development of enterprising skills and also for support of the programs of probation or practical participation of students in the “real social projects”.There were characterized prospects of research in the aspect of elaboration of the main functions that must establish the main claims to production tasks in professional activity of holder of the master’s degree on speciality “Christian pedagogics in the high education”

  20. Moral and Spiritual Aspects of Counseling: Recent Developments in the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Fatima Jafari

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at exploring the moral and spiritual dimension of counseling. Since professional counseling has developed in the West, cultural peculiarities and individualistic orientation of the Occident permeate the profession. Recently a surge of interest in spirituality and religion has been noted with some focused treatment on a new approach of counseling. The new approach suggests that spirituality in life is central to the individual, family, and community. Therapists are increasingly examining the relationship between spirituality and general psychological wellness. Both secular and religious professionals are recognizing the paradigm shift from illness to wellness and individualism to collectivism. Counseling has grown out of the premise that therapists need to be value-free. The emerging perspective of an integrated outlook of counseling with religion and spirituality has resulted in a fundamental conflict with the prevailing value system of the profession. Counselors still wish to avoid the role of a moralist. The controversy is also related to the desired assertiveness of a therapist in attaching a moral and spiritual dimension while advocating certain values. Psychotherapy, as a moralistic enterprise, requires modification in its training programmes. Therapists need to reorient themselves as scientists with a profound moral or spiritual commitment. Clients need and demand this reorientation. This profession has the claim of responding to the needs of its clientele and it cannot ignore the emerging thrust in its practice.

  1. Antecedent of Emotional Quotient, Spiritual Quotient, and Emotional Spiritual Quotient (ESQ among Boarding Schools and Higher Learning Institutions Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Su Mustaffa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotional and spiritual quotient plays a principal role in life especially among students which enables them to overcome challenges in their life. This research was conducted in order to answer the question, “To what extent does family communication and institutional communication relate with students’ nemotional and spiritual qoutients?” A quantitative design was employed to examine different variables in those relationships among students. Augustian’s Emotional Spiritual Quotient Instrument (2001, and Ritchie and Fitzpatrick’s Family Communication and Institutional Communication Instrument (1990 were adapted and employed in this study. A total of 404 participants from Malaysian Higher Learning nInstitutions (IPT and 699 respondents from Malaysian Boarding Schools (SBP participated in this nresearch. Questionnaires were distributed to gather the data and were analysed using mean score, ncorrelation, t-test, and One-Way ANOVA through SPPS version 11.0. The research findings indicated thatn the emotional and spiritual quotient level. The differences in term of emotional and spiritual quotient found namong these student groups were gender among SBP students, and age among IPT students.

  2. FEATURES OF USING WEBINARS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF SPIRITUAL AND MORAL VALUES IN INFORMAL ADULTS EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna S. Pichuhina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to examine the features of using webinars for the development of spiritual and moral values in the non-formal adult education. Actualization of the problem of spirituality formation is associated with the modern requirements to moral features of adults arising from their special social function of influence on the formation of spiritual values of younger generation. Conducting psychological and educational on-line workshops, lectures, consultations for adults arising from problems of misunderstanding or loss of key moral features is relevant and demanded. As a form of such interaction the webinar is suggested as an ICT-tool used in non-formal adults education.

  3. Emotion shapes the diffusion of moralized content in social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, William J; Wills, Julian A; Jost, John T; Tucker, Joshua A; Van Bavel, Jay J

    2017-07-11

    Political debate concerning moralized issues is increasingly common in online social networks. However, moral psychology has yet to incorporate the study of social networks to investigate processes by which some moral ideas spread more rapidly or broadly than others. Here, we show that the expression of moral emotion is key for the spread of moral and political ideas in online social networks, a process we call "moral contagion." Using a large sample of social media communications about three polarizing moral/political issues ( n = 563,312), we observed that the presence of moral-emotional words in messages increased their diffusion by a factor of 20% for each additional word. Furthermore, we found that moral contagion was bounded by group membership; moral-emotional language increased diffusion more strongly within liberal and conservative networks, and less between them. Our results highlight the importance of emotion in the social transmission of moral ideas and also demonstrate the utility of social network methods for studying morality. These findings offer insights into how people are exposed to moral and political ideas through social networks, thus expanding models of social influence and group polarization as people become increasingly immersed in social media networks.

  4. Emotion shapes the diffusion of moralized content in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Julian A.; Jost, John T.; Tucker, Joshua A.; Van Bavel, Jay J.

    2017-01-01

    Political debate concerning moralized issues is increasingly common in online social networks. However, moral psychology has yet to incorporate the study of social networks to investigate processes by which some moral ideas spread more rapidly or broadly than others. Here, we show that the expression of moral emotion is key for the spread of moral and political ideas in online social networks, a process we call “moral contagion.” Using a large sample of social media communications about three polarizing moral/political issues (n = 563,312), we observed that the presence of moral-emotional words in messages increased their diffusion by a factor of 20% for each additional word. Furthermore, we found that moral contagion was bounded by group membership; moral-emotional language increased diffusion more strongly within liberal and conservative networks, and less between them. Our results highlight the importance of emotion in the social transmission of moral ideas and also demonstrate the utility of social network methods for studying morality. These findings offer insights into how people are exposed to moral and political ideas through social networks, thus expanding models of social influence and group polarization as people become increasingly immersed in social media networks. PMID:28652356

  5. Jesse Prinz on the emotional construction of morals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How not to be a metaethical naturalist – Jesse Prinz on the emotional construction of morals. ... South African Journal of Philosophy ... with which he purports to sidestep 'Hume's law' by demonstrating how, on his theory, in describing what our moral beliefs commit us to we can determine what our moral obligations are.

  6. Emotional Reactions and Moral Judgment: the Effects of Morally Challenging Interactions in Military Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, Miriam; Schut, M; Verweij, D.E.M.; Vermetten, H.G.J.M.; Giebels, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the association between different types of morally challenging interactions during military deployment and response strategies (e.g., moral justification), as well as the mediating role of moral emotions. Interviews with Dutch servicemen who participated in military operations

  7. Emotions in work groups as moral orientation guides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Brinkmann, Svend

    2010-01-01

    We argue that emotions in groups can best be studied qualitatively and act as moral orientation guides. This article argues first that the normativity of particular practices is at play in any rational empirical investigation of emotions in workgroups and second that moral values must be studied...

  8. Investigation of Mathematics Teachers Conceptualisation of the Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Role of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashi, Pius P.; Enemali, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to investigate mathematics teachers' conceptualization of the spiritual, moral social and cultural (SMSC) role of mathematics in Ankpa Education Zone of Kogi State. It used a purposive sample of all the 82 mathematics teachers in the zone comprising of 64 male and 18 female. The instrument used for the study was SMSC Role of…

  9. The Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development of Pupils in Catholic Schools in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Andrew B.; Clark, Alison; Potter, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Schools in England have a statutory duty to contribute to the spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development of children. This paper reviews its historical background before considering the judgements of Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted) inspections undertaken in the three academic years 2008-2011 of this aspect of the…

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPIRITUAL AND MORAL SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS AND SELF-REALISATION IN ADULTHOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina B Kudinova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to studying and analyzing the features of the interrelations between the self-realization and spiritual and moral consciousness of the personality. The relevance of the raised problem is caused by the global socially-economical and political changes happening in the modern world, influencing both the society as a whole and the personality separately. “The judgment test of personality self-realization” by S.I. Kudinov which allows to diagnose a variety of styles of self-expression manifestation of the subject, different levels and types of self-realization, as well as the methodology of a research of spiritual and moral self-consciousness of the personality by I.V. Ezhov were used in the experimental work. The statistical analysis of data is presented by the correlation and factorial analysis. The sample included 100 people at the age ranging from 25 to 45 years, representatives of various professions and social backgrounds. The correlation analysis made it possible to disclose the diverse interrelations between the components of self-realization and the components of spiritual and moral consciousness. The factorial analysis allowed to single out and to qualitatively describe the variants of self-realization of the personality, depending on the inclusiveness of the components of spiritual and moral consciousness - “Spiritual and moral self-realization of the personality”, “Transcendental self-realization of the personality”, “Formal self-realization of the personality”, “Superficial self-realization of the personality”, “Assertive self-realization of the personality”, “Ego-pragmatic self-realization of the personality”, “Destructive self-realization of the personality”.

  11. Predictive Estimates of Employees’ Intelligence at Workplace with Special Reference to Emotional and Spiritual Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    B. K. Punia; Priyanka Yadav

    2015-01-01

    The piece of writing investigates the relationship between employees’ emotional and Spiritual intelligence. A conversation of spirituality and emotions within the workplace can be an unthinkable topic. However, emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence are, at present, more widely acknowledged. Drawing a research connected with these construct we suggest that emotional intelligence within the employees in organisations may provide employees with a medium to better understand and mix s...

  12. Contextual and perceptual brain processes underlying moral cognition: a quantitative meta-analysis of moral reasoning and moral emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinc, Gunes; Spreng, R Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Human morality has been investigated using a variety of tasks ranging from judgments of hypothetical dilemmas to viewing morally salient stimuli. These experiments have provided insight into neural correlates of moral judgments and emotions, yet these approaches reveal important differences in moral cognition. Moral reasoning tasks require active deliberation while moral emotion tasks involve the perception of stimuli with moral implications. We examined convergent and divergent brain activity associated with these experimental paradigms taking a quantitative meta-analytic approach. A systematic search of the literature yielded 40 studies. Studies involving explicit decisions in a moral situation were categorized as active (n = 22); studies evoking moral emotions were categorized as passive (n = 18). We conducted a coordinate-based meta-analysis using the Activation Likelihood Estimation to determine reliable patterns of brain activity. Results revealed a convergent pattern of reliable brain activity for both task categories in regions of the default network, consistent with the social and contextual information processes supported by this brain network. Active tasks revealed more reliable activity in the temporoparietal junction, angular gyrus and temporal pole. Active tasks demand deliberative reasoning and may disproportionately involve the retrieval of social knowledge from memory, mental state attribution, and construction of the context through associative processes. In contrast, passive tasks reliably engaged regions associated with visual and emotional information processing, including lingual gyrus and the amygdala. A laterality effect was observed in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, with active tasks engaging the left, and passive tasks engaging the right. While overlapping activity patterns suggest a shared neural network for both tasks, differential activity suggests that processing of moral input is affected by task demands. The results provide novel

  13. Neural evidence for moral intuition and the temporal dynamics of interactions between emotional processes and moral cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Dan-Yang; Gan, Tian; Liu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and neurological studies have revealed that emotions influence moral cognition. Although moral stimuli are emotionally charged, the time course of interactions between emotions and moral judgments remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the temporal dynamics of the interaction between emotional processes and moral cognition. The results revealed that when making moral judgments, the time course of the event-related potential (ERP) waveform was significantly different between high emotional arousal and low emotional arousal contexts. Different stages of processing were distinguished, showing distinctive interactions between emotional processes and moral reasoning. The precise time course of moral intuition and moral reasoning sheds new light on theoretical models of moral psychology. Specifically, the N1 component (interpreted as representing moral intuition) did not appear to be influenced by emotional arousal. However, the N2 component and late positive potential were strongly affected by emotional arousal; the slow wave was influenced by both emotional arousal and morality, suggesting distinct moral processing at different emotional arousal levels.

  14. Moral Emotions and Moral Judgments in Children's Narratives: Comparing Real-Life and Hypothetical Transgressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, Eveline; Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina

    2010-01-01

    How children make meaning of their own social experiences in situations involving moral issues is central to their subsequent affective and cognitive moral learning. Our study of young children's narratives describing their interpersonal conflicts shows that the emotions and judgments constructed in the course of these real-life narratives differ…

  15. Neural correlates of moral and non-moral emotion in female psychopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla L Harenski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the first neuroimaging investigation of female psychopathy in an incarcerated population. Prior studies have found that male psychopathy is associated with reduced limbic and paralimbic activation when processing emotional stimuli and making moral judgments. The goal of this study was to investigate whether these findings extend to female psychopathy. During fMRI scanning, 157 incarcerated and 46 non-incarcerated female participants viewed unpleasant pictures, half which depicted moral transgressions, and neutral pictures. Participants rated each picture on moral transgression severity. Psychopathy was assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R in all incarcerated participants. Non-incarcerated participants were included as a control group to derive brain regions of interest associated with viewing unpleasant versus neutral pictures (emotion contrast, and unpleasant pictures depicting moral transgressions versus unpleasant pictures without moral transgressions (moral contrast. Regression analyses in the incarcerated group examined the association between PCL-R scores and brain activation in the emotion and moral contrasts. Results of the emotion contrast revealed a negative correlation between PCL-R scores and activation in the right amygdala and rostral anterior cingulate. Results of the moral contrast revealed a negative correlation between PCL-R scores and activation in the right temporo-parietal junction. These results indicate that female psychopathy, like male psychopathy, is characterized by reduced limbic activation during emotion processing. In contrast, reduced temporo-parietal activation to moral transgressions has been less observed in male psychopathy. These results extend prior findings in male psychopathy to female psychopathy, and reveal aberrant neural responses to morally-salient stimuli that may be unique to female psychopathy.

  16. Self-transcendent positive emotions increase spirituality through basic world assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cappellen, Patty; Saroglou, Vassilis; Iweins, Caroline; Piovesana, Maria; Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-01-01

    Spirituality has mostly been studied in psychology as implied in the process of overcoming adversity, being triggered by negative experiences, and providing positive outcomes. By reversing this pathway, we investigated whether spirituality may also be triggered by self-transcendent positive emotions, which are elicited by stimuli appraised as demonstrating higher good and beauty. In two studies, elevation and/or admiration were induced using different methods. These emotions were compared to two control groups, a neutral state and a positive emotion (mirth). Self-transcendent positive emotions increased participants' spirituality (Studies 1 and 2), especially for the non-religious participants (Study 1). Two basic world assumptions, i.e., belief in life as meaningful (Study 1) and in the benevolence of others and the world (Study 2) mediated the effect of these emotions on spirituality. Spirituality should be understood not only as a coping strategy, but also as an upward spiralling pathway to and from self-transcendent positive emotions.

  17. Emotional Intelligence and Cognitive Moral Development in Undergraduate Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines relationships between emotional intelligence (EI) and cognitive moral development (CMD) in undergraduate business students. The ability model of emotional intelligence was used in this study, which evaluated possible relationships between EI and CMD in a sample of 82 undergraduate business students. The sample population was…

  18. Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidt, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Moral psychology is a rapidly growing field with two principle lineages. The main line began with Jean Piaget and includes developmental psychologists who have studied the acquisition of moral concepts and reasoning. The alternative line began in the 1990s with a new synthesis of evolutionary, neurological, and social-psychological research in which the central phenomena are moral emotions and intuitions. In this essay, I show how both of these lines have been shaped by an older debate between two 19th century narratives about modernity: one celebrating the liberation of individuals, the other mourning the loss of community and moral authority. I suggest that both lines of moral psychology have limited themselves to the moral domain prescribed by the liberation narrative, and so one future step for moral psychology should be to study alternative moral perspectives, particularly religious and politically conservative ones in which morality is, in part, about protecting groups, institutions, and souls. © 2008 Association for Psychological Science.

  19. MORAL AND SPIRITUAL FOUNDATIONS OF YOUTH POLICY IN REAL SECTOR OF ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Popova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The basic contradiction between market relations and social sphere is distinguished from the main sources of negative phenomena among young people and failures in realization of youth policy. Substitution of social production goals by its means, a sharp distortion towards a primacy of market economy with its only indicator of success in the form of money deform a process of formation of a personality of a young specialist both in professional, and in sociocultural plans. As a rule, management teams of enterprises expect the generation of young workers to possess initiative and role behaviour which consists in highly skilled independent performance of production functions. At the same time, creative importance of «Person – Person» relations is underestimated. In this regard, questions of social-moral education of young personnel are brought into focus, whereas providing and further increase in competitiveness of production in many respects depends on their decision.The aim of the present article is to conceptualize spiritual and moral foundations of youth policy implementation in a real sector of the economy.Methodology and research methods. The research methodology involves a comprehensive application of anthropological, ontological and axiological approaches. Dialectical method, method of historical and logical unity, statistical and comparative data analyses are used.Results and scientific novelty. Spiritual and moral characteristics of young workers which formation demands system educational measures are one of the most important development provisions of enterprises in new social and economic reality. The questions of realization of youth policy in real sector of economy, including Sverdlovsk region, are considered. The following concepts and aspects are analyzed from social and philosophical perspectives: the concept «spirituality»; features of mental phase of psychology and spiritual stages of consciousness; the

  20. The impact of spiritual and moral values of the youth on the Russian society civil culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Tkacheva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors conducted a sociological analysis of the spiritual and moral values of the youth and their impact on the civil culture, which largely determines the forms of individual and group social activity and the functioning of social institutions. The implementation of the key function of values, i.e. the achievement of material goods and the spiritual development, to a certain extent, will allow to overcome the cultural gap between elites and common citizens, which is considered one of the main reasons for the failure of reforms in Russia. The study of transformation processes determined great interest in the social potential of the youth as a subject of social reproduction, and the civil culture is a key factor and element of modernization for it changes and activates value orientations of the younger generations and leads to the qualitative transformations of all spheres of society. The article is based on the empirical data of a number of sociological surveys conducted in 2016 in five cities of the south of the Tyumen Region. The empirical data prove that there is an obvious emerging shift from paternalistic expectations, passivity and low estimates of the future to the rationality, individualization and self-reliance. The authors emphasize the influence of mass media as one of the factors of the civil culture formation, which is evident in the impact of media on the moral and spiritual values of the younger generations.

  1. Individual differences in moral development: Does intelligence really affect children’s moral reasoning and moral emotions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Maria Beißert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between intelligence and individual differences in children’s moral development across a range of different moral transgressions. Taking up prior research that showed morality and intelligence to be related in adolescents and adults, the current study wants to test if these findings can be extended to younger children. The study was designed to address some of the shortcomings in prior research by examining young children aged between 6 years; 4 months and 8 years; 10 months, using a broad concept of moral development including emotional aspects and applying an approach that is closely connected to children’s daily lives. Participants (N = 129 completed a standardized intelligence test and were presented four moral transgression stories to assess moral development. Results demonstrated that findings from prior research with adolescents or adults cannot simply be extended to younger participants. No significant correlations of moral development and intelligence were found for any of the presented stories. This provides first evidence that – at least in middle childhood – moral developmental status seems to be independent from children’s general intelligence assessed by figural inductive reasoning tests.

  2. Individual Differences in Moral Development: Does Intelligence Really Affect Children’s Moral Reasoning and Moral Emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beißert, Hanna M.; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between intelligence and individual differences in children’s moral development across a range of different moral transgressions. Taking up prior research that showed morality and intelligence to be related in adolescents and adults, the current study wants to test if these findings can be extended to younger children. The study was designed to address some of the shortcomings in prior research by examining young children aged between 6 years; 4 months and 8 years; 10 months, using a broad concept of moral development including emotional aspects and applying an approach that is closely connected to children’s daily lives. Participants (N = 129) completed a standardized intelligence test and were presented four moral transgression stories to assess moral development. Results demonstrated that findings from prior research with adolescents or adults cannot simply be extended to younger participants. No significant correlations of moral development and intelligence were found for any of the presented stories. This provides first evidence that – at least in middle childhood – moral developmental status seems to be independent from children’s general intelligence assessed by figural inductive reasoning tests. PMID:28066287

  3. How Large Is the Role of Emotion in Judgments of Moral Dilemmas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Zachary; Powell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Moral dilemmas often pose dramatic and gut-wrenching emotional choices. It is now widely accepted that emotions are not simply experienced alongside people's judgments about moral dilemmas, but that our affective processes play a central role in determining those judgments. However, much of the evidence purporting to demonstrate the connection between people's emotional responses and their judgments about moral dilemmas has recently been called into question. In the present studies, we reexamined the role of emotion in people's judgments about moral dilemmas using a validated self-report measure of emotion. We measured participants' specific emotional responses to moral dilemmas and, although we found that moral dilemmas evoked strong emotional responses, we found that these responses were only weakly correlated with participants' moral judgments. We argue that the purportedly strong connection between emotion and judgments of moral dilemmas may have been overestimated.

  4. A systematic review on social dilemmas and moral emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Analía Saavedra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in the role of emotions in behavioral economics, and the absence of reviews on this subject have motivated this work, which purpose was analyze the empirical evidence on the role of moral emotions in social dilemmas situations. The reviewed articles (n= 17 were obtained from EBSCO, OVID and ScienceDirect. We analyzed the following aspects: objectives, sample, experimental game or task, and results. A group of studies was focused on the influence of moral emotions on cooperation, using mainly the Give-Some game or the Ultimatum Game. Another group of studies was focused on the role of empathy-altruism in helping behaviors, using distribution tasks. The analysis of results shows that guilt and shame increase the tendency to cooperate, while emotions like anger and disgust diminish it. Furthermore, the induction of empathy promoted altruistic behavior and helping behaviors. This review provides useful elements to be considered in future research.

  5. Punishing hypocrisy: the roles of hypocrisy and moral emotions in deciding culpability and punishment of criminal and civil moral transgressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Sean M; Clark, Brian A M; Walker, Stephannie; Wiseman, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments explored how hypocrisy affects attributions of criminal guilt and the desire to punish hypocritical criminals. Study 1 established that via perceived hypocrisy, a hypocritical criminal was seen as more culpable and was punished more than a non-hypocritical criminal who committed an identical crime. Study 2 expanded on this, showing that negative moral emotions (anger and disgust) mediated the relationships between perceived hypocrisy, criminal guilt, and punishment. Study 3 replicated the emotion finding from Study 2 using new scenarios where group agents were clearly aware of the hypocrisy of their actions, yet acted anyway. Again, perceived hypocrisy worked through moral emotions to affect criminal guilt and punishment. The current studies provide empirical support for theories relating hypocrisy and moral transgressions to moral emotions, also informing the literature on the role of moral emotions in moral reasoning and legal decision making.

  6. Divergent Effects of Different Positive Emotions on Moral Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohminger, Nina; Lewis, Richard L.; Meyer, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Positive emotions are often treated as relatively similar in their cognitive-behavioral effects, and as having unambiguously beneficial consequences. For example, Valdesolo and DeSteno (2006) reported that a humorous video made people more prone to choose a utilitarian solution to a moral dilemma. They attributed this finding to increased positive…

  7. Comparative efficacy of spirituality, cognitive, and emotional support groups for treating eating disorder inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P Scott; Berrett, Michael E; Hardman, Randy K; Eggett, Dennis L

    2006-01-01

    Spiritual interventions are rarely used in contemporary treatment programs and little empirical evidence is available concerning their effectiveness. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a spiritual group intervention for eating disorder inpatients. We compared the effectiveness of a Spirituality group with Cognitive and Emotional Support groups using a randomized, control group design. Participants were 122 women receiving inpatient eating disorder treatment. Patients in the Spirituality group tended to score significantly lower on psychological disturbance and eating disorder symptoms at the conclusion of treatment compared to patients in the other groups, and higher on spiritual well-being. On weekly outcome measures, patients in the Spirituality group improved significantly more quickly during the first four weeks of treatment. This study provides preliminary evidence that attending to eating disorder patients' spiritual growth and well-being during inpatient treatment may help reduce depression and anxiety, relationship distress, social role conflict, and eating disorder symptoms.

  8. Mastering moral misery : Emotional and coping responses to intragroup morality (vs. competence) evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, Romy; Ellemers, Naomi; Scheepers, Daan

    2016-01-01

    In social groups, individuals are often confronted with evaluations of their behaviour by other group members and are motivated to adapt their own behaviour accordingly. In two studies we examine emotional responses towards, and perceived coping abilities with, morality vs. competence evaluations

  9. Personality Influences the Relationship Between Primary Emotions and Religious/Spiritual Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Hiebler-Ragger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of human emotions and personality provides valuable insights into the parameters of mental health and well-being. Affective neuroscience proposes that several levels of emotions – ranging from primary ones such as LUST or FEAR up to higher emotions such as spirituality – interact on a neural level. The present study aimed to further explore this theory. Furthermore, we hypothesized that personality – formed by bottom-up primary emotions and cortical top-down regulation – might act as a link between primary emotions and religious/spiritual well-being. A total sample of 167 (78% female student participants completed the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scale (primary emotions, the Big Five Personality Inventory and the Multidimensional Inventory of Religious/Spiritual Well-Being (higher emotions. Correlation analyses confirmed the link between primary and higher emotions as well as their relation to personality. Further regression analyses indicated that personality dimensions mediate the relationship between primary and higher emotions. A substantial interaction between primary emotions, personality dimensions, and religious/spiritual well-being could be confirmed. From a developmental perspective, cortical top-down regulation might influence religious/spiritual well-being by forming relevant personality dimensions. Hence, CARE as well as Agreeableness seem of special importance. Future studies might focus on implications for clinical groups.

  10. Personality Influences the Relationship Between Primary Emotions and Religious/Spiritual Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebler-Ragger, Michaela; Fuchshuber, Jürgen; Dröscher, Heidrun; Vajda, Christian; Fink, Andreas; Unterrainer, Human F

    2018-01-01

    The study of human emotions and personality provides valuable insights into the parameters of mental health and well-being. Affective neuroscience proposes that several levels of emotions - ranging from primary ones such as LUST or FEAR up to higher emotions such as spirituality - interact on a neural level. The present study aimed to further explore this theory. Furthermore, we hypothesized that personality - formed by bottom-up primary emotions and cortical top-down regulation - might act as a link between primary emotions and religious/spiritual well-being. A total sample of 167 (78% female) student participants completed the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scale (primary emotions), the Big Five Personality Inventory and the Multidimensional Inventory of Religious/Spiritual Well-Being (higher emotions). Correlation analyses confirmed the link between primary and higher emotions as well as their relation to personality. Further regression analyses indicated that personality dimensions mediate the relationship between primary and higher emotions. A substantial interaction between primary emotions, personality dimensions, and religious/spiritual well-being could be confirmed. From a developmental perspective, cortical top-down regulation might influence religious/spiritual well-being by forming relevant personality dimensions. Hence, CARE as well as Agreeableness seem of special importance. Future studies might focus on implications for clinical groups.

  11. Unique and Interactive Effects of Moral Emotions and Moral Disengagement on Bullying and Defending among School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert; Pozzoli, Tiziana; Gianluca, Gini; Jungert, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The first aim of the present study was to examine in a single model how moral disengagement and moral emotions were related to bullying and defending behavior among schoolchildren. The second aim was to test whether the two moral dimensions interacted with each other to explain behavior in bullying situations. Data were collected from 561 Swedish…

  12. Risk Communication, Moral Emotions and Climate Change.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeser, S.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the potential role that emotions might play in enticing a lifestyle that diminishes climate change. Climate change is an important challenge for society. There is a growing consensus that climate change is due to our behavior, but few people are willing to significantly adapt

  13. Development of Moral Emotions and Decision-Making from Childhood to Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mari

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the development of moral decision-making and moral emotion attributions in antisocial behavior and peer relationship dilemma scenarios. Participants were 540 school- and college-aged students, who were asked to explain their moral decision-making, subsequent emotions, and reasoning in regard to the scenarios. We combined…

  14. Reappraising the moral nature of emotions in decision making : The case of shame and guilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, R.M.A.; Breugelmans, S.M.; Zeelenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    Emotions play a crucial role in moral behavior. The present paper does not contest this point but argues that qualifications of certain feelings such as shame and guilt as moral emotions should not exclusively be based on a proximal analysis of their function. A proximal analysis details how moral

  15. Developing a Medical School Curriculum for Psychological, Moral, and Spiritual Wellness: Student and Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D.; Bandini, Julia; Amobi, Ada; Cahill, Jonathan; Enzinger, Andrea; Noveroske, Sarah; Peteet, John; Balboni, Tracy; Balboni, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Context Although many studies have addressed the integration of a religion and/or spirituality curriculum into medical school training, few describe the process of curriculum development based on qualitative data from students and faculty. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of medical students and chaplaincy trainees regarding the development of a curriculum to facilitate reflection on moral and spiritual dimensions of caring for the critically ill and to train students in self-care practices that promote professionalism. Methods Research staff conducted semiscripted and one-on-one interviews and focus groups. Respondents also completed a short and self-reported demographic questionnaire. Participants included 44 students and faculty members from Harvard Medical School and Harvard Divinity School, specifically senior medical students and divinity school students who have undergone chaplaincy training. Results Two major qualitative themes emerged: curriculum format and curriculum content. Inter-rater reliability was high (kappa = 0.75). With regard to curriculum format, most participants supported the curriculum being longitudinal, elective, and experiential. With regard to curriculum content, five subthemes emerged: personal religious and/or spiritual (R/S) growth, professional integration of R/S values, addressing patient needs, structural and/or institutional dynamics within the health care system, and controversial social issues. Conclusion Qualitative findings of this study suggest that development of a future medical school curriculum on R/S and wellness should be elective, longitudinal, and experiential and should focus on the impact and integration of R/S values and self-care practices within self, care for patients, and the medical team. Future research is necessary to study the efficacy of these curricula once implemented. PMID:27693904

  16. Developing a Medical School Curriculum for Psychological, Moral, and Spiritual Wellness: Student and Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D; Bandini, Julia; Amobi, Ada; Cahill, Jonathan; Enzinger, Andrea; Noveroske, Sarah; Peteet, John; Balboni, Tracy; Balboni, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have addressed the integration of a religion and/or spirituality curriculum into medical school training, few describe the process of curriculum development based on qualitative data from students and faculty. The aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of medical students and chaplaincy trainees regarding the development of a curriculum to facilitate reflection on moral and spiritual dimensions of caring for the critically ill and to train students in self-care practices that promote professionalism. Research staff conducted semiscripted and one-on-one interviews and focus groups. Respondents also completed a short and self-reported demographic questionnaire. Participants included 44 students and faculty members from Harvard Medical School and Harvard Divinity School, specifically senior medical students and divinity school students who have undergone chaplaincy training. Two major qualitative themes emerged: curriculum format and curriculum content. Inter-rater reliability was high (kappa = 0.75). With regard to curriculum format, most participants supported the curriculum being longitudinal, elective, and experiential. With regard to curriculum content, five subthemes emerged: personal religious and/or spiritual (R/S) growth, professional integration of R/S values, addressing patient needs, structural and/or institutional dynamics within the health care system, and controversial social issues. Qualitative findings of this study suggest that development of a future medical school curriculum on R/S and wellness should be elective, longitudinal, and experiential and should focus on the impact and integration of R/S values and self-care practices within self, care for patients, and the medical team. Future research is necessary to study the efficacy of these curricula once implemented. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reproduction as spiritual kin work: orthodoxy, IVF, and the moral economy of motherhood in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Heather

    2006-12-01

    Bringing gender and kinship studies together with an anthropology of religion, in this article I demonstrate how urban Greek couples and clinical practitioners in the middle 1990s proceeded with in vitro fertilization (IVF) in the absence of government regulations, and did so with reference to cultural beliefs and social relations consistent with Greek Orthodox religious practice. Drawing on ethnographic observations at an Athens IVF clinic as well as on interviews with former patients, I argue that Athenian women, in particular, engage IVF as a kind of spiritual kin work, normalizing the use of medical techniques with reference to ideologies of motherhood that treat it as a woman's moral achievement and as a source of womanly suffering. Since the period of ethnographic research described here, and despite disapproval of the Greek Orthodox Church, legislation regulating the use of IVF and other methods of medically assisted reproduction has become law. This article reconciles how the Church can officially reject medically assisted means of reproduction that Athenian users have normalized with reference to spiritual beliefs and practices.

  18. The importance of moral emotions for effective collaboration in culturally diverse healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine; Brunton, Margaret

    2018-04-01

    Moral emotions shape the effectiveness of culturally diverse teams. However, these emotions, which are integral to determining ethically responsive patient care and team relationships, typically go unrecognised. The contribution of emotions to moral deliberation is subjugated within the technorational environment of healthcare decision-making. Contemporary healthcare organisations rely on a multicultural workforce charged with the ethical care of vulnerable people. Limited extant literature examines the role of moral emotions in ethical decision-making among culturally diverse healthcare teams. Moral emotions are evident in ethnocentric moral perspectives that construct some colleagues' practices as 'other'. This article examines how moral emotions are evoked when cultural dissonance influences nurses' moral perceptions. We use a qualitative investigation of teamwork within culturally diverse healthcare organisations. We use Haidt's () account of moral emotions to examine practice-based accounts of 36 internationally educated and 17 New Zealand educated nurses practising in New Zealand. The study provides evidence that moral emotions are frequently elicited by communication and care practices considered 'foreign'. The main implication is that although safe practice in healthcare organisations is reliant on highly functioning teams, collaboration is challenged by interprofessional power relations of contested culturally shaped values. We address practice-based strategies that enable engagement with moral emotions to enhance effective teamwork. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Moral Injury, Spiritual Care and the Role of Chaplains: An Exploratory Scoping Review of Literature and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Lindsay B; Hodgson, Timothy J; Krikheli, Lillian; Soh, Rachel Y; Armour, Annie-Rose; Singh, Taranjeet K; Impiombato, Cassandra G

    2016-08-01

    This scoping review considered the role of chaplains with regard to 'moral injury'. Moral injury is gaining increasing notoriety. This is due to greater recognition that trauma (in its various forms) can cause much deeper inflictions and afflictions than just physiological or psychological harm, for there may also be wounds affecting the 'soul' that are far more difficult to heal-if at all. As part of a larger research program exploring moral injury, a scoping review of literature and other resources was implemented utilising Arksey and O'Malley's scoping method (Int J Soc Res Methodol 8(1):19-32, 2005) to focus upon moral injury, spirituality (including religion) and chaplaincy. Of the total number of articles and/or resources noting the term 'moral injury' in relation to spiritual/religious issues (n = 482), the results revealed 60 resources that specifically noted moral injury and chaplains (or other similar bestowed title). The majority of these resources were clearly positive about the role (or the potential role) of chaplains with regard to mental health issues and/or moral injury. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases: Australian Modification of Health Interventions to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and related Health problems (10th revision, vol 3-WHO ICD-10-AM, Geneva, 2002), was utilised as a coding framework to classify and identify distinct chaplaincy roles and interventions with regard to assisting people with moral injury. Several recommendations are made concerning moral injury and chaplaincy, most particularly the need for greater research to be conducted.

  20. Children's moral judgments and moral emotions following exclusion of children with disabilities: relations with inclusive education, age, and contact intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina; Buholzer, Alois

    2013-03-01

    We investigated relations between children's moral judgments and moral emotions following disability-based exclusion and inclusive education, age, and contact intensity. Nine- and 12-year-old Swiss children (N=351) from inclusive and noninclusive classrooms provided moral judgments and moral emotion attributions following six vignettes about social exclusion of children with disabilities. Children also reported on their level of sympathy towards children with disabilities and their contact intensity with children with disabilities. Overall, children condemned disability-based exclusion, attributed few positive emotions to excluder targets, and expressed high sympathy for children with disabilities, independent of age and educational setting. However, younger children from inclusive classrooms exhibited more moral judgments and moral emotions than younger children from noninclusive classrooms. Moreover, children who expressed high sympathy towards children with disabilities were more likely to report frequent contact with children with disabilities. The findings extend existing research on social exclusion by examining disability-based exclusion and are discussed with respect to developmental research on social and moral judgments and emotions following children's inclusion and exclusion decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fitness costs predict emotional, moral and attitudinal inbreeding aversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Lespiau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In terms of sexual intercourse, the very last people we think about are our kin. Imagining inbreeding intercourse, whether it involves our closest kin or not, induces aversion in most people who invoke inbreeding depression problems or cultural considerations. Research has focused on the disgust felt when facing inbreeding intercourse between close kin but little is known about other responses. In this study, we considered the influence of fitness costs on aversive reactions by including disgust and emotional reaction as well as moral judgment and attitudes towards inbreeding: higher costs should induce a stronger aversive reaction. The fitness costs were manipulated by two factors: (i the degree of the participants’ involvement in the story (themselves, a sib or an unknown individual, and (ii the degree of relatedness between the two inbreeding people (brother/sister, uncle-aunt/niece-nephew, cousin. To test this hypothesis, 140 women read and assessed different inbreeding stories varying in the fitness costs incurred. Findings showed that the higher the fitness costs were, the greater the aversive reaction was in an overall way. First, our results fitted with previous studies that tested the influence of fitness costs on disgust. Second, and more interestingly, findings went further by examining overall aversion, showing that fitness costs could influence emotions felt as well as attitudes and behaviors towards inbreeding people. The higher the fitness costs were, the less inbreeding people were perceived as moral and the more they were considered as a nuisance. However, results regarding avoidance were more nuanced.

  2. Fitness Costs Predict Emotional, Moral, and Attitudinal Inbreeding Aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespiau, Florence; Kaminski, Gwenaël

    2016-01-01

    In terms of sexual intercourse, the very last people we think about are our kin. Imagining inbreeding intercourse, whether it involves our closest kin or not, induces aversion in most people who invoke inbreeding depression problems or cultural considerations. Research has focused on the disgust felt when facing inbreeding intercourse between close kin but little is known about other responses. In this study, we considered the influence of fitness costs on aversive reactions by including disgust and emotional reaction as well as moral judgment and attitudes toward inbreeding: higher costs should induce a stronger aversive reaction. The fitness costs were manipulated by two factors: (i) the degree of the participants' involvement in the story (themselves, a sib or an unknown individual), and (ii) the degree of relatedness between the two inbreeding people (brother/sister, uncle-aunt/niece-nephew, cousin). To test this hypothesis, 140 women read and assessed different inbreeding stories varying in the fitness costs incurred. Findings showed that the higher the fitness costs were, the greater the aversive reaction was in an overall way. First, our results fitted with previous studies that tested the influence of fitness costs on disgust. Second, and more interestingly, findings went further by examining overall aversion, showing that fitness costs could influence emotions felt as well as attitudes and behaviors toward inbreeding people. The higher the fitness costs were, the less inbreeding people were perceived as moral and the more they were considered as a nuisance. However, results regarding avoidance were more nuanced.

  3. Workplace spirituality and organisational commitment: Role of emotional intelligence among Indian banking professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra Kumar Pradhan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In present times the concept of “workplace spirituality” has been acknowledged as an important discipline so called a “transient advantage” in corporate world for supplementing a meaningful atmosphere to one’s workplace. The domains like behavioral science and human resource has embraced the topic as a promising research area with an assumption to offer fresh and significant insights to the business world. However, it is presumed that the present state of academic research in the field of workplace spirituality is in many ways reminiscent of where theories of leadership and other similar developmental intervention in Hr domain were there some fifty years ago. Today’s organizations’ are seeking for a committed workforce as organizational commitment and emotional involvement in one’s respective job profile is viewed as a business necessity. This is apparently possible when the professionals in a work set-up are able to derive meaning and significance in their work profile. Therefore, this present study has attempted through a field survey to document the findings from selected executives of public and private sector banking industries of Indian sub-continent on the relationships between workplace spirituality, organizational commitment and emotional intelligence. Regression analysis has revealed that emotional intelligence stood as a potential moderator between workplace spirituality and organizational commitment. The paper has brought out the potential benefits of bringing spirituality into the workplace; providing suggestions for Hr and behavioral practitioners to incorporate spirituality in organizations.

  4. A Philosophical Perception Of Emotion In Morality | Omoyefa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In answering the question what is the standard of morality, some philosophers argue that reason is the moral standard. By reason, they mean whatever action is in accordance with reason is morally right and whatever action is opposed to reason is morally wrong. The rationalists contend further that morality is the function of ...

  5. Happiness, Emotional Well-Being and Mental Health--What Has Children's Spirituality to Offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaude, Tony

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the concepts of happiness, emotional well-being and mental health in the light of recent work on children's spirituality, to argue that such a consideration can help to avoid simplistic and individualistic views of each. Distinguishing between happiness as short-term gratification and as longer-term flourishing, the latter…

  6. The Relationship between Spiritual Leadership and Organizational Cynicism: The Moderating Effect of Emotional Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şafak GÜNDÜZ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The dramatic effects of the discipline of Business Management on employees have brought leadership into sharp focus; the concept of Spiritual Leadership has recently begun to be included in the scope of the studies on positive leadership and emotional leadership, and probably because Organizational Cynicism, which results from the stresses and strains brought about by globalization, is regarded as an organizational pathological disorder, leadership has become a concept through which the discipline of Business Management is seeking a remedy. Based on these, the aim of this study is to supportthe tautology with an emic approachthat spiritual leadership, which can be favoured by employees who are in search of some meaning in the workplace has inevitably a positive effect on organizational cynicism and emotional intelligence has a mediating effect on the relationship between spiritual leadership and cynicism within the Turkish culture. Stating the negative relationship between spiritual leadership and organizational cynicism and to some extend it may be overcome by emotional intelligence may contribute to leadership.

  7. What We Talk About When We Talk About Morality: Deontological, Consequentialist, and Emotive Language Use in Justifications Across Foundation-Specific Moral Violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Melissa A; Laham, Simon M

    2016-09-01

    Morality is inherently social, yet much extant work in moral psychology ignores the central role of social processes in moral phenomena. To partly address this, this article examined the content of persuasive moral communication-the way people justify their moral attitudes in persuasive contexts. Across two studies, we explored variation in justification content (deontological, consequentialist, or emotive) as a function of moral foundations. Using justification selection techniques (Study 1) and open-ended justification production (Study 2), results demonstrate a preference (a) for deontological appeals in justifications for the sanctity foundation, (b) for consequentialist appeals for the individualizing foundations (care and fairness), and (c) for emotive appeals in justifications for the binding foundations (loyalty, authority and sanctity). The present research questions the generality of inferences about the primacy of emotions/intuition in moral psychology research and highlights the important role of reasons in persuasive moral communication. © 2016 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  8. Spiritual and Moral Culture in the Higher Education” Expectations and fears (the results of ‘Christmas Educational Readings’ in PFUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh V Puzanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of the key issues of the III International Conference “Spiritual and Moral Culture in the Higher Education” devoted to the discussion of the action plan to implement the National Strategy of Education Development until 2025. The authors consider the basic ideas of the key conference speakers’ presentations and present the results of the express-poll among the conference participants conducted to identify their expectations. The main leitmotif of all speakers’ presentations was as follows: the higher school is responsible for training the new generations of professionals - with high moral standards and responsibility for the fate of the country and one’s homeland. Young Russian citizens focused on fruitful activity can be raised only by joint efforts of the state, the church and society. It is extremely important to coordinate the efforts of the church and the state in the support and protection of the family, in combating extremism, and in forming high moral standards. ‘Christmas Readings’ is a good tradition established several years ago, which continues to bring together people interested in solving the most urgent problems in the educational sphere. The participants of the round tables discussed the issues of youth education and its impact on the country’s national security, the relationships of spiritual values and nation’s health, pedagogical aspects of spiritual and moral education of the youth, the impact of mass culture on the society, the student volunteer movement, spiritual and moral criteria of science.

  9. Optimal Developmental Outcomes for the Child Aged Six to Twelve: Social, Moral, Cognitive, and Emotional Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kay

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Montessori theories for development of social, moral, cognitive, and emotional dimensions of the human personality during the second plane of development--age six to puberty--as these theories relate to the theory of optimal experience. (JPB)

  10. What Are They Thinking? The Moral Judgment of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe the moral judgment of 12 third- through fifth-grade children with and without emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and to explore how feelings affected their thought processes. Data were gathered via three individually conducted moral dilemma interviews with each child participant. These procedures produced…

  11. Moral Judgments and Emotions: Adolescents' Evaluations in Intergroup Social Exclusion Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Shelby; Elenbaas, Laura; Killen, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    This article examines children's moral judgments and emotional evaluations in the context of social exclusion. As they age, children and adolescents face increasingly complex situations in which group membership and allegiance are in opposition with morally relevant decisions, such as the exclusion of an individual from a group. While adolescents…

  12. Children's Interpretive Understanding, Moral Judgments, and Emotion Attributions: Relations to Social Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Gasser, Luciano; Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, Eveline

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated interpretive understanding, moral judgments, and emotion attributions in relation to social behaviour in a sample of 59 5-year-old, 123 7-year-old, and 130 9-year-old children. Interpretive understanding was assessed by two tasks measuring children's understanding of ambiguous situations. Moral judgments and emotion…

  13. SPIRITUAL EMOTIONAL FREEDOM TECHNIQUE DECREASING STRESS ON PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL CANCER

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    Desmaniarti Z,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cervical cancer is known as one of deadly disease. The global incidence of cervical cancer is the second largest in the entire world, including in Indonesia. RSUP Dr. Hasan Sadikin Bandung, cervical cancer ranked fi rst (62.27% compared with other fi ve types of obstetry and gynecology malignancies (suspected malignant ovarian tumors 16.12%, ovarian cancer 11.76%, vulva cancer 8.65% and endometrial cancer 1.19% (Destiana, 2012. Chemotherapy as one of cancer treatment causes various side effects include hair loss, nails blackened, nausea and vomiting, that could makes patient stressful. SEFT ( Spiritual Emotional Freedom Technique is useful to overcome negative emotions through a combination technique that uses psychological energy, spiritual strength, and praying. SEFT is an effective intervention in manage stress, there are some techniques that practiced simply such as praying, NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming, hypnotherapy, visualisation, meditation, relaxation, imagery and desensitisasi (Zainuddin, 2008. The purpose of this study was to explain reducing stress on patiens with cervical cancer through Spiritual Emotional Freedom Technique (SEFT at RSUP Dr. Hasan Sadikin Bandung. Improvements on patient’s stress will lead to a better result on cervical cancer therapy. Methods: This study was used quasy experiment pre-post test randomize control group design. Patient with cervical cancer at stadium I to III that taking chemotherapy was selected by using purposive sampling and divided into two groups. Each group contains 34 patients. Intervention group was given SEFT in three round. Each round took 30 minutes. Before and after intervention patients was given Questionnaire. The data were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. Result: The result of this research showed that patient’s stress getting lower signifi cantly after intervention. Discussion: SEFT could reduced stress on patients with cervical cancer that

  14. Investigating the actor effect in moral emotion expectancies across cultures: a comparison of Chinese and Canadian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Jia, Fanli

    2013-09-01

    The study investigated adolescents' moral emotion expectancies for actions versus inactions across cultures (Chinese vs. Canadian) and different moral rule contexts (rules that prohibit antisocial behaviour vs. rules that prescribe prosocial actions) while controlling for judgements of obligatoriness of moral actions. The sample consisted of 372 teenagers from three grade levels (7-8, 10-11, and 1st-2nd year university). Participants were provided with scenarios depicting moral and immoral actions of self or others. Moral emotion expectancies were assessed following each scenario by asking participants to rate the intensity of various emotions they anticipate for themselves in the given situation. Actions were related to stronger self-evaluative and other-evaluative moral emotion expectancies than inactions in both cultures. Whereas perceived obligatoriness of moral actions was associated with moral emotion expectancies, it did not account for the actor effect. Moreover, Chinese adolescents tended to report stronger negatively charged other-evaluative emotions when observing others engaging in antisocial behaviour and less positive emotions for moral actions. Overall, the study indicates that moral emotion expectancies hinge upon universal moral principles (as exemplified by the actor effect) that interact with cultural values and individuals' moral judgement in complex ways. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Moral Emotions, Emotion Self-Regulation, Callous-Unemotional Traits, and Problem Behavior in Children of Incarcerated Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotze, Geri M.; Ravindran, Neeraja; Myers, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Children with incarcerated mothers are at high risk for developing problem behaviors. Fifty children (6-12 years; 62% girls) participated in summer camps, along with adult mentors. Regression analyses of child and adult measures of child's emotion self-regulation and callous-unemotional traits, and a child measure of moral emotions, showed that…

  16. Influence of spiritual and moral values of young people on the formation of the civic culture of the Russian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Alekseevna Tkacheva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a sociological analysis of the spiritual and moral orientations of young people and their influence on the formation of civic culture, which largely determines the form of the activity of individuals and social groups, the functioning of social institutions. Implementation of the objective function value consists in the achievement of a modern person in not only different kinds of material goods, but also, more importantly, in spiritual development. This, to a certain extent, will help to overcome the cultural gap between the elite of society and the main mass of citizens which can be considered as one of the important reasons for the failure of reform in Russia. Research of transformation processes have aroused great interest in the study of the social potential of youth as a subject of the reproduction of society. One of the factors in favor of subjectivity of youth is a civic culture, which is a key element of modernization. As a result of its formation, there is a change and activation of value orientations of young people, causing a qualitative transformation in all spheres of society. The empirical base of an article presents the results of original research conducted during 2016 among residents of five cities on the south of the Tyumen region, on the basis of which the authors point out the emerging shift from paternalistic expectations and passivity, the low value of the future to rationality, individualization, orientation on their own power. As one of the factors in the formation of civic culture the potential of the media were highlighted, which allowed the authors to justify the impact of the media on the formation of moral and spiritual values of the younger generation.

  17. An exploratory sequential design to validate measures of moral emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Margarita G; Delgado, Ana R

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an exploratory and sequential mixed methods approach in validating measures of knowledge of the moral emotions of contempt, anger and disgust. The sample comprised 60 participants in the qualitative phase when a measurement instrument was designed. Item stems, response options and correction keys were planned following the results obtained in a descriptive phenomenological analysis of the interviews. In the quantitative phase, the scale was used with a sample of 102 Spanish participants, and the results were analysed with the Rasch model. In the qualitative phase, salient themes included reasons, objects and action tendencies. In the quantitative phase, good psychometric properties were obtained. The model fit was adequate. However, some changes had to be made to the scale in order to improve the proportion of variance explained. Substantive and methodological im-plications of this mixed-methods study are discussed. Had the study used a single re-search method in isolation, aspects of the global understanding of contempt, anger and disgust would have been lost.

  18. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Spiritual Well-Being and Emotional Intelligence of the Elderly Mourners

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    Abas Solaimani Khashab

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Grief is one of the most painful experiences of the humans after linking emotions. In the literature of trauma, grief and mourning can be seen on many topics. Intervention and treatment of grief seems necessary as the period of mourning is prolonged. Thus, this study aimed at understanding the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy on spiritual well-being and emotional intelligence in the elderly bereavement.Method: This was an experimental study with pre-and posttest design, and control group. The population of this study was the elderly mourners in city of Ardabil in 15-2014. After conducting clinical interviews and diagnostic tests using the sampling method, 30 elderly mourners selected. Spiritual Well-Being questionnaire and Emotional Intelligence questionnaire were used for data collection. The questionnaire and pretest-posttest were used in this study. Data were analyzed using multivariate analysis of covariance.Results: The results of the data analysis revealed that cognitive behavioral therapy increased spiritual well-being and emotional intelligence of the mourners was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P<0.01. However, the means of Spiritual Well-Being and Emotional Intelligence at pretest was not significant in the intervention group compared with the control group (P>0.05.Conclusion: Method of cognitive behavioral therapy helps confront the emotional drain and grief acceptance, increasing the spiritual well-being and emotional intelligence of the elderly bereavement.‏

  19. The development of moral emotions and decision-making from adolescence to early adulthood: a 6-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Colasante, Tyler; Buchmann, Marlis; Malti, Tina

    2014-04-01

    Adolescents' emotions in the context of moral decision-making repeatedly have been shown to predict actual behaviour. However, little systematic information on developmental change regarding these emotion expectancies has been available thus far. This longitudinal study investigated anticipated moral emotions and decision-making between the ages of 15 and 21 in a representative sample of Swiss adolescents (N = 1,258; 54 % female; M = 15.30 years). Anticipated moral emotions and decision-making were assessed through a semi-structured interview procedure. Using Bernoulli hierarchical linear modeling, it was found that positive feelings after a moral transgression (i.e., "happy victimizer" responses) decreased over time, whereas positive feelings after a moral decision (i.e., "happy moralist" responses) increased. However, this pattern was contingent upon the moral scenario presented. Systematic relationships between anticipated moral emotions and moral personality characteristics of sympathy, conscientiousness, and agreeableness were found, even when controlling for socio-demographic characteristics and cognitive ability. Overall, this study demonstrates that the development of anticipated moral emotions is not limited to childhood. Furthermore, our findings suggest that moral emotions serve as an important link between moral personality development and decision-making processes that are more proximal to everyday moral behavior.

  20. Moral motivation based on multiple developmental structures: an exploration of cognitive and emotional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ulas; Tivnan, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    Intrapersonal variability and multiplicity in the complexity of moral motivation were examined from Dynamic Systems and Self-Determination Theory perspectives. L. Kohlberg's (1969) stages of moral development are reconceptualized as soft-assembled and dynamically transformable process structures of motivation that may operate simultaneously within person in different degrees. Moral motivation is conceptualized as the real-time process of self-organization of cognitive and emotional dynamics out of which moral judgment and action emerge. A detailed inquiry into intrapersonal variation in moral motivation is carried out based on the differential operation of multiple motivational structures. A total of 74 high school students and 97 college students participated in the study by completing a new questionnaire, involving 3 different hypothetical moral judgments. As hypothesized, findings revealed significant multiplicity in the within-person operation of developmental stage structures, and intrapersonal variability in the degrees to which stages were used. Developmental patterns were found in terms of different distributions of multiple stages between high school and college samples, as well as the association between age and overall motivation scores. Differential relations of specific emotions to moral motivation revealed and confirmed the value of differentiating multiple emotions. Implications of the present theoretical perspective and the findings for understanding the complexity of moral judgment and motivation are discussed.

  1. The Foreign Language Effect on Moral Judgment: The Role of Emotions and Norms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Geipel

    Full Text Available We investigated whether and why the use of a foreign language influences moral judgment. We studied the trolley and footbridge dilemmas, which propose an action that involves killing one individual to save five. In line with prior work, the use of a foreign language increased the endorsement of such consequentialist actions for the footbridge dilemma, but not for the trolley dilemma. But contrary to recent theorizing, this effect was not driven by an attenuation of emotions. An attenuation of emotions was found in both dilemmas, and it did not mediate the foreign language effect on moral judgment. An examination of additional scenarios revealed that foreign language influenced moral judgment when the proposed action involved a social or moral norm violation. We propose that foreign language influences moral judgment by reducing access to normative knowledge.

  2. The Foreign Language Effect on Moral Judgment: The Role of Emotions and Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geipel, Janet; Hadjichristidis, Constantinos; Surian, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether and why the use of a foreign language influences moral judgment. We studied the trolley and footbridge dilemmas, which propose an action that involves killing one individual to save five. In line with prior work, the use of a foreign language increased the endorsement of such consequentialist actions for the footbridge dilemma, but not for the trolley dilemma. But contrary to recent theorizing, this effect was not driven by an attenuation of emotions. An attenuation of emotions was found in both dilemmas, and it did not mediate the foreign language effect on moral judgment. An examination of additional scenarios revealed that foreign language influenced moral judgment when the proposed action involved a social or moral norm violation. We propose that foreign language influences moral judgment by reducing access to normative knowledge.

  3. Effects of oxytocin administration on spirituality and emotional responses to meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cappellen, Patty; Way, Baldwin M; Isgett, Suzannah F; Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2016-10-01

    The oxytocin (OT) system, critically involved in social bonding, may also impinge on spirituality, which is the belief in a meaningful life imbued with a sense of connection to a Higher Power and/or the world. Midlife male participants (N = 83) were randomly assigned to receive intranasal OT or placebo. In exploratory analyses, participants were also genotyped for polymorphisms in two genes critical for OT signaling, the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR rs53576) and CD38 (rs6449182 and rs3796863). Results showed that intranasal OT increased self-reported spirituality on two separate measures and this effect remained significant a week later. It also boosted participants' experience of specific positive emotions during meditation, at both explicit and implicit levels. Furthermore, the effect of OT on spirituality was moderated by OT-related genotypes. These results provide the first experimental evidence that spirituality, endorsed by millions worldwide, appears to be supported by OT. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Self-Reported Risk and Delinquent Behavior and Problem Behavioral Intention in Hong Kong Adolescents: The Role of Moral Competence and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Zhu, Xiaoqin

    2018-01-01

    Based on the six-wave data collected from Grade 7 to Grade 12 students (N = 3,328 at Wave 1), this pioneer study examined the development of problem behaviors (risk and delinquent behavior and problem behavioral intention) and the predictors (moral competence and spirituality) among adolescents in Hong Kong. Individual growth curve models revealed that while risk and delinquent behavior accelerated and then slowed down in the high school years, adolescent problem behavioral intention slightly accelerated over time. After controlling the background socio-demographic factors, moral competence and spirituality were negatively associated with risk and delinquent behavior as well as problem behavioral intention across all waves as predicted. Regarding the rate of change in the outcome measures, while the initial level of spirituality was positively linked to the growth rate of risk and delinquent behavior, the initial level of moral competence was negatively associated with the growth rate of problem behavioral intention. The theoretical and practical implications of the present findings are discussed with reference to the role of moral competence and spirituality in the development of adolescent problem behavior. PMID:29651269

  5. Exploring the Trajectory of Personal, Moral and Spiritual Values of 16- to 18-Year-Old Students Taking Religious Studies at A Level in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J.; Village, Andrew; Parker, Stephen G.

    2017-01-01

    This study set out to explore the trajectory of personal, moral and spiritual values of students taking Religious Studies at A level in the UK. A sample of 150 students completed a battery of measures at the beginning of their period of A level study and again at the end. The data found no difference over this period of time in personal values…

  6. PENINGKATAN ESQ (EMOTIONAL SPIRITUAL QUOTIENT SISWA SMAN 1 PACITAN MELALUI PEMBELAJARAN PENDIDIKAN AGAMA ISLAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Zamroni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available SQ (Spiritual Quotion is the intelligence obtained through spiritual creativity that took focus around the area of the spirit. IQ (intelegency Quotion is the intelligence obtained through a creative mind centered in the brain. EQ (Emotional Quotion is the intelligence obtained through the emotional creativity centered in the soul. The owner of a high IQ is not a guarantee for success. Often found the owner of a high IQ but failed to achieve success; while the owner of a mediocre IQ achieved tremendous success because it is supported by EQ and SQ. EQ mechanism does not stand alone in contributing to a human being but the intensity and effectiveness is strongly influenced by elements of spiritual intelligence (SQ. The existence of a variety of immoral behavior, cases of pregnancy among learners out of wedlock and the number of students involved in drug use, showing the appreciation of the values of religious teaching students is not adequate. Crime is increasingly prevalent in society and animosity between followers of the teachings of religion are also assessed as a result of the limited understanding of religious teachings. it would require a strategy to improve the quality of learning PAI which not only emphasizes the aspect of knowledge (cognitive, but more important is learning PAI capable of providing guidance intensively on aspects psykomotorik and affective learners that the learning strategy to improve spiritual intelligence and emotional lessons Islamic Education (PAI. so that will give birth to good behavior (behavior commendable. Through learning Strategil PAI improve spiritual intelligence and emotional, can also increase the interest, the response and performance of learners. Because the implementation is more oriented towards the involvement of students (student centered learning in the learning process in the classroom and are more cooperative learning * Guru PAI SMAN I Pacitan 68 Jurnal Ilmu Tarbiyah "At-Tajdid", Vol. 3, No. 2

  7. Emotions Targeting Moral Exemplarity: Making Sense of the Logical Geography of Admiration, Emulation and Elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Kristján

    2017-01-01

    Despite renewed interest in moral role-modelling and its emotional underpinnings, further conceptual work is needed on the logical geography of the emotions purportedly driving it, in particular, admiration, emulation and elevation. In this article, I explore admiration (as understood by Linda Zagzebski), emulation (as understood by Aristotle) and…

  8. Changes in Emotional-Social Intelligence, Caring, Leadership and Moral Judgment during Health Science Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Helene; Benson, Gerry; Wessel, Jean; Martin, Lynn; Ploeg, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    In addition to having academic knowledge and clinical skills, health professionals need to be caring, ethical practitioners able to understand the emotional concerns of their patients and to effect change. The purpose of this study was to determine whether emotional-social intelligence, caring, leadership and moral judgment of health science…

  9. Validity of Social, Moral and Emotional Facets of Self-Description Questionnaire II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kim Chau; Marsh, Herbert W.; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Abduljabbar, Adel S.

    2015-01-01

    Studies adopting a construct validity approach can be categorized into within- and between-network studies. Few studies have applied between-network approach and tested the correlations of the social (same-sex relations, opposite-sex relations, parent relations), moral (honesty-trustworthiness), and emotional (emotional stability) facets of the…

  10. The physiological correlates of children's emotions in contexts of moral transgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Colasante, Tyler; Zuffianò, Antonio; de Bruine, Marieke

    2016-02-01

    Heightened attention to sociomoral conflicts and arousal at the prospect of committing moral transgressions are thought to increase the likelihood of negatively valenced moral emotions (NVMEs; e.g., guilt) in children. Here, we tested this biphasic model of moral emotions with a psychophysiological framework. For a series of vignettes depicting moral transgressions, 5- and 8-year-olds (N=138) were asked to anticipate their emotions as hypothetical victimizers. Their responses were coded for the presence and intensity of NVMEs. In addition, their heart rate (HR) was calculated for three intervals of interest: a baseline period, the presentation of vignettes, and the anticipation of emotions following vignettes. We used multilevel modeling to examine how change in children's HR across these intervals related to the intensity of their NVMEs. Those who experienced greater HR deceleration from baseline to vignettes and greater acceleration from vignettes to anticipated emotions reported more intense NVMEs. We discuss the potential attention- and arousal-related processes behind children's physiological reactivity and anticipated emotions in contexts of moral transgression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Spirituality and ethics in psychosomatic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmiš, Felix

    2015-01-01

    A patient has to cope with an illness on a physical, mental and spiritual level. There exists a difference between religiousness and spirituality even though the approach has a common foundation. Nonreligious spirituality relates to an inner experience, transcendent states of consciousness, meaningfulness, responsibility, sympathy, ethics, humanisation, faith. We encounter the spiritual point of view in humanistic psychotherapy, pastoral medicine, work of hospital chaplains, New Age, psychotherapies with religious and alternative aspects, transpersonal psychotherapy, psycho-spiritual crises, unusual states of consciousness, in meditation, Yoga, relaxation, kinesiology, ethicotherapy, reincarnation therapy, positive motivation, holotropic breathing, etc. There is description of different degrees of spiritual development, rational and irrational feeling of spirituality, Quantum Physics, spiritual intelligence, neuro-theology, physiological change, effects on improving adaptation during stress, drugs addiction, etc. Spirituality in relation with ethics is discussed in terms of socio-biology, evolution, emotions, aggressivity, genetics and social influence. The work analyses the effect of stressful situations on the deterioration of moral attitudes: during lack of time, obedience to authority and order. It is described how temperament and personality disorders can affect perception of spirituality, guilt feeling and conscience. Stressful situations, lack of time, relying only on the auxiliary objective methods leads to alienation of physician with a patient. Spirituality can partially improve the doctor-patient relationship, communication and sense of responsibility.

  12. Language of Responsibility. The Influence of Linguistic Abstraction on Collective Moral Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilewicz Michal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments investigated the effects of linguistic abstractness on the experience of collective moral emotions. In Experiment 1 participants were presented with two scenarios about ingroup misbehavior, phrased using descriptive action verbs, interpretative action verbs, adjectives or nouns. The results show that participants experienced slightly more negative moral emotions with higher levels of linguistic abstractness. In Experiment 2 we also tested for the influence of national identification on the relationship between linguistic abstractness and emotional reactions. Additionally, we expanded the number of scenarios. Experiment 2 replicated the earlier pattern, but found larger differences between conditions. The strength of national identification did not moderate the observed effects. The results of this research are discussed within the context of the linguistic category model and psychology of collective moral emotions.

  13. The Effect of Moral Reasoning Level and Emotional Intelligence on Employment Ethics Assessment of Earnings Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewita Puspawati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of moral level reasoning and emotional intelligence on the assessment of earnings management ethics. The theory used is the theory of planned behavior. Respondents in this study are S1 Accounting Department Faculty of Economics and Business University of Muhammadiyah Surakarta. The samples used were 89 respondents with convenience sampling technique. The results showed that the moral level of reasoning affect the evaluation of earnings management ethics, while emotional intelligence does not affect the dependent variable.

  14. The moral emotions: a social-functionalist account of anger, disgust, and contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcherson, Cendri A; Gross, James J

    2011-04-01

    Recent research has highlighted the important role of emotion in moral judgment and decision making (Greene, Sommerville, Nystrom, Darley, & Cohen, 2001; Haidt, 2001). What is less clear is whether distinctions should be drawn among specific moral emotions. Although some have argued for differences among anger, disgust, and contempt (Rozin, Lowery, Imada, & Haidt, 1999), others have suggested that these terms may describe a single undifferentiated emotional response to morally offensive behavior (Nabi, 2002). In this article, we take a social-functionalist perspective, which makes the prediction that these emotions should be differentiable both in antecedent appraisals and in consequent actions and judgments. Studies 1-3 tested and found support for our predictions concerning distinctions among antecedent appraisals, including (a) a more general role for disgust than has been previously been described, (b) an effect of self-relevance on anger but not other emotions, and (c) a role for contempt in judging incompetent actions. Studies 4 and 5 tested and found support for our specific predictions concerning functional outcomes, providing evidence that these emotions are associated with different consequences. Taken together, these studies support a social-functionalist account of anger, disgust, and contempt and lay the foundation for future research on the negative interpersonal emotions.

  15. Preliminary findings on associations between moral emotions and social behavior in young children with normal hearing and with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelaar, Lizet; Wiefferink, Carin H; Frijns, Johan H M; Broekhof, Evelien; Rieffe, Carolien

    2015-11-01

    Moral emotions such as shame, guilt and pride are the result of an evaluation of the own behavior as (morally) right or wrong. The capacity to experience moral emotions is thought to be an important driving force behind socially appropriate behavior. The relationship between moral emotions and social behavior in young children has not been studied extensively in normally hearing (NH) children, let alone in those with a hearing impairment. This study compared young children with hearing impairments who have a cochlear implant (CI) to NH peers regarding the extent to which they display moral emotions, and how this relates to their social functioning and language skills. Responses of 184 NH children and 60 children with CI (14-61 months old) to shame-/guilt- and pride-inducing events were observed. Parents reported on their children's social competence and externalizing behavior, and experimenters observed children's cooperative behavior. To examine the role of communication in the development of moral emotions and social behavior, children's language skills were assessed. Results show that children with CI displayed moral emotions to a lesser degree than NH children. An association between moral emotions and social functioning was found in the NH group, but not in the CI group. General language skills were unrelated to moral emotions in the CI group, yet emotion vocabulary was related to social functioning in both groups of children. We conclude that facilitating emotion language skills has the potential to promote children's social functioning, and could contribute to a decrease in behavioral problems in children with CI specifically. Future studies should examine in greater detail which factors are associated with the development of moral emotions, particularly in children with CI. Some possible directions for future research are discussed.

  16. The CAD triad hypothesis: a mapping between three moral emotions (contempt, anger, disgust) and three moral codes (community, autonomy, divinity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, P; Lowery, L; Imada, S; Haidt, J

    1999-04-01

    It is proposed that 3 emotions--contempt, anger, and disgust--are typically elicited, across cultures, by violations of 3 moral codes proposed by R. A. Shweder and his colleagues (R. A. Shweder, N. C. Much, M. Mahapatra, & L. Park, 1997). The proposed alignment links anger to autonomy (individual rights violations), contempt to community (violation of communal codes including hierarchy), and disgust to divinity (violations of purity-sanctity). This is the CAD triad hypothesis. Students in the United States and Japan were presented with descriptions of situations that involve 1 of the types of moral violations and asked to assign either an appropriate facial expression (from a set of 6) or an appropriate word (contempt, anger, disgust, or their translations). Results generally supported the CAD triad hypothesis. Results were further confirmed by analysis of facial expressions actually made by Americans to the descriptions of these situations.

  17. Moral Emotions during Military Deployments of Dutch Forces: A Qualitative Study on Moral Emotions in Intercultural Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, M; de Graaff, Miriam; Verweij, D.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Which emotions are generated by the behavior of “the other” in intercultural interactions that Dutch soldiers perceive as conflicting with their own values? How are these emotions related to types of behavioral reactions of Dutch military personnel? This preliminary study explores the emotional and

  18. An agent harms a victim: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on specific moral emotions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedia, G.; Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L.; Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L.; Kedia, G.; Hilton, D.; Berthoz, S.; Wessa, M.

    2008-01-01

    The statement 'An agent harms a victim' depicts a situation that triggers moral emotions. Depending on whether the agent and the victim are the self or someone else, it can lead to four different moral emotions: self-anger ('I harm myself'), guilt ('I harm someone'), other-anger ('someone harms me'), and compassion ('someone harms someone'). In order to investigate the neural correlates of these emotions, we examined brain activation patterns elicited by variations in the agent (self vs. other) and the victim (self vs. other) of a harmful action. Twenty-nine healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while imagining being in situations in which they or someone else harmed themselves or someone else. Results indicated that the three emotional conditions associated with the involvement of other, either as agent or victim (guilt, other-anger, and compassion conditions), all activated structures that have been previously associated with the Theory of Mind (ToM, the attribution of mental states to others), namely, the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the bilateral temporo-parietal junction. Moreover, the two conditions in which both the self and other were concerned by the harmful action (guilt and other-anger conditions) recruited emotional structures (i. e., the bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate, and basal ganglia). These results suggest that specific moral emotions induce different neural activity depending on the extent to which they involve the self and other. (authors)

  19. Is Shame an Ugly Emotion? Four Discourses--Two Contrasting Interpretations for Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Kristján

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a sustained philosophical meditation on contrasting interpretations of the emotion of shame within four academic discourses--social psychology, psychological anthropology, educational psychology and Aristotelian scholarship--in order to elicit their implications for moral education. It turns out that within each of these…

  20. The Development of the Sense of Justice: Moral Development, Resources, and Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Constructs a model applying evolutionary biology theory to the development of children's sense of justice. Maintains that competition for scarce resources causes many of the moral problems involving justice. Examines the place of emotions in the sense of justice. Hypothesizes rules of justice that predate cultural history. (CH)

  1. Spirituality, Religion, and Substance Coping as Regulators of Emotions and Meaning Making: Different Effects on Pain and Joy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarrocchi, Joseph W.; Brelsford, Gina M.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses whether aspects of spirituality and religion predict psychological and emotional well-being in a general population over and above personality and coping through the use of drugs or alcohol. Results are consistent with self-control theory and positive psychology approaches. (Contains 3 tables.)

  2. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, MORAL, ETHICS, BIO-ETHICS AND WHAT IS IN BETWEEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Daniella; Yagoda, Arie

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, the study of emotions has broadened its scope and established its standing as a new scientific discipline. Humanity has become increasingly conscious of the seminal role played by the emotional components in both intrapersonal and interpersonal behavior. A deeply rooted and inherent correlation exists between emotional intelligence (E.I. - Emotional Intelligence) and positive social results: social adaptation, quality social relationships, the capacity for healthy social behaviors, caring, altruism, empathy, enlightened communication and the efficacy and personal coherence essential to moral and ethical behavior, including its manifestation in the sphere of bio-ethics. The importance of the personal relationship between the doctor and the patient is especially fundamental in the current era of immense and accelerated scientific-technological development, forcing doctors to cope with an increasingly complicated technical environment. Precisely because of this reality, it is essential that a doctor's actions and interpersonal relationship with the patient proceed from an ethical base, grounded in both professional and emotional responsibility. Emotional responsibility is one of the central elements underlying bioethical conduct and is the element that provides the guideposts for the treatment of others. The symbiotic connection between emotional intelligence and the sphere of ethics and morals is what delineates human beings. Human beings, by definition and in essence, bear responsibility for their actions. The beginning of ethics is in the human being's consciousness of choice in relation to self and to others. An individual's choices integrate emotion and cognition. That ability to integrate alongside the capacity for choice enables the human race to act in accordance with ethical and moral codes. At work, on a daily basis, a doctor is positioned opposite to the physical, emotional, cognitive and ethical entirety of the patient. Beyond the doctor

  3. Spirituality, emotional distress, and post-traumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their partners: an actor-partner interdependence modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesselman, Amanda N; Bigatti, Silvia M; Garcia, Justin R; Coe, Kathryn; Cella, David; Champion, Victoria L

    2017-10-01

    The association between spirituality and emotional health has been well documented in healthy individuals. A small literature has shown that spirituality plays a role in well-being for some breast cancer (BC) survivors; however, this link is virtually unexplored in partners/spouses of survivors. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between spirituality, emotional distress, and post-traumatic growth for BC survivors and their partners using a dyadic analyses approach. A total of 498 couples who were 3-8 years post-BC diagnosis were recruited from the Eastern Oncology Group database. For BC survivors and their partners, greater levels of spirituality were associated with increases in their own post-traumatic growth. There was no relation between BC and partner spirituality and their own emotional distress, but partner's spirituality was associated with reduced occurrence of intrusive thoughts in the BC survivor. In contrast, BC survivors' spirituality was found to be wholly unrelated to partner's mental health and adjustment. Following diagnosis and treatment, spirituality appears to associate with positive growth in BC survivors and their partners. However, BC survivor and partner spirituality seem to be ineffective at impacting the other's post-traumatic growth or emotional distress, with the exception of intrusive thoughts. Dyadic analysis takes into account the reciprocal influence of close relationships on health and is an important and under-utilized methodology in behavioral oncology research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. INTERVENSI SPIRITUAL EMOTIONAL FREEDOM TECHNIQUE UNTUK MENGURANGI RASA NYERI PASIEN KANKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rr. Tutik Sri Hariyati

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual emotional freedom technique (SEFT represents an combination technique from body’s energy system and spiritual therapy by tapping at certain points of the body. SEFT focuses on certain words or sentences pronounced several times in a rhythm, follows by resignation to God as in patients’ belief. This research was aimed to explore the effect of SEFT intervention to reduce of cancer pain patients at the Dr Soetomo General Hospital in Surabaya. Quasi experimental were used in this study using pre test and post test design with control group. Samples, 20 respondents (in 2 groups were recruited using consecutive sampling. The intervention group received SEFT intervention combined with analgesic therapy and the control group given only analgesic therapy. SEFT intervention implemented after administrating analgesic, for 5-10 minutes every day during five days. Pain was measured using numeric rating scale (NRS. The combination SEFT intervention and analgesic therapy was more effective than only analgesic therapy. SEFT can be employed for cancer patients to relieve their pain. Nursing intervention with SEFT encourages nurse’s role autonomy and steps to reduce patient’s dependency on analgesic therapy.

  5. Spiritually Integrated Treatment of Depression: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have found an inverse correlation between religious/spiritual involvement and depression. Yet several obstacles impede spiritually integrated treatment of depressed individuals. These include specialization and fragmentation of care, inexperience of clinicians and spiritual care providers, ideological bias, boundary and ethical concerns, and the lack of an accepted conceptual framework for integrated treatment. Here I suggest a framework for approaching these obstacles, constructed from a unified view of human experience (having emotional, existential, and spiritual dimensions); spirituality seen as a response to existential concerns (in domains such as identity, hope, meaning/purpose, morality, and autonomy in relation to authority, which are frequently distorted and amplified in depression); a rationale for locating spiritually oriented approaches within a clinician's assessment, formulation, and treatment plan; and recognition of the challenges and potential pitfalls of integrated treatment. PMID:22577530

  6. Spiritually Integrated Treatment of Depression: A Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Peteet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have found an inverse correlation between religious/spiritual involvement and depression. Yet several obstacles impede spiritually integrated treatment of depressed individuals. These include specialization and fragmentation of care, inexperience of clinicians and spiritual care providers, ideological bias, boundary and ethical concerns, and the lack of an accepted conceptual framework for integrated treatment. Here I suggest a framework for approaching these obstacles, constructed from a unified view of human experience (having emotional, existential, and spiritual dimensions; spirituality seen as a response to existential concerns (in domains such as identity, hope, meaning/purpose, morality, and autonomy in relation to authority, which are frequently distorted and amplified in depression; a rationale for locating spiritually oriented approaches within a clinician's assessment, formulation, and treatment plan; and recognition of the challenges and potential pitfalls of integrated treatment.

  7. LAND AND MORALITY IN A RURAL COMMUNITY: EMOTIVE LANGUAGE IN THE NARRATIVES OF THE PAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bužeková Tatiana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of ethnographic research in a village in eastern Slovakia. My aim is to consider the narratives of people from countryside who witnessed socialist period and to present their view of land which they cultivated. I explore two sources: people’s life stories; and a local chronicle which was written during the 1960s. I argue that (1 both kinds of narratives serve as cultural tools for members of a collective as they recount the past in certain context; (2 in this, expression of moral emotions indicates narrative conventions related to social norms. I demonstrate that the semi-official context of the local chronicle demands expression of moral emotions in evaluation of the big-scale political events, but the chroniclers are rather cautious in assessment of local people’s behaviour. On the other side, in informal settings people summarize life periods using moral terms and freely express positive as well as negative attitudes toward other people and social conditions, to make sense of the past events in relation to the present time. Thus, the language of emotions indicates the specific narrative context as well as social rules. At the same time, emotional expressions should be read considering a narrator’s personality and social background; in this, the local historical and cultural setting is essential.

  8. Identifying Emotions in Organizational Settings : towards dealing with morality

    OpenAIRE

    Teran Villegas, Oswaldo Ramon; Sibertin-Blanc, Christophe; Gaudou, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Emotions play an essential role in the behaviour of human beings, either at their sudden occurrence or by the continuous care to prevent the occurrence of unpleasant ones and to search for the occurrence of pleasant ones. Notably, in any system of collective action, they influence the behaviours of the actors with respect to each others. SocLab is a framework devoted to the study of the functioning of social organizations, through the agent-based modelling of their str...

  9. Effect of opponent type on moral emotions and responses to video game play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Fang

    2011-11-01

    This study suggests that fighting against different types of opponents in video games (e.g., human opponents vs. monster opponents) may lead to different emotional responses and moral judgments toward game characters. Based on Bandura's moral disengagement theory, this study proposes that shooting at monster opponents makes game players feel less guilty and judge the player-controlled character as more morally justified. An experiment was conducted in which participants played shooting games with either human opponents or monster opponents. The results show that when playing against monster opponents, participants felt both less ashamed and less guilty, reported enjoying the game more, and judged their character as more justified than participants who played against human opponents.

  10. Emotional and Utilitarian Appraisals of Moral Dilemmas Are Encoded in Separate Areas and Integrated in Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser-Kouhsari, Leila; Woodward, James; Rangel, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Moral judgment often requires making difficult tradeoffs (e.g., is it appropriate to torture to save the lives of innocents at risk?). Previous research suggests that both emotional appraisals and more deliberative utilitarian appraisals influence such judgments and that these appraisals often conflict. However, it is unclear how these different types of appraisals are represented in the brain, or how they are integrated into an overall moral judgment. We addressed these questions using an fMRI paradigm in which human subjects provide separate emotional and utilitarian appraisals for different potential actions, and then make difficult moral judgments constructed from combinations of these actions. We found that anterior cingulate, insula, and superior temporal gyrus correlated with emotional appraisals, whereas temporoparietal junction and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex correlated with utilitarian appraisals. Overall moral value judgments were represented in an anterior portion of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Critically, the pattern of responses and functional interactions between these three sets of regions are consistent with a model in which emotional and utilitarian appraisals are computed independently and in parallel, and passed to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex where they are integrated into an overall moral value judgment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Popular accounts of moral judgment often describe it as a battle for control between two systems, one intuitive and emotional, the other rational and utilitarian, engaged in winner-take-all inhibitory competition. Using a novel fMRI paradigm, we identified distinct neural signatures of emotional and utilitarian appraisals and used them to test different models of how they compete for the control of moral behavior. Importantly, we find little support for competitive inhibition accounts. Instead, moral judgments resembled the architecture of simple economic choices: distinct regions represented emotional

  11. Formation of Public Consciousness, Spiritual and Moral Culture of Students in the System of Continuous Pedagogical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Esimbekovna Abylkassymova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is written within the framework of the project "Formation of social consciousness and spiritual & moral culture of students in the system of continuous pedagogical education on the basis of the patriotic idea "Mangilik El". There is an imposition through the media, including the Internet, on the territory of Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Belarus, etc. Western, supposedly "universal" values with an emphasis on liberalism and the free market. Only the rights and freedoms of the individual, without emphasis on the laws of community living in society, are put at the center of this work. It divides, individualizes society, provokes in the youth environment of excessive competition. The article presents the results of the study self-positioning of student youth. Young people's perception of themselves and their expectations of others portray an image of a person living in a state of heightened anxiety and a highly actualized need for security, material well-being and recognition focused on himself/herself and private life, ready for action and responsibility in the distance of his/her inner circle. The key components of his ideas about success in life: family and children, financial well-being, business work (55-60% emerge from this self-attitude. Complement the normative model of success self-realization and the possibility of self-manifestation, education, health, beauty, sports (35-40%. The second plan – the criteria of success associated with the outside world (to be useful to society and people – 18%, recognition and respect from others, finding important contacts and connections, access to information and communication in social networks – 12-15%, politics and participation in political and public organizations – 1%. The model of success in life of young people today is largely confined to the man himself.

  12. Moral emotions associated with prosocial and antisocial behavior in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Barón, María J; Etxebarria Bilbao, Itziar; Apodaca Urquijo, Pedro; Conejero López, Susana; Pascual Jimeno, Aitziber

    2018-02-01

    The present study aims to explore the main effects and interactive effects of empathy, guilt, shame, pride (authentic and hubristic), and moral pride, on prosocial and antisocial behavior in children. The sample group comprised 351 children aged between 10 and 14 selected from four schools in the Basque Country (Spain). Hierarchical multiple regression models were used in the statistical analyses. Prosocial behavior was found to be predicted by the additive interaction between empathy and moral pride, by guilt and, to a lesser extent and negatively, by shame. In relation to antisocial behavior, children with a strong disposition to guilt scored lower for antisocial behavior, regardless of their empathy levels. Nevertheless, the combination of low empathy and low guilt levels was associated with highest antisocial behavior scores. As regards shame, this emotion was moderately associated with antisocial behavior. By exploring interactions the present study provided a more nuanced view of the emotional factors associated with children´s prosocial and antisocial behavior.

  13. Relationship between Different Types of Educational, Emotional and Spiritual Intelligence and Second Grade High School Female Students’ Religious Orientation, in Sari, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ali Doustdar Toosi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, we investigated how significantly the second grade high school female students’ educational, emotional, and spiritual intelligence were associated with their religious orientation. This research is descriptive (non- experimental with a correlation design. The research population includes all of the second grade high school girl students, during the 2015-16 educational year in Sari, a city in the north of Iran.  In this research, 260 samples were selected randomly. Research results showed that educational, emotional, and spiritual intelligence (independent variables had positive and significant relationship with internal and external religious orientation (dependent variable. As the levels of educational, emotional, and spiritual intelligence increased, so did the level of religious orientation. Also the results of multiple regression analysis showed that educational, emotional, spiritual intelligence were anticipants of religious orientation and its dimensions (internal and external religious orientation.

  14. Empathy and moral emotions in post-apartheid South Africa: an fMRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Melike M; Stein, Dan J; Solms, Mark; Gobodo-Madikizela, Pumla; Decety, Jean

    2017-06-01

    Moral emotions elicited in response to others' suffering are mediated by empathy and affect how we respond to their pain. South Africa provides a unique opportunity to study group processes given its racially divided past. The present study seeks insights into aspects of the moral brain by investigating behavioral and functional MRI responses of White and Black South Africans who lived through apartheid to in- and out-group physical and social pain. Whereas the physical pain task featured faces expressing dynamic suffering, the social pain task featured victims of apartheid violence from the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission to elicit heartfelt emotion. Black participants' behavioral responses were suggestive of in-group favoritism, whereas White participants' responses were apparently egalitarian. However, all participants showed significant in-group biases in activation in the amygdala (physical pain), as well as areas involved in mental state representation, including the precuneus, temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and frontal pole (physical and social pain). Additionally, Black participants reacted with heightened moral indignation to own-race suffering, whereas White participants reacted with heightened shame to Black suffering, which was associated with blunted neural empathic responding. These findings provide ecologically valid insights into some behavioral and brain processes involved in complex moral situations. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. An agent harms a victim: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on specific moral emotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kedia, G. [INSERM, Inst Hlth et Med Res, U797, Res Unit Neuroimaging Psychiat, F-91401 Orsay (France); Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, Orsay (France); Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L. [Univ Paris Sud, U797, Paris (France); Kedia, G.; Hilton, D. [Univ Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Berthoz, S. [Paris Descartes Univ, U797, Paris (France); Wessa, M. [Univ Heidelber, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, D-6800 Mannheim (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The statement 'An agent harms a victim' depicts a situation that triggers moral emotions. Depending on whether the agent and the victim are the self or someone else, it can lead to four different moral emotions: self-anger ('I harm myself'), guilt ('I harm someone'), other-anger ('someone harms me'), and compassion ('someone harms someone'). In order to investigate the neural correlates of these emotions, we examined brain activation patterns elicited by variations in the agent (self vs. other) and the victim (self vs. other) of a harmful action. Twenty-nine healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while imagining being in situations in which they or someone else harmed themselves or someone else. Results indicated that the three emotional conditions associated with the involvement of other, either as agent or victim (guilt, other-anger, and compassion conditions), all activated structures that have been previously associated with the Theory of Mind (ToM, the attribution of mental states to others), namely, the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the bilateral temporo-parietal junction. Moreover, the two conditions in which both the self and other were concerned by the harmful action (guilt and other-anger conditions) recruited emotional structures (i. e., the bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate, and basal ganglia). These results suggest that specific moral emotions induce different neural activity depending on the extent to which they involve the self and other. (authors)

  16. Easing the Burden: Describing the Role of Social, Emotional and Spiritual Support in Research Families with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, June A; Kenen, Regina; Bremer, Renee; Givens, Shannon; Savage, Sharon A; Mai, Phuong L

    2016-06-01

    This study presents findings of a mixed-method descriptive exploration of the role of friends and spirituality/religiosity in easing the burden of families with the rare inherited disorder, Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS). LFS is caused by germline mutations in the TP53 gene and is associated with very high lifetime risk of developing one or more malignancies. During the first clinical visit we assessed several types of social support among a subset of study participants (N = 66) using an established interactive research tool called the Colored Eco-Genetic Relationship Map (CEGRM). We performed both quantitative and qualitative analyses of social relationships with LFS family members and close non-kin. Distress scores (N = 59) were mostly low normal, with some outliers. We found that reported friendships varied widely, that the friendships were often deep and enduring, and were important sources of informational, tangible, emotional and spiritual support. Confidantes tended to be best friends and/or spouses. Organized religion was important in selected families, typically from mainstream traditions. However, a number of people identified themselves as "spiritual" and reported spiritual and humanist explorations. Our results shed preliminary light on how some people in families with LFS cope in the face of tremendous medical, social and emotional challenges.

  17. Modeling and Simulating Moral Emotions in Organizations: exploring its impact on collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Teran Villegas, Oswaldo Ramon; Sibertin-Blanc, Christophe; Gaudou, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The paper presents how moral sensitivity and emotions are modeled in organizational setting by using the SocLab formal framework. Additionally simulation results, including an interesting tendency for a Free Rider model, will be given. SocLab is a platform for the modeling, simulation and analysis of cooperation relationships within social organizations - and more generally Sys-tems of Organized Action. Taking into account the fact that decision-making processes are no...

  18. The Relation of Moral Emotion Attributions to Prosocial and Antisocial Behavior: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Krettenauer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analytic review of 42 studies covering 8,009 participants (ages 4-20) examines the relation of moral emotion attributions to prosocial and antisocial behavior. A significant association is found between moral emotion attributions and prosocial and antisocial behaviors ("d" = 0.26, 95% CI [0.15, 0.38]; "d" = 0.39, 95%…

  19. Pengaruh Intelligent Quotient, Emotional Quotient, Dan Spiritual Quotient terhadap Pemahaman Akuntansi Pada Mahasiswa Akuntansi S-1 Di Universitas Sumatera Utara

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Riri Zulia

    2015-01-01

    Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui pengaruh Intelligent Quotient (IQ), Emotional Quotient (EQ), dan Spiritual Quotient (SQ) terhadap pemahaman akuntansi. Penelitian ini merupakan jenis penelitian kausal dan bersifat replikasi terhadap penelitian sebelumnya dengan populasi penelitian adalah mahasiswa akuntansi S-1 di Universitas Sumatera Utara stambuk 2008-2010. Pemilihan sampel dilakukan dengan metode purposive sampling dan dari mahasiswa akuntansi S-1 stambuk 2008-1010 diperoleh 120 s...

  20. Training Emotion Cultivates Morality: How Loving-Kindness Meditation Hones Compassion and Increases Prosocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankard, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Traditional moral philosophy has long focused on rationality, principled thinking, and good old-fashioned willpower, but recent evidence strongly suggests that moral judgments and prosocial behavior are more heavily influenced by emotion and intuition. As the evidence mounts, rational traditions emphasizing deliberative analysis and conscious decision making are called into question. The first section highlights some compelling evidence supporting the primacy of affective states in motivating moral judgments and behavior. The real challenge is finding a way to align intuition with desired behavior. In cool reflective states, one may desire to be a kind and loving person. But when it is time to act, the moment is often accompanied by strong affect-laden intuitions. I argue that if affective states are the primary motivators of behavior, then moral sentiments must be trained through habituation in order to increase prosocial behavior. The second section provides empirical evidence linking emotional training with increased prosociality. To highlight this connection, focus is placed on the relationship between habitual meditation training, compassion, and prosocial behavior. Recent studies by Antoine Lutz, Richard Davidson, Susanne Leiberg, and others show that various meditation practices can dramatically affect the human person at various levels, i.e., increased physical health, neural restructuring, regulation and development of emotions, and increased helping behavior, to name a few. The current article focuses on the impact the habit of loving-kindness meditation (LKM) has on compassion and prosocial behavior. Recent studies strongly support the conclusion that LKM training hones compassion and ultimately leads to an increase in compassionate behavior.

  1. Spiritual Emotional Freedom Technique (SEFT terhadap Kualitas Hidup Penderita Tuberkulosis Paru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberkulosis paru (TB merupakan penyakit kronik yang dapat memengaruhi kualitas hidup seseorang. Spiritual Emotional Freedom Technique (SEFT merupakan salah satu terapi non-farmakologis untuk mengatasi hal tersebut. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menjelaskan pengaruh terapi SEFT terhadap peningkatan Quality of Life (QoL pada penderita TB di Puskesmas Perak Timur Surabaya. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah quasi-eksperimental dengan jumlah sampel yang memenuhi kriteria inklusi sebanyak 22 orang. Analisis data dilakukan dengan menggunakan uji Wilcoxon dan Mann Whitney dengan tingkat kemaknaan α<0,05. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan adanya peningkatan kualitas hidup pasien TB secara signifikan pada aspek kesehatan fisik (p=0,003, psikologis (p=0,003, dan sosial (p=0,046 setelah dilakukan intervensi SEFT. Sedangkan hasil tidak signifikan terdapat pada aspek lingkungan (p=1,000. Pada uji Mann Whitney didapatkan hasil signifikan pada aspek kesehatan fisik (p=0,000, aspek psikologis (p=0,000, dan aspek fungsi sosial (p=0,015. Hasil uji Mann Whitney tidak signifikan pada aspek lingkungan (p=0,167. Kesimpulan yang didapatkan adalah SEFT mampu meningkatkan kualitas hidup responden secara umum, karena mampu mengatasi “psychological reversal” dan karena pengaruh dari “electrical active cells”.

  2. Valence of emotions and moral decision-making: increased pleasantness to pleasant images and decreased unpleasantness to unpleasant images are associated with utilitarian choices in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Perera, Martina; Martí-García, Celia; Pérez-García, Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Moral decision-making is a key asset for humans’ integration in social contexts, and the way we decide about moral issues seems to be strongly influenced by emotions. For example, individuals with deficits in emotional processing tend to deliver more utilitarian choices (accepting an emotionally aversive action in favor of communitarian well-being). However, little is known about the association between emotional experience and moral-related patterns of choice. We investigated whether subjective reactivity to emotional stimuli, in terms of valence, arousal, and dominance, is associated with moral decision-making in 95 healthy adults. They answered to a set of moral and non-moral dilemmas and assessed emotional experience in valence, arousal and dominance dimensions in response to neutral, pleasant, unpleasant non-moral, and unpleasant moral pictures. Results showed significant correlations between less unpleasantness to negative stimuli, more pleasantness to positive stimuli and higher proportion of utilitarian choices. We also found a positive association between higher arousal ratings to negative moral laden pictures and more utilitarian choices. Low dominance was associated with greater perceived difficulty over moral judgment. These behavioral results are in fitting with the proposed role of emotional experience in moral choice. PMID:24133433

  3. The Cultivation of Humanities and Emotions. Reflections on Moral and Political Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gil

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper involves a reflection on the current orientation that education is adopting based on Martha Nussbaum’s thinking. Under the imperative of the economic growth, education is seen as a mere means to achieve success in the job market, and arts and humanities are being marginalized from study programs increasingly. We will talk about the cultivation of empathic imagination and compassion as mechanisms that help us to understand people that are different from us, and to acquire a concern for them. We will see why the role of these emotions might be relevant in order to prompt us to help whoever that finds himself in a vulnerability situation or suffering. This is why we will argue that the cultivation of these emotions may help us to develop a better moral agency, and also to enhance our condition as citizens, making us more sensitive towards other’s necessities, and orienting our political decisions towards cooperation and solidarity.

  4. Bodily moral disgust: what it is, how it is different from anger, and why it is an unreasoned emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Pascale Sophie; Giner-Sorolla, Roger

    2013-03-01

    With the recent upswing in research interest on the moral implications of disgust, there has been uncertainty about what kind of situations elicit moral disgust and whether disgust is a rational or irrational player in moral decision making. We first outline the benefits of distinguishing between bodily violations (e.g., sexual taboos, such as pedophilia and incest) and nonbodily violations (e.g., deception or betrayal) when examining moral disgust. We review findings from our lab and others' showing that, although many existing studies do not control for anger when studying disgust, disgust at nonbodily violations is often associated with anger and hard to separate from it, while bodily violations more consistently predict disgust independently of anger. Building on this distinction, we present further empirical evidence that moral disgust, in the context of bodily violations, is a relatively primitively appraised moral emotion compared to others such as anger, and also that it is less flexible and less prone to external justifications. Our review and results underscore the need to distinguish between the different consequences of moral emotions. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  5. A spirituality teaching program for depression: qualitative findings on cognitive and emotional change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Sabine; Kelly, Mary T; Xu, Tracy J; Toews, John; Rickhi, Badri

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted with participants from a trial evaluating an 8-week spirituality teaching program to treat unipolar major depression. The objectives of this study were to understand the nature of the observed mood following participation in the spirituality based intervention. This study used the methods of a naturalistic inquiry. A total of 15 interviewees were purposefully sampled from the trial population. The intervention consisted of audio CDs for home-based use that delivered lectures and stories about spirituality, suggested behavioural applications and included relaxation practices. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with each participant 6 months post program completion. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were coded for patterns of substantive core meaning in terms of the participants' subjective and behavioural experiences of the program materials. Participants described an expanded spiritual awareness, characterized by a sense of connection with self, others, the world and universal energy. The primary influences participants reported occurred as a result of practicing forgiveness, compassion, gratitude and acceptance in their daily lives and included reduced negative thinking patterns, being less judgmental, reduced ego-centricity, and improved self-esteem. Concurrent with these shifts, participants experienced an improved mood characterized by reduced anxiety and/or depression, mental clarity, calmness and improved relationships. Findings suggest that the spirituality teaching program impacts depression by expanding spiritual beliefs and shifting perspectives of life situations, oneself and others. Spiritual teachings and practices could be an innovative and valuable adjunct intervention to treat depression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Secret Wisdom: Spiritual Intelligence in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcup, Charmayne

    2016-01-01

    Current models of spiritual development suggest that adolescents have limited capacity for spirituality and spiritual experiences. Adolescents are seen to have immature moral and ethical judgment and be incapable of deep spiritual experience due to lack of cognitive development. This mixed-methods study explored the existence of spiritual…

  7. Terminating a Child’s Life? Religious, Moral, Cognitive, and Emotional Factors Underlying Non-Acceptance of Child Euthanasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Deak

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Is opposition to child euthanasia motivated only by ideology, or also by other personality characteristics and individual differences? In Belgium, the first country to legalize child euthanasia (in 2014, we investigated religious, moral, emotional, and cognitive factors underlying the (disapproval of this legalization ('N' = 213. Disapproval was associated with religiousness, collectivistic morality (loyalty and purity, and prosocial dispositions, in terms of emotional empathy and behavioral generosity, but not values (care and fairness. It was also associated with low flexibility in existential issues and a high endorsement of slippery slope arguments, but not necessarily low openness to experience. A regression analysis showed that in addition to religiousness, low flexibility in existential issues and high empathy and generosity distinctly predicted opposition to child euthanasia. Whereas most of the findings parallel those previously reported for adult euthanasia, the role of prosocial inclinations in predicting moral opposition seems to be specific to child euthanasia.

  8. Ethical quandaries in spiritual healing and herbal medicine: a critical analysis of the morality of traditional medicine advertising in southern African urban societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyaradzi, Mawere

    2011-01-01

    This paper critically examines the morality of advertising by practitioners in spiritual healing and herbal medicine heretofore referred to as traditional medicine, in southern African urban societies. While the subject of traditional medicine has been heavily contested in medical studies in the last few decades, the monumental studies on the subject have emphasised the place of traditional medicine in basic health services. Insignificant attention has been devoted to examine the ethical problems associated with traditional medicine advertising. Critical look at the worthiness of some advertising strategies used by practitioners in traditional medicine in launching their products and services on market thus has been largely ignored. Yet, though advertising is key to helping traditional medicine practitioners' products and services known by prospective customers, this research registers a number of morally negative effects that seem to outweigh the merits that the activity brings to prospective customers. The paper adopts southern African urban societies, and in particular Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe as particular references. The choice of the trio is not accidental, but based on the fact that these countries have in the last few decades been flooded with traditional medicine practitioners/traditional healers from within the continent and from abroad. Most of these practitioners use immoral advertising strategies in communicating to the public the products and services they offer. It is against this background that this paper examines the morality of advertising strategies deployed by practitioners in launching their products and services. To examine the moral worthiness of the advertising strategies used by traditional medical practitioners, I used qualitative analysis of street adverts as well as electronic and print media. From the results obtained through thematic content analysis, the paper concludes that most of the practitioners in traditional

  9. Ethical quandaries in spiritual healing and herbal medicine: A critical analysis of the morality of traditional medicine advertising in southern African urban societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyaradzi, Mawere

    2011-01-01

    This paper critically examines the morality of advertising by practitioners in spiritual healing and herbal medicine heretofore referred to as traditional medicine, in southern African urban societies. While the subject of traditional medicine has been heavily contested in medical studies in the last few decades, the monumental studies on the subject have emphasised the place of traditional medicine in basic health services. Insignificant attention has been devoted to examine the ethical problems associated with traditional medicine advertising. Critical look at the worthiness of some advertising strategies used by practitioners in traditional medicine in launching their products and services on market thus has been largely ignored. Yet, though advertising is key to helping traditional medicine practitioners’ products and services known by prospective customers, this research registers a number of morally negative effects that seem to outweigh the merits that the activity brings to prospective customers. The paper adopts southern African urban societies, and in particular Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe as particular references. The choice of the trio is not accidental, but based on the fact that these countries have in the last few decades been flooded with traditional medicine practitioners/traditional healers from within the continent and from abroad. Most of these practitioners use immoral advertising strategies in communicating to the public the products and services they offer. It is against this background that this paper examines the morality of advertising strategies deployed by practitioners in launching their products and services. To examine the moral worthiness of the advertising strategies used by traditional medical practitioners, I used qualitative analysis of street adverts as well as electronic and print media. From the results obtained through thematic content analysis, the paper concludes that most of the practitioners in traditional

  10. The role of self-blaming moral emotions in major depression and their impact on social-economical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcu, Erdem; Zahn, Roland; Elliott, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    People with major depressive disorder (MDD) are more prone to experiencing moral emotions related to self-blame, such as guilt and shame. DSM-IV-TR recognizes excessive or inappropriate guilt as one of the core symptoms of current MDD, whereas excessive shame is not part of the criteria for MDD. However, previous studies specifically assessing shame suggested its involvement in MDD. In the first part of this review, we will consider literature discussing the role of self-blaming moral emotions in MDD. These self-blaming moral emotions have been purported to influence people when they make social and financial decisions in cognitive studies, particularly those using neuroeconomical paradigms. Such paradigms aim to predict social behavior in activities of daily living, by using important resource tangibles (especially money) in laboratory conditions. Previous literature suggests that guilt promotes altruistic behavior via acting out reparative tendencies, whereas shame reduces altruism by means of increasing social and interpersonal distance. In the second part of this review, we will discuss the potential influence of self-blaming moral emotions on overt behavior in MDD, reviewing clinical and experimental studies in social and financial decision-making, in which guilt, and shame were manipulated. This is not a well-established area in the depression literature, however in this opinion paper we will argue that studies of moral emotions and their impact on behavioral decision-making are of potential importance in the clinical field, by linking specific symptoms of a disorder to a behavioral outcome which may lead to stratification of clinical diagnoses in the future.

  11. Moral processing deficit in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia is associated with facial emotion recognition and brain changes in default mode and salience network areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Stock, Jan; Stam, Daphne; De Winter, François-Laurent; Mantini, Dante; Szmrecsanyi, Benedikt; Van Laere, Koen; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2017-12-01

    Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is associated with abnormal emotion recognition and moral processing. We assessed emotion detection, discrimination, matching, selection, and categorization as well as judgments of nonmoral, moral impersonal, moral personal low- and high-conflict scenarios. bvFTD patients gave more utilitarian responses on low-conflict personal moral dilemmas. There was a significant correlation between a facial emotion processing measure derived through principal component analysis and utilitarian responses on low-conflict personal scenarios in the bvFTD group (controlling for MMSE-score and syntactic abilities). Voxel-based morphometric multiple regression analysis in the bvFTD group revealed a significant association between the proportion of utilitarian responses on personal low-conflict dilemmas and gray matter volume in ventromedial prefrontal areas ( p height  importance of emotions in moral cognition and suggest a common basis for deficits in both abilities, possibly related to reduced experience of emotional sensations. At the neural level abnormal moral cognition in bvFTD is related to structural integrity of the medial prefrontal cortex and functional characteristics of the anterior insula. The present findings provide a common basis for emotion recognition and moral reasoning and link them with areas in the default mode and salience network.

  12. Caring for nonhuman primates in biomedical research facilities: scientific, moral and emotional considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Kristine

    2011-03-01

    Animal care for nonhuman primates (NHPs) in biomedical facilities has undergone major changes in the past few decades. Today, most primate facilities have dedicated and highly trained animal care technicians who go to great efforts to ensure the physiological and psychological well being of the primates in their charge. These caretakers work closely with the animals and, as a result, often develop strong relationships with them. Once discouraged and considered a potential threat to scientific objectivity, such positive relationships are now seen as important components to animal care. Positive interactions between caretakers and primates can benefit the primates by reducing their stress and improving their overall well being which can, in turn, help the scientific endeavor. Further, providing the best possible care is our moral responsibility. However, there can also be emotional costs associated with caring for NHPs in research facilities, particularly when animals become ill or have to be euthanized. Facilities can do much to help ease this conflict. High-quality and conscientious animal care is good for the animals, science, and public perception of research facilities. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Moral Education as Intercultural Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisancho, Susana; Delgado, Guillermo Enrique

    2018-01-01

    In a diverse country such as Peru, moral education should reflect social, cultural, political and spiritual dilemmas of both indigenous and non-indigenous peoples and their communities. To promote understanding and respect amongst people from different sociocultural backgrounds, moral education should encourage a dialogue between indigenous values…

  14. Degree of Practice of Emotional and Spiritual Education by Faculty Members of Tafila Technical University and Its Role in Development of Self-Behavior from the Perspective of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraimeen, Hani; Al-Mhasnah, Abd Al Raheem

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the practice of emotional and spiritual education by faculty members of Tafila Technical University and its relation in development of students' self-behavior, a notion that includes some aspects of self-emotions, behavior control, and emotional control and to guide a person towards achievement, excellence, in light of…

  15. PENGETAHUAN SPIRITUAL YOGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Dayuh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The education paradigm emhasizes the complete balance of intelectual, emotional, and spiritual potencies. The spiritual one becomes more importantwhen the influence of materialism, hedonism, and pragmatism have becoming significant. To face it self-control as taught in Yogasutra Patanjali is crucial.

  16. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  17. Emotional and behavioural reactions to moral transgressions: cross-cultural and individual variations in India and Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laham, Simon M; Chopra, Sonavi; Lalljee, Mansur; Parkinson, Brian

    2010-02-01

    Reactions to moral transgressions are subject to influence at both the cultural and individual levels. Transgressions against an individual's rights or against social conventions of hierarchy may elicit different reactions in individualistic and collectivistic cultures. In the current study, affective and behavioural reactions to transgressions of autonomy (rights) and community (hierarchy) were examined in India and Britain. Results revealed that although reactions to autonomy transgressions are similar in India and Britain, Indian participants express more moral outrage than do Britons in response to transgressions of community. Results also supported the contention of emotion-specificity in affective moral reaction: Participants in both India and Britain reported anger in response to autonomy transgressions, but contempt in response to violations of community. Importantly, these results extend previous research by demonstrating the importance of emotion specificity in moral reactions, as opposed to categorization or dilemma resolution. In addition, an individual difference measure of respect for persons was shown to moderate reactions to moral transgressions. Specifically, participants with high respect for persons were less negative to violators of the community ethic, but not the autonomy ethic. These findings highlight the importance of examining emotion-specific responses in the moral domain and introduce a significant individual difference variable, respect for persons, into the psychology of morality. Les réactions aux transgressions morales sont susceptibles d'influence à la fois aux niveaux culturel et individuel. Les transgressions contre les droits d'un individu ou contre les conventions sociales d'hiérarchie peuvent susciter de différentes réactions dans les cultures individualiste et collectiviste. Dans la présente étude, les réactions affective et comportementale aux transgressions de l'autonomie (droits) et de la communauté (hi

  18. The Greatest Threat: Spiritual Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-10

    infiltrated every aspect of Greek life - even religion . In time Greece fell, and with it democracy, because it lacked the moral fiber and spiritual ...American way of life if there is no spiritual backbone? My research has convinced me more than ever that we need to look back and rediscover the...America’s sons and daughters, the strength of our armed forces, will be the big losers unless spiritual leadership becomes an essential quality of our

  19. Spiritual Dormancy: The Strategic Effect of the Depravation of God

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Spirituality , Human Spirit, Religion , Moral Injury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER...Family Fitness, Spirituality , Human Spirit, Religion , Moral Injury Classification: Unclassified This paper explores...conduct. Spirituality is a component of soldier fitness but there is no direct reference to God or religion in the Army’s latest capstone document the

  20. Relationship among moral authority and emotional empowerment: perspectives of clinical nurses in Imam Reza (AS) Kermanshah, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, R; Mohammadi, M; Mohammadi, E; Esfandnia, F; Bayat, R; Esfandnia, N; Esfandnia, A

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of the present research is to establish the connection among the decent masters of the emotional empowerment perspectives of nurses in Imam Reza (AS) Kermanshah Hospital in 2015. Methods. The required information are gathered at the start of the towering utilization of the Internet search and library. Data relevant to the communication are gathered by using questionnaires. Standard information are gathered. The population of the research included all formal hospital-training nurses, meaning the persons responsible with the behaving of patients in Medical Sciences Kermanshah University, respectively 550. Based on the formula of the Cochran, 226 questionnaires were simple random Bayat samples; 219 surveys are delivered, used, and returned from the ultimate population. The accuracy and their confirmation are already under investigation and confirmation. Findings. The findings indicated a psychological association with the ethical leadership and the enabling nurses. There is also a clear (sig = .000). Moreover, there is a direct and clear link [sig = .000] between the moral leader and enabling the psychological views of the nurses. Discussion. Based on the results of the present research, it can be said that the master of morality led to the emotional empowerment of nurses. The moral evil leader of the yen means creating faith, work happiness, increased efficiency and it activates the effective organizational goals.

  1. Spiritual pain and suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunjes, George B

    2010-01-01

    Spiritual pain/suffering is commonly experienced by persons with life-limiting illness and their families. Physical pain itself can be exacerbated by non-physical causes such as fear, anxiety, grief, unresolved guilt, depression and unmet spiritual meets. Likewise, the inability to manage physical pain well can be due to emotional and spiritual needs. This is why a holistic, interdisciplinary assessment of pain and suffering is required for each patient and family. The mind, body and spirit are understood in relationship to each other and, in those cases, in relationship to a deity or deities are important to understand. Cultural interpretations of pain and suffering may conflict with the goals of palliative care. Understanding the spiritual framework of the patient and family can help to assure that the physical and spiritual suffering of the patient can be eliminated to provide a peaceful death. Spiritual practices may help in the management of physical pain.

  2. Impact of emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence on the caring behavior of nurses: a dimension-level exploratory study among public hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Devinder; Sambasivan, Murali; Kumar, Naresh

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the impact of individual factors such as emotional intelligence (EI) and spiritual intelligence (SI) on the caring behavior of nurses. A cross-sectional survey using questionnaire was conducted by sampling 550 nurses working in seven major public hospitals in Malaysia. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The main findings are: (1) critical existential thinking and transcendental awareness dimensions of SI have significant impacts on assurance of human presence dimension of caring behavior; (2) personal meaning production and conscious state expansion dimensions of SI have significant impacts on perception of emotion and managing own emotions dimensions of EI; and (3) managing own emotions dimension of EI has significant impacts on respectful deference to other and assurance of human presence dimensions of caring behavior of nurses. The results can be used to recruit and educate nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring Nurse Communication About Spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ragan, Sandra L; Ferrell, Betty

    2017-07-01

    Although spiritual care is considered one of the pillars of palliative care, many health-care providers never receive formal training on how to communicate about spirituality with patients and families. The aim of this study was to explore the spiritual care experiences of oncology nurses in order to learn more about patient needs and nurse responses. A survey was circulated at a communication training course for oncology nurses in June 2015. Nurses recalled a care experience that included the initiation of a spiritual care topic and their response to the patient/family. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Nurses reported that communication about spirituality was primarily initiated by patients, rather than family members, and spiritual topics commonly emerged during the end of life or when patients experienced spiritual distress. Nurses' experiences highlighted the positive impact spiritual conversations had on the quality of patient care and its benefit to families. Spiritual communication was described as an important nursing role at the end of patients' lives, and nonverbal communication, listening, and discussing patients' emotions were emphasized as important and effective nurse communication skills during spiritual care conversations. Approximately one-third of nurses in the sample reported sharing their own personal spiritual or religious backgrounds with patients, and they reported that these sharing experiences strengthened their own faith. It is evident that patients want to discuss spiritual topics during care. Study findings illustrate the need to develop a spiritual communication curriculum and provide spiritual care communication training to clinicians.

  4. [The Recognition of Emotions, Empathy and Moral Judgment in the National Mental Health Survey in Colombia, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matallana, Diana; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Ramirez, Paulina; Martínez, Nathalie Tamayo; Rondon, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Social cognition refers to the mental processes involved in social interactions. Different aspects, such as the perception of others, self-knowledge, motivation and the cultural context, can modulate empathy responses and moral judgments regarding the actions of others. The National Mental Health Survey (ENSM for its acronym in Spanish) explored aspects of social cognition such as the perception of emotions, empathy and moral judgment in situations in which another person experiences pain. To describe the overall findings of the ENSM in relation to the emotional perception and empathic responses to situations where pain is inflicted on others in an intentional or accidental manner. A total of 3863 people aged 18-96 years old completed the social cognition module. They were asked to identify the emotions expressed in the images of several faces. A modified version of the awareness of social inference test (TASIT) was used. Additionally, the cognitive, affective, and moral elements of empathy were assessed with a modified version of the empathy for pain task (EPT), which uses a sequence of images in which someone is being hurt. Happiness was identified by 91.5% of those interviewed; neutral or emotionless faces were identified by 65%; 55% of respondents correctly identified surprise. Only 19.7%, 21.8% and 27.4% could identify negative emotions like fear, disgust and sadness, respectively. When the data were analysed by age, poverty status, and different regions of the country, the results tend to vary. As regards empathy, 73.7% correctly identified intentional actions, and accidental actions were identified by 56.6%. According to the moral judgment of some respondents, even in situations where the pain was caused by accident, there must be some kind of punishment (20.7% deserved a low punishment and 26.8% a moderate one). Noteworthy findings include the high recognition of happiness by the respondents, in contrast to the apparent difficulty in recognising sadness

  5. Why Do You Believe in God? Relationships between Religious Belief, Analytic Thinking, Mentalizing and Moral Concern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ian Jack

    Full Text Available Prior work has established that analytic thinking is associated with disbelief in God, whereas religious and spiritual beliefs have been positively linked to social and emotional cognition. However, social and emotional cognition can be subdivided into a number of distinct dimensions, and some work suggests that analytic thinking is in tension with some aspects of social-emotional cognition. This leaves open two questions. First, is belief linked to social and emotional cognition in general, or a specific dimension in particular? Second, does the negative relationship between belief and analytic thinking still hold after relationships with social and emotional cognition are taken into account? We report eight hypothesis-driven studies which examine these questions. These studies are guided by a theoretical model which focuses on the distinct social and emotional processing deficits associated with autism spectrum disorders (mentalizing and psychopathy (moral concern. To our knowledge no other study has investigated both of these dimensions of social and emotion cognition alongside analytic thinking. We find that religious belief is robustly positively associated with moral concern (4 measures, and that at least part of the negative association between belief and analytic thinking (2 measures can be explained by a negative correlation between moral concern and analytic thinking. Using nine different measures of mentalizing, we found no evidence of a relationship between mentalizing and religious or spiritual belief. These findings challenge the theoretical view that religious and spiritual beliefs are linked to the perception of agency, and suggest that gender differences in religious belief can be explained by differences in moral concern. These findings are consistent with the opposing domains hypothesis, according to which brain areas associated with moral concern and analytic thinking are in tension.

  6. Why Do You Believe in God? Relationships between Religious Belief, Analytic Thinking, Mentalizing and Moral Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony Ian; Friedman, Jared Parker; Boyatzis, Richard Eleftherios; Taylor, Scott Nolan

    2016-01-01

    Prior work has established that analytic thinking is associated with disbelief in God, whereas religious and spiritual beliefs have been positively linked to social and emotional cognition. However, social and emotional cognition can be subdivided into a number of distinct dimensions, and some work suggests that analytic thinking is in tension with some aspects of social-emotional cognition. This leaves open two questions. First, is belief linked to social and emotional cognition in general, or a specific dimension in particular? Second, does the negative relationship between belief and analytic thinking still hold after relationships with social and emotional cognition are taken into account? We report eight hypothesis-driven studies which examine these questions. These studies are guided by a theoretical model which focuses on the distinct social and emotional processing deficits associated with autism spectrum disorders (mentalizing) and psychopathy (moral concern). To our knowledge no other study has investigated both of these dimensions of social and emotion cognition alongside analytic thinking. We find that religious belief is robustly positively associated with moral concern (4 measures), and that at least part of the negative association between belief and analytic thinking (2 measures) can be explained by a negative correlation between moral concern and analytic thinking. Using nine different measures of mentalizing, we found no evidence of a relationship between mentalizing and religious or spiritual belief. These findings challenge the theoretical view that religious and spiritual beliefs are linked to the perception of agency, and suggest that gender differences in religious belief can be explained by differences in moral concern. These findings are consistent with the opposing domains hypothesis, according to which brain areas associated with moral concern and analytic thinking are in tension.

  7. Why Do You Believe in God? Relationships between Religious Belief, Analytic Thinking, Mentalizing and Moral Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony Ian; Friedman, Jared Parker; Boyatzis, Richard Eleftherios; Taylor, Scott Nolan

    2016-01-01

    Prior work has established that analytic thinking is associated with disbelief in God, whereas religious and spiritual beliefs have been positively linked to social and emotional cognition. However, social and emotional cognition can be subdivided into a number of distinct dimensions, and some work suggests that analytic thinking is in tension with some aspects of social-emotional cognition. This leaves open two questions. First, is belief linked to social and emotional cognition in general, or a specific dimension in particular? Second, does the negative relationship between belief and analytic thinking still hold after relationships with social and emotional cognition are taken into account? We report eight hypothesis-driven studies which examine these questions. These studies are guided by a theoretical model which focuses on the distinct social and emotional processing deficits associated with autism spectrum disorders (mentalizing) and psychopathy (moral concern). To our knowledge no other study has investigated both of these dimensions of social and emotion cognition alongside analytic thinking. We find that religious belief is robustly positively associated with moral concern (4 measures), and that at least part of the negative association between belief and analytic thinking (2 measures) can be explained by a negative correlation between moral concern and analytic thinking. Using nine different measures of mentalizing, we found no evidence of a relationship between mentalizing and religious or spiritual belief. These findings challenge the theoretical view that religious and spiritual beliefs are linked to the perception of agency, and suggest that gender differences in religious belief can be explained by differences in moral concern. These findings are consistent with the opposing domains hypothesis, according to which brain areas associated with moral concern and analytic thinking are in tension. PMID:27008093

  8. Re-authoring life narratives of trauma survivors: Spiritual perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Manda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the exploration of the impact of trauma on trauma survivors in South Africa has been focused mainly on the bio-psychosocial aspects. The bio-psychosocial approach recognises that trauma affects people biologically, socially and psychologically. In this article, the author explores a holistic understanding of the effects of trauma on people from communities historically affected by political violence in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Using a participatory action research design (PAR as a way of working through trauma, a longitudinal study was conducted in Pietermaritzburg from 2009–2013. At the end of the study, life narratives were documented and published. The textual analysis of these life narratives reveals that, besides the bio-psychosocial effects that research participants experienced during and after the trauma, they also sustained moral and spiritual injuries. Trauma took its toll in their lives emotionally, psychologically, spiritually, morally and in their relationships with themselves, others and God. From these findings, the author argues that the bio-psychosocial approach is incomplete for understanding the holistic effects of trauma on the whole person. Therefore, he recommends the integration of the moral and spiritual aspects of trauma to come up with a holistic model of understanding the effects of trauma on traumatised individuals. The holistic model will enhance the treatment, healing and recovery of trauma survivors. This, in turn, will alleviate the severe disruption of many aspects of psychological functioning and well-being of trauma survivors caused by the effects of trauma.

  9. The Development of Children's Moral Sensibility: Individual Differences and Emotion Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Judy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Developmental changes and individual differences in children's conceptions of transgression were studied in 46 children from preschool through 1st grade. Differences in response to moral transgressions in kindergarten were related to mothers' control management and to siblings' friendly behavior in the preschool period, early understanding of…

  10. Emotions of Moral Disengagement, Class Norms, and Bullying in Adolescence: A Multilevel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menesini, Ersilia; Palladino, Benedetta Emanuela; Nocentini, Annalaura

    2015-01-01

    Using an individual-by-environment framework, this study evaluated the role of individual- and group-level moral indices and their interaction in predicting student reports of bullying. The sample included 1,009 Italian adolescents (36% girls) from 56 classrooms (mean age = 15.02 years, SD = 0.71). Individual-level predictors included gender and…

  11. Adolescents' Emotions and Reasoning in Contexts of Moral Conflict and Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Ongley, Sophia F.; Dys, Sebastian P.; Colasante, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how adolescents feel and think about contexts of moral conflict and social exclusion. We asked twelve-year-old adolescents how they would feel about intentionally harming another peer, omitting a prosocial duty, and excluding another peer. We then asked them to explain the reasoning behind their feelings and report on levels…

  12. Face-to-Face and Online: An Investigation of Children's and Adolescents' Bullying Behavior through the Lens of Moral Emotions and Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Gomez-Garibello, Carlos; Talwar, Victoria; Shariff, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the influence of type of aggression (cyberbullying or traditional bullying) and participant role (bystander or perpetrator) on children and adolescents' self-attribution of moral emotions and judgments, while examining the influence of chronological age. Participants (N = 122, 8-16 years) evaluated vignettes and were…

  13. Peran Guru Bimbingan Konseling dalam Membina Kecerdasan Emosional dan Spiritual Siswa Berkebutuhan Khusus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adita Pramanasari dan Zainal Arifin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The background of this research is the need for Students with Special Needs (SBK in SMP PGRI will Pity the extra handling of teacher Counseling (BK in the development of Emotional and Spiritual Intelligence (ESQ. The results showed: First, SBK is emotionally not able to manage their emotions, but capable of fostering social relationships with both. Spiritually, SBK has not been able to practice well but was able to do good to both parents. Second, the role of teachers Counseling (BK in fostering ESQ as a communicator, facilitator, motivator, and advisor. Third, the implementation of the BK inhibiting factors includes the student's family background differences and differences in the characteristics of individual students. While supporting factors include: BK teacher morale in providing guidance and mentoring and guardians

  14. The problem of moral choice personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kadievskaya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Article is dedicated to the comprehension of the problems of the moral selection of personality. It is substantiated, that the moral consciousness is the complex system, because of which in the society are established the specific rules of interrelations between the people.   The concepts are analyzed: morals, relativity, moral absolutism, general human values, globalization, manipulation by consciousness, spiritual­ moral training. The specific character of the moral relativity, which denies absolute nature, i.e., is established universality and compulsion of morals, emphasizing conditionality and situationality of moral n. Moral absolutism is contradicted to moral relativity. Moral absolutism corresponds to persuasion, that there are absolute standards, which can be used for the permission of questions of morals, and that the specific actions can be correct or incorrect by themselves independent of their context. The two­digit (positive and negative axiological understanding of the phenomenon of globalization, which dually influences our consciousness, spiritual peace and moral selection, is represented. Under the conditions for large­scale information manipulations the translation of moral values as information, modifies their essence. Is shown the role of spiritual­ moral training in the formation, which must be variative and voluntary, allow for the possibility of ideological selection. The moral freedom of each person is manifested in the transformation of moral requirements into the internal needs of personality, into its own persuasions.

  15. Moral and Aesthetic Aspect of the Professional Training of Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Budnyk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the results of diagnosis of forming moral and aesthetic component of personal and professional readiness of teachers to educational activities in school. The study of moral and aesthetic readiness of students was conveyed using the method of diagnosis empathetic abilities (V. Boyko, the author's methods of detection of readiness for activities of actional moral and aesthetic sense and personal predisposition to conflict behavior (test K. Thomas. The experiment proved that future teachers have had developed moral ideals and spiritual values; and formed aesthetic consciousness (feelings, attitudes, tastes, needs, feelings and motivation and are ready for active transformative activities in the system of interpersonal communication. The majority of future teachers who participated in the study display a lack of following formed skills and abilities: attention, perception and thinking focused on the state, problems and behavior of another person; emotional sensitivity, the abilities to observe behavior of a partner, traits that promote openness, the ability to understand another person on the mutual basis due to emotional flexibility and the ability to accept other behaviour. This may adversely affect their future professional activities, including working with neglected pupils and their parents. The author considers that a high level of moral consciousness of a teacher being a unity of rational and sensual aspects to facilitate moral and aesthetic relations in professional collaboration.

  16. Are Psychopaths Morally Sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; Le Sage, Leonie

    2009-01-01

    Philosophical and psychological opinion is divided over whether moral sensitivity, understood as the ability to pick out a situation's morally salient features, necessarily involves emotional engagement. This paper seeks to offer insight into this question. It reasons that if moral sensitivity does draw significantly on affective capacities of…

  17. C. Taylor靈性倫理思想對「道德主義」之批判暨其德育蘊義 C. Taylor’s Criticism of Moralism and the Implications of His Spiritual Ethics for Moral Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    林京霈 Chinf-Pey Lin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 現代民主社會的道德哲學多關注個體的義務行為及規則遵守,並重視個體自由平等權利的保障。當代重要哲學家C. Taylor(1931-)稱這樣的道德哲學為「道德主義」(moralism),相對於以「善」為探究核心的「倫理學」(ethics)。Taylor認為,道德主義缺少對善之實質內涵的認識及其道德根源的不穩定,可能造成「自許正義」的偏狹態度,甚至是暴力的表現。而Taylor肯定超越性道德根 源的倫理學思想,能提供吾人對於自我與善、與他人、與更高力量之關係的新理解,並給予有力的實踐動機。最後,藉由Taylor的倫理思想指出道德教育應回歸對「善」的重視,及其作為引導美善及智慧生活的重要性。 The focus of moral philosophy in modern democratic societies is more concerned with an individual’s obligatory actions and his or her rights to freedom and to equality than what is considered morally good. C. Taylor (1931-, a significant contemporary philosopher, has deemed the aforementioned moral philosophy “moralism,” which opposes “ethics,” because ethical discourse places the highest priority on defining goodness and love. Taylor contends that the sources of moralism are vulnerable, lack stability, and fail to consider the good. The ability for people to express compassion and love toward each other is easily eclipsed by moralism, and this induces the expression of “righteousness.” Taylor’s ethics specifically identifies the transcendent as the greater moral source and provides a new understanding of the relationships between the self and the good, the self and the other, and the self and the transcendent, as well as a more powerful motivation to behave morally. Based on Taylor’s ethics, this study highlights the significance of moral education that should reinstate the weight of the good, thereby assisting in the cultivation of students’ wisdom

  18. Moral Disengagement and Emotional and Social Difficulties in Bullying and Cyberbullying: Differences by Participant Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Participant roles in traditional bullying have been well researched, and the social and emotional characteristics identified with each role are clearly documented. However, little is known about the participant roles in cyberbullying and the degree to which these correspond to traditional bullying roles. This study aims to investigate similarities…

  19. Recovery Spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Kurtz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A. and other secular, spiritual, and religious frameworks of long-term addiction recovery. The present paper explores the varieties of spiritual experience within A.A., with particular reference to the growth of a wing of recovery spirituality promoted within A.A. It is suggested that the essence of secular spirituality is reflected in the experience of beyond (horizontal and vertical transcendence and between (connection and mutuality and in six facets of spirituality (Release, Gratitude, Humility, Tolerance, Forgiveness, and a Sense of Being-at-home shared across religious, spiritual, and secular pathways of addiction recovery. The growing varieties of A.A. spirituality (spanning the “Christianizers” and “Seculizers” reflect A.A.’s adaptation to the larger diversification of religious experience and the growing secularization of spirituality across the cultural contexts within which A.A. is nested.

  20. Practical approaches to spiritual pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunjes, George B

    2010-01-01

    Spiritual pain/suffering is commonly experienced by persons with life-limiting illness and their families. Physical pain itself can be exacerbated by non-physical causes such as fear, anxiety, grief, unresolved guilt, depression and unmet spiritual meets. Likewise, the inability to manage physical pain well can be due to emotional and spiritual needs. This is why a holistic, interdisciplinary assessment of pain and suffering is required for each patient and family. The mind, body and spirit are understood in relationship to each other and, in those cases, in relationship to a deity or deities are important to understand. Cultural interpretations of pain and suffering may conflict with the goals of palliative care. Understanding the spiritual framework of the patient and family can help to assure that the physical and spiritual suffering of the patient can be eliminated to provide a peaceful death. Spiritual practices may help in the management of physical pain.

  1. Spiritual-Intelligence/-Quotient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

    2005-01-01

    Drawing on the "new" [c. 2000], upgraded science of the human brain with its three different kinds of neural structures--mental, emotional and spiritual--Zohar [14] offers a model for structure, leadership and learning within an organization that allows them to thrive on uncertainty, deal creatively with rapid change, and realize the full…

  2. Who Engages with Moral Beauty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Rhett; Iyer, Ravi; Smith, Meghan M.; Haidt, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the "telos" of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 ("N" = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological…

  3. Pengaruh Gender, Intelligent Quotient (Iq), Emotional Quotient (Eq) Dan Spiritual Quotient (Sq) Terhadap Pertimbangan Pemberian Opini Auditor

    OpenAIRE

    Suprihatin, Maylani; Wahyuni, Endang Dwi; Kurniawati, Eris Tri

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of gender, intelligent quotient, emotionalquotient and spiritual quotient on the judgment of the auditor's opinion. Therefore, researcheruses a quantitative methods with SPSS as an analytical tool in this study. The results showthat men and women do not have a significant difference based on psychological aspects that saywomen have a tendency to be more efficient and more thorough in decision making. On the otherhand, The higher of intellectu...

  4. The Moral Shadows of Shame and Contempt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2018-01-01

    Are shame and contempt moral, immoral, or non-moral emotions? The answer, I argue in this paper, is less than straightforward.......Are shame and contempt moral, immoral, or non-moral emotions? The answer, I argue in this paper, is less than straightforward....

  5. Moral imperatives for academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J N

    1997-12-01

    As the health care system becomes dominated by managed care, academic medicine must do more than simply learn how to continue to offer the same level of care with ever-tightening resources and in new practice environments. Three moral imperatives must guide how medicine is practiced and taught: (1) patients' health and well-being must always be foremost, centered in quality of care and respect for life; (2) the emotional and spiritual needs of patients must be considered, not just the physical needs; (3) academic medicine must instill in its trainees discipline, passion, and skills to meet their obligation to be lifelong learners. These imperatives make it more important than ever for medical educators to tackle two crucial questions: What kind of person makes the best possible physician? And what constitutes the best possible training for that person? Taking these questions seriously in the new era of health care may mean that medical educators need to rethink the teaching of medicine. One example of how this might be done is the Curriculum for 2002 Committee recently formed at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine. It is becoming clear that medical educators can do a better and more comprehensive job of helping future physicians uncover and strengthen their own morality and, in the face of managed care's pressures, renew their loyalty to medicine as a service rather than a business. Morally sensitized physicians can better deal with the hard issues of medicine, such as euthanasia and abortion, and can help their students examine these issues. Most important, they can show their students that physicians are members of a moral community dedicated to something other than its own self-interest.

  6. SPIRITUAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP BERBASIS AL-QUR’AN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodiman Sodiman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ian Marshall and Danah Zohar predicted theoretically that in the context of modern business will appear spirituality without religion as the moral basis of the business which he described as spiritual capital. But look at the phenomenon in Indonesia, sharia economic development is rapidly increasing which in fact appears based on religious values, then the theory Marshal and the Zohar indisputable. Spiritual entrepreneurship based on the Koran in Indonesia is growing; the ideas, thoughts, willingness (iradah, passion (ghirah and determination ('azm owned by an individual or group (community Muslims to strive in commerce (material or services that are based on the values of faith in God who taught the Koran. Spirituality entrepreneurship models based al-Qur'an that life (living values is very varied, among the models discussed in this paper are (1 spirituality entrepreneurship kaafah models, (2 spirituality entrepreneurship ukhuwah models, (3 spirituality entrepreneurship tareqat models, (4 spirituality entrepreneurship models keep ablution, (5 spirituality entrepreneurship models do not sell cigarettes, (6 the spirituality of entrepreneurship model- publication that profit to charity. Key Words : Spiritual, entrepreneurship, and models of bussines.

  7. TEORI PERKEMBANGAN MORAL DAN MODEL PENDIDIKAN MORAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Abdul Rahman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Moral values and it’s decadence were one of many problems that in Indonesia, whereas becoming a huge responsibility that hold by all member of society. The inquiry, designing and implementation of moral education strategy is foreseen as the most important aspect to improve society. Aside from great efforts to improve society, it is imperative that we also need to review and inquire more about moral development theory. Nowadays, it seems that moral development theory had moved from its role and position which moved from its autonomic, rationalistic and universalistic nature to more emotionally roles and becoming more culture bounded. The changes in society paradigm were also have many implications on education of moral development. In this paper there are at least 3 models that can be used in moral education, which are the learning of rule ethics, character ethics and the integration of both in multidimensional fields.

  8. Clinical holistic medicine: factors influencing the therapeutic decision-making. From academic knowledge to emotional intelligence and spiritual "crazy" wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2007-12-10

    Scientific holistic medicine is built on holistic medical theory, on therapeutic and ethical principles. The rationale is that the therapist can take the patient into a state of salutogenesis, or existential healing, using his skills and knowledge. But how ever much we want to make therapy a science it remains partly an art, and the more developed the therapist becomes, the more of his/her decisions will be based on intuition, feeling and even inspiration that is more based on love and human concern and other spiritual motivations than on mental reason and rationality in a simple sense of the word. The provocative and paradoxal medieval western concept of the "truth telling clown", or the eastern concepts of "crazy wisdom" and "holy madness" seems highly relevant here. The problem is how we can ethically justify this kind of highly "irrational" therapeutic behavior in the rational setting of a medical institution. We argue here that holistic therapy has a very high success rate and is doing no harm to the patient, and encourage therapists, psychiatrists, psychologist and other academically trained "helpers" to constantly measure their own success-rate. This paper discusses many of the important factors that influence clinical holistic decision-making. Sexuality could, as many psychoanalysts from Freud to Reich and Searles have believed, be the most healing power that exists and also the most difficult for the mind to comprehend, and thus the most "crazy-wise" tool of therapy.

  9. Christian Spirituality in Eating Disorder Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora Grant

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are some of the most severe and destructive of all psychological conditions. They are associated with restricted capacities in cognitive, emotional, physical, and spiritual development. This paper provides an examination of the practical application of Christian spirituality as a force for recovery from an eating disorder. Specifically, it expounds the transformative potential in the spiritual qualities of hope, trust, acceptance, surrender, and courage underpinning engagement with evidence-based therapeutic models of care in eating disorder recovery.

  10. Moral Intelligence in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2009-01-01

    Moral intelligence is newer and less studied than the more established cognitive, emotional and social intelligences, but has great potential to improve our understanding of learning and behavior. Moral intelligence refers to the ability to apply ethical principles to personal goals, values and actions. The construct of moral intelligence consists…

  11. Effect of Intellectual Intelligence , Emotional Intelligence , Intelligence and Spiritual Organization Commitment to the Performance of Provincial Auditor BPK Riau

    OpenAIRE

    Anggraini, Lila; Nasir, Azwir; Sitompul, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of intellectual, emotional intelligence , spiritualintelligence and organizational commitment to performance BPK auditors Riau province .The research method used is a research method deskriktif the survey approach . The collected data obtained through questionnaires , with 54 auditors . Processing and analyzing the data using the classical assumption test after test validity and reliability , then drawn a conclusion by using multiple regression statistic...

  12. Content of Spiritual Counselling for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in Iran: A Qualitative Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memaryan, Nadereh; Ghaempanah, Zeinab; Saeedi, Mir Majid; Aryankhesal, Aidin; Ansarinejad, Nafiseh; Seddigh, Ruohollah

    2017-07-27

    Background: Cancer is one of the leading causes of human death. Besides clinical treatment, cancer patients may need emotional and spiritual counselling to overcome their mental and morale problems. Such counselling sessions have been reported influential by many patients. We aimed to explore the structure of spiritual counselling sessions and their content as one of services provided to patients who experience chemotherapy in Iranian hospitals. Methods: Through a qualitative content analysis study, we recorded the discussions between a counsellor, who was a cleric as well, and cancer cases who were undergoing chemotherapy in a hospital in Tehran. The sessions were only recorded if the patient consented to attend at the study. All consideration were taken to avoid release of patients’ identity. The recorded discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically after each session, until no new theme was emerged. Result: Twenty two sessions were held. The patients aged 53 years old on average. The content of discussions were analyzed along which 165 codes emerged. Four general themes or phases were recognized through counseling as (i) history-Taking (including demographic, disease-related and spiritual history and characteristics), (ii) general advice, (iii) spiritual-religious advice, and (iv) dealing with patients’ spiritual or religious ambiguities and paradoxes. Conclusion: Counselling of cancer patients needs special and in depth knowledge on spiritual and religious issues. The counsellor should be able to motivate patients, among whom many are disappointed, to follow the curative instructions well and stay hopeful about their treatment and life. Exploring and understanding what happens during a spiritual counselling session can counselling to the conformity and standardization of such interventions. Creative Commons Attribution License

  13. The Four Domains Model: Connecting Spirituality, Health and Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    John Fisher

    2011-01-01

    At our core, or coeur, we humans are spiritual beings. Spirituality can be viewed in a variety of ways from a traditional understanding of spirituality as an expression of religiosity, in search of the sacred, through to a humanistic view of spirituality devoid of religion. Health is also multi-faceted, with increasing evidence reporting the relationship of spirituality with physical, mental, emotional, social and vocational well-being. This paper presents spiritual health as a, if not THE, f...

  14. Offering Spiritual Support for Family or Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spiritual pain and suffering. Spiritual pain and suffering is as real and powerful as physical or emotional pain. There ... guilt, denial, hope, joy, peace. Expression of feelings is important in dealing with ... such as “It’s part of God’s plan” or “Everything happens for a reason” often ...

  15. Existential well-being : Spirituality or well-being?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anja; Garssen, Bert; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Measures of spirituality often contain the dimension existential well-being (EWB). However, EWB has been found to overlap with emotional and psychological well-being. Using the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List (SAIL), we have further investigated the overlap between aspects of spirituality

  16. Existential Well-Being Spirituality or Well-Being?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anja; Garssen, Bert; Vingerhoets, Ad J. J. M.

    Measures of spirituality often contain the dimension existential well-being (EWB). However, EWB has been found to overlap with emotional and psychological well-being. Using the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List (SAIL), we have further investigated the overlap between aspects of spirituality

  17. Transformative Learning Theory and Spirituality: A Whole-Person Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Spirituality is gaining popularity within academics as discussions regarding the importance of spirituality within leadership and education increases. A biblical anthropology embraces human nature as physical, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual with recognition that adults are capable of learning within each of those realms. Embracing humans are…

  18. Spirituality and Early Childhood Special Education: Exploring a "Forgotten" Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaili

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality is recognised by many to be an inherent property of the human being. Empirical studies and theoretical literature both suggest that spirituality affects one's quality of life in terms of emotional and physical well-being, relationships, and social inclusion. However, the importance of the spiritual dimension of life is rarely…

  19. Moral intuitions, moral expertise, and moral reasoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musschenga, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    In this article I examine the consequences of the dominance of intuitive thinking in moral judging and deciding for the role of moral reasoning in moral education. I argue that evidence for the reliability of moral intuitions is lacking. We cannot determine when we can trust our intuitive moral

  20. Neoliberalism, Emotional Experience in Education and Adam Smith: Reading "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" Alongside "The Wealth of Nations"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines some critical accounts of emotional life shaped by neoliberalism. A range of literature concerned with neoliberalism and emotional experience in educational contexts is reviewed. I argue that neoliberal "reforms" in public institutions create an ever-increasing demand for emotional performance. Neoliberals often refer…

  1. Despite their inevitable conflicts--science, religion and New Age spirituality are essentially compatible and complementary activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2006-01-01

    Until recently it seemed that the continued expansion of scientific ways of thinking was destined to render religion extinct and spirituality unfeasible. But the example of the United States disproves this, since America is the most successful scientific nation of this era, church-going remains strong and New Age spiritualities are thriving. Therefore, despite the obvious conflicts; science, religion and spirituality are essentially compatible. Future science will continue to win territory from religion since its validation procedures are more objective and reliable. However, churches can survive and grow by dropping those aspects of doctrine which clash with science, and expanding their social functions. The fast-growing US 'mega-church' movement shows the way - since these organizations are minimally dogmatic but instead provide a family-orientated and morally-cohesive social milieu. Like organized religion, New Age spirituality comes into conflict with science when it makes incredible or bizarre factual claims. However, in practice modern spirituality is based on subjective evaluations which do not clash with the procedures of science. Indeed, the reliance upon individual, emotion-based evaluations (e.g., 'my truth', 'whatever works for you') renders New Age spirituality 'science-proof', and has enabled it to expand massively in an age of science. Science, religion and spirituality perform different functions in the modern world, and their relationship is therefore one of mutual-dependence. Borderline disputes will inevitably occur, but as part of a broader context of complementarity. Science, 'social' churches and New Age spirituality all have a bright future.

  2. Morality problems in ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Abakarova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Having been defined the position of morality in the modern ecological space it was found that ecological crisis increases because of spirit crisis, education crisis and human crisis. Defining the different levels of human spirituality it is revealed that at the highest level the nature is perceived as a human value, a value just as for people living in it.

  3. Islamic Spirituality in America: A Middle Path to Unity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altareb, Belkeis Y.

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes the concept of Islamic spirituality and its emphasis on personal and community forms of worship. Explains the concept of the "middle path," briefly describes the five pillars of faith, and shows how integration of various realms (spiritual, social, moral, and individual) allows Muslims to live a peaceful life. (RJM)

  4. Towards a Spirituality of Peace | De Villiers | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article contributes towards designing a Spirituality of Peace within Spirituality as a discipline. It first analyses the increasing attention to violence and peace generally and within religious contexts specifically. It then critically evaluates some approaches that view violence and peace as moral issues and shows how these ...

  5. Spiritual Needs of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For many patients confronted with chronic diseases, spirituality/religiosity is an important resource for coping. Patients often report unmet spiritual and existential needs, and spiritual support is also associated with better quality of life. Caring for spiritual, existential and psychosocial needs is not only relevant to patients at the end of their life but also to those suffering from long-term chronic illnesses. Spiritual needs may not always be associated with life satisfaction, but sometimes with anxiety, and can be interpreted as the patients’ longing for spiritual well-being. The needs for peace, health and social support are universal human needs and are of special importance to patients with long lasting courses of disease. The factor, Actively Giving, may be of particular importance because it can be interpreted as patients’ intention to leave the role of a `passive sufferer´ to become an active, self-actualizing, giving individual. One can identify four core dimensions of spiritual needs, i.e., Connection, Peace, Meaning/Purpose, and Transcendence, which can be attributed to underlying psychosocial, emotional, existential, and religious needs. The proposed model can provide a conceptual framework for further research and clinical practice. In fact, health care that addresses patients’ physical, emotional, social, existential and spiritual needs (referring to a bio-psychosocial-spiritual model of health care will contribute to patients’ improvement and recovery. Nevertheless, there are several barriers in the health care system that makes it difficult to adequately address these needs.

  6. Conceptualising spirituality and religion for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, Barbara; Fowler, Marsha; Taylor, Elizabeth J; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Sawatzky, Richard

    2008-11-01

    To discuss some of the challenges of conceptualising spirituality and religion for healthcare practice. With the growing interest in spirituality in healthcare, has come the inevitable task of trying to conceptualise spirituality, a daunting task given the amorphous nature of spirituality, the changing understandings of spirituality among individuals and the diverse globalised society within which this task is taking place. Spirituality's relationship to religion is a particularly challenging point of debate. Critical review. Three social and historical conditions - located in the context of Western thought - have contributed to current conceptualisations of spirituality and religion: the diminishment of the social authority of religion as a result of the Enlightenment focus on reason, the rise of a postmodern spirituality emphasising spiritual experience and current tensions over the ideological and political roles of religion in society. The trend to minimise the social influence of religion is a particular Western bias that seems to ignore the global megatrend of the resurgence of religion. Current conceptualisations are critiqued on the following grounds: that they tend to be ungrounded from a rich history of theological and philosophical thought, that a particular form of elitist spirituality is emerging and that the individualistic emphasis in recent conceptualisations of spirituality diminishes the potential for societal critique and transformation while opening the door for economic and political self interest. Constructing adequate conceptualisations of spirituality and religion for clinical practice entails grounding them in the wealth of centuries of philosophical and theological thinking, ensuring that they represent the diverse society that nursing serves and anchoring them within a moral view of practice.

  7. SPIRITUALITY NURSING AMONG PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Padma Sari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spirituality has been reported to have benefits for recovery and quality of life for people with mental disorders including patients with schizophrenia. Spiritual can also be a coping strategy for patients with schizophrenia. This study aims to explore the importance of spirituality among patients with schizophrenia. Method: This study uses descriptive phenomenological approach. There are 9 participants in this study, 7 participants are patients who diagnosed of schizophrenia and 2 participants are the caregivers. The data were analyzed by phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Results: Two main themes emerge from this study are 1 the meaning of spirituality is closed with Allah and the improvement of the spiritual practice and 2 the benefits of spirituality is recovery from the illness, symptoms management, behavioral change, emotional change and hope. Discussion: Spirituality has an important role for patients with schizophrenia including helping the recovery process and hope. The results of this study are expected to give an overview of the spiritual need among patients with schizophrenia so that the nurses can give religion and or spiritual activity in the nursing intervention. Key words: schizophrenia, spirituality, recovery

  8. The efficacy of integrating spirituality into undergraduate nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Meryem; Gurler, Hesna

    2014-12-01

    Attention to patients' spirituality, as a moral obligation of care, is now widely accepted in nursing practice. However, until recently, many nursing programs have paid little attention to spirituality. The objective of this study was to identify the impact of two different curricula, used to teach undergraduate nursing students, on increasing nursing student awareness of spirituality in the care of patients. A quasi-experimental post-intervention two-group design was conducted in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 academic years. The study included a total of 130 volunteer senior-year students. The students were assigned as "the intervention group/integrated system" that were informed about spirituality or as "the control group/traditional system" that received no information on spirituality. Data were collected via a personal information form and the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale was used to assess responses. The study was conducted at the Department of Nursing of the Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumhuriyet University, in Central Anatolia/Turkey. Permission to conduct the study at the nursing school was obtained from the schools' management teams. The rights of the participants were protected in this study by obtaining informed consent. The results revealed that the intervention group had a higher mean score on the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale than did the control group. The students in the intervention group defined the terms of spirituality and spiritual care more accurately than did the control group students. Nurses are professionally and ethically responsible for providing spiritual care. Nurses' competence in meeting the spiritual needs of their patients should be improved by undergraduate education on spiritual care. Nursing scholars reported a significant difference in the knowledge and attitudes toward spirituality of nursing students as a result of the integration of spirituality into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Spirituality

  9. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  10. Embodied Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trousdale, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the concept of embodied spirituality from early Celtic traditions through the British medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to the present day. A "high theology" of the body in early Christianity and early Christian understandings of the relation among body, soul and spirit gave way to the influences of Greek thought with its…

  11. Re-examining definitions of spirituality in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Katia Garcia; Koenig, Harold G

    2013-12-01

    To discuss the definition of spirituality and its limitations for nursing research. It proposes a definition that will capture more accurately the role of spirituality in health outcomes. Studies have increasingly examined spirituality in nursing research as a coping mechanism attenuating the negative impact of traumatic stress on mental health. Existing definitions of spirituality in nursing research include elements of positive emotional states (meaning, purpose, general well-being) which confound mental health outcomes. Medline and CINAHL databases were searched from 2007-2011 for research articles examining spirituality definitions and measures used by nurse researchers. An analysis of the definitions of spirituality in nursing research reveals inconsistencies and confounding mental health concepts. The authors propose defining spirituality in the context of religious involvement when conducting research, while using a broader definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. They argue such definition provides a more appropriate method of measuring this concept in research aimed at evaluating mental health outcomes while preserving the currently used patient-defined definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. A consistent definition of spirituality in nursing research evaluating mental health outcomes, distinct from 'spiritual care' in a clinical setting, is essential to avoid tautological results that are meaningless. Appropriate definitions will enable nursing researchers to more clearly identify resilience mechanisms and improved health outcomes in those exposed to traumatic stress. A definition of spirituality that focuses on religious involvement provides a more uniform and consistent measure for evaluating mental health outcomes in nursing research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  13. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior.

  14. Spiritual Dryness as a Measure of a Specific Spiritual Crisis in Catholic Priests: Associations with Symptoms of Burnout and Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt Büssing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality/religiosity is recognized as a resource to cope with burdening life events and chronic illness. However, less is known about the consequences of the lack of positive spiritual feelings. Spiritual dryness in clergy has been described as spiritual lethargy, a lack of vibrant spiritual encounter with God, and an absence of spiritual resources, such as spiritual renewal practices. To operationalize experiences of “spiritual dryness” in terms of a specific spiritual crisis, we have developed the “spiritual dryness scale” (SDS. Here, we describe the validation of the instrument which was applied among other standardized questionnaires in a sample of 425 Catholic priests who professionally care for the spiritual sake of others. Feelings of “spiritual dryness” were experienced occasionally by up to 40%, often or even regularly by up to 13%. These experiences can explain 44% of variance in daily spiritual experiences, 30% in depressive symptoms, 22% in perceived stress, 20% in emotional exhaustion, 19% in work engagement, and 21% of variance of ascribed importance of religious activity. The SDS-5 can be used as a specific measure of spiritual crisis with good reliability and validity in further studies.

  15. Spiritual Dryness as a Measure of a Specific Spiritual Crisis in Catholic Priests: Associations with Symptoms of Burnout and Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Andreas; Baumann, Klaus; Frick, Eckhard; Jacobs, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Spirituality/religiosity is recognized as a resource to cope with burdening life events and chronic illness. However, less is known about the consequences of the lack of positive spiritual feelings. Spiritual dryness in clergy has been described as spiritual lethargy, a lack of vibrant spiritual encounter with God, and an absence of spiritual resources, such as spiritual renewal practices. To operationalize experiences of “spiritual dryness” in terms of a specific spiritual crisis, we have developed the “spiritual dryness scale” (SDS). Here, we describe the validation of the instrument which was applied among other standardized questionnaires in a sample of 425 Catholic priests who professionally care for the spiritual sake of others. Feelings of “spiritual dryness” were experienced occasionally by up to 40%, often or even regularly by up to 13%. These experiences can explain 44% of variance in daily spiritual experiences, 30% in depressive symptoms, 22% in perceived stress, 20% in emotional exhaustion, 19% in work engagement, and 21% of variance of ascribed importance of religious activity. The SDS-5 can be used as a specific measure of spiritual crisis with good reliability and validity in further studies. PMID:23843867

  16. Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Bericat Alastuey, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The emotions that human beings experience play a fundamental role in all social phenomena. As a result, sociology needs to incorporate the analysis of emotions into its objects of study. This process began three decades ago with the birth of the sociology of emotions. This article offers an introductory and critical overview of the work sociologists of emotions have carried out so far.

  17. A Kantian ethics approach to moral bioenhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Abstract It seems, at first glance, that a Kantian ethics approach to moral enhancement would tend towards the position that there could be no place for emotional modulation in any understanding of the endeavour, owing to the typically understood view that Kantian ethics does not allow any role for emotion in morality as a whole. It seems then that any account of moral bioenhancement which places emotion at its centre would therefore be rejected. This article argues, however, that this assump...

  18. Western Sport and Spiritualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosiewicz Jerzy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport activity of achievement-oriented (professional, Olympic, spectacular character is first of all exposition of rivalry and striving for variously understood sports success (resulting from measurable or discretionary criteria. It refers to winning a competition or taking another expected place as well as to other forms of satisfaction, such as financial gratification or social (political, ethnic, professional recognition. Spirituality is here neither an aim, nor an expected value - it constitutes rather an additional or redundant quality. A competitor focuses his/her attention first of all on the main aim assumed in planned or current rivalry. Emotional sensations which are experienced by athletes before, during or after competitions testify to mental and emotional stress which accompanies sports combat.

  19. Anthropocentric and theocentric spirituality as an object of psychological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski Romuald

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic direction of psychological and theological interpretations of spirituality is very important. The traditional psychological approach to the spiritual sphere is characterised by reductionism, which consists in reducing spiritual experiences to mental experiences, or even biological processes. The studies in the field of religion psychology led to distinguish between two types of spirituality. The first one is theocentric spirituality, where human being places God in the centre of his interest and life in general. The second type of spirituality is anthropocentric spirituality, focused on human being, his own aspirations, preferences and needs. Both types of spirituality have certain value. Their close characteristics includes sources of inspiration, purpose, presented image of God, as well as understanding of spirituality and manner of realizing spiritual life. In order to distinguish between two types of spirituality, anthropocentric and theocentric, in practice, a proper research method – Range of Theocentric and Anthropocentric Spirituality (SDT – DA had to be developed. The individuals with theocentric spirituality displayed a higher level of stability and emotional balance, better social adjustment, higher sense of duty and attachment to acceptable social standards, deeper and more satisfactory contacts with other human beings, more trust and openness towards others, as well as higher trust to themselves and to God. Such individuals are better at handling difficulties and have optimistic attitude to life.

  20. A Study of Spiritual Intelligence of the Pre-Service Teachers at the Secondary Stage in Relation to Self Esteem and Emotional Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibha, Keerti

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted on a sample of 500 B.Ed. teacher trainees from School of Education, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara. Spiritual Intelligence and its dimensions of Transcendence, Interconnectedness, Expansion of Self, Extrasensory Perception and Existential Enquiry were taken up as dependent variables and whereas Self Esteem and…

  1. A Qur’anic Framework for Spiritual Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaouda Bensaid

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the perspective of the Qur’an on spiritual intelligence in an attempt to understand its foundations, meaning and nature, as well as derive its indicators, in an effort to develop a competency-based criterion for it. This paper draws on some illustrations that effectively highlight the Qur’anic perspective on the subject of spiritual intelligence. The paper concludes that spiritual intelligence developed in accordance with a Qur’anic framework that incorporates spiritual consciousness into a system of belief, worship, morality and social responsibility. The understanding of the Qur’anic perspective helps uncover some of the broad underlying theoretical principles and values of Islamic spiritual intelligence which shapes much of Muslim spiritual undertaking with relation to a wider spectrum of interaction with faith-groups and society; effectively developing more inclusive models of evaluation and capacity-building in contemporary multi-religious societies.

  2. Moral Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Cecilie

    Moral change and the dynamics leading to it are explored through the practice of law in the present thesis. Moral change raises a sceptical chal-lenge directed at moral normativity: How can we legitimately criticise and develop our practices and morality, if all we have at our disposal...... is transcendental, absolute, immanent and transcending. Using the later Wittgenstein’s work on justification and practice changes as well as eight narratives of moral changes in law, moral scepticism is shown to be empty. It is thus unable to challenge moral normativity. On the same background, a pluralistic...... account of the dynamics of moral change is worked out. It is argued that moral change can happen on the grounds of both causal factors and normative reasons, including moral reasons. Zooming in on those latter reasons, it is demon-strated that our sources of ethical critique and creativity are numerous...

  3. Spiritual Quotient (Sq): the Ultimate Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Rus'an, Rus'an

    2013-01-01

    : This paper discusses the spiritual intelligence as the ultimate intelligence which exceeds the IQ and EQ. IQ or intelligence quotient is a form of intelligence that based on reasoning, intellectual ratio, which is a linear way of thinking that in-cludes the ability to count, analyze to evaluate. While EQ or Emotional Quotient based on emotional, namely the intelligence which is capable to control emotions and give empathy so a person is able to act natural. Therefore the true nature of the ...

  4. Types of childhood trauma and spirituality in adult patients with depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun-Mi; Min, Jung-Ah; Huh, Hyu-Jung; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in spirituality among adult patients with depressive disorders, who had suffered various types of abuse or neglect in childhood. A total of 305 outpatients diagnosed with depressive disorders completed questionnaires on socio-demographic variables, childhood trauma history, and spirituality. We used the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF) to measure five different types of childhood trauma (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect) and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being Scale (FACIT-Sp-12) to assess spirituality. Depressive symptoms and total CTQ-SF scores showed a negative correlation with spirituality. In the regression model, being older and belonging to a religion significantly predicted greater spirituality. Depressive symptoms significantly predicted lower spirituality. From among the five types of childhood trauma assessed by the CTQ-SF, only emotional neglect significantly predicted lower spirituality. A history of childhood emotional neglect was significantly related to lower spirituality, especially in the case of the Meaning aspect of spirituality. This finding suggests the potential harmful influence of childhood emotional neglect on the development of spirituality in psychiatric patients. Investigating different aspects of childhood trauma might be important in order to develop a more comprehensive psychiatric intervention that aids in the development of spirituality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Atypical moral judgment following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Muresan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an association between emotions, particularly social emotions, and moral judgments. Some studies suggested an association between blunted emotion and the utilitarian moral judgments observed in patients with prefrontal lesions. In order to investigate how prefrontal brain damage affects moral judgment, we asked a sample of 29 TBI patients (12 females and 17 males and 41 healthy participants (16 females and 25 males to judge 22 hypothetical dilemmas split into three different categories (non-moral, impersonal and personal moral. The TBI group presented a higher proportion of affirmative (utilitarian responses for personal moral dilemmas when compared to controls, suggesting an atypical pattern of utilitarian judgements. We also found a negative association between the performance on recognition of social emotions and the proportion of affirmative responses on personal moral dilemmas. These results suggested that the preference for utilitarian responses in this type of dilemmas is accompanied by difficulties in social emotion recognition. Overall, our findings suggest that deontological moral judgments are associated with normal social emotion processing and that frontal lobe plays an important role in both emotion and moral judgment.

  6. Music and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, William

    1995-01-01

    Music can help create a good moral environment if it is music that can be shared, that channels emotions and shapes the soul, that has stood the test of time, and that tells a story. Today's rock music all too often plays a destructive role in leading youth away from virtue. (SLD)

  7. Spiritual pain among patients with advanced cancer in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mako, Caterina; Galek, Kathleen; Poppito, Shannon R

    2006-10-01

    The large body of empirical research suggesting that patients' spiritual and existential experiences influence the disease process has raised the need for health care professionals to understand the complexity of patients' spiritual pain and distress. The current study explores the multidimensional nature of spiritual pain, in patients with end-stage cancer, in relation to physical pain, symptom severity, and emotional distress. The study combines a quantitative evaluation of participants' intensity of spiritual pain, physical pain, depression, and intensity of illness, with a qualitative focus on the nature of patients' spiritual pain and the kinds of interventions patients believed would ameliorate their spiritual pain. Fifty-seven patients with advanced stage cancer in a palliative care hospital were interviewed by chaplains. Overall, 96% of the patients reported experiencing spiritual pain, but they expressed it in different ways: (1) as an intrapsychic conflict, (2) as interpersonal loss or conflict, or (3) in relation to the divine. Intensity of spiritual pain was correlated with depression (r = 0.43, p spiritual pain did not vary by age, gender, disease course or religious affiliation. Given both the universality of spiritual pain and the multifaceted nature of pain, we propose that when patients report the experience of pain, more consideration be given to the complexity of the phenomena and that spiritual pain be considered a contributing factor. The authors maintain that spiritual pain left unaddressed both impedes recovery and contributes to the overall suffering of the patient.

  8. Spiritual Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Rambeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Foucault, the uprising of the Iranian people in the seventies reveals how much the political force of Islam is due precisely to the fact that it is not principally located in the field of politics, but in that of ethics. Religion (Shiite Islam appears as the guarantee of real change in the very mode of existence. This spiritual politics is marginalized by Marxism, where it is understood as a discontinuity in relation to proper politics, given that the latter is necessarily linked to a strategic rationalization. By indicating, at this juncture of what is intolerable, the living source and the critical impulse of the Foucauldian ethics, this spiritual politics also leads to recognize in the concept of “subjectivation” a dimension that might escape the circle of freedom as determined by a total immanence to power. This conceptual possibility is highly present in the aporias of the Foucauldian concept of the “relation to oneself”, both as a first condition of governmentality and the ultimate point of resistance against any governmentality. It thus reveals the difficulties in relating political to ethical subjectivation.

  9. SPIRITUAL QUOTIENT (SQ: THE ULTIMATE INTELLIGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rus'an Rus'an

    2013-07-01

    Abstract: This paper discusses the spiritual intelligence as the ultimate intelligence which exceeds the IQ and EQ. IQ or intelligence quotient is a form of intelligence that based on reasoning, intellectual ratio, which is a linear way of thinking that in-cludes the ability to count, analyze to evaluate. While EQ or Emotional Quotient based on emotional, namely the intelligence which is capable to control emotions and give empathy so a person is able to act natural. Therefore the true nature of the SQ or spiritual intelligence quotient was based on the soul. This intelligence makes people to have the ability to find meaning in life, as well as refine the manners. According to Danah Zohar SQ as the ultimate intelligence means that the meaning of life is the first and foremost goal of life for humans. Only intelligent people spiritually who can give meaning in his life.

  10. Language and the (im)possibilities of articulating spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Anne; Sheilds, Laurene; Molzahn, Anita

    2011-03-01

    Despite growing interest in spiritual matters throughout society, definitions and descriptions of spirituality seem incomplete or otherwise unsatisfactory. In this article, the authors consider the possibility that such incompleteness is perhaps necessary and welcomed in addressing spirituality. In particular, they investigate the challenges of using metaphor and metonymic approaches to "languaging" spirituality. By exploring these figures of speech they hope to diversify how nurses articulate deeply personal and perhaps enigmatic human phenomena such as spirituality. Metaphoric language uses everyday structures to help make sense of complex, emotional, and abstract experience. Whereas metaphor creates substitutive relationships between things and provides insights into conceptualizing spirituality, metonymy and metonymic writing establish relationships of contiguity. Whereas metaphor functions to represent and facilitates understanding and feelings about spirituality, metonymy disrupts while opening possibilities of moving beyond binary thinking. Attending to language and its various ontological assumptions opens diverse and potentially more inclusive possibilities.

  11. On Spirituality and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    It is a mistake to ignore the scientific study of spirituality. Research examining the structure and function of concepts such as "spirit" and "spirituality" is likely to reveal new insights into the relationship between a functional spirituality and other thinking skills, including creativity. The study of spirituality should not stand alone as a…

  12. Moral Exemplars in Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagzebski, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In this article I outline an original form of ethical theory that I call exemplarist virtue theory. The theory is intended to serve the philosophical purposes of a comprehensive moral theory, but it is also intended to serve the practical purpose of moral education by structuring the theory around a motivating emotion--the emotion of admiration.…

  13. The spiritual personal orientation as the factor of character harmonization in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Pavlyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the analysis of spiritual determination of character development in adolescence. On the basis of the experimental research of spiritual sphere and the degree of a character harmony of today’s students, the author allocates the psychological laws of influencing the spiritual orientation for the process of character developments in adolescents. The experimental research has shown that spiritual orientation and character harmony are mutually influenced. However, the spiritual potential does not always positively correlate with character harmony as because the process of character harmonization does not appear linear, but cyclic with of rise and fall periods. The fall periods are accompanied by expressed disharmony of character and promotes social psychological personality maladjustment. Conditioned by steady spiritual orientation, spiritual self-development promotes character harmonization through overcoming personal spiritual crises. Continuous moral struggle against imperfection conditioned, the personality faces gradual character harmonization according to the spiritual ideal. Spiritually and creative activity promotes activation of psychological mechanisms of character harmonization in adolescents. The basic directions of optimization of the education system is creating psychological conditions of spirituality and moral improvement, saturation of teaching and educational programs by spiritual and creative contents.

  14. EARLY MORAL CONSCIENCE: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MORAL SHORT PLAYED STORIES PROCEDURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolais, Giampaolo; Fazeli-Fariz Hendi, Sara; Modesti, Camilla; Presaghi, Fabio

    2017-05-01

    We set up a cross-sectional study to investigate how moral core self's mental representations develop from age 3 to 6 years. An ad hoc instrument (Moral Short Played Stories Procedure; MSPSP) was developed to tap into how moral emotions, conducts, and cognitions referred to moral and nonmoral characters. A total of 143 preschoolers completed the MSPSP and moral dilemmas procedures, together with attachment and behavioral inhibition assessment. The main results confirm the hypothesis of a mild developmental trend characterized by the prominence of moral conduct over moral emotion and cognition. In addition, our results stress the emergence of a developmental turning point at around age 4 when procedural moral activation in children predicts the declarative feature of moral conscience. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  15. Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Liv Kondrup; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Observing science classroom activities presents an opportunity to observe the emotional aspect of interactions, and this chapter presents how this can be done and why. Drawing on ideas proposed by French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, emotions are theorized as publicly embodied enactments......, where differences in behavior between people shape emotional responses. Merleau-Ponty’s theorization of the body and feelings is connected to embodiment while examining central concepts such as consciousness and perception. Merleau-Ponty describes what he calls the emotional atmosphere and how it shapes...... the ways we experience events and activities. We use our interpretation of his understanding of emotions to examine an example of a group of year 8 science students who were engaged in a physics activity. Using the analytical framework of analyzing bodily stance by Goodwin, Cekaite, and Goodwin...

  16. Nursings' need for the idea of spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    Spirituality is an idea that has sustained significant interest in nursing over the past quarter century. Extensive conceptual work has generated robust critique around clarity and professional jurisdictional claims. However, less attention has been paid to the challenges nursing has faced that have contributed to the spirituality quest. Reflecting on my own experiences as a scholar writing in this literature over the past decade, I suggest three challenges that spirituality has attempted to redress: to relate across difference in a globalized world, to be good in a world of uncertain morality and to find meaning in a disenchanted world. The idea of spirituality could be viewed as resistance against othering, against law based ethics, and against politics and power. But the impact of the idea of spirituality has yet to be determined and caution is in order. As important as this resistance is, nursing must refrain from creating a new world of insiders and outsiders and from minimizing the role of religious ethics in a globalized world. Spirituality, like its predecessor religion, will likely continue to play an enduring role in providing fundamental meaning for nursing work. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Primordial Spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Waaijman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the primordial spirituality of the Bible, as expressed in names, narratives and prayers. It looks at the nomadic families of Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebecca, Jacob, Lea and Rachel, moving around from Mesopotamia via Canaan into Egypt and vice versa (see Gn 11:31–32; 12:4–5; 27:43; 28:10; 29:4; Gn 24 and 29–31. It analyses their experiences, covering the span between birth and death and listens to their parental concerns about education as survival. It also follows their journeys along the margins of the deserts. It shares their community life as it takes shape in mutual solidarity, mercy and compassion.

  18. Moral Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleim, Stephan; Clausen, Jens; Levy, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Research on moral cognition is a growing and heavily multidisciplinary field. This section contains chapters addressing foundational psychological, neuroscientific, and philosophical issues of research on moral decision-making. Further- more, beyond summarizing the state of the art of their

  19. Moral Development at the Crossroads: New Trends and Possible Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsley, Daniel; Carlo, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a special section on moral development. We claim that the field is now undergoing a resurgence of theoretical and methodological innovation after the eclipse of paradigmatic moral stage theory. Although research on prosocial development, moral emotions, and social domain theory has sustained interest in moral development,…

  20. If We Knew What Spirituality Was, We Would Teach for It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yob, Iris M.

    2011-01-01

    Two extraordinary recent experiences that the author would call highly "spiritual" are explored against the background of ideas provided by writers such as Friedrich Schleiermacher, Rudolf Otto, Paul Tillich, and Abraham Maslow to unpack what spirituality is, with particular attention to the emotions and the insights involved in spirituality. The…

  1. The Straight Path to Healing: Using Motivational Interviewing to Address Spiritual Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Philip B.; Giordano, Amanda L.; Cashwell, Craig S.; Lewis, Todd F.

    2013-01-01

    Spiritual bypass is the avoidance of underlying emotional issues by focusing solely on spiritual beliefs, practices, and experiences. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a client-centered, compassionate approach to effectively addressing resistance among those who present with spiritual bypass. In this article, the authors provide background…

  2. PENDIDIKAN MORAL PERSPEKTIF NASIH ULWAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Istiadie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerned in moral education thought based on Nasih Ulwan and its relevance in answering the problems of human modern. From Ulwan’s perspective, moral education is a set of moral basic principle and the primacy of attitude and character (nature which has to be owned and used as habit by children since they are young until become mukallaf, is ready to face the world. In modern era, the issue which emerges is a physical and psychic problem. Physical issue leads to conditioning a human as an object of all the products of science and technology. Meanwhile, psychic problem leads to the silting up of moral-spiritual value caused by the dominance of modern science and technology products. One of the fundamental problems in this country is a moral crisis and faithful. The crisis started from the dishonesty of country’s apparatures in carrying out their mandate as the policy controller. The corruption, and its relation, is the reflective of dishonesty, thieving, delinquency, and irregularities. Therefore, moral learning by Ulwan is very relevant if applied in this country in order to answer the moral crisis problem and trust which is occurred.

  3. Moral politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin; Traunmüller, Richard; Freitag, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This article combines the research strands of moral politics and political behavior by focusing on the effect of individual and contextual religiosity on individual vote decisions in popular initiatives and public referenda concerning morally charged issues. We rely on a total of 13 surveys with 1...... American research on moral politics, direct democracies, and the public role of religion....

  4. STIMULASI KECERDASAN SPIRITUAL PADA ANAK USIA DINI MELALUI KISAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidik Nuryanto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual intelligence is an important part of early childhood development. The story as one of the storytelling method that raised the Islamic story to be a guide for children in stimulating spiritual intelligence. This method is relevant if used for early childhood, because they know the value is still using his imagination. As in the story can raise the story of the life of the Prophets, Rosul, as well as the companions who do have a good track record of morals. Hopefully the lesson or moral message of the story can inspire children to apply in everyday life.

  5. Moral knowledge and moral factuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Wilburn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2008v7n1p69For naturalistic and non-intuitionistic moral realists, moral knowledge is more problematic than ordinary and scientific factual knowledge. For without special faculties of moral discernment, how could we ever detect moral facts and properties? Physical facts and properties may be accessible to perceptual recognition. But how could moral facts and properties ever be similarly accessible? To address this challenge, we need a meta-ethical account that does two things. First, it must explain how the discernment of moral facts and properties ultimately consists only of the detection of appropriate physical items. Second, it must explain why, despite this fact, moral perception seems so very puzzling. In this paper I endeavor to provide such an account. It is largely because of the relational nature of moral properties, and the corresponding externalistically determined normative content of moral property terms, I argue, that our epistemic access to moral knowledge appears mysterious. The metaphysics of moral factuality does a lot to explain the seeming elusiveness of moral knowledge, and in ways that are surprisingly mundane.

  6. Making Sense of Genetic Uncertainty: The Role of Religion and Spirituality

    OpenAIRE

    White, Mary T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that to the extent that religious and spiritual beliefs can help people cope with genetic uncertainty, a limited spiritual assessment may be appropriate in genetic counseling. The paper opens by establishing why genetic information is inherently uncertain and why this uncertainty can be medically, morally, and spiritually problematic. This is followed by a review of the range of factors that can contribute to risk assessments, including a few heuristics commonly used in resp...

  7. Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sukwoo

    It was widely accepted that emotion such as fear, anger and pleasure could not be studied using a modern scientific tools. During the very early periods of emotion researches, psychologists, but not biologist, dominated in studying emotion and its disorders. Intuitively, one may think that emotion arises from brain first and then bodily responses follow. For example, we are sad first, and then cry. However, groups of psychologists suggested a proposal that our feeling follows bodily responses; that is, we feel sad because we cry! This proposal seems counterintuitive but became a popular hypothesis for emotion. Another example for this hypothesis is as follows. When you accidentally confront a large bear in a mountain, what would be your responses?; you may feel terrified first, and then run, or you may run first, and then feel terrified later on. In fact, the latter explanation is correct! You feel fear after you run (even because you run?). Or, you can imagine that you date with your girl friend who you love so much. Your heart must be beating fast and your body temperature must be elevated! In this situation, if you take a very cold bath, what would you expect? Your hot feeling is usually calmed down after this cold bath; that is, you feel hot because your heart and bodily temperature change. While some evidence supported this hypothesis, others do not. In the case of patients whose cervical vertebrae were severed with an accident, they still retained significant amount of emotion (feelings!) in some cases (but other patients lost most of emotional experience). In addition, one can imagine that there would be a specific set of physical responses for specific emotion if the original hypothesis is correct (e.g. fasten heart beating and redden face for anger etc.). However, some psychologists failed to find any specific set of physical responses for specific emotion, though others insisted that there existed such specific responses. Based on these controversial

  8. DILEMAS MORALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Realpe Quintero

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Antes del siglo XX la tradición filosófica moral ha reconocido la existencia de los conflictos morales pero ha rechazado la posibilidad de los auténticos dilemas morales. Para poder entender por qué hoy el tema de los dilemas morales ha reclamado para sí tanta atención, es importante ponernos de acuerdo en la definición de algunos conceptos. Un conflicto moral es una situación en la que un(a agente se ve confrontado(a con dos obligaciones morales que le instan a actuar. Un dilema moral es una situación extrema de conflicto moral en la que nuestro(a agente no puede seguir un curso de acción que sea conforme con sus dos obligaciones en conflicto. Para que un conflicto moral tenga el carácter de ser un auténtico dilema moral (genuine moral dilemma y no simplemente un aparente dilema moral (apparent moral di- DILEMAS MORALES SANDRA REALPE Licenciada en Filosofía, Univalle, Maestría en Filosofía, Univalle, Diplomado en Psicología Aplicada, Universidad de Londres, Diplomado en Etica de los Negocios Universidad de Colorado, profesora Universidad Icesi, Facultad de Derecho y Humanidades. E-mail: sandrarealpe@hotmail.com lemma, ninguna de las obligaciones en conflicto es en efecto más fuerte o logra invalidar a la otra obligación. A raíz de un artículo escrito en 1962 por E. J. Lemmon, titulado precisamente “Dilemas morales” (Moral Dilemmas, se abrió un debate entre los filósofos anglosajones contemporáneos acerca de la existencia o no de los auténticos dilemas morales. Informar sobre este debate reciente, esclarecer los argumentos de sus principales protagonistas, y hacer presente en nuestro medio un novedoso debate que es importante para reflexionar sobre un buen número de problemas morales, son nuestros principales propósitos en el presente ensayo. ...

  9. Re-examining Definitions of Spirituality in Nursing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Katia; KOENIG, Harold G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This article presents a discussion of the definition of spirituality and its limitations for nursing research. It proposes a definition that will capture more accurately the role of spirituality in health outcomes. Background Studies have increasingly examined spirituality in nursing research as a coping mechanism attenuating the negative impact of traumatic stress on mental health. Existing definitions of spirituality in nursing research include elements of positive emotional states (meaning, purpose, general well-being) which confound mental health outcomes. Data sources Medline and CINAHL databases were searched from 2007–2011 for research articles examining spirituality definitions and measures used by nurse researchers. Discussion An analysis of the definitions of spirituality in nursing research reveals inconsistencies and confounding mental health concepts. The authors propose defining spirituality in the context of religious involvement when conducting research, while using a broader definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. They argue such definition provides a more appropriate method of measuring this concept in research aimed at evaluating mental health outcomes while preserving the currently used patient- defined definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. Nursing Implications A consistent definition of spirituality in nursing research evaluating mental health outcomes, distinct from ‘spiritual care’ in a clinical setting, is essential to avoid tautological results that are meaningless. Appropriate definitions will enable nursing researchers to more clearly identify resilience mechanisms and improved health outcomes in those exposed to traumatic stress. Conclusion A definition of spirituality that focuses on religious involvement provides a more uniform and consistent measure for evaluating mental health outcomes in nursing research. PMID:23600849

  10. Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julia F.; Flexas, Albert; Calabrese, Margareta; Gut, Nadine K.; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability, and Intention) and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats) that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan, and Danish). The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set. PMID:25071621

  11. Moral Judgment Reloaded: A Moral Dilemma validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F. Christensen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability and Intention and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan and Danish. The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set.

  12. Parental spirituality in life-threatening pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, David B; Barrera, Maru; Granek, Leeat; D'Agostino, Norma Mammone; Shaheed, Jenny; Beaune, Laura; Bouffet, Eric; Antle, Beverley

    2017-01-01

    This study addressed parental spirituality in the context of pediatric cancer with a poor prognosis. Drawing upon previous research implementing a longitudinal grounded theory design examining parental hope, 35 parents were interviewed regarding their experiences with an emergent description of the role of spirituality in parents' daily lives. Spirituality included religious beliefs and practices, notions of a higher force or cosmos, relationship with a divine being, as well as elements emerging from meaning-making and relationships. Parental expectations of spirituality remained relatively constant across data collection time points (3-9 months postdiagnosis), although limited variation occurred relative to shifting circumstance (e.g., deterioration of the child's condition). Spirituality appeared to offer: greater acceptance of parents' inability to protect their child from harm related to her/his life-threatening illness, guidance and emotion decompression, and support from one's faith community. Recommendations for integrating spiritual assessment in clinical care practice are offered.

  13. Adolescent spirituality with the support of adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-22

    Jun 22, 2017 ... adolescents acquire at this stage of their lives are carried through to adulthood. Adolescents and their spiritual lives. Adolescence is a trying time in a human being's life, as there are sudden changes in his or her physical and emotional self (Fowler 1981:151). The adolescent becomes awkward within his or.

  14. Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian; Vetner, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    En emotion er en evaluerende respons på en betydningsfuld hændelse, som har affektiv valens og motiverer organismen i forhold til objektverdenen (omverden). Emotioner fører til affekt: til smerte (negativ) eller glæde (positiv affekt). Både positive og negative emotioner påvirker organismens...

  15. Understanding Spiritual Experience in Christian Spirituality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A spiritual experience for some means a mere fabrication of the mind. For others it is pathological and the consequence of psychiatric disturbances and psychological disorders. Others acknowledge that certain role-players are present when spiritual experiences occur. However, the identification of the involvement of these ...

  16. Spirituality and business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandram, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    In Chap. 2, Sharda Nandram provides an overview of issues on spirituality and some definitions of spirituality in both nonacademic settings and academic literature. She makes a distinction between inner and outer spirituality. She explains the types of knowledge based on the work of Sri Aurobindo

  17. Spiritual Development with Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponds, Kenneth T.

    2014-01-01

    Research on positive psychology indicates that spiritual strengths can be important in helping individuals overcome crisis and loss. Encounters with difficult challenges of life inspire people to think more deeply about their spiritual and religious beliefs and the meaning of life. Spirituality, faith, and religious roots have been shown to be…

  18. Moral Hindsight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhut, Nadine; Meder, Björn; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2017-03-01

    How are judgments in moral dilemmas affected by uncertainty, as opposed to certainty? We tested the predictions of a consequentialist and deontological account using a hindsight paradigm. The key result is a hindsight effect in moral judgment. Participants in foresight, for whom the occurrence of negative side effects was uncertain, judged actions to be morally more permissible than participants in hindsight, who knew that negative side effects occurred. Conversely, when hindsight participants knew that no negative side effects occurred, they judged actions to be more permissible than participants in foresight. The second finding was a classical hindsight effect in probability estimates and a systematic relation between moral judgments and probability estimates. Importantly, while the hindsight effect in probability estimates was always present, a corresponding hindsight effect in moral judgments was only observed among "consequentialist" participants who indicated a cost-benefit trade-off as most important for their moral evaluation.

  19. Moral virtues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Spielthenner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although much has been published on virtues in recent years, there is still considerable uncertainty in philosophy (and even more among philosophical laymen about the concept of a virtue and especially about moral virtues. In this article, I will try to clarify these notions. In particular, I want to answer the question: When are virtues moral virtues? Clearly, not every practical virtue is a moral virtue. Why was the courage of the Nazi soldiers in the second world war not a moral virtue, but yet is presumably one if included among the cardinal virtues? To clarify this question, this article will deal with the concept of a virtue but I will also investigate the notion of virtues being of a moral nature. To this end, I propose and explain (I a definition of moral virtues and clarify this definition further in section (II, by explaining why I did not include qualities, which others have considered as essential.

  20. How Do We Teach What Is Right? Research and Issues in Ethical and Moral Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Constance M.

    1996-01-01

    Enhances understanding of values-education issues by addressing research on moral and ethical development. Presents Damon's tripartite distinction among moral reflection, moral emotion, and moral conduct--head, heart, and habit--to show moral development's complexity. Although promoting prosocial behavior is parents' responsibility, literature is…

  1. The Policy of Moral Education on KH Imam Zarkasyi’s Thought at Gontor Modern Islamic Boarding School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Karnaen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available KH. Imam Zarkasyi is one of the founding fathers of Gontor Modern Islamic Boarding School and also a famous national figure. The writer proposes to study moral education especially in the perspectives of KH. Imam Zarkasyi. The writer describes KH. Imam Zarkasyi’s definition of moral education, then the measurement of moral and method of teaching moral. The study is found that moral is action science, or knowledge about things that shows the good and bad elements in living in society, and moral education is action education or delivering the knowledge on the measurement of moral, that shows the bad and good things in living in society, and the measurement is the absolute one.Moral education can be categorized into two; physical and spiritual moral education.Here, the writer concludes that in inculcating moral, there is no difference between physical and spiritual, but the integrated system as one education method.

  2. The Theory of Dyadic Morality: Reinventing Moral Judgment by Redefining Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Chelsea; Gray, Kurt

    2018-02-01

    The nature of harm-and therefore moral judgment-may be misunderstood. Rather than an objective matter of reason, we argue that harm should be redefined as an intuitively perceived continuum. This redefinition provides a new understanding of moral content and mechanism-the constructionist Theory of Dyadic Morality (TDM). TDM suggests that acts are condemned proportional to three elements: norm violations, negative affect, and-importantly-perceived harm. This harm is dyadic, involving an intentional agent causing damage to a vulnerable patient (A→P). TDM predicts causal links both from harm to immorality (dyadic comparison) and from immorality to harm (dyadic completion). Together, these two processes make the "dyadic loop," explaining moral acquisition and polarization. TDM argues against intuitive harmless wrongs and modular "foundations," but embraces moral pluralism through varieties of values and the flexibility of perceived harm. Dyadic morality impacts understandings of moral character, moral emotion, and political/cultural differences, and provides research guidelines for moral psychology.

  3. Stress alters personal moral decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Farid F; Dookeeram, Karine; Basdeo, Vasant; Francis, Emmanuel; Doman, Mekaeel; Mamed, Danielle; Maloo, Stefan; Degannes, Joel; Dobo, Linda; Ditshotlo, Phatsimo; Legall, George

    2012-04-01

    While early studies of moral decision making highlighted the role of rational, conscious executive processes involving frontal lobe activation more recent work has suggested that emotions and gut reactions have a key part to play in moral reasoning. Given that stress can activate many of the same brain regions that are important for and connected to brain centres involved in emotional processing we sought to evaluate if stress could influence moral decision making. Sixty-five undergraduate volunteers were randomly assigned to control (n=33) and experimental groups (n=32). The latter underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and induction of stress was assessed by measurement of salivary cortisol levels. Subjects were then required to provide a response to thirty moral dilemmas via a computer interface that recorded both their decision and reaction time. Three types of dilemmas were used: non-moral, impersonal moral and personal moral. Using a binary logistic model there were no significant predicators of utilitarian response in non-moral and impersonal moral dilemmas. However the stressed group and females were found to predict utilitarian responses to personal moral dilemmas. When comparing percentage utilitarian responses there were no significant differences noted for the non-moral and impersonal moral dilemmas but the stressed group showed significantly less utilitarian responses compared to control subjects. The stress response was significantly negatively correlated with utilitarian responses. Females also showed significantly less utilitarian responses than males. We conclude that activation of the stress response predisposed participants to less utilitarian responses when faced with high conflict personal moral dilemmas and suggest that this offers further support for dual process theory of moral judgment. We also conclude that females tend to make less utilitarian personal moral decisions compared to males, providing further evidence that there are

  4. Neurocomputational model of moral behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebe, Alessio

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of human morality has dramatically improved in the last decades, thanks to efforts carried out with scientific methods, in addition to the traditional speculative approach. Substantial contributions and relevant empirical data have come from neuroscience, psychology, genetics, comparative ethology, anthropology, and the social sciences. In this fruitful synergy, one useful approach is still missing: computational modeling. More precisely, a neurocomputational model aimed at simulating forms of moral behavior, to our knowledge, has not yet been designed. The purpose of this work is to start filling this gap, proposing MOral Neural Engine (MONE), a model that simulates the emergence of moral cognition. The neural engine in this model is assumed to be based in frontal areas, specifically the orbitofrontal and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and in connections to limbic areas involved in emotions and reward, such as the ventral striatum and the amygdala. Moral cognition is probably the result of a collection of several different neural processes, activated depending on the type of moral problem, each associated with a variety of emotions. This model, in its first implementation, deals with only a single moral situation: stealing someone's food, a transgression that typically elicits guilt, learned in the model from the angry facial expressions of the victim.

  5. Palliative care and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanasamy Aru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical junctures in patients′ lives such as chronic illnesses and advanced diseases may leave the persons in a state of imbalance or disharmony of body, mind and spirit. With regard to spirituality and healing, there is a consensus in literature about the influence of spirituality on recovery and the ability to cope with and adjust to the varying and demanding states of health and illness. Empirical evidence suggests that spiritual support may act as an adjunct to the palliative care of those facing advanced diseases and end of life. In this article, the author draws from his empirical work on spirituality and culture to develop a discourse on palliative care and spirituality in both secular and non-secular settings. In doing so, this paper offers some understanding into the concept of spirituality, spiritual needs and spiritual care interventions in palliative care in terms of empirical evidence. Responding to spiritual needs could be challenging, but at the same time it could be rewarding to both healthcare practitioner (HCP and patient in that they may experience spiritual growth and development. Patients may derive great health benefits with improvements in their quality of life, resolutions and meaning and purpose in life. It is hoped that the strategies for spiritual support outlined in this paper serve as practical guidelines to HCPs for development of palliative care in South Asia.

  6. Nursing and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care.

  7. Warrior culture, spirituality, and prayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmin, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Research has shown an increase in suicides by military veterans and law enforcement officers in the United States. Etiologic research elucidates warrior culture and subculture as contributing factors of this pathology. This paper examines the idiosyncratic nature and influence of warrior culture and subculture and offers recommendations to promote culture change. Faith-based spirituality and prayer are examined as adjunct modalities for stress management and emotional healing. Further research is recommended to assess the associated hidden cost factors and long-term financial impact of warrior culture on society.

  8. Salt, Light, and Leaven? Spiritual Formation of Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Russell M.

    Exact delineation of the duties and obligations of Catholic educators in the development of religious growth in their pupils is set forth. Teaching methods and instructional aids are suggested, and the role of the teacher as a spiritual guide is explored. Responsibility for moral instruction is delegated to parents and to the community as well as…

  9. On the Spiritual Dimension of Education: Finding a Common Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Questions about the place of spirituality in publicly funded schools are made difficult in a multicultural secular society. I discuss the work of Paulus Geheeb and Rabindranath Tagore, two great 20th century educational innovators, to offer, by way of an argument from analogy with the social importance of moral education, a common ground for…

  10. Morality, Moral Luck and Responsibility. Fortune's Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Fogh

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Nafsika Athanassoulis bog: Morality, Moral Lock and Responsibility (Palgrave MacMillian 2010)......Anmeldelse af Nafsika Athanassoulis bog: Morality, Moral Lock and Responsibility (Palgrave MacMillian 2010)...

  11. Spirituality and well-being in cancer patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Anja; Garssen, Bert; Vingerhoets, Ad

    2010-06-01

    Cancer places many demands on the patient and threatens the person's sense of meaning to life. It has been shown that cancer patients use their spirituality to cope with these experiences. The present literature review summarizes the research findings on the relationship between spirituality and emotional well-being. Special attention is given to the strength of the research findings. A literature search was performed in Pubmed and Web of Science. Spirituality does not necessarily coincide with religiosity. Therefore, studies were excluded that focused on religiosity. Forty publications met the inclusion criteria: Twenty-seven studies that investigated the relationship between spirituality and well-being, and 13 publications that explored the relationship between meaning in life and well-being. The majority of the cross-sectional studies (31 of 36) found a positive association between spirituality and well-being. The four studies with a longitudinal design showed mixed results. The significance of the findings is challenged, because most spirituality questionnaires contain several items that directly refer to emotional well-being. Despite that the majority of the studies concluded that spirituality was associated with higher well-being, no definitive conclusions on this relationship can be drawn due to major methodological shortcomings of these studies. Longitudinal research utilizing spirituality and well-being measures that do not overlap in content is recommended. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Evolutionary origins of human brain and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberg, Maciej; Saniotis, Arthur

    2009-12-01

    Evolving brains produce minds. Minds operate on imaginary entities. Thus they can create what does not exist in the physical world. Spirits can be deified. Perception of spiritual entities is emotional--organic. Spirituality is a part of culture while culture is an adaptive mechanism of human groups as it allows for technology and social organization to support survival and reproduction. Humans are not rational, they are emotional. Most of explanations of the world, offered by various cultures, involve an element of "fiat", a will of a higher spiritual being, or a reference to some ideal. From this the rules of behaviour are deduced. These rules are necessary to maintain social peace and allow a complex unit consisting of individuals of both sexes and all ages to function in a way ensuring their reproductive success and thus survival. There is thus a direct biological benefit of complex ideological superstructure of culture. This complex superstructure most often takes a form of religion in which logic is mixed with appeals to emotions based on images of spiritual beings. God is a consequence of natural evolution. Whether a deity is a cause of this evolution is difficult to discover, but existence of a deity cannot be questioned.

  13. Moral character in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taya R; Panter, A T; Turan, Nazli; Morse, Lily; Kim, Yeonjeong

    2014-11-01

    Using two 3-month diary studies and a large cross-sectional survey, we identified distinguishing features of adults with low versus high levels of moral character. Adults with high levels of moral character tend to: consider the needs and interests of others and how their actions affect other people (e.g., they have high levels of Honesty-Humility, empathic concern, guilt proneness); regulate their behavior effectively, specifically with reference to behaviors that have positive short-term consequences but negative long-term consequences (e.g., they have high levels of Conscientiousness, self-control, consideration of future consequences); and value being moral (e.g., they have high levels of moral identity-internalization). Cognitive moral development, Emotionality, and social value orientation were found to be relatively undiagnostic of moral character. Studies 1 and 2 revealed that employees with low moral character committed harmful work behaviors more frequently and helpful work behaviors less frequently than did employees with high moral character, according to their own admissions and coworkers' observations. Study 3 revealed that adults with low moral character committed more delinquent behavior and had more lenient attitudes toward unethical negotiation tactics than did adults with high moral character. By showing that individual differences have consistent, meaningful effects on employees' behaviors, after controlling for demographic variables (e.g., gender, age, income) and basic attributes of the work setting (e.g., enforcement of an ethics code), our results contest situationist perspectives that deemphasize the importance of personality. Moral people can be identified by self-reports in surveys, and these self-reports predict consequential behaviors months after the initial assessment.

  14. Strategies to support spirituality in health care communication: a home hospice cancer caregiver case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reblin, Maija; Otis-Green, Shirley; Ellington, Lee; Clayton, Margaret F

    2014-12-01

    Although there is growing recognition of the importance of integrating spirituality within health care, there is little evidence to guide clinicians in how to best communicate with patients and family about their spiritual or existential concerns. Using an audio-recorded home hospice nurse visit immediately following the death of a patient as a case-study, we identify spiritually-sensitive communication strategies. The nurse incorporates spirituality in her support of the family by 1) creating space to allow for the expression of emotions and spiritual beliefs and 2) encouraging meaning-based coping, including emphasizing the caregivers' strengths and reframing negative experiences. Hospice provides an excellent venue for modeling successful examples of spiritual communication. Health care professionals can learn these techniques to support patients and families in their own holistic practice. All health care professionals benefit from proficiency in spiritual communication skills. Attention to spiritual concerns ultimately improves care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Alcohol Dependence Associated with Increased Utilitarian Moral Judgment: A Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemiri, Lotfi; Guterstam, Joar; Franck, Johan; Jayaram-Lindström, Nitya

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that emotional processes, mediated by the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPC), are of great importance for moral judgment. Neurological patients with VMPC dysfunction have been shown to generate increased utilitarian moral judgments, i.e. are more likely to endorse emotionally aversive actions in order to maximize aggregate welfare, when faced with emotionally salient personal moral dilemmas. Patients with alcohol dependence (AD) also exhibit impairments in functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex, but whether they exhibit increased utilitarian moral reasoning has not previously been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate moral judgment in AD patients (n = 20) compared to healthy controls (n = 20) matched by sex, age and education years. Each subject responded to a battery of 50 hypothetical dilemmas categorized as non-moral, moral impersonal and moral personal. They also responded to a questionnaire evaluating explicit knowledge of social and moral norms. Results confirmed our hypothesis that AD patients generated increased utilitarian moral judgment compared to controls when faced with moral personal dilemmas. Crucially, there was no difference in their responses to non-moral or impersonal moral dilemmas, nor knowledge of explicit social and moral norms. One possible explanation is that damage to the VMPC, caused by long term repeated exposure to alcohol results in emotional dysfunction, predisposing to utilitarian moral judgment. This work elucidates a novel aspect of the neuropsychological profile of AD patients, namely a tendency to generate utilitarian moral judgment when faced with emotionally salient moral personal dilemmas. PMID:22761922

  16. Alcohol dependence associated with increased utilitarian moral judgment: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemiri, Lotfi; Guterstam, Joar; Franck, Johan; Jayaram-Lindström, Nitya

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that emotional processes, mediated by the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPC), are of great importance for moral judgment. Neurological patients with VMPC dysfunction have been shown to generate increased utilitarian moral judgments, i.e. are more likely to endorse emotionally aversive actions in order to maximize aggregate welfare, when faced with emotionally salient personal moral dilemmas. Patients with alcohol dependence (AD) also exhibit impairments in functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex, but whether they exhibit increased utilitarian moral reasoning has not previously been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate moral judgment in AD patients (n = 20) compared to healthy controls (n = 20) matched by sex, age and education years. Each subject responded to a battery of 50 hypothetical dilemmas categorized as non-moral, moral impersonal and moral personal. They also responded to a questionnaire evaluating explicit knowledge of social and moral norms. Results confirmed our hypothesis that AD patients generated increased utilitarian moral judgment compared to controls when faced with moral personal dilemmas. Crucially, there was no difference in their responses to non-moral or impersonal moral dilemmas, nor knowledge of explicit social and moral norms. One possible explanation is that damage to the VMPC, caused by long term repeated exposure to alcohol results in emotional dysfunction, predisposing to utilitarian moral judgment. This work elucidates a novel aspect of the neuropsychological profile of AD patients, namely a tendency to generate utilitarian moral judgment when faced with emotionally salient moral personal dilemmas.

  17. Religion, spirituality, health and medicine: why should Indian physicians care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2007-01-01

    Religion, spirituality, health and medicine have common roots in the conceptual framework of relationship amongst human beings, nature and God. Of late, there has been a surge in interest in understanding the interplay of religion, spirituality, health and medicine, both in popular and scientific literature. A number of published empirical studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with better outcomes in physical and mental health. Despite some methodological limitations, these studies do point towards a positive association between religious involvement and better health. When faced with disease, disability and death, many patients would like physicians to address their emotional and spiritual needs, as well. The renewed interest in the interaction of religion and spirituality with health and medicine has significant implications in the Indian context. Although religion is translated as dharma in major Indian languages, dharma and religion are etymologically different and dharma is closer to spirituality than religion as an organized institution. Religion and spirituality play important roles in the lives of millions of Indians and therefore, Indian physicians need to respectfully acknowledge religious issues and address the spiritual needs of their patients. Incorporating religion and spirituality into health and medicine may also go a long way in making the practice of medicine more holistic, ethical and compassionate. It may also offer new opportunities to learn more about Ayurveda and other traditional systems of medicine and have more enriched understanding and collaborative interaction between different systems of medicine. Indian physicians may also find religion and spirituality significant and fulfilling in their own lives.

  18. A Kantian ethics approach to moral bioenhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    It seems, at first glance, that a Kantian ethics approach to moral enhancement would tend towards the position that there could be no place for emotional modulation in any understanding of the endeavour, owing to the typically understood view that Kantian ethics does not allow any role for emotion in morality as a whole. It seems then that any account of moral bioenhancement which places emotion at its centre would therefore be rejected. This article argues, however, that this assumption is incorrect. Given later writings by Kant on the role of sympathy, and taking into account other concerns in Kantian ethics (such as bodily integrity), it may in fact be the case that Kantian ethics would allow for an account of moral bioenhancement through emotional modulation, and that in some (rare) cases such an intervention might even be considered to be a duty. © 2017 The Authors Bioethics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Factors Influencing The Therapeutic Decision-Making. From Academic Knowledge to Emotional Intelligence and Spiritual “Crazy” Wisdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific holistic medicine is built on holistic medical theory, on therapeutic and ethical principles. The rationale is that the therapist can take the patient into a state of salutogenesis, or existential healing, using his skills and knowledge. But how ever much we want to make therapy a science it remains partly an art, and the more developed the therapist becomes, the more of his/her decisions will be based on intuition, feeling and even inspiration that is more based on love and human concern and other spiritual motivations than on mental reason and rationality in a simple sense of the word. The provocative and paradoxal medieval western concept of the “truth telling clown”, or the eastern concepts of “crazy wisdom” and “holy madness” seems highly relevant here. The problem is how we can ethically justify this kind of highly “irrational” therapeutic behavior in the rational setting of a medical institution. We argue here that holistic therapy has a very high success rate and is doing no harm to the patient, and encourage therapists, psychiatrists, psychologist and other academically trained “helpers” to constantly measure their own success-rate. This paper discusses many of the important factors that influence clinical holistic decision-making. Sexuality could, as many psychoanalysts from Freud to Reich and Searles have believed, be the most healing power that exists and also the most difficult for the mind to comprehend, and thus the most “crazy-wise” tool of therapy.

  20. Moral communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2006-11-01

    This article explores the twin issues of whether organizations can act as ethical agents and what it means to exert moral influence over others. A discursive perspective is advanced that characterizes ethics as the action of communities based on promises. The received view of ethics as either the universal principles or individual responsibility is criticized as inadequate. Moral influence within community is considered under the various headings of democracy, office, brotherhood, agency, witness, and promise making. Moral influence among communities can include the damaging methods of "the superior position," coercion and misrepresentation, and appeal to third parties and the sound methods of rhetoric and promise making.

  1. A Spiritual Philosophy of Recovery: Aquinas and Alcoholics Anonymous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. William McVey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is an attempt to formulate a Thomistic spiritual philosophy of recovery. The author faces two issues. One, what do recovering alcoholics mean when they say: “I am spiritual, but not religious?” He comes to the conclusion that it means recovering alcoholics are experiencing spiritual healing in their willingness to trust a loving God who has performed a miracle of recovery from alcoholism in their life. As a result of this experience, they are prepared to live a life of virtuous habit. Two, recovering alcoholics have discovered a spiritual second nature of moral character. The author explains why there are many in A.A. who discover that as God comes into their life and they turn to the path of virtue they rediscover religious worship and devotion is essential to the one day at a time journey.

  2. Spirituality in adolescent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Meaghann S; Wratchford, Dale

    2017-07-01

    Adolescence, the transition between childhood and adulthood, represents a time of rapid biological, neurocognitive, and psychosocial changes. These changes have important implications for the development and evolution of adolescent spirituality, particularly for adolescents with chronic or life-limiting illnesses. To contribute positively to adolescent spiritual formation, palliative care teams benefit from understanding the normative changes expected to occur during adolescence. This paper provides a narrative review of adolescent spirituality while recognizing the role of religious, familial, and cultural influences on spiritual development during the teenage years. By giving explicit attention to the contextual norms surrounding adolescence and still recognizing each adolescent-aged patient as unique, palliative care teams can help adolescents transition toward meaningful and sustainable spiritual growth. This paper reviews the clinical and research implications relevant to integrating adolescent spiritual health as part of comprehensive palliative care.

  3. A concept analysis of moral resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Peter D; Rushton, Cynda Hylton

    Nurses experience moral distress, which has led to emotional distress, frustration, anger, and nurse attrition. Overcoming moral distress has become a significant focus in nursing research. The continued focus on moral distress has not produced sustainable solutions within the nursing profession. Since positive language may alter the outcomes of morally distressing situations, we look to better understand one such positive phrase, moral resilience. We explored moral resilience through a literature search using 11 databases to identify instances of the phrase. Occurrences of moral resilience were then divided into three distinct categories: antecedents, attributes, and consequences, and following this, major themes within each category were identified. There is a dearth of scholarship on moral resilience, and additionally, there is currently no unifying definition. Despite this, our analysis offers promising direction in refining the concept. This concept analysis reveals differences in how moral resilience is understood. More conceptual work is needed to refine the definition of moral resilience and understand how the concept is useful in mitigating the negative consequences of moral distress and other types of moral adversity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Moral transhumanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingmar; Savulescu, Julian

    2010-12-01

    In its basic sense, the term "human" is a term of biological classification: an individual is human just in case it is a member of the species Homo sapiens. Its opposite is "nonhuman": nonhuman animals being animals that belong to other species than H. sapiens. In another sense of human, its opposite is "inhuman," that is cruel and heartless (cf. "humane" and "inhumane"); being human in this sense is having morally good qualities. This paper argues that biomedical research and therapy should make humans in the biological sense more human in the moral sense, even if they cease to be human in the biological sense. This serves valuable biomedical ends like the promotion of health and well-being, for if humans do not become more moral, civilization is threatened. It is unimportant that humans remain biologically human, since they do not have moral value in virtue of belonging to H. sapiens.

  5. Education to spirituality

    OpenAIRE

    Novotný, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to create a pedagogical concept of the education for spirituality. I try to map the various views of human spirituality. The spirituality is one of the important philosophy topics, so I dedicated this view most. Next is the psychology, within witch I strive to grab this term in a scientific way. I also notice the changes in the perception of the term spirituality, namely in the relation to the religion, as well as to the usage of this term, which is equivalent to the p...

  6. Spirituality in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Tirri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the concept of spirituality in the educational framework is discussed. The concepts of religion and spirituality are compared. The psychological view of spirituality is presented with a new suggested intelligence type: spiritual intelligence. The educational view emphasizes spiritual sensitivity as a universal human ability that needs to be developed through education. The sociological view of spirituality explores it as an expression of postsecular religiosity. Empirical studies indicate that an increasing number of people­ now prefer to call themselves ‘spiritual’ rather than ‘religious’. This trend seems to be more present in some European countries, for example, in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Finland. Empirical studies on spirituality are reviewed and discussed. A special emphasis is given to the Finnish research findings related to the spirituality of a new generation or young adults. It is argued that understanding spirituality as an expression of postsecular religiosity gives more room for young adults to participate in communicative action concerning religion. This would promote a discursive religiousness in the spirit of Jürgen Habermas, in which a plurality of religious beliefs and practices are acknowledged and a dialogical and inter-religious approach is advocated.

  7. Moral Communities and Moral Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Dentists is embarking on a multiyear project to improve ethics in dentistry. Early indications are that the focus will be on actual moral behavior rather than theory, that we will include organizations as ethical units, and that we will focus on building moral leadership. There is little evidence that the "telling individuals how to behave" approach to ethics is having the hoped-for effect. As a profession, dentistry is based on shared trust. The public level of trust in practitioners is acceptable, but could be improved, and will need to be strengthened to reduce the risk of increasing regulation. While feedback from the way dentists and patients view ethics is generally reassuring, dentists are often at odds with patients and their colleagues over how the profesion manages itself. Individuals are an inconsistent mix of good and bad behavior, and it may be more helpful to make small improvements in the habits of all dentists than to try to take a few certifiably dishonest ones off the street. A computer simulation model of dentistry as a moral community suggests that the profession will always have the proportion of bad actors it will tolerate, that moral leadership is a difficult posture to maintain, that massive interventions to correct imbalances through education or other means will be wasted unless the system as a whole is modified, and that most dentists see no compelling benefit in changing the ethical climate of the profession because they are doing just fine. Considering organiza-tions as loci of moral behavior reveals questionable practices that otherwise remain undetected, including moral distress, fragmentation, fictitious dentists, moral fading, decoupling, responsibility shifting, and moral priming. What is most needed is not phillosophy or principles, but moral leadership.

  8. Moral development and recidivism: A meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, E.S.; Gibbs, J.; Stams, G.J.; Bijleveld, C.C.J.H.; van der Laan, P.H.; Hendriks, J.

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 19 studies (N = 15,992 offenders) showed a significant inverse relation between more mature moral development and recidivism. Moderator analyses revealed a larger effect size for moral cognition (r =.20) than for moral emotion (r =.11). Effect sizes for production measures (r

  9. Moral development and recidivism: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, E.; Gibbs, J.; Stams, G.J.; Bijleveld, C.; Hendriks, J.; van der Laan, P.

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 19 studies (N = 15,992 offenders) showed a significant inverse relation between more mature moral development and recidivism. Moderator analyses revealed a larger effect size for moral cognition (r = .20) than for moral emotion (r = .11). Effect sizes for production measures (r =

  10. A model of moral identity: applications for education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, M Kyle; Murzyn, Theresa; Hart, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to build an intellectual bridge between moral psychology and education. Our hope is that the findings from moral psychology will inform and explain best practices in moral education. With that end in mind, we briefly and selectively review the moral education and character education literature highlighting some of the challenges these domains have faced. Next, we review the moral identity literature and offer our own model of moral identity formation emphasizing the "characteristic adaptations" (i.e., moral orientation, moral self, moral emotions, and social relationships and opportunities) of the model. Finally, we illustrate and explain how some of these "characteristic adaptations" have been or could be used in the development of successful moral education programs, and provide specific examples for application of our model in the domain of sex education.

  11. PERAN KECERDASAN SPIRITUAL DALAM PENCAPAIAN KEBERMAKNAAN HIDUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Laili Khoirun Nida

    2014-08-01

    , spiritual quetion  is contributing  to the achievement of the meaning fulness of life, in which role he was able to become the media, control and guidance for individual sindynamics of life, so that individual under any circumstances while maintaining the quality of humanexistence as intellectually, emotionally and spiritually so that he able to achieve the meaning of life.   Keywords: Role, Spiritual Quetion, Meaning of Life

  12. Spirituality and distress in palliative care consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Judith; Paice, Judith A; Cameron, Jacqueline R; Shott, Susan

    2005-08-01

    One's spirituality or religious beliefs and practices may have a profound impact on how the individual copes with the suffering that so often accompanies advanced disease. Several previous studies suggest that negative religious coping can significantly affect health outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to explore the relationship between spirituality, religious coping, and symptoms of distress among a group of inpatients referred to the palliative care consult service. Pilot study. The study was conducted in a large academic medical center with a comprehensive Palliative Care and Home Hospice Program. (1) National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Management Assessment Tool; (2) Pargament Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief RCOPE); (3) Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp); (4) Puchalski's FICA; and (5) Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF). The 31 subjects surveyed experienced moderate distress (5.8 +/- 2.7), major physical and psychosocial symptom burden, along with reduced function and significant caregiving needs. The majority (87.2%) perceived themselves to be at least somewhat spiritual, with 77.4% admitting to being at least somewhat religious. Negative religious coping (i.e., statements regarding punishment or abandonment by God) was positively associated with distress, confusion, depression, and negatively associated with physical and emotional well-being, as well as quality of life. Palliative care clinicians should be alert to symptoms of spiritual distress and intervene accordingly. Future research is needed to identify optimal techniques to address negative religious coping.

  13. It's not all about moral reasoning: Understanding the content of Moral Case Deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svantesson, Mia; Silén, Marit; James, Inger

    2018-03-01

    Moral Case Deliberation is one form of clinical ethics support described as a facilitator-led collective moral reasoning by healthcare professionals on a concrete moral question connected to their practice. Evaluation research is needed, but, as human interaction is difficult to standardise, there is a need to capture the content beyond moral reasoning. This allows for a better understanding of Moral Case Deliberation, which may contribute to further development of valid outcome criteria and stimulate the normative discussion of what Moral Case Deliberation should contain. To explore and compare the content beyond moral reasoning in the dialogue in Moral Case Deliberation at Swedish workplaces. A mixed-methods approach was applied for analysing audio-recordings of 70 periodic Moral Case Deliberation meetings at 10 Swedish workplaces. Moral Case Deliberation facilitators and various healthcare professions participated, with registered nurses comprising the majority. Ethical considerations: No objection to the study was made by an Ethical Review Board. After oral and written information was provided, consent to be recorded was assumed by virtue of participation. Other than 'moral reasoning' (median (md): 45% of the spoken time), the Moral Case Deliberations consisted of 'reflections on the psychosocial work environment' to a varying extent (md: 29%). Additional content comprised 'assumptions about the patient's psychosocial situation' (md: 6%), 'facts about the patient's situation' (md: 5%), 'concrete problem-solving' (md: 6%) and 'process' (md: 3%). The findings suggest that a restorative function of staff's wellbeing in Moral Case Deliberation is needed, as this might contribute to good patient care. This supports outcome criteria of improved emotional support, which may include relief of moral distress. However, facilitators need a strategy for how to proceed from the participants' own emotional needs and to develop the use of their emotional knowing to focus on

  14. Effects of anger, guilt, and envy on moral hypocrisy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Evan; Ruttan, Rachel L

    2012-01-01

    In the current article the authors examined the impact of specific emotions on moral hypocrisy, the tendency among people to judge others more severely than they judge themselves. In two studies, they found that (a) anger increased moral hypocrisy, (b) guilt eliminated moral hypocrisy, and (c) envy reversed moral hypocrisy. In particular, these findings were observed in two domains. In Study 1, participants responded to moral dilemmas describing unethical behavior and rated how acceptable it would be if others engaged in the unethical behavior, or alternatively, if they themselves engaged in the unethical behavior. In Study 2, participants were asked how much they would like to donate to research on cancer, or alternatively, how much they think others should donate. The results demonstrate that specific emotions influence moral decision making, even when real money is at stake, and that emotions of the same valence have opposing effects on moral judgment.

  15. Moral foundations vignettes: a standardized stimulus database of scenarios based on moral foundations theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Scott; Iyengar, Vijeth; Cabeza, Roberto; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Research on the emotional, cognitive, and social determinants of moral judgment has surged in recent years. The development of moral foundations theory (MFT) has played an important role, demonstrating the breadth of morality. Moral psychology has responded by investigating how different domains of moral judgment are shaped by a variety of psychological factors. Yet, the discipline lacks a validated set of moral violations that span the moral domain, creating a barrier to investigating influences on judgment and how their neural bases might vary across the moral domain. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by developing and validating a large set of moral foundations vignettes (MFVs). Each vignette depicts a behavior violating a particular moral foundation and not others. The vignettes are controlled on many dimensions including syntactic structure and complexity making them suitable for neuroimaging research. We demonstrate the validity of our vignettes by examining respondents' classifications of moral violations, conducting exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and demonstrating the correspondence between the extracted factors and existing measures of the moral foundations. We expect that the MFVs will be beneficial for a wide variety of behavioral and neuroimaging investigations of moral cognition.

  16. Emerging Adult Religiosity and Spirituality: Linking Beliefs, Values, and Ethical Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Snell Herzog

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper challenges the “spiritual but not religious” (SBNR category as a methodological artifact caused by interacting two closed-ended survey items into binary combinations. Employing a theoretically rich approach, this study maps the multiple ways in which the religious and the spiritual combine for emerging adults. Results indicate that most emerging adults have a tacit sense of morality, displaying limited cognitive access to how moral reasoning relates to religious and spiritual orientations. This longitudinal study investigates efforts to raise moral awareness through: exposure to diverse religious and spiritual orientations, personal reflection, and collective discussion. Relative to control groups, emerging adults in this study display increases in moral awareness. We combine the results of these studies to formulate a theoretical framework for the ways in which beliefs, values, and ethical decision-making connect in expressing plural combinations of religiosity and spirituality. The implication is that direct attention to religiosity and spirituality — not avoidance of — appears to facilitate ethical decision-making.

  17. Spirituality matters: creating a time and place for hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revheim, Nadine; Greenberg, William M

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with serious psychiatric disabilities may become demoralized or hopeless consequent to longstanding disability and stigma. Potential antidotes are social support from the religious community and use of personal spiritual resources as coping mechanisms. The "Spirituality Matters Group" offers comfort and hope through structured and innovative exercises focusing on spiritual beliefs and coping. Activities facilitate verbal expression and appropriate social interaction, and build a sense of community. Activities and themes from selected group sessions are discussed within a recovery-oriented "emotion-focused coping" framework.

  18. Incorporating spiritual beliefs into a cognitive model of worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmarin, David H; Pirutinsky, Steven; Auerbach, Randy P; Björgvinsson, Thröstur; Bigda-Peyton, Joseph; Andersson, Gerhard; Pargament, Kenneth I; Krumrei, Elizabeth J

    2011-07-01

    Cognitive theory and research have traditionally highlighted the relevance of the core beliefs about oneself, the world, and the future to human emotions. For some individuals, however, core beliefs may also explicitly involve spiritual themes. In this article, we propose a cognitive model of worry, in which positive/negative beliefs about the Divine affect symptoms through the mechanism of intolerance of uncertainty. Using mediation analyses, we found support for our model across two studies, in particular, with regards to negative spiritual beliefs. These findings highlight the importance of assessing for spiritual alongside secular convictions when creating cognitive-behavioral case formulations in the treatment of religious individuals. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Individual moral development and moral progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Anders; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    At first glance, one of the most obvious places to look for moral progress is in individuals, in particular in moral development from childhood to adulthood. In fact, that moral progress is possible is a foundational assumption of moral education. Beyond the general agreement that moral progress is

  20. Individual Moral Development and Moral Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Anders; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2017-01-01

    At first glance, one of the most obvious places to look for moral progress is in individuals, in particular in moral development from childhood to adulthood. In fact, that moral progress is possible is a foundational assumption of moral education. Beyond the general agreement that moral progress is

  1. Iranian cancer patients’ perception of spirituality: a qualitative content analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Spirituality is a subjective and multi-dimensional concept. The ambiguity in its meaning can create barriers in its application in both education and medicine. The present study aimed to explore the Iranian cancer patients’ perception of spirituality. Methods A qualitative study, using the content analysis approach, was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were held with 11 cancer patients and six members of their families in one of Tehran’s hospitals and a charity institute. The data generated were transcribed verbatim and content analysis approach was used for data reduction, naming data, obtaining analytical code and determining categories and themes. Results Three themes (and seven sub-themes) emerged from the data analysis: 1) God as the spiritual truth (relationship with God and trust in God), 2) Moralities as a spiritual sign (considering personal and social moral codes) and 3) Spiritual resources as the source of hope (religious, personal and social resources). Conclusions Overall, in the view of cancer patients, spirituality can be defined in a religious context. However, some of them believe in morality beside religiosity, so health care staff must pay due attention to these aspects, to provide them with the opportunity to use spiritual resources. PMID:23043231

  2. Freedom and Spirituality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vintges, K.; Taylor, D.

    2011-01-01

    Spirituality is an idiosyncratic concept in the work of Foucault, which might best be characterized as an "intensity without a ‘spirit’". To understand Foucault's specific concept of spirituality, we have to take into account some basic themes of his oeuvre, especially of his later work, that is,

  3. Spirituality in Logotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrullah Okan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Frankl wrote that he needed to find meaning in his life so that he could sustain his life physically, psychologically, and spiritually. In other words, when an individual understands meaning in life, these three dimensions will be in a healthy interaction. The spiritual dimension and the other two dimensions have healing power. Therefore, it will become even easier for a person who is aware of the spiritual side and acts with this consciousness to find meaning. One of the most effective elements in finding meaning is spirituality. Studies have shown that spirituality helps people find meaning in their lives and even has an important effect in defeating the fear of death. In this respect, logotherapy does not reject spirituality and religion but rather encourages their use. This study examines the perspective of religion and spirituality in logotherapy and touches on the work done in this area. The spiritual point of view and applications of logotherapy, which center on finding meaning in the final analysis, are included in this study.

  4. [Neuroethics (I): moral pathways in normal brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-González, Luis C

    2014-03-01

    Morality is made of rules and values that guide human behavior. They barely change among different cultures. Social accomplishments are the result of moral development, due to a taint of fairness which pervades any human activity. The moral functions are the consequence of evolution and have their own specific neural circuits. To describe their appearance, starting and underlying mechanisms in the normal brain. Moral responses are basically homogeneous. They are linked to the emotional development, as much basic and individual (fear, wrath) as social (compassion, justice). Their emergence is the result of the emotional dichotomies pleasure/pain and reward/punishment, which lead to the basic moral dichotomy good/bad. For their working it is required the running of the prefrontal cortex (ventromedian and dorsolateral), the anterior cingular cortex and the superior temporal sulcus, that asses and elaborate and utilitarian moral response; and also the insula, the amygdale and the hypothalamus, that perform a quicker and emotionally rooted response. In addition, the mirror neuronal system (fronto-parietal) enables motor learning and empathy, linking this factor to the theory of mind. Moral sense and its responses underlay the complex social development that humans have reached and enjoyed. Thus opens ways for improving benefits in human groups and individuals alike. In addition, the knowledge of the normal function of the moral circuits is permeating and influencing the many areas of neuroculture.

  5. Screening Patient Spirituality and Spiritual Needs in Oncology Nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, René; Schep-Akkerman, Annemiek; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To select 2 appropriate spiritual assessment tools and evaluate these by involving oncology nurses. Background. Spirituality is recognized as an important domain of cancer care. At admission, integration of spiritual assessment seems necessary. It is unclear what kind of spiritual assessment

  6. Screening patient spirituality and spiritual needs in oncology nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R. van; Schep-Akkerman, A.E.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van

    2013-01-01

    AIM.: To select 2 appropriate spiritual assessment tools and evaluate these by involving oncology nurses. BACKGROUND.: Spirituality is recognized as an important domain of cancer care. At admission, integration of spiritual assessment seems necessary. It is unclear what kind of spiritual assessment

  7. Realist Review of Programs, Policies, and Interventions to Enhance the Social, Emotional, and Spiritual Well-Being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People Living in Out-of-Home Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Lindstedt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The child protection system in Australia includes out-of-home care (OoHC for children and young people at risk of harm and neglect. In Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people are 9 times more likely to be placed in care than non-Aboriginal young people (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015. Australia’s history of colonization and subsequent policies have caused trauma to individuals, families, and communities and resulted in poor physical and mental health and mistrust of services. This review was undertaken to identify programs and policies currently in place that aim to improve the mental health and well-being of this vulnerable population. It provides an analysis of both the strengths of the current system as well as what has been inadequately addressed based on literature in the area.By incorporating an Aboriginal perspective, this review focuses on social, emotional, and spiritual well-being (SESWB and the aspects of a child’s life and community that promote this. A realist review of the academic and grey literature was conducted in 2014. It included an extensive search of government and non-government (NGO publications. The review identified nine programs or policies that are designed to improve the SESWB of Aboriginal young people in OoHC in local and international settings. These are the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle, cultural support plans, Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations (ACCOs, family group decision-making, therapeutic care, and Panyappi Mentoring Program. Given that culturally competent service provision is important to SESWB, the review concludes that an increase in monitoring and evaluation is necessary to determine the effectiveness of programs and ensure their implementation and sustainability when warranted. Policy and research work is needed to adapt and devise programs promoting the SESWB of Aboriginal young people (at both the

  8. Educación de la inteligencia emocional, social y espiritual de la mujer embarazada / Education of emotional, social and spiritual intelligence of the pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carballo Vargas, Sonia

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: La presente propuesta se basa en la investigación “La educación del niño y la niña menores de tres años. Un estudio sobre la percepción que tienen las madres acerca de manejo de limites con sus hijos e hijas”, que se realizó durante el 2006 y el 2007 en el Instituto de Investigaciones en Educación de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Parte de la tarea consistió en analizar las percepciones de un grupo de mujeres sobre el embarazo que estaban viviendo. Los resultados obtenidos que se presentan se enmarcan dentro de este artículo, los cuales son el fundamento para la propuesta “Educar las habilidades de la inteligencia emocional de la mujer embarazada”.Abstract: The present proposal is based on the research paper “The education of children below age 3. A study on mothers’ perception on handling limits with their children”, written during 2006 and 2007 at Instituto de Investigaciones en Educación (Institute of Research in Education at Universidad de Costa Rica. Part of the research work dealt with the analysis of a group of women’s perceptions during pregnancy. The results are presented within this article; as a basis for the proposal “Educating the skills of emotional intelligence in pregnant women”.

  9. Religion, Spirituality, and Medicine: Psychiatrists’ and Other Physicians’ Differing Observations, Interpretations, and Clinical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlin, Farr A.; Lawrence, Ryan E.; Odell, Shaun; Chin, Marshall H.; Lantos, John D.; Koenig, Harold G.; Meador, Keith G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study compared the ways in which psychiatrists and nonpsychiatrists interpret the relationship between religion/spirituality and health and address religion/spirituality issues in the clinical encounter. Method The authors mailed a survey to a stratified random sample of 2,000 practicing U.S. physicians, with an oversampling of psychiatrists. The authors asked the physicians about their beliefs and observations regarding the relationship between religion/spirituality and patient health and about the ways in which they address religion/spirituality in the clinical setting. Results A total of 1,144 physicians completed the survey. Psychiatrists generally endorse positive influences of religion/spirituality on health, but they are more likely than other physicians to note that religion/spirituality sometimes causes negative emotions that lead to increased patient suffering (82% versus 44%). Compared to other physicians, psychiatrists are more likely to encounter religion/spirituality issues in clinical settings (92% versus 74% report their patients sometimes or often mention religion/spirituality issues), and they are more open to addressing religion/spirituality issues with patients (93% versus 53% say that it is usually or always appropriate to inquire about religion/spirituality). Conclusions This study suggests that the vast majority of psychiatrists appreciate the importance of religion and/or spirituality at least at a functional level. Compared to other physicians, psychiatrists also appear to be more comfortable, and have more experience, addressing religion/spirituality concerns in the clinical setting. PMID:18056237

  10. Experiences and Expressions of Spirituality at the End of Life in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinton, Marilyn; Giacomini, Mita; Toledo, Feli; Rose, Trudy; Hand-Breckenridge, Tracy; Boyle, Anne; Woods, Anne; Clarke, France; Shears, Melissa; Sheppard, Robert; Cook, Deborah

    2017-01-15

    The austere setting of the intensive care unit (ICU) can suppress expressions of spirituality. To describe how family members and clinicians experience and express spirituality during the dying process in a 21-bed medical-surgical ICU. Reflecting the care of 70 dying patients, we conducted 208 semistructured qualitative interviews with 76 family members and 150 clinicians participating in the Three Wishes Project. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed by three investigators using qualitative interpretive description. Participants characterize dying as a spiritual event. Spirituality is an integral part of the life narrative of the patient before, during, and after death. Experiences and expressions of spirituality for patients, families, and clinicians during end-of-life care in the ICU are supported by eliciting and implementing wishes in several ways. Eliciting wishes stimulates conversations for people of diverse spiritual orientations to respond to death in personally meaningful ways that facilitate continuity and closure, and ease emotional trauma. Soliciting wishes identifies positive aspirations, which provide comfort in the face of death. The act of soliciting wishes brings clinician humanity to the fore. Wishing makes individual spiritual preferences and practices more accessible. Wishes may be grounded in spiritual goals, such as peace, comfort, connections, and tributes; they may seek a spiritually enhanced environment or represent specific spiritual interventions. Family members and clinicians consider spirituality an important dimension of end-of-life care. The Three Wishes Project invites and supports the expression of myriad forms of spirituality during the dying process in the ICU.

  11. Spirituality and spiritual care in and around childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan; Hall, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence points to childbirth as a spiritually felt meaningful occasion. Although growing literature and development of guidelines charge the midwife to provide spiritual care felt spiritual experiences are not addressed. There is need to revisit contemporary approaches to spiritual care in midwifery lest something of significance becomes lost in policy rhetoric. The aim of this discussion paper is to bring to the surface what is meant by spiritual care and spiritual experiences, to increase awareness about spirituality in childbirth and midwifery and move beyond the constraints of structured defined protocols. The authors' own studies and other's research that focuses on the complex contextual experiences of childbirth related to spirituality are discussed in relation to the growing interest in spiritual care assessments and guidelines. There is a growing presence in the literature about how spirituality is a concern to the wellbeing of human beings. Although spirituality remains on the peripheral of current discourse about childbirth. Spiritual care guidelines are now being developed. However spiritual care guidelines do not appear to acknowledge the lived-experience of childbirth as spiritually meaningful. Introduction of spiritual care guidelines into midwifery practice do not address the spiritual meaningful significance of childbirth. If childbirth spirituality is relegated to a spiritual care tick box culture this would be a travesty. The depth of spirituality that inheres uniquely in the experience of childbirth would remain silenced and hidden. Spiritual experiences are felt and beckon sensitive and tactful practice beyond words and formulaic questions. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spiritual Competency Scale: Further Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Stephanie F.; Robertson, Linda A.; Gill, Carman S.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a follow-up analysis of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which initially validated ASERVIC's (Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling) spiritual competencies. The study examined whether the factor structure of the Spiritual Competency Scale would be supported by participants (i.e., ASERVIC…

  13. A subjective utilitarian theory of moral judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dale J; Ahn, Minwoo

    2016-10-01

    Current theories hypothesize that moral judgments are difficult because rational and emotional decision processes compete. We present a fundamentally different theory of moral judgment: the Subjective Utilitarian Theory of moral judgment. The Subjective Utilitarian Theory posits that people try to identify and save the competing item with the greatest "personal value." Moral judgments become difficult only when the competing items have similar personal values. In Experiment 1, we estimate the personal values of 104 items. In Experiments 2-5, we show that the distributional overlaps of the estimated personal values account for over 90% of the variance in reaction times (RTs) and response choices in a moral judgment task. Our model fundamentally restructures our understanding of moral judgments from a competition between decision processes to a competition between similarly valued items. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. MORALE Assignment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carienvt

    Military and political leaders around the world regard high morale of the armed forces as one of the ... mental well-being of the individual soldier, the military unit as well as the armed force as a whole.2 It is thus ..... include elements such as dust, noise, harsh weather, lack of food and water and sleep deprivation. Van Dyk ...

  15. Moral Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahel, Kenneth

    1976-01-01

    Explains the rationale that there should be a kind of harmony between moral understanding or reasoning on the one hand, and the feeling dispositions on the other hand. Considers the views of Kant and Schopenhauer as they apply to the subject. (Author/RK)

  16. Examining the Role of Religiosity in Moral Cognition, Specifically in the Formation of Sacred Values, and Researching Computational Models for Analyzing Sacred Rhetoric and its Consequential Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-13

    attempts for detecting linguistic features related to emotions and sentiment by coupling this research with a distinct theoretical emphasis on the...efforts in this project extended contemporary attempts for detecting linguistic features related to emotions and sentiment by coupling this research with...loading of concepts as they are used in a corpus . These methods are especially useful for the study of online corpora as it allows for the rapid analysis

  17. Human morality and temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Jerome

    2005-01-01

    This chapter has tried to make two points. First, the concept of morality refers to a developmental cascade of phenomena whose essential features are (a) inhibition of punished acts; (b) a representation of prohibited actions; (c) the emotions of uncertainty, empathy, shame, and guilt; (d) the semantic concepts of good and bad; (e) accepting the moral obligations of social categories; and (f) the concepts of fairness and the ideal. The inhibition of prohibited actions and the cognitive representation of prohibited behaviors, as well as the affect states that follow violations, appear by the end of the second year of life. The concepts of good and bad appear early in the third year, the experience of guilt and awareness of social categories by 4-6 years, and the notions of fairness, the ideal, and relational social categories during the school years. Second, some of the variation in the intensity and frequency of the moral emotions is attributable to the child's temperament. Eleven-year-old children who had been high-reactive infants and admitted to feelings of guilt when they violated a family standard were cortically and autonomically more aroused than the low reactives who reported equally frequent experiences of guilt. Further, high reactives who were perceived by their mothers as highly sensitive to punishment were biologically more aroused than high reactives perceived as less sensitive. Both universal developmental phenomena tied to brain maturation and temperamental variation associated with neurochemistry contribute to the complex phenomena that constitute the moral domain. The role of affect in promoting the adherence to standards remains controversial. Kant believed that people acted morally because acceptance of the categorical imperative required proper behavior-reason was the guardian of social harmony. Peirce and Dewey, by contrast, argued that anticipation of the emotions of anxiety, shame, and guilt motivated loyalty to the community's ethical

  18. Incorporating Religiosity, Spirituality, and Mindfulness into the Professional Development of Residence Life Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Monica Galloway; Sauerheber, Jill Duba; Dye, Lacretia; Hughey, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating an understanding of religiosity and spirituality into the professional development of residence life staff can give them the knowledge and insights needed to successfully utilize students' already heightened awareness of their own religiosity, spirituality, and mindfulness, creating an environment that meets their emotional and…

  19. Student nurses' perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Lay Hwa; Creedy, Debra K; Chan, Moon Fai

    2013-06-01

    To investigate nursing students' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Spirituality is an essential part of holistic care but often neglected in practice. Barriers to spiritual care include limited educational preparation, negative attitudes towards spirituality, confusion about nurses' role, perceptions of incompetence and avoidance of spiritual matters. There is limited knowledge about students' perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care. Previous studies have predominantly focused on educational approaches to enhance spirituality. The next generation of clinicians may have different worldviews, cultural beliefs and values about spirituality and spiritual care from current nurses. There is a need to understand students' views and how their spiritual development is shaped in order to inform pre-registration education. A cross-sectional survey of final-year students from three educational institutions in Singapore was conducted from April to August 2010. Data included demographic details and responses on a new composite tool, the Spiritual Care Giving Scale (SCGS). A response rate of 61.9% (n=745 out of 1204) was achieved. The lowest mean score was item 9, "Without spirituality, a person is not considered whole". Highest mean was item 2, "Spirituality is an important aspect of human being". Factor 5 (Spiritual Care Values) had the lowest mean with Factor 2 (Spirituality Perspectives) the highest. Participants considered spirituality as essential to being human; developmental in nature; and vital for individuals' state of well-being. Attributes important for spiritual care were identified. Multivariate analyses showed positive association between participants' scores and institution but not with other variables. Participating student nurses reported a high level of spiritual awareness that was not constrained by age. Students affirmed the importance of spiritual awareness in order to address the spiritual needs of patients. There was some congruence

  20. Spirituality of persons and patients treated in a medium complex renal unit at department of Cauca - Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudy Esperanza Cardoso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the spirituality of hemodialysis outpatients and for the period June-December 2013. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 86 users attending a program of hemodialysis in the department of Cauca, with users who agreed to participate in a survey study of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics was applied spirituality Parsian Dunning test. Results: The study reports the spirituality of the respondents 83.7 % of the population reports a high level of self-awareness, 94% considered important spiritual beliefs, 66 % identify with spiritual practices and 86 % indicated that spiritual needs. Conclusions: Patients perceive as important practical and spiritual needs, should consider the need to provide patients on Hemodialysis and its network of family support integral human accompaniment to cognitive, emotional, behavioral, social and spiritual to consolidate benefit your health level.

  1. Emotional Intelligence Effect and Side of Gender Spritual Intelligence against Performance of Employees in the West Sumatra Staffing Parliament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusnaena Yusnaena

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Human resources play an important role in the organization of the company. Although supported by the infrastructure and sufficient financial resources, without the support of human resources who are competent in their respective fields of activities in the organization, the company will not run properly. It is proved that human resources are the key issue and have to be managed as well as possible, because as the key, human resources will determine the success of an organization's operational activities. Provincial Parliament stressed the need for employees who have emotional and spiritual balance accumulated in the form of morality working and able to work together in solid team work. It is necessary for emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence. But the phenomenon in the field indicates the employee's performance is far from the desired expectation as there are many employees who are less concerned about jobs, less concerned about the peer delay - temporize absence of a sense of community work, is selfishness and want to win yourself all this illustrates the field of emotional intelligence oversight and intelligence spiritual so disturbing to the achievement of actual performance. This study is a descriptive study that compares the explanatory theories with circumstances that occur in the field. The sampling method selected is a total sampling technique. Data was processed using a multiple linear regression analysis formula. The results of this study conclude that the variables Emotional Intelligence have significant positive effect on employee performance in the Secretariat of the West Sumatra Provincial Parliament. The variable Spiritual Intelligence does not significantly influence the performance of employees of the West Sumatra Provincial Parliament Secretariat.

  2. Negative Outcomes After Morally Injurious Experiences: A Replication and Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Steven Lloyd

    2017-11-20

    The current study replicates and extends a model of the relationship between morally injurious experiences, moral emotions, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Jordan, Eisen, Bolton, Nash, & Litz, 2017). The current study builds on this earlier work by including broader measures of moral emotions and by including an assessment of symptoms of depression. An online survey, distributed using crowdsourcing software, was completed by 161 military veterans. The survey included measures of transgressive acts, appraisals of these acts including self-transgressions and betrayal by leadership, and symptoms of PTSD and depression. The hypothesized model was tested using structural equation techniques. The results of the current study largely replicate the earlier work, suggesting the effects of morally injurious experiences are mediated by moral emotions while also indicating transgressive acts can have a direct effect on PTSD. The model accounted for a large percentage of the variance of both PTSD and depression and supported specific paths between forms of morally injurious experiences, moral emotions, and negative psychological outcomes. The current study replicates the model that suggested moral emotions mediate the role of morally injurious experiences on symptoms of PTSD. The results also demonstrate that future studies should account for the role of transgressive acts in addition to appraisals of these acts. Finally, the results suggest the model developed by Jordan and colleagues may be useful in predicting outcomes beyond PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  4. On Moral Luck and Nonideal Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Ann

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the Kantian principle that we are morally accountable only for those actions over which we have control, Bernard Williams, Thomas Nagel, and others have argued that luck plays a significant role in the moral life. Put briefly, moral luck is at play when we are appropriately praised or blamed for our moral actions despite the fact…

  5. Cyber bullying: Child and youth spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Apostolides

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Digital culture is part of children’s and adolescents’ everyday lives. Digital culture has both positive and negative consequences. One such negative consequence is cyber violence that has been termed cyber bullying. Cyber bullying can cause serious emotional, behavioural and academic problems for both the victim and the bully. Although there is ongoing research on the effects of cyber bullying on children and youth in South Africa, no research has been carried out on how children’s and youth’s spirituality may be affected when they are cyber bullied. This article discusses the accumulative results from different South African institutes that have researched the cyber bullying effects on children and adolescents. These results point to the spiritual effects that children and youth may experience as a result of cyber bullying. This article proposes that spirituality may prevent cyber bullying and even help children and youth heal from the trauma caused by cyber bullying. This article contributes in starting a conversation that may result in more specific research being done on how the spiritual lives of children and adolescents may be affected through the trauma caused by cyber bullying.

  6. Spirituality: what is its role in pain medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Philip J; Lovell, Melanie; MacLeod, Rod

    2015-01-01

    For many years, spirituality has been regarded as an integral aspect of patient care in fields closely allied to pain medicine such as palliative and supportive care. Despite this, it has received relatively little attention within the field of pain medicine itself. Reasons for this may include a lack of understanding of what spirituality means, doubtfulness of its relevance, an uncertainty about how it may be addressed, or a lack of awareness of how addressing spirituality may be of benefit. A review of the literature was conducted to determine the changing conceptual frameworks that have been applied to pain medicine, the emergence of the biopsychospiritual approach and what that means as well as evidence for the benefits of incorporation of this approach for the management of pain. Although the concept of spirituality is broad, there is now greater consensus on what is meant by this term. Many authors and consensus panels have explored the concept and formulated a conceptual framework and an approach that is inclusive, accessible, relevant, and applicable to people with a wide range of health conditions. In addition, there is accumulating evidence that interventions that address the issue of spirituality have benefits for physical and emotional health. Given the firm place that spirituality now holds within other fields and the mounting evidence for its relevance and benefit for people with pain, there is increasing evidence to support the inclusion of spiritual factors as an important component in the assessment and treatment of pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Development of Science Spiritual Model for Pre-school Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Rahman, M.Y

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the Islamic Education Philosophy, the success of the education system can be achieved when an individual who has total devotion to God in all areas could be produced. The objective of this paper is to develop a science spiritual model for pre-school level to cultivate a balanced character of Muslim child as early as that, to be at the starting point to the formation of personality in the future. This model focusses on the development of the child’s spiritual intelligence through comprehensive application of three skills such as cognitive intelligence, emotional intelligence and physically intelligence, all of which are part of the National Education Philosophy where it emerges in the implementation of contemplation (tafakkur. This approach is expected to endow with strong foundation for the students in developing their spiritual cognitive intellegence as a preparation to obtain the next level of education more efficiently, especially to strengthen their spiritual elements .

  8. Drug tourism or spiritual healing? Ayahuasca seekers in Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Michael

    2005-06-01

    This research addresses the question of whether Westerners who seek traditional spiritual medicine known as ayahuasca can be best characterized as "drug tourists" or as people pursuing spiritual and therapeutic opportunities. Participants in an ayahuasca retreat in Amazonia were interviewed regarding their motivations for participation and the benefits they felt that they received. These findings from the interviews were organized to reveal common motivations and benefits. Contrary to the characterization as "drug tourists", the principal motivations can be characterized as: seeking spiritual relations and personal spiritual development; emotional healing; and the development of personal self-awareness, including contact with a sacred nature, God, spirits and plant and natural energies produced by the ayahuasca. The motivation and perceived benefits both point to transpersonal concerns, with the principal perceived benefits involving increased self awareness, insights and access to deeper levels of the self that enhanced personal development and the higher self, providing personal direction in life.

  9. Spirituality and spiritual care in Iran: nurses' perceptions and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria Kiaei, M; Salehi, A; Moosazadeh Nasrabadi, A; Whitehead, D; Azmal, M; Kalhor, R; Shah Bahrami, E

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to explore the perception of Iranian nurses concerning spiritual care and to reveal any confronted barriers. Although the context of spiritual care is a substantial aspect of holistic care, the delivery of spiritual care has been problematic due to lack of nurses' understanding of this concept. Nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care directly influence their performance as well as their relationships with patients. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 with 259 nurses working in hospitals affiliated with Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Data were collected using the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale alongside qualitative open-ended questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for the quantitative data and content analysis for the qualitative data. The overall average for spirituality and spiritual care was 2.84 (score range: 1-4), indicating a moderate mean score. A significant relationship was found between education level and spiritual care. The majority of participants believed that they did not receive enough training in this aspect of care. The main obstacles regarding delivering spiritual care included busy working schedules, insufficient knowledge regarding spiritual care, low motivation, diversity of patients' spiritual needs and feeling 'unqualified' to provide spiritual cares. Consistent with the previous studies, this study has demonstrated that nurses had low confidence to meet the spiritual needs of patients due to lack of knowledge and training in this regard. Iranian nurses' perception of spirituality and spiritual care is moderate, reflecting that they do not receive sufficient training regarding spiritual care. Despite the attention focused on spiritual care in clinical settings in Iran, there remains a significant gap in terms of meeting the spiritual needs of patients in nursing practice. This finding assists nursing clinicians, educators and policy makers to more

  10. Shadows Along the Spiritual Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Contemporary spirituality discourses tend to assume that a canopy of light and love overarches all spiritual pathways. Unfortunately, the dark side of humanity cannot be spirited away so easily, and aberrations of personal spiritual development, interpersonal spiritual relationships and new spiritual movements can often be traced to the denial, repression and return of our dark side. Transpersonal psychology offers a way of approaching, reframing and redeeming the unconscious depths of our psyche, with its metaphors of shadows and daimons on the one hand, and its therapeutic practices for symbolically containing and transcending polarities on the other. In its absence, any spirituality which eulogises holistic growth is likely to engender the reverse effect.

  11. Students' voices on spiritual care at a Higher Education Institution in the Western Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda, Ntombizodwa S; Klopper, Hester C; Phetlhu, Deliwe R

    2015-12-18

    Nurses have a moral obligation to ensure holistic care of patients, inclusive of the spiritual dimension. However, there seems to be a void in the teaching and learning of spiritual care in nursing curricula. Despite the South African Nursing Council being in favour of holistic nursing, there are no measures in place to ensure implementation of spiritual care, hence its practice is not standardised in nursing education in South Africa. Currently, the undergraduate nursing curriculum does not provide clear direction on how spiritual care in nursing should be integrated and the reason for this is not clear. It appears that the lack of professional regulation, difficulties in definition and the personalised nature of spiritual practice are partly responsible for the practice being barely enforced and scarcely practised by students in clinical placements. The aim of the study was to develop a practice theory for teaching-learning of spiritual care in the undergraduate nursing programme. The study objective was to describe and explore the students' experiencs of teaching-learning of spiritual care in the undergraduate nursing programme. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design with purposive sampling was used. The sample consisted of undergraduate nursing students at a University in the Western Cape Province. Measures for trustworthiness were applied. The findings indicated a need to provide support, a conducive learning environment and structure for teaching, learning and practice of spiritual care. There is a need for formal education regarding spiritual care in nursing.

  12. Spirituality in patients with advanced illness: The role of symptom control, resilience and social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fombuena, Miguel; Galiana, Laura; Barreto, Pilar; Oliver, Amparo; Pascual, Antonio; Soto-Rubio, Ana

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed the relationships among clinical, emotional, social, and spiritual dimensions of patients with advanced illness. It was a cross-sectional study, with a sample of 108 patients in an advanced illness situation attended by palliative care teams. Statistically significant correlations were found between some dimensions of spirituality and poor symptomatic control, resiliency, and social support. In the structural model, three variables predicted spirituality: having physical symptoms as the main source of discomfort, resiliency, and social support. This work highlights the relevance of the relationships among spirituality and other aspects of the patient at the end of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Memadukan Konsep Kecerdasan Intelektual, Emosional, Spiritual dan Ruhaniah Dalam Proses Pendidikan

    OpenAIRE

    -, Junanah

    2016-01-01

    The integrated educational system is an alternative in overcoming problems of the educational which are dualistic. The intention is integrating of the IQ (Intelligent Quotiens), EQ (Emotional Quotiens), SQ (Spiritual Quotient), and TQ (Trancedental Quotiens). To develop this model, we need a school which supported by a good teacher, and school management completely, otherwise, it could be fallen.Key Word: The integrated educational system, Intelligent Quotiens, Emotional Quotiens, Spiritual Q...

  14. The Mind-Body Connection - Emotions and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Mind-Body Connection Emotions and Health Past Issues / Winter ... Today, we accept that there is a powerful mind-body connection through which emotional, mental, social, spiritual, ...

  15. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  16. Teaching spirituality and spiritual care in health sciences education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, educators seemed to be unprepared and have insufficient knowledge about how to include spirituality in teaching. This review aimed to systematically review previous literature from 2000 to 2013 regarding the content knowledge and teaching strategies used to teach spirituality and spiritual care in health ...

  17. spirituality and contextuality 1. the historiography of spirituality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contextuality or historicity of spirituality is not self-evident. Not until modern times, in Europe, did it become more or less normal to look at spirituality from a historical perspective. It is thus not strange that the historiography of spirituality arose from the nineteenth century. In that time, the historical perspective was ...

  18. Mysticism and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils G. Holm

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available How does the popular correspond to the grand terms of the title? Are not mysticism and spirituality something very exclusive, reserved for a few individuals? No they are not, as this presentation of both the author's own studies and the research of others will provide a different picture of these two concepts. Mysticism and spirituality are notions that are very difficult to define. Traditionally mysticism has been regarded as a way to reach the inner dimensions of human life, dimensions where man even achieves unity with the Divine Being. Such traditions have been found in all the major religions, and since the times of William James a hundred years ago, the features of mysticism in various religions have been analysed. Spirituality is a concept that can hold various meanings. It has often been associated with religious traditions where inner life and its growth are emphasized. These include, in particular, various schools, orders and movements that aim at cultivating a deeper spiritual life. In its more recent use, the term spirituality has, to a fairly large extent, been dissociated from religion and has become a notion that seeks to grasp the searching of modern man for ethics and norms in a globalised world, where pollution is accelerating and where stress and entertainment disrupt the inner harmony of people. Keywords

  19. An investigation into the spiritual needs of neuro-oncology patients from a nurse perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nixon Aline Victoria

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spiritual needs of cancer patients should be assessed and discussed by healthcare professionals. Neurosurgical nurses need to be able to assess and support neuro-oncology patients with their spiritual needs from diagnosis and throughout their hospital stay. Methods Data were collected through questionnaires using a Critical Incident Technique (CIT from neurosurgical nurses, findings were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Nurses reported some awareness of their patients’ spiritual needs during their stay on neurosurgical units although some used expressions approximating what could be described as spiritual needs. Patients’ spiritual needs were identified as: need to talk about spiritual concerns, showing sensitivity to patients’ emotions, responding to religious needs; and relatives’ spiritual needs included: supporting them with end of life decisions, supporting them when feeling being lost and unbalanced, encouraging exploration of meaning of life, and providing space, time and privacy to talk. Participants appeared largely to be in tune with their patients’ spiritual needs and reported that they recognised effective strategies to meet their patients’ and relatives’ spiritual needs. However, the findings also suggest that they don’t always feel prepared to offer spiritual support for neuro-oncology patients. Conclusions There is a need for healthcare professionals to provide spiritual care for neuro-oncology patients and their relatives. Although strategies were identified that nurses can use to support patients with spiritual needs further research is required to explore how effective nurses are at delivering spiritual care and if nurses are the most appropriate professionals to support neuro-oncology patients with spiritual care.

  20. ENHANCING SPIRITUALISM IN VIRTUAL WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Lata DANGWAL

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spiritualism is one word which puts man on the highest plinth of life. Spirituality is the way we find meaning, hope, comfort and inner peace in life. Spirituality in the virtual World is generally known as Virtual Spirituality. A goldmine of wisdom from all kinds of religious and spiritual philosophies, traditions and practices can be found in virtual World now. Technology and Spirituality together forms the material to which man can incline on to and work for the development of a globe in which war will be considered a taboo and violence a rejected dogma. Therefore there is an urgent nee to made the world a safe place to live in and the spiritual reconstruction can help us in achieving this.Spiritualism, Virtual World, Online Technology.

  1. Psychological, emotional and spiritual violence: Carole Langille's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... use of the unconventional liturgy of Brown's church in order to bring insights to bear upon the Shakespearean text. The enterprise places her in an egalitarian and democratic poetic tradition which may be found in much North American poetry, from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson to Carl Sandburg and Audre Lorde.

  2. The relationship between spiritual intelligence and burnout in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Job burnout is a psychiatric syndrome that causes symptoms such as emotional exhaustion, loss of job satisfaction and dispossess of personality. Spiritual intelligence also includes a type of adaptation and problem-solving behavior that includes the highest levels of growth in different cognitive, ethical, ...

  3. Spirituality in the Healthcare Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Donia Baldacchino

    2017-01-01

    Spirituality involves a sense of connectedness, meaning making and transcendence. There is abundant published research that focuses on the importance of spirituality to patients and their families during times of illness and distress. However over the last decade there has also been a growing awareness about the importance of considering the need to address peoples’ spiritual needs in the workplace. Engaging in ones own personal spirituality involves connecting with the inner self, becoming m...

  4. Liberalism, legal moralism and moral disagreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuflik, Arthur

    2005-01-01

    According to "legal moralism" it is part of law's proper role to "enforce morality as such". I explore the idea that legal moralism runs afoul of morality itself: there are good moral reasons not to require by law all that there is nevertheless good moral reason to do. I suggest that many such reasons have broad common-sense appeal and could be appreciated even in a society in which everyone completely agreed about what morality requires. But I also critique legal moralism from the special perspective of liberal political justice. Liberalism requires that citizens who disagree with one another on a number of morally significant matters nevertheless coexist and cooperate within a political framework of basic rights protections. When it comes to working out the most basic terms of their political association, citizens are expected to address one another within the limits of what Rawls has called "public reason". Critics of liberalism claim that this is an essentially a-moral (or expedient) attempt to evade substantive moral issues--such as the moral status of the fetus. I argue, on the contrary, that liberalism's emphasis on public reason is itself grounded in very deep--though (suitably) "non-comprehensive"--moral considerations.

  5. Sexual Trauma, Spirituality, and Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Mark J.; Thompson, Kevin M.; Simonich, Heather; Crosby, Ross D.; Donaldson, Mary Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the association between spirituality and psychopathology in a group of sexual abuse victims and controls with a focus on whether spirituality moderated the association between sexual trauma and psychopathology. Seventy-one sexual trauma victims were compared to 25 control subjects on spiritual well-being, the Eating Disorder…

  6. Corporate spirituality as organizational praxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Eelco van den Dool

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for doing research into corporate spirituality should enable us to deal with the religious component of spirituality instead of trying to separate spirituality from religious beliefs, as the positivist school proposes. Waaijman’s phenomenological-dialogical research cycle enables us to

  7. Afrikaner spirituality: A complex mixture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    Afrikaner spirituality: A complex mixture. Erna Oliver. Department of Christian Spirituality. Church History and Missiology. University of South Africa. Abstract. The article argues that the perception that Afrikaner spirituality is and has always been founded mainly or only upon the Calvinistic tradition is a misconception.

  8. Religion, spirituality and psychiatry: conceptual, cultural and personal challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbott, J

    1996-12-01

    Recent psychiatric literature and contemporary sociopolitical developments suggest a need to reconsider the place of religion and spirituality in psychiatry. This paper was written with the aim of encouraging dialogue between the often antithetical realms of religion and science. Material from psychiatric, sociological and religious studies literature was reviewed, with particular emphasis on New Zealand sources. Despite the secularising effects of science, the presence and influence of 'religiosity' remains substantial in Western culture. The literature emphasises the central importance of religion and spirituality for mental health, and the difficulty of integrating these concepts with scientific medicine. Psychiatric tradition and training may exaggerate the 'religiosity gap between doctors and patients. In New Zealand, the politically mandated bicultural approach to mental health demands an understanding of Maori spirituality. Intellectual, moral and pragmatic arguments all suggest that psychiatry should reconsider its attitude to religion and spirituality. There are many opportunities for research in the field. Psychiatry would benefit if the vocabulary and concepts of religion and spirituality were more familiar to trainees and practitioners. Patients would find better understanding from psychiatrists, and fruitful interdisciplinary dialogue about mutual issues of 'ultimate concern' might ensue.

  9. Spiritual wellbeing, Attitude toward Spiritual Care and its Relationship with Spiritual Care Competence among Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarsa, Tagie; Davoodi, Arefeh; Khorami Markani, Abdolah; Gahramanian, Akram; Vargaeei, Afkham

    2015-12-01

    Nurses' spiritual wellbeing and their attitude toward spirituality and competence of nurses in providing of spiritual care can affect the quality of care in nursing. The aim of this study was to evaluate spiritual wellbeing, attitude toward spiritual care and its relationship with the spiritual care competence among nurses. This was a correlational descriptive study conducted on 109 nurses working in the Intensive Care Units of Imam Reza and Madani hospitals in 2015, Tabriz, Iran. Data collection tools were a demographic data form and three standard questionnaires including Spiritual Wellbeing Scale, Spirituality and Spiritual Results: The mean score of the spiritual wellbeing was 94.45 (14.84), the spiritual care perspective was 58.77 (8.67), and the spiritual care competence was 98.51 (15.44). The linear regression model showed 0.42 variance between the spiritual care competence scores which were explained by the two aspects of spiritual wellbeing (religious health, existential health) and three aspects of spiritual care perspective (spirituality, spiritual care, personalized care). The spiritual care competence had a positive relationship with spiritual wellbeing and spiritual care perspective. Because of the nature of nursing and importance of close interaction of nurses with patients in ICUs, the higher nurses' SW and the more their positive attitude toward spiritual care, the more they can provide spiritual care to their patients.

  10. Psychometric assessment of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version for nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Albaqawi, Hamdan Mohammad; Alharbi, Sami Melbes; Alicante, Jerico G; Vitorino, Luciano M; Abunab, Hamzeh Y

    2017-12-07

    To assess the psychometric properties of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version for Saudi nurses. Evidence showed that a high level of spiritual climate in the workplace is associated with increased productivity and performance, enhanced emotional intelligence, organisational commitment and job satisfaction among nurses. A convenient sample of 165 Saudi nurses was surveyed in this descriptive, cross-sectional study. Cronbach's α and intraclass correlation coefficient of the 2 week test-retest scores were computed to establish reliability. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to support the validity of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version. The Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version manifested excellent content validity. Exploratory factor analysis supported a single factor with an explained variance of 73.2%. The Cronbach's α values of the scale ranged from .79 to .88, while the intraclass correlation coefficient value was .90. The perceived spiritual climate was associated with the respondents' hospital, gender, age and years of experience. Findings of this study support the sound psychometric properties of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version. The Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version can be used by nurse managers to assess the nurses' perception of the spiritual climate in any clinical area. This process can lead to spiritually centred interventions, thereby ensuring a clinical climate that accepts and respects different spiritual beliefs and practices. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. (Un)Happily Ever after: Fairy Tale Morals, Moralities, and Heterosexism in Children's Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Neal A.

    2007-01-01

    This essay explores the physical, emotional, and spiritual manifestations of heterosexism in childhood education. While there is abundant children's literature dealing with gay and lesbian parents of presumably straight children, little exists in this literature that directly addresses a child's developing gay, lesbian, or bisexual orientations.…

  12. Religion, Spirituality, and the Hidden Curriculum: Medical Student and Faculty Reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Michael J; Bandini, Julia; Mitchell, Christine; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D; Amobi, Ada; Cahill, Jonathan; Enzinger, Andrea C; Peteet, John; Balboni, Tracy

    2015-10-01

    Religion and spirituality play an important role in physicians' medical practice, but little research has examined their influence within the socialization of medical trainees and the hidden curriculum. The objective is to explore the role of religion and spirituality as they intersect with aspects of medicine's hidden curriculum. Semiscripted, one-on-one interviews and focus groups (n = 33 respondents) were conducted to assess Harvard Medical School student and faculty experiences of religion/spirituality and the professionalization process during medical training. Using grounded theory, theme extraction was performed with interdisciplinary input (medicine, sociology, and theology), yielding a high inter-rater reliability score (kappa = 0.75). Three domains emerged where religion and spirituality appear as a factor in medical training. First, religion/spirituality may present unique challenges and benefits in relation to the hidden curriculum. Religious/spiritual respondents more often reported to struggle with issues of personal identity, increased self-doubt, and perceived medical knowledge inadequacy. However, religious/spiritual participants less often described relationship conflicts within the medical team, work-life imbalance, and emotional stress arising from patient suffering. Second, religion/spirituality may influence coping strategies during encounters with patient suffering. Religious/spiritual trainees described using prayer, faith, and compassion as means for coping whereas nonreligious/nonspiritual trainees discussed compartmentalization and emotional repression. Third, levels of religion/spirituality appear to fluctuate in relation to medical training, with many trainees experiencing an increase in religiousness/spirituality during training. Religion/spirituality has a largely unstudied but possibly influential role in medical student socialization. Future study is needed to characterize its function within the hidden curriculum. Copyright

  13. Religion, Spirituality, and the Hidden Curriculum: Medical Student and Faculty Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Michael J.; Bandini, Julia; Mitchell, Christine; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D.; Amobi, Ada; Cahill, Jonathan; Enzinger, Andrea C.; Peteet, John; Balboni, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Context Religion and spirituality play an important role in physicians’ medical practice, but little research has examined their influence within the socialization of medical trainees and the hidden curriculum. Objectives The objective is to explore the role of religion and spirituality as they intersect with aspects of medicine’s hidden curriculum. Methods Semiscripted, one-on-one interviews and focus groups (n = 33 respondents) were conducted to assess Harvard Medical School student and faculty experiences of religion/spirituality and the professionalization process during medical training. Using grounded theory, theme extraction was performed with interdisciplinary input (medicine, sociology, and theology), yielding a high inter-rater reliability score (kappa = 0.75). Results Three domains emerged where religion and spirituality appear as a factor in medical training. First, religion/spirituality may present unique challenges and benefits in relation to the hidden curriculum. Religious/spiritual respondents more often reported to struggle with issues of personal identity, increased self-doubt, and perceived medical knowledge inadequacy. However, religious/spiritual participants less often described relationship conflicts within the medical team, work-life imbalance, and emotional stress arising from patient suffering. Second, religion/spirituality may influence coping strategies during encounters with patient suffering. Religious/spiritual trainees described using prayer, faith, and compassion as means for coping whereas nonreligious/nonspiritual trainees discussed compartmentalization and emotional repression. Third, levels of religion/spirituality appear to fluctuate in relation to medical training, with many trainees experiencing an increase in religiousness/spirituality during training. Conclusion Religion/spirituality has a largely unstudied but possibly influential role in medical student socialization. Future study is needed to characterize its

  14. Evolution, Moral Justification, and Moral Realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Peters

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Does evolutionary theory have the potential to undermine morality? In his book The Evolution of Morality, Richard Joyce (2006 argues for a positive answer. He contends that an evolutionary account of morality would undermine moral judgements and lend support to moral scepticism. I offer a critique of Joyce’s argument. As it turns out, his case can be read in two different ways. It could be construed as an argument to establish a general scepticism about the justification of moral judgements. Or it could be read as an argument that targets only a particular meta-ethical position, namely moral realism. My claim is that it fails on both interpretations. There is no reason to believe that evolutionary considerations undermine morality.

  15. Gender differences in moral judgment and the evaluation of gender-specified moral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Valerio; Sippel, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Whether, and if so, how exactly gender differences are manifested in moral judgment has recently been at the center of much research on moral decision making. Previous research suggests that women are more deontological than men in personal, but not impersonal, moral dilemmas. However, typical personal and impersonal moral dilemmas differ along two dimensions: Personal dilemmas are more emotionally salient than impersonal ones and involve a violation of Kant's practical imperative that humans must never be used as a mere means, but only as ends. Thus, it remains unclear whether the reported gender difference is due to emotional salience or to the violation of the practical imperative. To answer this question, we explore gender differences in three moral dilemmas: a typical personal dilemma, a typical impersonal dilemma, and an intermediate dilemma, which is not as emotionally salient as typical personal moral dilemmas, but contains an equally strong violation of Kant's practical imperative. While we replicate the result that women tend to embrace deontological ethics more than men in personal, but not impersonal, dilemmas, we find no gender differences in the intermediate situation. This suggests that gender differences in these type of dilemmas are driven by emotional salience, and not by the violation of the practical imperative. Additionally, we also explore whether people think that women should behave differently than men in these dilemmas. Across all three dilemmas, we find no statistically significant differences about how people think men and women should behave.

  16. PENGARUH PENDEKATAN DISCOVERY YANG MENEKANKAN ASPEK ANALOGI TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR, KEMAMPUAN PENALARAN, KECERDASAN EMOSIONAL SPIRITUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Choiro Siregar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan menyelidiki pengaruh pembelajaran segiempat dan segitiga dengan pendekatan discovery yang menekankan aspek analogi terhadap prestasi belajar, kemampuan penalaran, dan kecerdasan emosional spiritual siswa SMP Negeri 9 Yogyakarta. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimen semu.Instrumen yang digunakan adalah tes prestasi belajar, tes kemampuan penalaran, dan angket kecerdasan emosional spiritual. Data dianalisis menggunakan uji Multivariate Analysis of Variance (Manova dan Analysis of Variance (Anova. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan ada pengaruh pembelajaran segiempat dan segitiga dengan pendekatan discovery yang menekankan aspek analogi terhadap prestasi belajar, dan kemampuan penalaran siswa. Berdasarkan analisis, pembelajaran segiempat dan segitiga dengan pendekatan discovery yang menekankan aspek analogi lebih unggul daripada pembelajaran biasa dalam hal prestasi belajar dan kemampuan penalaran. Sebaliknya, dalam hal kecerdasan emosional spiritual siswa, pendekatan discovery yang menekankan aspek analogi tidak memberi pengaruh dan tidak lebih unggul daripada pembelajaran biasa. Kata Kunci: discovery, menekankan aspek analogi, prestasi belajar, kemampuan penalaran, kecerdasan emosional spiritual   THE EFFECT OF DISCOVERY APPROACH EMPHASING ON THE ANALOGY ASPECT ON ACHIEVEMENT, REASONING ABILITY, EMOTIONAL SPIRITUAL INTELLIGENCE Abstract This study aims to investigate the effect of quadrilateral and triangle teaching using the disco-very approach emphasing on the analogy aspect on achievement, reasoning ability, and emotional spiritual intelligenceof Grade VII students of SMPN 9 Yogyakarta. This study was a quasi-experimen-tal study. The instruments of the study were an achievement test, reasoning ability test, and emotional spiritual intelligence questionnaire. The data wereanalyzed using the Multivariate Analysis of Variance (Manova and Analysis of Variance(Anova tests. The results of the study are as follows. There

  17. Spirituality in the Healthcare Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality involves a sense of connectedness, meaning making and transcendence. There is abundant published research that focuses on the importance of spirituality to patients and their families during times of illness and distress. However over the last decade there has also been a growing awareness about the importance of considering the need to address peoples’ spiritual needs in the workplace. Engaging in ones own personal spirituality involves connecting with the inner self, becoming more self aware of ones humanity and limitations. Engaging with ones personal spirituality can also mean that people begin to greater find meaning and purpose in life and at work. This may be demonstrated in the workplace by collegial relationships and teamwork. Those who engage with their own spirituality also engage more easily with others through a connectedness with other staff and by aligning their values with the respective organization if they fit well with ones personal values. Workplace spirituality is oriented towards self-awareness of an inner life which gives meaning, purpose and nourishment to the employees’ dynamic relationships at the workplace and is eventually also nourished by meaningful work. Exercising ones personal spirituality contributes towards generating workplace spirituality. Essentially acting from ones own personal spirituality framework by being in doing can contribute towards a person becoming a healing and therapeutic presence for others, that is nourishing in many workplaces. Personal spirituality in healthcare can be enhanced by: reflection in and on action; role-modeling; taking initiative for active presence in care; committing oneself to the spiritual dimension of care; and, integrating spirituality in health caregivers’ education. As spirituality is recognized as becoming increasingly important for patients in healthcare, increasing educational opportunities are now becoming available for nurses internationally that

  18. A moral profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newham, Roger; Terry, Louise; Atherley, Siobhan; Hahessy, Sinead; Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Evans, Marilyn; Ferguson, Karen; Carr, Graham; Cedar, S H

    2017-01-01

    Lack of compassion is claimed to result in poor and sometimes harmful nursing care. Developing strategies to encourage compassionate caring behaviours are important because there is evidence to suggest a connection between having a moral orientation such as compassion and resulting caring behaviour in practice. This study aimed to articulate a clearer understanding of compassionate caring via nurse educators' selection and use of published texts and film. This study employed discourse analysis. Participants and research context: A total of 41 nurse educators working in universities in the United Kingdom (n = 3), Ireland (n = 1) and Canada (n = 1) completed questionnaires on the narratives that shaped their understanding of care and compassion. The desire to understand others and how to care compassionately characterised educators' choices. Most narratives were examples of kindness and compassion. A total of 17 emphasised the importance of connecting with others as a central component of compassionate caring, 10 identified the burden of caring, 24 identified themes of abandonment and of failure to see the suffering person and 15 narratives showed a discourse of only showing compassion to those 'deserving' often understood as the suffering person doing enough to help themselves. These findings are mostly consistent with work in moral philosophy emphasising the particular or context and perception or vision as well as the necessity of emotions. The narratives themselves are used by nurse educators to help explicate examples of caring and compassion (or its lack). To feel cared about people need to feel 'visible' as though they matter. Nurses need to be alert to problems that may arise if their 'moral vision' is influenced by ideas of desert and how much the patient is doing to help himself or herself.

  19. Filipino Nurses' Spirituality and Provision of Spiritual Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Achaso, Romeo H; Cachero, Geifsonne S; Mohammad, Mary Rose A

    2016-12-01

    This study was to explore the perceptions of Filipino nurses' spirituality and the provision of spiritual nursing care. A descriptive, cross-sectional, and quantitative study was adopted for this study. The study was conducted in the Philippines utilizing a convenience sample of 245 nurses. Nurses' Spirituality and Delivery of Spiritual Care (NSDSC) was used as the main instrument. The items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to nurses' perception of spirituality were Item 7, "I believe that God loves me and cares for me," and Item 8, "Prayer is an important part of my life," with mean scores of 4.87 (SD = 1.36) and 4.88 (SD = 1.34), respectively. Items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to the practice of spiritual care were Item 26, "I usually comfort clients spiritually (e.g., reading books, prayers, music, etc.)," and Item 25, "I refer the client to his/her spiritual counselor (e.g., hospital chaplain) if needed," with mean scores of 3.16 (SD = 1.54) and 2.92 (SD = 1.59). Nurse's spirituality correlated significantly with their understanding of spiritual nursing care (r = .3376, p ≤ .05) and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3980, p ≤ .05). Positive significant correlations were found between understanding of spiritual nursing care and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3289, p ≤ .05). For nurses to better provide spiritual nursing care, they must care for themselves through self-awareness, self-reflection, and developing a sense of satisfaction and contentment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Moral Personality Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kalin

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning in terms of personality growth is a life-long process, just as personality growth itself is a life-long process. Kalin presents a number of psychological theories and their impact on moral development - which is an integral part of personality growth. The paper further treats the formation and changing of beliefs, and the role of education in the two processes. Great emphasis is put on cognitive theories; Kalin explains those formulated by L. Kohlberg and J. Rest. In discussing the process of shaping and changing one's views, special emphasis is put on the environment, or rather the social group an individual belongs to, and on the influence of personality traits and experience. The paper juxtaposes the influence - strengths and weaknesses - of the psychology of persuasion and education on forming and changing one's views, taken into consideration that views consist of cognitive, emotive and conative dimensions.

  1. Moral Motivation, Moral Judgment, and Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jeff; Bock, Tonia; Narvaez, Darcia

    2013-01-01

    The link between judgment and action is weak throughout psychology, including moral psychology. That is, people often do not act in accordance with their reasoning. Might moral judgment development be better viewed as a capacity that inhibits "immoral" behavior? One model that helps account for the moral judgment-action gap is Rest's…

  2. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians.

  3. Spirituality in the Addiction Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kárová, Lydie

    2011-01-01

    Spiritualita při léčbě závislosti Spirituality in the Addiction Treatment Lydie Kárová In my work, Spirituality in the Addiction Treatment, I focus on spirituality as a component of personality, which is involved in its formation and development. The work falls into three parts, in the first one I place spirituality into the Czech environment and present its definition, in the second part I look for the role of spirituality in the conception and treatment of addiction and in the third one I p...

  4. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenefelt PD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Philip D Shenefelt,1 Debrah A Shenefelt2 1Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, 2Congregation Or Ahavah, Lutz, FL, USA Abstract: Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, "goose bumps", redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. Keywords: skin, skin disorders, spiritual, religious

  5. Measuring a Journey without Goal: Meditation, Spirituality, and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Buttle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The secular practice of meditation is associated with a range of physiological and cognitive effects, including lower blood pressure, lower cortisol, cortical thickening, and activation of areas of the brain associated with attention and emotion regulation. However, in the context of spiritual practice, these benefits are secondary gains, as the primary aim is spiritual transformation. Despite obvious difficulties in trying to measure a journey without goal, spiritual aspects involved in the practice of meditation should also be addressed by experimental study. This review starts by considering meditation in the form of the relaxation response (a counterpart to the stress response, before contrasting mindfulness research that emphasizes the role of attention and alertness in meditation. This contrast demonstrates how reference to traditional spiritual texts (in this case Buddhist can be used to guide research questions involving meditation. Further considerations are detailed, along with the proposal that research should triangulate spiritual textual sources, first person accounts (i.e., neurophenomenology, and physiological/cognitive measures in order to aid our understanding of meditation, not only in the secular context of health benefits, but also in the context of spiritual practice.

  6. Existential Well-Being: Spirituality or Well-Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Anja; Garssen, Bert; Vingerhoets, Ad Jjm

    2017-03-01

    Measures of spirituality often contain the dimension existential well-being (EWB). However, EWB has been found to overlap with emotional and psychological well-being. Using the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List (SAIL), we have further investigated the overlap between aspects of spirituality and of well-being among patients with cancer, by determining a) the divergent validity of the subscales of the SAIL compared with a well-being questionnaire and b) the differences in their associations to changes in pain and fatigue, and the occurrence of negative life events. Our findings suggest that a sense of trust that one is able to cope with difficulties of life belongs to the realm of well-being, instead of spirituality. Other aspects, such as a sense of meaning in life, seem more similar to spirituality than to well-being. These results can bring researchers a step further toward constructing "pure" spirituality and well-being measures, which will allow them to investigate the (causal) relationship between these constructs.

  7. [Neuroethics (II): moral pathways in disordered brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-González, Luis C

    2014-03-16

    Morality is made out of rules and values that guide human behavior. They barely change among different cultures and result in top social accomplishments. Specific moral pathways are available for this purpose in the brain. Their lesion or dysfunction will produce changes or alterations in moral behavior. To describe the process and mechanisms of moral dysfunctions under different lesions and neurological disorders. Moral pathologies are the result of either different structural lesions (destructive of the prefrontal cortex; microscopic involvement of the amygdala/prefrontal cortex in psychopathies), or neurochemical involvement (dopaminergic hyperfunction in Parkinson patients under certain treatments, or in some drug-dependences) or genetic alterations (point mutations of COMT or MAO enzymes in certain psychopathies). This activity is due to excitatory, inhibitory or mixed mechanisms. They operate at different levels of the moral circuits, as much emotional (temporal lobe) as cognitive ones (prefrontal lobe). The underlying topography and operating mechanisms can explain the different clinical expressivity. The knowledge of the disordered moral behaviors improves the background of information about the moral circuits that operate in healthy control groups, in anatomical and also in physiological terms. By this means, ethical variations among different cultures might be elucidated. This contribution is also paramount for the huge current progress of neuroethics, which is highly complex and influenced by distinct areas of the neuroculture.

  8. Making sense of genetic uncertainty: the role of religion and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary T

    2009-02-15

    This article argues that to the extent that religious and spiritual beliefs can help people cope with genetic uncertainty, a limited spiritual assessment may be appropriate in genetic counseling. The article opens by establishing why genetic information is inherently uncertain and why this uncertainty can be medically, morally, and spiritually problematic. This is followed by a review of the range of factors that can contribute to risk assessments, including a few heuristics commonly used in responses to uncertainty. The next two sections summarize recent research on the diverse roles of religious and spiritual beliefs in genetic decisions and challenges to conducting spiritual assessments in genetic counseling. Based on these findings, religious and spiritual beliefs are posited as serving essentially as a heuristic that some people will utilize in responding to their genetic risks. In the interests of helping such clients make informed decisions, a limited spiritual assessment is recommended and described. Some of the challenges and risks associated with this limited assessment are discussed. Since some religious and spiritual beliefs can conflict with the values of medicine, some decisions will remain problematic. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Refining moral agency: Insights from moral psychology and moral philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, Aimee

    2018-01-01

    Research in moral psychology has recently raised questions about the impact of context and the environment on the way the human mind works. In a 2012 call to action, Paley wrote: "If some of the conclusions arrived at by moral psychologists are true, they are directly relevant to the way nurses think about moral problems, and present serious challenges to favoured concepts in nursing ethics, such as the ethics of care, virtue, and the unity of the person" (p. 80). He urges nurse ethicists and scholars to evaluate the impact these findings may have for moral theory. In this paper, I review some of Paley's (Nursing Philosophy, 13, 2012, 80) critique, focusing on the argument that theories of nursing ethics have failed to account for the role of context; both in terms of its impact on the way nurses make moral judgements and in terms of the environment's influence on the way the mind works. I then examine nursing literature on moral agency, and focus on the role of the environment and context play within existing theory. I argue that theories of moral agency have often accounted for the role of context on the way nurses make decisions; however, less attention has been paid to its impact on the mind. With this background, I use insights from the fields of moral philosophy and moral psychology to refine the conceptualization of nurse moral agency in a way that is reflective of current cognitive, philosophical and nursing practice-based science. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Spiritual-based Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruzan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although far from mainstream, the concept of spiritual-based leadership is emerging as an inclusive and yet highly personal approach to leadership that integrates a leader’s inner perspectives on identity, purpose, responsibility and success with her or his decisions and actions in the outer worl...

  11. MORAL INJURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Mildred

    2017-12-01

    The devastating effect on the self of moral injury, often a core component of trauma, occurring when one's actions have profoundly violated one's code of ethics, when one has been a victim of such violation, or when one has been a passive witness, has been extensively explored as it has occurred in veterans of the wars in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Two examples illustrate its prevalence in civilian life. The literature shows violation of expected empathy from and for others, inherent in our nature, is more devastating than violation of the ethical code of our culture or sub-culture, adherence to which becomes urgent as our need emerges to belong to the culture or subculture of which we are a part, values which often contradict our innate sense of "what is right."

  12. Spiritual Assessments in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hemphill

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality is recognized as an important concept in the study and practice of medicine, including occupational therapy. This aligns with occupational therapy’s core value of treating people holistically—mind, body, and spirit. Currently, the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Hospital Organizations ( JCAHO requires that a spiritual assessment be given to patients on admission. To conduct effective spiritual assessments, occupational therapists must distinguish between religion and spirituality. They also must be aware of their own spiritual beliefs and practices and how those might influence their clinical interactions. This article presents spiritual assessment tools that occupational therapists can use in clinical practice; they range from history taking, to questionnaires, to observation scales. Guidelines are presented for selecting among several spiritual assessments. A case study is presented in which a patient’s faith tradition is being challenged, which could affect the outcome of therapy. Finally, treatment and intervention planning and ethical considerations are discussed.

  13. The Aesthetic and the Spiritual Attitude in Learning: Lessons from Simone Weil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranfa, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    This essay attempts to set out the fundamental notions--attention, detachment, silence, solitude, prayer, and apprenticeship--of Weil's educational method, claiming that such a pedagogy expresses a vision of learning in which the moral, the aesthetic, and the spiritual life are harmoniously balanced. Simone Weil's approach to education is not only…

  14. Spirituality Phenomenon and the Ideal-Realism Method in Modern Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Vetoshkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the spiritual revival of modern Russia. In the author’s view, the Russian Idea with its basic principles, moral, spiritual and semantic concepts should provide the guidelines for education, upbringing and the youth policy, guaranteeing the spiritual transformation and mobilization of the moral power for the benefit of the motherland, local society and family, as well as the personal growth. The theoretical and methodological bases for developing and implementing the above idea could be found in Russian national religious and philosophic thinking with its balanced dialectics of spiritual and social aspects. The experience of the ideal-realism, as the leading trend of the national spiritual culture, is being analyzed and summarized. The correlation between the ideal and material in social and individual life is demonstrated along with the dialectics and wholeness of the divine and human, religious and secular, ecclesiastical and civil.The author addresses the philosophic heritage of I. A. Ilyin, V. S. Solovyev, S. N. Trubetskoy, S. N. Bulgakov, N. A. Berdyayev, N. O. Losskiy etc, and regards spirituality as the basic defining, systematic and leading origin of the whole socio-historical process including human being formation and development, education and upbringing. 

  15. Moral Education in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jeffrey F.

    1988-01-01

    Reports the attitudes of 80 Taiwanese teachers of morality about moral education in the face of drastic social change and modernization. Discusses the content and nature of traditional Chinese morality, the effects of contemporary culture on children's moral development, and teaching methods. Contains 18 references. (SV)

  16. Brogaard's Moral Contextualism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Lars Grassme

    2008-01-01

    Brogaard's non-indexical version of moral contextualism has two related problems. It is unable to account for the function of truth-governed assertoric moral discourse, since it leaves two (semantically clearheaded) disputants without any incentive to resolve seemingly contradictory moral claims....... non-objectivist, but less revisionist, since it takes the semantics of moral discourse at face value, and can also explain all of Brogaard's other linguistic evidence.......Brogaard's non-indexical version of moral contextualism has two related problems. It is unable to account for the function of truth-governed assertoric moral discourse, since it leaves two (semantically clearheaded) disputants without any incentive to resolve seemingly contradictory moral claims....... The moral contextualist could explain why people do feel such an incentive by ascribing false beliefs about the semantic workings of their own language. But, secondly, this leaves Brogaard's moral contextualism looking weaker than a Mackie-style invariantist error theory about morals. The latter is equally...

  17. Defining Legal Moralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how legal moralism should be defined. It is argued that legal moralism should be defined as the position that “For any X, it is always a pro tanto reason for justifiably imposing legal regulation on X that X is morally wrong (where “morally wrong” is not conceptually equivalent...... to “harmful”)”. Furthermore, a distinction between six types of legal moralism is made. The six types are grouped according to whether they are concerned with the enforcement of positive or critical morality, and whether they are concerned with criminalising, legally restricting, or refraining from legally...... protecting morally wrong behaviour. This is interesting because not all types of legal moralism are equally vulnerable to the different critiques of legal moralism that have been put forth. Indeed, I show that some interesting types of legal moralism have not been criticised at all....

  18. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  19. Religion and spirituality: assessment and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doka, Kenneth J

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the ways that an individual's spirituality influences responses to life-threatening illness and dying. He begins by differentiating between religion and spirituality, and then delineates the spiritual issues that arise in a life-threatening illness including the spiritual needs that arise in the final phases of illness. Recommendations for spiritual assessments and interventions are offered.

  20. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    OpenAIRE

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-01-01

    Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world) and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  1. [Evolutionary Concept Analysis of Spirituality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Il Sun; Choi, So Young; Kim, Jin Sook

    2017-04-01

    This study was done to clarify attributes, antecedents, and consequences of spirituality. Rodgers's evolutionary concept analysis was used to analyze fifty seven studies from the literature related to spirituality as it appears in systematic literature reviews of theology, medicine, counseling & psychology, social welfare, and nursing. Spirituality was found to consist of two dimensions and eight attributes: 1) vertical dimension: 'intimacy and connectedness with God' and 'holy life and belief', 2) horizontal dimension: 'self-transcendence', 'meaning and purpose in life', 'self-integration', and 'self-creativity' in relationship with self, 'connectedness' and 'trust' in relationship with others·neighbors·nature. Antecedents of spirituality were socio-demographic, religious, psychological, and health related characteristics. Consequences of spirituality were positive and negative. Being positive included 'life centered on God' in vertical dimension, and among horizontal dimension 'joy', 'hope', 'wellness', 'inner peace', and 'self-actualization' in relationship with self, 'doing in love' and 'extended life toward neighbors and the world' in relationship with others·neighbors·nature. Being negative was defined as having 'guilt', 'inner conflict', 'loneliness', and 'spiritual distress'. Facilitators of spirituality were stressful life events and experiences. Spirituality is a multidimensional concept. Unchangeable attributes of spirituality are 'connectedness with God', 'self-transcendence', 'meaning of life' and 'connectedness with others·nature'. Unchangeable consequences of spirituality are 'joy' and 'hope'. The findings suggest that the dimensional framework of spirituality can be used to assess the current spiritual state of patients. Based on these results, the development of a Korean version of the scale measuring spirituality is recommended. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  2. Moral Coppélia - Combining ratio with affect in ethical reasoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, M.A.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.; Hoorn, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    We present an integration of rational moral reasoning with emotional intelligence. The moral reasoning system alone could not simulate the different human reactions to the Trolley dilemma and the Footbridge dilemma. However, the combined system can simulate these human moral decision making

  3. Prevention of the Moral Degradation of Society as one of the Purposes of State and Legal Policy of the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia O. Bragina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of falling of moral and moral installations, cultural traditions is an actual problem of the modern Russian state. Constitution of the Russian Federation sets justice bases, thereby defining the democratic contents and embodying the requirement of idea of justice and humanity. At the same time concepts of morals, moral thereof, questions of spiritual and moral character are out of a legal framework aren't enshrined in the legislation. On the basis of the Country constitution, according to the Law of the Russian Federation "About education" the Concept of spiritual and moral education of the Russian school students in which basic values are stated is developed: patriotism, social solidarity, civic consciousness, a family, work and creativity, science, those moral installations which would provide successful development of the state.

  4. Are all types of morality compromised in psychopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Andrea L; Iyer, Ravi; Graham, Jesse; Koleva, Spassena; Haidt, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    A long-standing puzzle for moral philosophers and psychologists alike is the concept of psychopathy, a personality disorder marked by tendencies to defy moral norms despite cognitive knowledge about right and wrong. Previously, discussions of the moral deficits of psychopathy have focused on willingness to harm and cheat others as well as reasoning about rule-based transgressions. Yet recent research in moral psychology has begun to more clearly define the domains of morality, encompassing issues of harm, fairness, loyalty, authority, and spiritual purity. Clinical descriptions and theories of psychopathy suggest that deficits may exist primarily in the areas of harm and fairness, although quantitative evidence is scarce. Within a broad sample of participants, we found that scores on a measure of psychopathy predicted sharply lower scores on the harm and fairness subscales of a measure of moral concern, but showed no relationship with authority, and very small relationships with in group and purity. On a measure of willingness to violate moral standards for money, psychopathy scores predicted greater willingness to violate moral concerns of any type. Results are further explored via potential mediators and analyses of the two factors of psychopathy.

  5. The spiritual experience index: A measure of spiritual maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genia, V

    1991-12-01

    The Spiritual Experience Index was developed to measure spiritual maturity in persons of diverse religious and spiritual beliefs. The scale was constructed from a developmental rather than a multidimensional conceptualization of faith. Initial findings from a religiously heterogeneous college sample indicated good reliability for the SEI and supported its use as a unidimensional measure. Higher scores on the SEI were significantly related to lower dogmatism and intolerance of ambiguity. The SEI was also moderately related to higher religious participation and positively correlated with intrinsicness and quest. However, compared with the intrinsic and quest scales, the SEI emerged as the strongest indicator of adaptive spiritual functioning. Directions for future research are suggested.

  6. FORMATION OF MORAL VALUES OF STUDENTS OF PEDAGOGICAL INSTITUTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mikhaylovna Borisova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted, in terms of improving the education system in Russia, political and economic reality, the subject of moral education of future teachers. The subject of analysis are the pedagogical conditions of education of moral values. The author aims to reveal the value of the spiritual culture of the people in the education of moral values at the future teachers. Methodology. The basis of the research form the theoretical and methodological analysis, equity and advanced pedagogical experience, diagnostic methods. Results. The results concluded that the author notes a significant increase in the level of formation of moral values in students of the experimental group. Practical implications. The proposed system of pedagogical conditions, technologies, forms and methods as a holistic innovation process can be used in the work of teachers and educators of secondary schools, employees of institutions of additional education.

  7. Sociological concept of morale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author first discusses the overall unity of the total normative regulation, from which it is separated in the late Roman empire the right, but only in the new century and the morale. There are analyzed the relationship between the moral and ethical reflection and Weber's distinction between pure ethics will (Gesinnungsethik and ethics of responsibility (Verantwortungsethik. The morale is determined by the good as the highest value, as a specific form of social norms but also as a kind of human behavior. These three definitions can be combined in an integrative approach. There are examined the dimensions of moral statements, subjective and objective side of morality, as well as the difference between morale and morality. A general notion of morale can not be defined in substantive but only in formal way . The formal definition is a constituent of general as well as of sociological concept of morale and it is related to morality as a social phenomenon. Its essence is to define the morale by specific norms, the characteristics of the internal and external mandatory (with the pricks of conscience as the most distinctive moral sanction and control exercised by the formal not institutionalized or diffuse society , and in consideration of morality as a social process (actions of people associated moral norms . The basic types of social moral process - being, education, functioning and changing of morale are described. There are briefly analyzed the influence of society to the morale and social function of morale, with special emphasis on the relationship between law and morale.

  8. New Perspectives on Religious and Moral Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, William J.

    The 10-chapter book presents a holistic approach to teaching religious and moral development emphasizing the essential unity of human nature and the convergence in recent years of religion and the science of psychology. Primarily a two-part psychological study, it discusses the varieties of religious experience and the role of emotion in human…

  9. Spirituality in diaconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitler, Ullrich Martin Rudenko

    2014-01-01

    ’s Theory U (TU) provides the conceptual and methodological framework for operationalising spirituality in diaconal work. It is argued that the concept of “presencing” is an adequate way to express “spirituality”, and that, overall TU is an appropriate model to describe and develop the essential features...... of diaconal social work and diaconal leadership. I shall use the Danish Blue Cross as an example of an organisation that can be interpreted as working on the basis of TU....

  10. Western Sport and Spiritualism

    OpenAIRE

    Kosiewicz Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Sport activity of achievement-oriented (professional, Olympic, spectacular character) is first of all exposition of rivalry and striving for variously understood sports success (resulting from measurable or discretionary criteria). It refers to winning a competition or taking another expected place as well as to other forms of satisfaction, such as financial gratification or social (political, ethnic, professional) recognition. Spirituality is here neither an aim, nor an expected value - it c...

  11. TARIAN SPIRITUAL JALALUDDIN RUMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Murdiati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Whirling Dervishes (The Darwisy the Round and round or Sama’. The term used by the Maulawiyah or Jalaliyah adherents of this, by doing a dance around in circles, accompanied by drums and flute, in the devotions they are to reach ecstasy. Rumi and the legendary spiritual dance into a work of great almighty to fill in a drought spitual man approached the Creator.

  12. Dimensi Spiritual dalam Kepemimpinan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcadius Benawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show that the spiritual aspect must be noted in the leadership because every leader is always marked with oath of office in carrying out her/his position. So, how leaders are accountable, it is not only on the horizontal level but also at the vertical level. Research was done with phenomenological and literature studies about the practice of leadership faced with a number of theories about leadership and then to be synthesized the more authentic leadership than just imaging or false branding leadership. This article was based on the assumption that leadership (including in the political sphere was merely a sociological problem that kicked out spiritual aspects, while in the historical development of leadership, it had never been excluded from the spiritual dimension, whether in the form of manipulative (just because fed people understand that leadership came from the “sky”/gods. So then, a king acted tyrannical and led to the birth of authentic leadership as popularized as servant leadership. This article concluded that authentic leadership will give more benefit to develop the life system as well as the purpose of leadership itself rather than a merely apparent leadership which actually hurts the members (people because of the failure to meet the expectations of the members (people. 

  13. F. M. DOSTOYEVSKY AND L. N. TOLSTOY ABOUT SPIRITUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Strutsenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the urgent issue of moral personality formation in the framework of the modern education system. Both the society and education specialists are concerned about the unsatisfactory moral education of the growing generation. For solving the problem of moral revival, the author considers the Russian pedagogical heritage - in particular, philosophical and publicistic works of F. M. Dostoyevsky and L. N. Tolstoy. The paper provides the modern definition of spirituality as the intellectual essence of the human being, based both on the deep knowledge of nature, society, human individuality and humanistic or religious values outweighing the selfish needs. In author’s opinion, the pedagogical concepts developed by Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy are still relevant, being aimed at developing a free personality and addressing the universal human values. The ideas and concepts of the 19th century’s outstanding thinkers perfectly correspond with the currently proclaimed educational content: they define the man as the highest society value; direct all the principles and parenting practices of spiritual and ethic education at creativity development, self-development, and self-improvement; and acknowledge the student’s right of individuality.

  14. F. M. DOSTOYEVSKY AND L. N. TOLSTOY ABOUT SPIRITUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Strutsenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the urgent issue of moral personality formation in the framework of the modern education system. Both the society and education specialists are concerned about the unsatisfactory moral education of the growing generation. For solving the problem of moral revival, the author considers the Russian pedagogical heritage – particularly, the philosophical and publicistic works of F. M. Dostoyevsky and L. N. Tolstoy. The paper provides the modern definition of spirituality as the intellectual essence of the human being, based both on the deep knowledge of nature, society, human individuality and humanistic or religious values outweighing the selfish needs. In author’s opinion, the pedagogical concepts developed by Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy are still relevant, being aimed at developing the free personality and addressing the universal human values. The ideas and concepts of the 19th century’s outstanding thinkers perfectly correspond with the currently proclaimed educational content: they define the man as the highest society value; direct all the principles and parenting practices of spiritual and ethic education at creativity development, self-development, and self-improvement; and acknowledge a student’s individuality.

  15. Internet Pornography Use, Perceived Addiction, and Religious/Spiritual Struggles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Joshua B; Exline, Julie J; Pargament, Kenneth I; Volk, Fred; Lindberg, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that religious beliefs and moral attitudes are often related to sexual functioning. The present work sought to examine another possibility: Do sexual attitudes and behaviors have a relationship with religious and spiritual functioning? More specifically, do pornography use and perceived addiction to Internet pornography predict the experience of religious and spiritual struggle? It was expected that feelings of perceived addiction to Internet pornography would indeed predict such struggles, both cross-sectionally and over time, but that actual pornography use would not. To test these ideas, two studies were conducted using a sample of undergraduate students (N = 1519) and a sample of adult Internet users in the U.S. (N = 713). Cross-sectional analyses in both samples found that elements of perceived addiction were related to the experience of religious and spiritual struggle. Additionally, longitudinal analyses over a 1-year time span with a subset of undergraduates (N = 156) and a subset of adult web users (N = 366) revealed that perceived addiction to Internet pornography predicted unique variance in struggle over time, even when baseline levels of struggle and other related variables were held constant. Collectively, these findings identify perceived addiction to Internet pornography as a reliable predictor of religious and spiritual struggle.

  16. Why People with More Emotion Regulation Difficulties Made a More Deontological Judgment: The Role of Deontological Inclinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisong; Li, Zhongquan; Wu, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Ziyuan

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the key role of emotion in moral judgment, and explored the relationship between emotion regulation and moral judgment. The present study investigated the influence of individual differences in emotion regulation difficulties on moral judgment. Study 1 examined whether individuals with high emotion regulation difficulties made a more deontological judgment. Study 2 explored the underlying mechanism using a process-dissociation approach, examining whether deontological inclinations and utilitarian inclinations separately or jointly accounted for the association. The results indicated that individuals with high emotion regulation difficulties rated the utilitarian actions less morally appropriate, and one's deontological inclinations mediated the association between emotion regulation difficulties and moral judgment.

  17. Oscillatory correlates of moral decision-making: Effect of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Dorosheva, Elena A; Tamozhnikov, Sergey S; Saprigyn, Alexander E

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotion in moral decision-making is still a matter of debate. Greene, Sommerville, Nystrom, Darley, and Cohen (2001) argue that 'personal' moral judgments are driven by emotional responses, while 'impersonal' judgments are largely driven by cognitive processes. In this study, oscillatory correlates of decision-making were compared in moral personal, moral impersonal, and nonmoral conditions, as well as in trials associated with utilitarian (i.e., favoring the 'greater good' over individual rights) and non-utilitarian choices. Event-related synchronization in delta and theta bands was greater in the right temporal lobe in personal than in both nonmoral and impersonal moral condition. Graph-theoretical analysis of connectivity patterns showed the prominent role of the orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices in personal moral decision-making, implying greater emotional and self-processing. Higher conscientiousness and intellect and lower behavioral activation were associated with greater difference in oscillatory responses between utilitarian and non-utilitarian choices in personal than in impersonal condition, indicating that sensitivity to moral issues and the ability to grasp the nuances of moral situation are essential for understanding the implications of utilitarian choices in personal and impersonal conditions.

  18. Spirituality, Spiritual Well-Being, and Spiritual Coping in Advanced Heart Failure: Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Clayton C; Hunter, Jennifer

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure is a chronic and terminal disease that affects a significant portion of the U.S. It is marked by considerable suffering, for which palliative care has been recommended. Palliative care standards require the inclusion of spiritual care, but there is a paucity of literature supporting effective spiritual interventions for the heart failure population. A literature search resulted in 30 articles meeting the criteria for review of spirituality and spiritual coping in the heart failure population. Findings within this body of literature include descriptive evidence of the uniqueness of spirituality in this population, quantitative and qualitative approaches to inquiry, theoretical models of spiritual coping, and proposed interventions. The article concludes with implications for future research and practice.

  19. Exploring spiritual value in earth science concept through learning using chain till unanswered questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johan, Henny; Suhandi, Andi; Samsudin, Ahmad; Ratna Wulan, Ana

    2017-08-01

    Now days, the youth's moral decline is an urgent problem in our country. Natural science especially earth and space science learning is potential to insert spirituality value in its learning activities. The aim of this study is to explore concept of planet earth to embed spirituality attitude through earth science learning. Interactive conceptual learning model using chain till unanswered questions (CTUQ) with help visualizations was implemented in this study. 23 pre-service physics teacher in Bengkulu, Indonesia participated in this study. A sixth indicator of spiritual aspect about awareness of divinity were used to identify the shifted of students' spirituality. Quasi experimental research design had been utilized to implement the learning model. The data were collected using a questionnaire in pretest and posttest. Open ended question was given at post-test only. Questionnaire was analyzed quantitative while open ended question was analyzed qualitatively. The results show that after implementation student's spiritual shifted to be more awareness of divinity. Students' response at scale 10 increased been 97.8% from 87.5% of total responses. Based on analysis of open ended question known that the shifted was influenced by spiritual value inserted in concepts, CTUQ, and media visualization used to show unobservable earth phenomenon during learning activities. It can be concluded that earth science concepts can be explored to embed spiritual aspect.

  20. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. spirituality and contextuality 1. the historiography of spirituality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Historia de la Espi- ritualidad, again in four volumes, partly made up for this lack: it re- flected awareness of extra-Christian forms of spirituality (Judaism, Islam, gnosis, Hellenism, and so forth) and of modern atheism (Flors 1969). The third bridgehead became apparent with the reference work entitled World spirituality ...

  2. Personality, spirituality and their relation to well-being in physicians of various specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Skrzypińska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Based on the available literature, four hypotheses were formulated: the group of physicians differs from the control group in terms of personality traits and the level of spirituality (H1; specific personality traits in physicians predict the level of particular components of spirituality (H2; Spirituality is a predictor of Well-Being (H3; considering the specialties that physicians have as well as Spirituality, they will differentiate this group according to the level of the sense of Well-Being (H4. Participants and procedure The aim of the present study was to compare and test the relations between personality and spirituality and between spirituality and well-being in physicians of various specialties (internists, pediatricians, neurologists, surgeons, and emergency medicine specialists (n = 100, control group n = 93. Results Our research confirmed most of the hypotheses, also showing how important it is to differentiate between physicians of different specialties. We found that physicians differ from the control group in terms of Extraversion and Openness, but do not differ according to Spirituality (H1. The most frequent predictor of spirituality proved to be Agreeableness, followed by Openness and Conscientiousness (H2. Contrary to assumptions in the present study (H3, spirituality is not a predictor of Satisfaction With Life in physicians, but according to Basic Emotions it is, including with regard to the specialties physicians have (H4. Conclusions Generally, we found a relationship between spirituality and basic emotions as a part of well-being, although the obtained results indicated a different pattern in the groups of neurologists and surgeons.

  3. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, “goose bumps”, redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  4. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELIABILITY OF INTUITIVE MORAL DECISIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Nadurak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the research is a critical analysis of the reliability of intuitive moral decisions. Methodology. The work is based on the methodological attitude of empirical ethics, involving the use of findings from empirical research in ethical reflection and decision making. Originality. The main kinds of intuitive moral decisions are identified: 1 intuitively emotional decisions (i.e. decisions made under the influence of emotions that accompanies the process of moral decision making; 2 decisions made under the influence of moral risky psychological aptitudes (unconscious human tendencies that makes us think in a certain way and make decisions, unacceptable from the logical and ethical point of view; 3 intuitively normative decisions (decisions made under the influence of socially learned norms, that cause evaluative feeling «good-bad», without conscious reasoning. It was found that all of these kinds of intuitive moral decisions can lead to mistakes in the moral life. Conclusions. Considering the fact that intuition systematically leads to erroneous moral decisions, intuitive reaction cannot be the only source for making such decisions. The conscious rational reasoning can compensate for weaknesses of intuition. In this case, there is a necessity in theoretical model that would structure the knowledge about the interactions between intuitive and rational factors in moral decisions making and became the basis for making suggestions that would help us to make the right moral decision.

  5. Virtual morality in the helping professions: Simulated action and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Kathryn B; Gummerum, Michaela; Ganis, Giorgio; Howard, Ian S; Terbeck, Sylvia

    2017-11-22

    Recent advances in virtual technologies have allowed the investigation of simulated moral actions in aversive moral dilemmas. Previous studies have employed diverse populations to explore these actions, with little research considering the significance of occupation on moral decision-making. For the first time, in this study we have investigated simulated moral actions in virtual reality made by professionally trained paramedics and fire service incident commanders who are frequently faced with and must respond to moral dilemmas. We found that specially trained individuals showed distinct empathic and related personality trait scores and that these declined with years of experience working in the profession. Supporting the theory that these professionals develop resilience in moral conflict, reduced emotional arousal was observed during virtual simulations of a distressing dilemma. Furthermore, trained professionals demonstrated less regret following the execution of a moral action in virtual reality when compared to untrained control populations. We showed that, contrary to previous research, trained individuals made the same moral judgements and moral actions as untrained individuals, though showing less arousal and regret. In the face of increasing concerns regarding empathy decline in health care professionals, we suggest that the nature of this decline is complex and likely reflects the development of a necessary emotional resilience to distressing events. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  6. PENDIDIKAN SPIRITUAL KEAGAMAAN MELALUI SASTRA DAERAH: DESKRIPSI DAN ANALISIS TEKS SASTRA LISAN BAUDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmahwati A. Fatmahwati A.

    2013-10-01

      Religious Spiritual Education through Local Literature: Description and Analysis of Oral literature Bauda.   Education is considered as alternative which is preventive to build young generation moral so it can minimized the cause of various culture problems and nation character.  One of learning resource to provide moral education is culture heritage in the form of oral literature which contain ideas and meaning of philosophy which are rooted from local culture.  Oral literature bauda is one of culture heritage of Melayu Tapung community in Riau Province which convey advise and message, custom rule, and stories which contain wisdom.  The aim of this study is analyze values of religious spiritual and moral education which are contained in oral literature bauda. The design of this study is in the form of qualitative descriptive which explain and analyze data in accord with the aim of study.  The result of study show that oral literature bauda contain religion education values which can be used to enhance the spiritual power.  Character education through this oral literature is hope capable to shape the individual who have lofty behavior, self control, intelligence, and skill which are needed by him/herself, society, nation and country. Keywords: Education, religious spiritual, oral literature, Bauda

  7. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  8. WHAT IS SPIRITUALITY? 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    we must assign to the treatises concerning the spiritual life a very early date. .... Aside from the theory and history of spirituality, experimental psychology, pa- thology .... everyone in his or her mother's womb, causes them to be born and leads them throughout life. This is evident from their proper names, prayers, and stories.

  9. Workplace spirituality and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Freda; de Klerk, Jeremias J

    2014-06-01

    In order to obtain an improved understanding of behaviour at work, employees should be studied from physical, psychological, and spiritual dimensions. Although the physical and psychological dimensions of individuals at work have been studied extensively, the spiritual dimension has been neglected for many years. The objective of the current research was to determine the relationship between workplace spirituality and a positive attitude related to work, that is, job satisfaction. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 600 white-collar workers, chosen from two organizations in different industries in South Africa. The research results indicate that there is a positive relationship between workplace spirituality and job satisfaction. These findings deepen the understanding of personal spirituality, organizational spirituality, and job satisfaction. They bring new insights into the significant role which spirituality plays in the context of the workplace. To survive in the 21st century, organizations need to be spiritually based. This, in turn, will lead to workers being satisfied with their entire work experience.

  10. Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantmeier, Edward J., Ed.; Lin, Jing, Ed.; Miller, John P., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education" attempts to deeply explore the universal and particular dimensions of education for inner and communal peace. This co-edited book contains fifteen chapters on world spiritual traditions, religions, and their connections and relevance to peacebuilding and peacemaking. This book examines the…

  11. Aspects of spirituality concerning illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Jochemasen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2007-01-01

    The spiritual dimension of illness, health and care may be seen as a unique aspect in addition to the physical, mental and social dimension. This contribution describes experiences of patients, nurses and hospital chaplains in relation to the spiritual aspects of being ill. Qualitative research was

  12. The Spiritual Life of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ruth A.

    2010-01-01

    A misconception about spirituality is that it is tied to religion (i.e., belief in and reverence for a supernatural power). Yet, the term "spirituality" is derived from the word "spirit"--often defined as the vital principle or animating force within living things. This definition may reflect some overlap with what is generally covered in…

  13. SPIRITUALITY AS PHILOSOPHICAL, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DE-VELOPMENT PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Gromov

    2013-12-01

    . Anthropocentrism as a world view principle is a main obstacle on the way to spiritual transformation of consumer society. This principle made the human being the cult for itself and weakened its ability for will and belief. Democratic pluralism and diversity of cultural forms, reinforcement of analytic tendency in cognition are turned into the aspects of confusion in selection the trends of social development. Many philosophers of “postmodern situation” connect democracy and pluralism with fighting against totalitarian ideologies. However, we have no person without any ideology and undoubtedly it is possible to attain consonance in the sphere of main morality values.

  14. Professional Quality of Life and Changes in Spirituality Among VHA Chaplains: A Mixed Methods Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Wesley H; Carroll, Timothy D; Slagel, Brett A; Drescher, Kent D; Nieuwsma, Jason A; Currier, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    A mixed method design was implemented to examine the spirituality and emotional well-being of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) chaplains and how potential changes in spirituality and emotional well-being may affect their professional quality of life. Four distinct categories of changes emerged from the narrative statements of a nationally representative sample of 267 VHA chaplains: (1) positive changes (e.g., increased empathy), (2) negative changes (e.g., dysthymic mood, questioning religious beliefs), (3) combination of positive and negative changes, and (4) no change (e.g., sustenance through spirituality or self-care). Most chaplains reported positive (37%) or no change (30%) in their spirituality and/or emotional well-being. However, quantitative analyses revealed that chaplains who reported negative changes endorsed greater burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Overall, these findings suggest VHA chaplains are predominantly spiritually resilient, but negative changes in the spiritual domain can occur, potentially increasing the risk of adverse changes in professional quality of life.

  15. Reactions to morally motivated deviance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramwinckel, F.M.; Van den Bos, K.; Van Dijk, E.

    2015-01-01

    People value morality in themselves and others. They want to be moral and good individuals, associate themselves with others who share their moral values, and belong to moral groups. As an ironic consequence of the importance of morality, people sometimes respond negatively to morally motivated

  16. Moral Education in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Shafiqua

    1980-01-01

    This report describes formal and informal methods of moral education operative in Pakistan. The nation's Islamic environment is explained; school policy, objectives, and practices are outlined; and informal moral education efforts through the mass media are noted. Problems in moral education in Pakistan and proposals for the future are discussed.…

  17. Sentimentalist Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Care ethics, and moral sentimentalism more generally, have not developed a picture of moral education that is comparable in scope or depth to the rationalist/Kantian/Rawlsian account of moral education that has been offered by Lawrence Kohlberg. But it is possible to do so if one borrows from the work of Martin Hoffman and makes systematic use of…

  18. Mapping the Moral Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jesse; Nosek, Brian A.; Haidt, Jonathan; Iyer, Ravi; Koleva, Spassena; Ditto, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically-grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ) based on a theoretical model of five universally available (but variably developed) sets of moral intuitions: Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/respect, and Purity/sanctity. We present evidence for the internal and external validity of the scale and the model, and in doing so present new findings about morality: 1. Comparative model fitting of confirmatory factor analyses provides empirical justification for a five-factor structure of moral concerns. 2. Convergent/discriminant validity evidence suggests that moral concerns predict personality features and social group attitudes not previously considered morally relevant. 3. We establish pragmatic validity of the measure in providing new knowledge and research opportunities concerning demographic and cultural differences in moral intuitions. These analyses provide evidence for the usefulness of Moral Foundations Theory in simultaneously increasing the scope and sharpening the resolution of psychological views of morality. PMID:21244182

  19. Satisfaction With Life, Coping, and Spirituality Among Urban Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Benjamin; Courtney, Malachi; Jasien, Joan

    2015-10-01

    Urban families face many challenges that affect life satisfaction, including low income, limited access to resources, and unstable neighborhoods. To investigate life satisfaction and identify potential mediators: neighborhood stability, emotional coping strategies, religion, and spirituality. A convenience sample of families presenting to an urban primary care clinic for routine care filled out an anonymous, voluntary survey that included demographic data, the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), the Spiritual Inventory and Beliefs Scale, and an emotional coping inventory. 127 individuals filled out the survey. Life satisfaction was high (21.3 ± 9). Families in the lowest quartile of the SWLS were 4.5 times as likely to have a child with a chronic medical illness. SWLS correlated with strategy planning (r = 0.24, P life satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Moral responsibility and free will: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, Adam; Cova, Florian

    2014-11-01

    Fundamental beliefs about free will and moral responsibility are often thought to shape our ability to have healthy relationships with others and ourselves. Emotional reactions have also been shown to have an important and pervasive impact on judgments and behaviors. Recent research suggests that emotional reactions play a prominent role in judgments about free will, influencing judgments about determinism's relation to free will and moral responsibility. However, the extent to which affect influences these judgments is unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the impact of affect. Our meta-analysis indicates that beliefs in free will are largely robust to emotional reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Spirituality in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia San Martín Petersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality may be understood as a group of feelings, beliefs and actions that suppose a search for the transcendent, sacred or divine. As representations about an ultimate power, they contribute to the sense and purpose in life and orient peoples behavior, relationships, and ways to feel and think about reality and about themselves. Since either in the growing old process and in the evaluation of life that occurs when approaching to death it may emerge conflicts, confusion and suffering, people beliefs about what is beyond death, or the answers to the questions about what for and why of life, become determinants in elders well-being. Furthermore, considering that life expectancy has significantly increased, and that the ways of growing old are changing as well as what being old means, and this process advantages and disadvantages or problems, in it ́s different contexts, it ́s necessary to think old age over again, as well as the policies that affect the quality of life of this group of people. Therefore, every professional who assist elderly, specially mental health professionals, must consider the spiritual referents of the individual in order to give the best assistance in whatever problems may appear in the growing old process. 

  2. Sikhism, spirituality and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Bhui, Kamaldeep S; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2012-12-01

    Sikhism has millions of followers in India and among the Indian diaspora. As a religion it is relatively young but carries with it unique perspectives which are often not well known. The holy book of Sikhism, Guru Granth Sahib, is not only the last Guru, but also remained a key text for this religion. Using descriptions of the religion and its followers we attempt to understand the context of spirituality within this religion and attempt to apply it to clinical settings. We explored various texts to understand the notions of spirituality and ethics and directions for living one's life. We studied both the Gurumukhi version as well as the English translation of the Sikh holy text. In the context of history of the Sikhs, various descriptions related to mental well being were identified. In this paper we describe the history, development and the core values of the religion and we also review their role on psychiatric and mental health settings for managing Sikh patients. Guru Granth Sahib offers a very useful insight into what is understood by the term equivalent to depression and its phenomenology. The notions of dukh (loosely translated as pain, but can also mean sadness or suffering) and maya (illusion) and their role in daily living are also discussed. In this paper these descriptions are explored further and their importance explained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Morally autonomous practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P A

    1998-12-01

    The structures and contexts within which nurses work results in the moral agency and moral autonomy of the nurse being compromised. This claim results from a confusion of (1) the concept of autonomy with those of freedom and independence; and (2) a confusion of the notion of moral autonomy with that of autonomous professional practice. The drawing of appropriate distinctions allows clarification of the relevant concepts. It also underlines the responsibility of practitioners to recognize the moral dimension of their practice, and the moral implications of their actions, as they attempt to meet the health care needs of their patients and develop practice professionally.

  4. Religion, morality, evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    How did religion evolve? What effect does religion have on our moral beliefs and moral actions? These questions are related, as some scholars propose that religion has evolved to enhance altruistic behavior toward members of one's group. I review here data from survey studies (both within and across countries), priming experiments, and correlational studies of the effects of religion on racial prejudice. I conclude that religion has powerfully good moral effects and powerfully bad moral effects, but these are due to aspects of religion that are shared by other human practices. There is surprisingly little evidence for a moral effect of specifically religious beliefs.

  5. Examining Client Spiritual History and the Construction of Meaning: The Use of Spiritual Timelines in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Jennifer R.

    2009-01-01

    The imperative to integrate spirituality in counseling has been well documented in the counseling literature. Developing spiritual timelines is one creative technique that may help clients with spiritual concerns. The purpose of this manuscript is to briefly review spirituality in counseling, describe the use of spiritual timelines as a creative…

  6. Hippocampal Damage Increases Deontological Responses during Moral Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Cornelia; Rosenthal, Clive R; Miller, Thomas D; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2016-11-30

    Complex moral decision making is associated with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in humans, and damage to this region significantly increases the frequency of utilitarian judgments. Since the vmPFC has strong anatomical and functional links with the hippocampus, here we asked how patients with selective bilateral hippocampal damage would derive moral decisions on a classic moral dilemmas paradigm. We found that the patients approved of the utilitarian options significantly less often than control participants, favoring instead deontological responses-rejecting actions that harm even one person. Thus, patients with hippocampal damage have a strikingly opposite approach to moral decision making than vmPFC-lesioned patients. Skin-conductance data collected during the task showed increased emotional arousal in the hippocampal-damaged patients and they stated that their moral decisions were based on emotional instinct. By contrast, control participants made moral decisions based on the integration of an adverse emotional response to harming others, visualization of the consequences of one's action, and the rational re-evaluation of future benefits. This integration may be disturbed in patients with either hippocampal or vmPFC damage. Hippocampal lesions decreased the ability to visualize a scenario and its future consequences, which seemed to render the adverse emotional response overwhelmingly dominant. In patients with vmPFC damage, visualization might also be reduced alongside an inability to detect the adverse emotional response, leaving only the utilitarian option open. Overall, these results provide insights into the processes involved in moral decision making and highlight the complementary roles played by two closely connected brain regions. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is closely associated with the ability to make complex moral judgements. When this area is damaged, patients become more utilitarian (the ends justify the means) and have

  7. The Spiritual Genogram in Training and Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Marsha Wiggins

    2001-01-01

    Describes the spiritual genogram, a blueprint of family members' multigenerational religious and spiritual affiliations, events, and conflicts. Used as a tool in both training and supervision, the spiritual genogram enables students and supervisees to make sense of their own religious and spiritual heritage and to explore the ways in which their…

  8. The Critical Spirituality of Paulo Freire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that Paulo Freire's capacity for hope in the face of personal struggle and exile issued from his spirituality, this paper examines Freire's spirituality through the lens of Michael Dantley's concept of critical spirituality. The concept of spirituality as discussed in the literature is explored, followed by an explication…

  9. Acute care nurses' spiritual care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallison, Barry S; Xu, Yan; Jurgens, Corrine Y; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers in providing spiritual care to hospitalized patients. A convenience sample (N = 271) was recruited at an academic medical center in New York City for an exploratory, descriptive questionnaire. The Spiritual Care Practice (SCP) questionnaire assesses spiritual care practices and perceived barriers to spiritual care. The SCP determines the percentage that provides spiritual support and perceived barriers inhibiting spiritual care. The participation rate was 44.3% (N = 120). Most (61%) scored less than the ideal mean on the SCP. Although 96% (N = 114) believe addressing patients spiritual needs are within their role, nearly half (48%) report rarely participating in spiritual practices. The greatest perceived barriers were belief that patient's spirituality is private, insufficient time, difficulty distinguishing proselytizing from spiritual care, and difficulty meeting needs when spiritual beliefs were different from their own. Although nurses identify themselves as spiritual, results indicate spirituality assessments are inadequate. Addressing barriers will provide nurses opportunities to address spirituality. Education is warranted to improve nurses' awareness of the diversity of our society to better meet the spiritual needs of patients. Understanding these needs provide the nurse with opportunities to address spirituality and connect desires with actions to strengthen communication and the nurse-patient relationship.

  10. Treating Spiritual Issues in Secular Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminiak, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirituality as a spiritual phenomenon that is independent of, yet open to, matters of personal religion and belief in God. Proposes that an elaborated psychology of spirituality helps therapists focus the psychotherapeutically relevant and spiritual issues in the client's presentation; build on the client's healthy commitments; and…

  11. Moral Hard-Wiring and Moral Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingmar; Savulescu, Julian

    2017-05-01

    We have argued for an urgent need for moral bioenhancement; that human moral psychology is limited in its ability to address current existential threats due to the evolutionary function of morality to maximize cooperation in small groups. We address here Powell and Buchanan's novel objection that there is an 'inclusivist anomaly': humans have the capacity to care beyond in-groups. They propose that 'exclusivist' (group-based) morality is sensitive to environmental cues that historically indicated out-group threat. When this is not present, we are inclusivist. They conclude that moral bioenhancement is unnecessary or less effective than socio-cultural interventions. We argue that Powell and Buchanan underestimate the hard-wiring features of moral psychology; their appeal to adaptively plastic, conditionally expressed responses accounts for only a fragment of our moral psychology. In addition to restrictions on our altruistic concern that their account addresses - such as racism and sexism - there are ones it is ill-suited to address: that our concern is stronger for kin and friends and for concrete individuals rather than for statistical lives; also our bias towards the near future. Hard-wired features of our moral psychology that are not clearly restrictions in altruistic concern also include reciprocity, tit-for-tat, and others. Biomedical means are not the only, and maybe not the most important, means of moral enhancement. Socio-cultural means are of great importance and there are currently no biomedical interventions for many hard-wired features. Nevertheless research is desirable because the influence of these features is greater than our critics think. © 2017 The Authors Bioethics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Brogaard's Moral Contextualism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Lars Grassme

    2008-01-01

    Brogaard's non-indexical version of moral contextualism has two related problems. It is unable to account for the function of truth-governed assertoric moral discourse, since it leaves two (semantically clearheaded) disputants without any incentive to resolve seemingly contradictory moral claims....... The moral contextualist could explain why people do feel such an incentive by ascribing false beliefs about the semantic workings of their own language. But, secondly, this leaves Brogaard's moral contextualism looking weaker than a Mackie-style invariantist error theory about morals. The latter is equally...... non-objectivist, but less revisionist, since it takes the semantics of moral discourse at face value, and can also explain all of Brogaard's other linguistic evidence....

  13. Emotional Intelligence Model for Managers in Mumbai

    OpenAIRE

    Vaibhav P. Birwatkar

    2014-01-01

    Much of the literature pertinent to management indicates that managers with high emotional intelligence are morale boosters in their workplaces. Previous studies offer limited evidence regarding the impact of manager's emotional intelligence on workplace psychology, productivity and job satisfaction. This research examines the awareness level of the concept of emotional intelligence, the emotional intelligence level of managers across the organizations, whether managers use emotional intellig...

  14. Sleep paralysis as spiritual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, David J

    2005-03-01

    This article presents an overview of the sleep paralysis experience from both a cultural and a historical perspective. The robust, complex phenomenological pattern that represents the subjective experience of sleep paralysis is documented and illustrated. Examples are given showing that, for a majority of subjects, sleep paralysis is taken to be a kind of spiritual experience. This is, in part, because of the very common perception of a non-physical 'threatening presence' that is part of the event. Examples from various cultures, including mainstream contemporary America which has no widely known tradition about sleep paralysis, are used to show that the complex pattern and spiritual interpretation are not dependent on cultural models or prior learning. This is dramatically contrary to conventional explanations of apparently 'direct' spiritual experiences, explanations that are summed up as the 'Cultural Source Hypothesis.' This aspect of sleep paralysis was not recognized through most of the twentieth century. The article examines the way that conventional modern views of spiritual experience, combined with medical ideas that labeled 'direct' spiritual experiences as psychopathological, and mainstream religious views of such experiences as heretical if not pathological, suppressed the report and discussion of these experiences in modern society. These views have resulted in confusion in the scientific literature on sleep paralysis with regard to its prevalence and core features. The article also places sleep paralysis in the context of other 'direct' spiritual experiences and offers an 'Experiential Theory' of cross-culturally distributed spiritual experiences.

  15. Positive effects of Religious and Spiritual Coping on Bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yoffe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonovsky (1987 coined the term “salutogenesis” in opposition to “pathogenesis”, with the intention to point out to cientific researchers ways and mechanisms that could promote health, well -being and life satisfaction. The area of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality began both in Europe and in the United States at the beginning of the twenth century. The research done in this field -since the last two decades- has focused on the relationships between religion, spirituality and health; and on the ways in which religious people cope with negative life events. We could think this area as a complementary one to the Positive Psychology; as both share certain common points of view about health, coping and well-being. In the field of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, Pargament and Koenig (1997 used the term “coping” -coined by Lazarus and Folkman (1986- referring to different styles of “religious coping” as “ways and mechanism by which religious people apply their religious beliefs and behaviours to prevent and /or moderate negative consequences of stressful life events, in order to solve their problems as well”. Each religion promotes ways to overcome negative life events, such as the death of loved ones. By using faith, prayers, meditations, religious rituals and beliefs about life, death and afterlife, religious persons try to cope with their grief and enhance positive feelings of emotional ,mental and spiritual well-being. Clergy of different religions are trained in religious practices, knowledge and skills to provide social support to those ones who face pain and loss. Religious groups can provide different types of emotional, practical, intelectual and spiritual support that can help diminish feelings of loneliness and grief. Being and feeling part of a religious community can promote ways to reconect to life and positive feelings that can help to overcome the grief of the death of loved ones and make

  16. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  17. MORAL SEBAGAI EFEK MODERASI PADA SIKAP MENTAL DAN KOMITMEN KERJA GURU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susminingsih *

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Guru wiyata bhakti sebagai human resource mempunyai kompetensi nalar sosial dan nalar spiritual yang menjadi modal utama bagi performa mereka sebagai pendidik. Sikap mental didukung dengan pemahaman moral yang baik ternyata melahirkan komitmen kerja para guru yang luar biasa. Potensi ini sangat penting untuk membangun mutual relationship dari para stakeholder pendidikan, agar terwujud kualitas pendidikan yang kompetitif. Kematangan kedua nalar tersebut dalam pembentukan kepribadian yang matang pada akhirnya akan memunculkan sikap profesional dan tanggung jawab profesional. Hal ini terjadi karena secara otomatis akan memunculkan sikap moral atau integritas moral yang tinggi pula.

  18. Celtic spirituality and the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Duncan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Celtic spirituality has a long and distinguished ancestry with its origins in pre-Christian times. It was inculturated amongst peoples in the far west of Europe, particularly in Ireland, Scotland and the north and south west of England. It was different from Roman Christianity in distinct ways until the mid-7th century CE when Roman Christianity became the norm in Britain. It has experienced various revivals during the history of Christianity, with two contemporary expressions in New Age spirituality and Christian spirituality. From its inception, it has been closely linked to the environment.

  19. Emotional Engineers : Toward Morally Responsible Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeser, S.

    2010-01-01

    Engineers are normally seen as the archetype of people who make decisions in a rational and quantitative way. However, technological design is not value neutral. The way a technology is designed determines its possibilities, which can, for better or for worse, have consequences for human wellbeing.

  20. Morality and moral development: Traditional Hindu concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Chhitij; Dhingra, Vishal; Bhardwaj, Anupam; Srivastava, Alka

    2013-01-01

    Morality (from the Latin word moralitas that means “manner, character, proper behavior”) is the differentiation of intentions, decisions, and actions between those that are good (or right) and those that are bad (or wrong). It is determined by how one's genetic makeup interacts with the environment. The development of morality has been a subject of investigation for a number of decades, and our understanding of neuro-biological and psychological mechanisms has increased manifolds in the last few decades. Development of morality has been of particular significance to psychiatric literature because of its significant contribution to the development of one's personality and it's aberration in various disorders. Cultures that have been just, equal and moral have been widely accepted and appreciated. In this review, we shall summarize the modern theories of moral development and then look into a part of our past and cultural heritage and review the traditional Hindu concepts of morality and their contribution to development of one's personality and their relevance in the current times. PMID:23858269

  1. [Moral and religious issues in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necek, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarises the moral and spiritual factors important in care for sick people. Medical care is one of the ancient forms of our activity as humans, expounding care for other people's well-being. The moral aspect of medical care is deeply rooted in constant daily interaction between the patient and the doctor aiming at easing symptoms, support, help, prevention and defense. Such teleological orientation of medicine is, according to John Paul II, made possible not so much by technology but by physician's conscience, wisdom and unlimited honesty. This is where ethics is needed to regulate that particular relation. This ethics stems from Christian morality, which raises our role as humans to that of guardians of dignity of another human being. Man is indeed the measure of all things, and this becomes the context for all relations including man's relation to God, but also relation of God to man. Thus, human dignity assumes the status of unconditional natural rule, inherently forestalling all legal arrangements. The morality of health care requires holistic approach, including care for body, mind, social interaction and spiritual needs. Only then, as explained by dr Ewa Kucharska, is it possible to answer patient's all needs. The moral side of the therapeutic contract bounds the doctor and the patient, alike. From this point of view, it is immoral not to cooperate with physicians in their strife for the preservation of health and life itself. Self negligence or active self harm (drugs, alcohol abuse, HIV/AIDS) are the utmost examples of such dishonesty. Finally, the imperative to bring hope and faith to the suffering, vests special importance in hospital chaplains, who bring good word, but most importantly the sacrament to those in need. The prayer in turn may evoke strong hope for cure, capable of supporting both soul and body. The suffering of man cannot be understood on rational grounds. It requires acceptance, and, above all, it requires faith. And this

  2. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following: Religious denomination , if any. Beliefs or philosophy of life. Important spiritual practices or rituals . Using ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  3. Concept analysis of moral courage in nursing: A hybrid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadooghiasl, Afsaneh; Parvizy, Soroor; Ebadi, Abbas

    2018-02-01

    Moral courage is one of the most fundamental virtues in the nursing profession, however, little attention has been paid to it. As a result, no exact and clear definition of moral courage has ever been accessible. This study is carried out for the purposes of defining and clarifying its concept in the nursing profession. This study used a hybrid model of concept analysis comprising three phases, namely, a theoretical phase, field work phase, and a final analysis phase. To find relevant literature, electronic search of valid databases was utilized using keywords related to the concept of courage. Field work data were collected over an 11 months' time period from 2013 to 2014. In the field work phase, in-depth interviews were performed with 10 nurses. The conventional content analysis was used in two theoretical and field work phases using Graneheim and Lundman stages, and the results were combined in the final analysis phase. Ethical consideration: Permission for this study was obtained from the ethics committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Oral and written informed consent was received from the participants. From the sum of 750 gained titles in theoretical phase, 26 texts were analyzed. The analysis resulted in 494 codes in text analysis and 226 codes in interview analysis. The literature review in the theoretical phase revealed two features of inherent-transcendental characteristics, two of which possessed a difficult nature. Working in the field phase added moral self-actualization characteristic, rationalism, spiritual beliefs, and scientific-professional qualifications to the feature of the concept. Moral courage is a pure and prominent characteristic of human beings. The antecedents of moral courage include model orientation, model acceptance, rationalism, individual excellence, acquiring academic and professional qualification, spiritual beliefs, organizational support, organizational repression, and internal and external personal barriers

  4. Explaining Moral Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Magda; Wiegmann, Alex

    2017-03-01

    In this review we make a simple theoretical argument which is that for theory development, computational modeling, and general frameworks for understanding moral psychology researchers should build on domain-general principles from reasoning, judgment, and decision-making research. Our approach is radical with respect to typical models that exist in moral psychology that tend to propose complex innate moral grammars and even evolutionarily guided moral principles. In support of our argument we show that by using a simple value-based decision model we can capture a range of core moral behaviors. Crucially, the argument we propose is that moral situations per se do not require anything specialized or different from other situations in which we have to make decisions, inferences, and judgments in order to figure out how to act.

  5. Moral Education in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roesgaard, Marie Højlund

    ‘religion’ is not a subject in schools. So, how do the Japanese go about the business of teaching values and morality? Using the Japanese example, this volume looks at moral education from the basic point of view of universal and common human values, with due attention given to culture-specific traits....... It places moral education within the context of globalization and cosmopolitanism and shows, that moral education in Japan is a useful key to understanding how globalization and cosmopolitanism can work within a specific system, in this case Japanese values education. In recent years various changes...... values. How are the new requirements and the renewed focus on moral education met in schools and by educators? This volume will describe the history of moral education in Japan, analyse the recent changes of the curriculum, analyse the practices in selected schools via fieldwork and case-studies and take...

  6. Moral realism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    For more than 15 years Professor Per Nortvedt has been arguing the case for moral realism in nursing and the health-care context more generally. His arguments focus on the clinical contexts of nursing and medicine and are supplemented by a series of persuasive examples. Following a description of moral realism, and the kinds of considerations that support it, criticisms of it are developed that seem persuasive. It is argued that our moral responses are explained by our beliefs as opposed to moral realities. In particular, two key arguments presented by Nortvedt are challenged: the so-called argument from convergence and the argument from clinical sensitivity. Both of these key planks in the case for moral realism are rejected, and an alternative 'social conditioning' account briefly sketched, which, it is claimed, has the same explanatory power as Nortvedt's thesis but does not rest on an appeal to independently existing moral properties. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Morality in clinical space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Sara Seerup; Dehlholm-Lambertsen, Birgitte; Stenager, Egon

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores the moral implications of treatment of young people with functional somatic symptoms. Based on an ethnographic field study at a Danish pain clinic for youngsters (age 8 to 18), the paper seeks to unearth the cultural, moral values that clinical practice steers by and upholds...... at a specific location and in specific cases. The two cases illustrate that the underlying norms and values can give rise to very different moral assessments of symptoms and selves within the same diagnostic category....

  8. The Notion of Spirituality in Modern Russian Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia Kolkunova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of contemporary Russian academic literature on spirituality. The authors single out key features of these texts, especially their approach to defi ning their subject. They formulate major semantic contexts within which spirituality is discussed by sociologists and psychologists, as well as practical implications of the term. The authors compare the academic usage of the term ‘spirituality’ with its usage in everyday language; the comparison is based on a mass survey conducted in 2006. In the literature that served as the material for the present study, we can observe political, cultural and religious aspects of spirituality. It can be viewed as a form of patriotism, as religious worldview, as overcoming the limitations of human nature, as erudition, as a means to fi ght the non-spiritual character of modern society, or as an aspiration towards the ideal. The overall fuzziness of the term is a consequence of its emotional and utopian connotations in the Russian language.

  9. Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Registered Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirsten Haugaard; Turner, de Sales

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Nurses The purpose of this study was to explore how Danish registered nurses understand the phenomenon of spiritual care and how their understanding impacts on their interventions with their patients. Nurses are responsible for the provision of care which...... would engage in provision of spiritual care. The participants acknowledged that their understanding of spirituality influenced their provision of spiritual care, which was recognized as a challenge requiring the nurse’s initiative and courage. Spirituality was primarily understood as a patient’s private...... respects patients’ values, religion, customs, and spiritual beliefs. Literature however revealed that the phenomenon of spiritual care is complex and variously interpreted, and that there seems to be a lack of conceptual clarity regarding what constitutes spiritual care. A phenomenological and hermeneutic...

  10. Describing Spirituality at the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Pam Shockey; Berry, Devon M

    2015-09-01

    Spirituality is salient to persons nearing the end of life (EOL). Unfortunately, researchers have not been able to agree on a universal definition of spirituality reducing the effectiveness of spiritual research. To advance spiritual knowledge and build an evidence base, researchers must develop creative ways to describe spirituality as it cannot be explicitly defined. A literature review was conducted to determine the common attributes that comprise the essence of spirituality, thereby creating a common ground on which to base spiritual research. Forty original research articles (2002 to 2012) focusing on EOL and including spiritual definitions/descriptions were reviewed. Analysis identified five attributes that most commonly described the essence of spirituality, including meaning, beliefs, connecting, self-transcendence, and value. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Acute care nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care: an exploratory study in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Brendan Wk; Tiew, Lay Hwa; Creedy, Debra K

    2016-09-01

    To investigate acute care nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care and relationships with nurses' personal and professional characteristics. Spirituality and spiritual care are often neglected or absent in daily nursing practice. Nurses' perceptions of spirituality can be influenced by personal, professional and social factors and affect the provision of spiritual care. A cross-sectional, exploratory, nonexperimental design was used. All nursing staff (n = 1008) from a large acute care hospital in Singapore were invited to participate. Participants completed a demographic form and the Spiritual Care-Giving Scale. Completed surveys were received from 767 staff yielding a response rate of 76%. Descriptive statistics and General Linear Modelling were used to analyse data. Acute care nurses reported positive perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Religion, area of clinical practice and view of self as spiritual were associated with nurses' reported perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care. Nurses working in this acute care hospital in Singapore reported positive perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Respondents tended to equate religion with spirituality and were often unclear about what constituted spiritual care. They reported a sense of readiness to apply an interprofessional approach to spiritual care. However, positive perceptions of spirituality may not necessarily translate into practice. Spiritual care can improve health outcomes. Nurses' understanding of spirituality is essential for best practice. Interprofessional collaboration with clinicians, administrators, educators, chaplains, clergy and spiritual leaders can contribute to the development of practice guidelines and foster spiritual care by nurses. Further research is needed on the practical applications of spiritual care in nursing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Moral Agency, Moral Imagination, and Moral Community: Antidotes to Moral Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Terri; Liaschenko, Joan; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Moral distress has been covered extensively in the nursing literature and increasingly in the literature of other health professions. Cases that cause nurses' moral distress that are mentioned most frequently are those concerned with prolonging the dying process. Given the standard of aggressive treatment that is typical in intensive care units (ICUs), much of the existing moral distress research focuses on the experiences of critical care nurses. However, moral distress does not automatically occur in all end-of-life circumstances, nor does every critical care nurse suffer its damaging effects. What are the practices of these nurses? What specifically do they do to navigate around or through the distressing situations? The nursing literature is lacking an answer to these questions. This article reports a study that used narrative analysis to explore the reported practices of experienced critical care nurses who are skilled at and comfortable working with families and physicians regarding the withdrawal of aggressive treatment. A major finding was that these nurses did not report experiencing the damaging effects of moral distress as described in the nursing literature. The verbal communication and stated practices relevant to this finding are organized under three major themes: (1) moral agency, (2) moral imagination, and (3) moral community. Further, a total of eight subthemes are identified. The practices that constitute these themes and subthemes are further detailed and discussed in this article. Understanding these practices can help mitigate critical care nurses' moral distress. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  13. Sleep and moral awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher M; Gunia, Brian C; Wagner, David T

    2015-04-01

    The implications of sleep for morality are only starting to be explored. Extending the ethics literature, we contend that because bringing morality to conscious attention requires effort, a lack of sleep leads to low moral awareness. We test this prediction with three studies. A laboratory study with a manipulation of sleep across 90 participants judging a scenario for moral content indicates that a lack of sleep leads to low moral awareness. An archival study of Google Trends data across 6 years highlights a national dip in Web searches for moral topics (but not other topics) on the Monday after the Spring time change, which tends to deprive people of sleep. Finally, a diary study of 127 participants indicates that (within participants) nights with a lack of sleep are associated with low moral awareness the next day. Together, these three studies suggest that a lack of sleep leaves people less morally aware, with important implications for the recognition of morality in others. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Family Spirituality and Family Health Among Korean-American Elderly Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk-Sun; Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo; Koenig, Harold G

    2016-04-01

    Spirituality has been regarded as an individual and private matter; consequently, research on spirituality as a family phenomenon has been largely neglected. In addition, most published research has been focused on Western cultures. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of family spirituality and how it influences health among Korean-American elderly couples who are the first generation to reside in the Southeastern USA. A thematic and interpretive data analysis method was used. Thirteen elderly couples (N = 26) participated in in-depth individual interviews in Korean with the primary author. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and then translated by two bilingual researchers with a background in Korean and American culture. Three main themes of family spirituality were identified: (1) family togetherness, (2) family interdependence, and (3) family coping. Also, participants reported that family spirituality strengthened family health by fostering family commitment, improving emotional well-being, developing new healthy behaviors, and providing healing experiences. This finding implies that healthcare providers need to assess family spiritual issues of elderly couples to maximize their strengths for coping with health problems. As our society becomes more culturally diverse, healthcare providers should seek to understand family spirituality from different cultural perspectives to develop a more holistic approach to care.

  15. SPIRITUALITY IN ISLAMIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP: MOTIVATIONAND ACHIEVEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS IN KELANTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zain Mubarak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality is a vital aspect in the context of Islamic entrepreneurship. In fact, the Malay entrepreneur’s achievement that associated with their attitude as one of the influential factors in many extents, is derived from internal religious values as a final solution. However, there is little studies that scrutinizing this issue extensively in the context of the entrepreneurs success. Therefore, this research will explore spiritual aspects by identifying the related characteristics and the significance from motivational view and achievements that would lead to the success in entrepreneurship. Through an in-depth interview and thematic analysis, it can be said that the characteristics and spiritual practice do influence the motivation of entrepreneurs to build confidence and perseverance. Holding tight to the moral principles and assisting to more efficient managerial aspects and the undertakings will lead to the success in the business endeavour.

  16. Effects of spiritual well-being on subsequent happiness, psychological well-being, and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Jens

    2011-12-01

    Recently, Gomez and Fisher (Gomez R and Fisher JW (2003) Pers Individ Dif 35: 1975-1991) proposed that four facets of spiritual well-being exist, namely, personal, communal, environmental, and transcendental spiritual well-being. Based on data from three independent studies, the present research effort tested the validity of a German version of (Gomez R and Fisher JW (2003) Pers Individ Dif 35: 1975-1991) of the Spiritual Well-Being Questionnaire (SWBQ-G). It was found that the SWBQ-G was factorially valid and that each of the four SWBQ-G scales was discriminant to mental, physical, and emotional well-being. Also, it was found that the SWBQ-G predicted levels of subsequent happiness, psychological well-being (positive relationship), and stress (negative relationship). These results add to our knowledge about the validity of the construct of spiritual well-being.

  17. Moralized Psychology or Psychologized Morality? Ethics and Psychology in Recent Theorizing about Moral and Character Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David

    2007-01-01

    Moral philosophy seems well placed to claim the key role in theorizing about moral education. Indeed, moral philosophers have from antiquity had much to say about psychological and other processes of moral formation. Given this history, it may seem ironic that much systematic latter-day theorizing about moral education has been social scientific,…

  18. tDCS Over DLPFC Leads to Less Utilitarian Response in Moral-Personal Judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoli Zheng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The profound nature of moral judgment has been discussed and debated for centuries. When facing the trade-off between pursuing moral rights and seeking better consequences, most people make different moral choices between two kinds of dilemmas. Such differences were explained by the dual-process theory involving an automatic emotional response and a controlled application of utilitarian decision-rules. In neurocognitive studies, the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC has been demonstrated to play an important role in cognitive “rational” control processes in moral dilemmas. However, the profile of results across studies is not entirely consistent. Although one transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS study revealed that disrupting the right DLPFC led to less utilitarian responses, other TMS studies indicated that inhibition of the right DLPFC led to more utilitarian choices. Moreover, the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ is essential for its function of integrating belief and intention in moral judgment, which is related to the emotional process according to the dual-process theory. Relatively few studies have reported the causal relationship between TPJ and participants' moral responses, especially in moral dilemmas. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate a direct link between the neural and behavioral results by application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS in the bilateral DLPFC or TPJ of our participants. We observed that activating the right DLPFC as well as inhibiting the left DLPFC led to less utilitarian judgments, especially in moral-personal conditions, indicating that the right DLPFC plays an essential role, not only through its function of moral reasoning but also through its information integrating process in moral judgments. It was also revealed that altering the excitability of the bilateral TPJ using tDCS negligibly altered the moral response in non-moral, moral-impersonal and moral

  19. Do spiritual patients want spiritual interventions?: A qualitative exploration of underserved cancer patients' perspectives on religion and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Emma M; Kolidas, Evelyn; Moadel, Alyson

    2015-02-01

    This study examines religion and spirituality among advanced cancer patients from an underserved, ethnically-diverse population by exploring patient conceptualizations of religion and spirituality, the role of religion and spirituality in coping with cancer, and patient interest in spiritual support. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients who had participated in a study of a "mind-body" support group for patients with all cancer types. Analysis based on grounded theory was utilized to identify themes and theoretical constructs. With regard to patient conceptualizations of religion and spirituality, three categories emerged: (1) Spirituality is intertwined with organized religion; (2) Religion is one manifestation of the broader construct of spirituality; (3) Religion and spirituality are completely independent, with spirituality being desirable and religion not. Religion and spirituality played a central role in patients' coping with cancer, providing comfort, hope, and meaning. Patients diverged when it came to spiritual support, with some enthusiastic about interventions incorporating their spiritual values and others stating that they already get this support through religious communities. Spirituality plays a central role in the cancer experience of this underserved ethnically-diverse population. While spirituality seems to be a universal concern in advanced cancer patients, the meaning of spirituality differs across individuals, with some equating it with organized religion and others taking a more individualized approach. It is important that psychosocial interventions are developed to address this concern. Future research is needed to further explore the different ways that patients conceptualize spirituality and to develop spiritually-based treatments that are not "one size fits all."

  20. KONSEP PENDIDIKAN MORAL MENURUT AL-GAZALI DAN ÉMILE DURKHEIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Ratna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The development of science and technology has brought about many changes in society life. However, the main concern here is that the changes have caused the existence of moral crisis. This is based on the fact that the development of knowledge in the area of technology and information is not balanced with the development of moral of modern society. The reality of life that drives educa­tional activity continuously to run and change that demand the new acceleration in educational world, especially moral education. Therefore, the concept of moral education still needs to be specifically examined because the concept of moral education is very important in educational world. Moral education is not a new problem. There are many experts that have formulated the concept of education and have taken moral as not a separated part of educational system. Even, moral education has to integrate the spiritual and intelectual aspects and also normatif  and hystorical aspects (reality. The integration of all these aspects will become the core for the balance between the aspects of cognitive (mind, affective (faith, and pychomotoric (deed in education practices. Abstrak: Perkembangan sains dan teknologi telah banyak memberi perubahan dalam kehidupan masyarakat. Tetapi, yang memprihatinkan adalah perubahan itu justru mendorong munculnya krisis moral. Hal ini didasarkan pada kenyataan bahwa kemajuan ilmu pengetahuan di bidang teknologi dan informasi tidak selalu sebanding dengan kemajuan di bidang moral pada masyarakat modern. Realitas kehidupan yang menggiring aktivitas pendidikan terus berjalan dan berubah-ubah menuntut adanya suatu akselerasi baru dalam dunia pendidikan terkhusus pendidikan moral. Oleh karena itu, konsep pendidikan moral masih perlu dikaji secara spesifik karena konsep pendidikan moral adalah hal yang sangat penting dalam dunia pendidikan. Pendidikan moral memang bukanlah persoalan baru. Banyak ahli pendidikan telah merumuskan konsep

  1. Low Levels of Empathic Concern Predict Utilitarian Moral Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Young, Liane

    2013-01-01

    Is it permissible to harm one to save many? Classic moral dilemmas are often defined by the conflict between a putatively rational response to maximize aggregate welfare (i.e., the utilitarian judgment) and an emotional aversion to harm (i.e., the non-utilitarian judgment). Here, we address two questions. First, what specific aspect of emotional responding is relevant for these judgments? Second, is this aspect of emotional responding selectively reduced in utilitarians or enhanced in non-utilitarians? The results reveal a key relationship between moral judgment and empathic concern in particular (i.e., feelings of warmth and compassion in response to someone in distress). Utilitarian participants showed significantly reduced empathic concern on an independent empathy measure. These findings therefore reveal diminished empathic concern in utilitarian moral judges. PMID:23593213

  2. A framework for understanding moral distress among palliative care clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda H; Kaszniak, Alfred W; Halifax, Joan S

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care clinicians confront suffering as they care for people living with life-limiting conditions. When the degree of suffering becomes unjustified, moral distress can ensue. Promising work from neuroscience and social psychology has yet to be applied to clinical practice. Our objective was to expand a social psychology model focusing on empathy and compassion in response to suffering to include an ethical dimension and to examine how the interrelationships of its proposed components can assist clinicians in understanding their responses to morally distressing situations. In the clinical context, responses to distressing events are thought to include four dimensions: empathy (emotional attunement), perspective taking (cognitive attunement), memory (personal experience), and moral sensitivity (ethical attunement). These dynamically intertwined dimensions create the preconditions for how clinicians respond to a triggering event instigated by an ethical conflict or dilemma. We postulate that if the four dimensions are highly aligned, the intensity and valence of emotional arousal will influence ethical appraisal and discernment by engaging a robust view of the ethical issues, conflicts, and possible solutions and cultivating compassionate action and resilience. In contrast, if they are not, ethical appraisal and discernment will be deficient, creating emotional disregulation and potentially leading to personal and moral distress, self-focused behaviors, unregulated moral outrage, burnout, and secondary stress. The adaptation and expansion of a conceptual framework offers a promising approach to designing interventions that help clinicians mitigate the detrimental consequences of unregulated moral distress and to build the resilience necessary to sustain themselves in clinical service.

  3. Religion, spirituality, positive youth development, and thriving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Pamela Ebstyne; Carr, Drew; Boitor, Ciprian

    2011-01-01

    Issues of spirituality and thriving are pertinent to the period of adolescence given the marked changes in body, mind, and relationships. In order to provide an overview of the relationship between religion, spirituality, and positive youth development, this chapter offers a developmental systems perspective and proposes a relational spirituality as a framework for understanding adolescent religious and spiritual development. In addition, the chapter examines various psychological mechanisms through which religion and spirituality may promote positive youth development. Existing empirical research on the relationships between adolescent religion, spirituality, thriving, and specific indicators of positive youth development is reviewed. Finally, future directions for continuing to build the field of study are discussed.

  4. Spiritual culture crisis in modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusko Nadiya Mykhaylivna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article researches the concept of spirituality as a holistic phenomenon, characterises the current state of spirituality in Ukraine and reveal the basic ways of forming spiritual culture with the help of philosophical, cultural, theological, linguistic, pedagogical, and psychological approaches. Moreover, the crisis in the today’s spiritual culture is analysed, and the determinants of the negative processes in the modern society are examined. Therefore, we can state that education remains a priority area in the spiritual and cultural development of the society. In the current phase of state construction, the main educational objective is the development of the spiritual culture of personality.

  5. Aligning Islamic Spirituality to Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Zainul Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    This paper attempts to conceptualize Islamic spirituality in medical imaging that deals with the humanistic and technical dimensions. It begins with establishing an understanding concerning spirituality, an area that now accepted as part of patient-centred care. This is followed by discussions pertaining to Islamic spirituality, related to the practitioner, patient care and the practice. Possible avenues towards applying Islamic spirituality in medical imaging are proposed. It is hoped that the resultant harmonization between Islamic spirituality and the practice will trigger awareness and interests pertaining to the role of a Muslim practitioner in advocating and enhancing Islamic spirituality.

  6. Can Emotionally Intelligent Volleyball Players Be More Prone to Sportspersonship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Suleyman

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence concept has been examined by researchers in the field of education as well as field of sports. When emotional intelligence theory examined, it comes to mind that emotional intelligence can be related to moral behaviors in sport. In this regard, the question of "Can emotional intelligence predict sportspersonship…

  7. Virtue ethics: an approach to moral dilemmas in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Arries

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Nurses are increasingly confronted with situations of moral difficulty, such as not to feed terminally ill patients, whistle blowing, or participation in termination of pregnancy. Most of these moral dilemmas are often analyzed using the principle-based approach which applies the four moral principles of justice, autonomy, beneficence, and nonmalificence. In some instances, consequentialism is considered, but these frameworks have their limitations. Their limitations has to do with a consideration for the interpersonal nature of clinical nursing practice on the one hand, and is not always clear on how to judge which consequences are best on the other hand. When principles are in conflict it is not always easy to decide which principle should dominate. Furthermore, these frameworks do not take into account the importance of the interpersonal and emotional element of human experience. On the contrary, decision making about moral issues in healthcare demands that nurses exercise rational control over emotions. This clearly focuses the attention on the nurse as moral agent and in particular their character. In this article I argue that virtue ethics as an approach, which focus of the character of a person, might provide a more holistic analysis of moral dilemmas in nursing and might facilitate more flexible and creative solutions when combined with other theories of moral decision-making. Advancing this argument, firstly, I provide the central features of virtue ethics. Secondly I describe a story in which a moral dilemma is evident. Lastly I apply virtue ethics as an approach to this moral dilemma and in particular focusing on the virtues inherent in the nurse as moral agent in the story.

  8. Moral Education versus Indoctrination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, David

    2016-01-01

    Moral education is open to worries about indoctrination given the controversies there are about a wide range of ethical matters. I argue, however, that moral education is no more liable to being "indoctrinal" than education in history or science. I begin by proposing an account of what indoctrination involves. I then note that moral…

  9. Una idea de moral

    OpenAIRE

    García Soto, Luis

    2001-01-01

    El objeto del presente trabajo es examinar la idea de moral, que encontremos en A. Sánchez Vázquez y en M. Foucault, y, a partir de ahí, esbozar un concepto de moral que pueda definir adecuadamente la moralidad contemporánea occidental.

  10. The Breakdown of Morale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Vikander (Nick)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies how morale in teams can break down. It interprets high morale as team members working together productively, either because of a sense of fairness or because of implicit incentives from repeated interactions. Team members learn that lay-offs will occur at a fixed

  11. Moral og videnproduktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Birgitte

    Research report concerning moral and ethical problems inherent in the consulting engineers' profession. Based upon 25 in-depth interviews in 11 firms, the report is contributing to the understanding of the concepts and meaning of moral and ethics in a world of technical rationality. The objectivity...

  12. Moral og Videnproduktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Birgitte

    En analyse af relationerne mellem viden og moral i de tekniske rådgivningskulturer. Publikationen beskriver de moralske og etiske overvejelser der præger rådgivernes professionelle univers i den praktiske udførelse af konsulentprojekter, og eftersporer den gensidige konstruktion af viden, moral og...

  13. Moral Life and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2016-01-01

    Nel Noddings, Lee Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita, at Stanford University, agrees with Professors Lapsley and Woodbury that moral aims are central to education. She has argued that the main aim of education is to produce better people--better in "all aspects of a complete life: moral, physical, social, vocational, aesthetic,…

  14. IS MORALITY AN ILLUSION?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    For well over two millennia, philosophers and theologians assumed that morality presupposed com- pliance to a set of ideals used for the ... ethics, whereby morality is to be left at the discretion of the individual. The assumption is that each indi- ..... to abdicate his or her family responsibilities. Apart from these considerations, ...

  15. Factors Influencing the Spiritual Competency of Predoctoral Psychology Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasz, Christine A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among spiritual competencies, personal spiritual beliefs, and clinical supervision in spirituality with professional psychology predoctoral interns. It was hypothesized personal spiritual beliefs and supervision in spirituality would be predictors of spiritual competencies in clinical practice. Social…

  16. Why People with More Emotion Regulation Difficulties Made a More Deontological Judgment: The Role of Deontological Inclinations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lisong; Li, Zhongquan; Wu, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Ziyuan

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the key role of emotion in moral judgment, and explored the relationship between emotion regulation and moral judgment. The present study investigated the influence of individual differences in emotion regulation difficulties on moral judgment. Study 1 examined whether individuals with high emotion regulation difficulties made a more deontological judgment. Study 2 explored the underlying mechanism using a process-dissociation approach, examining whether deo...

  17. The challenge of consolation: nurses' experiences with spiritual and existential care for the dying-a phenomenological hermeneutical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornøe, Kirsten Anne; Danbolt, Lars Johan; Kvigne, Kari; Sørlie, Venke

    2015-01-01

    A majority of people in Western Europe and the USA die in hospitals. Spiritual and existential care is seen to be an integral component of holistic, compassionate and comprehensive palliative care. Yet, several studies show that many nurses are anxious and uncertain about engaging in spiritual and existential care for the dying. The aim of this study is to describe nurses' experiences with spiritual and existential care for dying patients in a general hospital. Individual narrative interviews were conducted with nurses in a medical and oncological ward. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method. The nurses felt that it was challenging to uncover dying patients' spiritual and existential suffering, because it usually emerged as elusive entanglements of physical, emotional, relational, spiritual and existential pain. The nurses' spiritual and existential care interventions were aimed at facilitating a peaceful and harmonious death. The nurses strove to help patients accept dying, settle practical affairs and achieve reconciliation with their past, their loved ones and with God. The nurses experienced that they had been able to convey consolation when they had managed to help patients to find peace and reconciliation in the final stages of dying. This was experienced as rewarding and fulfilling. The nurses experienced that it was emotionally challenging to be unable to relieve dying patients' spiritual and existential anguish, because it activated feelings of professional helplessness and shortcomings. Although spiritual and existential suffering at the end of life cannot be totally alleviated, nurses may ease some of the existential and spiritual loneliness of dying by standing with their patients in their suffering. Further research (qualitative as well as quantitative) is needed to uncover how nurses provide spiritual and existential care for dying patients in everyday practice. Such research is an important and valuable knowledge supplement

  18. Negotiating Moral Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Lene; Svendsen, Mette N.

    2015-01-01

    laboratories. The normal procedure would be to kill research animals after the termination of an experiment; in this case, however, a decision was reached to close down the lab. The moral landscape had changed, and it was no longer considered acceptable to use nonhuman primates in Danish biomedicine. From...... being considered a biological resource serving as a model of man, the monkeys had become moral subjects with a claim to a life suiting their natural needs. Simultaneously, the monkeys became instrumental in creating moral legitimacy for the actors involved in their rescue. What we see is an instance...... of pathfinding in a changing moral landscape where actors negotiate nonhuman primate nature as they create new moral positions for themselves....

  19. Transforming Losses―A Major Task of Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckhard Frick

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Since Freud’s “Mourning and Melancholia”, bereavement encompasses the dilemma between continuing versus relinquishing bonds to deceased persons. Mourning is the process of symbolizing the loss, of making sense by facing the conflict between the absence of the lost object and the continuing presence of an emotional relationship to that which is lost. Furthermore, mourning is not limited to bereaved persons but also concerns dying persons and, in a broader sense, our whole symbolic life which is playful coping with a rhythm of absence and presence. True consolation connects the individual and the archetypical mourning. Spiritually integrated psychotherapy may accompany this process by amplification. Christian mysticism takes its starting point from the experience of Jesus Christ’s lost body, and this may be understood as a model of spiritual transformation.

  20. Unawareness of Self-interest Bias in Moral Judgments of Others’ Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bocian Konrad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies (Bocian & Wojciszke, 2014 showed that self-interest biases moral perception of others’ unethical actions. Moreover, affective changes in attitudinal responses towards the perpetrator of an immoral act drives the bias. In the present studies, we attempted to answer the question whether people are aware of the self-interest bias in their judgments of others’ behavior. We conducted two experiments showing that moral judgments of verbally described and imagined actions were dominated by norms rather than self-interest (Study 1 and that people were not aware that self-interest distorted their moral judgment (Study 2. The unawareness of the self-interest bias among the participants was attributable to omission of their own emotional responses when forecasting their moral judgments. We discuss the importance of emotions presence in studies on moral judgments as well as contribution of the present research to the intuitionist approach to moral judgment.

  1. Science, Spirituality and Truth: Acknowledging Difference for Spiritual Dialogue and Human Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to explain why spiritual education must be clear about the nature of spiritual knowledge and truth and how it differs from the knowledge and truth generated by science. The author argues this is important in order that spirituality and science are equally valued, and in order that spiritual pedagogy appropriately reflects the…

  2. ASSET: A Model for Actioning Spirituality and Spiritual Care Education and Training in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Aru

    1999-01-01

    A model for improving nurses' preparation in spiritual care includes development of spiritual self-awareness, knowledge of varied traditions of spirituality, and ability to implement a spiritual dimension in nursing practice using the skills of communication, trust building, and giving hope. (SK)

  3. A Model of Spirituality for Ageing Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahjabeen; Khan, Shamsul

    2016-06-01

    Spirituality's influence on general well-being and its association with healthy ageing has been studied extensively. However, a different perspective has to be brought in when dealing with spirituality issues of ageing Muslims. Central to this perspective is the intertwining of religion and spirituality in Islam. This article will contribute to the understanding of the nature of Islamic spirituality and its immense importance in the life of a practicing ageing Muslim. Consequently, it will help care providers to include appropriate spiritual care in the care repertoire of a Muslim care recipient. It is assumed that the framework for a model of spirituality based on Islamic religious beliefs would help contextualise the relationship between spirituality and ageing Muslims. Not only challenges, but also the opportunities that old age provides for charting the spiritual journey have underpinned this model.

  4. Spirituality and spiritual self-care: expanding self-care deficit nursing theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary L; Peters, Rosalind; Schim, Stephanie Myers

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose an integration of the concepts of spirituality and spiritual self-care within Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory as a critical step in theory development. Theoretical clarity is needed to understand the contributions of spirituality to health and well-being. Spirituality is the beliefs persons hold related to their subjective sense of existential connectedness including beliefs that reflect relationships with others, acknowledge a higher power, recognize an individual's place in the world, and lead to spiritual practices. Spiritual self-care is the set of spiritually-based practices in which people engage to promote continued personal development and well-being in health and illness.

  5. Measuring Symptoms of Moral Injury in Veterans and Active Duty Military with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Moral Injury Symptom Scale-Military Version (MISS-M is a 45-item measure of moral injury (MI symptoms designed to use in Veterans and Active Duty Military with PTSD. This paper reviews the psychometric properties of the MISS-M identified in a previous report, discusses the rationale for the development of the scale, and explores its possible clinical and research applications. The MISS-M consists of 10 theoretically grounded subscales that assess the psychological and spiritual/religious symptoms of MI: guilt, shame, betrayal, moral concerns, loss of meaning/purpose, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, self-condemnation, spiritual/religious struggles, and loss of religious faith/hope. The scale has high internal reliability, high test-retest reliability, and a factor structure that can be replicated. The MISS-M correlates strongly with PTSD severity, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms, indicating convergent validity, and is relatively weakly correlated with social, spiritual, and physical health constructs, suggesting discriminant validity. The MISS-M is the first multidimensional scale that measures both the psychological and spiritual/religious symptoms of MI and is a reliable and valid measure for assessing symptom severity in clinical practice and in conducting research that examines the efficacy of treatments for MI in Veterans and Active Duty Military personnel.

  6. Religiosity, Spirituality, and Help-Seeking among Filipino Americans: Religious Clergy or Mental Health Professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe-Kim, Jennifer; Gong, Fang; Takeuchi, David

    2004-01-01

    Data from structured interviews with 2,285 respondents for the Filipino American Community Epidemiological Survey (FACES) were used to examine help-seeking for emotional distress among Filipino Americans. The influence of religious affiliation, religiosity, and spirituality upon help-seeking from religious clergy and mental health professionals…

  7. An exploration of how spiritual nursing care is applied in clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... (2002:38–39) to determine whether nurse theorists actually acknowledge the spiritual domain in their conceptual ... nursing care and to differentiate it from emotional, social or psychological care. However, prayer with or for ..... the image of God, not a an object which will help me get some money come ...

  8. Mengembangkan Kecerdasan Spiritual Mahasiswa di Perguruan Tinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M. Tampubolon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses about how to develop spiritual intelligence of students in the college environment. This article describes pinciples of the application of the six ways of spiritual intelligence development into learning models, assignments, and campus life. The principles should be done by considering the meaning of the spiritual, developmental characteristics of students, and the characteristics of students’ spiritual development.  

  9. Spirituality and Religion in Modern Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Darpan Kaur Mohinder; Ajinkya, Shaunak

    2012-01-01

    Man has always yearned for a higher sense of belonging in life. Since ancient ages, human beings have tried to examine and evaluate the relationship between spirituality, religion and medicine. The interface of spirituality, quality of life and mental health is fascinating and sublime. Religion and spirituality play an essential role in the care giving of patients with terminal illnesses and chronic medical conditions. Patient′s needs, desires and perspectives on religion and spirituality sho...

  10. John Calvin and postmodern spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.H. Fick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Postmodernists reject universal truth claims and brand them as violent impositions on a person by powerful institutions. Postmodernist spirituality seeks for a more subjective, life- experience based attitude towards values and truths of the Bible and relationship in community. Careful consideration should be given to the issues of community, knowledge/truth, faith, and faith experience. This article will show that, in his “Institutes”, Calvin gives ample attention to faith, the liberating truth about God as revealed in Jesus Christ, and to the Chris- tian’s intimate relationship with Him. Being in Christ, commu- nion with Christ or the “unio mystica cum Christo” through faith as a central theme in Calvin’s theology, needs to be redis- covered and re-applied to reformed spirituality as apologetic means in a postmodern world. This treasure should satisfy the kind of spirituality postmodernists yearn for.

  11. Why Be Moral? Moral Identity Motivation and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Victor, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    Moral identity research to date has largely failed to provide evidence for developmental trends in moral identity, presumably because of restrictions in the age range of studies and the use of moral identity measures that are insensitive to age-related change. The present study investigated moral identity motivation across a broad age range (14-65…

  12. Moral Identity as Moral Ideal Self: Links to Adolescent Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sam A.; Walker, Lawrence J.; Olsen, Joseph A.; Woodbury, Ryan D.; Hickman, Jacob R.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to conceptualize moral identity as moral ideal self, to develop a measure of this construct, to test for age and gender differences, to examine links between moral ideal self and adolescent outcomes, and to assess purpose and social responsibility as mediators of the relations between moral ideal self and outcomes.…

  13. Cultural Conceptions of Morality: Examining Laypeople's Associations of Moral Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauclair, Christin-Melanie; Wilson, Marc; Fischer, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Whether moral conceptions are universal or culture-specific is controversial in moral psychology. One option is to refrain from imposing theoretical constraints and to ask laypeople from different cultures how "they" conceptualize morality. Our article adopts this approach by examining laypeople's associations of moral character in…

  14. Moral Psychology and the Problem of Moral Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This article is intended as an initial investigation into the foundations of moral psychology. I primarily examine a recent work in moral education, Daniel Lapsley's and Darcia Narvaez"s "Character education", whose authors seem to assume at points that criteria for discerning moral actions and moral traits can be derived apart from ethics or…

  15. Interfaith Spiritual Care: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefbroer, A.I.; Olsman, E.; Ganzevoort, R.R.; Van Etten - Jamaludin, F.S.

    2017-01-01

    Although knowledge on spiritual care provision in an interfaith context is essential for addressing the diversity of patients’ religious and spiritual needs, an overview of the literature is lacking. Therefore, this article reviews the empirical literature on interfaith spiritual care (ISC) in

  16. [Spiritual phenomena occurring in everybody and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsiak, M

    2008-01-01

    The past several years have seen an explosion of research in the area of spirituality and health. However, confusion and incomprehension of the conception of spirituality (e.g. confounding spirituality with various conventional views on religiousness) hampers better understanding in this area. The present paper proposes definition of spiritual phenomena in man based on natural epistemological and instrumental criteria (whether a certain phenomenon can be objectively known and evoked): spiritual phenomena in man are those, which cannot be objectively known nor evoked, but which act (e.g., love, idea). Spiritual phenomena can be really known only in the self ("in spirit"). Objectively known can be only manifestations of spiritual phenomena. Some attributes of love (e.g. its personal uniqueness) or ideas (e.g., sense of own life) whose satisfaction appears to be important for health are briefly outlined. A review of some frequently cited recent papers investigating the role of spirituality in health and discussion of frequent pitfalls in this area is given. Spirituality is a universal human phenomenon. All human beings, secular or religious, encounter with spiritual phenomena. Although the present conception of spirituality distances from some conventional views on religiousness, it is not atheistic. On the contrary, it accommodates the basic religious concept "God is love". Conceptual clarification is essential for further progress in the study of impact of spirituality on health.

  17. Why Is Music a Language of Spirituality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yob, Iris M.

    2010-01-01

    The basic thesis explored in this paper is that rather than seeing spirituality as a byproduct of music, the other arts, and religion, music, the other arts, and religion might be seen as a byproduct of spirituality--hence, the proposition that music is a language of spirituality. If that is the case, there are twin dangers: talk of "wholism" can…

  18. Spirituality and contextuality | Waaijman | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses various historiographies of spirituality as an indication of the influence of context on spirituality. It gives an overview of the most important historiographies of spirituality. Secondly, it describes the extremes of contextuality and noncontextuality, before finally reflecting on the dialectic tension between ...

  19. What is spirituality? | Waaijman | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay provides, first of all, a historical perspective on the nature of spirituality by investigating its early forms, followed by a discussion of two approaches in the last century. It then investigates three basic forms of spirituality, concluding with an overview of elements of spirituality.

  20. Interfaith Spiritual Care: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefbroer, Anke I.; Olsman, Erik; Ganzevoort, R. Ruard; van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi S.

    2017-01-01

    Although knowledge on spiritual care provision in an interfaith context is essential for addressing the diversity of patients' religious and spiritual needs, an overview of the literature is lacking. Therefore, this article reviews the empirical literature on interfaith spiritual care (ISC) in