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Sample records for spiritual growth dulce

  1. Spiritual gifts for biblical church growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. DeVries

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the use of spiritual gifts for church growth, particularly in relation to the sovereign work of the Holy Spirit. The article begins with a definition of spiritual gifts and by highlighting their purpose for growing the church. This is followed by two practical considerations: How should Christian believers use spiritual gifts for church growth, and how should church leaders motivate gift use for this purpose? Since the Holy Spirit works though believers to build up the body of Christ, advocates of biblical church growth should seek to employ his means to motivate spiritual giftedness in the church.

  2. Spiritual gifts for biblical church growth

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    Brian A. DeVries

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the use of spiritual gifts for church growth, particularly in relation to the sovereign work of the Holy Spirit. The article begins with a definition of spiritual gifts and by highlighting their purpose for growing the church. This is followed by two practical considerations: How should Christian believers use spiritual gifts for church growth, and how should church leaders motivate gift use for this purpose? Since the Holy Spirit works though believers to build up the b...

  3. Exploratory Study of Spirituality and Psychosocial Growth in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymann, Linda S.; Fialkowski, Geraldine M.; Stewart-Sicking, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined spirituality, personality, and psychosocial growth among 216 students at a small university in Maryland. Results demonstrated that faith maturity predicted unique variance in purpose in life. There was a main effect observed for gender among faith scores, as well as an interaction effect between gender and year in school among…

  4. La Industria de Dulces

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    López Alejandro

    1941-08-01

    Full Text Available En Colombia producimos y consumimos los tres renglones de dulces en todas las regiones del país, aunque las proporciones de uno y otro son muy variables de región a región y el consumo de uno y otro varían con la región y hasta con las clases sociales. La miel se produce y consume en grandes cantidades en Boyacá, Cundinamarca, Santander, Nariño y Magdalena, para citarlos en orden descendente de consumo; mientras que son grandes productores y consumidores de panela, en orden también descendente, Antioquia, Santander, Caldas, Cundinamarca, Tolima, Nariño, Huila y Santanderes, Cundinamarca, Santander y Nariño consumen, pues, el dulce en forma de miel y de panela a la vez. El consumo de azúcar es peculiar de las clases acomodadas y refinadas y se acentúa, naturalmente, en las ciudades.

  5. Recovery Spirituality

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    Ernest Kurtz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A. and other secular, spiritual, and religious frameworks of long-term addiction recovery. The present paper explores the varieties of spiritual experience within A.A., with particular reference to the growth of a wing of recovery spirituality promoted within A.A. It is suggested that the essence of secular spirituality is reflected in the experience of beyond (horizontal and vertical transcendence and between (connection and mutuality and in six facets of spirituality (Release, Gratitude, Humility, Tolerance, Forgiveness, and a Sense of Being-at-home shared across religious, spiritual, and secular pathways of addiction recovery. The growing varieties of A.A. spirituality (spanning the “Christianizers” and “Seculizers” reflect A.A.’s adaptation to the larger diversification of religious experience and the growing secularization of spirituality across the cultural contexts within which A.A. is nested.

  6. Coming to America for Spiritual or Academic Growth? Experiences of International Students at One Christian School

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    Yin, Lishu

    2013-01-01

    The number of international students flocking to North American private Christian schools has continued to grow. The author examined the overall experiences of 67 international high school students studying at a private Christian school in South Carolina. Their frustrations and struggles with academic and spiritual growth in a new cross-cultural…

  7. Differences in the Perception of Growth in Spiritual Development between Freshmen and Seniors Attending an Assemblies of God Affiliated University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Paula R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose, Scope, and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to describe the perception of growth in spiritual development of undergraduate students attending an Assemblies of God affiliated university by examining the differences in the perception of spiritual development between freshmen and seniors. This quantitative study used a survey…

  8. Linking religion and spirituality with psychological well-being: examining self-actualisation, meaning in life, and personal growth initiative.

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    Ivtzan, Itai; Chan, Christine P L; Gardner, Hannah E; Prashar, Kiran

    2013-09-01

    Research largely shows that religion and spirituality have a positive correlation to psychological well-being. However, there has been a great deal of confusion and debate over their operational definitions. This study attempted to delineate the two constructs and categorise participants into different groups based on measured levels of religious involvement and spirituality. The groups were then scored against specific measures of well-being. A total of 205 participants from a wide range of religious affiliations and faith groups were recruited from various religious institutions and spiritual meetings. They were assigned to one of four groups with the following characteristics: (1) a high level of religious involvement and spirituality, (2) a low level of religious involvement with a high level of spirituality, (3) a high level of religious involvement with a low level of spirituality, and (4) a low level of religious involvement and spirituality. Multiple comparisons were made between the groups on three measures of psychological well-being: levels of self-actualisation, meaning in life, and personal growth initiative. As predicted, it was discovered that, aside from a few exceptions, groups (1) and (2) obtained higher scores on all three measures. As such, these results confirm the importance of spirituality on psychological well-being, regardless of whether it is experienced through religious participation.

  9. Spirituality, emotional distress, and post-traumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their partners: an actor-partner interdependence modeling approach.

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    Gesselman, Amanda N; Bigatti, Silvia M; Garcia, Justin R; Coe, Kathryn; Cella, David; Champion, Victoria L

    2017-10-01

    The association between spirituality and emotional health has been well documented in healthy individuals. A small literature has shown that spirituality plays a role in well-being for some breast cancer (BC) survivors; however, this link is virtually unexplored in partners/spouses of survivors. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between spirituality, emotional distress, and post-traumatic growth for BC survivors and their partners using a dyadic analyses approach. A total of 498 couples who were 3-8 years post-BC diagnosis were recruited from the Eastern Oncology Group database. For BC survivors and their partners, greater levels of spirituality were associated with increases in their own post-traumatic growth. There was no relation between BC and partner spirituality and their own emotional distress, but partner's spirituality was associated with reduced occurrence of intrusive thoughts in the BC survivor. In contrast, BC survivors' spirituality was found to be wholly unrelated to partner's mental health and adjustment. Following diagnosis and treatment, spirituality appears to associate with positive growth in BC survivors and their partners. However, BC survivor and partner spirituality seem to be ineffective at impacting the other's post-traumatic growth or emotional distress, with the exception of intrusive thoughts. Dyadic analysis takes into account the reciprocal influence of close relationships on health and is an important and under-utilized methodology in behavioral oncology research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Factors Associated With Post-Traumatic Growth, Quality of Life, and Spiritual Well-Being in Outpatients Undergoing Bone Marrow Transplantation: A Pilot Study.

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    Sinclair, Shane; Booker, Reanne; Fung, Tak; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Enns, Bert; Beamer, Kate; Ager, Naree

    2016-11-01

    To examine the relationships between spiritual, religious, and sociodemographic factors and post-traumatic growth, quality of life, and spiritual well-being in outpatients undergoing bone marrow and/or stem cell transplantation (BMSCT).
. Cross-sectional, descriptive, exploratory.
. Outpatient bone marrow transplantation clinic at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
. 100 patients (21 pre-BMSCT and 79 post-BMSCT) accrued consecutively via non-probability sampling.
. Study participants completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplantation (FACT-BMT), the Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI), the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp), and a demographic questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, t tests, and correlational analyses.
. Demographic variables, FACT-BMT scores, PTGI scores, FACIT-Sp scores. 
. The majority of participants identified themselves as being at least somewhat spiritual. Significant differences were noted between those who identified as being not religious at all versus having at least some religiosity in several subscales of the PTGI, as well as on the FACIT-Sp. Similarly, significant differences were observed between participants who identified as being not spiritual at all versus having at least some spirituality for several subscales on the PTGI. Most participants indicated they would be at least somewhat likely to recommend spiritual care to a new patient. 
. Most patients in this study within a publicly funded healthcare system self-identified with spirituality, used spiritual resources, and would recommend that other patients undergoing BMSCT seek the support of a spiritual care professional or chaplain. Spirituality, along with practical and relational factors, had a positive impact on certain aspects of post-traumatic growth, quality of life, and spiritual and physical well-being.
. Oncology nurses are

  11. Palliative care and spirituality

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    Narayanasamy Aru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical junctures in patients′ lives such as chronic illnesses and advanced diseases may leave the persons in a state of imbalance or disharmony of body, mind and spirit. With regard to spirituality and healing, there is a consensus in literature about the influence of spirituality on recovery and the ability to cope with and adjust to the varying and demanding states of health and illness. Empirical evidence suggests that spiritual support may act as an adjunct to the palliative care of those facing advanced diseases and end of life. In this article, the author draws from his empirical work on spirituality and culture to develop a discourse on palliative care and spirituality in both secular and non-secular settings. In doing so, this paper offers some understanding into the concept of spirituality, spiritual needs and spiritual care interventions in palliative care in terms of empirical evidence. Responding to spiritual needs could be challenging, but at the same time it could be rewarding to both healthcare practitioner (HCP and patient in that they may experience spiritual growth and development. Patients may derive great health benefits with improvements in their quality of life, resolutions and meaning and purpose in life. It is hoped that the strategies for spiritual support outlined in this paper serve as practical guidelines to HCPs for development of palliative care in South Asia.

  12. Stress coping strategies, spirituality, social support and posttraumatic growth in a Polish sample of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

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    Rzeszutek, Marcin; Oniszczenko, Włodzimierz; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the level of posttraumatic growth (PTG) and its relationship to the level of stress coping strategies, spirituality and social support among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (n = 250). The level of PTG was measured by the Polish adaptation of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. Stress coping strategies were evaluated by the Polish adaptation of the Mini-COPE Inventory. Spirituality was measured by the Self-Description Questionnaire. Social support was assessed with the Berlin Social Support Scales. Stress coping strategies (return to religion, acceptance), spirituality and social support (need for support) were significantly related to the level of PTG among participants. Despite evidence of a beneficial relationship between PTG and the course of RA, little empirical attention has been paid to the factors associated with PTG among this patient group. Given the substantial health-related benefits associated with PTG among RA patients, it is important to further explore the phenomena of PTG among RA patients.

  13. Shadows Along the Spiritual Pathway.

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    Humphrey, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Contemporary spirituality discourses tend to assume that a canopy of light and love overarches all spiritual pathways. Unfortunately, the dark side of humanity cannot be spirited away so easily, and aberrations of personal spiritual development, interpersonal spiritual relationships and new spiritual movements can often be traced to the denial, repression and return of our dark side. Transpersonal psychology offers a way of approaching, reframing and redeeming the unconscious depths of our psyche, with its metaphors of shadows and daimons on the one hand, and its therapeutic practices for symbolically containing and transcending polarities on the other. In its absence, any spirituality which eulogises holistic growth is likely to engender the reverse effect.

  14. Spirituality in adolescent patients.

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    Weaver, Meaghann S; Wratchford, Dale

    2017-07-01

    Adolescence, the transition between childhood and adulthood, represents a time of rapid biological, neurocognitive, and psychosocial changes. These changes have important implications for the development and evolution of adolescent spirituality, particularly for adolescents with chronic or life-limiting illnesses. To contribute positively to adolescent spiritual formation, palliative care teams benefit from understanding the normative changes expected to occur during adolescence. This paper provides a narrative review of adolescent spirituality while recognizing the role of religious, familial, and cultural influences on spiritual development during the teenage years. By giving explicit attention to the contextual norms surrounding adolescence and still recognizing each adolescent-aged patient as unique, palliative care teams can help adolescents transition toward meaningful and sustainable spiritual growth. This paper reviews the clinical and research implications relevant to integrating adolescent spiritual health as part of comprehensive palliative care.

  15. Perceived and Actual Change in Religion/Spirituality in Cancer Survivors: Longitudinal Relationships With Distress and Perceived Growth.

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    Trevino, Kelly M; Naik, Aanand D; Moye, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    This observational cohort study examined the relationships between actual and perceived R/S change at 12 months post cancer diagnosis with depression, anxiety, and perceived growth 6 months later. Older adult military veteran cancer survivors ( n = 111) completed self-report surveys at 6, 12, and 18 months post cancer diagnosis. Perceived R/S change was assessed at 12 months postdiagnosis with "Have your religious or spiritual beliefs changed as a result of your cancer" (more R/S, less R/S, other). Actual R/S change was assessed at 6 and 12 months postdiagnosis on a single item, "I have faith in God or a Higher Power" ( no, somewhat, yes ). A notable minority reported perceived (18.9%) and actual (14.4%) change. Greater perceived R/S change predicted more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety and greater perceived growth at 18 months postdiagnosis; perceived growth was positively associated with anxiety. Cancer survivors who report R/S changes may benefit from spiritual and/or psychological support.

  16. Sensory shelf life of dulce de leche.

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    Garitta, L; Hough, G; Sánchez, R

    2004-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine the sensory cutoff points for dulce de leche (DL) critical descriptors, both for defective off-flavors and for storage changes in desirable attributes, and to estimate the shelf life of DL as a function of storage temperature. The critical descriptors used to determine the cutoff points were plastic flavor, burnt flavor, dark color, and spreadability. Linear correlations between sensory acceptability and trained panel scores were used to determine the sensory failure cutoff point for each descriptor. To estimate shelf life, DL samples were stored at 25, 37, and 45 degrees C. Plastic flavor was the first descriptor to reach its cutoff point at 25 degrees C and was used for shelf-life calculations. Plastic flavor vs. storage time followed zero-order reaction rate. Shelf-life estimations at different temperatures were 109 d at 25 degrees C, 53 d at 37 degrees C, and 9 d at 45 degrees C. The activation energy, necessary to calculate shelf lives at different temperatures, was 14,370 +/- 2080 cal/mol.

  17. Geografía dulce de Colombia

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    Julián Estrada

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available No sin razón en 1976 Germán Castro Caicedo tituló Colombia amarga a una recopilación de informaciones  periodísticas sobre la situación social de nuestro país, las cuales, sin lugar a dudas, justificaban dicho título. Diez años más tarde (diciembre de 1986, el Instituto Distrital de Cultura y Turismo de Bogotá organiza en el Planetario Distrital una conspicua exposición divulgada bajo el nombre de Geografía Dulce de Colombia. Aun cuando se trata de dos realizaciones diametralmente opuestas, en donde la denominación de la primera posee una validez inobjetable, es nuestra intención, con este comentario, no solamente justificar el acertado nombre asignado a la mencionada exposición, sino también rescatar su valioso contenido como expresión sociocultural de las diferentes regiones geográficas que conforman el territorio colombiano.

  18. A Sociological Look at the Growth of the Emerging Spirituality in Tabriz

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    N. Jaberian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of a large number of people to the emerging spiritual sect (hereafter mentioned as “the M sect” in the current study indicates a socio-cultural trend and the current study attempts to identify its causes and effective factors. Qualitative methodology in the form of Grounded Theory has been applied. Data were collected through distributing a semi-structured questionnaire in an in-depth interview from fourteen participants. Findings constitute a two-step paradigm model where the dimensions and major elements include: A preliminary conditions: stresses of religious life in the modern age, lack of acceptability in the traditional religious culture, emotional detachment; B causal conditions: spiritual needs, epistemic crisis, physical or mental illnesses; C1 The central phenomenon and context: the feeling of distress with regard to intensity, continuity, and diversity; D1 Strategy: reference to traditional religious texts, medical treatment, psychotherapy, counseling, exercise; E1 intervening conditions: lack of acceptability in the religious culture; F1 Result: inefficient or partially efficient of strategy and continuity of the feeling of distress; C2 the feeling of distress with desperation; D2 choosing the spiritual method proposed by M; E2 value system, religious socialization and lack of congruence with the religious culture, the congruence of the sect with the general culture, having fresh viewpoints and the acceptability of explanations provided by the sect, objective reports on the effectiveness of the practices in the sect, open membership, and the quality and quantity of the network of relations with members in the sect; F2 Conversion that has instrumental and ultimate interpretations.

  19. The Transport of Gmelina Logs on the Rio Dulce

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    Ensminger, J.T.; Martines, R.; Perlack, B.; Ranney, J.

    1997-02-01

    The Rio Dulce National Park is one of Guatemala's major environmental assets. The park contains the remaining remnants of an eastern Guatemalan tropical rainforest which has good but fast deteriorating value for the development of the ecotourism industry. The governmenial objective for the region as stated in the Master Plan for the park is ecotourism development and protection of biodiversity. The decisions to be made concerning the long-term, sustainable use of the natural resources of the Rio Dulce region appear to be directed by existing environmental laws and the Rio Dulce Master Plan. However, the wording of these instruments is ambiguous and lacks specific definitions and criteria for making necessary determinations. This, in combination with lack of enforcement in the region, has led to extensive disparity in interpretation of the laws and uncontrolled, conflicting actions by individuals and organizations.

  20. Lenses; systems; sensitive; leadership; models; integral; spiritual; images; evolve; states; stages; consciousness; power; force; determinants; mind; genius; belief systems; evolution; spiritual growth; rationality; attitude

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    Jacobus C. van der Merwe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lenses on spirituality and being church; the road ahead for the Netherdutch Reformed Church of Africa (NRCA. At this point of time the Netherdutch Reformed Church of Africa (NRCA is facing the seemingly unsolvable dilemma of not being able to handle diversity in a positive manner. By applying three lenses to the current impasse with regards to the church’s struggle with diversity, this article aims at providing an answer to the question of how to proceed. The first lens addresses the challenge to maintain spiritual health and harmony in the midst of differences and tension in the church. The theory behind systems sensitive leadership as lens serves as the guideline to achieve the necessary spiritual health that the church needs in such challenging times. The second lens explores the inner Christian spiritual path in a both developmental and comprehensive way. Drawing on the work of Paul Smith this lens sets forth the developmental framework by which Christians grow inwardly in their understanding of Jesus and his teachings. The third lens is a view on a practice whereby the validity of intellectual positions, statements, or ideologies could be appraised as an innate quality in any subject. This lens opens a unique perspective which provides not only a new understanding of humanity’s journey in the universe, but also serves as a guide to were we and the whole cosmos are on our personal journeys to become who we could be. The vision that is provided by these three lenses has the capacity not only to serve as guidelines, but also to provide the tools to handle the challenges the church has to face on the road a head.

  1. Preference mapping of dulce de leche commercialized in Brazilian markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaze, L V; Oliveira, B R; Ferrao, L L; Granato, D; Cavalcanti, R N; Conte Júnior, C A; Cruz, A G; Freitas, M Q

    2015-03-01

    Dulce de leche samples available in the Brazilian market were submitted to sensory profiling by quantitative descriptive analysis and acceptance test, as well sensory evaluation using the just-about-right scale and purchase intent. External preference mapping and the ideal sensory characteristics of dulce de leche were determined. The results were also evaluated by principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, partial least squares regression, artificial neural networks, and logistic regression. Overall, significant product acceptance was related to intermediate scores of the sensory attributes in the descriptive test, and this trend was observed even after consumer segmentation. The results obtained by sensometric techniques showed that optimizing an ideal dulce de leche from the sensory standpoint is a multidimensional process, with necessary adjustments on the appearance, aroma, taste, and texture attributes of the product for better consumer acceptance and purchase. The optimum dulce de leche was characterized by high scores for the attributes sweet taste, caramel taste, brightness, color, and caramel aroma in accordance with the preference mapping findings. In industrial terms, this means changing the parameters used in the thermal treatment and quantitative changes in the ingredients used in formulations. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Spiritist "passe" (Spiritual healing) on growth of bacterial cultures.

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    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; de Oliveira, Renata Ferreira; Gonçalves, Juliane Piasseschi de Bernardin; Ueda, Suely Mitoi Ykko; Mimica, Lycia Mara Jenne; Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas Granero

    2013-12-01

    Biofield therapies are approaches that harness energy fields to influence the human body. These therapies encompass Reiki, Qigong, Therapeutic Touch, Johrei and Spiritist "passe", among others. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial growth in two groups of cultures subjected to biofield therapy (Spiritist "passe" and laying on of hands (LOH)) in four situations (no intention, intention to inhibit bacterial growth, intention to promote growth, and influence of a negative factor) and compare them with a "no LOH/no treatment" group. Bacterial cultures (Escherichia coli ATCC) were randomized and allocated into three groups: Spiritist "passe", "LOH", and "no LOH". Bacterial growth was assessed using the McFarland Nephelometer Scale. A One-way ANOVA was performed to determine group differences in bacterial growth at 48h, and at 1 week after each situation. A total of 11 Spiritist "passe" healers, 10 LOH laymen and "no LOH" tubes were assessed. Under the intention to inhibit bacterial growth condition, statistically significant differences were found between the Spiritist "passe" and "no LOH" Groups (p=0.002 after 48h, and p=0.008 after one week) and also between the Spiritist "passe" and "LOH" Groups (p=0.005 after 48h, and p=0.009 after one week). No statistically significant difference was detected for the other situations tested (no intention, intention to promote growth and influence of a negative factor). We concluded that Spiritist "passe" effectively inhibited growth in bacterial cultures compared to LOH with intention or no LOH. Further studies comparing different intentions and types of LOH in cultures of cells and microorganisms are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dormancy break in Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb. Benth. seeds

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    Francisco Elder Carlos Bezerra Pereira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to evaluate different methods for breaking dormancy in seeds of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb. Benth., arboreal species of multiple use in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil. The treatments were: control – intact seeds (T1; immersion in water until it reaches 80 °C (T2, and 100 °C (T3, concentrated sulfuric acid for five minutes (T4, 10 minutes (T5 , and 15 minutes (T6, mechanical scarification with sandpaper number 80 (T7, mechanical scarification with sandpaper number 80 + immersion in water for six hours (T8, and for 12 hours (T9, soaking in water for 24 hours (T10, and for 48 hours (T11. The characteristics evaluated were such: emergency, mean emergency time, shoot length, root length, number of leaves, leaf area and total dry matter. The best method for breaking dormancy of seeds of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb. Benth. is mechanical scarification with sandpaper number 80.

  4. Our New Cathedrals: Spirituality and Old-Growth Forests in Western Australia

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    David Worth

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years in Western Australia (WA, there has been heated debate about the future use of the remaining karri and jarrah forests in the south-west of the State. This debate revolves around policy proposals from two social movements: one wants to preserve as much of the remaining old-growth forests as possible, and an opposing movement supports a continued

  5. Mysticism and spirituality

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    Nils G. Holm

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available How does the popular correspond to the grand terms of the title? Are not mysticism and spirituality something very exclusive, reserved for a few individuals? No they are not, as this presentation of both the author's own studies and the research of others will provide a different picture of these two concepts. Mysticism and spirituality are notions that are very difficult to define. Traditionally mysticism has been regarded as a way to reach the inner dimensions of human life, dimensions where man even achieves unity with the Divine Being. Such traditions have been found in all the major religions, and since the times of William James a hundred years ago, the features of mysticism in various religions have been analysed. Spirituality is a concept that can hold various meanings. It has often been associated with religious traditions where inner life and its growth are emphasized. These include, in particular, various schools, orders and movements that aim at cultivating a deeper spiritual life. In its more recent use, the term spirituality has, to a fairly large extent, been dissociated from religion and has become a notion that seeks to grasp the searching of modern man for ethics and norms in a globalised world, where pollution is accelerating and where stress and entertainment disrupt the inner harmony of people. Keywords

  6. Spirituality in nursing practice.

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    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  7. Embodied Spirituality

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    Trousdale, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the concept of embodied spirituality from early Celtic traditions through the British medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to the present day. A "high theology" of the body in early Christianity and early Christian understandings of the relation among body, soul and spirit gave way to the influences of Greek thought with its…

  8. Una visión sostenibilista sobre la escasez del agua dulce en el mundo

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    Escribano Rodríguez de Robles, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    El acceso al agua dulce ha sido a lo largo de la historia de la humanidad una fuente de poder o de conflicto. También conocemos experiencias desafortunadas de antiguas civilizaciones poderosas que llegan al colapso por escasez o por una mala gestión del agua dulce. El objetivo de este estudio es el análisis multidisciplinar de la escasez de agua dulce en el mundo. Para aproximarnos, desarrollamos algunos factores, no todos, sin perder de vista el marco de la sostenibilidad: el concepto de esc...

  9. Travel as a Transformational Spiritual Event.

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    Prater, Lyn S; Riley, Cheryl; Garner, Shelby L; Spies, Lori A

    2016-11-01

    There is a philosophical connection between elements of travel and elements of spirituality. Nurses can develop spiritual intelligence, hone transcultural skills, and develop cultural humility through travel. Concepts of spiritual intelligence are incorporated to distinguish spirituality from religion. This discussion is to describe the spiritual attributes of travel through exploration of unique cultural sameness and differences, stepping out of one's routine, experiences of solitude, and the application to nursing. Venues such as study abroad, mission trips, cultural exchange opportunities, and service learning projects all can provide meaningful times of transformation, spiritual growth, learning new ways of doing things, and of being in the world. Nurses who integrate these practices into the care they provide daily will be enriched personally and rewarded with improved outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Evaluation of Aguas Dulces Black sands reserves, Rocha, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrando, L.; Bossi, J.; Maldonado, S.; Schipilov; Campal, N.

    2003-01-01

    Black sands data in Aguas Dulces (Rocha) studied by ANCAP during 60 were reanalyzed with geological criterion in order to redefine the prefactibility of economic explotation with the present infrastructure and world market conditions.The sand deposits is limited between a high slope palaeocost and the ocean, with medium depth of 10m and 2% of useful minerals:ilmenite, rutile, monazite and zircon.Mineral reserves expressed in thousands of tons are of 3 kinds:proved (3.600), probable (5.500) and possible (16.000=.Demonstrated reserves (proved + probable) allow to estimate a value of U$S 650 million, taking in account year 2000 prices. A factory to process about 7 millions ton of raw sand needs an investment of U$S 13 million and will produce a sale of U$S 8 million per year

  11. A Lysozyme with Antifungal Activity from Pithecellobium dulce Seeds

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    Ploypat Niyomploy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A protein of an apparent molecular mass of 14.4 kDa with antifungal activity was isolated from the seeds of Pithecellobium dulce using extraction with 100 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH=8.0, precipitation with 80 % ammonium sulfate, and bioassay purification via Resource Q anion exchange chromatography and Superdex 200 gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein was putatively identified by tandem mass spectrometry with Mascot database searching, with the partial amino acid sequences showing a high degree of similarity to chicken egg white lysozyme. This putative plant lysozyme expressed antifungal activity with a rather high thermal stability of up to 80 °C for 15 min (at pH=8.0. It exerted an antifungal action towards Macrophomina phaseolina but displayed no antifungal activity against two other isolates, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora and Fusarium avenaceum.

  12. Secular Schools, Spirituality and Maori Values

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    Fraser, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    New Zealand has had free, state, secular education since 1877, but just what is meant by secularism is changing. Since the 1980s the growth of Maori education initiatives has mushroomed and these place emphasis on Maori values and beliefs, including spirituality. In addition, in 1999 a definition and statement on spirituality appeared in the…

  13. Spiritual Dynamics Involved with Overseas Student Teaching: A Qualitative Analysis

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    Firmin, Michael W.; Firmin, Ruth L.; MacKay, Brenda B.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a qualitative, phenomenological research study that explored the spiritual dynamics of 13 overseas student teachers. Overall, participants in our sample described spiritual growth on two levels. First, they related that spiritual development often followed an inside-out pattern. In explaining this phenomenon, students…

  14. Spiritual care in Christian parish nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dover, Leslie; Pfeiffer, Jane Bacon

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a substantive theory to explain the process parish nurses use to provide spiritual care to parishioners in Christian churches in a context where patients and nurses share a common set of values. Despite a surge of interest in spirituality and spiritual care in nursing, consensus is lacking on how care should be conceptualized and provided. Grounded theory method was used to explore and describe the processes 10 American parish nurses experienced and used as they gave spiritual care. Data were collected between 1998 and 2001. Participants were interviewed and audiotapes transcribed verbatim. Constant comparative methods were used to analyse more than 50 separate incidents reported by the nurses. From its initial emergence as the core category, 'Bringing God Near' became a Basic Social Process theory of giving spiritual care for these parish nurses. This Basic Social Process became a theory through writing theoretical memos that described how the 'main concern' of the nurses to give spiritual care was resolved. Phases within the process include: trusting God, forming relationships with the patient/family, opening to God, activating/nurturing faith and recognizing spiritual renewal or growth. The essence is bringing God near to people as they face health challenges. Findings from the study and spiritual care literature are integrated in the discussion. The parish nurses' spiritual challenge is to respond to what God is directing the nurse to be and do to strengthen people spiritually. This spiritual care can help restore the patient's sense of well-being, and encourage growth in faith. Those interested in providing and teaching spiritual care in the church context will find this theory useful as a conceptual guide.

  15. Spiritual Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Rambeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Foucault, the uprising of the Iranian people in the seventies reveals how much the political force of Islam is due precisely to the fact that it is not principally located in the field of politics, but in that of ethics. Religion (Shiite Islam appears as the guarantee of real change in the very mode of existence. This spiritual politics is marginalized by Marxism, where it is understood as a discontinuity in relation to proper politics, given that the latter is necessarily linked to a strategic rationalization. By indicating, at this juncture of what is intolerable, the living source and the critical impulse of the Foucauldian ethics, this spiritual politics also leads to recognize in the concept of “subjectivation” a dimension that might escape the circle of freedom as determined by a total immanence to power. This conceptual possibility is highly present in the aporias of the Foucauldian concept of the “relation to oneself”, both as a first condition of governmentality and the ultimate point of resistance against any governmentality. It thus reveals the difficulties in relating political to ethical subjectivation.

  16. On Spirituality and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    It is a mistake to ignore the scientific study of spirituality. Research examining the structure and function of concepts such as "spirit" and "spirituality" is likely to reveal new insights into the relationship between a functional spirituality and other thinking skills, including creativity. The study of spirituality should not stand alone as a…

  17. Primordial Spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Waaijman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the primordial spirituality of the Bible, as expressed in names, narratives and prayers. It looks at the nomadic families of Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebecca, Jacob, Lea and Rachel, moving around from Mesopotamia via Canaan into Egypt and vice versa (see Gn 11:31–32; 12:4–5; 27:43; 28:10; 29:4; Gn 24 and 29–31. It analyses their experiences, covering the span between birth and death and listens to their parental concerns about education as survival. It also follows their journeys along the margins of the deserts. It shares their community life as it takes shape in mutual solidarity, mercy and compassion.

  18. Usage of the milk whey originated from Serro cheese to manufacture Dulce de Leche: economic viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Regina Lima

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The State of Minas Gerais is known for being the most traditional cheese producer in Brazil and part of those products are artisanal. About 90% of the milk used to produce cheese results in whey. Whey processing is of great importance due to its nutritional quality, volume and pollutant capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the economic viability of dulce de leche production with the addition of whey  from Serro cheese production. Formulations of dulce de leche were elaborated added with whey concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50%. The total investment for the production of the dulce de leche was R$359,26 (US$110.72. The fixed cost was R$18,00 (US$5.55. The variable costs stayed between R$81,07 (US$24.98 and R$96,91 (US$29.87. The sales price varied between R$5,36 (US$1.65 and R$5,47 (US$1.69. The performance indicators showed that the formulation with the highest percentage of whey added was more profitable. The profitability was approximately 27% for the formulation with the lowest percentage of whey added. The return time for the investment was 4 months for all the formulations. The equilibrium point for dulce de leche production is at the sales of 8 units. It can be concluded that it is economically viable to utilize whey for the production of the dulce de leche.

  19. [Water birds from Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary, Jalisco, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vázquez, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Waterbird abundance, and seasonal and spatial distribution, were studied in two natural water pools at Jalisco, Mexico, from December 1997 through November 1998. Maximum monthly abundance in Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary was 86 471 birds (29 686 in Agua Dulce and 56 785 in Ermitaño), with a total cummulative abundance of 179 808 individuals (66 976 in Agua Dulce and 112 832 in Ermitaño). A total of 87 waterbirds species were recorded, 78 in Agua Dulce and 73 in Ermitaño. The higher species richness and abundance was observed during winter, when migratory species arrived. Most species prefered shallow waters, except seabirds which prefered protected areas such as dunes in Agua Dulce. Other groups, like clucks and related species. prefered low salinity areas, for example in the south-east area of Ermitaño. The higher abundance of the shorehirds was found when the water level on the estuary was low. Herons were seen often at areas with high salinity and influenced by tides (e.g. mouth of Ermitaño).

  20. Guatemala strives for environmental and economic sustainability in the Rio Dulce region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlack, Robert D.; Ensminger, J. Timothy; Martinez, Romeo

    2001-01-01

    Conditions in Guatemala's Rio Dulce National Park (RDNP) present an immediate decision-making challenge concerning the reversal of current destructive environmental trends, and in establishing policies for restoration, protection, and sustainable use. This article summarises results of environmental assessment activities undertaken at three levels: an environmental impact assessment (EIA) of a proposed industrial forestry activity, an environmental assessment of management options for the Rio Dulce National Park, and water management planning for the Rio Dulce/Lago Izabal watershed. A key result of the EIA was to prohibit construction of a barge terminal within the boundaries of the park because it could set a precedent for future development. Management options for the park focused on establishing land-use controls, dealing with river transport more effectively, and identifying funding mechanisms to implement solutions. At the watershed scale, a strategic approach was recommended to identify priority issues for initiating change toward sustainability in the region. (author)

  1. Understanding Spiritual Experience in Christian Spirituality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A spiritual experience for some means a mere fabrication of the mind. For others it is pathological and the consequence of psychiatric disturbances and psychological disorders. Others acknowledge that certain role-players are present when spiritual experiences occur. However, the identification of the involvement of these ...

  2. Spirituality and business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandram, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    In Chap. 2, Sharda Nandram provides an overview of issues on spirituality and some definitions of spirituality in both nonacademic settings and academic literature. She makes a distinction between inner and outer spirituality. She explains the types of knowledge based on the work of Sri Aurobindo

  3. Spiritual Development with Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponds, Kenneth T.

    2014-01-01

    Research on positive psychology indicates that spiritual strengths can be important in helping individuals overcome crisis and loss. Encounters with difficult challenges of life inspire people to think more deeply about their spiritual and religious beliefs and the meaning of life. Spirituality, faith, and religious roots have been shown to be…

  4. Dulce María Serret…paradigma para la pedagogía musical cubana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Severiano Alfonso Lolo-Troisi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article has to do with a musical pedagogy’s emblematic figure Cuban, the pedagogic Dulce María Serret, that highlights during the first half of the century XXin James of Cuba for the work developed at Música’s Conservatory Provincial of Orient, first conservatory for the teaching of music itself, founded by her in James of Cuba. Dulce María Serret’s figure must be appraised and studied like example for musicians’s future generations to balance the historic debt with evolution and development of musical pedagogy Cuban.

  5. Nursing and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care.

  6. Effects of Spirituality on Health-Related Quality of Life in Men with HIV/AIDS: Implications for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Marsha Wiggins; Uphold, Constance R.; Shehan, Constance L.; Reid, Kimberly J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the association of spirituality and health-related quality of life among 226 HIV-positive men. Two measures of spirituality were used: the Spiritual Growth subscale from the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (S. N. Walker, K. R. Sechrist, & N. J. Pender, 1987) and the Spirituality subscale of the HIV Coping Instrument (L.…

  7. Writing Gender in Revolutionary Times: Male Identity and Ideology in Dulce Chacon's "La voz dormida"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Inma Civico

    2009-01-01

    The historical content of "La voz dormida" by Dulce Chacon gives us unique insight into the formation of male subjectivities during the ideological and physical struggle that followed the establishment of Franco's regime. The second part of the novel which centers around the figure of the "maquis," allows us to investigate the construction of a…

  8. Preliminary Sampling to assess the grade of contamination of Rio Dulce waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, H.; Ramirez, Patricia; Gudiel, E.; Pinto, Kalina; Giron, A. de; Molina, Karla; Benavides, R.

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate data from measurements of physico-chemical parameters and microbiological parameters. Because of sources of contamination like petroleum residues, and derivated products are out of the limits accepted at international level. In addition to this contaminatio was found high levels of microbiological load that are causing harms to ecosystems of the river Dulce

  9. La diversidad marina del golfo dulce, pacífico sur de Costa Rica: amenazas de conservación

    OpenAIRE

    Morales-Ramírez, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    En Golfo Dulce la diversidad marina es muy alta, desde bacterias hasta mamíferos marinos, incluyendo aves costeras y marinas. Con 1028 especies reportadas de la literatura, Golfo Dulce contribuye con 21,5% del total de especies (4745) reportadas para la costa Pacífica del país. La mayor diversidad la muestran gusanos marinos, peces, macrocrustáceos y moluscos. Si se sigue el índice de diversidad lineal (# especies/km lineal), Golfo Dulce alcanza 5,24 especies por km lineal, un poco menos de l...

  10. Spiritual pain and suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunjes, George B

    2010-01-01

    Spiritual pain/suffering is commonly experienced by persons with life-limiting illness and their families. Physical pain itself can be exacerbated by non-physical causes such as fear, anxiety, grief, unresolved guilt, depression and unmet spiritual meets. Likewise, the inability to manage physical pain well can be due to emotional and spiritual needs. This is why a holistic, interdisciplinary assessment of pain and suffering is required for each patient and family. The mind, body and spirit are understood in relationship to each other and, in those cases, in relationship to a deity or deities are important to understand. Cultural interpretations of pain and suffering may conflict with the goals of palliative care. Understanding the spiritual framework of the patient and family can help to assure that the physical and spiritual suffering of the patient can be eliminated to provide a peaceful death. Spiritual practices may help in the management of physical pain.

  11. Education to spirituality

    OpenAIRE

    Novotný, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to create a pedagogical concept of the education for spirituality. I try to map the various views of human spirituality. The spirituality is one of the important philosophy topics, so I dedicated this view most. Next is the psychology, within witch I strive to grab this term in a scientific way. I also notice the changes in the perception of the term spirituality, namely in the relation to the religion, as well as to the usage of this term, which is equivalent to the p...

  12. Spirituality in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Tirri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the concept of spirituality in the educational framework is discussed. The concepts of religion and spirituality are compared. The psychological view of spirituality is presented with a new suggested intelligence type: spiritual intelligence. The educational view emphasizes spiritual sensitivity as a universal human ability that needs to be developed through education. The sociological view of spirituality explores it as an expression of postsecular religiosity. Empirical studies indicate that an increasing number of people­ now prefer to call themselves ‘spiritual’ rather than ‘religious’. This trend seems to be more present in some European countries, for example, in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Finland. Empirical studies on spirituality are reviewed and discussed. A special emphasis is given to the Finnish research findings related to the spirituality of a new generation or young adults. It is argued that understanding spirituality as an expression of postsecular religiosity gives more room for young adults to participate in communicative action concerning religion. This would promote a discursive religiousness in the spirit of Jürgen Habermas, in which a plurality of religious beliefs and practices are acknowledged and a dialogical and inter-religious approach is advocated.

  13. Scheme study of separation and concentration of heavy minerals from the black sand in Aguas dulces beach - Rocha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujica, H.; Marotta, L.

    1968-12-01

    This work is about a study of separation and concentration of heavy minerals from the black sand in Aguas dulces beach - Rocha. The beneficial minerals in that prospected zone are: ilmenite, zircon, rutile and monazite, associated with gangue minerals

  14. Pastoral care, spirituality, and religion in palliative care journals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, M.A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten

    2004-01-01

    With the growth and development of palliative care, interest in pastoral care, spirituality, and religion also seems to be growing. The aim of this article is to review the topic of pastoral care, spirituality, and religion appearing in the journals of palliative care, between January 1984 and

  15. Spirituality and Loss: Approaches for Counseling Grieving Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muselman, Dannette M.; Wiggins, Marsha I.

    2012-01-01

    The death of a loved one has serious implications for adolescent growth and development. The authors review relevant research on the grief process and spirituality in adolescence, and they give a rationale for integrating spirituality into adolescent grief work. By way of a case illustration, they draw implications for counselors' use of…

  16. Freedom and Spirituality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vintges, K.; Taylor, D.

    2011-01-01

    Spirituality is an idiosyncratic concept in the work of Foucault, which might best be characterized as an "intensity without a ‘spirit’". To understand Foucault's specific concept of spirituality, we have to take into account some basic themes of his oeuvre, especially of his later work, that is,

  17. Spirituality in Logotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrullah Okan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Frankl wrote that he needed to find meaning in his life so that he could sustain his life physically, psychologically, and spiritually. In other words, when an individual understands meaning in life, these three dimensions will be in a healthy interaction. The spiritual dimension and the other two dimensions have healing power. Therefore, it will become even easier for a person who is aware of the spiritual side and acts with this consciousness to find meaning. One of the most effective elements in finding meaning is spirituality. Studies have shown that spirituality helps people find meaning in their lives and even has an important effect in defeating the fear of death. In this respect, logotherapy does not reject spirituality and religion but rather encourages their use. This study examines the perspective of religion and spirituality in logotherapy and touches on the work done in this area. The spiritual point of view and applications of logotherapy, which center on finding meaning in the final analysis, are included in this study.

  18. PENGETAHUAN SPIRITUAL YOGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Dayuh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The education paradigm emhasizes the complete balance of intelectual, emotional, and spiritual potencies. The spiritual one becomes more importantwhen the influence of materialism, hedonism, and pragmatism have becoming significant. To face it self-control as taught in Yogasutra Patanjali is crucial.

  19. Screening Patient Spirituality and Spiritual Needs in Oncology Nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, René; Schep-Akkerman, Annemiek; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To select 2 appropriate spiritual assessment tools and evaluate these by involving oncology nurses. Background. Spirituality is recognized as an important domain of cancer care. At admission, integration of spiritual assessment seems necessary. It is unclear what kind of spiritual assessment

  20. Screening patient spirituality and spiritual needs in oncology nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R. van; Schep-Akkerman, A.E.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van

    2013-01-01

    AIM.: To select 2 appropriate spiritual assessment tools and evaluate these by involving oncology nurses. BACKGROUND.: Spirituality is recognized as an important domain of cancer care. At admission, integration of spiritual assessment seems necessary. It is unclear what kind of spiritual assessment

  1. A new subspecies of sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos, from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Bessesen,Brooke; Galbreath,Gary

    2017-01-01

    We describe a distinctive new subspecies of sea snake from the occasionally anoxic inner-basin waters of Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, based on combined data garnered between 2010 and 2017 for 154 specimens, 123 free-ranging and 31 museum-held. The yellow sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos Bessesen & Galbreath, subsp. n., is diagnosed by a notably smaller body size and nearly uniform yellow coloration, which contrasts with the black and yellow striae and tail spots or bands typical of t...

  2. Sensory evaluation of "dulce de leche" with coffee and whey using different affective data analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Oliveira Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to evaluate the acceptance of "dulce de leche" with coffee and whey. The results were analyzed through response surface, ANOVA, test of averages, histograms, and preference map correlating the global impression data with results of physical, physiochemical and sensory analysis. The response surface methodology, by itself, was not enough to find the best formulation. For ANOVA, test of averages, and preference map it was observed that the consumers' favorite "dulce de leche" were those of formulation 1 (10% whey and 1% coffee and 2 (30% whey and 1% coffee, followed by formulation 9 (20% whey and 1.25% coffee. The acceptance of samples 1 and 2 was influenced by the higher acceptability in relation to the flavor and for presenting higher pH, L*, and b* values. It was observed that samples 1 and 2 presented higher purchase approval score and higher percentages of responses for the 'ideal' category in terms of sweetness and coffee flavor. It was found that consumers preferred the samples with low concentrations of coffee independent of the concentration of whey thus enabling the use of whey and coffee in the manufacture of dulce de leche, obtaining a new product.

  3. The spirituality of student teachers: a blind spot?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. de Klerk-Luttig

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article, which is framed in a Christian perspective, argues the importance of creating a space to nurture the spirituality of student teachers since that colours the entire educational experience. Teacher education ought to be done in an environment which is conducive not only to intellectual growth, but also to spiritual growth. First, the concept of spirituality is briefly explained. The particular experiences of a lecturer in the Philosophy of Education, who is attempting to provide support for the spiritual dimension of students by challenging them to explore some of the fundamental questions of life, form the central part of the article. Ways are suggested of not only acknowledging the spirituality of education students, but also nurturing and deepening it. Finally, suggestions for further research are outlined.

  4. Spirituality and spiritual care in and around childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan; Hall, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence points to childbirth as a spiritually felt meaningful occasion. Although growing literature and development of guidelines charge the midwife to provide spiritual care felt spiritual experiences are not addressed. There is need to revisit contemporary approaches to spiritual care in midwifery lest something of significance becomes lost in policy rhetoric. The aim of this discussion paper is to bring to the surface what is meant by spiritual care and spiritual experiences, to increase awareness about spirituality in childbirth and midwifery and move beyond the constraints of structured defined protocols. The authors' own studies and other's research that focuses on the complex contextual experiences of childbirth related to spirituality are discussed in relation to the growing interest in spiritual care assessments and guidelines. There is a growing presence in the literature about how spirituality is a concern to the wellbeing of human beings. Although spirituality remains on the peripheral of current discourse about childbirth. Spiritual care guidelines are now being developed. However spiritual care guidelines do not appear to acknowledge the lived-experience of childbirth as spiritually meaningful. Introduction of spiritual care guidelines into midwifery practice do not address the spiritual meaningful significance of childbirth. If childbirth spirituality is relegated to a spiritual care tick box culture this would be a travesty. The depth of spirituality that inheres uniquely in the experience of childbirth would remain silenced and hidden. Spiritual experiences are felt and beckon sensitive and tactful practice beyond words and formulaic questions. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spiritual Competency Scale: Further Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Stephanie F.; Robertson, Linda A.; Gill, Carman S.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a follow-up analysis of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which initially validated ASERVIC's (Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling) spiritual competencies. The study examined whether the factor structure of the Spiritual Competency Scale would be supported by participants (i.e., ASERVIC…

  6. Workplace Learning as a Spiritual Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappel, Linda

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on workplace and transformational learning to explore how spirituality can be accessed to encourage individual growth through the development of critical awareness while providing a sense of direction in the workplace as part of organisational learning. In communities and societies where organisations may have…

  7. Student nurses' perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Lay Hwa; Creedy, Debra K; Chan, Moon Fai

    2013-06-01

    To investigate nursing students' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Spirituality is an essential part of holistic care but often neglected in practice. Barriers to spiritual care include limited educational preparation, negative attitudes towards spirituality, confusion about nurses' role, perceptions of incompetence and avoidance of spiritual matters. There is limited knowledge about students' perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care. Previous studies have predominantly focused on educational approaches to enhance spirituality. The next generation of clinicians may have different worldviews, cultural beliefs and values about spirituality and spiritual care from current nurses. There is a need to understand students' views and how their spiritual development is shaped in order to inform pre-registration education. A cross-sectional survey of final-year students from three educational institutions in Singapore was conducted from April to August 2010. Data included demographic details and responses on a new composite tool, the Spiritual Care Giving Scale (SCGS). A response rate of 61.9% (n=745 out of 1204) was achieved. The lowest mean score was item 9, "Without spirituality, a person is not considered whole". Highest mean was item 2, "Spirituality is an important aspect of human being". Factor 5 (Spiritual Care Values) had the lowest mean with Factor 2 (Spirituality Perspectives) the highest. Participants considered spirituality as essential to being human; developmental in nature; and vital for individuals' state of well-being. Attributes important for spiritual care were identified. Multivariate analyses showed positive association between participants' scores and institution but not with other variables. Participating student nurses reported a high level of spiritual awareness that was not constrained by age. Students affirmed the importance of spiritual awareness in order to address the spiritual needs of patients. There was some congruence

  8. Longitudinal spiritual coping with trauma in people with HIV: implications for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Heidemarie; Ironson, Gail

    2014-03-01

    This 10-year study (N=177) examines how people with HIV use spirituality to cope with life's trauma on top of HIV-related stress (e.g., facing death, stigma, poverty, limited healthcare) usual events. Spirituality, defined as a connection to a higher presence, is independent from religion (institutionalized spirituality). As a dynamic adaptive process, coping requires longitudinal studying. Qualitative content-analysis of interviews/essays yielded a coding of specific aspects and a longitudinal rating of overall spiritual coping. Most participants were rated as spiritual, using spiritual practices, about half experienced comfort, empowerment, growth/transformation, gratitude, less than one-third meaning, community, and positive reframing. Up to one-fifth perceived spiritual conflict, struggle, or anger, triggering post-traumatic stress, which sometimes converted into positive growth/transformation later. Over time, 65% used spiritual coping positively, 7% negatively, and 28% had no significant use. Spirituality was mainly beneficial for women, heterosexuals, and African Americans (pspirituality is a major source of positive and occasionally negative coping (e.g., viewing HIV as sin). We discuss how clinicians can recognize and prevent when spirituality is creating distress and barriers to HIV treatment, adding a literature review on ways of effective spiritual assessment. Spirituality may be a beneficial component of coping with trauma, considering socio-cultural contexts.

  9. Exploring Nurse Communication About Spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ragan, Sandra L; Ferrell, Betty

    2017-07-01

    Although spiritual care is considered one of the pillars of palliative care, many health-care providers never receive formal training on how to communicate about spirituality with patients and families. The aim of this study was to explore the spiritual care experiences of oncology nurses in order to learn more about patient needs and nurse responses. A survey was circulated at a communication training course for oncology nurses in June 2015. Nurses recalled a care experience that included the initiation of a spiritual care topic and their response to the patient/family. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Nurses reported that communication about spirituality was primarily initiated by patients, rather than family members, and spiritual topics commonly emerged during the end of life or when patients experienced spiritual distress. Nurses' experiences highlighted the positive impact spiritual conversations had on the quality of patient care and its benefit to families. Spiritual communication was described as an important nursing role at the end of patients' lives, and nonverbal communication, listening, and discussing patients' emotions were emphasized as important and effective nurse communication skills during spiritual care conversations. Approximately one-third of nurses in the sample reported sharing their own personal spiritual or religious backgrounds with patients, and they reported that these sharing experiences strengthened their own faith. It is evident that patients want to discuss spiritual topics during care. Study findings illustrate the need to develop a spiritual communication curriculum and provide spiritual care communication training to clinicians.

  10. Spirituality and spiritual care in Iran: nurses' perceptions and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria Kiaei, M; Salehi, A; Moosazadeh Nasrabadi, A; Whitehead, D; Azmal, M; Kalhor, R; Shah Bahrami, E

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to explore the perception of Iranian nurses concerning spiritual care and to reveal any confronted barriers. Although the context of spiritual care is a substantial aspect of holistic care, the delivery of spiritual care has been problematic due to lack of nurses' understanding of this concept. Nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care directly influence their performance as well as their relationships with patients. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 with 259 nurses working in hospitals affiliated with Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Data were collected using the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale alongside qualitative open-ended questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for the quantitative data and content analysis for the qualitative data. The overall average for spirituality and spiritual care was 2.84 (score range: 1-4), indicating a moderate mean score. A significant relationship was found between education level and spiritual care. The majority of participants believed that they did not receive enough training in this aspect of care. The main obstacles regarding delivering spiritual care included busy working schedules, insufficient knowledge regarding spiritual care, low motivation, diversity of patients' spiritual needs and feeling 'unqualified' to provide spiritual cares. Consistent with the previous studies, this study has demonstrated that nurses had low confidence to meet the spiritual needs of patients due to lack of knowledge and training in this regard. Iranian nurses' perception of spirituality and spiritual care is moderate, reflecting that they do not receive sufficient training regarding spiritual care. Despite the attention focused on spiritual care in clinical settings in Iran, there remains a significant gap in terms of meeting the spiritual needs of patients in nursing practice. This finding assists nursing clinicians, educators and policy makers to more

  11. Particularizing spirituality in points of tension: enriching the discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, Barbara; Fowler, Marsha; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston; Sawatzky, Rick

    2009-12-01

    The tremendous growth in nursing literature about spirituality has garnered proportionately little critique. Part of the reason may be that the broad generalizing claims typical of this literature have not been sufficiently explicated so that their particular implications for a practice discipline could be evaluated. Further, conceptualizations that attempt to encompass all possible views are difficult to challenge outside of a particular location. However, once one assumes a particular location in relation to spirituality, then the question becomes how one resolves the tension between what are essentially theological or philosophical commitments and professional commitments. In this study, we discuss the tension between these perspectives using the idea of a responsible nursing response to spiritual pluralism. We then problematize three claims about spirituality in nursing discourse based upon our location as scholars influenced by Christian theological understandings: (i) the claim that all individuals are spiritual; (ii) the claim that human spirituality can be assessed and evaluated; and (iii) the claim that spirituality is a proper domain of nursing's concern and intervention. We conclude by suggesting that the widely shared values of social justice, compassion and human dignity may well serve as a grounding for the critique of spiritual discourses in nursing across particularized positions.

  12. An Acylated Kaempferol Glycoside from Flowers of Foeniculum vulgare and F. Dulce

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Fathy M.; Shehata, Afaf H.; Khaleel, Amal E.; Ezzat, Shahera M.

    2002-01-01

    An acylated kaempferol glycoside, namely kaempferol-3-O-α-L-(2”,3”-di-E-pcoumaroyl)-rhamnoside (1) was isolated from the flowers of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. and F. dulce DC. It is thus isolated for the first time from family Apiaceae. In addition, the different organs of both plants afforded six flavonoid glycosides - namely afzelin (kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamnoside) (2), quercitrin (3), isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucoside (4), isoquercitrin (5), rutin (6), and miquelianin (quercetin-3...

  13. Dulce de Leche, a typical product of Latin America: characterisation by physicochemical, optical and instrumental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaze, L V; Costa, M P; Monteiro, M L G; Lavorato, J A A; Conte Júnior, C A; Raices, R S L; Cruz, A G; Freitas, M Q

    2015-02-15

    The physicochemical profile of Dulce de Leche (DL) was determined by both routine analysis and others techniques (HPLC, GC-MS and ICP-OES). Seven Brazilian commercial brands were characterised for moisture content, protein, fat, ash, pH and titratable acidity, mineral content (sodium, potassium, calcium, and phosphorus), colour parameters and instrumental analysis (carbohydrates content and volatile compounds). Overall, extensive variability among all the parameters evaluated were observed, suggesting different operational procedures in the dairy factories along the DL processing. In this sense, an increase of intrinsic quality of DL is related closely the standardization of operational parameters using during the manufacture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. La narrativa de Dulce Chacón: memoria de las perdedoras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servén, Carmen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Dulce Chacón´s narrative is committed to women, specially to the conflicts that women lived during the XXth century in Spain. Her writings can be divided in two main groups: on the one hand, the ones entitled The trilogy of the escape , which correspond to the beginnings of her work, and which reflect psychological concerns and feminine conflicts in Spain of the present times; on the other hand, the writings dedicated to recuperate the memories of women that were involved in the Spanish Civil war (1936-39, together with the period that corresponds to the post war. The most peculiar device in Chacón´s works is the fact that both, collective and individual identity, are related to memory, which appears to be embodied in the main characters of her stories, conditioning and determining their destiny. Dulce Chacón´s narrations point out a cultural reflection of the fighting of contemporary women in Spain, in spite of the fact that the feminine characters are not claiming any feminist doctrine in their discourses. One thing that readers should take into account is that Chacón´s stories originate from documented oral sources, and this confirms her particular interest towards oral expression and words; that might be the reason why she displays the most incredible expertise when building up the discourses of the different characters involved in the stories she wrote.La narrativa de Dulce Chacón se compromete con las mujeres, con los conflictos que ellas viven en la España del siglo XX. Sus relatos pueden dividirse en dos grupos: la Trilogía de la huida, que abarca las obras iniciales y que muestra psicología y conflictos femeninos en la España actual; y un segundo y último conjunto dedicado al rescate de la memoria de las mujeres durante la guerra civil de 1936-39 y la posguerra. En la mayor parte de las obras de la autora, la identidad individual y colectiva pende de la memoria, que se encarna en los personajes y condiciona sus destinos

  15. Teaching spirituality and spiritual care in health sciences education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, educators seemed to be unprepared and have insufficient knowledge about how to include spirituality in teaching. This review aimed to systematically review previous literature from 2000 to 2013 regarding the content knowledge and teaching strategies used to teach spirituality and spiritual care in health ...

  16. spirituality and contextuality 1. the historiography of spirituality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contextuality or historicity of spirituality is not self-evident. Not until modern times, in Europe, did it become more or less normal to look at spirituality from a historical perspective. It is thus not strange that the historiography of spirituality arose from the nineteenth century. In that time, the historical perspective was ...

  17. ENHANCING SPIRITUALISM IN VIRTUAL WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Lata DANGWAL

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spiritualism is one word which puts man on the highest plinth of life. Spirituality is the way we find meaning, hope, comfort and inner peace in life. Spirituality in the virtual World is generally known as Virtual Spirituality. A goldmine of wisdom from all kinds of religious and spiritual philosophies, traditions and practices can be found in virtual World now. Technology and Spirituality together forms the material to which man can incline on to and work for the development of a globe in which war will be considered a taboo and violence a rejected dogma. Therefore there is an urgent nee to made the world a safe place to live in and the spiritual reconstruction can help us in achieving this.Spiritualism, Virtual World, Online Technology.

  18. Towards a Model of Influence of Spirituality on Leadership: Empirical Research of School Leaders on Catholic Schools in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, C. A. M.; Koerts, E.

    2013-01-01

    What is spirituality? What is leadership? And what is their relationship? The article presents the concept of "discernment" (Latin: "discretion") as the link ("tertium comperationis") between spirituality and leadership. Spirituality is a way of life in (the growth of) discernment towards human fullness, which is…

  19. Spirituality in the Healthcare Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Donia Baldacchino

    2017-01-01

    Spirituality involves a sense of connectedness, meaning making and transcendence. There is abundant published research that focuses on the importance of spirituality to patients and their families during times of illness and distress. However over the last decade there has also been a growing awareness about the importance of considering the need to address peoples’ spiritual needs in the workplace. Engaging in ones own personal spirituality involves connecting with the inner self, becoming m...

  20. Sexual Trauma, Spirituality, and Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Mark J.; Thompson, Kevin M.; Simonich, Heather; Crosby, Ross D.; Donaldson, Mary Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the association between spirituality and psychopathology in a group of sexual abuse victims and controls with a focus on whether spirituality moderated the association between sexual trauma and psychopathology. Seventy-one sexual trauma victims were compared to 25 control subjects on spiritual well-being, the Eating Disorder…

  1. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  2. Corporate spirituality as organizational praxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Eelco van den Dool

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for doing research into corporate spirituality should enable us to deal with the religious component of spirituality instead of trying to separate spirituality from religious beliefs, as the positivist school proposes. Waaijman’s phenomenological-dialogical research cycle enables us to

  3. Afrikaner spirituality: A complex mixture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    Afrikaner spirituality: A complex mixture. Erna Oliver. Department of Christian Spirituality. Church History and Missiology. University of South Africa. Abstract. The article argues that the perception that Afrikaner spirituality is and has always been founded mainly or only upon the Calvinistic tradition is a misconception.

  4. Spiritual wellbeing, Attitude toward Spiritual Care and its Relationship with Spiritual Care Competence among Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarsa, Tagie; Davoodi, Arefeh; Khorami Markani, Abdolah; Gahramanian, Akram; Vargaeei, Afkham

    2015-12-01

    Nurses' spiritual wellbeing and their attitude toward spirituality and competence of nurses in providing of spiritual care can affect the quality of care in nursing. The aim of this study was to evaluate spiritual wellbeing, attitude toward spiritual care and its relationship with the spiritual care competence among nurses. This was a correlational descriptive study conducted on 109 nurses working in the Intensive Care Units of Imam Reza and Madani hospitals in 2015, Tabriz, Iran. Data collection tools were a demographic data form and three standard questionnaires including Spiritual Wellbeing Scale, Spirituality and Spiritual Results: The mean score of the spiritual wellbeing was 94.45 (14.84), the spiritual care perspective was 58.77 (8.67), and the spiritual care competence was 98.51 (15.44). The linear regression model showed 0.42 variance between the spiritual care competence scores which were explained by the two aspects of spiritual wellbeing (religious health, existential health) and three aspects of spiritual care perspective (spirituality, spiritual care, personalized care). The spiritual care competence had a positive relationship with spiritual wellbeing and spiritual care perspective. Because of the nature of nursing and importance of close interaction of nurses with patients in ICUs, the higher nurses' SW and the more their positive attitude toward spiritual care, the more they can provide spiritual care to their patients.

  5. Healing, spirituality and integrative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhorn, David M; Din, Jana; Johnson, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Spirituality plays a prominent role in the lives of most palliative patients whether or not they formally adhere to a specific religion and belief. As a result, the palliative care team is frequently called upon to support families who are experiencing their "dark night of the soul" and struggling to make sense of their lives during a healthcare crisis. While conventional religious practices provide a source of comfort and guidance for many of our patients, a significant number of our patients do not have a strong religious community to which to turn. Over the last two decades, more people in Western countries identify themselves as spiritual but not religious and do not belong to an organized faith community. For those patients who express a strong spiritual connection or sense of 'something greater' or 'a higher power', encouraging the exploration of those feelings and beliefs through chaplains, clergypersons, or members of the interdisciplinary palliative care team can help provide context, meaning and purpose in their lives impacted by serious illness. One of the goals of effective palliative care is the facilitation of personal growth and psychological resilience in dealing with one's health challenges. Integrative medicine, also referred to as complementary and alternative medicine, provides a set of tools and philosophies intended to enhance wellness and a sense of wellbeing. Many of the modalities are derived from disciplines such as massage, acupuncture, Rei Ki, aromatherapy, and dietary supplements. The use of integrative medicine in North America is widespread and frequently not shared with one's clinician due to many patients' concerns that clinicians will disapprove of the patient's use of them. In addition to its efficacy in reducing symptoms commonly experienced by patients receiving palliative care (e.g., nausea, pain, depression, and existential suffering), integrative medicine offers non-verbal, non-cognitive avenues for many to achieve a peaceful

  6. Comparative efficacy of spirituality, cognitive, and emotional support groups for treating eating disorder inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P Scott; Berrett, Michael E; Hardman, Randy K; Eggett, Dennis L

    2006-01-01

    Spiritual interventions are rarely used in contemporary treatment programs and little empirical evidence is available concerning their effectiveness. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a spiritual group intervention for eating disorder inpatients. We compared the effectiveness of a Spirituality group with Cognitive and Emotional Support groups using a randomized, control group design. Participants were 122 women receiving inpatient eating disorder treatment. Patients in the Spirituality group tended to score significantly lower on psychological disturbance and eating disorder symptoms at the conclusion of treatment compared to patients in the other groups, and higher on spiritual well-being. On weekly outcome measures, patients in the Spirituality group improved significantly more quickly during the first four weeks of treatment. This study provides preliminary evidence that attending to eating disorder patients' spiritual growth and well-being during inpatient treatment may help reduce depression and anxiety, relationship distress, social role conflict, and eating disorder symptoms.

  7. Screening of natural polysaccharides extracted from the fruits of Pithecellobium dulce as a pharmaceutical adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Preethi; A, Mary Saral

    2016-11-01

    Polysaccharides were extracted from the dried fruiting bodies of Pithecellobium dulce with 20% ethanol by microwave-assisted extraction. The polysaccharides were isolated by ion exchange chromatography and afford three water-soluble polysaccharides PDP-1, PDP-2, and PDP-3. These isolated compounds were subjected to acid hydrolysis, methylation, IR and GC-MS for its compositional analysis and revealed that all the three fractions are heteropolysaccharides. PDP-1 was found to be composed of xylose, mannose, galactose and Rhamnose. PDP-2 and PDP-3 composed of xylose, Rhamnose, glucose, ribose, galactose, and mannose. The micromeretic properties of the extracted polysaccharides possessed a bulk density of 0.69g/ml, 0.65g/ml and 0.71g/ml for PDP-1, PDP-2, and PDP-3 respectively. The Hausner's ratio and Carr's index confirm the good flow property and compressibility of the polysaccharides. The polysaccharides extracted from Pithecellobium dulce fruits were tested for its application as a pharmaceutical adjuvant. The in vitro drug release study suggests that the extracted polysaccharides are potential candidates as a pharmaceutical adjuvant. Furthermore, the three isolated polysaccharides were subjected to its radical scavenging activity using DPPH, phospho molybdenum assay and reducing power assay. The results exhibited that the polysaccharides can be explored as a novel natural antioxidant and can be recommended as a functional food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spirituality in the Healthcare Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality involves a sense of connectedness, meaning making and transcendence. There is abundant published research that focuses on the importance of spirituality to patients and their families during times of illness and distress. However over the last decade there has also been a growing awareness about the importance of considering the need to address peoples’ spiritual needs in the workplace. Engaging in ones own personal spirituality involves connecting with the inner self, becoming more self aware of ones humanity and limitations. Engaging with ones personal spirituality can also mean that people begin to greater find meaning and purpose in life and at work. This may be demonstrated in the workplace by collegial relationships and teamwork. Those who engage with their own spirituality also engage more easily with others through a connectedness with other staff and by aligning their values with the respective organization if they fit well with ones personal values. Workplace spirituality is oriented towards self-awareness of an inner life which gives meaning, purpose and nourishment to the employees’ dynamic relationships at the workplace and is eventually also nourished by meaningful work. Exercising ones personal spirituality contributes towards generating workplace spirituality. Essentially acting from ones own personal spirituality framework by being in doing can contribute towards a person becoming a healing and therapeutic presence for others, that is nourishing in many workplaces. Personal spirituality in healthcare can be enhanced by: reflection in and on action; role-modeling; taking initiative for active presence in care; committing oneself to the spiritual dimension of care; and, integrating spirituality in health caregivers’ education. As spirituality is recognized as becoming increasingly important for patients in healthcare, increasing educational opportunities are now becoming available for nurses internationally that

  9. Filipino Nurses' Spirituality and Provision of Spiritual Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Achaso, Romeo H; Cachero, Geifsonne S; Mohammad, Mary Rose A

    2016-12-01

    This study was to explore the perceptions of Filipino nurses' spirituality and the provision of spiritual nursing care. A descriptive, cross-sectional, and quantitative study was adopted for this study. The study was conducted in the Philippines utilizing a convenience sample of 245 nurses. Nurses' Spirituality and Delivery of Spiritual Care (NSDSC) was used as the main instrument. The items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to nurses' perception of spirituality were Item 7, "I believe that God loves me and cares for me," and Item 8, "Prayer is an important part of my life," with mean scores of 4.87 (SD = 1.36) and 4.88 (SD = 1.34), respectively. Items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to the practice of spiritual care were Item 26, "I usually comfort clients spiritually (e.g., reading books, prayers, music, etc.)," and Item 25, "I refer the client to his/her spiritual counselor (e.g., hospital chaplain) if needed," with mean scores of 3.16 (SD = 1.54) and 2.92 (SD = 1.59). Nurse's spirituality correlated significantly with their understanding of spiritual nursing care (r = .3376, p ≤ .05) and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3980, p ≤ .05). Positive significant correlations were found between understanding of spiritual nursing care and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3289, p ≤ .05). For nurses to better provide spiritual nursing care, they must care for themselves through self-awareness, self-reflection, and developing a sense of satisfaction and contentment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians.

  11. Spirituality in the Addiction Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kárová, Lydie

    2011-01-01

    Spiritualita při léčbě závislosti Spirituality in the Addiction Treatment Lydie Kárová In my work, Spirituality in the Addiction Treatment, I focus on spirituality as a component of personality, which is involved in its formation and development. The work falls into three parts, in the first one I place spirituality into the Czech environment and present its definition, in the second part I look for the role of spirituality in the conception and treatment of addiction and in the third one I p...

  12. Spiritual-Intelligence/-Quotient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

    2005-01-01

    Drawing on the "new" [c. 2000], upgraded science of the human brain with its three different kinds of neural structures--mental, emotional and spiritual--Zohar [14] offers a model for structure, leadership and learning within an organization that allows them to thrive on uncertainty, deal creatively with rapid change, and realize the full…

  13. Spiritual-based Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruzan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although far from mainstream, the concept of spiritual-based leadership is emerging as an inclusive and yet highly personal approach to leadership that integrates a leader’s inner perspectives on identity, purpose, responsibility and success with her or his decisions and actions in the outer worl...

  14. Spiritual Assessments in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hemphill

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality is recognized as an important concept in the study and practice of medicine, including occupational therapy. This aligns with occupational therapy’s core value of treating people holistically—mind, body, and spirit. Currently, the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Hospital Organizations ( JCAHO requires that a spiritual assessment be given to patients on admission. To conduct effective spiritual assessments, occupational therapists must distinguish between religion and spirituality. They also must be aware of their own spiritual beliefs and practices and how those might influence their clinical interactions. This article presents spiritual assessment tools that occupational therapists can use in clinical practice; they range from history taking, to questionnaires, to observation scales. Guidelines are presented for selecting among several spiritual assessments. A case study is presented in which a patient’s faith tradition is being challenged, which could affect the outcome of therapy. Finally, treatment and intervention planning and ethical considerations are discussed.

  15. Descripción de las especies del género Ipomoea presentes en el area de riego del río Dulce, Santiago del Estero, Argentina Description of the species of the genus Ipomoea in the irrigated area of Río Dulce, Santiago del Estero, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. del V. Carrizo

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue relevar y diferenciar especies del género Ipomoea presentes en diferentes fases de desarrollo, en el área de riego del Río Dulce, Santiago del Estero, Argentina. Para ello fueron herborizados y fotografiados diversos ejemplares encontrados en la región. En el laboratorio, después del trabajo de identificación, fueron descritas las diversas fases de desarrollo de la planta: semilla, plántula y estado adulto, creándose códigos de identificación para cada fase. Se registraron ocho especies del género Ipomoea, I. alba; I. amnicola; I. cairica; I. carnea; I. grandifolia; I. nil; I. purpurea e I. quamoclit, algunas de las cuales se cultivan como ornamentales, otras aparecen como ruderales y algunas son malezas en cultivos de la región.The objective of this research was to describe and differentiate the stages of species of the genus Ipomoea in the irrigated area of Rio Dulce - Santiago del Estero - Argentina, under different growth stages. Species prototypes from the area were mounted in a herbarium, photographed and then identified with detailed descriptions of the seed, seedling and mature stages. A classification key was constructed to identify them under different growth stages. Eight species in the genus Ipomoea: (I. alba, I. amnicola, I. cairica, I. carnea, I. grandifolia, I. nil, I. purpurea and I. quamoclit were registered, some cultivated as ornamental, while others appear naturally or as crop weeds in the region.

  16. Thermophysical and rheological properties of dulce de leche with and without coconut flakes as a function of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Camarinha Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dulce de leche (DL, a dairy dessert highly appreciated in Brazil, is a concentrated product containing about 70% m/m of total solids. Thermophysical and rheological properties of two industrial Brazilian Dulce de leche formulations (classic Dulce de leche and Dulce de leche added with coconut flakes 1.5% m/m were determined at temperatures comprised between 28.4 and 76.4 °C. In general, no significant differences (p < 0.05 were observed in the presence of coconut flakes in the two formulations. Heat capacity varied from 2633.2 to 3101.8 J/kg.°C; thermal conductivity from 0.383 to 0.452 W/m.°C; specific mass from 1350.7 to 1310.7 kg/m³; and, thermal diffusivity from (1.082 × 10-7 to 1.130 × 10-7 m²/s. The Bingham model was used to properly describe the non-Newtonian behavior of both formulations, with yielding stress values varying from 27.3 to 17.6 Pa and plastic viscosity from 19.9 to 5.9 Pa.s.

  17. Larvicidal & ovicidal efficacy of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth. (Fabaceae) against Anopheles stephensi Liston & Aedes aegypti Linn. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, M.; Rajeswary, M.; Sivakumar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticide, this study was undertaken to assess the larvicidal and ovicidal potential of the crude hexane, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol solvent extracts from the medicinal plant Pithecellobium dulce against the mosquito vectors, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Methods: Larvicidal activity of P. dulce plant extracts was studied in the range of 60 to 450 mg/l against early third instar larvae of An. stephensi and Ae. aegypti in the laboratory. The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. The ovicidal activity was determined against An. stephensi and Ae. aegypti to various concentrations ranging from 100 to 750 mg/l under the laboratory conditions. Mean per cent hatchability of the eggs were observed after 48 h post treatment. Results: All leaf and seed extracts showed moderate larvicidal and ovicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in methanol extract of leaf of P. dulce against the larvae of An. stephensi and Ae. aegypti with the LC50 and LC90 values 145.43, 155.78 mg/l and 251.23, 279.73 mg/l, respectively. The per cent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. Zero hatchability was observed at 400 mg/l for leaf methanol extract and 625 mg/l for seed methanol extract of P. dulce against An. stephensi and Ae. aegypti, respectively. Compared to leaf extracts, seed extracts have low potency against the two mosquitoes. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results suggest that the leaf and seed extracts of P. dulce have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquitoes. PMID:24056567

  18. Advances in the conceptualization and measurement of religion and spirituality. Implications for physical and mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Peter C; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2003-01-01

    Empirical studies have identified significant links between religion and spirituality and health. The reasons for these associations, however, are unclear. Typically, religion and spirituality have been measured by global indices (e.g., frequency of church attendance, self-rated religiousness and spirituality) that do not specify how or why religion and spirituality affect health. The authors highlight recent advances in the delineation of religion and spirituality concepts and measures theoretically and functionally connected to health. They also point to areas for areas for growth in religion and spirituality conceptualization and measurement. Through measures of religion and spirituality more conceptually related to physical and mental health (e.g., closeness to God, religious orientation and motivation, religious support, religious struggle), psychologists are discovering more about the distinctive contributions of religiousness and spirituality to health and well-being.

  19. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  20. Religion and spirituality: assessment and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doka, Kenneth J

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the ways that an individual's spirituality influences responses to life-threatening illness and dying. He begins by differentiating between religion and spirituality, and then delineates the spiritual issues that arise in a life-threatening illness including the spiritual needs that arise in the final phases of illness. Recommendations for spiritual assessments and interventions are offered.

  1. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    OpenAIRE

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-01-01

    Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world) and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  2. [Evolutionary Concept Analysis of Spirituality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Il Sun; Choi, So Young; Kim, Jin Sook

    2017-04-01

    This study was done to clarify attributes, antecedents, and consequences of spirituality. Rodgers's evolutionary concept analysis was used to analyze fifty seven studies from the literature related to spirituality as it appears in systematic literature reviews of theology, medicine, counseling & psychology, social welfare, and nursing. Spirituality was found to consist of two dimensions and eight attributes: 1) vertical dimension: 'intimacy and connectedness with God' and 'holy life and belief', 2) horizontal dimension: 'self-transcendence', 'meaning and purpose in life', 'self-integration', and 'self-creativity' in relationship with self, 'connectedness' and 'trust' in relationship with others·neighbors·nature. Antecedents of spirituality were socio-demographic, religious, psychological, and health related characteristics. Consequences of spirituality were positive and negative. Being positive included 'life centered on God' in vertical dimension, and among horizontal dimension 'joy', 'hope', 'wellness', 'inner peace', and 'self-actualization' in relationship with self, 'doing in love' and 'extended life toward neighbors and the world' in relationship with others·neighbors·nature. Being negative was defined as having 'guilt', 'inner conflict', 'loneliness', and 'spiritual distress'. Facilitators of spirituality were stressful life events and experiences. Spirituality is a multidimensional concept. Unchangeable attributes of spirituality are 'connectedness with God', 'self-transcendence', 'meaning of life' and 'connectedness with others·nature'. Unchangeable consequences of spirituality are 'joy' and 'hope'. The findings suggest that the dimensional framework of spirituality can be used to assess the current spiritual state of patients. Based on these results, the development of a Korean version of the scale measuring spirituality is recommended. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  3. When trauma, spirituality, and mental illness intersect: A qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnino, Vincent R

    2016-05-01

    Studies have identified spirituality to be a helpful resource for dealing with various types of trauma experiences. This coincides with a heightened focus on the role of spirituality within trauma-related theory (e.g., spiritual coping, meaning-making, and posttraumatic growth). Little remains known, however, about the relationship between trauma and spirituality among people with severe psychiatric disorders. Meanwhile, a high percentage of those with psychiatric disabilities are known to have trauma histories, whereas a majority self-identify as spiritual and/or religious. Two cases from a hermeneutic phenomenological qualitative study of people with co-occurring psychiatric disabilities and trauma histories are highlighted. Themes related to trauma and spirituality are discussed in-depth. Study participants drew upon a variety of spiritual coping strategies (e.g., prayer, meditation, spiritual readings) to help deal with trauma experiences. Participants additionally experienced spiritual struggles-a detailed account is given of a participant who was able to work through such struggles by shifting to a less self-blaming spiritual worldview (e.g., shifted from believing in a "punishing God" to viewing oneself as part of "oneness with humanity"). The study also examined the meaning-making process and shows how concepts such as global and appraised meaning-making are applicable to people with psychiatric disabilities. Finally, unique challenges related to posttraumatic growth are discussed (e.g., intrusive ruminations and "voices" with spiritual themes). This study offers useful examples of how spirituality and trauma can impact one another, and how people with psychiatric disabilities draw upon spirituality to cope as they strive for recovery. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The spiritual experience index: A measure of spiritual maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genia, V

    1991-12-01

    The Spiritual Experience Index was developed to measure spiritual maturity in persons of diverse religious and spiritual beliefs. The scale was constructed from a developmental rather than a multidimensional conceptualization of faith. Initial findings from a religiously heterogeneous college sample indicated good reliability for the SEI and supported its use as a unidimensional measure. Higher scores on the SEI were significantly related to lower dogmatism and intolerance of ambiguity. The SEI was also moderately related to higher religious participation and positively correlated with intrinsicness and quest. However, compared with the intrinsic and quest scales, the SEI emerged as the strongest indicator of adaptive spiritual functioning. Directions for future research are suggested.

  5. A new subspecies of sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos, from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessesen, Brooke L; Galbreath, Gary J

    2017-01-01

    We describe a distinctive new subspecies of sea snake from the occasionally anoxic inner-basin waters of Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, based on combined data garnered between 2010 and 2017 for 154 specimens, 123 free-ranging and 31 museum-held. The yellow sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos Bessesen & Galbreath, subsp. n. , is diagnosed by a notably smaller body size and nearly uniform yellow coloration, which contrasts with the black and yellow striae and tail spots or bands typical of the species. Within the modest geographic range (circa 320 km 2 ), nearly all specimens possess both diagnostic character states. Bathymetrics appear to restrict genetic flow between this allopatric population and conspecifics in the broader Eastern Pacific. In perspicuous contrast to typical H. platurus , H. p. xanthos shows no association with drift lines, and feeds at night in turbulent waters, assuming a sinusoidal ambush posture never previously reported for the species. This evolutionarily significant unit (ESU) warrants taxonomic recognition and active protection.

  6. An Acylated Kaempferol Glycoside from Flowers of Foeniculum vulgare and F. Dulce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahera M. Ezzat

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available An acylated kaempferol glycoside, namely kaempferol-3-O-α-L-(2”,3”-di-E-pcoumaroyl-rhamnoside (1 was isolated from the flowers of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. and F. dulce DC. It is thus isolated for the first time from family Apiaceae. In addition, the different organs of both plants afforded six flavonoid glycosides - namely afzelin (kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamnoside (2, quercitrin (3, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucoside (4, isoquercitrin (5, rutin (6, and miquelianin (quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide (7. Structure elucidation of the above mentioned flavonoids was achieved by UV, 1H- and 13C-NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC and EI-MS.

  7. Spirituality in diaconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitler, Ullrich Martin Rudenko

    2014-01-01

    ’s Theory U (TU) provides the conceptual and methodological framework for operationalising spirituality in diaconal work. It is argued that the concept of “presencing” is an adequate way to express “spirituality”, and that, overall TU is an appropriate model to describe and develop the essential features...... of diaconal social work and diaconal leadership. I shall use the Danish Blue Cross as an example of an organisation that can be interpreted as working on the basis of TU....

  8. Western Sport and Spiritualism

    OpenAIRE

    Kosiewicz Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Sport activity of achievement-oriented (professional, Olympic, spectacular character) is first of all exposition of rivalry and striving for variously understood sports success (resulting from measurable or discretionary criteria). It refers to winning a competition or taking another expected place as well as to other forms of satisfaction, such as financial gratification or social (political, ethnic, professional) recognition. Spirituality is here neither an aim, nor an expected value - it c...

  9. TARIAN SPIRITUAL JALALUDDIN RUMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Murdiati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Whirling Dervishes (The Darwisy the Round and round or Sama’. The term used by the Maulawiyah or Jalaliyah adherents of this, by doing a dance around in circles, accompanied by drums and flute, in the devotions they are to reach ecstasy. Rumi and the legendary spiritual dance into a work of great almighty to fill in a drought spitual man approached the Creator.

  10. Practical approaches to spiritual pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunjes, George B

    2010-01-01

    Spiritual pain/suffering is commonly experienced by persons with life-limiting illness and their families. Physical pain itself can be exacerbated by non-physical causes such as fear, anxiety, grief, unresolved guilt, depression and unmet spiritual meets. Likewise, the inability to manage physical pain well can be due to emotional and spiritual needs. This is why a holistic, interdisciplinary assessment of pain and suffering is required for each patient and family. The mind, body and spirit are understood in relationship to each other and, in those cases, in relationship to a deity or deities are important to understand. Cultural interpretations of pain and suffering may conflict with the goals of palliative care. Understanding the spiritual framework of the patient and family can help to assure that the physical and spiritual suffering of the patient can be eliminated to provide a peaceful death. Spiritual practices may help in the management of physical pain.

  11. Decápodos de agua dulce del Suborden Brachyura reportados para Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos Martha R.

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available Los decápodos de agua dulce de Suramérica constituyen uno de los grupos mejor conocidos sistemáticamente. Según RODRIGUEZ (1981, los factores que han determinado el interés por este grupo son entre otros: eltamaño relativamente grande de los organismos, la abundancia de la mayoría de las especies y las áreas amplias de distribución. Por otra parte, la familia Pseudothelphusidae ha merecido la atención de los parasitólogos por ser huéspedes intermediarios de la duela del pulmón de los humanos (Paragonimus, IBANEZ s: MIRANDA (1974.La información pertinente para Colombia se encuentra muy dispersa y es necesario recopilarla con el fin de contribuir al inventario de los recursos naturales del país y a facilitar eventualmente la adecuada utilización de los mismos. En consecuencia, uno de los objetivos del presente trabajo es reunir la información sobre las especies de decápodos de agua dulce (Suborden Brachyura reportadas para  Colombia, al igual que su sinonimia, la cual se ha hecho mediante el estudio de la literatura existente. Además se presenta información sobre la distribución geográfica y sobre la abundancia de las especies mencionándose los sitios de recolección y el número de ejemplares colectados.

  12. Dimensi Spiritual dalam Kepemimpinan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcadius Benawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show that the spiritual aspect must be noted in the leadership because every leader is always marked with oath of office in carrying out her/his position. So, how leaders are accountable, it is not only on the horizontal level but also at the vertical level. Research was done with phenomenological and literature studies about the practice of leadership faced with a number of theories about leadership and then to be synthesized the more authentic leadership than just imaging or false branding leadership. This article was based on the assumption that leadership (including in the political sphere was merely a sociological problem that kicked out spiritual aspects, while in the historical development of leadership, it had never been excluded from the spiritual dimension, whether in the form of manipulative (just because fed people understand that leadership came from the “sky”/gods. So then, a king acted tyrannical and led to the birth of authentic leadership as popularized as servant leadership. This article concluded that authentic leadership will give more benefit to develop the life system as well as the purpose of leadership itself rather than a merely apparent leadership which actually hurts the members (people because of the failure to meet the expectations of the members (people. 

  13. The Greatest Threat: Spiritual Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-10

    infiltrated every aspect of Greek life - even religion . In time Greece fell, and with it democracy, because it lacked the moral fiber and spiritual ...American way of life if there is no spiritual backbone? My research has convinced me more than ever that we need to look back and rediscover the...America’s sons and daughters, the strength of our armed forces, will be the big losers unless spiritual leadership becomes an essential quality of our

  14. Spiritual care of the child with cancer at the end of life: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Cheryl L

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to report an analysis of the concept of spiritual care of a child with cancer at the end of life. Spirituality is a vital dimension of a child's experience at the end of life; providing comfort; support; and a sense of connection. Spiritual care is paramount to address the substantial spiritual distress that may develop. Rodgers' method of evolutionary concept analysis guided the review process. The literature search was not limited by start date and literature through the end of 2012 was included. English, peer-reviewed texts in the databases CINAHL, ATLA and PubMed were included. Critical analysis of the literature identified surrogate terms, related concepts, attributes, antecedents and consequences. The analysis identified six attributes: assessing spiritual needs; assisting the child to express feelings; guiding the child in strengthening relationships; helping the child to be remembered; assisting the child to find meaning; and aiding the child to find hope. Antecedents include existential questions and spiritual distress. Consequences include a peaceful death, spiritual growth, a relationship of trust and enhanced end-of-life care. Spiritual care is a vital aspect of holistic nursing care; however, gaps in knowledge and practice prevent children from receiving adequate spiritual care at the end of life. Nurses would benefit from increased awareness, skills and knowledge about spiritual care. Research is needed to identify interventions that exert the greatest effect on patient care outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Spirituality, Spiritual Well-Being, and Spiritual Coping in Advanced Heart Failure: Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Clayton C; Hunter, Jennifer

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure is a chronic and terminal disease that affects a significant portion of the U.S. It is marked by considerable suffering, for which palliative care has been recommended. Palliative care standards require the inclusion of spiritual care, but there is a paucity of literature supporting effective spiritual interventions for the heart failure population. A literature search resulted in 30 articles meeting the criteria for review of spirituality and spiritual coping in the heart failure population. Findings within this body of literature include descriptive evidence of the uniqueness of spirituality in this population, quantitative and qualitative approaches to inquiry, theoretical models of spiritual coping, and proposed interventions. The article concludes with implications for future research and practice.

  16. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. spirituality and contextuality 1. the historiography of spirituality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Historia de la Espi- ritualidad, again in four volumes, partly made up for this lack: it re- flected awareness of extra-Christian forms of spirituality (Judaism, Islam, gnosis, Hellenism, and so forth) and of modern atheism (Flors 1969). The third bridgehead became apparent with the reference work entitled World spirituality ...

  18. Philo of Alexandria: A model for early Christian 'spiritual readings' of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3:18), which has as aim the transformation and growth of the person towards the good and happy life. Interaction with the spiritual wealth of the Greek philosophical traditions was seen as a fruitful asset and challenge. This article highlights some of the key themes of Philo's philosophical or spiritual reading of the Scriptures: ...

  19. [Development of Spiritual Care in Cancer Treatment in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazono, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Spiritual care started worldwide in the late 1960s with the development of the hospice movement and death studies. Why did spiritual care start duringthis time in history ? In some Christian societies, of that time,"pastoral care" evolved into an interfaith "spiritual care" where in the caretaker was the main agent instead of the caregiver. On the other hand, the importance of palliative care for cancer patients was gradually acknowledged. In addition, this progress was accompanied by the academic development of "death studies" which is called "death and life studies" in Japan. The Japanese hospice care and death studies movement started in the late 1970s. In the precedingperiod, the spiritual quest of cancer patients facingdeath was already gaining public attention. A scholar of religious studies, Hideo Kishimoto of the University of Tokyo, was diagnosed with cancer in 1954; he survived many operations until his death in 1964. Duringthose years, he wrote about his personal experience of acceptinghis approachingdeath. Although he did not believe in any specific faith, he had studied various religious teachings. It is important to understand his perception of his own death. His book, On Facing Death, was published immediately after his death. Therefore, it provided a prominent discourse on copingwith spiritual pain of approachingdeath even before the growth of spiritual care in Japan.

  20. Rol de los anfípodos (Amphipoda) en ambientes de agua dulce de Patagonia: epibiosis y parasitismo

    OpenAIRE

    Rauque Perez, Carlos Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    En Argentina existen escasos estudios sobre los epibiontes y los parásitos de crustáceos, siendo el objetivo del presente estudio reportar la presencia de los organismos asociados a anfípodos del género Hyalella y ampliar su distribución geográfica en ambientes de agua dulce de Patagonia. Los anfípodos se colectaron con un tamiz de 1 mm de tamaño de malla en diferentes cuerpos de agua dulce, abarcando un rango latitudinal entre los 38º27?S y los 54º55´S (provincias de Neuquén a Tierra del Fue...

  1. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  2. WHAT IS SPIRITUALITY? 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    we must assign to the treatises concerning the spiritual life a very early date. .... Aside from the theory and history of spirituality, experimental psychology, pa- thology .... everyone in his or her mother's womb, causes them to be born and leads them throughout life. This is evident from their proper names, prayers, and stories.

  3. Workplace spirituality and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Freda; de Klerk, Jeremias J

    2014-06-01

    In order to obtain an improved understanding of behaviour at work, employees should be studied from physical, psychological, and spiritual dimensions. Although the physical and psychological dimensions of individuals at work have been studied extensively, the spiritual dimension has been neglected for many years. The objective of the current research was to determine the relationship between workplace spirituality and a positive attitude related to work, that is, job satisfaction. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 600 white-collar workers, chosen from two organizations in different industries in South Africa. The research results indicate that there is a positive relationship between workplace spirituality and job satisfaction. These findings deepen the understanding of personal spirituality, organizational spirituality, and job satisfaction. They bring new insights into the significant role which spirituality plays in the context of the workplace. To survive in the 21st century, organizations need to be spiritually based. This, in turn, will lead to workers being satisfied with their entire work experience.

  4. Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantmeier, Edward J., Ed.; Lin, Jing, Ed.; Miller, John P., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education" attempts to deeply explore the universal and particular dimensions of education for inner and communal peace. This co-edited book contains fifteen chapters on world spiritual traditions, religions, and their connections and relevance to peacebuilding and peacemaking. This book examines the…

  5. Aspects of spirituality concerning illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Jochemasen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2007-01-01

    The spiritual dimension of illness, health and care may be seen as a unique aspect in addition to the physical, mental and social dimension. This contribution describes experiences of patients, nurses and hospital chaplains in relation to the spiritual aspects of being ill. Qualitative research was

  6. The Spiritual Life of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ruth A.

    2010-01-01

    A misconception about spirituality is that it is tied to religion (i.e., belief in and reverence for a supernatural power). Yet, the term "spirituality" is derived from the word "spirit"--often defined as the vital principle or animating force within living things. This definition may reflect some overlap with what is generally covered in…

  7. Indicadores de desempeño del sistema de riego del Rio Dulce, Santiago del Estero, Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto, D.; Angella, G.; Angueira, M.C.; Pérez Carrera, A.; Moscuzza, C.

    2005-01-01

    Mucha atención se ha puesto en el estudio del desempeño de los sistemas de riego a partir de la década de 1990, al tomarse conciencia de los bajos resultados de muchos de ellos, y su impacto ambiental negativo. El Sistema de Riego del Río Dulce en Santiago del Estero (PRD), no es la excepción,

  8. Dulce Digital: An mHealth SMS-Based Intervention Improves Glycemic Control in Hispanics With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmann, Addie L; Gallo, Linda C; Garcia, Maria Isabel; Taleb, Mariam; Euyoque, Johanna A; Clark, Taylor; Skidmore, Jessica; Ruiz, Monica; Dharkar-Surber, Sapna; Schultz, James; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena

    2017-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes is growing in epidemic proportions and disproportionately affects lower-income, diverse communities. Text messaging may provide one of the most rapid methods to overcome the "digital divide" to improve care. A randomized, nonblinded, parallel-groups clinical trial design allocated N = 126 low-income, Hispanic participants with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes to receive the Dulce Digital intervention or usual care (UC). Dulce Digital participants received up to three motivational, educational, and/or call-to-action text messages per day over 6 months. The primary outcome was HbA 1c ; lipids, blood pressure, and BMI were secondary outcomes. Satisfaction and acceptability were evaluated via focus groups and self-report survey items. The majority of patients were middle-aged (mean age 48.43 years, SD 9.80), female (75%), born in Mexico (91%), and uninsured (75%) and reported less than a ninth-grade education level (73%) and mean baseline HbA 1c 9.5% (80 mmol/mol), SD 1.3, and fasting plasma glucose 187.17 mg/dL, SD 64.75. A statistically significant time-by-group interaction effect indicated that the Dulce Digital group achieved a significantly greater reduction in HbA 1c over time compared with UC ( P = 0.03). No statistically significant effects were observed for secondary clinical indicators. The number of blood glucose values texted in by participants was a statistically significant predictor of month 6 HbA 1c ( P < 0.05). Satisfaction and acceptability ratings for the Dulce Digital intervention were high. Use of a simple, low-cost text messaging program was found to be highly acceptable in this sample of high-risk, Hispanic individuals with type 2 diabetes and resulted in greater improvement in glycemic control compared with UC. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. In vitro activity of Pithecellobium dulce and Lysiloma acapulcensis on exogenous development stages of sheep gastrointestinal strongyles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Olmedo-Juárez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of two lyophilised aqueous extracts of Lysiloma acapulcensis (LAE and Phitecellobium dulce (PDE tree leaves on in vitro assessment of hatching of eggs, larval development and migration of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep using a general linear model. Treatments contained extracts from both species at concentrations of 0, 125, 250 and 500 μg/mL. Both albendazole and levamisole were used at a level of 1% as positive control. The extract of LAE, compared to PDE, showed better inhibition (P<0.05 of egg hatching. Different doses of both the LAE and PDE extracts showed a larvicidal effect (P<0.05 on all larvae exposed to different doses of the extracts. In the larval migration assay, a similar effect with levamisole at doses of 250 and 500 μg/mL occurred with the LAE extract. The extract of P. dulce had a lower larvicidal effect (P<0.05 than levamisole and L. acapulcensis extracts. Using aqueous extracts of both species of L. acapulcensis and P. dulce could be a promising alternative to synthetic anthelmintics as treatments of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep in organic and conventional production systems under subtropical conditions.

  10. Preparation and evaluation of antibacterial potential of Pithecellobium dulce root extract against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Muneer Ahmad; Malik, Rayees Ahmad; Prakash, Poonam; Lone, Ali Mohd

    2018-03-01

    In the present study hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of Pithecellobium dulce root were prepared using soxhlet extractor. The extracts were evaluated for antibacterial activity against one Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and three Gram negative (Acetobacter aceti, Acetobacter aceti, Klebsiella pneumoniae) strains. Disc diffusion method revealed promising antibacterial activity of the extracts prepared in polar solvents (ethyl acetate and ethanol) compared to non-polar solvents (hexane and benzene). Ethanolic root extract was found to be most active against Acetobacter aceti, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes bacterial strains. The zone of inhibition of ethanolic root extract against Acetobacter aceti, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes bacterial strains was 15.4, 11.0, 19.0 and 13.0 mm, respectively at 100 mg concentration. Ethyl acetate extract also exhibited good antibacterial activity against Entrobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acetobacter aceti. The zone of inhibition of ethyl acetate root extracts against Entrobacter aerogenes, Acetobacter aceti and Klebsiella pneumonia was 10.5, 18.0 and 10.0 mm, respectively. The benzene extract showed some activity against Acetobacter aceti with the zone of inhibition 10.0 mm. The antibacterial activity of Pithecellobium dulce root hexane extract was found to be negligible against all the four tested strains of bacteria. These findings suggest that ethanolic and ethyl acetate root extracts of Pithecellobium dulce has potential as effective anti-bacterial agent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spirituality in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia San Martín Petersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality may be understood as a group of feelings, beliefs and actions that suppose a search for the transcendent, sacred or divine. As representations about an ultimate power, they contribute to the sense and purpose in life and orient peoples behavior, relationships, and ways to feel and think about reality and about themselves. Since either in the growing old process and in the evaluation of life that occurs when approaching to death it may emerge conflicts, confusion and suffering, people beliefs about what is beyond death, or the answers to the questions about what for and why of life, become determinants in elders well-being. Furthermore, considering that life expectancy has significantly increased, and that the ways of growing old are changing as well as what being old means, and this process advantages and disadvantages or problems, in it ́s different contexts, it ́s necessary to think old age over again, as well as the policies that affect the quality of life of this group of people. Therefore, every professional who assist elderly, specially mental health professionals, must consider the spiritual referents of the individual in order to give the best assistance in whatever problems may appear in the growing old process. 

  12. Sikhism, spirituality and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Bhui, Kamaldeep S; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2012-12-01

    Sikhism has millions of followers in India and among the Indian diaspora. As a religion it is relatively young but carries with it unique perspectives which are often not well known. The holy book of Sikhism, Guru Granth Sahib, is not only the last Guru, but also remained a key text for this religion. Using descriptions of the religion and its followers we attempt to understand the context of spirituality within this religion and attempt to apply it to clinical settings. We explored various texts to understand the notions of spirituality and ethics and directions for living one's life. We studied both the Gurumukhi version as well as the English translation of the Sikh holy text. In the context of history of the Sikhs, various descriptions related to mental well being were identified. In this paper we describe the history, development and the core values of the religion and we also review their role on psychiatric and mental health settings for managing Sikh patients. Guru Granth Sahib offers a very useful insight into what is understood by the term equivalent to depression and its phenomenology. The notions of dukh (loosely translated as pain, but can also mean sadness or suffering) and maya (illusion) and their role in daily living are also discussed. In this paper these descriptions are explored further and their importance explained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Examining Client Spiritual History and the Construction of Meaning: The Use of Spiritual Timelines in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Jennifer R.

    2009-01-01

    The imperative to integrate spirituality in counseling has been well documented in the counseling literature. Developing spiritual timelines is one creative technique that may help clients with spiritual concerns. The purpose of this manuscript is to briefly review spirituality in counseling, describe the use of spiritual timelines as a creative…

  14. The Spiritual Genogram in Training and Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Marsha Wiggins

    2001-01-01

    Describes the spiritual genogram, a blueprint of family members' multigenerational religious and spiritual affiliations, events, and conflicts. Used as a tool in both training and supervision, the spiritual genogram enables students and supervisees to make sense of their own religious and spiritual heritage and to explore the ways in which their…

  15. Secret Wisdom: Spiritual Intelligence in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcup, Charmayne

    2016-01-01

    Current models of spiritual development suggest that adolescents have limited capacity for spirituality and spiritual experiences. Adolescents are seen to have immature moral and ethical judgment and be incapable of deep spiritual experience due to lack of cognitive development. This mixed-methods study explored the existence of spiritual…

  16. The Critical Spirituality of Paulo Freire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that Paulo Freire's capacity for hope in the face of personal struggle and exile issued from his spirituality, this paper examines Freire's spirituality through the lens of Michael Dantley's concept of critical spirituality. The concept of spirituality as discussed in the literature is explored, followed by an explication…

  17. Acute care nurses' spiritual care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallison, Barry S; Xu, Yan; Jurgens, Corrine Y; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers in providing spiritual care to hospitalized patients. A convenience sample (N = 271) was recruited at an academic medical center in New York City for an exploratory, descriptive questionnaire. The Spiritual Care Practice (SCP) questionnaire assesses spiritual care practices and perceived barriers to spiritual care. The SCP determines the percentage that provides spiritual support and perceived barriers inhibiting spiritual care. The participation rate was 44.3% (N = 120). Most (61%) scored less than the ideal mean on the SCP. Although 96% (N = 114) believe addressing patients spiritual needs are within their role, nearly half (48%) report rarely participating in spiritual practices. The greatest perceived barriers were belief that patient's spirituality is private, insufficient time, difficulty distinguishing proselytizing from spiritual care, and difficulty meeting needs when spiritual beliefs were different from their own. Although nurses identify themselves as spiritual, results indicate spirituality assessments are inadequate. Addressing barriers will provide nurses opportunities to address spirituality. Education is warranted to improve nurses' awareness of the diversity of our society to better meet the spiritual needs of patients. Understanding these needs provide the nurse with opportunities to address spirituality and connect desires with actions to strengthen communication and the nurse-patient relationship.

  18. Treating Spiritual Issues in Secular Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminiak, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirituality as a spiritual phenomenon that is independent of, yet open to, matters of personal religion and belief in God. Proposes that an elaborated psychology of spirituality helps therapists focus the psychotherapeutically relevant and spiritual issues in the client's presentation; build on the client's healthy commitments; and…

  19. Sleep paralysis as spiritual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, David J

    2005-03-01

    This article presents an overview of the sleep paralysis experience from both a cultural and a historical perspective. The robust, complex phenomenological pattern that represents the subjective experience of sleep paralysis is documented and illustrated. Examples are given showing that, for a majority of subjects, sleep paralysis is taken to be a kind of spiritual experience. This is, in part, because of the very common perception of a non-physical 'threatening presence' that is part of the event. Examples from various cultures, including mainstream contemporary America which has no widely known tradition about sleep paralysis, are used to show that the complex pattern and spiritual interpretation are not dependent on cultural models or prior learning. This is dramatically contrary to conventional explanations of apparently 'direct' spiritual experiences, explanations that are summed up as the 'Cultural Source Hypothesis.' This aspect of sleep paralysis was not recognized through most of the twentieth century. The article examines the way that conventional modern views of spiritual experience, combined with medical ideas that labeled 'direct' spiritual experiences as psychopathological, and mainstream religious views of such experiences as heretical if not pathological, suppressed the report and discussion of these experiences in modern society. These views have resulted in confusion in the scientific literature on sleep paralysis with regard to its prevalence and core features. The article also places sleep paralysis in the context of other 'direct' spiritual experiences and offers an 'Experiential Theory' of cross-culturally distributed spiritual experiences.

  20. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  1. Celtic spirituality and the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Duncan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Celtic spirituality has a long and distinguished ancestry with its origins in pre-Christian times. It was inculturated amongst peoples in the far west of Europe, particularly in Ireland, Scotland and the north and south west of England. It was different from Roman Christianity in distinct ways until the mid-7th century CE when Roman Christianity became the norm in Britain. It has experienced various revivals during the history of Christianity, with two contemporary expressions in New Age spirituality and Christian spirituality. From its inception, it has been closely linked to the environment.

  2. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Buckweed Fire Perimeter, Agua Dulce Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  3. A new subspecies of sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos, from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke L. Bessesen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a distinctive new subspecies of sea snake from the occasionally anoxic inner-basin waters of Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, based on combined data garnered between 2010 and 2017 for 154 specimens, 123 free-ranging and 31 museum-held. The yellow sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos Bessesen & Galbreath, subsp. n., is diagnosed by a notably smaller body size and nearly uniform yellow coloration, which contrasts with the black and yellow striae and tail spots or bands typical of the species. Within the modest geographic range (circa 320 km2, nearly all specimens possess both diagnostic character states. Bathymetrics appear to restrict genetic flow between this allopatric population and conspecifics in the broader Eastern Pacific. In perspicuous contrast to typical H. platurus, H. p. xanthos shows no association with drift lines, and feeds at night in turbulent waters, assuming a sinusoidal ambush posture never previously reported for the species. This evolutionarily significant unit (ESU warrants taxonomic recognition and active protection.

  4. The social structure of Golfo Dulce bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and the influence of behavioural state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Kelsey; Acevedo-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Ecological factors such as habitat and food availability affect the social structure of bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops spp.). Here, we describe the social structure of bottlenose dolphins ( T. truncatus ) in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, a semi-enclosed, fjord-like tropical embayment resembling a pelagic system. We also examine behaviour-linked social strategies by comparing social structure relative to behavioural state: feeding versus non-feeding. We analysed 333 sightings over 210 days from boat-based surveys. Despite the uniqueness of the area, the 47 analysed adults had a social structure similar to other populations: a well-differentiated fission-fusion society with sex-specific patterns of associations and aggression. These results indicate that differences in social structure relative to other populations were a matter of degree. Association strength of dyads was highly correlated across behavioural states, indicating constraints on social fluidity. Males displayed a marked difference in lagged association rate and females displayed a small difference in association homogeneity between states. We suggest this difference in population-wide social connections between behavioural states, particularly for males, was due to mating strategies, a pressure which is strongest during non-feeding behaviour and relaxed during feeding. This finding highlights the importance of considering behavioural state when examining individual bonds and the behavioural plasticity for which the bottlenose dolphin is well known.

  5. Order and session size effects on treatment discrimination: Case study liking for Dulce de Leche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jéssica Ferreira; da Silveira, Andreza Pereira Lage; Bueno Filho, Júlio Silviode de Sousa; Souza, Vanessa Rios de; da Silva, André Barbosa Ventura; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the implications of the number of samples per panelist in experimental precision and relative efficiency of treatment comparisons when modelling order effects for Dulce de Leche samples using a Sudoku design. Precision is defined as small variance and relative efficiency is defined as smaller variance than other alternative. Both are related to increasing discrimination power. A series of 8 Sudoku 16×16 squares being 4 randomized independently and 4 others in the reverse order, was designed to allow a linear model fitting to experiments of different sizes (orders 1 to 4, 1 to 8, 1 to 12 and 1 to 16). Data from 112 panelists were kept. Responses were recorded using a nine-point hedonic scale. Data was analyzed using a mixed linear model panelist, order and treatment (sample) effects. Analysis has shown a pronounced order effect, showing a first sample effect overestimation. Moreover, it was noted that order effect was rather evidenced in the first four orders, making for a relatively more precise experiment than the ones using remaining samples. Therefore, the use of Sudoku can be a convenient strategy to organize smaller testing sessions that could result in efficient experiments, with small variance of the estimated averages or effects and needing a lot less panelists to make a design as efficient as the large one used. Moreover, Sudoku can also inspire an efficient design that allows different test sessions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Western Sport and Spiritualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosiewicz Jerzy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport activity of achievement-oriented (professional, Olympic, spectacular character is first of all exposition of rivalry and striving for variously understood sports success (resulting from measurable or discretionary criteria. It refers to winning a competition or taking another expected place as well as to other forms of satisfaction, such as financial gratification or social (political, ethnic, professional recognition. Spirituality is here neither an aim, nor an expected value - it constitutes rather an additional or redundant quality. A competitor focuses his/her attention first of all on the main aim assumed in planned or current rivalry. Emotional sensations which are experienced by athletes before, during or after competitions testify to mental and emotional stress which accompanies sports combat.

  7. The relationship between spiritual intelligence and burnout in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Job burnout is a psychiatric syndrome that causes symptoms such as emotional exhaustion, loss of job satisfaction and dispossess of personality. Spiritual intelligence also includes a type of adaptation and problem-solving behavior that includes the highest levels of growth in different cognitive, ethical, ...

  8. McDonaldizing Spirituality: Mindfulness, Education, and Consumerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Terry

    2017-01-01

    The exponential growth of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in recent years has resulted in a marketisation and commodification of practice--popularly labeled "McMindfulness"--which divorces mindfulness from its spiritual and ethical origins in Buddhist traditions. Such commodification is criticized by utilising ideas and insights…

  9. Salt, Light, and Leaven? Spiritual Formation of Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Russell M.

    Exact delineation of the duties and obligations of Catholic educators in the development of religious growth in their pupils is set forth. Teaching methods and instructional aids are suggested, and the role of the teacher as a spiritual guide is explored. Responsibility for moral instruction is delegated to parents and to the community as well as…

  10. Religiousness/Spirituality and Mental Health among Older Male Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Phillips, Laura Lee; Roff, Lucinda Lee; Cavanaugh, Ronald; Day, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: With the rapid growth in the older inmate population, emerging issues regarding physical and mental health require greater research and clinical attention. We examined the relation of religiousness/spirituality; demographic characteristics such as age, race, and type of crime; and physical and mental health among 73 older male inmates in…

  11. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following: Religious denomination , if any. Beliefs or philosophy of life. Important spiritual practices or rituals . Using ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  12. Dulce Wireless Tijuana: A Randomized Control Trial Evaluating the Impact of Project Dulce and Short-Term Mobile Technology on Glycemic Control in a Family Medicine Clinic in Northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzaldo-Campos, María Cecilia; Contreras, Sonia; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana; Menchaca-Díaz, Rufino; Fortmann, Addie; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena

    2016-04-01

    The global epidemic of diabetes calls for innovative interventions. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Project Dulce model, with and without wireless technology, on glycemic control and other clinical and self-reported outcomes in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in Mexico. Adults with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥8% were recruited from Family Medical Unit #27 of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Tijuana, México, and randomly assigned to one of three groups: Project Dulce-only (PD); Project Dulce technology-enhanced with mobile tools (PD-TE); or IMSS standard of care/control group (CG). Clinical and self-reported outcomes were assessed at baseline, Month 4, and Month 10. Time-by-group interactions and within-group changes were analyzed. HbA1c reductions from baseline to Month 10 were significantly greater in PD-TE (-3.0% [-33 mmol/mol]) and PD (-2.6% [-28.7 mmol/mol]) compared with CG (-1.3% [-14.2 mmol/mol]) (P = 0.009 and 0.001, respectively). PD-TE and PD also exhibited significant improvement in diabetes knowledge when compared with CG (P technology substantially improved glycemic control and diabetes knowledge in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes in a Mexican family medical unit, suggesting that integrating peer-led education, nurse coordination, and 3G wireless technology is an effective approach for improving diabetes outcomes in high-risk populations.

  13. Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Registered Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirsten Haugaard; Turner, de Sales

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Nurses The purpose of this study was to explore how Danish registered nurses understand the phenomenon of spiritual care and how their understanding impacts on their interventions with their patients. Nurses are responsible for the provision of care which...... would engage in provision of spiritual care. The participants acknowledged that their understanding of spirituality influenced their provision of spiritual care, which was recognized as a challenge requiring the nurse’s initiative and courage. Spirituality was primarily understood as a patient’s private...... respects patients’ values, religion, customs, and spiritual beliefs. Literature however revealed that the phenomenon of spiritual care is complex and variously interpreted, and that there seems to be a lack of conceptual clarity regarding what constitutes spiritual care. A phenomenological and hermeneutic...

  14. Describing Spirituality at the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Pam Shockey; Berry, Devon M

    2015-09-01

    Spirituality is salient to persons nearing the end of life (EOL). Unfortunately, researchers have not been able to agree on a universal definition of spirituality reducing the effectiveness of spiritual research. To advance spiritual knowledge and build an evidence base, researchers must develop creative ways to describe spirituality as it cannot be explicitly defined. A literature review was conducted to determine the common attributes that comprise the essence of spirituality, thereby creating a common ground on which to base spiritual research. Forty original research articles (2002 to 2012) focusing on EOL and including spiritual definitions/descriptions were reviewed. Analysis identified five attributes that most commonly described the essence of spirituality, including meaning, beliefs, connecting, self-transcendence, and value. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Acute care nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care: an exploratory study in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Brendan Wk; Tiew, Lay Hwa; Creedy, Debra K

    2016-09-01

    To investigate acute care nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care and relationships with nurses' personal and professional characteristics. Spirituality and spiritual care are often neglected or absent in daily nursing practice. Nurses' perceptions of spirituality can be influenced by personal, professional and social factors and affect the provision of spiritual care. A cross-sectional, exploratory, nonexperimental design was used. All nursing staff (n = 1008) from a large acute care hospital in Singapore were invited to participate. Participants completed a demographic form and the Spiritual Care-Giving Scale. Completed surveys were received from 767 staff yielding a response rate of 76%. Descriptive statistics and General Linear Modelling were used to analyse data. Acute care nurses reported positive perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Religion, area of clinical practice and view of self as spiritual were associated with nurses' reported perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care. Nurses working in this acute care hospital in Singapore reported positive perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Respondents tended to equate religion with spirituality and were often unclear about what constituted spiritual care. They reported a sense of readiness to apply an interprofessional approach to spiritual care. However, positive perceptions of spirituality may not necessarily translate into practice. Spiritual care can improve health outcomes. Nurses' understanding of spirituality is essential for best practice. Interprofessional collaboration with clinicians, administrators, educators, chaplains, clergy and spiritual leaders can contribute to the development of practice guidelines and foster spiritual care by nurses. Further research is needed on the practical applications of spiritual care in nursing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Do spiritual patients want spiritual interventions?: A qualitative exploration of underserved cancer patients' perspectives on religion and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Emma M; Kolidas, Evelyn; Moadel, Alyson

    2015-02-01

    This study examines religion and spirituality among advanced cancer patients from an underserved, ethnically-diverse population by exploring patient conceptualizations of religion and spirituality, the role of religion and spirituality in coping with cancer, and patient interest in spiritual support. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients who had participated in a study of a "mind-body" support group for patients with all cancer types. Analysis based on grounded theory was utilized to identify themes and theoretical constructs. With regard to patient conceptualizations of religion and spirituality, three categories emerged: (1) Spirituality is intertwined with organized religion; (2) Religion is one manifestation of the broader construct of spirituality; (3) Religion and spirituality are completely independent, with spirituality being desirable and religion not. Religion and spirituality played a central role in patients' coping with cancer, providing comfort, hope, and meaning. Patients diverged when it came to spiritual support, with some enthusiastic about interventions incorporating their spiritual values and others stating that they already get this support through religious communities. Spirituality plays a central role in the cancer experience of this underserved ethnically-diverse population. While spirituality seems to be a universal concern in advanced cancer patients, the meaning of spirituality differs across individuals, with some equating it with organized religion and others taking a more individualized approach. It is important that psychosocial interventions are developed to address this concern. Future research is needed to further explore the different ways that patients conceptualize spirituality and to develop spiritually-based treatments that are not "one size fits all."

  17. Religion, spirituality, positive youth development, and thriving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Pamela Ebstyne; Carr, Drew; Boitor, Ciprian

    2011-01-01

    Issues of spirituality and thriving are pertinent to the period of adolescence given the marked changes in body, mind, and relationships. In order to provide an overview of the relationship between religion, spirituality, and positive youth development, this chapter offers a developmental systems perspective and proposes a relational spirituality as a framework for understanding adolescent religious and spiritual development. In addition, the chapter examines various psychological mechanisms through which religion and spirituality may promote positive youth development. Existing empirical research on the relationships between adolescent religion, spirituality, thriving, and specific indicators of positive youth development is reviewed. Finally, future directions for continuing to build the field of study are discussed.

  18. Spiritual culture crisis in modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusko Nadiya Mykhaylivna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article researches the concept of spirituality as a holistic phenomenon, characterises the current state of spirituality in Ukraine and reveal the basic ways of forming spiritual culture with the help of philosophical, cultural, theological, linguistic, pedagogical, and psychological approaches. Moreover, the crisis in the today’s spiritual culture is analysed, and the determinants of the negative processes in the modern society are examined. Therefore, we can state that education remains a priority area in the spiritual and cultural development of the society. In the current phase of state construction, the main educational objective is the development of the spiritual culture of personality.

  19. Aligning Islamic Spirituality to Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Zainul Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    This paper attempts to conceptualize Islamic spirituality in medical imaging that deals with the humanistic and technical dimensions. It begins with establishing an understanding concerning spirituality, an area that now accepted as part of patient-centred care. This is followed by discussions pertaining to Islamic spirituality, related to the practitioner, patient care and the practice. Possible avenues towards applying Islamic spirituality in medical imaging are proposed. It is hoped that the resultant harmonization between Islamic spirituality and the practice will trigger awareness and interests pertaining to the role of a Muslim practitioner in advocating and enhancing Islamic spirituality.

  20. Rendimiento y valor nutricional de tres variedades de sorgo dulce cultivadas en cuatro ambientes de Durango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Jiménez Ocampo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available El sorgo dulce muestra alto rendimiento de forraje para la alimentación de rumiantes. El objetivo fue evaluar el rendimiento y calidad forrajera de tres variedades de sorgo en Durango. En 2014, se evaluaron las variedades Lico, TOM 3 y Mercedes, en la Colonia Hidalgo (CH, Campo Experimental Valle del Guadiana (CEVAG, La Soledad (LS y La Goma (LG. El diseño experimental fue completamente aleatorio con arreglo factorial y cinco repeticiones. Se evaluó forraje verde (FV, forraje seco (FS, proteína cruda (PC, digestibilidad verdadera in vitro (DIVMS, fibra detergente neutra (FDN, fibra detergente ácida (FDA, lignina (L, celulosa (Cel, hemicelulosa (HE, valor relativo (VRF y calidad relativa del forraje (CRF. Se observaron diferencias significativas (P≤0.01 y 0.05 entre ambientes y variedades para FV, FS, L, VRF y CRF y entre ambientes para PC, FDN, FDA, CEL, HE y DIVMS. En CEVAG, se registró el mayor rendimiento de FV (75.9 t ha-1 y FS (12.4 t ha-1. El valor más alto de PC se obtuvo en LG (10 %; mientras que la DIVMS fue alta en LS (78.2 % y más baja en LG (63.9 %. El contenido de L fue más alto en CH (6.3 % y LG (6.2 %; mientras que, en LS fue de 3.4 %. Exceptuando LG, en todos los ambientes se obtuvo alta calidad forrajera (CRF= 106.7 a 135.0 %. El sorgo es una opción forrajera en Durango, aunque debe cuidarse la fecha de siembra y cosecha, control de insectos, riego y fertilización para incrementar el rendimiento y calidad nutricional.

  1. Comportamiento de las masas de agua en el Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica durante El Niño (1997 - 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Quesada-Alpízar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Los patrones de circulación oceánica, la estructura vertical de la columna de agua y la posición vertical de la termoclina son factores de gran importancia para comprender la distribución vertical de los organismos planctónicos en los océanos. Este trabajo estudia la hidrografía del Golfo Dulce, un fiordo tropical en el Pacífico Oriental Tropical (POT, y la posible influencia sobre dicho sistema del ENOS 1997-1998. Se seleccionó un total de cinco estaciones de muestreo, para las cuales se obtuvo, mensualmente, perfiles verticales de temperatura (ºC, salinidad (‰ y oxígeno disuelto (mg O2 /l durante un periodo de dos años. Los resultados muestran una fuerte estratificación vertical de la columna de agua asociada a la morfología de la cuenca del Golfo Dulce y a la incidencia del fenómeno ENOS. Además, se determinó que existen diferencias significativas en las características hidrográficas de las partes interna y externa de la cuenca del Golfo Dulce. Finalmente, se detectaron eventos bianuales de entrada de agua oceánica fría, con salinidad y concentraciones de oxígeno disuelto relativamente altas, a la cuenca. Estos eventos podrían estar asociados al sistema de afloramiento costero del Golfo de PanamáIn order to understand the vertical distribution of planktonic organisms in the oceans, it is important to consider a number of factors. Including oceanic circulation patterns, the vertical structure of the water column and the vertical position of the thermocline. This study examines the hydrography of Golfo Dulce, a tropical fjord -like embayment in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and the influence of the 1997-1998 ENSO on the system. Five sampling stations were selected and visited once a month for two years in order to obtain vertical profiles of temperature (ºC, salinity (‰ and dissolved oxygen (mg O² /l. Results show a strong vertical stratification of the water column associated to the morphology of Golfo Dulce

  2. Spirituality, social support, and flexibility among older adults: a five-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Nathalie; Martinent, Guillaume; Ferrand, Claude; Agli, Océane; Giraudeau, Caroline; Gana, Kamel; Roussiau, Nicolas

    2018-01-30

    The objectives of the study were to examine the trajectory of spirituality among older adults, to investigate the roles of gender and religion on the developmental trajectory of spirituality, and to explore whether the linear growth of spirituality accelerated or decelerated at time points at which the participants reported high scores of social support and flexibility. A five-year longitudinal study. The research used data from a longitudinal study, which follows a non-institutionalized older adults cohort of residents from France. The data used in this paper were collected at three time points (T1: 2007; T2: 2009; T3: 2012). A total of 567 participants were included in the analysis (59.44% female; M age = 75.90, SD = 5.12). Multilevel growth curve analysis was used measuring spirituality, satisfaction with social support, and flexibility. The results indicated the following: (1) stability of spirituality over time, (2) older women reported higher levels of spirituality than older men, and those who had a religion reported higher scores of spirituality than their counterparts who had no religion (these effects were strong and clinically meaningful), (3) older adults who reported higher levels of social support and flexibility also reported higher levels of spirituality, and (4) the slope of spirituality seemed to accelerate at time points at which participants also had higher levels of social support and flexibility (these effects were rather small but of theoretical interest). The results of the present study help to improve the understanding of the potential benefit of encouraging the spiritual aspects of life.

  3. Nurses' and caregivers' definition of spirituality from the Christian perspective: a comparative study between Malta and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torskenæs, Kristina B; Baldacchino, Donia R; Kalfoss, Mary; Baldacchino, Tracy; Borg, Josette; Falzon, Marica; Grima, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional comparative exploratory study was to explore the term spirituality as defined by four groups of nurses and two groups of caregivers from Malta and Norway. Spirituality is a complex subjective concept which may or may not contain religiosity. Several factors may influence the individual's interpretation with implications to nursing care and nursing management. Data were collected from six purposive samples using focus group discussions in Malta and Norway. The Taxonomy of Spirituality guided the study. Four themes defined the term 'spirituality'. Two differences were found between Malta and Norway. Connectedness with family and nature was emphasized more by the Maltese group while the Norwegian group identified both the positive and the negative energies of spirituality. A clinical environment conducive to holistic care is needed. Inclusion of spirituality in the continuous professional development programmes may enhance understanding of spirituality and foster spiritual growth. Irrespective of differences in cultures between Malta and Norway, commonalities were found in the definition and essence of spirituality in nursing care. Trans-cultural longitudinal research is recommended to explore further the definition of spirituality. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Factors Influencing the Spiritual Competency of Predoctoral Psychology Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasz, Christine A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among spiritual competencies, personal spiritual beliefs, and clinical supervision in spirituality with professional psychology predoctoral interns. It was hypothesized personal spiritual beliefs and supervision in spirituality would be predictors of spiritual competencies in clinical practice. Social…

  5. Effectiveness of Spiritual Group Therapy on Quality of Life and Spiritual Well-Being among Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Zamaniyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is deemed the century’s major health problem, and its increasing growth during the last decades has made experts concerned more than ever. Of all types of cancer, breast cancer is regarded as the second most common disease among women. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of spiritual group therapy on quality of life and spiritual well-being among patients suffering from breast cancer. The present research was carried out between March and June 2011. The sample consisted of 24 participants randomly assigned to 2 groups: an experimental group (n, 12 and a control group (n, 12. All the subjects completed questionnaires on quality of life and spiritual well-being in pretest and posttest. The experimental group received 12 sessions of spiritual group therapy. The results demonstrated improvement in quality of life and spiritual well-being in the experimental group. In conclusion, spiritual group therapy can be used to improve quality of life and spiritual well-being (religious health and existential health among patients with breast cancer.

  6. Science, Spirituality and Truth: Acknowledging Difference for Spiritual Dialogue and Human Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to explain why spiritual education must be clear about the nature of spiritual knowledge and truth and how it differs from the knowledge and truth generated by science. The author argues this is important in order that spirituality and science are equally valued, and in order that spiritual pedagogy appropriately reflects the…

  7. ASSET: A Model for Actioning Spirituality and Spiritual Care Education and Training in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Aru

    1999-01-01

    A model for improving nurses' preparation in spiritual care includes development of spiritual self-awareness, knowledge of varied traditions of spirituality, and ability to implement a spiritual dimension in nursing practice using the skills of communication, trust building, and giving hope. (SK)

  8. A Model of Spirituality for Ageing Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahjabeen; Khan, Shamsul

    2016-06-01

    Spirituality's influence on general well-being and its association with healthy ageing has been studied extensively. However, a different perspective has to be brought in when dealing with spirituality issues of ageing Muslims. Central to this perspective is the intertwining of religion and spirituality in Islam. This article will contribute to the understanding of the nature of Islamic spirituality and its immense importance in the life of a practicing ageing Muslim. Consequently, it will help care providers to include appropriate spiritual care in the care repertoire of a Muslim care recipient. It is assumed that the framework for a model of spirituality based on Islamic religious beliefs would help contextualise the relationship between spirituality and ageing Muslims. Not only challenges, but also the opportunities that old age provides for charting the spiritual journey have underpinned this model.

  9. Aves acuáticas de la Laguna de Agua Dulce y el Estero El Ermitaño, Jalisco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Hernández Vázquez

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Se analizó la presencia y número de aves acuáticas, así como la distribución estacional y espacial de los diferentes grupos en la laguna de Agua Dulce y el estero El Ermitaño, Jalisco, México, entre diciembre de 1997 a noviembre de 1998. Considerando únicamente el mes de máxima abundancia de cada especie hubo 86 471 aves en ambos humedales (29 686 en Agua Dulce y 56 785 en El ermitaño, y una abundancia acumulada (suma de las abundancias mensuales de 179 808 aves (66 976 en Agua Dulce y 112 832 en Ermitaño. Se identificaron 87 especies de aves, de las cuales 78 especies estuvieron presentes en Agua Dulce y 73 especies en El Ermitaño. La riqueza y abundancia fueron influenciados por la llegada de aves migratorias por lo que el mayor número de especies e individuos se presentó durante el invierno. En general las aves mostraron preferencia por áreas someras, excepto las marinas que prefirieron áreas arenosas y protegidas por dunas como las que se encuentran en Agua Dulce. Los demás grupos como los patos y afines prefirieron las áreas con salinidades bajas, como las que se encuentran al sureste del estero El Ermitaño. La mayor abundancia de aves playeras fue observada en niveles de agua bajos, y al igual que las garzas se les observó con mayor frecuencia en sitios con salinidades altas e influenciados por las variaciones en las mareas, como los que se encuentran cerca de la boca-barra del ErmitañoWater birds from Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary, Jalisco, Mexico. Waterbird abundance, and seasonal and spatial distribution, were studied in two natural water pools at Jalisco, México, from December 1997 through November 1998. Maximum monthly abundance in Agua Dulce lake and El Ermitaño estuary was 86 471 birds (29 686 in Agua Dulce and 56 785 in Ermitaño, with a total cummulative abundance of 179 808 individuals (66 976 in Agua Dulce and 112 832 in Ermitaño. A total of 87 waterbirds species were recorded, 78 in Agua Dulce

  10. Spirituality and spiritual self-care: expanding self-care deficit nursing theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary L; Peters, Rosalind; Schim, Stephanie Myers

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose an integration of the concepts of spirituality and spiritual self-care within Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory as a critical step in theory development. Theoretical clarity is needed to understand the contributions of spirituality to health and well-being. Spirituality is the beliefs persons hold related to their subjective sense of existential connectedness including beliefs that reflect relationships with others, acknowledge a higher power, recognize an individual's place in the world, and lead to spiritual practices. Spiritual self-care is the set of spiritually-based practices in which people engage to promote continued personal development and well-being in health and illness.

  11. Mengembangkan Kecerdasan Spiritual Mahasiswa di Perguruan Tinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M. Tampubolon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses about how to develop spiritual intelligence of students in the college environment. This article describes pinciples of the application of the six ways of spiritual intelligence development into learning models, assignments, and campus life. The principles should be done by considering the meaning of the spiritual, developmental characteristics of students, and the characteristics of students’ spiritual development.  

  12. Spirituality and Religion in Modern Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Darpan Kaur Mohinder; Ajinkya, Shaunak

    2012-01-01

    Man has always yearned for a higher sense of belonging in life. Since ancient ages, human beings have tried to examine and evaluate the relationship between spirituality, religion and medicine. The interface of spirituality, quality of life and mental health is fascinating and sublime. Religion and spirituality play an essential role in the care giving of patients with terminal illnesses and chronic medical conditions. Patient′s needs, desires and perspectives on religion and spirituality sho...

  13. John Calvin and postmodern spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.H. Fick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Postmodernists reject universal truth claims and brand them as violent impositions on a person by powerful institutions. Postmodernist spirituality seeks for a more subjective, life- experience based attitude towards values and truths of the Bible and relationship in community. Careful consideration should be given to the issues of community, knowledge/truth, faith, and faith experience. This article will show that, in his “Institutes”, Calvin gives ample attention to faith, the liberating truth about God as revealed in Jesus Christ, and to the Chris- tian’s intimate relationship with Him. Being in Christ, commu- nion with Christ or the “unio mystica cum Christo” through faith as a central theme in Calvin’s theology, needs to be redis- covered and re-applied to reformed spirituality as apologetic means in a postmodern world. This treasure should satisfy the kind of spirituality postmodernists yearn for.

  14. Comportamiento de variedades de Chile dulce (capsicum annum en la región occidental de el Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesser Linares

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsicun annum en la región occidental de El Salvador. Con el objetivo de seleccionar material vegetativo adaptable a las diferentes condiciones agroecológicas de El Salvador, se implementó una investigación de seis variedades de chile dulce. Los ensayos se realizaron en Candelaria de la Frontera, Atiquizaya y Chalchuapa en el año 2002. El diseño experimental fue de bloques al azar, con cuatro repeticiones y seis tratamientos, conformados por los variedades Nathalie, Comandante, Lido, Tikal, Quetzal y una variedad Criolla. Hubo diferencias significativas al 1 % de probabilidad para las variables de altura de planta, largo, peso, diámetro, numero de frutos y rendimiento, en el combinado de las tres localidades. El material Nathalie, sobresalió en las variables altura de planta (0,49 m, número de frutos (259.500 frutos/ha, y rendimiento (25,11 t/ha, y como consecuencia reportó el mejor ingreso ($ 19.332,80 y la mejor relación beneficio costo (3,31. La duración de anaquel varió entre seis y nueve días con respecto a los diferentes materiales de chile dulce. Los resultados obtenidos podrían crear la base para validar el cultivar Nathalie en las zonas de influencia.

  15. Interfaith Spiritual Care: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefbroer, A.I.; Olsman, E.; Ganzevoort, R.R.; Van Etten - Jamaludin, F.S.

    2017-01-01

    Although knowledge on spiritual care provision in an interfaith context is essential for addressing the diversity of patients’ religious and spiritual needs, an overview of the literature is lacking. Therefore, this article reviews the empirical literature on interfaith spiritual care (ISC) in

  16. [Spiritual phenomena occurring in everybody and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsiak, M

    2008-01-01

    The past several years have seen an explosion of research in the area of spirituality and health. However, confusion and incomprehension of the conception of spirituality (e.g. confounding spirituality with various conventional views on religiousness) hampers better understanding in this area. The present paper proposes definition of spiritual phenomena in man based on natural epistemological and instrumental criteria (whether a certain phenomenon can be objectively known and evoked): spiritual phenomena in man are those, which cannot be objectively known nor evoked, but which act (e.g., love, idea). Spiritual phenomena can be really known only in the self ("in spirit"). Objectively known can be only manifestations of spiritual phenomena. Some attributes of love (e.g. its personal uniqueness) or ideas (e.g., sense of own life) whose satisfaction appears to be important for health are briefly outlined. A review of some frequently cited recent papers investigating the role of spirituality in health and discussion of frequent pitfalls in this area is given. Spirituality is a universal human phenomenon. All human beings, secular or religious, encounter with spiritual phenomena. Although the present conception of spirituality distances from some conventional views on religiousness, it is not atheistic. On the contrary, it accommodates the basic religious concept "God is love". Conceptual clarification is essential for further progress in the study of impact of spirituality on health.

  17. Why Is Music a Language of Spirituality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yob, Iris M.

    2010-01-01

    The basic thesis explored in this paper is that rather than seeing spirituality as a byproduct of music, the other arts, and religion, music, the other arts, and religion might be seen as a byproduct of spirituality--hence, the proposition that music is a language of spirituality. If that is the case, there are twin dangers: talk of "wholism" can…

  18. Spirituality and contextuality | Waaijman | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses various historiographies of spirituality as an indication of the influence of context on spirituality. It gives an overview of the most important historiographies of spirituality. Secondly, it describes the extremes of contextuality and noncontextuality, before finally reflecting on the dialectic tension between ...

  19. What is spirituality? | Waaijman | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay provides, first of all, a historical perspective on the nature of spirituality by investigating its early forms, followed by a discussion of two approaches in the last century. It then investigates three basic forms of spirituality, concluding with an overview of elements of spirituality.

  20. Interfaith Spiritual Care: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefbroer, Anke I.; Olsman, Erik; Ganzevoort, R. Ruard; van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi S.

    2017-01-01

    Although knowledge on spiritual care provision in an interfaith context is essential for addressing the diversity of patients' religious and spiritual needs, an overview of the literature is lacking. Therefore, this article reviews the empirical literature on interfaith spiritual care (ISC) in

  1. Relationships between breath ratios, spirituality and health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this retrospective, quantitative study was to investigate relationships between breath ratios, spirituality perceptions and health perceptions, with special reference to breath ratios that best predict optimal health and spirituality. Significant negative correlations were found between breath ratios and spirituality ...

  2. Does the spirituality of nurses interfere in the record of spiritual suffering diagnosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Ienne; Rosa Aurea Quintella Fernandes; Ana Claudia Puggina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To assess the spirituality of nurses and relate it to personal characteristics, sector of activity, and spiritual practices; to analyze the influence of spirituality of nurses in the record of a "spiritual suffering" diagnosis. Methods: Quantitative cross-sectional study, using the World Health Organization's Quality of Life Instrument-Spirituality, Religion and Personal Beliefs Module (WHOQOL-SRPB). Results: 132 nurses were included and most of them were women (81.8%)...

  3. Measuring Spirituality as a Universal Human Experience: A Review of Spirituality Questionnaires

    OpenAIRE

    Jager Meezenbroek, Eltica; Garssen, Bert; Berg, Machteld; Dierendonck, Dirk; Visser, Adriaan; Schaufeli, Wilmar

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSpirituality is an important theme in health research, since a spiritual orientation can help people to cope with the consequences of a serious disease. Knowledge on the role of spirituality is, however, limited, as most research is based on measures of religiosity rather than spirituality. A questionnaire that transcends specific beliefs is a prerequisite for quantifying the importance of spirituality among people who adhere to a religion or none at all. In this review, we discus...

  4. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima NN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nádia Nara Rolim Lima,1 Vânia Barbosa do Nascimento,1 Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho,1 Modesto Leite Rolim Neto,2 Marcial Moreno Moreira,2 Aline Quental Brasil,2 Francisco Telésforo Celestino Junior,2 Gislene Farias de Oliveira,2 Alberto Olavo Advíncula Reis3 1Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, ABC Region Medical School, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil; 3Public Health Postgraduate Program, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS] was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people's welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers

  5. Nurses’ Perceptions of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Different Health Care Settings in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van Leeuwen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows similarities and differences in perceptions and competences regarding spirituality and spiritual care of nurses in different health care settings. Research on this specific topic is limited and can contribute towards a nuanced implementation of spiritual care in different nursing care settings. Four hundred forty nine nurses in different health care settings completed a questionnaire concerning spirituality and spiritual care, spiritual care competence, and personal spirituality. Respondents reported a generic (instead of more specific view of spirituality and spiritual care, and they perceived themselves to be competent in providing spiritual care. Compared to nurses in hospital settings, nurses in mental health care and home care have a more generic view of spirituality and spiritual care and report a higher level of competence. Next to this, they perceive themselves more as spiritual persons. Future research is needed to develop further understanding in setting specific factors and their influence on nurses’ views and competence regarding spiritual care. Nursing education and management should consider an emphasis on spiritual competence development related to working settings of nurses.

  6. Student nurses perceptions of spirituality and competence in delivering spiritual care: a European pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Linda; van Leeuwen, René; Baldacchino, Donia; Giske, Tove; McSherry, Wilfred; Narayanasamy, Aru; Downes, Carmel; Jarvis, Paul; Schep-Akkerman, Annemiek

    2014-05-01

    Spiritual care is expected of nurses, but it is not clear how undergraduates can achieve competency in spiritual care at point of registration as required by nursing/midwifery regulatory bodies. To describe undergraduate nurses'/midwives' perceptions of spirituality/spiritual care, their perceived competence in delivering spiritual care, and to test out the proposed method and suitability of measures for a larger multinational follow-on study. Cross-sectional, multinational, descriptive survey design. Author administered questionnaires were completed by 86% of the intended convenience sample of 618 undergraduate nurses/midwives from 6 universities in 4 European countries in 2010. Students held a broad view of spirituality/spiritual care and considered themselves to be marginally more competent than not in spiritual care. They were predominantly Christian and reported high levels of spiritual wellbeing and spiritual attitude and involvement. The proposed method and measures were appropriate and are being used in a follow-on study. The following are worthy of further investigation: whether the pilot study findings hold in student samples from more diverse cultural backgrounds; whether students' perceptions of spirituality can be broadened to include the full range of spiritual needs patients may encounter and whether their competence can be enhanced by education to better equip them to deliver spiritual care; identification of factors contributing to acquisition of spiritual caring skills and spiritual care competency. © 2013.

  7. Estabilidad de un producto dulce de tamarillo (Cyphomandra betacea conservado por métodos combinados

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    Xadeni Villegas-Ruíz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue aplicar la tecnología de métodos combinados para elaborar una base dulce (BDT de tamarillo (Cyphomandra betacea, así como evaluar su estabilidad durante el almacenamiento. La BDT fue preparada al pH natural de la fruta (3,72, con una actividad de agua (aw reducida (0,901 mediante la adición de sacarosa, y adicionada con benzoato de sodio (0,1% como antimicrobiano. La BDT se almacenó en refrigeración (4°C, protegida de la luz, y se evaluó cada tercer día durante 60 días determinando sus características fisicoquímicas (color, aw, pH y acidez titulable como ácido cítrico; antioxidantes (capacidad antioxidante, fenoles totales y antocianinas; y microbiológicas (bacterias mesófilas aerobias, mohos y levaduras. La BDT fue adicionada a yogurt natural para evaluar sensorialmente su aceptación general durante el almacenamiento; esta evaluación se llevó a cabo cada siete días durante 49 días. El tiempo de almacenamiento no tuvo efecto sobre la aw, el pH y la acidez de la BDT. Se observó un aumento en el cambio neto de color (de 0 a 4,9 y se registró disminución en los compuestos fenólicos totales (de 1,213 a 0,816 mg de ácido gálico/g BDT, en las antocianinas monoméricas totales (de 0,910 a 0,611 mg cianidina-3-glucósido/g de BDT y en la capacidad antioxidante (de 5,816 a 3,576 μmol Trolox/g BDT. Las cuentas de bacterias mesófilas aerobias, mohos y levaduras, aumentaron ligeramente durante el almacenamiento (de 0,05 durante el almacenamiento.

  8. Spirituality and Virtue in Christian Formation: A Conversation between Thomistic and Ignatian Traditions

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects on Christian formation, the growth of the disciple into the image of Christ, from two traditions, the Thomistic and Ignatian. The Thomistic tradition offers a rich theological theory of virtue, but seems to require a more convincing narrative of how ‘infused’ virtue develops in the Christian life. The Ignatian tradition offers a more experiential spirituality, but today needs to explain how spiritual experience can be lived out. It is argued that the two traditions can be ...

  9. The use of dreams in spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranahan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of dreams in the context of pastoral care. Although many people dream and consider their dreams to hold some significant spiritual meaning, spiritual care providers have been reluctant to incorporate patients' dreams into the therapeutic conversation. Not every dream can be considered insightful, but probing the meaning of some dreams can enhance spiritual care practice. Hill's Cognitive-Experimental Dream Interpretation Model is applied in the current article as a useful framework for exploring dreams, gaining insight about spiritual problems, and developing a therapeutic plan of action. Bulkeley's criteria for dream interpretation were used to furnish safeguards against inappropriate application of dream interpretation to spiritual assessment and interventions.

  10. SPIRITUAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP BERBASIS AL-QUR’AN

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    Sodiman Sodiman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ian Marshall and Danah Zohar predicted theoretically that in the context of modern business will appear spirituality without religion as the moral basis of the business which he described as spiritual capital. But look at the phenomenon in Indonesia, sharia economic development is rapidly increasing which in fact appears based on religious values, then the theory Marshal and the Zohar indisputable. Spiritual entrepreneurship based on the Koran in Indonesia is growing; the ideas, thoughts, willingness (iradah, passion (ghirah and determination ('azm owned by an individual or group (community Muslims to strive in commerce (material or services that are based on the values of faith in God who taught the Koran. Spirituality entrepreneurship models based al-Qur'an that life (living values is very varied, among the models discussed in this paper are (1 spirituality entrepreneurship kaafah models, (2 spirituality entrepreneurship ukhuwah models, (3 spirituality entrepreneurship tareqat models, (4 spirituality entrepreneurship models keep ablution, (5 spirituality entrepreneurship models do not sell cigarettes, (6 the spirituality of entrepreneurship model- publication that profit to charity. Key Words : Spiritual, entrepreneurship, and models of bussines.

  11. [Spirituality and ethics in psychosomatic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmiš, Felix

    2015-01-01

    A patient has to cope with an illness on a physical, mental and spiritual level. There exists a difference between religiousness and spirituality even though the approach has a common foundation. Nonreligious spirituality relates to an inner experience, transcendent states of consciousness, meaningfulness, responsibility, sympathy, ethics, humanisation, faith. We encounter the spiritual point of view in humanistic psychotherapy, pastoral medicine, work of hospital chaplains, New Age, psychotherapies with religious and alternative aspects, transpersonal psychotherapy, psycho-spiritual crises, unusual states of consciousness, in meditation, Yoga, relaxation, kinesiology, ethicotherapy, reincarnation therapy, positive motivation, holotropic breathing, etc. There is description of different degrees of spiritual development, rational and irrational feeling of spirituality, Quantum Physics, spiritual intelligence, neuro-theology, physiological change, effects on improving adaptation during stress, drugs addiction, etc. Spirituality in relation with ethics is discussed in terms of socio-biology, evolution, emotions, aggressivity, genetics and social influence. The work analyses the effect of stressful situations on the deterioration of moral attitudes: during lack of time, obedience to authority and order. It is described how temperament and personality disorders can affect perception of spirituality, guilt feeling and conscience. Stressful situations, lack of time, relying only on the auxiliary objective methods leads to alienation of physician with a patient. Spirituality can partially improve the doctor-patient relationship, communication and sense of responsibility.

  12. Teaching spiritual care to nursing students:an integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston; Testerman, Nancy; Hart, Dynnette

    2014-01-01

    Graduating nurses are required to know how to support patient spiritual well-being, yet there is scant literature about how spiritual care is taught in undergraduate programs. Typically spiritual content only is sporadically included; the authors recommend intergrating spiritual can thoughout the nursing curriculum. This article describes how one Christian nursing school integrates spiritual care content, supports student spiritual well-being throughout the program, and evaluates spiritual care instruction at graduation.

  13. Spirituality in narratives of meaning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-23

    Jan 23, 2013 ... One of the themes that were identified by the research community, was that meaning in life is often associated with ... differed so much in terms of how God was 'storied', we decided to group the 'God stories' under the theme of ..... religion (and I assume also spirituality) into a psychological discussion would ...

  14. Leo Tolstoy the Spiritual Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Dan

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the often overlooked religious and educational works of the Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910). After outlining Tolstoy's life, religious and educational views, it is argued that Tolstoy has much to offer spiritual educators today. In particular, it suggests Tolstoy's insistence on the absolute and eternal nature of…

  15. About Human Condition and Spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Mihaela MACSUT

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the mankind is enthused about a real informational explosion but it the anxiety about the human mission also appears: “the humankind, enthused about its own discoveries and its power asks itself with anxiety which is its place and role in the Universe (Gaudim et Spes 3. Yesterday and today, the human being realized that he cannot “answer these fundamental questions which always have tormented his heart regarding the end and the beginning and hence his sense of existence” (Benedict XVI, Discourse, Pontifical Gregorian University Rome, the 4-th of November 2006. The 21st century is marked by a return to spirituality because the need for spirituality “reaffirms with power, so far that the observers... reach the conclusion attributed to Andre Malraux: «The 21st century will be religious or will not be at all»”.1 Nowadays, spirituality means searching for wisdom and there are questions as: who are the humans, where do they come from and where do they go. Under these circumstances, we have to establish some ethical benchmarks.2 This void makes place for the religious fundamentalism, a laic spirituality based of consumerism described as “a process through which goods are the services created, produced, used and exhausted”.3 But the human must switch from the state of consumer to the state of citizen.”4 Here is about “the necessity of surpassing a selfish ethics.”5

  16. New Spirituality and Social Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuijs, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    For some decades now, the supposedly egocentric character and subsequent lack of social engagement of adherents of new forms of spirituality is discussed without being resolved decisively, as chapter 1 shows. Therefore this empirical, quantitative study was started, with the main research question:

  17. Spirituality and Contemporary Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Though religion played a central role in the founding of U.S. higher education, over the centuries, its influence was diluted by competing secular emphases. In recent decades, religion has seen a resurgence in academic and co-curricular attention on campuses. In addition, a spirituality not based on religion has gained increasing attention. The…

  18. Nurses' Spirituality Improves Caring Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Abu; Nursalam; Adriani, Merryana; Kusnanto; Qomariah, Siti Nur; Hidayati, Laily; Pratiwi, Ika Nur; Ni'mah, Lailatun

    2017-01-01

    Caring is a behavior of giving holistic assistance to individuals. In fact, this important behavior still has not routinely performed in current nursing practice. Personality and sipirituality are important factors in forming one's caring behavior. Spirituality is a passion or impulse to perform noble action. The objective of this study was to…

  19. Spirituality and religion in modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Darpan Kaur Mohinder; Ajinkya, Shaunak

    2012-10-01

    Man has always yearned for a higher sense of belonging in life. Since ancient ages, human beings have tried to examine and evaluate the relationship between spirituality, religion and medicine. The interface of spirituality, quality of life and mental health is fascinating and sublime. Religion and spirituality play an essential role in the care giving of patients with terminal illnesses and chronic medical conditions. Patient's needs, desires and perspectives on religion and spirituality should be addressed in standard clinical care. Ongoing research in medical education and curriculum design points towards the inclusion of competence, communication and training in spirituality. There are structured and reliable instruments available for assessing the relationship between spirituality, religion and health in research settings. Intervention based scientific studies in the arena of spirituality and modern medicine are needed. Further research should be directed towards making modern medicine more holistic.

  20. Spiritual development in Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2017-12-01

    Spiritual development is one of the most important aspects of socialization that has attracted the attention of researchers. It is needed to train nursing student and novice nurses to provide high-quality care for patients. There is ambiguity in the definition of spiritual development and its relations, especially in the eastern countries. To explore the concept of spiritual development in Iranian nurses. Qualitative content analysis approach. Data were gathered from semi-structured interviews. Participants and research context: The participants were 17 Iranian Muslim nurses selected using a purposeful sampling. The place of interviews was on their choice. Ethical considerations: Based on the principles of the Helsinki declaration, the focus was on preserving the participants' autonomy, confidentiality, and anonymity. The participants were told the study purposes and trends, and their rights were emphasized; they were then asked to sign written consent forms. Formal research approval was obtained from Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Ethical approval was granted by the University Ethics Committee before the study was conducted (K/92 etc). Three themes for spiritual development were defined: obligation to religion, commitment to ethics, and commitment to law. From the results, factors such as connection to the limitless divine power, personal and society-oriented ethical codes, and commitment to the law are proposed. There are some differences between these findings and previous study, especially in the relation of the spirituality, religion, and law. Some studies, mostly Iranian, support these findings partially. The results suggest that it is better to teach nursing education based on humanistic principles, ethics, and law to the new generation of nurses to improve community health and development. More studies are needed to examine the relation between these themes.

  1. EFECTO DE LA PROPORCIÓN DE LECHE BOVINA Y CAPRINA EN LAS CARACTERÍSTICAS DEL DULCE DE LECHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Chac\\u00F3n-Villalobos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar el efecto de la proporción de leche de vaca y leche de cabra en las características del dulce de leche. En la Universidad de Costa Rica y en el Instituto Nacional de Aprendizaje (enero de 2010 a mayo de 2011 se evaluó el efecto sobre el pH, grados Brix, color y textura en los días 1 y 60 de almacenamiento, de diferentes proporciones de sustitución de leche bovina por leche caprina en el dulce de leche (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% y 100%. El agrado sensorial se estimó en el día 15 con 100 consumidores para las formulaciones y un producto comercial de referencia, efectuando un análisis de conglomerados. Para todas las variables existió efecto significativo del almacenamiento (p≤0,05, solo para el pH hubo interacción almacenamiento x producto. A mayor porcentaje de sustitución, menor fue el pH, disminuyendo este con el almacenamiento. Se requirió de más grados brix para alcanzar la consistencia deseada en las formulaciones que contenían leche caprina. El color mostró diferencias significativas (p≤0,05 pero con variaciones leves, incrementándose el color rojizo y amarillento con el tiempo y el porcentaje de sustitución. Existieron diferencias significativas (p≤0,05 en elasticidad, dureza, consistencia, índice de viscosidad y adhesividad para todos los porcentajes de leche de cabra excepto para 25% y 50%, generando un 0% de leche caprina la mayor dureza, adhesividad y elasticidad. Sensorialmente, un primer conglomerado (63% arrojó un aceptable agrado para todas las muestras, mientras un segundo conglomerado (37% manifestó un mayor agrado por el dulce de leche comercial y en segundo lugar por la sustitución de 50%.

  2. SISTEMA DE PRODUCCIÓN A PEQUEÑA ESCALA DE DULCE DE LECHE CAPRINO EN COSTA RICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mora Valverde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sistema de producción a pequeña escala de dulce de leche caprino en Costa Rica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue implementar un estudio de factibilidad para la diversifi cación productiva y comercial de un sistema caprino a través de la producción de dulce de leche. Éste incluyó el estudio de factibilidad, el desarrollo del proceso de producción y el diseño de producto para la elaboración a pequeña escala. Fue desarrollado en la provincia de San José, Costa Rica, en el cantón de Mora entre los meses de agosto del 2009 hasta enero del 2010. Se cuantifi caron datos por concepto de inversión, costos de producción, e índices fi nancieros. El estudio obtuvo una inversión de US $1360 (¢685 000* para una unidad con capacidad de transformación de 50 litros diarios. Se defi nió con un costo de producción por litro de dulce de leche de US$ 6,46 (¢3265, por presentación de 275 ml un costo de US$ 2,54 (¢1284. Con una tasa de actualización de 12% la proyección del proyecto generó un valor actual neto (VAN de US$ 24 530 (¢12 388 000 (US$ 0,41 ó ¢209 por unidad de venta, con un periodo de vida útil del mismo estimado en diez años. Conjuntamente se determinó un valor de Tasa interna de retorno (TIR de 226%. Respecto a los costos productivos anuales, el rubro de mayor importancia representó la compra de leche, con un 35% del costo total de producción, seguido por el envasado (18% y etiquetado (16%. El dato de rentabilidad fi nanciera correspondió a un 17,9%.

  3. Assessing the construction of spirituality: conceptualizing spirituality in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Martin Neal

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality has become a popular term in chaplaincy and health care settings, but is defined in such a myriad of ways and in such broad terms that, as a term, it threatens to become unfit for clinical practice. Several prominent conceptualizations of spirituality are analyzed in an attempt to recover the distinctiveness of spirituality. An adequate understanding of spirituality for clinical use should run close to the lived spirituality of persons in their unique individuality, differing contexts and various persuasions. In the second place a distinct discourse on spirituality needs to be sensitive to characteristic experiences of that which is other.

  4. Spirituality as a Positive Youth Development Construct: A Conceptual Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of spirituality as a positive youth development construct is reviewed in this paper. Both broad and narrow definitions of spirituality are examined and a working definition of spirituality is proposed. Regarding theories of spirituality, different models pertinent to spiritual development and the relationship between spirituality and positive youth development are highlighted. Different ecological factors, particularly family and peer influences, were found to influence spirituality. Research on the influence of spirituality on adolescent developmental outcomes is examined. Finally, ways to promote adolescent spirituality are discussed.

  5. Spirituality as a Positive Youth Development Construct: A Conceptual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of spirituality as a positive youth development construct is reviewed in this paper. Both broad and narrow definitions of spirituality are examined and a working definition of spirituality is proposed. Regarding theories of spirituality, different models pertinent to spiritual development and the relationship between spirituality and positive youth development are highlighted. Different ecological factors, particularly family and peer influences, were found to influence spirituality. Research on the influence of spirituality on adolescent developmental outcomes is examined. Finally, ways to promote adolescent spirituality are discussed. PMID:22654611

  6. Spirituality in Contemporary Paradigms: An Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Ramezani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: As two of the most prominent cultural components, spirituality and religion give sense to our human values, conducts, and experiences. The spiritual dimension is one of the four significant aspects of holistic care. However, the diversity of views has resulted in different interpretations of the reality of spirituality and its origins and consequences. Aim: This study aimed to examine the available approaches and paradigms in the realm of spirituality. Method: In the present integrative review, the initial search was performed in national and international databases, including Science Direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Sage, Medline, Wiley, SID, MagIran, IranMedex, and IranDoc, using the keyword, "spirituality", without considering any time limits. Articles relevant to the objectives of the study were then fully reviewed. Results: Since ancient times, spirituality has been sporadically discussed in human intellectual and artistic artifacts. This concept was expanded as an independent, systematic, and conscious movement since the second half of the 19th century in Europe, USA, and Canada. The three prominent approaches to spirituality include religious, secular, and holistic health perspectives. Implications for Practice: Despite the growing interest in research on spirituality, it is difficult to reach a unanimous decision about this concept. However, it should be noted that spiritual concerns cannot be disregarded, considering the holistic perspective to humanity as the building block of holistic nursing care. Overall, every patient is a unique human being whose spiritual needs are affected by his/her cultural beliefs and values.

  7. SPIRITUALITY NURSING AMONG PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Padma Sari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spirituality has been reported to have benefits for recovery and quality of life for people with mental disorders including patients with schizophrenia. Spiritual can also be a coping strategy for patients with schizophrenia. This study aims to explore the importance of spirituality among patients with schizophrenia. Method: This study uses descriptive phenomenological approach. There are 9 participants in this study, 7 participants are patients who diagnosed of schizophrenia and 2 participants are the caregivers. The data were analyzed by phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Results: Two main themes emerge from this study are 1 the meaning of spirituality is closed with Allah and the improvement of the spiritual practice and 2 the benefits of spirituality is recovery from the illness, symptoms management, behavioral change, emotional change and hope. Discussion: Spirituality has an important role for patients with schizophrenia including helping the recovery process and hope. The results of this study are expected to give an overview of the spiritual need among patients with schizophrenia so that the nurses can give religion and or spiritual activity in the nursing intervention. Key words: schizophrenia, spirituality, recovery

  8. Spirituality: an overlooked predictor of placebo effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Nikola; Sauer, Sebastian; Offenbächer, Martin; Giordano, James

    2011-06-27

    Empirical findings have identified spirituality as a potential health resource. Whereas older research has associated such effects with the social component of religion, newer conceptualizations propose that spiritual experiences and the intrapersonal effects that are facilitated by regular spiritual practice might be pivotal to understanding potential salutogenesis. Ongoing studies suggest that spiritual experiences and practices involve a variety of neural systems that may facilitate neural 'top-down' effects that are comparable if not identical to those engaged in placebo responses. As meaningfulness seems to be both a hallmark of spirituality and placebo reactions, it may be regarded as an overarching psychological concept that is important to engaging and facilitating psychophysiological mechanisms that are involved in health-related effects. Empirical evidence suggests that spirituality may under certain conditions be a predictor of placebo response and effects. Assessment of patients' spirituality and making use of various resources to accommodate patients' spiritual needs reflect our most current understanding of the physiological, psychological and socio-cultural aspects of spirituality, and may also increase the likelihood of eliciting self-healing processes. We advocate the position that a research agenda addressing responses and effects of both placebo and spirituality could therefore be (i) synergistic, (ii) valuable to each phenomenon on its own, and (iii) contributory to an extended placebo paradigm that is centred around the concept of meaningfulness.

  9. Concept Analysis of Spirituality: An Evolutionary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Geraldine; Coffey, Alice

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article is to clarify the concept of spirituality for future nursing research. Previous concept analyses of spirituality have mostly reviewed the conceptual literature with little consideration of the empirical literature. The literature reviewed in prior concept analyses extends from 1972 to 2005, with no analysis conducted in the past 9 years. Rodgers' evolutionary framework was used to review both the theoretical and empirical literature pertaining to spirituality. Evolutionary concept analysis is a formal method of philosophical inquiry, in which papers are analyzed to identify attributes, antecedents, and consequences of the concept. Empirical and conceptual literature. Three defining attributes of spirituality were identified: connectedness, transcendence, and meaning in life. A conceptual definition of spirituality was proposed based on the findings. Also, four antecedents and five primary consequences of spirituality were identified. Spirituality is a complex concept. This concept analysis adds some clarification by proposing a definition of spirituality that is underpinned by both conceptual and empirical research. Furthermore, exemplars of spirituality, based on prior qualitative research, are presented to support the findings. Hence, the findings of this analysis could guide future nursing research on spirituality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Spirituality: an overlooked predictor of placebo effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Nikola; Sauer, Sebastian; Offenbächer, Martin; Giordano, James

    2011-01-01

    Empirical findings have identified spirituality as a potential health resource. Whereas older research has associated such effects with the social component of religion, newer conceptualizations propose that spiritual experiences and the intrapersonal effects that are facilitated by regular spiritual practice might be pivotal to understanding potential salutogenesis. Ongoing studies suggest that spiritual experiences and practices involve a variety of neural systems that may facilitate neural ‘top-down’ effects that are comparable if not identical to those engaged in placebo responses. As meaningfulness seems to be both a hallmark of spirituality and placebo reactions, it may be regarded as an overarching psychological concept that is important to engaging and facilitating psychophysiological mechanisms that are involved in health-related effects. Empirical evidence suggests that spirituality may under certain conditions be a predictor of placebo response and effects. Assessment of patients' spirituality and making use of various resources to accommodate patients' spiritual needs reflect our most current understanding of the physiological, psychological and socio-cultural aspects of spirituality, and may also increase the likelihood of eliciting self-healing processes. We advocate the position that a research agenda addressing responses and effects of both placebo and spirituality could therefore be (i) synergistic, (ii) valuable to each phenomenon on its own, and (iii) contributory to an extended placebo paradigm that is centred around the concept of meaningfulness. PMID:21576141

  11. Palliative care specialists' beliefs about spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Megan; Butow, Phyllis; Olver, Ian

    2016-08-01

    A previous survey of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) members found low frequency of spiritual care provision. We hypothesized that physicians with special training in palliative medicine would demonstrate an increased sense of responsibility for and higher self-reported adequacy to provide spiritual care to patients than health professionals with general training. We surveyed members of the Australian and New Zealand Palliative Medicine Society (ANZSPM) to ascertain their spiritual care practices. We sent 445 e-mails on four occasions, inviting members to complete the online survey. Tabulated results were analyzed to describe the results. One hundred and fifty-eight members (35.5 %) responded. Physicians working primarily in palliative care comprised the majority (95 %) of the sample. Significantly more of the ANZSPM than MASCC respondents had previously received training in spiritual care and had pursued training in the previous 2 years. There was a significant difference between the two groups with regard to interest in and self-reported ability to provide spiritual care. Those who believed it was their responsibility to provide spiritual care were more likely to have had training, feel they could adequately provide spiritual care, and were more likely to refer patients if they could not provide spiritual care themselves. Training in spiritual care was more common in healthcare workers who had received training in palliative care. ANZSPM members gave higher scores for both the importance of spiritual care and self-reported ability to provide it compared to MASCC members.

  12. Mental Health: A Case for Spiritual Education in Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Dixie L.; Dennis, Brent G.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests a unique mental health prevention strategy that focuses on spiritual education in public schools, defining spirituality, describing the spirituality-mental health connection, highlighting educators' responsibility toward spiritual education, and offering specific activities and strategies for enhancing students' spirituality suitable for…

  13. The qualitative findings from an online survey investigating nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Wilfred; Jamieson, Steve

    2013-11-01

    To provide an opportunity for members to express their understandings of spirituality and spiritual care. The role and place of spirituality within nursing have been contested by academics and wider society. One argument posited is supporting patients with their spiritual needs is not the responsibility of nurses. This is despite a clear professional requirement for nurses to achieve competence in the delivery of spiritual care. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) conducted an online survey of its membership to ascertain their perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care identifying current practice. This article presents the findings from the final part of the survey that asked respondents to use a free-text facility to add comments on the subjects of spirituality and spiritual care. Overall, 4054 RCN members responded, of these 2327 provided additional comments. These comments were analysed using keyword and content/thematic analysis. Five broad themes emerged: (1) theoretical and conceptual understanding of spirituality, (2) fundamental aspects of nursing, (3) notion of integration and integrated care, (4) education and professional development and (5) religious belief and professional practice. Findings suggest that nurses have diverse understandings of spirituality and the majority consider spirituality to be an integral and fundamental element of the nurses' role. Generally, nurses had a broad, inclusive understanding of spirituality considering this to be 'universal'. There was some uncertainty and fear surrounding the boundaries between personal belief and professional practice. Respondents advocated formal integration of spirituality within programmes of nurse education. The concept of spirituality and the provision of spiritual care are now recognised as fundamental aspects of the nurse's role. There is a need for greater clarity between personal and professional boundaries to enable nurses to feel more confident and competent in delivering spiritual

  14. The Possibility, at Least, of Fiction and Perjury in Dulce Chacón’s La voz dormida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Graff

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches Dulce Chacón’s novel La voz dormida in the frame of its influence in Spain’s politics of memory. It offers to expand the horizons of the numerous works carried out up to the date relying on Jacques Derrida’s theories and reasonings on the notion of testimony or witnessing, in order to analyze the limits and the strengths of the narrative project of the authoress. Across this research, it will evoke the reasons for which the writer, who comes from a right-winged aristocratic family, felt the need to deliver the testimonies of communist victims of Franco. After questioning the possibility of bearing witness for the other, it will point that Chacón’s perspective may in fact proceed of an ideological coherence with the contemporary political power.

  15. The Death of Patriotism: Wilfre Owen’s Dulce et Decorum Est as an Anti-War Manifesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barış Ağır

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Being one of the biggest fluctuations in world history, humanity had never seen an event such World War I that so completely convulsed its existing ideals. Collapsing the existing ethos, the war soon showed its potencies in art and aesthetic. It would be unimaginable that poetry stood indifferent to the massive carnage. The poets who witnessed fighting on the front lines inscribed their experiences into their literary lives and used poetry as a medium of opposing war. They shaped their works to criticize threats directed to humanity. With these pecularities, war poetry, an important move towards modern poetry, stands for a geniune disengagement from the previous naturalistic poetry and signals a change in 20th century thinking. Among war poets, Wilfred Owen is an important figure whose works juxtapose the expected and the actual circumstances of war and his best known poem Dulce Et Decorum is probable to be read as an anti-war manifesto.

  16. Spiritual Care Education of Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nurses and health care professionals should have an active role in meeting the spiritual needs of patients in collaboration with the family and the chaplain. Literature criticizes the impaired holistic care because the spiritual dimension is often overlooked by health care professionals. This could be due to feelings of incompetence due to lack of education on spiritual care; lack of inter-professional education (IPE; work overload; lack of time; different cultures; lack of attention to personal spirituality; ethical issues and unwillingness to deliver spiritual care. Literature defines spiritual care as recognizing, respecting, and meeting patients’ spiritual needs; facilitating participation in religious rituals; communicating through listening and talking with clients; being with the patient by caring, supporting, and showing empathy; promoting a sense of well-being by helping them to find meaning and purpose in their illness and overall life; and referring them to other professionals, including the chaplain/pastor. This paper outlines the systematic mode of intra-professional theoretical education on spiritual care and its integration into their clinical practice; supported by role modeling. Examples will be given from the author’s creative and innovative ways of teaching spiritual care to undergraduate and post-graduate students. The essence of spiritual care is being in doing whereby personal spirituality and therapeutic use of self contribute towards effective holistic care. While taking into consideration the factors that may inhibit and enhance the delivery of spiritual care, recommendations are proposed to the education, clinical, and management sectors for further research and personal spirituality to ameliorate patient holistic care.

  17. The spiritual distress assessment tool: an instrument to assess spiritual distress in hospitalised elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Estelle

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although spirituality is usually considered a positive resource for coping with illness, spiritual distress may have a negative influence on health outcomes. Tools are needed to identify spiritual distress in clinical practice and subsequently address identified needs. This study describes the first steps in the development of a clinically acceptable instrument to assess spiritual distress in hospitalized elderly patients. Methods A three-step process was used to develop the Spiritual Distress Assessment Tool (SDAT: 1 Conceptualisation by a multidisciplinary group of a model (Spiritual Needs Model to define the different dimensions characterizing a patient's spirituality and their corresponding needs; 2 Operationalisation of the Spiritual Needs Model within geriatric hospital care leading to a set of questions (SDAT investigating needs related to each of the defined dimensions; 3 Qualitative assessment of the instrument's acceptability and face validity in hospital chaplains. Results Four dimensions of spirituality (Meaning, Transcendence, Values, and Psychosocial Identity and their corresponding needs were defined. A formalised assessment procedure to both identify and subsequently score unmet spiritual needs and spiritual distress was developed. Face validity and acceptability in clinical practice were confirmed by chaplains involved in the focus groups. Conclusions The SDAT appears to be a clinically acceptable instrument to assess spiritual distress in elderly hospitalised persons. Studies are ongoing to investigate the psychometric properties of the instrument and to assess its potential to serve as a basis for integrating the spiritual dimension in the patient's plan of care.

  18. The spiritual environment in New Zealand hospice care: identifying organisational commitment to spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Richard; MacLeod, Rod; Jaye, Chrystal; McGee, Rob; Baxter, Joanne; Herbison, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Spiritual matters naturally arise in many people who have either a serious illness or are nearing end-of-life. The literature shows many examples of spiritual assessments, interventions and care; however, there is a lack of focus on organisational support for spiritual care. We aimed to ascertain the structural and operational capacity of New Zealand's hospices to attend to the spiritual needs and concerns of patients, families and staff. As part of a larger study, a mail out cross-sectional survey was distributed to 25 New Zealand hospices and asked details from staff about facilities, practices and organisational aspects of spiritual care. Data were collated by creating a 'hospice setting spiritual score' based on an aggregate of eight items from the survey. There was a 66% response rate. Summary scores ranged from 2 to 7 indicating that while sites delivered a range of spiritual services, all could improve the level of spiritual care they provide. The two most common items missing were 'spiritual professional development' and 'formal spiritual assessment.' This simple setting spiritual score provides a snapshot of a hospice's commitment to spiritual care. It could be used as a preliminary auditing tool to assist hospices in identifying organisational and operational aspects that could be improved to enhance spiritual care delivery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. An Investigation of the Perceptions and Practices of Nursing Students Regarding Spirituality and Spiritual Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Kalkim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine Turkish nursing students’ knowledge, practices and perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care and to investigate the relationship between their perceptions and their demographics. This study was a descriptive survey conducted at a nursing school providing degree-level education in the city of Manisa, in the western part of Turkey. The sample of the study consisted of the 400 nursing students. A nursing student sociodemographic form, a form on nursing students’ knowledge and practices of spirituality and spiritual care, and the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale were used to collect the data. Half of the students could meet patients’ or individuals’ spiritual needs, and the spiritual care that they gave was most frequently listening, empathy, and psychological support. The research findings were that nursing students’ perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care were “sufficiently” although not “very sufficiently” defined. Being female, being in the second year of education and seeing spiritual care education as necessary were determinants of their perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care.

  20. The ethical basis of teaching spirituality and spiritual care: a survey of student nurses perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Wilfred; Gretton, Mark; Draper, Peter; Watson, Roger

    2008-11-01

    There is a professional requirement for student nurses to achieve competence in the delivery of spiritual care. However, there is no research exploring students nurses perceptions of being educated in these matters. This paper explores the ethical basis of teaching student nurses about the concepts of spirituality and spiritual care by reporting the findings from the first year of a 3 year investigation. An exploratory longitudinal design was used to obtain student nurses perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care as they progressed through a 3 year programme. A questionnaire incorporating the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale was distributed to 176 pre-registration nursing students undertaking either the Advanced Diploma or Bachelor of Science degree programmes. A response rate of 76.7% was obtained. Findings reveal that the majority of student nurses perceived spirituality to be a universal phenomenon of a type that can be associated with existentialism. Some students were very uncertain and apprehensive about being instructed in spiritual matters. A cohort of student nurses held similar understandings of spirituality to those presented in the nursing literature. However the results also suggest an overwhelming majority felt it was wrong for spirituality to imply that some people are better than others and most were uncertain whether spirituality was related to good and evil. RELEVANCE TO NURSE EDUCATION: The investigation reveals that there are a number of ethical concerns surrounding the teaching of spirituality to student nurses that need to be resolved.

  1. Creating a spiritual tapestry: nurses' experiences of delivering spiritual care to patients in an Irish hospice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bailey, Maria E

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to describe nurses\\' experiences of delivering spiritual support in a palliative care setting in the Republic of Ireland. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 nurses working in the area of specialist palliative care. A content analysis of the transcriptions revealed five sub-themes: understanding spirituality; the art of nursing in spiritual care; education and learning; the challenge of spiritual caring; and the dimensions of time. The resulting creation of a spiritual tapestry provided an overall theme. Nurses in this study were spiritually self-aware and placed a high value on the spiritual element of their caring role. Nurses described their individual understanding of spirituality and discussed how they recognized and addressed a patient\\'s spiritual needs. Time was described as essential to the provision of spiritual support and appeared to be a significant resource challenge to the provision of spiritual care. The challenges of assessing spiritual needs and measuring outcomes of care were also reported. Participants in this study described the creation of a spiritual tapestry that \\'weaves\\' together care and compassion with skills and knowledge in their nursing practice.

  2. An extract of Apium graveolens var. dulce leaves: structure of the major constituent, apiin, and its anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencherini, T; Cau, A; Bianco, G; Della Loggia, R; Aquino, R P; Autore, G

    2007-06-01

    Flavonoids, natural compounds widely distributed in the plant kingdom, are reported to affect the inflammatory process and to possess anti-inflammatory as well as immunomodulatory activity in-vitro and in-vivo. Since nitric oxide (NO) produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is one of the inflammatory mediators, the effects of the ethanol/water (1:1) extract of the leaves of Apium graveolens var. dulce (celery) on iNOS expression and NO production in the J774.A1 macrophage cell line stimulated for 24 h with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were evaluated. The extract of A. graveolens var. dulce contained apiin as the major constituent (1.12%, w/w, of the extract). The extract and apiin showed significant inhibitory activity on nitrite (NO) production in-vitro (IC50 0.073 and 0.08 mg mL(-1) for the extract and apiin, respectively) and iNOS expression (IC50 0.095 and 0.049 mg mL(-1) for the extract and apiin, respectively) in LPS-activated J774.A1 cells. The croton-oil ear test on mice showed that the extract exerted anti-inflammatory activity in-vivo (ID50 730 microg cm(-2)), with a potency seven-times lower than that of indometacin (ID50 93 microg cm(-2)), the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used as reference. Our results clearly indicated the inhibitory activity of the extract and apiin in-vitro on iNOS expression and nitrite production when added before LPS stimulation in the medium of J774.A1 cells. The anti-inflammatory properties of the extract demonstrated in-vivo might have been due to reduction of iNOS enzyme expression.

  3. The Relationship of Nurses' Involvement and Beliefs in Spirituality and Their Attitudes Toward Providing Spiritual Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willis, Wanda

    2001-01-01

    .... This includes caring for the patient's spiritual needs. It is well documented in the health care literature that a patient's sense of spiritual well-being can have a positive outcome on health care and the quality of life...

  4. SPIRITUALITY AS A LIVED EXPERIENCE: EXPLORING THE ESSENCE OF SPIRITUALITY FOR WOMEN IN LATE LIFE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Lydia K.

    2013-01-01

    Against the backdrop of a dramatic increase in the number of individuals living longer, particularly older women, it is vital that researchers explore the intersection of spirituality, gender, and aging. In this qualitative study of six women aged 80 and older, I explore, using, multiple, in-depth interviews, the experiences of spirituality over the life course. A hermeneutic phenomenological analysis of the interviews was performed and provided insights into the nature of their “lived experience” allowing for the understanding of the essence of their spirituality. The results are presented as an interpretation of the participants’ perceptions of their spirituality and spiritual experiences. For the women in this study, the essence of their spirituality lies in: being profoundly grateful; engaging in complete acceptance; and having a strong sense of assuredness, while stressing the linkages and importance of spirituality. Implications for understanding spirituality for older adults are considered. PMID:23185856

  5. Connections Between Science and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garen, David C.

    2006-07-01

    I would like to continue the discussion ofpoints raised in William Carter's response toRobert Frodeman's Eos Forum article Carter,2006; Frodeman, 2005. I have appreciatedFrodeman's work and feel that perspectiveson science deriving from humanities, philosophy,and religion can add depth, insight,and meaning to our endeavors. I would liketo broaden the discussion beyond just spacepolicy to include the relationship betweenscience in general and these, what I wouldcall, spiritual issues.

  6. Meaning of spiritual care: Iranian nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirgari, Batool; Iranmanesh, Sedigheh; Ali Cheraghi, Mohammad; Arefi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Spiritual care is an essential component in nursing practice and strongly influenced by the sociocultural context. This article aimed to elucidate the meaning of nurses' experiences of giving spiritual care in southeast of Iran. A phenomenological hermeneutic approach influenced by Ricoeur was used. Eleven staff nurses who were currently working in the 3 major hospitals under the umbrella of the Kerman University of Medical Sciences were interviewed. The meaning of spiritual care was comprehensively understood as meeting patient as a unique being. This can be divided into 3 themes: meeting patient as a being in relationship, meeting patient as a cultural being, and meeting patient as a religious being. The results in this study suggest that education about spirituality and spiritual care should be included in the continuous and in-service education of registered nurses. Spiritual and cultural assessment criteria should be included in this education to improve the provision of holistic care.

  7. Spiritual Intimacy, Marital Intimacy, and Physical/Psychological Well-Being: Spiritual Meaning as a Mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Karen J; Lee, Jerry W; Marshak, Helen H; Martin, Leslie R

    2016-08-01

    Intimacy is an essential part of marital relationships, spiritual relationships, and is also a factor in well-being, but there is little research simultaneously examining the links among spiritual intimacy, marital intimacy, and well-being. Structural equation modeling was used to examine associations among the latent variables-spiritual intimacy, marital intimacy, spiritual meaning, and well-being-in a cross-sectional study of 5,720 married adults aged 29-100 years ( M = 58.88, SD = 12.76, 59% female). All participants were from the Adventist Health Study-2, Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study. In the original structural model, all direct associations between the three latent variables of spiritual intimacy, marital intimacy, and well-being were significantly positive indicating that there was a significant relationship among spiritual intimacy, marital intimacy, and well-being. When spiritual meaning was added as a mediating variable, the direct connections of spiritual intimacy to marital intimacy and to well-being became weakly negative. However, the indirect associations of spiritual intimacy with marital intimacy and with well-being were then strongly positive through spiritual meaning. This indicates that the relationship among spiritual intimacy, marital intimacy, and well-being was primarily a result of the meaning that spiritual intimacy brought to one's marriage and well-being, and that without spiritual meaning greater spirituality could negatively influence one's marriage and well-being. These findings suggest the central place of spiritual meaning in understanding the relationship of spiritual intimacy to marital intimacy and to well-being.

  8. Conceptualising spirituality and religion for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, Barbara; Fowler, Marsha; Taylor, Elizabeth J; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Sawatzky, Richard

    2008-11-01

    To discuss some of the challenges of conceptualising spirituality and religion for healthcare practice. With the growing interest in spirituality in healthcare, has come the inevitable task of trying to conceptualise spirituality, a daunting task given the amorphous nature of spirituality, the changing understandings of spirituality among individuals and the diverse globalised society within which this task is taking place. Spirituality's relationship to religion is a particularly challenging point of debate. Critical review. Three social and historical conditions - located in the context of Western thought - have contributed to current conceptualisations of spirituality and religion: the diminishment of the social authority of religion as a result of the Enlightenment focus on reason, the rise of a postmodern spirituality emphasising spiritual experience and current tensions over the ideological and political roles of religion in society. The trend to minimise the social influence of religion is a particular Western bias that seems to ignore the global megatrend of the resurgence of religion. Current conceptualisations are critiqued on the following grounds: that they tend to be ungrounded from a rich history of theological and philosophical thought, that a particular form of elitist spirituality is emerging and that the individualistic emphasis in recent conceptualisations of spirituality diminishes the potential for societal critique and transformation while opening the door for economic and political self interest. Constructing adequate conceptualisations of spirituality and religion for clinical practice entails grounding them in the wealth of centuries of philosophical and theological thinking, ensuring that they represent the diverse society that nursing serves and anchoring them within a moral view of practice.

  9. Christian Spirituality in Eating Disorder Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora Grant

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are some of the most severe and destructive of all psychological conditions. They are associated with restricted capacities in cognitive, emotional, physical, and spiritual development. This paper provides an examination of the practical application of Christian spirituality as a force for recovery from an eating disorder. Specifically, it expounds the transformative potential in the spiritual qualities of hope, trust, acceptance, surrender, and courage underpinning engagement with evidence-based therapeutic models of care in eating disorder recovery.

  10. Spirituality and health care in Iran: time to reconsider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Najmeh; Loghmani, Amir; Puchalski, Christina M

    2014-12-01

    Spirituality is increasingly recognized as an essential element of care. This article investigates the role of spirituality in Iranian health care system and provides some guidelines to integrate spirituality in routine health care practice in Iran.

  11. The Complex Reasons for Missing Spirituality. A Response to "Democratic Foundations for Spiritually Responsive Pedagogy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Marian

    2017-01-01

    This article is written in response to Lingley's (2016) concept of spiritually responsive pedagogy. To begin with, the word "spiritual", when applied to education, still attracts varied responses. Therefore, I have begun by examining contemporary understandings of spirituality as reflected in current research and literature, which…

  12. Spirituality Expressed in Creative Learning: Young Children's Imagining Play as Space for Mediating Their Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodliff, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Historically underpinning principles of the English curriculum framework for children from birth to five years explicitly acknowledged a spiritual dimension to children's uniqueness and well-being. Yet spirituality receives scant reference in the discourse of creative learning and teaching. This paper considers the relationship of spirituality to…

  13. Teaching Spirituality as Ontology in Public Schools. A Response to "Democratic Foundations of Spiritual Responsive Pedagogy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer-Bacon, Barbara J.

    2017-01-01

    In "Democratic Foundations of Spiritually Responsive Pedagogy," Lingley worried that talk of spirituality is taboo in U.S. public school classrooms. Lingley pointed out that the dominant narrative demands silence on the topic. She wanted to make the case for spiritually responsive pedagogy as vital to an inclusive democracy. I begin this…

  14. Measuring Spirituality as a Universal Human Experience: A Review of Spirituality Questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Jager Meezenbroek (Eltica); B. Garssen (Bert); M. van den Berg (Machteld); D. van Dierendonck (Dirk); A. Visser (Adriaan); W.B. Schaufeli (Wilmar)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSpirituality is an important theme in health research, since a spiritual orientation can help people to cope with the consequences of a serious disease. Knowledge on the role of spirituality is, however, limited, as most research is based on measures of religiosity rather than

  15. Spiritual Needs of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For many patients confronted with chronic diseases, spirituality/religiosity is an important resource for coping. Patients often report unmet spiritual and existential needs, and spiritual support is also associated with better quality of life. Caring for spiritual, existential and psychosocial needs is not only relevant to patients at the end of their life but also to those suffering from long-term chronic illnesses. Spiritual needs may not always be associated with life satisfaction, but sometimes with anxiety, and can be interpreted as the patients’ longing for spiritual well-being. The needs for peace, health and social support are universal human needs and are of special importance to patients with long lasting courses of disease. The factor, Actively Giving, may be of particular importance because it can be interpreted as patients’ intention to leave the role of a `passive sufferer´ to become an active, self-actualizing, giving individual. One can identify four core dimensions of spiritual needs, i.e., Connection, Peace, Meaning/Purpose, and Transcendence, which can be attributed to underlying psychosocial, emotional, existential, and religious needs. The proposed model can provide a conceptual framework for further research and clinical practice. In fact, health care that addresses patients’ physical, emotional, social, existential and spiritual needs (referring to a bio-psychosocial-spiritual model of health care will contribute to patients’ improvement and recovery. Nevertheless, there are several barriers in the health care system that makes it difficult to adequately address these needs.

  16. Spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viftrup, Dorte Toudal; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Buus, Niels

    2013-01-01

    WE SYSTEMATICALLY REVIEWED THE RESEARCH LITERATURE ON SPIRITUALLY AND RELIGIOUSLY INTEGRATED GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING THREE QUESTIONS: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group...... for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded....... psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total...

  17. Religion, spirituality, and the practice of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P

    2004-01-01

    Physicians are confronted with new information from the popular media, peer-reviewed journals, and their patients regarding the association of religious and spiritual factors with health outcomes. Although religion and spirituality have become more visible within health care, there are considerable ethical issues raised when physicians incorporate these dimensions into their care. Spiritualities are responsive to patient needs by offering beliefs, stories, and practices that facilitate the creation of a personally meaningful world, a constructed "reality" in the face of illness, disability, or death. It is largely through narrative that physicians incorporate into the health care encounter the spiritualities that are central to their patients' lived experience of illness and health.

  18. Spiritual care: how to do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Shane; Bouchal, Shelley Raffin; Chochinov, Harvey; Hagen, Neil; McClement, Susan

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the provision of spiritual care by healthcare professionals working at the end of life. Qualitative-ethnographic inquiry. Phase 1: five Canadian sites; phase 2: a residential hospice in Alberta, Canada. Phase 1: six palliative care leaders; phase 2: 24 frontline palliative care clinicians. Data were collected over a 12-month period with analysis of findings occurring concurrently. Using semistructured interviews and participant observation, 11 themes, organised under five overarching categories, emerged from the data. Five bedside skills were identified as essential to spiritual care: hearing, sight, speech, touch and presence. The integration of these bedside skills with the intrinsic qualities of healthcare professionals, including their values and spiritual beliefs, appeared to be essential to their application in spiritual care. Spiritual care primarily involved the tacit qualities of healthcare professionals and their effect on patient's spiritual well-being, rather than their explicit technical skill set or expert knowledge base. Participants identified spiritual care as both a specialised care domain and as a philosophy of care that informs and is embedded within physical and psychosocial care. Hearing, sight, speech, touch and presence were identified as the means by which healthcare professionals impacted patients' spiritual well-being regardless of clinician's awareness or intent. An empirical framework is presented providing clinicians with a pragmatic way of incorporating spiritual care into clinical practice.

  19. Spiritual Criminology: The Case of Jewish Criminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronel, Natti; Ben Yair, Y

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the ages and in most cultures, spiritual and religious thinking have dealt extensively with offending (person against person and person against the Divine), the response to offending, and rehabilitation of offenders. Although modern criminology has generally overlooked that body of knowledge and experience, the study of spirituality and its relation to criminology is currently growing. Frequently, though, it is conducted from the secular scientific perspective, thus reducing spiritual knowledge into what is already known. Our aim here is to present a complementary perspective; that is, spiritual criminology that emerges from the spiritual perspective. Following a description of the state-of-the-art in criminological research concerning spirituality and its impact upon individuals, we focus on Jewish criminology as an illustrative case study, and present a spiritual Jewish view on good and evil, including factors that lead to criminality, the issue of free choice, the aim of punishment and societal response, crime desistance, rehabilitation, and prevention. The proposed establishment of spiritual criminology can be further developed by including parallel schools of spirituality, to create an integrated field in criminology.

  20. Biblical Spirituality and J.H. Eaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Lombaard

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, the nature of �Biblical Spirituality� as an academic discipline is reviewed from a methodological perspective. Two core aspects are indicated: the importance of ancient expressions of faith (spiritualities in the Bible, and the importance of modern expressions of faith (spiritualities as they draw on the Bible. Based on this framework, as a first application of such a nature within the field of Biblical Spirituality, the relevant publications of an Old Testament scholar are evaluated; in this case, those of J.H. Eaton. Such an analysis opens an arena for discussion on whether this model of Biblical Spirituality holds promise for wider application.

  1. Hospice and the politics of spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces-Foley, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Within the hospice literature, spirituality and religion are usually defined in opposition to one another, with religion negatively associated with the external, authoritarian doctrines of Christianity and spirituality positively associated with the free search for truth, meaning, and authenticity. According to survey data, however, most Americans integrate spirituality and traditional religious commitments. The hospice literature is promoting spirituality to its own detriment by alienating potential patients and depriving religious patients of the resources that religious traditions and their affiliated religious communities have to offer.

  2. Professional, Spectator, and Olympic Sports in the Context of the Terms Spiritualism and Spirituality, and in the Context of Normative Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosiewicz Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The author has used - in his paper - two different expressions related to spirituality in its entirety: that is, spirituality (the spiritual sphere in superficial sense and meaning and spiritualism (the spiritual sphere in deep sense and meaning. The author presented selected different definitions and manifestations of spirituality and spiritualism.

  3. Spiritual Nursing Care Education An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Hand, Mikel

    The failure of nursing schools to integrate spiritual nursing care education into the curriculum has contributed to a lack in nurses' spiritual care ability. Developing, integrating, and testing a Spiritual Care Nursing Education strategy in an Associates of Science nursing program significantly increased the perceived spiritual care competence of student nurses. Utilizing a faculty team to develop learning activities to address critical spiritual care attributes offers a method to integrate spiritual nursing care content throughout the curriculum in ASN and BSN programs.

  4. South African Society of Psychiatrists guidelines for the integration of spirituality in the approach to psychiatric practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert B R Janse van Rensburg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. It was important to develop South African guidelines in view of the extent of local and worldwide religious affiliation, rapid growth of academic investigation, guidelines provided by other associations (e.g. Royal College of Psychiatrists, the South African Society of Psychiatrists (SASOP’s own position statements on culture, mental health and psychiatry, the appropriate definition of spirituality, the need for an evolutionary and anthropological approach, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-V’s cultural formulation, local legislation, ongoing research, and teaching requirements.  Objective. To report on the outcome of the peer-reviewed process that was followed to draft local guidelines for psychiatric training and practice.  Methods. During 2013, comments by members of the SASOP on a framework for guidelines on the role of spirituality in psychiatry practice and training were collated and subsequently submitted to the SASOP board for approval.  Results. Guidelines were compiled in terms of: (i integrating spirituality in clinical care and service provision; (ii integrating spirituality in psychiatric training; (iii ethically integrating spirituality within the professional scope of practice; and (iv appropriate referral between psychiatrists and spiritual advisors.  Conclusions. Integrating spirituality in the approach to practice and training cannot be ignored by local psychiatrists in the multicultural, multireligious and spiritually diverse South African context.

  5. Malacología Latinoamericana: Moluscos de agua dulce de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rumi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un estado de situación y una lista actualizada y comentada sobre las especies de moluscos de agua dulce de la República Argentina. Se aborda en Gastropoda y Bivalvia la distribución a nivel de familias; las entidades endémicas, exóticas, invasoras y de importancia sanitaria. Los moluscos relacionados a la cuenca del Plata presentan la mayor riqueza específica. Base de datos: 4 500 registros relevados de las tres colecciones más importantes de la Argentina: MLP, MACN y FML. Además, se incluye información de recolecciones actuales y localidades citadas por otros autores. Hasta el presente han sido descritas 166 especies. De ellas 101 pertenecen a 10 familias de Gastropoda y 65 a 7 de Bivalvia. Las familias que presentan mayor riqueza específica son Lithoglyphidae (22 y Sphaeriidae (25, respectivamente. Sphaeriidae, Cochliopidae, Chilinidae y Lymnaeidae se distribuyen prácticamente en todo el país. Erodonidae y Solecurtidae se registran en ambientes mixohalinos de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Thiaridae y Glacidorbiidae presentan una distribución muy restringida. Especies endémicas de la Argentina: Gastropoda: Ampullariidae (1, Cochliopidae (10, Lithoglyphidae (11, Thiariidae (3, Chilinidae (11, Lymnaeidae (2 y Physidae (2?; Bivalvia: Hyriidae (1?; Etheriidae (1? y Sphaeriidae (10. Especies de interés sanitario: propagadoras de: Esquistosomiasis, Biomphalaria peregrina, B. straminea y B. tenagophila (Planorbidae; Fasciolasis, Lymnaea viatrix y L. columnella (Lymnaeidae; y dermatitis esquistosómicas, Chilina gibbosa y C. fluminea (Chilinidae. Especies de origen asiático: Corbicula fluminea (Corbiculidae y Limnoperna fortunei (Mytilidae. Es prioritaria la formación de áreas protegidas para la conservación de especies endémicas, especialmente de la Mesopotamia Argentina.Latin American Malacology. Freshwater Mollusks from Argentina. A report and an updated list with comments on the species of freshwater molluscs of

  6. El escritor, las sombras y la Patria: En esta dulce tierra de Andrés Rivera The writer, the shadows and the homeland in Andrés Rivera's "La dulce tierra"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Perilli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La novela En esta dulce tierra arma un simulacro histórico que se desintegra en una narración de finales múltiples. Parodia su nombre "en esta dulce tierra" ya que el circunstancial anuncia sucesos terribles que hacen estallar el adjetivo. Remite a la literatura decimonónica, en especial a los romances fundacionales como Amalia de José Mármol. La nación se imagina como espacio cerrado, clausurado por el despotismo en el asilo, la morgue, la cárcel, el sótano. Los protagonistas se mueven ilusoriamente de Sur a Norte. Si Sarmiento invoca la sombra de Facundo, Rivera evoca en Cufré otras propias sombras, dobles en tiempos y lugares otros. La narración de la historia argentina es la narración de una derrota, la de la civilización. La imagen histórica es disfórica: el mundo está enfermo, ebrio de sangre y violencia. Facundo es la sombra de la barbarie, cifra de la naturaleza americana, producto de los llanos riojanos. Cufré es la sombra de una clase "culta" que dibuja en su trayectoria una figura paradojal. Las dos son víctimas de una tierra concebida como naturaleza bárbara en un caso y de una tierra construida como patria siniestra en el otro. El Poder actúa como una segunda naturaleza que, en esta tierra, tiene el sabor de la muerte.The novel En esta dulce tierra sets up a historical pretense that disintegrates into several endings. The title is an irony, since terrible events take place in this "sweet land." It refers to the literature of the XIX century, especially to the founding romances such as that of José Mármol's Amalia. The nation is envisioned as a closed space relegated by despotism to the asylum, the morgue, the jail, the basement. The characters live an illusion moving from north to south. If Sarmiento invokes the shadow of Facundo, Rivera evokes some of his own shadows in Cufré, doubles in different times and spaces. The narration of the Argentine history is a story of defeat: civilizarion's. The historical

  7. “Tenía corazón”: Dulce dueño de Emilia Pardo Bazán

    OpenAIRE

    Charnon-Deutsch, Lou

    2006-01-01

    This article explores Pardo Bazán´s dialogue with realist representational fiction, with its voyeuristic obsessions, by revisiting certain passages in the novel Dulce Dueño and reviewing recent feminist scholarship (Bieder, Bacon, Medina and Kirkpatrick) that sees the novel to varying degrees as subversive of the male gaze. While these critics correctly see the novel as gesturing towards modernity, this article examines also its backward glance at earlier woman-plots in relation to feminine s...

  8. Does the spirituality of nurses interfere in the record of spiritual suffering diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ienne

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To assess the spirituality of nurses and relate it to personal characteristics, sector of activity, and spiritual practices; to analyze the influence of spirituality of nurses in the record of a "spiritual suffering" diagnosis. Methods: Quantitative cross-sectional study, using the World Health Organization's Quality of Life Instrument-Spirituality, Religion and Personal Beliefs Module (WHOQOL-SRPB. Results: 132 nurses were included and most of them were women (81.8%, married (56.8%, with an average age of 34 years (± 6.8. Most nurses believe in God or in a superior force (99.2% and have never recorded a "spiritual suffering" diagnosis (78.8%. There was no association of spirituality with the sector of activity; the variable "marital status" was significant in six out of the eight factors of spirituality, and the variable "willingness to talk about spirituality" was significant in seven out of the eight factors. Conclusion: The spirituality of nurses does not interfere with the recording of a "spiritual suffering" diagnosis.

  9. Spirituality Phenomenon and the Ideal-Realism Method in Modern Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Vetoshkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the spiritual revival of modern Russia. In the author’s view, the Russian Idea with its basic principles, moral, spiritual and semantic concepts should provide the guidelines for education, upbringing and the youth policy, guaranteeing the spiritual transformation and mobilization of the moral power for the benefit of the motherland, local society and family, as well as the personal growth. The theoretical and methodological bases for developing and implementing the above idea could be found in Russian national religious and philosophic thinking with its balanced dialectics of spiritual and social aspects. The experience of the ideal-realism, as the leading trend of the national spiritual culture, is being analyzed and summarized. The correlation between the ideal and material in social and individual life is demonstrated along with the dialectics and wholeness of the divine and human, religious and secular, ecclesiastical and civil.The author addresses the philosophic heritage of I. A. Ilyin, V. S. Solovyev, S. N. Trubetskoy, S. N. Bulgakov, N. A. Berdyayev, N. O. Losskiy etc, and regards spirituality as the basic defining, systematic and leading origin of the whole socio-historical process including human being formation and development, education and upbringing. 

  10. The impact of spiritual care education upon preparing undergraduate nursing students to provide spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katherine L; Chang, Esther; Sheehan, Athena; Johnson, Amanda

    2013-09-01

    Spiritual care is an important component of holistic care. In Australia competency statements relating to nursing practice emphasise the need to provide care that addresses the spiritual as well as other aspects of being. However, many nurses feel they are poorly prepared to provide spiritual care. This is attributed largely to lack a of spiritual care education provided in undergraduate nursing programmes. A few higher education providers have responded to this lack of spiritual care education by incorporating specific content related to this area into their undergraduate nursing programme. Minimal international studies have investigated the impact of spiritual care education on undergraduate nursing students and no Australian studies were identified. This review explores spiritual care education in undergraduate nursing programmes and identifies the need for an Australian study. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CONTOURS OF BIBLICAL SPIRITUALITY AS A DISCIPLINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirituality is enacted between 1. the human person and 2. the basic inspiration that moves someone. This process is influenced by 3. the spirit of the time in its own way. Kees Waaijman, following M. de Certeau, explains this influence as a dialectic one. Continuity and discontinuity between spirituality are extremes in a field.

  12. Test spirituální citlivosti

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčan, Pavel; Janošová, Pavlína; Tyl, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2007), s. 153-160 ISSN 0009-062X Grant - others:GAUK(CZ) GAUK379/2005/A-PP/HTF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : spirituality * spiritual experience * religiosity Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.133, year: 2007

  13. Religiousity, Spirituality and Adolescents' Self-Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japar, Muhammad; Purwati

    2014-01-01

    Religiuosity, spirituality, and adolescents' self-adjustment. The objective of this study is to test the correlation among religiosity, spirituality and adolescents' self-adjustment. A quantitative approach was employed in this study. Data were collected from 476 junior high schools students of 13 State Junior High Schools and one Junior High…

  14. Does Education Cause Spiritual Belief Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle, D. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Currently, little is known about the influence classroom learning has on the spiritual beliefs of students. Despite this fact, decisions on educational policy, parental home schooling, and even whether to bring legal actions against school districts, often rest on the assumption that education can induce spiritual belief change. To begin the…

  15. Migraines and meditation: does spirituality matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy B; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2008-08-01

    Migraine headaches are associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety (Waldie and Poulton Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 72: 86-92, 2002) and feelings of low self-efficacy (French et al. Headache, 40: 647-656, 2000). Previous research suggests that spiritual meditation may ameliorate some of the negative traits associated with migraine headaches (Wachholtz and Pargament Journal of behavioral Medicine, 30: 311-318, 2005). This study examined two primary questions: (1) Is spiritual meditation more effective in enhancing pain tolerance and reducing migraine headache related symptoms than secular meditation and relaxation? and, (2) Does spiritual meditation create better mental, physical, and spiritual health outcomes than secular meditation and relaxation techniques? Eighty-three meditation naïve, frequent migraineurs were taught Spiritual Meditation, Internally Focused Secular Meditation, Externally Focused Secular Meditation, or Muscle Relaxation which participants practiced for 20 min a day for one month. Pre-post tests measured pain tolerance (with a cold pressor task), headache frequency, and mental and spiritual health variables. Compared to the other three groups, those who practiced spiritual meditation had greater decreases in the frequency of migraine headaches, anxiety, and negative affect, as well as greater increases in pain tolerance, headache-related self-efficacy, daily spiritual experiences, and existential well being.

  16. Postsecular spirituality, engaged hermeneutics, and Charles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay sets out to argue that postsecular spirituality is about the quest for hypergoods within today's mass populist- and consumerist-oriented world. It shows that people who consider themselves to be spiritual not only have many values in their lives, but rank some values higher than others, with some being ranked as ...

  17. On the Spiritual Element in Arts Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbs, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Attempts a redefinition of spirituality and an incorporation of this into art education. Argues that symbolic and spiritual consciousness plays a crucial role in the works of artists as disparate as William Blake and Frida Kahlo. Criticizes the preeminence of scientific theory as a modern belief system. (MJP)

  18. Disembodied Spirituality: Conflicts in the Writing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Peggy; Mutschelknaus, Mike

    Noting that at Saint Mary's University (where the authors teach) the issue of spirituality is in the forefront of education and is seamlessly woven into required courses throughout four years of college in an attempt to "enhance students' spiritual and personal lives," this paper positions writing centers as a place for student inquiries…

  19. Offering Spiritual Support for Family or Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spiritual pain and suffering. Spiritual pain and suffering is as real and powerful as physical or emotional pain. There ... guilt, denial, hope, joy, peace. Expression of feelings is important in dealing with ... such as “It’s part of God’s plan” or “Everything happens for a reason” often ...

  20. A Spiritual Framework in Incest Survivors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Kelli; Cheung, Monit

    2004-01-01

    Through an examination of recent incest treatment development, this article emphasizes the theoretical concept of "integration" within the treatment process for female adult incest survivors. Spirituality as a therapeutic foundation is discussed with examples of therapeutic techniques. A case study illustrates the psycho-spiritual process of…

  1. An Awareness of Spirituality from Two Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweiback, Yoshi; Kaplan, Sandra N.; Manzone, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of spirituality in a religious setting, and prayer as an expression of ultimate values, as a discipline which inspires empathy, as an instrument for connecting us with nature, and as a compass pointing us toward God, meaning, and purpose. Spirituality in the general education setting will also be discussed, as…

  2. Spirituality and School Counselor Education and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Spirituality is an area that has not received a great deal of attention in supervision, yet it can have substantial effects on the counseling process. A definition of spirituality that allows for a variety of worldviews can be useful to both counselor and client as it helps strengthen the counseling relationship and lessen differences between…

  3. 1 authentic leadership and spiritual capital development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-01

    May 1, 2008 ... The purpose of this paper is to examine authentic leadership and spiritual capital as key elements for the successful building of quality management and effective organizations. It highlights the nexus between authentic leadership and spiritual capital, describes the common features of authentic leadership.

  4. Sport and Children's Spirituality: An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Micheline Wyn

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of sport and physical activity are endorsed by a number of professionals as a means of improving children's health and their sense of well-being, and their unity with the natural world, other people and the Transcendent. For children, sport is a spiritual source of joy and wonder. Using Champagne's "spiritual modes of…

  5. Secular spirituality versus secular dualism: Towards postsecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The term “secular spirituality” is meant to convey the contemporary phenomenon of spirituality as experienced in different spheres not associated with structured, institutionalised religion. An outline is given of the relation between secular reality (the natural realm) and religious/spiritual reality (the supernatural realm), as it ...

  6. Pengembangan Manajemen Spiritual di Sekolah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoirul Anam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of the school in the long term can be predicted from the values that espoused and used as share value. The process of selecting the virtue value that will be the foundation’s vision and mission for the school has been developing very dynamically with a model that is very varied. These models can be only as part of a school strategy or model that implements the noble values with pure consciousness. The values of spirituality seems increasingly been the trend as the noble values espoused school to ensure its long-term performance.

  7. Warrior culture, spirituality, and prayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmin, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Research has shown an increase in suicides by military veterans and law enforcement officers in the United States. Etiologic research elucidates warrior culture and subculture as contributing factors of this pathology. This paper examines the idiosyncratic nature and influence of warrior culture and subculture and offers recommendations to promote culture change. Faith-based spirituality and prayer are examined as adjunct modalities for stress management and emotional healing. Further research is recommended to assess the associated hidden cost factors and long-term financial impact of warrior culture on society.

  8. Spiritual diversity: multifaith perspectives in family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Froma

    2010-09-01

    This paper addresses the growing diversity and complexity of spirituality in society and within families. This requires a broadly inclusive, multifaith approach in clinical training and practice. Increasingly, individuals, couples, and families seek, combine, and reshape spiritual beliefs and practices--within and among faiths and outside organized religion--to fit their lives and relationships. With rising faith conversion and interfaith marriages, the paper examines challenges in multifaith families, particularly with marriage, childrearing, and the death of a loved one. Clinical guidelines, cautions, and case examples are offered to explore the role and significance of spiritual beliefs and practices in couple and family relationships; to identify spiritual sources of distress and relational conflict; and to draw potential spiritual resources for healing, well-being, and resilience, fitting client values and preferences. 2010 © FPI, Inc.

  9. Evaluación de la efectividad del tratamiento con agua dulce para el control del piojo de mar Caligus rogercresseyi Boxshall & Bravo, 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bravo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Para evaluar la tolerancia de Caligus rogercresseyi al tratamiento con agua dulce, se recolectaron parásitos desde dos centros de cultivos localizados en el área de Calbuco, sur de Chile. El primer estudio se realizó en diciembre 2012 en un centro de cultivos ubicado en el Canal Huito, cuya salinidad fue de 26 y el segundo estudio se realizó en abril 2013 en un centro de cultivos en el Canal Chidhuapi, donde la salinidad fue de 32. En el primer estudio se evaluó la tolerancia de hembras y machos adultos de C. rogercresseyi al agua dulce y también la tolerancia de esta especie en truchas bañadas con agua dulce por 30 min de exposición. En el segundo estudio se evaluó la tolerancia de machos y hembras adultas a diferentes gradientes de salinidad, y también la tolerancia de copepoditos a la baja salinidad. En el primer estudio el 100% de los machos y hembras estuvieron inconscientes después de 30 min de exposición. Sin embargo, una vez que los parásitos inconscientes fueron retornados a agua de mar se registró una supervivencia de 93% en machos, 73% en hembras ovígeras y 100% en hembras sin sacos. En el segundo estudio se registró una supervivencia de 45% en hembras y 20% en machos sometidos a salinidad de 15 por 24 h. Los copepoditos no sobrevivieron a salinidad de 25. La eficacia registrada en el desprendimiento de C. rogercresseyi en las truchas tratadas con agua dulce fue de 57%, con una mayor tolerancia de las hembras en comparación con los machos. Los parásitos colectados desde el sector con 26 de salinidad, mostraron mayor tolerancia al agua dulce en comparación con los parásitos colectados del sitio con 32 de salinidad.

  10. Effects of a spiritual care training for nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlasblom, J.P.; Steen, van der J.T.; Knol, D.L.; Jochemsen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that spiritual care is an essential part of nursing care according to many nursing definitions, it appears to be quite different in practice. A spirituality training for nurses may be necessary to give spiritual care the attention it deserves. In a trial a pre-tested “spirituality

  11. Women's Spirituality across the Life Span: Implications for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michele Kielty; Dixon, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Women's spirituality has unique characteristics that are often ignored within the spirituality literature. The authors review the literature on women's spirituality to reveal the major themes women have identified as relevant to their spiritual journeys across the life span. Implications for counseling and ideas for practice are included after…

  12. Spirituality and Young Women in Transition: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Kimberly A.; Cummings, Anne L.

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the growing body of knowledge about spirituality and life transitions. Through qualitative investigation, 9 young women in professional education programs described their definition of spirituality, their spiritual activities, and how they used their spirituality to cope with life transitions as they prepared to enter the…

  13. Spiritual Needs and Practices of Counselor Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Debra; Street, Sue; Bradham-Cousar, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the self-reported value of spirituality, types of spiritual practices, and values of 69 counselor education students. It also examined counseling students' ideas for how to increase their comfort with incorporating spirituality into counseling practice. Implications for implementing spirituality training in counselor education…

  14. PEMENUHAN KEBUTUHAN SPIRITUAL BERHUBUNGAN DENGAN STATUS KECEMASAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Nugraheni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:All employees of the company or government employees will in time retire. Upon enteringthe age of 56 years, the employee or civil servant to retire. Retirement is a stage of life characterized bythe presence of transition and change in psychosocial rolethat causes stress. Retirement impact on thephysical, social and spiritual individual. Physical disorders includes activity inhibited activity. Socialproblems cause individuals less participate in social activities. Less of spiritual needs fulfillment are morelikely to cause the individual less activity in religious.Objective:To identify the correlation between spiritual fulfillment and civil servants retirement anxiety inSleman.Methods:This study was a cross cectional design study. Statistical tests using correlationKendal Tauwith significance level p=0.05. Samples were taken using simple random sampling involved 55respondents. The research instrument used questionnaires spiritual needs and anxiety questionnaires.Results:The results showed that the civils servant unmet spiritual needs (98.2% and 68.4% retirementin the category of moderate anxiety. Kendal Tau test showed p=0.042, indicating there was a relationshipbetween the spiritual fulfillment with retirement anxiety indicating on civil servant with r=-0.274 showedweak relationship.Conclusion:civil servant who had fulfilled spiritual needs would have moderate to mild levels of anxiety.

  15. Development of the Sources of Spirituality Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Don E; Rice, Kenneth; Hook, Joshua N; Van Tongeren, Daryl R; DeBlaere, Cirleen; Choe, Elise; Worthington, Everett L

    2015-07-01

    Most measures of spirituality privilege religious spirituality, but people may experience spirituality in a variety of ways, including a sense of closeness, oneness, or connection with a theistic being, the transcendent (i.e., something outside space and time), oneself, humanity, or nature. The overall purpose of the present 4 studies was to develop the Sources of Spirituality (SOS) Scale to measure these different elements of spirituality. In Study 1, we created items, had them reviewed by experts, and used data from a sample of undergraduates (N = 218) to evaluate factor structure and inform initial measurement revisions. The factor structure replicated well in another sample of undergraduates (N = 200; Study 2), and in a sample of community adults (N = 140; Study 3). In a sample of undergraduates (N = 200; Study 4), we then evaluated evidence of construct validity by examining associations between SOS Scale scores and religious commitment, positive attitudes toward the Sacred, and dispositional connection with nature. Moreover, based on latent profile analyses results, we found 5 distinct patterns of spirituality based on SOS subscales. We consider implications for therapy and relevance of the findings for models of spirituality and future research. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. On the epistemology of postmodern spirituality

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    Dudley A. Schreiber

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available At first glance, the postmodern spiritual �scene� appears �sociologically messy, experiential, multifaceted, ecological, provisional and collective� (Petrolle 2007 and of uncertain epistemic provenance. Here, I ask: can Roland Benedikter�s (2005 conception of postmodern dialectic and spiritual turn, help us understand postmodern spirituality and can it assist in a construction of a postmodern epistemology of spirituality? The current argument constitutes a meta-theoretical exploration of:� Deconstruction and neo-essentialism as representing the significant dialectic in philosophical postmodernism. Deconstruction is presented as an apophatic moment in Western thought about �knowing� and �being� whilst postmodern neo-essentialism, though contextualised by antirealism and ambiguity, palpably suggests itself. � Postmodern trends which derive from the dialectic. � How these epistemic trends influence methodology in the study of spirituality. � How a trans-traditional (anthropological spirituality might incorporate insights about transformation from a complex of epistemologies in which, theories of �self� abound.In the conclusion an attempt is made to describe how postmodern spirituality expresses itself in society.�

  17. Mapping spiritual life: a spatial approach to late medieval spirituality

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    Corbellini, Sabrina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution investigates the use of the concepts of place, space and (restriction of movement in the spiritual education of religious women living in Third Order communities in the diocese of Utrecht (Netherlands. Through the study of institutional sources, in particular the Third Order statutes, and literary texts written and used in Third Order convents (the Informieringheboeck by Jan de Wael and the Jhesus Collacien, the article will discuss the allegedly binary oppositions “inside-outside” and “safety of the convent-dangers of the world” that pervade the text of the statutes and form the backbone of the spiritual instruction of cloistered women.Esta contribución tiene como objetivo investigar el uso de los conceptos de lugar, espacio y (restricción de movimiento en la educación espiritual de las mujeres religiosas que vivían en comunidades de la Tercera Orden en la diócesis de Utrecht (Países Bajos. A través del estudio de las fuentes institucionales, en particular los estatutos de la Orden Tercera, y los textos literarios escritos y utilizados en los conventos de la Tercera Orden (la Informieringheboeck de Jan de Wael y el Jhesus Collacien, el artículo discutirá las supuestas oposiciones binarias “dentro/ fuera” y “seguridad de los conventos/ peligros del mundo” que impregnan el texto de los estatutos y forman la columna vertebral de la enseñanza espiritual de las mujeres enclaustradas.

  18. Anthropocentric and theocentric spirituality as an object of psychological research

    OpenAIRE

    Jaworski Romuald

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic direction of psychological and theological interpretations of spirituality is very important. The traditional psychological approach to the spiritual sphere is characterised by reductionism, which consists in reducing spiritual experiences to mental experiences, or even biological processes. The studies in the field of religion psychology led to distinguish between two types of spirituality. The first one is theocentric spirituality, where human being places God in the cent...

  19. Spiritual care in dementia nursing - A qualitative, exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Ødbehr, Liv Skomakerstuen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spiritual care is included in nurses’ holistic care. Descriptions of spirituality in research highlight humans search for the sacred, experiences of self-transcendence and connectedness (to self, to others and to God/a deity), with the end-point being the human experience of meaning. Nurses report spiritual care as being difficult to carry out, and that they lack knowledge in relation to what a spiritual dimension to nursing means and implies, and how to practise spiritual care in...

  20. Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Toby L; Schmid, Kendra K; Boucher-Payne, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Researchers are beginning to collect empiric data about coping mechanisms of health science students. Yet, there is an important aspect of coping with stress that is only partially addressed in health sciences curricula: students' spiritual well-being. In this essay, we describe a course in spirituality and health care that we offered to fourth-year medical students, as well as a small empirical study we conducted to assess students' spiritual needs and practices. We then offer reflections on the broad applicability of this work to students in the health sciences more generally, including suggestions for curriculum interventions that may ensure students' success.

  1. Spirituality in narratives of meaning

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    Francois Wessels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article forms part of a study which was inspired by the ever-growing need for significance expressed both by my life coaching and pastoral therapy clients as well as the need for existential meaning reported both in the lay press and academic literature. The study reflected on a life that matters with a group of co-researchers in a participatory action research relationship. The study has been positioned within pastoral theology and invited the theological discourse into a reflection of existential meaning. Adopting a critical relational constructionist epistemology, the research was positioned within a postmodern paradigm. The implications for meaning and research were explored and described. This article tells the story of how spirituality was positioned in the narratives of meaning by my fellow researchers.

  2. Changes in spiritual well-being and psychological outcomes in ovarian cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lauren Z; Cuneo, Michaela; Thaker, Premal H; Goodheart, Michael J; Bender, David; Lutgendorf, Susan K

    2018-02-01

    Because of the poor prognosis of ovarian cancer and concomitant distress, understanding contributors to positive well-being is critical. This study examines spiritual growth as a domain of posttraumatic growth and its contribution to longitudinal emotional outcomes in ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer patients (N = 241) completed measures assessing spirituality (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being-12; subscales: faith, meaning, and peace), depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), cancer-specific anxiety (Impact of Event Scale), and total mood disturbance (TMD; Profile of Mood States) prior to surgery and 1-year postsurgery. Stressful life events in the year after diagnosis were measured at 1-year postsurgery. Regressions examined the association between changes in spirituality and depression, anxiety, and TMD at 1-year postsurgery. Additionally, spiritual change was examined as a moderator of the effect of recent life events on mood. Increases in peace were related to lower depression (β = -.40, P Changes in meaning and faith were unrelated to all outcomes. Additionally, changes in peace moderated the effect of stressful life events on depression (β = -.14, P = .027), anxiety (β = -.16, P = .05), and TMD (β = -.17, P = .01), such that those with a high number of life events paired with a decrease in peace experienced the worst psychological outcomes at 1 year. These findings suggest that the quality of peace may be the most adaptive facet of spiritual growth in cancer patients. Furthermore, changes in peace appear to moderate the effect of life events on psychological well-being. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. “ Habitus ” in soul care. Towards “spiritual fortigenetics” (parrhesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that habitus plays a fundamental role in both a practical theological and pastoral-anthropological approach in order to focus on the “wholeness” of the human soul (soul as a qualitative and relational entity). It is hypothesized that a spiritual understanding of fortigenetics and the emphasis on a positive growth ...

  4. Perception of spirituality, spiritual care, and barriers to the provision of spiritual care among undergraduate nurses in the University of Lagos, Nigeria

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    Florence F Folami

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spiritual care is an important aspect of holistic care in nursing, and as a result, some nursing schools have begun offering courses in spirituality. Even at that, studies in some countries have shown that nursing students' perception on spirituality and spiritual care was not sufficient and most professional nurses still feel inadequately prepared to provide spiritual care, showing the inadequacy of the education that was received, thus, hindering the patients from receiving holistic care. Objectives: This study has the broad objective of identifying the perception of spirituality and spiritual care and barriers to the provision of spirituality care among undergraduate nurses in the College of Medicine, University of Lagos. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study, utilizing stratified random sampling technique. A total of 117 out of 157 students of the nursing department, University of Lagos, ranging from 200 level to 500 level participated in the study. Data were collected using structured self-administered questionnaire, with a reliability coefficient of 0.509, which was validated using face and content method. Analyses were done using Statistical Package for Social Services version 14 and presented using tables, percentages, and pie chart. Results: Result shows that of the respondents, 67.9% scored <50% of the questions pertaining to perception on spirituality and spiritual care. This shows that nurses had poor perception regarding spirituality and spiritual care, with majority (68.7% of them perceiving spirituality as religion. Barriers to the provision of spirituality care were also identified with “lack of confidence” being the most common. Conclusion: The findings of this research showed that nursing students' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care was poor which had no relationship with their academic level or kind of religion, thus, showing that the education being provided on this

  5. The Spiritual Journey of Infertile Couples: Discussing the Opportunity for Spiritual Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Romeiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a worldwide public health issue that exerts an in-depth impact on couples, families, communities and the individual. This reproductive health condition, along with fertility treatments, often forces couples to question their purpose and meaning in life, and to begin a spiritual journey. Nursing and midwifery literature describes the care of those living with infertility, but often lacks a clear approach of the spiritual dimension, and diagnosis and interventions may not be effectively addressed. In this paper, we present a discussion about spirituality and the assessment of spiritual needs such as hope, beliefs, meaning and satisfaction in life. In addition, spiritual needs are defined, for both nurses and midwives, and spiritual interventions are proposed for promoting couples’ resilience and spiritual well-being. Spirituality should be considered from the beginning to the end of life. It is necessary to translate this into the development and implementation of both specific policies regarding a spiritual approach and advanced education and training programs for nurses and midwives who care for infertile couples.

  6. Effects of Personality Traits, Religiousness/ Spirituality on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Religiousness Index (IWSRI), and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) were administered to 412 randomly selected senior secondary school students to evaluate personality traits, spirituality/religiousness, and psychopathology respectively.

  7. Psychiatry, religion, positive emotions and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, George E

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes that eight positive emotions: awe, love/attachment, trust/faith, compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, joy and hope constitute what we mean by spirituality. These emotions have been grossly ignored by psychiatry. The two sciences that I shall employ to demonstrate this definition of spirituality will be ethology and neuroscience. They are both very new. I will argue that spirituality is not about ideas, sacred texts and theology. Rather, spirituality is all about emotion and social connection that are more dependent on the limbic system than the cortex. Specific religions, for all their limitations, are often the portal through which positive emotions are brought into conscious attention. Neither Freud nor psychiatric textbooks ever mention emotions like joy and gratitude. Hymns and psalms give these emotions pride of place. Our whole concept of psychotherapy might change, if clinicians set about enhancing positive emotions, rather than focusing only on the negative ones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Secular spirituality versus secular dualism: Towards postsecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    spiritual reality (the ... closely related to the cardinal problems that preoccupy a culture. In every context worldview should be ..... 13 Paradoxically, the whole notion of virtual reality and cyberspace represents the non- corporeal. Aupers & Houtman ...

  9. Social representations about religion and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Moema da Silva; Santos, Marília Borges Couto; Pinheiro, Tiago Gomes

    2015-01-01

    to identify the social representations about the concepts of spirituality and religion of of health teachers. exploratory and descriptive study, based on a qualitative approach. 25 subjects participated in it. The following instruments were used to collect data: questionnaire to identify the profile; questionnaire of free association, whose inducing words were religion and spirituality, and an interview based on the scale FICA (Puchalski, 2006). the representations about religion and spirituality, for professors, are forged around the faith in God and it gives them meaning and purpose to deal with the challenges of personal and professional living. there are still barriers that need to be overcome with a view to a comprehensive care. For this, it is essential to incorporate spirituality in the process in the curricula of health courses.

  10. Features of structure of spirituality of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Chkhikvadze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The correlation of the structure of the spirituality is analyzed in the article, gender differences and differences between students of natural-science and humanitarian direction are investigated.

  11. Celtic spirituality and contemporary environmental issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Duncan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Celtic spirituality has a long and distinguished ancestry with its origins in pre-Christian times. It was inculturated among peoples in the far west of Europe, particularly in Ireland, Scotland and the north and south-west of England. It was different from Roman Christianity in distinct ways until the mid-7th century CE when Roman Christianity became the norm in Britain and Ireland. This spirituality has endured throughout the centuries and has experienced a revival from the latter half of the 20th century. From its inception, it has been closely linked to the environment. Over the years many key aspects of Celtic spirituality have been integrated in many religious traditions and shows similarities with and can contribute to a new ethical perspective on environmental issues. This article investigates the current environmental crisis from a faith perspective and attempts to draw lessons from Celtic traditions of spirituality in a scientific age.

  12. Business leadership as a spiritual discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh-Taylor, C

    2000-01-01

    What motivates organizational leaders in their search for spirituality? They seek to integrate their inner journey with their day-to-day professional roles. This article describes how a course in spirituality for executives has provided tools to analyze and clarify intentions, avoid the traps of excessive greed and power, and make decisions that are both compassionate and effective. André L. Delbecq, DBA, the Thomas J. and Kathleen L. McCarthy Professor at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University in California, offers seminars in spirituality for organizational leadership through the MBA program and the Center for Executive Development. Delbecq is the first to admit his surprise at the number of executives who have repeatedly asked for courses in spirituality. He talks about how his seminars have helped CEOs and other top executives achieve greater effectiveness in leading organizations.

  13. A Psychological View of Spirituality and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jeffrey; Hunter, Jeremy

    2002-01-01

    Using Howard Gardner's concept of existential intelligence along with others such as Jerome Bruner, explores the psychology of spirituality and leadership. Describes how famous film director uses meditation in his work. Draws implications for educational leadership. (PKP)

  14. Spirituality in business: Sparks from the Anvil

    OpenAIRE

    B. Mahadevan

    2013-01-01

    The economic crises in the recent past have led to a renewed interest in exploring the role of spirituality in business management. However there are several challenges in understanding what “spirituality” means in an operational sense of business management. This article first traces the research in the area of spirituality as applied to business and in the second part, reports on the beliefs of Suresh B. Hundre, Chairman and MD of Polyhydron Pvt. Ltd, Belgaum, India, as practised in Polyhyd...

  15. Quality-of-life and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzini, Raquel Gehrke; Mosqueiro, Bruno Paz; Zimpel, Rogério R; Bandeira, Denise Ruschel; Rocha, Neusa S; Fleck, Marcelo P

    2017-06-01

    Spirituality has been identified as an important dimension of quality-of-life. The objective of this study was to review the literature on quality-of-life and spirituality, their association, and assessment tools. A search was conducted of the keyterms 'quality-of-life' and 'spirituality' in abstract or title in the databases PsycINFO and PubMed/Medline between 1979-2005, complemented by a new search at PUBMED from 2006-2016. Quality-of-life is a new concept, which encompasses and transcends the concept of health, being composed of multiple domains: physical, psychological, environmental, among others. The missing measure in health has been defined as the individual's perception of their position in life in the context of culture and value system in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards, and concerns. There is consistent evidence of an association between quality-of-life and religiosity/spirituality (R/S), through studies with reasonable methodological rigour, using several variables to assess R/S (e.g. religious affiliation, religious coping, and prayer/spirituality). There are also several valid and reliable instruments to evaluate quality-of-life and spirituality. Further studies are needed, however, especially in Brazil. Such studies will provide empirical data to be used in planning health interventions based on spirituality, seeking a better quality-of-life. In the last 10 years, research is consistently growing about quality-of-life and spirituality in many countries, and also in many areas of health research.

  16. Spiritual exercises and parrhesia in Montaigne's Essays

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro, AS

    2011-01-01

    In his late work Michel Foucault stressed the importance of parrhesia (libertas, franc-parler, frankness of speech) in the philosophical practices of the Anciens, through a broader reflection on "spirituality" inspired chiefly by the work of Pierre Hadot. The notion of parrhesia emerges as an interesting matter also in a approach of Montaigne's Essays, where we can recognize a series of "spiritual exercises", in the sense given to the expression by Hadot: practices, not only intellectual, int...

  17. Nursings' need for the idea of spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    Spirituality is an idea that has sustained significant interest in nursing over the past quarter century. Extensive conceptual work has generated robust critique around clarity and professional jurisdictional claims. However, less attention has been paid to the challenges nursing has faced that have contributed to the spirituality quest. Reflecting on my own experiences as a scholar writing in this literature over the past decade, I suggest three challenges that spirituality has attempted to redress: to relate across difference in a globalized world, to be good in a world of uncertain morality and to find meaning in a disenchanted world. The idea of spirituality could be viewed as resistance against othering, against law based ethics, and against politics and power. But the impact of the idea of spirituality has yet to be determined and caution is in order. As important as this resistance is, nursing must refrain from creating a new world of insiders and outsiders and from minimizing the role of religious ethics in a globalized world. Spirituality, like its predecessor religion, will likely continue to play an enduring role in providing fundamental meaning for nursing work. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Expert Discussion on Taking a Spiritual History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, Piret; Frick, Eckhard; Roser, Traugott; Jobin, Guy

    2017-01-01

    This article elaborates on the hazards of spiritual history taking. It provides expert insights to consider before entering the field. In summer 2012, a group of spiritual care experts were invited to discuss the complexity of taking spiritual histories in a manner of hermeneutic circle. Thematic analysis was applied to define the emerging themes. The results demonstrate that taking a spiritual history is a complex and challenging task, requiring a number of personal qualities of the interviewer, such as 'being present', 'not only hearing, but listening', 'understanding the message beyond the words uttered', and 'picking up the words to respond'. To 'establish a link of sharing', the interviewer is expected 'to go beyond the ethical stance of neutrality'. The latter may cause several dilemmas, such as 'fear of causing more problems', 'not daring to take it further', and above all, 'being ambivalent about one's role'. Interviewer has to be careful in terms of the 'patient's vulnerability'. To avoid causing harm, it is essential to propose 'a follow-up contract' that allows responding to 'patient's yearning for genuine care'. These findings combined with available literature suggest that the quality of spiritual history taking will remain poor unless the health-care professionals revise the meaning of spirituality and the art of caring on individual level.

  19. Spiritual Pain in Meals on Wheels’ Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Boss

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Meals on Wheels’ clients are at risk for spiritual pain due to advanced age, social isolation, and failing health. They are also prone to stress, depression, and loneliness, placing them at risk for adverse biological disruptions and health outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine associations of spiritual pain with psychosocial factors (stress, depression, loneliness, religious coping and salivary biomarkers of stress and inflammation (cortisol, IL-1β in Meals on Wheels’ clients. Methods: Data were collected cross-sectionally from 88 elderly (mean age 75.4. Spiritual pain, stress, depression, loneliness, and religious coping were measured with standardized instruments, and salivary biomarkers were assessed with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Spiritual pain was significantly and positively correlated with stress (r = 0.35, p ≤ 0.001, depression (r = 0.27, p = 0.01, and negative religious coping (r = 0.27, p = 0.01. Correlations with loneliness, positive religious coping, and salivary biomarkers were non-significant. Conclusion: Spiritual pain is an important concept in this population. Research should be expanded to understand the significance of spiritual pain in conjunction with psychosocial and biological variables and its potential impact on physical, mental, and cognitive health outcomes in the elderly.

  20. Development of a spiritual self-care practice scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary L; Schim, Stephanie Myers

    2013-01-01

    Development of a valid, reliable instrument to measure spiritual self-care practices of patients with heart failure. African American patients (N = 142) with heart failure participated in the study. Spiritual advisors from several religious groups reviewed the Spiritual Self-Care Practices Scale (SSCPS) for content validity. Construct validity was determined using a principal components factor analysis. Reliability was established using Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Religious advisors provided suggestions to improve content validity. Four factors consistent with spiritual practices (personal spiritual practices, spiritual practices, physical spiritual practices, and interpersonal spiritual practices) emerged from the factor analysis. The alpha coefficient was moderate at 0.64. Results indicated the SSCPS was reliable and valid for measuring spiritual self-care practices among African Americans with heart failure. Additional testing is needed to confirm results in other patient groups with chronic illnesses.

  1. Acknowledging others as 'whole beings'. Managers' perceptions of spirituality and health in the South African workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honiball, George; Geldenhuys, Dirk; Mayer, Claude-Hélène

    2014-06-01

    This article explores the concept of spirituality within selected South African managerial work contexts. The aim of the study was to determine managers' perceptions of spirituality and health-related aspects in various South African workplaces. A phenomenological research paradigm was used, applying an in-depth qualitative research approach. The sample consisted of 12 senior managers from different organizations, including, for example, an international healthcare provider, an international auditing and consulting firm, a manufacturer of paint supplies and decorations and an ecclesiastical organization. Research methods included semi-structured interviews and observation. Data was analysed through content analysis, identifying themes, categories and codes. The findings indicate that spirituality promotes the development of health-related aspects of individuals, such as self-awareness, inner peace and the management of stress and depression. Managers emphasize that spirituality also has an impact on managing teams and teamwork, engaging in competitive behaviour, encouraging honesty and reducing selfishness. Based on the findings, a conclusion is given and practical as well as scientific recommendations are emphasized. In love lies the seed of our growth. The more we love, the closer we are to the spiritual experience. (Paulo Coelho, 1994).

  2. Re-examining definitions of spirituality in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Katia Garcia; Koenig, Harold G

    2013-12-01

    To discuss the definition of spirituality and its limitations for nursing research. It proposes a definition that will capture more accurately the role of spirituality in health outcomes. Studies have increasingly examined spirituality in nursing research as a coping mechanism attenuating the negative impact of traumatic stress on mental health. Existing definitions of spirituality in nursing research include elements of positive emotional states (meaning, purpose, general well-being) which confound mental health outcomes. Medline and CINAHL databases were searched from 2007-2011 for research articles examining spirituality definitions and measures used by nurse researchers. An analysis of the definitions of spirituality in nursing research reveals inconsistencies and confounding mental health concepts. The authors propose defining spirituality in the context of religious involvement when conducting research, while using a broader definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. They argue such definition provides a more appropriate method of measuring this concept in research aimed at evaluating mental health outcomes while preserving the currently used patient-defined definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. A consistent definition of spirituality in nursing research evaluating mental health outcomes, distinct from 'spiritual care' in a clinical setting, is essential to avoid tautological results that are meaningless. Appropriate definitions will enable nursing researchers to more clearly identify resilience mechanisms and improved health outcomes in those exposed to traumatic stress. A definition of spirituality that focuses on religious involvement provides a more uniform and consistent measure for evaluating mental health outcomes in nursing research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Spiritual needs of dying patients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, C P

    2001-01-01

    To identify dying patients' definitions of spirituality and their spiritual needs. Descriptive, qualitative. Participants' places of residence. 19 hospice patients (10 females and 9 males), mean age 72, with a range of length of time as a hospice patient of 2 weeks to 12 months. Semistructured interviews were conducted. Interview transcripts and field notes were analyzed to reduce data into codes and themes. Data were coded by extracting verbatim phrases used to describe spirituality and spiritual needs. Themes emerged from the data as commonalities among the codes developed. Meaning of "spiritual" and perceived spiritual needs. Participants initially defined spiritual as relating to God or religion; however, as interviews progressed, it was apparent that their spirituality was a part of their total existence. Twenty-nine unique spiritual needs were identified and grouped into six themes: need for religion, need for companionship, need for involvement and control, need to finish business, need to experience nature, and need for positive outlook. Participants perceived spirituality as a broad concept that may or may not involve religion. Spiritual needs were likewise broad in scope and were linked closely to purpose and meaning in life. Spiritual care of dying patients is within the scope of nursing practice. Spiritual needs are quite varied and encompass more than religion. If nurses are to enhance the quality of life of dying patients, spiritual needs must be addressed.

  4. Implicaciones de los abejorros (Bombus spp.) en la dispersión del virus del mosaico del pepino dulce (Pepino Mosaic Virus) en cultivos de tomate

    OpenAIRE

    Lacasa Plasencia, Alfredo; Guerrero Díaz, María del Mar; Hita, I.; Martínez Francés, María A.; Jordá Gutiérrez, María Concepción; Bielza Lino, Pablo; Contreras Gallego, Joséfa; Alcázar, A.; Cano, A.

    2002-01-01

    [ESP] Desde 1999 el virus del mosaico del pepino dulce (Pepino Mosaic Virus, PepMV) afecta el cultivo del tomate en varios países europeos. Produce abullonado, mosaicos y filiformismo en las hojas jóvenes y jaspeado y pardeamiento en los frutos. Se transmite fácilmente por contacto entre plantas y mecánicamente por las manipulaciones de las labores culturales (desbrotado, entutorado, etc.). Se han realizado ensayos para conocer las posibles implicaciones de los abejorros pol...

  5. Evaluación de la efectividad del tratamiento con agua dulce para el control del piojo de mar Caligus rogercresseyi Boxshall & Bravo, 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Bravo; Veronica Pozo; María Teresa Silva

    2015-01-01

    Para evaluar la tolerancia de Caligus rogercresseyi al tratamiento con agua dulce, se recolectaron parásitos desde dos centros de cultivos localizados en el área de Calbuco, sur de Chile. El primer estudio se realizó en diciembre 2012 en un centro de cultivos ubicado en el Canal Huito, cuya salinidad fue de 26 y el segundo estudio se realizó en abril 2013 en un centro de cultivos en el Canal Chidhuapi, donde la salinidad fue de 32. En el primer estudio se evaluó la tolerancia de hembras y mac...

  6. Determinación del mejor proceso de elaboración de dulce de leche a partir de la sustitución parcial o total de leche fresca por leche en polvo

    OpenAIRE

    Roca, Erika; Cáceres, Patricio

    2011-01-01

    El propósito de esta tesis fue determinar si en la elaboración de dulce de leche era posible la sustitución parcial o total de leche fresca por leche en polvo reconstituida como materia prima, para obtener un producto con características similares a las del dulce de leche tradicional. Para lograr este objetivo en primer lugar se estandarizó la leche reconstituida a utilizarse como materia prima. Después en base al diseño de experimento se elaboraron veinte muestras distintas de du...

  7. New Zealand Nurses’ Perceptions of Spirituality and Spiritual care: Qualitative Findings from a National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Egan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the qualitative findings from the first national survey of New Zealand nurses’ views on spirituality and spiritual care. The importance of spirituality as a core aspect of holistic nursing care is gaining momentum. Little is currently known about New Zealand nurses’ understandings, perceptions and experience of spirituality. Design: A descriptive online survey. Method: A random sample of 2000 individuals resident in New Zealand whose occupation on the New Zealand electoral roll suggested nursing was their current or past occupation were invited via postcard to participate in an online survey. This paper reports on the free response section of the survey. Findings: Overall, 472 invitees responded (24.1%. From the respondents, 63% completed at least one of the optional free response sections. Thematic analysis generated three metathemes: ‘The role of spirituality in nursing practice’, ‘Enabling best practice’, and ‘Creating a supportive culture’. Conclusions: Spirituality was predominantly valued as a core aspect of holistic nursing care. However, clarity is needed surrounding what constitutes spiritual care and how this intersects with professional responsibilities and boundaries. Participants’ insights suggest a focus on improving the consistency and quality of spiritual care by fostering inter-professional collaboration, and improved provision of resources and educational opportunities.

  8. Promotion of Spiritual Development: Exploration of the Self and Spiritualism through the Practice of Chinese Calligraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-Tak

    2009-01-01

    Promotion of students' spiritual development is one of the goals of pastoral care in schools. The heritage of Chinese calligraphy is traditionally used as a way to enhance an individual's self-reflection and cultivation, and has an educational value in spiritual development. This study aims to examine the cultural meaning of Chinese calligraphy…

  9. Spirituality as a Lived Experience: Exploring the Essence of Spirituality for Women in Late Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Lydia K.

    2012-01-01

    Against the backdrop of a dramatic increase in the number of individuals living longer, particularly older women, it is vital that researchers explore the intersection of spirituality, gender, and aging. In this qualitative study of six women aged 80 and older, I explore, using, multiple, in-depth interviews, the experiences of spirituality over…

  10. Early Childhood Spirituality in Education: Towards an Understanding of the Distinctive Features of Young Children's Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kate; Bull, Rebecca; Maynes, Mary-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Early years education is a holistic endeavour, with some education policies including spiritual development as part of that approach. However, studies exploring the spirituality of young children are scarce, which limits understanding of the phenomenon and its full application in educational settings. Furthermore, nurturing children's spiritual…

  11. "Spiritual Friends": An Investigation of Children's Spirituality in the Context of British Urban Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkinshaw, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This article argues relational consciousness of Self and Other is influenced by multiple significant relationships--what are termed "Spiritual Friends". The research on which this article is based explores the spirituality of children within the context of British urban secondary education, and identifies significant relationships in…

  12. PERAN KECERDASAN SPIRITUAL DALAM PENCAPAIAN KEBERMAKNAAN HIDUP

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    Fatma Laili Khoirun Nida

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Kehendak untuk maksud kehidupan adalah motivasi fundamental hadir dalam setiap individu. Pemenuhan kebutuhan ini berpunca dari tiga nilai-nilai  which termasuk: nilai- nilai  kreatif,  nilai- nilai experiental, dan nilai-nilai sikap. Sumber makna nilai-nilai hidup akan actualized dengan bantuan peran kualitas spiritual yang berpotensi hadir dalam setiap individu sebagai quetion shape spiritual. Dengan mengadopsi  logoanalisis dasar teoretis dikembangkan oleh Victor E.  Frankl  dalam metode terapis meaningfulness  kehidupan, di  mana  Frankl  percaya bahwa semua aspek-aspek  arti hidup menyimpan.  Arti hidup untuk dapat dicapai akan diwujudkan dengan bantuan quetion rohani yang melekat pada setiap individu. Justru itu, quetion rohani berkontribusi terhadap pencapaian meaningfulness  kehidupan, dalam peran yang dia dapat menjadi media, control dan petunjuk bagi individu dalam dinamika kehidupan, sehingga masing- masing dalam keadaan apa pun dengan tetap menjaga kualitas keberadaan manusia sebagai intelektual, emosi dan rohani agar ia dapat mencapai maksud kehidupan.   Kata Kunci: Peran, Kecerdasan Spiritual, Kebermaknaan  Hidup THE ROLE OF THE SPIRITUAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE ACHIEVEMENT OF MEANINGFULLNESS. The will to meaning of life is the fundamental  motivation  present in every individual. The fulfillment of these need system from the three valueswhich include: the creative values, experiental values, and attitudinal  values. The source of the meaning of life values that will be actualized with the help of the role of spiritual qualities that are potentially present in every individual as a shaper of spiritual quetion. By adopting the theoretical basic logo analysis developed by Victor E. Franklin therapeutic methods meaning fulness of life, where Frankl  believes that all aspects of the meaning of life saving. Meaning of life to be achieved will be realized with the help of spiritual quetion inherent in each individual. Thus

  13. Spiritual Dryness as a Measure of a Specific Spiritual Crisis in Catholic Priests: Associations with Symptoms of Burnout and Distress

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    Arndt Büssing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality/religiosity is recognized as a resource to cope with burdening life events and chronic illness. However, less is known about the consequences of the lack of positive spiritual feelings. Spiritual dryness in clergy has been described as spiritual lethargy, a lack of vibrant spiritual encounter with God, and an absence of spiritual resources, such as spiritual renewal practices. To operationalize experiences of “spiritual dryness” in terms of a specific spiritual crisis, we have developed the “spiritual dryness scale” (SDS. Here, we describe the validation of the instrument which was applied among other standardized questionnaires in a sample of 425 Catholic priests who professionally care for the spiritual sake of others. Feelings of “spiritual dryness” were experienced occasionally by up to 40%, often or even regularly by up to 13%. These experiences can explain 44% of variance in daily spiritual experiences, 30% in depressive symptoms, 22% in perceived stress, 20% in emotional exhaustion, 19% in work engagement, and 21% of variance of ascribed importance of religious activity. The SDS-5 can be used as a specific measure of spiritual crisis with good reliability and validity in further studies.

  14. Spiritual Dryness as a Measure of a Specific Spiritual Crisis in Catholic Priests: Associations with Symptoms of Burnout and Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Andreas; Baumann, Klaus; Frick, Eckhard; Jacobs, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Spirituality/religiosity is recognized as a resource to cope with burdening life events and chronic illness. However, less is known about the consequences of the lack of positive spiritual feelings. Spiritual dryness in clergy has been described as spiritual lethargy, a lack of vibrant spiritual encounter with God, and an absence of spiritual resources, such as spiritual renewal practices. To operationalize experiences of “spiritual dryness” in terms of a specific spiritual crisis, we have developed the “spiritual dryness scale” (SDS). Here, we describe the validation of the instrument which was applied among other standardized questionnaires in a sample of 425 Catholic priests who professionally care for the spiritual sake of others. Feelings of “spiritual dryness” were experienced occasionally by up to 40%, often or even regularly by up to 13%. These experiences can explain 44% of variance in daily spiritual experiences, 30% in depressive symptoms, 22% in perceived stress, 20% in emotional exhaustion, 19% in work engagement, and 21% of variance of ascribed importance of religious activity. The SDS-5 can be used as a specific measure of spiritual crisis with good reliability and validity in further studies. PMID:23843867

  15. [Resilience and the Role of Spiritual Care].

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    Shimazono, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    One of the main goals of spiritual care is to elicit the patient's own power. Previously, religious professionals encouraged people to believe in God, Buddha, or spiritual beings and helped those who were suffering. The power to recover was believed to come from outside human beings. For example, the foremost role of hospital chaplains in the past was to pray to a transcendental being (s) with those who were suffering. When resilience was expected, the first thing to do was to rely on the transcendental being (s). In contrast, the priority in contemporary spiritual care is to trust the resilience of those with difficulties, even when the concerned believe in a transcendental power. The emphasis is on human beings and things which can be seen, rather than transcendental beings. Through this kind of expectation, resilience is to be expected and becomes a source of hope. However, there may be cases in which resilience does not grow. On caring for the dying or those with marked grief, just facing spiritual pain may be the prevalent situation. Care workers need to accept the reality that overcoming spiritual pain is not easy. Then, the paradox is that facing weakness itself can become a source of power. This may be experienced in spiritual care, and it helps elucidate an aspect of resilience. The author's position is that there are many cases in which power is elicited from weakness. Examples are found through the activities to provide aid following the Great East Japan Earthquake, in the spiritual care of dying persons at home, as well as in the care of psychiatric patients who are liberated from the obsession that they must be cured.

  16. The efficacy of integrating spirituality into undergraduate nursing curricula.

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    Yilmaz, Meryem; Gurler, Hesna

    2014-12-01

    Attention to patients' spirituality, as a moral obligation of care, is now widely accepted in nursing practice. However, until recently, many nursing programs have paid little attention to spirituality. The objective of this study was to identify the impact of two different curricula, used to teach undergraduate nursing students, on increasing nursing student awareness of spirituality in the care of patients. A quasi-experimental post-intervention two-group design was conducted in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 academic years. The study included a total of 130 volunteer senior-year students. The students were assigned as "the intervention group/integrated system" that were informed about spirituality or as "the control group/traditional system" that received no information on spirituality. Data were collected via a personal information form and the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale was used to assess responses. The study was conducted at the Department of Nursing of the Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumhuriyet University, in Central Anatolia/Turkey. Permission to conduct the study at the nursing school was obtained from the schools' management teams. The rights of the participants were protected in this study by obtaining informed consent. The results revealed that the intervention group had a higher mean score on the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale than did the control group. The students in the intervention group defined the terms of spirituality and spiritual care more accurately than did the control group students. Nurses are professionally and ethically responsible for providing spiritual care. Nurses' competence in meeting the spiritual needs of their patients should be improved by undergraduate education on spiritual care. Nursing scholars reported a significant difference in the knowledge and attitudes toward spirituality of nursing students as a result of the integration of spirituality into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Spirituality

  17. Anthropocentric and theocentric spirituality as an object of psychological research

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    Jaworski Romuald

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic direction of psychological and theological interpretations of spirituality is very important. The traditional psychological approach to the spiritual sphere is characterised by reductionism, which consists in reducing spiritual experiences to mental experiences, or even biological processes. The studies in the field of religion psychology led to distinguish between two types of spirituality. The first one is theocentric spirituality, where human being places God in the centre of his interest and life in general. The second type of spirituality is anthropocentric spirituality, focused on human being, his own aspirations, preferences and needs. Both types of spirituality have certain value. Their close characteristics includes sources of inspiration, purpose, presented image of God, as well as understanding of spirituality and manner of realizing spiritual life. In order to distinguish between two types of spirituality, anthropocentric and theocentric, in practice, a proper research method – Range of Theocentric and Anthropocentric Spirituality (SDT – DA had to be developed. The individuals with theocentric spirituality displayed a higher level of stability and emotional balance, better social adjustment, higher sense of duty and attachment to acceptable social standards, deeper and more satisfactory contacts with other human beings, more trust and openness towards others, as well as higher trust to themselves and to God. Such individuals are better at handling difficulties and have optimistic attitude to life.

  18. Nurses' Experiences of Spiritual Communication with Seriously III Children.

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    Ferrell, Betty; Wittenberg, Elaine; Battista, Vanessa; Walker, Gay

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this study was to explore nurse experiences in communication with children about spiritual topics in order to develop training in this area. Although spiritual care is essential in pediatric palliative care, few providers receive training about communication with ill children about spirituality. Researchers developed a brief survey to prompt nurses to reflect on pediatric palliative care experiences that included spiritual discussions. Nurses attending training courses voluntarily submitted stories. Qualitative data were thematically analyzed by members of the research team, consisting of two researchers with expertise in palliative care, spirituality, and communication and two expert pediatric palliative care clinicians. Nurses' spiritual conversations with children revealed that children question God and the reason for their illness, have a desire to talk about the afterlife as a way of understanding their limited lifespan, and to share descriptions of an afterlife, in these cases described as heaven. Nurses conveyed the importance of being present and engaging in spiritual communication with children. Communication training is needed and should prepare providers to respond to a child's spiritual questioning, assist parents when the child initiates discussion about the afterlife, and help parent and child understand the spiritual meaning of their illness. Chaplains serve as spiritual care experts and can help train nurses to screen for spiritual distress, have greater competence in spiritual communication, and to collaborate with chaplains in care. Quality palliative care is incomplete without attention to spiritual care.

  19. Influences of chia flour and the concentration of total solids on the characteristics of ‘dulce de leche’ from goat milk

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    Marcia Alves CHAVES

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A factorial categorical design totalling six treatments was applied to investigate the influence of the substitution of corn starch with whole and partially defatted chia flour under the technical characteristics (centesimal composition, instrumental analyses, and sensory evaluation and nutritional disorders (composition of fatty acids and index of the nutritional quality of the lipid fraction of ‘dulce de leche’ concentrated to 72 and 78 °B. The treatments with chia flour concentrated to 72 °B showed higher moisture content and lower compression force, and when the concentration range increased to 78 °B, the levels of total lipids amounted up to 1.40 times when compared to treatment with corn starch. The polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly omega-3 and omega-6 levels, were higher in treatments with chia flour on both tracks of concentration, allowing a reduction in the atherogenic index and thrombogenic index effects and the n-6/n-3 ratio. The treatments of ‘dulce de leche’ with a lower concentration of soluble solids obtained greater acceptance and consumer purchase intention. The application of whole chia flour in small proportions and in the concentration of 72 °B was the most appropriate under the studied conditions, showing improvement in the nutritional quality and with good technical aspects of candy made with goat milk.

  20. “Tenía corazón”: Dulce dueño de Emilia Pardo Bazán

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    Charnon-Deutsch, Lou

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores Pardo Bazán´s dialogue with realist representational fiction, with its voyeuristic obsessions, by revisiting certain passages in the novel Dulce Dueño and reviewing recent feminist scholarship (Bieder, Bacon, Medina and Kirkpatrick that sees the novel to varying degrees as subversive of the male gaze. While these critics correctly see the novel as gesturing towards modernity, this article examines also its backward glance at earlier woman-plots in relation to feminine subjectivity that imagine various ways to demonstrate that woman tenía corazón.Este ensayo explora el diálogo de Pardo Bazán con la ficción representativa realista, con sus obsesiones voyeuristas, revisitando ciertos pasajes de la novela Dulce Dueño y revisando investigaciones feministas recientes (Bieder, Bacon, Medina y Kirkpatrick que consideran la novela como una subversión, en distintos grados, de la mirada masculina. Mientras que estos críticos ven en la novela, acertadamente, un ademán hacia la modernidad, se examina también aquí su ojeada retrospectiva hacia anteriores tramas que exploran la subjetividad femenina y que imaginan varias maneras de demostrar que la mujer tenía corazón.

  1. Apresiasi Keimanan kepada Tuhan melalui Pengalaman Spiritual

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    Abdul Kadir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The awareness of God departed from religion which becomes introverted understanding in one’s experience. Appreciation of God should not be limited to the value of formalities by simply doing spirituality teaching, but also the embodiment of spiritual experience of God. The constellation of religious values is not just about understanding and appreciation but also achieve esoteric experience, so as to reveal its meaning for deeper appreciation, recognition and encounter with Him. Esoteric aspect of religion has become an important goal in the appreciation of spiritual experience ascent and acquisition with cleaning bonds which related to plurality and turned it from horizontal dimension senses to the vertical dimension of the universe to reach the consciousness of mortality. If God wills, there will be an incline in spiritual sensing sharpness until one can see, watch, or feel the real evidence from God about the things that are obviously high, so that the faith based on mukâshafah, ma‘rifah, and mushâhadah namely faith through spiritual vision to arrive at the essence.

  2. Spirituality and distress in palliative care consultation.

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    Hills, Judith; Paice, Judith A; Cameron, Jacqueline R; Shott, Susan

    2005-08-01

    One's spirituality or religious beliefs and practices may have a profound impact on how the individual copes with the suffering that so often accompanies advanced disease. Several previous studies suggest that negative religious coping can significantly affect health outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to explore the relationship between spirituality, religious coping, and symptoms of distress among a group of inpatients referred to the palliative care consult service. Pilot study. The study was conducted in a large academic medical center with a comprehensive Palliative Care and Home Hospice Program. (1) National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Management Assessment Tool; (2) Pargament Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief RCOPE); (3) Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp); (4) Puchalski's FICA; and (5) Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF). The 31 subjects surveyed experienced moderate distress (5.8 +/- 2.7), major physical and psychosocial symptom burden, along with reduced function and significant caregiving needs. The majority (87.2%) perceived themselves to be at least somewhat spiritual, with 77.4% admitting to being at least somewhat religious. Negative religious coping (i.e., statements regarding punishment or abandonment by God) was positively associated with distress, confusion, depression, and negatively associated with physical and emotional well-being, as well as quality of life. Palliative care clinicians should be alert to symptoms of spiritual distress and intervene accordingly. Future research is needed to identify optimal techniques to address negative religious coping.

  3. Spiritual nursing care: A concept analysis.

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    Monareng, Lydia V

    2012-10-08

    Although the concept 'spiritual nursing care' has its roots in the history of the nursing profession, many nurses in practice have difficulty integrating the concept into practice. There is an ongoing debate in the empirical literature about its definition, clarity and application in nursing practice. The study aimed to develop an operational definition of the concept and its application in clinical practice. A qualitative study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses render spiritual nursing care. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit the sample. Individual and focus group interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Trustworthiness was ensured through strategies of truth value, applicability, consistency and neutrality. Data were analysed using the NUD*IST power version 4 software, constant comparison, open, axial and selective coding. Tech's eight steps of analysis were also used, which led to the emergence of themes, categories and sub-categories. Concept analysis was conducted through a comprehensive literature review and as a result 'caring presence' was identified as the core variable from which all the other characteristics of spiritual nursing care arise. An operational definition of spiritual nursing care based on the findings was that humane care is demonstrated by showing caring presence, respect and concern for meeting the needs not only of the body and mind of patients, but also their spiritual needs of hope and meaning in the midst of health crisis, which demand equal attention for optimal care from both religious and nonreligious nurses.

  4. Race, Religion, and Spirituality for Asian American Students

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    Park, Julie J.; Dizon, Jude Paul Matias

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes how race, ethnicity, religion, and spirituality uniquely interact for Asian American college students, including a discussion of the diverse religious and spiritual backgrounds of this population.

  5. Spiritually journeying through illness: default or devoted God?

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    Wilder, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Nurses have the opportunity to companion patients on their spiritual journey during illness. The author, a nurse and spiritual director, relays the use of Ignatian Contemplation to help a friend journeying through the experience of renal carcinoma.

  6. Spiritual disclosure between older adolescents and their mothers.

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    Brelsford, Gina M; Mahoney, Annette

    2008-02-01

    This study examines the role of spiritual disclosure within older adolescent-mother relationships. Spiritual disclosure is defined as mutual disclosure of personal religious and spiritual beliefs and practices. Three hundred 18- to 20-year-old college students and 130 of their mothers reported on spiritual disclosure in their relationships. According to both parties, greater spiritual disclosure was related to higher relationship satisfaction, greater use of collaborative conflict resolution strategies, less dysfunctional communication patterns, less verbal aggression, and increased general disclosure in mother-adolescent relationships beyond global religiousness and demographics. Spiritual disclosure also predicted unique variance in collaborative conflict resolution strategies beyond these factors and general disclosure. The findings underscore the value of attending to the interpersonal dimension of religion/spirituality. More specifically, the results suggest that spiritual disclosure is an indicator of relationship quality, one that is tied to better relationship functioning, and one that merits further attention in studies of family dynamics.

  7. Nurse Religiosity and Spiritual Care: An Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston; Gober-Park, Carla; Schoonover-Shoffner, Kathy; Mamier, Iris; Somaiya, Chintan K; Bahjri, Khaled

    2017-08-01

    This study measured the frequency of nurse-provided spiritual care and how it is associated with various facets of nurse religiosity. Data were collected using an online survey accessed from the home page of the Journal of Christian Nursing. The survey included the Nurse Spiritual Care Therapeutics Scale, six scales quantifying facets of religiosity, and demographic and work-related items. Respondents ( N = 358) indicated high religiosity yet reported neutral responses to items about sharing personal beliefs and tentativeness of belief. Findings suggested spiritual care was infrequent. Multivariate analysis showed prayer frequency, employer support of spiritual care, and non-White ethnicity were significantly associated with spiritual care frequency (adjusted R 2 = .10). Results not only provide an indication of spiritual care frequency but empirical encouragement for nurse managers to provide a supportive environment for spiritual care. Findings expose the reality that nurse religiosity is directly related, albeit weakly, to spiritual care frequency.

  8. Spiritual formation and the nurturing of creative spirituality: A case study in Proverbs

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    Anneke Viljoen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is positioned in the interface between Old Testament scholarship and the discipline of spiritual direction of which spiritual formation is a component. The contribution that a Ricoeurian hermeneutic may make in unlocking the potential which an imaginal engagement with the book of Proverbs may hold for the discipline of spiritual formation was explored. Specifically three aspects of the text of Proverbs illustrated the creative process at work in the text, and how it converges with the concept of spiritual formation and the nurturing of creative spirituality. These aspects were, the development in Lady Wisdom�s discourses, the functional definition of the fear of Yahweh (illustrated from Proverbs 10:1�15:33, and the paradigmatic character of the book of Proverbs.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The research is positioned in the interface between Old Testament studies and Practical Theology. The research results in the enhancement of the interdisciplinary dialogue and interchange of resources between the named disciplines with regard to the interest in formation of persons that the biblical book of Proverbs and the discipline of spiritual formation shares.Keywords: Spiritual formation; fear of Yahweh; Proverbs; Wisdom; Hermeneutics; Paul Ricoeur; Symbolic world; Textual reference

  9. Spiritual and Religious Interventions in Health Care: An Integrative Review

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    Mohammadali Hosseini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review article is describing a research on spiritual and religious interventions in Iran. An integrative review was conducted to determine the state of the science in Iran. Iranmedex, Scientific Information Database, Irandoc, Noormags, Magiran and Google scholar were searched to find articles published in peer-reviewed journals from August 2002 to August 2012. A qualitative approach utilizing content analysis was used in the review. Overall, 21 articles on spiritual and religious interventions in Iran's health care system which met the search criteria were included from 800,000 records in 438 journals. The review shows that there are at least four overarching themes of spiritual and religious interventions: spiritual and religious behaviours, spiritual care as part of a holistic caring approach, spiritual/religious therapy as an effective healing technique, and patients’ spiritual needs. These themes are linked and interrelated. The main concern for caregivers was “hanging on to spirituality” in spite of the eroding effects on spiritual beliefs caused by different factors in the health care system. Spirituality plays an important role in the way people live and die. The majority of the research on spiritual and religious interventions in Iran’s health care system focuses on patients’ need toward spiritual care and health professionals’ spiritual approach, as well as factors that influence their spirituality. More research is needed on the factors that influence patients’ spiritual needs, spirituality among health care providers, and interventions to engender spiritual and religious interventions in the health care system.

  10. PRODUCCIÓN DE CHILE DULCE EN INVERNADERO BAJO DIFERENTES NIVELES DE AGOTAMIENTO EN LA HUMEDAD DEL SUSTRATO

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    Gustavo Quesada Roldán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el efecto de 3 niveles de hume - dad en el sustrato sobre el crecimiento y pro - ducción comercial de 2 híbridos de chile dulce establecidos bajo condiciones de invernadero. El ensayo se efectuó en el invernadero multica - pilla de la Estación Experimental Fabio Baudrit Moreno en La Garita, Alajuela, y los materia - les evaluados fueron los híbridos Villaplants Americano (de fruta cuadrada tipo blocky color amarillo y FBM-9 (de fruta cónica color rojo, ambos genotipos de origen nacional. El primer tratamiento consistió en el suministro de agua la planta a capacidad de campo (CC mientras que al segundo y tercer tratamiento se le restó a la planta el 15 y el 30%, respectivamente, de ese aporte original de agua. Se demostró que no hay un efecto en la cantidad de agua suministrada sobre el crecimiento de la planta aunque sí se observó que plantas sometidas a estrés hídrico comenzaron primero su fase de floración y fruc - tificación. Para ambos híbridos se obtuvo una disminución en la cantidad de frutos de primera y segunda, y un aumento en fruta de rechazo, conforme se limitó el riego. La pudrición apical fue la principal causa de rechazo producto de la falta de agua, asociado con la poca disponibilidad de calcio. El rendimiento comercial más alto se obtuvo con el híbrido Villaplants Americano (31,8 ton.ha -1 , aunque sin deferencia estadística entre sustratos a CC y CC–15%, pese a que sí disminuyó la calidad de la fruta con ese último tratamiento. Lo mismo se observó para el híbrido FBM-9. Con el tratamiento CC–30% se afectó tanto el rendimiento comercial como la calidad de la fruta, en ambos híbridos.

  11. Spirituality and spiritual care in in the context of nursing education in South Africa

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    Sandhya Chandramohan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order for nursing education to prepare nurses for holistic patient care, it is critical that educators become more aware of the religious and spiritual dimensions in patien tcare and be able to provide adequate knowledge and skills for nurses to offer spiritually-basedc are in an ethical way. Furthermore, spiritual care is an essential component in the nursing context, as nurses have to care for patients who may often turn to the spiritual dimension to cope and heal. These aspects are important issues to be considered in planning what should be taught as part of spiritual care. Objectives: This paper presents findings from a study on nursing practitioners’ views on the role of spiritual care in nursing practice and whether current nursing education has integrated this dimension into teaching. Method: A descriptive survey using a cross-sectional design with 385 nurses was conducted between December 2012 and February 2013. Participants were recruited through multistage random sampling. Data analysis was undertaken using SSPS 0.20. Results: All the participants (n = 385 concurred that spiritual care was a salient component of holistic patient care. They however stated that the primary barriers to providing spiritual care related to uncertainty on how to provide this type of care, and a lack of educational preparedness for this role. Conclusion: The study found that nurses were very accepting of the need for spiritual care as part of their nursing role but that nursing education had not paid adequate attention to integrating this dimension into the nursing curriculum.

  12. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life.

  13. SPIRITUAL QUOTIENT (SQ: THE ULTIMATE INTELLIGENCE

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    Rus'an Rus'an

    2013-07-01

    Abstract: This paper discusses the spiritual intelligence as the ultimate intelligence which exceeds the IQ and EQ. IQ or intelligence quotient is a form of intelligence that based on reasoning, intellectual ratio, which is a linear way of thinking that in-cludes the ability to count, analyze to evaluate. While EQ or Emotional Quotient based on emotional, namely the intelligence which is capable to control emotions and give empathy so a person is able to act natural. Therefore the true nature of the SQ or spiritual intelligence quotient was based on the soul. This intelligence makes people to have the ability to find meaning in life, as well as refine the manners. According to Danah Zohar SQ as the ultimate intelligence means that the meaning of life is the first and foremost goal of life for humans. Only intelligent people spiritually who can give meaning in his life.

  14. Vulnerable populations: cultural and spiritual direction.

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    Quest, Tammie E; Franks, Nicole M

    2006-08-01

    Cultural, spiritual, and religious diversity of emergency department patients is increasing while that of emergency physicians in particular remains predominantly homogeneous. With a discordance of cultural, race, and ethnicity exist, in the case of ethical conflict -resolution becomes that much more difficult. Patients may feel vulnerable when their emergency care provider does not understand his or her cultural, spiritual, and religious uniqueness as it relates to the patient-doctor interaction and health care decision making. This review will examine (1) language differences; (2) cultural, religious, and spiritual differences between patient and provider; (3) differing explanatory models of disease between patient and provider; and (4) diverse bioethical models of decision making of differing cultures in an effort to reduce vulnerabilities.

  15. Spiritual care in a multicultural oncology environment.

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    Dennis, Kristopher; Duncan, Graeme

    2012-06-01

    Increasingly, oncology is practiced within multicultural environments. All aspects of care, including spiritual care should be delivered to patients with cancer in a culturally sensitive manner. In this article, we discuss the influence of culture on patients with cancer throughout the disease process by highlighting relevant reports in the literature. Most articles focussing on culture and oncology are single-author or single-institution narrative reports pertaining to experiences with an individual racial, ethnic, religious or minority patient group. The majority of articles are found within the palliative care and nursing literature. Health-related values vary widely across cultures, and the experience of spiritual care in oncology differs greatly across cultural groups. Although culture is generally recognized as an important health determinant that impacts the experience of care, the extent of different cultural influences is not well understood due to a paucity of relevant data, and reports on resources and educational strategies to optimize culturally competent spiritual care are similarly lacking.

  16. Focus Groups as Transformative Spiritual Encounters

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    Sharon Moloney PhD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Focus groups are a valuable method for exploring the construction and negotiation of meanings. In her doctoral research the author explored how Australian women's experiences of menstruation, birth, and spirituality are invested with meaning and how that meaning influences and shapes those experiences. The focus group has been described as a potentially liminal space, which enables the discussion of taboo subjects by breaking the ice and giving people permission to comment. In addition, she discovered that the groups could be occasions of empowerment and transformation for both participants and researcher. In a way that far exceeded her expectations, the group format was ideally suited to feminist research and the organic inquiry methodology she used. Some groups became deeply spiritual encounters that were nourishing and transformative for all. This article explores how focus groups can be vehicles of spiritual transformation, examining one group in particular to highlight the points raised.

  17. Spirituality: the new religion of our time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. van der Walt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mainstream religions and their institutions have since the 1960s been gradually bleeding to death because of their members leaving them in search of rather more inspirational experiences elsewhere. Christian educationists are concerned about this development, because it means that these churches have been losing their capacity for entering into meaningful tripartite pedagogical partnerships with family and school. A description of the problem of churches losing members is followed by a brief depiction of spirituality, something that can be experienced both within Christianity and elsewhere. The inability of main- stream churches to let their members experience true Christian spirituality compels the latter to go elsewhere in search of it. It is concluded that spirituality is no “new” religion after all as far as Christianity is concerned. It is in fact the quintessence of Christianity, but has through the ages become deeply buried in the mainstream religions and churches under thick layers of dogmatic and other superficialities.

  18. Spirituality, religion, and healing in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalski, Christina M; Dorff, Rabbi Elliot; Hendi, Imam Yahya

    2004-11-01

    In end-of-life care, attending to spiritual needs ensures that a dying patient has the opportunity to find meaning in the midst of suffering and to have the opportunity for love, compassion, and partnership in their final journey. This article summarizes some of the beliefs and traditions from Judaism, Islam, and Christianity that affect people as they face their own dying and mortality. People who do not participate in any formal religion also have a drive to find meaning in the midst of suffering and dying. They may find this in personal ways. This article presents some practical tools to help clinicians address and respect spiritual and religious issues of patients. It is crucial that our culture and our systems of care for the dying include a spiritual approach so that dying can be meaningful and even filled with hope.

  19. Spiritual Mentoring: Embracing the Mentor-Mentee Relational Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzanell, Patrice M.

    2009-01-01

    Spirituality offers a range of connections--to oneself, others, organizations, a higher being--that may shift over the course of an individual's lifetime. The spiritual values of compassion, humility, and simplicity are a basis on which spiritual practices and identities form and grow. In turn, practices and identities shape the meanings and…

  20. Conflicting Values: Spirituality and Wilderness at Mt. Shasta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Fernandez-Gimenez; Lynn Huntsinger; Catherine Phillips; Barbara Allen-Diaz

    1992-01-01

    Many people from a variety of backgrounds believe that Mt. Shasta is a major spiritual center. Although these "spiritual users" value the area's natural features, their spiritual and social activities, including construction of sweat lodges, medicine wheels, altars, meditation pads, trails, and campsites, are leading to rapid ecological degradation. This...

  1. Existential well-being : Spirituality or well-being?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anja; Garssen, Bert; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Measures of spirituality often contain the dimension existential well-being (EWB). However, EWB has been found to overlap with emotional and psychological well-being. Using the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List (SAIL), we have further investigated the overlap between aspects of spirituality

  2. Spiritually sensitive social work: A missing link in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the prominence of spirituality in social work practice. It maintains that spirituality is a very critical aspect of social work and the two must never be detached. It is also the authors' contention that the centrality of spirituality in social work is not a well taught and well researched area in Zimbabwe. Just like ...

  3. Existential Well-Being Spirituality or Well-Being?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anja; Garssen, Bert; Vingerhoets, Ad J. J. M.

    Measures of spirituality often contain the dimension existential well-being (EWB). However, EWB has been found to overlap with emotional and psychological well-being. Using the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List (SAIL), we have further investigated the overlap between aspects of spirituality

  4. Spiritual Dormancy: The Strategic Effect of the Depravation of God

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Spirituality , Human Spirit, Religion , Moral Injury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER...Family Fitness, Spirituality , Human Spirit, Religion , Moral Injury Classification: Unclassified This paper explores...conduct. Spirituality is a component of soldier fitness but there is no direct reference to God or religion in the Army’s latest capstone document the

  5. Fostering Spiritual Formation of Millennials in Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Anne Puidk

    2017-01-01

    Christian education seeks to foster millennials' spiritual formation to equip them for future challenges and to benefit society. Using nonexperimental mixed methods, 504 secondary educators revealed what spiritual formation programs their schools implement and their perceptions about millennial spiritual formation. Descriptive analysis showed that…

  6. Spiritual pain among patients with advanced cancer in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mako, Caterina; Galek, Kathleen; Poppito, Shannon R

    2006-10-01

    The large body of empirical research suggesting that patients' spiritual and existential experiences influence the disease process has raised the need for health care professionals to understand the complexity of patients' spiritual pain and distress. The current study explores the multidimensional nature of spiritual pain, in patients with end-stage cancer, in relation to physical pain, symptom severity, and emotional distress. The study combines a quantitative evaluation of participants' intensity of spiritual pain, physical pain, depression, and intensity of illness, with a qualitative focus on the nature of patients' spiritual pain and the kinds of interventions patients believed would ameliorate their spiritual pain. Fifty-seven patients with advanced stage cancer in a palliative care hospital were interviewed by chaplains. Overall, 96% of the patients reported experiencing spiritual pain, but they expressed it in different ways: (1) as an intrapsychic conflict, (2) as interpersonal loss or conflict, or (3) in relation to the divine. Intensity of spiritual pain was correlated with depression (r = 0.43, p spiritual pain did not vary by age, gender, disease course or religious affiliation. Given both the universality of spiritual pain and the multifaceted nature of pain, we propose that when patients report the experience of pain, more consideration be given to the complexity of the phenomena and that spiritual pain be considered a contributing factor. The authors maintain that spiritual pain left unaddressed both impedes recovery and contributes to the overall suffering of the patient.

  7. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to…

  8. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Counselor Education: Barriers and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher M.; Puig, Ana; Baggs, Adrienne; Wolf, Cheryl Pence

    2015-01-01

    Despite a professionally recognized need for training in religion/spirituality, literature indicates that religious and spirituality issues continue to be inconsistently addressed in counselor education. Ten experts were asked to identify potential barriers to integrating religion and spirituality into counselor education and indicate strategies…

  9. Transformative Learning Theory and Spirituality: A Whole-Person Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Spirituality is gaining popularity within academics as discussions regarding the importance of spirituality within leadership and education increases. A biblical anthropology embraces human nature as physical, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual with recognition that adults are capable of learning within each of those realms. Embracing humans are…

  10. Spirituality and Early Childhood Special Education: Exploring a "Forgotten" Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaili

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality is recognised by many to be an inherent property of the human being. Empirical studies and theoretical literature both suggest that spirituality affects one's quality of life in terms of emotional and physical well-being, relationships, and social inclusion. However, the importance of the spiritual dimension of life is rarely…

  11. A Trinitarian approach to spirituality: Exploring the possibilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirituality and ultimacy are inextricably linked. Underlying the plurality of spiritualities are myriad ways to construe the identity of the transcendent. In a Christian sense, the notion of the divine with a Trinitarian identification is central. The article examines the implications of such a naming of God for spirituality. Attention is ...

  12. Spirituality in Music Education: Transcending Culture, Exploration III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Spirituality and religion are not synonymous and, in fact, require not only different definitions but also appropriate vocabulary. A deeper discussion of the issues concerning spirituality ensues in several sections: 1) fundamental differences between spirituality and religion; 2) brain operations relative to transcendent states; 3) a definition…

  13. Integrating Spirituality into Counselling and Psychotherapy: Theoretical and Clinical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Carla; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, spirituality has become a prominent focus of psychological inquiry. As research begins to elucidate the role of spiritual beliefs and behaviours in mental health and the influences of spirituality in psychotherapy, developing therapist competency in this domain has increased in importance. This article will first situate…

  14. Social Justice and Spirituality: Educating for a Complicated Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Leona M.; Cameron, Paula

    2016-01-01

    This chapter proposes a spiritually relevant and social justice pedagogy that assists learners in making the transition to the workplace. Key elements of this spirituality include religion, cultural diversity, identity, health, and social class. Pedagogical strategies for infusing this spirituality in the curriculum are given.

  15. Spirituality and healing. Impacts on the Akan of Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opoku, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality and healing are two distinct realities in form and nature. While healing deals practically with physical bodily disorders, spirituality concerns the sacred and the supernatural aspects of human life. The study is devoted to the uncommon relationship between spirituality and healing and

  16. Religious and Spiritual Education in Disability Situations in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Valeria; Caldin, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    In this short article, the authors focus on religious and spiritual education's potential to offer social and spiritual inclusion for students with a disability. They take the view that the religious and spiritual education teacher in such situations is positioned better when seeing such teaching as a special vocation. They use Italy as the case…

  17. Working with Hindu Clients in a Spiritually Sensitive Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Although social work is witnessing growing interest in spiritual and religious issues, little guidance has appeared in the literature to assist practitioners in addressing the unique spirituality of rapidly increasing non-Western populations. This article discusses the significant cultural/spiritual beliefs, practices, and values of Hindus, the…

  18. Contours of Biblical spirituality as a discipline | Welzen | Acta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... divine human relational process. A dialogue of spirituality and exegesis is needed. For doing research a threefold competence is needed: in exegesis, in spirituality and in the integration of these two. The final section is about intertextuality. Intertextuality may help to understand the spiritual process in reading biblical texts.

  19. Learning Spiritual Dimensions of Care from a Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Aru

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the spiritual dimensions of nursing at various historical periods: ancient civilizations, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and the 18th and 19th centuries. Reviews contemporary perspectives on spirituality and nursing and suggests how nurses can be equipped to deal with patients' spiritual needs. (SK)

  20. spirituality, theology and the critical mind 1. introduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SPIRITUALITY, THEOLOGY AND THE. CRITICAL MIND. P.G.R. de Villiers1. ABSTRACT. This essay investigates aspects of the critical nature of spirituality as a ... implicating nature of the critical mind in terms of the spirituality of the researcher ..... liberative, compassionate, healing, and nurturing images assume signifi-.

  1. The Call for Spiritual Formation in Protestant Theological Institutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spiritual formation is a significant component of the educational work of a theological institution that prepares students for church leadership. Theological institutions have a responsibility to engage students in reflecting on the spiritual life, to provide opportunities for students, to deepen their spiritual journeys and to develop ...

  2. Contours of Biblical spirituality as a discipline | Welzen | Acta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three approaches are used for coming towards a definition of Biblical spirituality. The first approach is from lived spirituality. We see always a bipolarity of text and reader. The reader attributes meaning to the text guided by the data of the text. The second approach is the analysis of literature discussing Biblical spirituality.

  3. Spirituality and adherence to antiretroviral drugs among HIV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor drug adherence is a major problem in the care of HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Spirituality is one of the several factors that affects ... The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Spirituality (FACIT-Sp) tool was used to determine their level of spirituality. Participants were classified as having high or ...

  4. Creatively Negotiating the Place of Spirituality in the ELT Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambu, Joseph Ernest

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to better understand constraints (e.g., hostility toward spirituality) and opportunities that may affect teacher-student and student-student relations as spiritually informed ELT curriculum is negotiated. Viewed more broadly, spirituality aims to foster the ability to see one's own religious positioning in relation to other…

  5. Glocal spirituality for a brave new world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoon Geels

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality, as it is presented in this article, can serve as an antidote to an all too disrespectful attitude towards our fellow human beings, towards life in general. Spirituality might unite a greater part of the world in the battle for survival. Our world, Gaia, is threatened, as we all know. Apart from the usual disasters as seemingly never-ending wars and conflicts we now also have to confront global threats such as climate changes, global pollution, and food distribution problems. In such a world everything has to be done in order to promote the fundamental idea that we only have one planet and one humanity.Spirituality addresses such issues. The purpose of this paper is to show that people who express the view that they are ‘spiritual, not religious’, people belonging to what can be called the new spirituality, despite their aversion to institutionalized religion never­theless exhibit elements in their belief-systems that are closely related to the great mystical traditions in world religion. These common denominators are, a good ground for dialogue. When theologians from especially the theistic traditions more often than not search for differences, mystics and representatives for the new spirituality are more inclined to find commonalities. At a time when elements of traditional Christianity such as the belief in a transcendent God show signs of being in decline, there seems to be an increasing interest in the predominant mystical and panentheistic view of God, stating that God is both immanent and transcendent.

  6. Spirituality aspects in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedrus, Glória Maria Almeida Souza; Fonseca, Lineu Corrêa; Höehr, Gabriela Chaves

    2014-01-01

    Do epilepsy and spirituality interact? This study aimed to determine whether an easy-to-administer scale, such as the spirituality self-rating scale (SSRS), could detect increased religiousness in people with epilepsy and verify how epilepsy influences spirituality. A total of 196 consecutive patients with epilepsy (epilepsy group, EG) with a mean age and standard deviation of 46.5 ± 14.8 years and 66 subjects with no history of neurological or other chronic disorders (control group, CG) were assessed by the SSRS and neurologically. The SSRS scores of the EG and CG did not differ significantly (22.8 ± 5.1 and 22.0 ± 5.7, respectively). Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) had significantly higher SSRS scores than those with other epileptic syndromes and, than in individuals of the CG. Multiple regression showed that the factors significantly associated with greater spirituality (greater SSRS score) for the EG, were lower education level, abnormal background EEG activity, and MTLE-HS. Other relationships with the clinical features of epilepsy and with the presence of psychiatric co-morbidity were not found. The present findings do not confirm a specific role of epilepsy in spirituality or of "epileptic hyperreligiosity," but suggest that spirituality in people with epilepsy is influenced by education level, and may also stem from epilepsy-related factors such as abnormal background EEG activity and the presence of MTLE-HS. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Preparation for Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Care: Strengthening Pastoral "Felt Knowledge" and Empathy through the Appreciation and Use of Contemporary Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baard, Ronald W

    2017-03-01

    Contemporary film offers something unique in the preparation and practice of pastoral counselors and spiritual caregivers by expanding both "felt knowledge" and strengthening empathic responses to care seekers. By experiencing well-chosen films, pastoral counselors and other spiritual caregivers will be better prepared to work with relevant feelings in various caregiving contexts, and clients will gain many rewards, as both their healing and growth will be enhanced. This will be especially true when pastoral and spiritual caregivers are working in areas of need where they have limited personal or professional experience.

  8. Patient versus health care provider perspectives on spirituality and spiritual care: the potential to miss the moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Debbie; Seccaraccia, Dori; Huth, Jim; Kurppa, Kristin; Fitch, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    Spirituality and spiritual care are well recognized as important facets of patient care, particularly in the palliative care population. Challenges remain, however, in the provision of such care. This study sought to compare patient and health care professional (HCP) views on spirituality/spiritual care, originally with a view to exploring a simple question(s) HCP's could use to identify spiritual distress, but evolved further to a comparison of how patients and HCPs were both concordant and discordant in their thoughts, and how this could lead to HCP's 'missing' opportunities to both identify spirituality/spiritual distress and to providing meaningful spiritual care. Patients (n=16) with advanced illnesses and HCP's (n=21) with experience providing care to those with advanced disease were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Qualitative analysis distress and spiritual care, and screening for spiritual distress). Within each category there were areas of both concordance and discordance. Most notably, HCP's struggled to articulate definitions of spirituality whereas patients generally spoke with much more ease, giving rich examples. Equally, HCP's had difficulty relating stories of patients who had experienced spiritual distress while patients gave ready responses. Key areas where HCP's and patients differed were identified and set up the strong possibility for an HCP to 'miss the moment' in providing spiritual care. These key misses include the perception that spiritual care is simply not something they can provide, the challenge in defining/ recognizing spirituality (as HCP and patient definitions were often very different), and the focus on spiritual care, even for those interested in providing, as 'task oriented' often with emphasis on meaning making or finding purpose, whereas patients much more commonly described spiritual care as listening deeply, being present and helping them live in the moment. Several discrepancies in perception of

  9. Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, P. A.; Marler, Clayton Fay

    2001-03-01

    Tribal people in southeast Idaho sincerely desire that archaeologists include Shoshone concepts of spirituality when investigating archaeological materials and sites. However, most archaeologists and resource managers have little understanding about these concepts and this creates difficulties. We examine two important aspects of the Shoshone soul, Mugua’ and Nabushi’aipe, and discuss how understanding these attributes aid in explaining why certain archaeological remains are considered sacred. A greater understanding of Shoshone spirituality will begin to bridge the needs of both tribal people and archaeologists.

  10. South African fantasy: Identity and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Apostolides

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available South African society is grappling with the challenges of post-apartheid expectations within a ‘rainbow nation’. As a result of this rainbow nation, many people have to deal with fragmented identities and spiritualities. This can be particularly true for adolescents who are living out their lives in multicultural schools with multiple discourses. In this article, it will be argued that fantasy narratives, especially those written by South African writers from a South African context, may help heal the fragmented identities and spiritualities of school-going adolescents.

  11. Spiritual stress and coping model of divorce: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrei, Elizabeth J; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2011-12-01

    This study represents the first longitudinal effort to use a spiritual stress and coping model to predict adults' psychosocial adjustment following divorce. A community sample of 89 participants completed measures at the time of their divorce and 1 year later. Though the sample endorsed slightly lower levels of religiosity than the general U.S. population, most reported spiritual appraisals and positive and negative religious coping tied to divorce. Hierarchical regression analyses controlling general religiousness and nonreligious forms of coping indicated that (a) appraising divorce as a sacred loss or desecration at the time it occurred predicted more depressive symptoms and dysfunctional conflict tactics with the ex-spouse 1 year later; (b) positive religious coping reported about the year following divorce predicted greater posttraumatic growth 1 year after divorce; and (c) negative religious coping reported about the year following divorce predicted more depressive symptoms 1 year after the divorce. Bootstrapping mediation analyses indicated that negative religious coping fully mediated links between appraising the divorce as a sacred loss or desecration at the time it occurred and depressive symptoms 1 year later. In addition, moderation analyses revealed that negative religious coping is more strongly associated with depressive symptoms among those who form high versus low appraisals of their divorce as a sacred loss or desecration. These findings are relevant to divorce education and intervention provided by professionals in legal, family, mental health, and clerical roles. Implications are discussed for clinical and counseling psychology and religious communities.

  12. Religious Literacy or Spiritual Awareness? Comparative Critique of Andrew Wright's and David Hay's Approaches to Spiritual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipsone, Anta

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of a comparison of the educational approaches of Andrew Wright and David Hay this paper illustrates the persisting problem of dichotomising cognitive and trans-cognitive aspects of spiritual development and education. Even though both Wright and Hay speak of the same topic--spirituality and spiritual education--they define these terms…

  13. How Christian nurses converse with patients about spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Jane Bacon; Gober, Carla; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2014-10-01

    To describe the experience of conversing with clients to provide spiritual care from the perspective of Christian nurses identified as exemplary spiritual caregivers. More specifically, findings presented here describe the goals and strategies of these nurses when conversing with patients about spirituality. Although verbal communication is pivotal to most spiritual care interventions recognised in the nursing literature, there is scant empirical evidence to inform such spiritual care. There is evidence, however, that many nurses have discomfort and difficulty with conversations about spirituality. Cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative design framed by phenomenology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 southern California registered nurses working in varied clinical settings. Data were coded and thematically analysed by three researchers who established equivalency. Methods to support the trustworthiness of the findings were employed. Themes providing structure to the description of how nurses converse with patients about spirituality included assessing and establishing connection, overt introductions of spirituality, finding spiritual commonality, self-disclosure, spiritual encouragement, spiritual advice or religious teaching, and prayer. Requisite to any spiritual care conversation, however, was 'allowing them (patients) to talk'. Informants tread 'gently and softly' in approaching spiritual discourse, assessing for any patient resistance, and not pushing further if any was met. Findings illustrate compassionate nursing with specifiable goals and strategies for conversations about spirituality; they also raise questions about how nurse religious beliefs are to ethically inform these conversations. The Invitation, Connection, Attentive care, Reciprocity mnemonic is offered as a means for nurses to remember essentials for communication with patients about spirituality. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Employee Spirituality in the Workplace: A Cross-Cultural View for the Management of Spiritual Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey S.; Geroy, Gary D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses six entry points to initiate discussion of employee spirituality in management education: cross-cultural management, workplace diversity, leadership, team management, organizational culture, and human resource development. (SK)

  15. Finding Spirits in Spirituality: What are We Measuring in Spirituality and Health Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Lance D; Curtis, Cara E; Morgan, Jonathan R

    2017-02-01

    What are we asking when we ask about spirituality? When research subjects check survey boxes for "religiosity" and "spirituality" measures on health surveys, those of us who use them often assume that these responses indicate a relationship with-or reaction against-normative, conventional, Protestant-shaped religious practice and experience. We present a qualitative interview study of 13 low-income mothers with a history of depression, analyzing their descriptions of spiritual and religious coping practices. On the basis of a focused analysis of four mother's narratives, we argue that conventional survey answers may frequently hide more than they reveal about people's cultural, religious, and idiosyncratic experiences with ghosts, spirits, magic, and haunting presences that are relevant, sometimes integral, to illness and healing. We demonstrate that listening to participants' narratives challenges researchers' unconsciously normative assumptions and ought to help us reshape our understanding of the ways spirituality and religion influence health in a hyperdiverse society.

  16. Filling the void: spiritual development among adolescents of the affluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Samuel H; Miller, Lisa; Luthar, Suniya S

    2015-06-01

    Building on both the spiritual development and affluent youth literature, the current study explores spiritual development and health outcomes in a sample of upper-middle-class youth. Exploratory analyses indicate long-term stability in religiosity and spirituality from late adolescence (mean age 18) well into emerging adulthood (mean age 24); specifically, a strong personal relationship with a Higher Power, that carries into the broader arena of life, appears to be the primary source of spiritual life in adolescence that transitions into young adulthood. Moreover, cross-sectional associations at age 24 suggest spiritual development may have important implications for increased mental health and life satisfaction, as well as decreased antisocial behaviors.

  17. Characteristics of Spirituality and Religion Among Suicide Attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandhouj, Olfa; Perroud, Nader; Hasler, Roland; Younes, Nadia; Huguelet, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Spirituality and religiousness are associated with a lower risk of suicide. A detailed assessment of spirituality among 88 suicide attempters hospitalized after a suicide attempt was performed. Factors associated with the recurrence of suicide attempts over 18 months were looked into. Spirituality was low among most suicide attempters in comparison with the general population. Two groups were identified: those with a high score of depression who featured "low" in spirituality and those with a more heterogeneous profile, for example, involving personality disorders, characterized by a "high" spirituality. At the follow-up, the "meaning in life" score appeared to correlate with recurrence of suicide. Clinical implications are discussed herein.

  18. Conceptualising spirituality for medical research and health service provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koenig Harold G

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The need to take account of spirituality in research and health services provision is assuming ever greater importance. However the field has long been hampered by a lack of conceptual clarity about the nature of spirituality itself. We do not agree with the sceptical claim that it is impossible to conceptualise spirituality within a scientific paradigm. Our aims are to 1 provide a brief over-view of critical thinking that might form the basis for a useful definition of spirituality for research and clinical work and 2 demystify the language of spirituality for clinical practice and research.

  19. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses' and patients' experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Three categories emerged from the study: (1) "perceived barriers for providing spiritual care" including "lack of preparation for spiritual care," "time and space constraints," "unprofessional view," and "lack of support"; (2) "communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations" including "manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses" and "communication: Transmission of spiritual energy"; and (3) "religion-related spiritual experiences" including "life events as divine will and divine exam," "death as reincarnation," "trust in God," "prayer/recourse to Holy Imams," and "acceptance of divine providence." Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients' spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients' spiritual dimension. According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and nurses can benefit from organizational and clergymen's support to cope with spiritual distress. Researchers should

  20. [Experience of Spiritual Conflict in Hospice Nurses: A Phenomenological Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Sook; Kwak, Su Young

    2017-02-01

    This aim of this phenomenological study was to describe and understand the experience of spiritual conflict in hospice nurses by identifying the meanings and structures of the experience. Participants were 12 nurses working for one year or more at hospice units of general hospitals in a metropolitan city and experiencing of spiritual conflict as hospice nurses. Over six months data were collected using individual in-depth interviews and analyzed with the method suggested by Colaizzi. The experience of spiritual conflict in participants was organized into three categories, six theme-clusters, and 13 themes. The participants felt existential anxiety on death and a fear of death which is out of human control and skepticism for real facts of human beings facing death. They also experienced agitation of fundamental beliefs about life with agitation of the philosophy of life guiding themselves and mental distress due to fundamental questions that are difficult to answer. Also they had distress about poor spiritual care with guilty feelings from neglecting patients' spiritual needs and difficulties in spiritual care due to lack of practical competencies. Findings indicate the experience of spiritual conflict in hospice nurses is mainly associated with frequent experience of death in hospice patients. The experience of spiritual conflict consisted of existential anxiety, agitation of fundamental beliefs and distress over poor spiritual care. So, programs to help relieve anxiety, agitation and distress are necessary to prevent spiritual conflict and then spiritual burnout in hospice nurses. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  1. Integrating Spirituality as a Key Component of Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Brémault-Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patient care frequently focuses on physical aspects of disease management, with variable attention given to spiritual needs. And yet, patients indicate that spiritual suffering adds to distress associated with illness. Spirituality, broadly defined as that which gives meaning and purpose to a person’s life and connectedness to the significant or sacred, often becomes a central issue for patients. Growing evidence demonstrates that spirituality is important in patient care. Yet healthcare professionals (HCPs do not always feel prepared to engage with patients about spiritual issues. In this project, HCPs attended an educational session focused on using the FICA Spiritual History Tool to integrate spirituality into patient care. Later, they incorporated the tool when caring for patients participating in the study. This research (1 explored the value of including spiritual history taking in clinical practice; (2 identified facilitators and barriers to incorporating spirituality into person-centred care; and (3 determined ways in which HCPs can effectively utilize spiritual history taking. Data were collected using focus groups and chart reviews. Findings indicate positive impacts at organizational, clinical/unit, professional/personal and patient levels when HCPs include spirituality in patient care. Recommendations are offered.

  2. THE “TURN” TO SPIRITUALITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of isolation, hostility, domination and colonialism are giving way to respect and spiritual sharing — leading to “dialogic dialogue.” The lat- ter is a phrase coined by Raimon Panikkar to distinguish the creative encounter between religious traditions from dialectic dialogue, in which there is an attempt by the one party to refute ...

  3. MERCY, LOVE AND SALVATION IN ORTHODOX SPIRITUALITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    certainly wrote the most beautiful page on the philanthropic spirituality of the everlasting Church. Mercy was ... work and responsibilities but, on the contrary, brought a discipline of the soul and a balance of the body .... Mercy should not be a simple philanthropic act, but a religious one (Špidlík. 1998:295). Christian mercy is ...

  4. DISCERNMENT AND BIBLICAL SPIRITUALITY: AN OVERVIEW ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article briefly and very generally explores some of the developments in the field of biblical spirituality over the past six decades by analysing and discussing some seminal publications on the theme of discernment. It begins the overview with the articles on discernment and discretion in the Dictionnaire de Spiritualité.

  5. Patients’ views of CAM as spiritual practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Anita; Evron, Lotte; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann

    2011-01-01

    significantly elaborated upon in narratives by four female participants to warrant more detailed consideration and analysis. Conclusion: It is suggested that for some cancer patients CAM may function, not just as a treatment for cancer related symptoms and side effects, but also as a form of spiritual practice...

  6. Sacred Groves, Spirituality and Sustainable Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since creation, mankind has strived to maintain a positive relationship with nature by preserving and making certain specific trees, water bodies, highlands and other places sacred. The practice of keeping sacred groves is one of the ways which promotes this human, ecological and spiritual connection. These groves ...

  7. Spiritual care : implications for nurses' professional responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Post, Doeke; Jochemsen, Henk

    Aim. This paper aimed to gain insight into the spiritual aspects of nursing care within the context of health care in the Netherlands and to provide recommendations for the development of care in this area and the promotion of the professional expertise of nurses. Background. International nursing

  8. Cyber bullying: Child and youth spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Apostolides

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Digital culture is part of children’s and adolescents’ everyday lives. Digital culture has both positive and negative consequences. One such negative consequence is cyber violence that has been termed cyber bullying. Cyber bullying can cause serious emotional, behavioural and academic problems for both the victim and the bully. Although there is ongoing research on the effects of cyber bullying on children and youth in South Africa, no research has been carried out on how children’s and youth’s spirituality may be affected when they are cyber bullied. This article discusses the accumulative results from different South African institutes that have researched the cyber bullying effects on children and adolescents. These results point to the spiritual effects that children and youth may experience as a result of cyber bullying. This article proposes that spirituality may prevent cyber bullying and even help children and youth heal from the trauma caused by cyber bullying. This article contributes in starting a conversation that may result in more specific research being done on how the spiritual lives of children and adolescents may be affected through the trauma caused by cyber bullying.

  9. The spiritual features of servant-leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandram, S.S.; Vos, J.

    2009-01-01

    In Chap. 19, Sharda Nandram and Jan Vos write about the spiritual foundations of Servant-Leadership. According to them, Servant-Leadership can be approached as a means to create a meaningful workplace for all of the stakeholders involved in an organization. It involves authenticity, listening to,

  10. Authentic Leadership and Spiritual Capital Development: Agenda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important factor responsible for the poor performance of many organizations is paucity of authentic leadership and spiritual capital. Evidence from various researchers such as William George (2005), Zohar and Marshal (2004), Stephen Covey (2004), indicate that many business companies and government ...

  11. Adolescent spirituality with the support of adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-22

    Jun 22, 2017 ... culture and other adolescents within their social environments (people of all ages use aspects of their social context to form identity and spirituality). ..... using the internet. Not all media and social media are bad or dangerous. Media and social media, when used responsibly, are tools that allow the user ...

  12. [Religion and spirituality, definitions and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quercize, Anne-Sophie; Pian, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Understanding religious teachings and the religious dimension in our societies is not made any easier with a discourse that is often lacking in rigor for dealing with this reality. Some basic notions need to be clarified to better define the religious and the spiritual. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Spirituality and hearing voices: considering the relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Waegeli, Amanda; Watkins, John

    2013-01-01

    For millennia, some people have heard voices that others cannot hear. These have been variously understood as medical, psychological and spiritual phenomena. In this article we consider the specific role of spirituality in voice-hearing in two ways. First, we examine how spirituality may help or hinder people who hear voices. Benefits are suggested to include offering an alternative meaning to the experience which can give more control and comfort, enabling the development of specific coping strategies, increasing social support, and encouraging forgiveness. Potential drawbacks are noted to include increased distress and reduced control resulting from placing frightening or coercive constructions on voices, social isolation, the development of dysfunctional beliefs, and missed/delayed opportunities for successful mental health interventions. After examining problems surrounding classifying voices as either spiritual or psychotic, we move beyond an essentialist position to examine how such a classification is likely to be fluid, and how a given voice may move between these designations. We also highlight tensions between modernist and postmodernist approaches to voice-hearing. PMID:24273597

  14. Spiritual Intelligence: Developing Higher Consciousness Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Dorothy A.

    2016-01-01

    This article will share the intellectual journey E. Paul Torrance and I traveled in 2001, in which we explored psychology, science and ancient wisdom and traditions, including Native American and indigenous traditions, to establish a foundation for spiritual intelligence. This section will be followed by ways to develop and nurture spiritual…

  15. Beyond a sacrificial spirituality: Enhancing flourishing pastoral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This contribution explains the value of self-giving and critically questions the discourse on self-sacrifice in relation to ministerial spirituality. In practice, what others may describe as selfsacrifice may be experienced by a care-giver as an adequate form of self-giving inspired by the Christian vocation, without any praise for ...

  16. African American Women Counselors, Wellness, and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Debora; Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2011-01-01

    Given their tremendous professional responsibilities, professional counselors face daunting challenges to remaining healthy and avoiding role stress and overload. This article explores the intersection of race, gender, wellness, and spirituality in the self-care of African American women counselors. The authors give particular attention to…

  17. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  18. Children's Spirituality and "The Good Shepherd Experience"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Brendan

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to explore the connections between a religious education curriculum's methodology in the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne, Australia and some contemporary theories about children's spirituality. "The Good Shepherd Experience" curriculum is intended for use with 5- and 6-year-old children in the first years of formal schooling.…

  19. Evolutionary origins of human brain and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberg, Maciej; Saniotis, Arthur

    2009-12-01

    Evolving brains produce minds. Minds operate on imaginary entities. Thus they can create what does not exist in the physical world. Spirits can be deified. Perception of spiritual entities is emotional--organic. Spirituality is a part of culture while culture is an adaptive mechanism of human groups as it allows for technology and social organization to support survival and reproduction. Humans are not rational, they are emotional. Most of explanations of the world, offered by various cultures, involve an element of "fiat", a will of a higher spiritual being, or a reference to some ideal. From this the rules of behaviour are deduced. These rules are necessary to maintain social peace and allow a complex unit consisting of individuals of both sexes and all ages to function in a way ensuring their reproductive success and thus survival. There is thus a direct biological benefit of complex ideological superstructure of culture. This complex superstructure most often takes a form of religion in which logic is mixed with appeals to emotions based on images of spiritual beings. God is a consequence of natural evolution. Whether a deity is a cause of this evolution is difficult to discover, but existence of a deity cannot be questioned.

  20. THE MISNOMERS OF SPIRITUAL 'DIRECTING' AND 'COACHING'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    such as facilitation, therapy, and consulting, which I view as related to many ways .... we interact with people by means of modalities such as coaching or therapy. In my opinion, spirituality (and in the immediate context inclusive of religion) and narrative cannot be separated. .... gestalt coaching, and life coaching (Cox et al.

  1. Psychological and Spiritual Factors in Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ron

    1996-01-01

    Asserts the importance of psychological and spiritual factors in the treatment of chronic illness. Discusses the inevitably of sickness, old age, and death, as well as the presence of the physician, patience, pain, and hope. Maintains that reflection on these qualities can benefit both the physician and patient. (MJP)

  2. Adolescent spirituality with the support of adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-22

    Jun 22, 2017 ... adolescents acquire at this stage of their lives are carried through to adulthood. Adolescents and their spiritual lives. Adolescence is a trying time in a human being's life, as there are sudden changes in his or her physical and emotional self (Fowler 1981:151). The adolescent becomes awkward within his or.

  3. Business spirituality : The inner sense of entrepreneurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandram, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    The term spirituality is becoming more common as a field of interest for the business community. There are several conceptual definitions available without empirical basic. In this study definitions are presented based on a qualitative study amongst entrepreneurs. The study confirms that

  4. hiv/aids and feminist christian spirituality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10:10b), who experiences a relationship with God, has a sense of worth as a per son, participates in society and church in a ..... worthlessness and loneliness. For some of the participants, suicidal ..... from spiritual deafness because of privilege and indifference, facilitates com passion, understanding and a desire for action ...

  5. First-year Student Pharmacists' Spirituality and Perceptions Regarding the Role of Spirituality in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Bobby; White, Annesha; Shogbon, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To measure student pharmacists' spirituality utilizing validated survey instruments and to determine perceptions regarding the anticipated role of spirituality in academic course work and professional practice. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. The survey was offered to all first-year student pharmacists during the first week of the fall semester (2012-2015). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze data. Results: A total of 580 students (98%) participated. The majority of students reported having each of the spiritual experiences on most days of the week or more frequently (58% to 89% based on individual item). Furthermore, 57% of students anticipate that matters of spirituality would be significant components of academic course work and 75% anticipate they would be incorporated into eventual professional practice settings. These perceptions were positively correlated to measures of spirituality and religiosity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that faculty should evaluate current and future incorporation of topics related to spirituality and health in pharmacy curriculum.

  6. First-year Student Pharmacists’ Spirituality and Perceptions Regarding the Role of Spirituality in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Annesha; Shogbon, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To measure student pharmacists’ spirituality utilizing validated survey instruments and to determine perceptions regarding the anticipated role of spirituality in academic course work and professional practice. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. The survey was offered to all first-year student pharmacists during the first week of the fall semester (2012-2015). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze data. Results: A total of 580 students (98%) participated. The majority of students reported having each of the spiritual experiences on most days of the week or more frequently (58% to 89% based on individual item). Furthermore, 57% of students anticipate that matters of spirituality would be significant components of academic course work and 75% anticipate they would be incorporated into eventual professional practice settings. These perceptions were positively correlated to measures of spirituality and religiosity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that faculty should evaluate current and future incorporation of topics related to spirituality and health in pharmacy curriculum. PMID:28970609

  7. Spirituality for democracy: Spiritual resources for democratic participation in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick R. Hewitt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The topic invites us to explore spirituality for democracy and to identify and critique the spiritual resources that are needed for democratic participation in the 21st century. The statement specifically focused on for and not of democracy. Modern expressions of democracy are in crisis. Every context is teething with challenges and conflicts between government sand their citizens concerning how much influence through participation should be allowed in the decision-making process of governance. This topic is of extreme importance for academic discourse because the malaise that has crept into contemporary forms of democratic governance calls for urgent attention. Democratic forms of governance are not set in stone. Rather, they are formed as a result of human deliberation and praxis and cultural developments and must therefore remain open for further reformation. It is this intrinsic capacity for renewal that opens democracy to converse with spirituality. This article begins with identifying the key terms that constitute the academic building blocks of this study. The inherent contradictions in the use of these terms are noted in order to arrive at a theoretical construct to converse with the key concepts of spirituality, democracy, spiritual resources and democratic participation.Through the use of the post colonial lenses of Rastafari hermeneutics, a theoretical framework will be employed to map a life-giving path for contemporary expressions of spirituality for democracy and to identify the resources needed for democratic participation.

  8. American indians and spiritual needs during hospitalization: developing a model of spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R; Wolosin, Robert J

    2014-08-01

    Although spirituality is typically intertwined with health in Native cultures, little research has examined the relationship between American Indians' spiritual needs and overall satisfaction with service provision during hospitalization. This study examined this relationship, in tandem with the effects of 8 potential mediators, to develop a model of spiritual care for older hospitalized American Indians. Structural equation modeling was used with a sample of American Indians (N = 860), aged 50 and older, who were consecutively discharged from hospitals across the United States over a 12-month period. As posited, addressing spiritual needs was positively associated with overall satisfaction with service provision. The relationship between spiritual needs and satisfaction was fully mediated by 4 variables: nursing staff, the discharge process, physicians, and visitors. As the first study to develop and test a model of spiritual care for older hospitalized American Indians, this study provides practitioners with the information to provide more effective, culturally relevant services to older American Indians. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions of Spirituality in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthembu, Thuli Godfrey; Ahmed, Firdous; Nkuna, Thembi; Yaca, Khalipha

    2015-12-01

    Spirituality is recognized as an essential and integral component of a holistic approach in occupational therapy practice. However, little is known about occupational therapy students' perceptions regarding spirituality in learning context. This study used qualitative exploratory, descriptive design to explore the occupational therapy students' perceptions about spirituality in training. Using purposive sampling, four semi-structured interviews were conducted with two students, a lecturer and an occupational therapist. In addition, two focus groups were conducted with students in order to collect data. Data collected were audio-taped; transcribed and thematic analysis was used to identify themes. The analysis resulted in emergence of four themes: "Unique to every individual," "Spirituality in occupational therapy," "To be or not to be taught," and "The Real world." Participants perceived spirituality as an individually experienced. The study contributes to the body of knowledge base of occupational therapy education regarding spirituality. However, there is a need for guidelines to integrate spirituality in occupational therapy training.

  10. The role of religion and spirituality in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Samuel R; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2014-09-01

    There has been increased interest in the relationship between religion and spirituality and mental health in recent years. This article reviews recent research into the capacity of religion and spirituality to benefit or harm the mental health of believers. We also examine the implications this may have for assessment and treatment in psychiatric settings. Studies indicate that religion and spirituality can promote mental health through positive religious coping, community and support, and positive beliefs. Research also shows that religion and spirituality can be damaging to mental health by means of negative religious coping, misunderstanding and miscommunication, and negative beliefs. Tools for the assessment of patients' spiritual needs have been studied, and incorporation of spiritual themes into treatment has shown some promise. Religion and spirituality have the ability to promote or damage mental health. This potential demands an increased awareness of religious matters by practitioners in the mental health field as well as ongoing attention in psychiatric research.

  11. Spirituality, Religion, and Suicidality Among Veterans: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Jaimie; Dobscha, Steven K; Kopacz, Marek; Ritchie, Mary Frances; Ono, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the relationship between veterans' spirituality/religion and suicide ideation and attempts. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 veterans who either endorsed chronic suicidal ideation or had made suicide attempt(s). Interviews explored the bi-directional relationship between spirituality/religion (e.g., beliefs, practices, and experiences), and suicide ideation and behaviors. Interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Veterans' responses indicate that spirituality/religion can discourage or permit suicidal ideation, help in coping with ideation, and facilitate meaning making and coping in the presence of self-perceived suffering. Veterans who survived a suicide attempt explored the impact of their spirituality/religion on their recovery. Findings highlight a complex and diverse relationship between spirituality/religion and suicidality. These findings may inform further research on treatment strategies that assess the function of spirituality/religion, and incorporate protective aspects of spirituality/religion into mental health treatment.

  12. Language and the (im)possibilities of articulating spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Anne; Sheilds, Laurene; Molzahn, Anita

    2011-03-01

    Despite growing interest in spiritual matters throughout society, definitions and descriptions of spirituality seem incomplete or otherwise unsatisfactory. In this article, the authors consider the possibility that such incompleteness is perhaps necessary and welcomed in addressing spirituality. In particular, they investigate the challenges of using metaphor and metonymic approaches to "languaging" spirituality. By exploring these figures of speech they hope to diversify how nurses articulate deeply personal and perhaps enigmatic human phenomena such as spirituality. Metaphoric language uses everyday structures to help make sense of complex, emotional, and abstract experience. Whereas metaphor creates substitutive relationships between things and provides insights into conceptualizing spirituality, metonymy and metonymic writing establish relationships of contiguity. Whereas metaphor functions to represent and facilitates understanding and feelings about spirituality, metonymy disrupts while opening possibilities of moving beyond binary thinking. Attending to language and its various ontological assumptions opens diverse and potentially more inclusive possibilities.

  13. Spiritual Well-Being and Dyadic Adjustment: Mediator Effects for Family Strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Majid

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to test a structural model of hypothesized relationships between spiritual well-being, intervening variables of personal worth of self and others, commitment to relationship stability, commitment to relationship growth, positive interaction/appreciation, communication/conflict resolution, time spent together, and, the dependent variable, dyadic adjustment. Two hundred and sixty eight (171 females and 97 males) married parent subjects were selected by convenience sampling from three universities in Mazandaran, Iran, to take part in this study. They were all volunteers and were not paid and their age range was 23 to 47 (31.07 ± 4.37 years). All participants were asked to complete the spiritual well-being scale (SWBS), family strengths scale (FSS) and revised dyadic adjustment scale (RDAS). The results from structural equation modeling confirmed a hierarchy for the development of family strengths, and indicated that spiritual well-being and strength in most characteristics affected dyadic adjustment, positively (P spiritual well-being, value each other, have commitment to each other, communicate well, enjoy being with each other, and spend time together.

  14. Re-examining Definitions of Spirituality in Nursing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Katia; KOENIG, Harold G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This article presents a discussion of the definition of spirituality and its limitations for nursing research. It proposes a definition that will capture more accurately the role of spirituality in health outcomes. Background Studies have increasingly examined spirituality in nursing research as a coping mechanism attenuating the negative impact of traumatic stress on mental health. Existing definitions of spirituality in nursing research include elements of positive emotional states (meaning, purpose, general well-being) which confound mental health outcomes. Data sources Medline and CINAHL databases were searched from 2007–2011 for research articles examining spirituality definitions and measures used by nurse researchers. Discussion An analysis of the definitions of spirituality in nursing research reveals inconsistencies and confounding mental health concepts. The authors propose defining spirituality in the context of religious involvement when conducting research, while using a broader definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. They argue such definition provides a more appropriate method of measuring this concept in research aimed at evaluating mental health outcomes while preserving the currently used patient- defined definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. Nursing Implications A consistent definition of spirituality in nursing research evaluating mental health outcomes, distinct from ‘spiritual care’ in a clinical setting, is essential to avoid tautological results that are meaningless. Appropriate definitions will enable nursing researchers to more clearly identify resilience mechanisms and improved health outcomes in those exposed to traumatic stress. Conclusion A definition of spirituality that focuses on religious involvement provides a more uniform and consistent measure for evaluating mental health outcomes in nursing research. PMID:23600849

  15. Spirituality and job satisfaction among hospice interdisciplinary team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Leah; Leedy, Stephen; McDonald, Laurie; Muller, Barbara; Lamb, Cheryl; Mendez, Tracy; Kim, Sehwan; Schonwetter, Ronald

    2007-12-01

    As a continuing effort to enhance the quality of palliative care for the dying, this study examined (1) the prevalence of spirituality among hospice interdisciplinary team (IDT) members; (2) whether spirituality is related to job satisfaction; and (3) the structural path relationships among four variables: spiritual belief, integration of spirituality at work, self actualization and job satisfaction. The study surveyed 215 hospice IDT members who completed the Jarel Spiritual Well-Being Scale, the Chamiec-Case Spirituality Integration and Job Satisfaction Scales. Multiple regression and structural path modeling methods were applied to explain the path relationships involving all four variables. The IDT members surveyed were: nurses, 46.4%; home health aids, 24.9%; social workers, 17.4%; chaplains, 4.2%; physicians, 2.3%; and other, 4.8%. Ninety-eight percent of the respondents viewed themselves as having spiritual well-being. On a 0-100 scale, IDT staff reported high spiritual belief (mean = 89.4) and they were self-actualizing (mean = 82.6). Most reported high job satisfaction (mean = 79.3) and spiritual integration (mean = 67.9). In multiple regression, spirituality, integration and self-actualization explained 22% of the variation in job satisfaction (R = 0.48; adjusted R(2) = 0.218; df = 3,175; F = 17.2; p = 0.001). Structural path models revealed that job satisfaction is more likely to be realized by a model that transforms one's spirituality into processes of integrating spirituality at work and self actualization (chi(2) = 0.614; df = 1; p = 0.433) than a model that establishes a direct path from spirituality to job satisfaction (chi(2) = 1.65; df = 1; p = 0.199). Hospice IDT member's integration of their spirituality at work and greater self actualization significantly improve job satisfaction.

  16. Amar con dulce desesperanza

    OpenAIRE

    Pierrelus, Jefferson

    2003-01-01

    Reseña del libro "El amor, la soledad", André Comte-Sponville, Paidós, Barcelona, 2001. El autor nos dice en este libro, una recopilación de tres entrevistas al filósofo francés, realizadas por Patrick Vighetti, Judith Brouste y Charles Juliet, que no hay felicidad o amor verdadero fuera de la verdad y sin verdadera soledad, porque quien habla de amor habla de soledad.

  17. Spiritual nursing care: A concept analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia V. Monareng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the concept ‘spiritual nursing care’ has its roots in the history of the nursing profession, many nurses in practice have difficulty integrating the concept into practice. There is an ongoing debate in the empirical literature about its definition, clarity and application in nursing practice. The study aimed to develop an operational definition of the concept and its application in clinical practice. A qualitative study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses render spiritual nursing care. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit the sample. Individual and focus group interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Trustworthiness was ensured through strategies of truth value, applicability, consistency and neutrality. Data were analysed using the NUD*IST power version 4 software, constant comparison, open, axial and selective coding. Tech’s eight steps of analysis were also used, which led to the emergence of themes, categories and sub-categories. Concept analysis was conducted through a comprehensive literature review and as a result ‘caring presence’ was identified as the core variable from which all the other characteristics of spiritual nursing care arise. An operational definition of spiritual nursing care based on the findings was that humane care is demonstrated by showing caring presence, respect and concern for meeting the needs not only of the body and mind of patients, but also their spiritual needs of hope and meaning in the midst of health crisis, which demand equal attention for optimal care from both religious and nonreligious nurses.

  18. In Psycho-Spiritual Integrative Therapy for Women with Primary Breast Cancer, What Factors Account for the Benefits? Insights from a Multiple Case Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rettger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to understand the context in which Psycho-Spiritual Integrative Therapy (PSIT, a group intervention, promotes varying degrees of spiritual growth and quality of life change in breast cancer survivors. A secondary aim was to explore the relationship between spiritual well-being (SWB and Quality of Life (QL in PSIT participants. A qualitative, multiple case analysis was undertaken to examine the experiences of two participants with the highest change scores on the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Spiritual Well-Being Scale-Expanded Version (FACIT-Sp-Ex and two participants with among the lowest change scores on this measure. The participant factors thought to contribute to SWB and QL changes included utilization of metacognitive psychological skills and spiritual/religious frameworks, while PSIT factors included application of PSIT core intervention components, cognitive restructuring, group dynamics, and the role of the facilitator. The nature and extent of participant use of spiritual practices appeared to shape the relationship between SWB and OL. The findings suggest directions for future research to investigate potential moderators and mediators of treatment efficacy of PSIT specifically, as well as other psycho-spiritual interventions for cancer survivors more generally.

  19. Representar la muerte : Un análisis de las técnicas narrativas en La voz dormida, de Dulce Chacón

    OpenAIRE

    Vidhall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    El propósito de esta tesina es ampliar los conocimientos sobre la narrativa de Dulce Chacón al analizar cómo la aplicación de técnicas narrativas en La voz dormida refuerza la impresión trágica y triste de la muerte de Hortensia, una de las protagonistas de la novela. Para llevar a cabo el objetivo se ha identificado las técnicas narrativas más frecuentes e importantes para la presentación de los sucesos relacionados con la trama de Hortensia. El análisis demuestra que La voz dormida tiene un...

  20. Understandings of spirituality and its role in illness recovery in persons with schizophrenia and mental-health professionals: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow Tin Hung; Chan, Caitlin Kar Pui; Lo, Phyllis Hau Yan; Wong, Ping Ho; Chan, Cecilia Lai Wan; Leung, Pamela Pui Yu; Chen, Eric Yu Hai

    2016-04-02

    , peace, and growth rather than an existential quest; while professionals hold a more pathological perspective, viewing spirituality as a means to relieve symptoms, increase social acceptance, and cope with illness experiences. The differential understanding of the two perspectives provides insight and perhaps a roadmap for developing spiritual assessments and holistic care in the psychiatric context.

  1. Old Age and Spirituality - Metanoia, "The second half of life" according to Carl Gustav Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Pereira Gaeta Arcuri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the possibility of old age as human development, since the second half of life is the period of spiritual growth. Jung is a classic illustration of metanoia showing what connects and what distinguishes the second half of life. It is as if the focus change and a shift occurred. The focus may be because the ego does not find this place the foundation that once experienced as a solid foundation, and is directed to the Self.

  2. Micropropagation of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth-a multipurpose leguminous tree and assessment of genetic fidelity of micropropagated plants using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Pooja; Kachhwaha, Sumita; Kothari, S L

    2012-04-01

    An efficient and reproducible protocol has been developed for in vitro propagation of Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth (a multipurpose leguminous tree) from field grown nodal segments (axillary bud). Shoot bud induction occurred from nodal explants of 15-years-old tree on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 4.4 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and multiplication was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 4.4 μM BA + 0.73 μM phenylacetic acid (PAA) i.e. up to 7 shoot buds in the period of 5-6 weeks. Addition of adenine sulphate (AdS) to this medium further enhanced the number of shoot buds up to 10. Proliferating shoot cultures were established by repeatedly subculturing primary culture on fresh medium (MS + 4.4 μM BA + 0.73 μM PAA) after every 25 days. In vitro rooting was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 2.46 μM Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) + 41.63 μM activated charcoal (AC). The micropropagated shoots with well developed roots were acclimatized in green house in pots containing sand, soil and manure (1:1:1). Genetic stability of micropropagated clones was evaluated using Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The amplification products were monomorphic in micropropagated plants and similar to those of mother plant. No polymorphism was detected revealing the genetic uniformity of micropropagated plants. This is the first report of an efficient protocol for regeneration of P. dulce through organogenesis, which can be used for further genetic transformation and pharmaceutical purposes.

  3. Spirituality and spiritual care perspectives among baccalaureate nursing students in Saudi Arabia: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Alshammari, Farhan; Alotaibi, Khalaf Aied; Colet, Paolo C

    2017-02-01

    No study has been undertaken to understand how spirituality and spiritual care is perceived and implemented by Saudi nursing students undergoing training for their future professional roles as nurses. This study was conducted to investigate the perception of Baccalaureate nursing students toward spirituality and spiritual care. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was employed. A convenience sample of 338 baccalaureate nursing students in two government-run universities in Saudi Arabia was included in this study. A self-administered questionnaire, consisting of a demographic and spiritual care background information sheet and the Spiritual Care-Giving Scale Arabic version (SCGS-A), was used for data collection. A multivariate multiple regression analysis and multiple linear regression analyses were performed accordingly. The mean value on the SCGS-A was 3.84±1.26. Spiritual perspective received the highest mean (4.14±1.45), followed by attribute for spiritual care (3.96±1.48), spiritual care attitude (3.81±1.47), defining spiritual care (3.71±1.51) and spiritual care values (3.57±1.47). Gender, academic level and learning spiritual care from classroom or clinical discussions showed a statistically significant multivariate effect on the five factors of SCGS-A. Efforts should be done to formally integrate holistic concept including all the facets of spirituality and spiritual care in the nursing curriculum. The current findings can be used to inform the development and testing of holistic nursing conceptual framework in nursing education in Saudi Arabia and other Arab Muslim countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spiritual needs of patients with chronic pain diseases and cancer - validation of the spiritual needs questionnaire

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    Büssing A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose For many patients confronted with chronic diseases, spirituality/religiosity is a relevant resource to cope. While most studies on patients' spiritual needs refer to the care of patients at the end of life, our intention was to develop an instrument to measure spiritual, existential and psychosocial need of patients with chronic diseases. Methods In an anonymous cross-sectional survey, we applied the Spiritual Needs Questionnaire (SpNQ version 1.2. to 210 patients (75% women, mean age 54 ± 12 years with chronic pain conditions (67%, cancer (28%, other chronic conditions (5%. Patients were recruited at the Community Hospital Herdecke, the Institute for Complementary Medicine (University of Bern, and at a conference of a cancer support group in Herten. Results Factor analysis of the 19-item instrument (Cronbach's alpha = .93 pointed to 4 factors which explain 67% of variance: Religious Needs, Need for Inner Peace, Existentialistic Needs (Reflection/Meaning, and Actively Giving. Within the main sample of patients with chronic pain and cancer, Needs for Inner Peace had the highest scores, followed by Self competent Attention; Existentialistic Needs had low scores, while the Religious Needs scores indicate no interest. Patients with cancer had significantly higher SpNQ scores than patients with chronic pain conditions. There were just some weak associations between Actively Giving and life satisfaction (r = .17; p = .012, and negatively with the symptom score (r = -.29; p Need for Inner Peace was weakly associated with satisfaction with treatment efficacy (r = .24; p Conclusion The preliminary results indicate that spiritual needs are conceptually different from life satisfaction, and can be interpreted as the patients' longing for spiritual well-being. Methods how health care professionals may meet their patients' spiritual needs remain to be explored.

  5. Iranian nurses' professional competence in spiritual care in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Zehtabchi, Samira; Fini, Ismail Azizi

    2017-06-01

    The holistic approach views the human as a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual being. Evidence suggests that among these dimensions, the spiritual one is largely ignored in healthcare settings. This study aimed to evaluate Iranian nurses' perceived professional competence in spiritual care, the relationship between perceived competence and nurses' personal characteristics, and barriers to provide spiritual care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2014. Participants and research context: The study population consisted of nurses working in teaching hospitals in Kashan city. Using a stratified, systematic random method, 250 samples were selected from a total of 1400 nurses. An indigenous instrument was used to assess the nurses' competencies in spiritual care. Ethical considerations: A research ethics committee approved the study. All the participants were briefed on the study aims, were assured of the confidentiality of their personal information, and signed a written informed consent. Among a total of 250 nurses, 239 answered the questionnaire completely, and in total, 23%, 51%, and 26% had poor, moderate, and favorable competence in spiritual care, respectively. No significant differences were found between the mean competence scores of spiritual care in terms of gender, marital status, employment status, and level of qualification. Significant difference was found between nurses' overall score of competence in spiritual care and receiving training on spiritual care, nurses' position, and the ward they worked in. Confirming the findings of the international literature, this study puts light on the situation of nurses' perceived competence and barriers to providing spiritual care in Iran as an eastern and Islamic context. Three-quarters of the nurses had moderate or unfavorable competence in spiritual care. Due to the crucial role of spiritual care in quality of care and patient satisfaction, nurses should be trained and supported to provide spiritual care.

  6. Spiritual needs in cancer patients and spiritual care based on logotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Wataru; Morita, Satoshi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Aihara, Okihiko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Matsushima, Eisuke

    2006-01-01

    The suitability of Frankl's logotherapy for the spiritual care (psychotherapy) of cancer patients in Japan is suggested. Using Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual (FACIT-Sp, Japanese version), the Purpose in Life test (PIL test, Japanese version), and WHO-Subjective Inventory (WHO-SUBI, Japanese version), we attempted to elucidate the complicated structure of spirituality in cancer patients in order to identify possible approaches to their spiritual care and means of evaluating such care. Two hundred and ninety-eight cancer patients participated in the study. All three tests were taken at the same time, and the results were evaluated by principal component analysis. It was demonstrated that all the subscales employed in the present study could be represented by a two-dimensional structure (two principal components), and that the FACIT-Sp and PIL tests have similar contents. FACIT-Sp (Japanese version) is very similar in conception to the PIL test, which was prepared in accordance with logotherapy. The results suggest that this test can serve as an adequate evaluation scale for measuring the effectiveness of spiritual care based on Frankl's logotherapy.

  7. The spirituality as a problem of philosophical research and the humanitarian crisis in Ukraine

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    V. E. Gromov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to regard the phenomenon of spirituality in connection with ontological foundation of human being existence. The author suggests the concept of a new cosmo­theocentristical paradigm of human world­outlook as a ground of perspective transformation of social life activity. The author criticizes the principal of anthropocentrism of the world­outlook which dominates in present social consciousness.  He underlines the  role of spiritual teachers in cultural development and indicates the decline of the humanitarian component in modern system education. The author criticizes the modern system of education and gives great meaningfulness to self­dependence thought in spiritual growth of personality. Methodology. The method of philosophizing, which the author uses, is connected with unity of mind, sensuality, belief and will in mental organization of man. Such point of view takes into consideration not only objective factories.    It includes the senses of human being existence and world outlook ideas.  The author pays attention to the special ontological disposition of human being in the world as a «transcendent project» with «metaphysical responsibility». Scientific novelty. In the history of social culture the problem of   spiritual attitude to reality is a substantial problem. Now it becomes especially important, because the survival of civilization depends on development of spirituality. The author connects the consideration of spirituality with particular ontological status of human being in the world and provides his reflection speculative character. Conclusions. The transition the world outlook of modern society to cosmo­theocentrical  paradigm  prepared by contradictions its technological and cultural development. The conscious influence of society to itself is growing. The anthropocentrism as a world view principle is a main obstacle in the way to spiritual transformation of modern consumptive

  8. Spirituality and health: A narrativepastoral approach

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    C.J. Truter

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Health is much more than the absence of illness; it is rather a “high level wellness” and a life with “meaningful life-possibilities”. This article indicates how meaningful life-possibilities and a high level of wellness can be socially constructed within a process of narrativepastoral therapy for a patient who is chronically ill and therefore cannot be cured. Pastoral care as a spiritual and religious act can play an important role in giving sense and meaning to people’s lives, and can play a preventive role in living with illness. This article furthermore shows how patients’ stories of illness can be centralised by means of narrative therapy and how a pastoral and ethical attitude of love and respect can create a climate conducive to better health and well being. We share how patients’ richer descriptions of their illness can produce a spiritual climate which can contribute to their better health.

  9. Spiritual conflicts associated with praying about cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E J; Outlaw, F H; Bernardo, T R; Roy, A

    1999-01-01

    A secondary analysis of data from a study designed to describe how persons use prayer to cope with cancer is presented in this paper to illuminate the spiritual conflicts that can be experienced among persons with cancer. Employing phenomenological methods, 30 persons from various phases of the cancer experience and religious backgrounds, were interviewed in depth about why, when, and how they prayed, as well as what they prayed about and the outcomes they expected. The secondary analysis revealed that many of these informants had hesitancies about petitionary prayers for particular things, a cure, or for themselves. They also indicated questions about theodicy and the meaning of having cancer, the nature of God, and acknowledged 'unanswered' prayer. Several described an inner conflict about releasing control to God. A few referred to bargaining with God, and a few doubted their personal spirituality and worth, if they were praying correctly, and if prayer was efficacious. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Workplace spirituality: A tool or a trend?

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    Philip J.W. Schutte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Workplace spirituality is a construct widely discussed over the past few decades and it is a much-disputed inquiry field which is gaining the interest of practitioners and scholars. Some clarifications regarding concepts and definitions are necessary in order to structure and direct the current debate. The aim of this conceptual article is to gain a better understanding regarding the direction in which this field of study is progressing and to put the question on the table namely, whether workplace spirituality is only a new tool to be used in leadership development or is it a trend to be taken seriously? The results showed that this field has potential to further development. This article can be used as foundation for future studies within the knowledge area of practical theology.

  11. Confident spiritual care in a postmodern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salladay, Susan A

    2011-01-01

    Aostmodern thinking that embraces tolerance and suggests there is no absolute truth may make Christian nurses feel uncertain or uncomfortable in giving spiritual care, especially care consistent wtih their beliefs. Christian nurses can be guided by the example of Jesus Christ and the Apostles Peter and Paul in the bible, being sensitive to postmodern perceptions without being intimidated by them and feeling neither obliated to share their faith, nor afraid to do so if a patient asks and gives consent.

  12. Colour Dematerialization in Spiritual Literature and Painting

    OpenAIRE

    Sudrajat, Dadang; Piliang, Yasraf Amir; Sanjaya, Tisna; Kusmara, Andriyanto Rikrik

    2017-01-01

    Colour in variety of art expression can be interpreted differently. This study is aiming at analyzing the colour dematerialization of Javanese spiritual literature “Falsafah Jeroning Warna” by Suprapto Kadis and a painting by Ahmad Sadali entitled “Gunung Mas”. Research was done by employing qualitative research, while data was collected by observation, interview, discussion, and documentation study. The analysis of meanings in the two art works was done in descriptive way by using the theory...

  13. Spiritual Quotient (Sq): the Ultimate Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Rus'an, Rus'an

    2013-01-01

    : This paper discusses the spiritual intelligence as the ultimate intelligence which exceeds the IQ and EQ. IQ or intelligence quotient is a form of intelligence that based on reasoning, intellectual ratio, which is a linear way of thinking that in-cludes the ability to count, analyze to evaluate. While EQ or Emotional Quotient based on emotional, namely the intelligence which is capable to control emotions and give empathy so a person is able to act natural. Therefore the true nature of the ...

  14. Medical Sciences Education based on Religious Spiritualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Nasrollahi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available the term “spirituality” has been proposed to denote the notion of intellectuality. Actually, the former has been derived from the Latin words “spiritus” (means breath and “spirare” (means inhaling or breathing. Given the Latin translations of the New Testament, the term “spiritualis” or spiritual person is an individual whose life is dominated or influenced by the Holy Spirit or God (1.

  15. Communicating Spiritual Experience with Video Game Technology.

    OpenAIRE

    Highland, Michael; Yu, Gino

    2008-01-01

    Michael Highland and Gino Yu “Communicating Spiritual Experience with Video Game Technology” deal with the aspect of experience. They stress that given the interactive nature of video game technology, it is an ideal medium for representing and communicating experience. As the game world is causally dependent on input from individual players, they evoke feelings that are urgent, direct, and personalized. Online virtual spaces therefore provide an environment for people of different faiths to c...

  16. Alcoholics Anonymous and nursing. Lessons in holism and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, E M

    2000-03-01

    Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) is a worldwide, million-member organization that has assisted countless alcoholics to achieve sobriety through a spiritual program of recovery from alcoholism. Based on spiritual principles known as the "Twelve Steps" and "Twelve Traditions," AA has provided a model for other recovery programs such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Gamblers Anonymous (GA), and Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA). Recovery in AA appears to involve a process of self-transcendence. In recent years, nursing scholars have increasingly explored the concepts of self-transcendence and spirituality as they apply to nursing theory and practice. This article explores the roots and spiritual dimensions of 12-step recovery programs. It further explores the ways in which theoretical and clinical knowledge about the delivery of spiritual care interventions may be gained from an understanding of AA's spiritual approach to recovery.

  17. Spiritually Integrated Treatment of Depression: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have found an inverse correlation between religious/spiritual involvement and depression. Yet several obstacles impede spiritually integrated treatment of depressed individuals. These include specialization and fragmentation of care, inexperience of clinicians and spiritual care providers, ideological bias, boundary and ethical concerns, and the lack of an accepted conceptual framework for integrated treatment. Here I suggest a framework for approaching these obstacles, constructed from a unified view of human experience (having emotional, existential, and spiritual dimensions); spirituality seen as a response to existential concerns (in domains such as identity, hope, meaning/purpose, morality, and autonomy in relation to authority, which are frequently distorted and amplified in depression); a rationale for locating spiritually oriented approaches within a clinician's assessment, formulation, and treatment plan; and recognition of the challenges and potential pitfalls of integrated treatment. PMID:22577530

  18. Spiritually Integrated Treatment of Depression: A Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Peteet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have found an inverse correlation between religious/spiritual involvement and depression. Yet several obstacles impede spiritually integrated treatment of depressed individuals. These include specialization and fragmentation of care, inexperience of clinicians and spiritual care providers, ideological bias, boundary and ethical concerns, and the lack of an accepted conceptual framework for integrated treatment. Here I suggest a framework for approaching these obstacles, constructed from a unified view of human experience (having emotional, existential, and spiritual dimensions; spirituality seen as a response to existential concerns (in domains such as identity, hope, meaning/purpose, morality, and autonomy in relation to authority, which are frequently distorted and amplified in depression; a rationale for locating spiritually oriented approaches within a clinician's assessment, formulation, and treatment plan; and recognition of the challenges and potential pitfalls of integrated treatment.

  19. A Qur’anic Framework for Spiritual Intelligence

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    Benaouda Bensaid

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the perspective of the Qur’an on spiritual intelligence in an attempt to understand its foundations, meaning and nature, as well as derive its indicators, in an effort to develop a competency-based criterion for it. This paper draws on some illustrations that effectively highlight the Qur’anic perspective on the subject of spiritual intelligence. The paper concludes that spiritual intelligence developed in accordance with a Qur’anic framework that incorporates spiritual consciousness into a system of belief, worship, morality and social responsibility. The understanding of the Qur’anic perspective helps uncover some of the broad underlying theoretical principles and values of Islamic spiritual intelligence which shapes much of Muslim spiritual undertaking with relation to a wider spectrum of interaction with faith-groups and society; effectively developing more inclusive models of evaluation and capacity-building in contemporary multi-religious societies.

  20. The blessingway ceremony: ritual, nostalgic imagination and feminist spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Emily

    2015-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in the role of spirituality on the experience of health, wellness and illness, as well as the role of spiritual practice in health care provision. For pregnancy and childbirth, this focus has tended to concentrate on hospital birth settings and care, and religious forms of spirituality. The blessingway ceremony can be described as an alternative baby shower, popular with home-birthing women. Its focus is woman-centred and draws on the power of ritual to evoke a spiritual experience for the pregnant host and her guests. This spirituality is experienced as a strong connection between women, their relationship with 'nature', and forged via the nostalgic imagination of women through time and space. This article will draw on data obtained in 2010 during doctoral fieldwork with 52 home-birthing women across eastern Australia and will examine the blessingway ceremony and its significance as a site of potential spiritual empowerment for pregnant and birthing women.

  1. Parental spirituality in life-threatening pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, David B; Barrera, Maru; Granek, Leeat; D'Agostino, Norma Mammone; Shaheed, Jenny; Beaune, Laura; Bouffet, Eric; Antle, Beverley

    2017-01-01

    This study addressed parental spirituality in the context of pediatric cancer with a poor prognosis. Drawing upon previous research implementing a longitudinal grounded theory design examining parental hope, 35 parents were interviewed regarding their experiences with an emergent description of the role of spirituality in parents' daily lives. Spirituality included religious beliefs and practices, notions of a higher force or cosmos, relationship with a divine being, as well as elements emerging from meaning-making and relationships. Parental expectations of spirituality remained relatively constant across data collection time points (3-9 months postdiagnosis), although limited variation occurred relative to shifting circumstance (e.g., deterioration of the child's condition). Spirituality appeared to offer: greater acceptance of parents' inability to protect their child from harm related to her/his life-threatening illness, guidance and emotion decompression, and support from one's faith community. Recommendations for integrating spiritual assessment in clinical care practice are offered.

  2. Defining and Measuring Spirituality in South African Specialist Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, A B R; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C P H; Szabo, C P

    2015-10-01

    To define the meaning of "spirituality" in a South African phenomenological, theory-generating qualitative inquiry, theory construction methodology was used. This refers to the tradition of nursing theory development, where a central core concept identified from the integrated data-in this case, interviews and the literature content-had to be defined. A major focus of the study was to distinguish spirituality from religion. The denotative and connotative meanings of "spirituality" were explored to establish the components for a definition. The attributes of this definition included that spirituality constitutes a "quality", a "journey", a "relationship" as well as a "capacity". While these items derived from this local definition of spirituality can be proposed for inclusion in a questionnaire for measuring spirituality in a South African context, the limits of the scope of the explorative qualitative inquiry from which it was derived must be considered.

  3. Perceived Spirituality, Mindfulness and Quality of Life in Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, João P; Pereira, Anabela M S

    2017-02-01

    There is some evidence of the relationship between spirituality and quality of life, but there are few bibliographic references on these constructs for patients suffering from mental illness; thus, this study was aimed at revealing the possible role of spiritual outlooks as a protective factor in these individuals. The sample consisted of 96 Portuguese psychiatric patients, selected from a psychiatric hospital and assessed based on parameters for quality of life, spirituality and mindfulness. The data support some theories about the nature of the spirituality. Spiritual beliefs are poorly correlated with the quality of life index, and there is a moderate association between these beliefs and some aspects of mindfulness. It is suggested that a spiritual outlook of psychiatric patients should be taken into account in psychological interventions.

  4. Spirituality in occupational therapy: do we practice what we teach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Douglas N; Stecher, Jo; Briggs-Peppler, Kayla M; Chittenden, Chelsea M; Rubira, Joseph; Wismer, Lindsay K

    2014-02-01

    This mixed-method study examined the responses of 97 occupational therapists on the subject of spirituality in occupational therapy practice. The inclusion of spirituality into the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (2008) implies that clinicians address spirituality as a component of client-centered practice. This research revealed a gap between education, theory, and practice as evidenced in the quantitative and qualitative data. Although occupational therapy is intended to be holistic, therapists require a more complete understanding of what spirituality is and what the role of the occupational therapist is when addressing spirituality in evaluation or treatment. The discussion of this research provides information for future occupational therapy educators and educational programs as they seek to incorporate the construct of spirituality into curricula.

  5. Beyond descriptive research: advancing the study of spirituality and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmarin, David H; Wachholtz, Amy; Ai, Amy

    2011-12-01

    The past three decades have witnessed a surge in research on spirituality and health. This growing body of literature has linked many aspects of spirituality as well as religion to both positive and negative indices of human functioning. However, studies have primarily been descriptive, focusing on identifying associations between spirituality and health, rather than explanatory, focusing on identifying mechanisms underlying observed relationships. Earlier research is also limited by failure to control for salient covariates, apply prospective design, and use sophisticated measurements with well defined and empirically-validated factors. Recent research, however, is advancing the study of spirituality and health by examining not only whether religious factors are relevant to human health, but also how spirituality may functionally impact medical and psychological wellbeing and illness. This article introduces a special issue on Spirituality and Health containing 12 full-length research reports to further this welcomed, emerging trend.

  6. Spirituality: Everyone has it, but what is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepherd, Laurence

    2015-10-01

    Spirituality has been the subject of discussion over many years, yet understanding its nature, and usefulness during illness, can be elusive. Nurses and other health-care practitioners can often be in the position to help patients discuss spiritual matters because of their direct contact on a frequent basis, but might not feel confident to do so because the subject can appear to be overly complex. This paper summarizes some of the essential elements of spirituality as synthesized from literature that refers to it. The literature draws attention to spirit as the core of a person's being, and the notion that spirituality comprises multiple dimensions that exist internally or become externally manifest through behaviours. The presence and use of spirituality can lead to such outcomes as peace of mind, self-fulfilment and alleviation of suffering. Underpinning all spirituality is the concept of transcendence where a person can be 'lifted up' above the challenges of illness. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Spiritual Treatment for Depression in Brazil: An Experience From Spiritism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Alessandra L Granero; Peres, Mario F Prieto; Vallada, Homero P; Lucchetti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Spiritism has been strongly connected with mental health in Brazil. However, there is a lack of descriptions of spiritual treatment provided by thousands of Brazilian Spiritist centers. The present study aims to describe the spiritual care for depression provided by one large Spiritist center in São Paulo, Brazil. This is a descriptive study carried out in 2012 at "São Paulo Spiritist Federation." Authors visited the "spiritual intervention sections," observed the therapies provided, listened to the "spirits' communication," and interviewed two patients. The assistance consists on a 90-min "Spiritual healing" session which includes educational lectures, "disobsession" (spirit release therapy), "passe" (laying on of hands) and person advice. Both patients had remitted depression when they were interviewed. Further studies would be necessary to report other religious/spiritual treatments in order to improve our understanding of the available practices used by patients and optimize the integration of conventional care with spiritual treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spiritual Needs in Patients Suffering from Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Offenbaecher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess spiritual needs of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS and to evaluate correlations with disease and health associated variables. Using a set of standardized questionnaires (i.e., Spiritual Needs Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36's Quality of Life, Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, etc., we enrolled 141 patients (95% women, mean age 58 ± 10 years. Here, needs for inner peace and giving/generativity scored the highest, while existential needs and religious needs scored lowest. Particularly inner peace needs and existential needs correlated with different domains of reduced mental health, particularly with anxiety, the intention to escape from illness, and psychosocial restrictions. Thirty-eight percent of the patients stated needs to be forgiven and nearly half to forgive someone from their past life. Therefore, the specific spiritual needs of patients with chronic diseases should be addressed in clinical care in order to identify potential therapeutic avenues to support and stabilize their psychoemotional situation.

  9. Religion and spirituality in psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Mary E

    2011-11-01

    The role of religion and spirituality in psychiatric practice has long been a topic of discussion among mental health providers, patients, and faith communities. This review examines the recent findings in the literature that shape current dialogues on this topic and provide implications for patient care. An increasing body of evidence correlates certain aspects of religion/spirituality with mental and physical health outcomes, and researchers continue to explore how and when psychiatrists should intervene in matters of faith. As this topic is inherently multidisciplinary, many encourage approaches that incorporate neurobiology, faith, and psychology for enhanced understanding of patient experience. Many also stress the importance of effective interpersonal communication between providers and patients, using a person-centered framework. In all of these dialogues, implications for patient care are highlighted. The proper role of religion and spirituality in psychiatry continues as a matter of debate. However, current publications attempt to clarify issues that may lead to more evidence-based and empathic care in this area.

  10. Eating disorders and spirituality in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lauren; Kemppainen, Jeanne K; Mechling, Brandy M; MacKain, Sally; Kim-Godwin, Yeounsoo; Leopard, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Associations were examined between eating disorder symptoms and spiritual well-being in a convenience sample of college students. Undergraduate nursing students at a university in a Mid-Atlantic coastal beach community were recruited for the study. A total of 115 students completed the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS); the Sick, Control, One Stone, Fat, Food (SCOFF) screening questionnaire; and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). Approximately one quarter of students had positive screens for an eating disorder, and 40% admitted to binging/purging. SWBS scores reflected low life satisfaction and a lack of clarity and purpose among students. A significant association was found between EAT-26 scores and SWBS Existential Well-Being (EWB) sub-scale scores (p = 0.014). SCOFF scores were significantly associated with SWBS EWB scores (p = 0.001). Symptoms of eating disorders were pervasive. Future research that assesses the impact of spiritual factors on eating disorders may help health care providers better understand the unique contributions to the development of eating disorders. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(1), 30-37.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Spirituality and Quality of Life in Limb Amputees

    OpenAIRE

    Peirano, Amanda H.; Franz, Randall W.

    2012-01-01

    Limb amputation is a life-changing event that signifies long-term physical, social, psychological, and environmental change. Spiritual well-being in patients plays a significant role in coping and may affect outcomes of patients with limb loss. The objective of this study was to describe the role of spirituality in individuals with limb amputation and to determine whether spirituality is related to the quality of life (QOL) in this sample. Study participants were recruited through prosthetist...

  12. Spiritual Medicine in The Multi Perspective of Religion

    OpenAIRE

    Minhas, Marwa; Akhmad, Syaefudin Ali; Afzal, Nadeem

    2017-01-01

    Spiritual healing, also known as healing through prayer and meditation, has been widely studied by various scholars from different religions including Islam, Hindu, Buddhism and Christianity. The term spiritual medicine is increasingly popular with increasing mental disorders, degenerative diseases, metabolic, cancer and social illness such as drug abuse. Religions of Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Christianity have almost the same tradition in the spiritual aspect to create purity of self and...

  13. SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION AMONG HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS

    OpenAIRE

    Szaflarski, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Spirituality and religion are important to many people living with HIV (PLWH). Recent research has focused on special populations (ethnic-minorities, women, and youth), spirituality/religion measurement, mediating/moderating mechanisms, and individual and community-level interventions. Spirituality/religion in PLWH has been refined as a multidimensional phenomenon which improves health/quality of life directly and through mediating factors (healthy behaviors, optimism, social support). Spirit...

  14. Spirituality and secularization: nursing and the sociology of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, John

    2008-01-01

    The concept of spirituality is much discussed in the UK nursing literature, despite the fact that Britain is one of the most secular countries in the world, and steadily becoming more so. Here, I pose the following question: given this increasing secularization, what accounts for the current interest in spirituality among UK nurses? The literature on spirituality in nursing has blossomed in the last 10 years, and various attempts have been made to define 'spirituality', 'spiritual need' and 'spiritual care'. Most definitions distinguish between 'spirituality' and 'religion', acknowledging that the latter is more institutional, and theologically more restrictive, than the former; and they suggest that spirituality is universal, something which (unlike religion) all human beings share. I draw on the sociology of religion - neglected, for the most part, in the nursing literature - to establish two main points. Firstly, that the UK and the USA are at opposite ends of the religion/secularity spectrum, implying that it is a mistake to assimilate USA and UK sources. Secondly, that the concept of spirituality, as currently understood, is of very recent origin, and is still 'under construction', having become separated from its associations with Christian piety and mysticism only since the 1980s. The extension of spirituality into secular domains is part of a professionalization project in nursing, a claim to jurisdiction over a newly invented sphere of work. For the time being, it remains an academic project (in the UK) as it is not one with which many clinicians identify. Relevance to clinical practice. What counts as 'spiritual need' or 'spiritual care' may not be the same in both countries, and UK clinicians are unlikely to welcome the role of surrogate chaplain, which their USA colleagues are apparently willing to embrace.

  15. The Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief: Assessing Spiritual Crisis Following Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A. Burke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the death of a loved one, many grievers endorse spirituality as a source of both solace and strain. Studies show that some grievers struggle significantly with both their relationship with God and their faith community, a condition known as complicated spiritual grief (CSG. However, researchers have lacked a simple, multidimensional, well-validated, grief-specific measure of CSG. In this brief report, we reviewed the psychometric validation process and clinical utility of a measure called the Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief (ICSG, which was tested with 304 Christian grievers. The 18-item ICSG was shown to have strong internal consistency, high test–retest reliability, and convergent and incremental validity and supported a two-factor model, measuring one’s insecurity with God and the disruption in one’s religious practice.

  16. Philosophical - Psychological 's Recognition of Concept of Spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Solgi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In many of the contemporary writings, the scholars have talked about spirituality as a constant pursuit of humanity throughout history. Throughout history, the search for spirituality has found numerous cultural interpretations, but its critical and comparative study in the global and intercultural context is an emerging phenomenon of the twentieth century. Although many contemporary dictionaries and encyclopedias refer to spiritualism, spiritual associations, and spiritual experiences, or spiritual ways, they are not necessarily included an entry for spirituality in the true sense of the word. Some religions do not have a precise word for the term ‘spirituality’ which derives from the Christian tradition, but nevertheless the notion of spirituality has become popular today and is now used both inside and outside the religions as well as in the inter-faith and secular fields. The tendencies that are common in contemporary times to spirituality emphasize individuality and self-development and have been accompanied by a different understanding of human psychology.

  17. The relationship between spirituality and burnout among medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy; Rogoff, MaiLan

    2014-01-01

    Medical student burnout has been associated with depression, loss of empathy, and suicidal ideation. Spirituality has been identified in previous studies as a protective factor in coping with the stress but has not been examined as a factor in medical student burnout. An internet link to an anonymous survey was sent via email to medical students at a public northeastern medical school; 259/469 (55.2%) completed it. The survey included measures of spirituality, burnout, psychological distress, coping, and general happiness. A Pearson-r correlation showed significant inverse correlations between measures of spirituality and measures of psychological distress/burnout (r’s ranging from -.62 to -.14; p’s life satisfaction and spirituality (r’s .53 to .12; psatisfaction and Adaptive coping (Step 3), burnout remained significantly related to lower scores on both spirituality measures (FACIT-SP pspiritual well being and daily spiritual experiences described themselves as more satisfied with their life in general, while students with low scores on spiritual well being and daily spiritual experiences had higher levels of psychological distress and burnout. Spirituality may therefore be a protective factor against burnout in medical students and future studies should explore potential causal relationships. PMID:25485165

  18. Spirituality: a dimension of holistic critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kara; Girvin, Lindsey; Kitner, Whitney; Ruth-Sahd, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    Although many patients face significant physical needs, their mind and spirit may be ill as well. Three facets make up an individual: physical, mental, and spiritual. To provide optimal holistic care, the critical care nurse must take into consideration each of these three aspects. But most importantly, the critical care nurse must recognize that spiritual care begins with oneself. Spirituality is one such area of patient care that, when addressed, can reap positive benefits for both the client and the healthcare provider. This article explores all aspects of spirituality for the critical care nurse.

  19. Learning spiritual dimensions of care from a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, A

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to bring to focus an historical perspective to the subject of spirituality in nurse education. In doing so, the historical roots of spirituality in nursing are traced and commented. Whilst acknowledging the emerging perspectives on spirituality (Simsen 1986, Burnard 1986, 1987, Narayanasamy 1991, 1993, Harrison 1993, Bradshaw 1994, Ross 1995, Oldnall 1996, McSherry & Draper 1998) this paper attempts to address its historical dimension, which is presently lacking in the nursing literature. In order to address this historical gap in spirituality, this paper begins by looking at the spiritual influences of nursing in ancient civilizations like Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, Palestine, India, Greece and Rome and then examines the influence of Christianity. After this, the spiritual dimension of nursing is portrayed as it was in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Eighteenth and Nineteenth centuries. Finally, the emerging nursing theories and their positions on spirituality (including those of humanists) are reviewed and commented. It is hoped that this paper, through a brief review of events, has begun to highlight the significance of the precursor to spirituality in nursing from an historical perspective. It is concluded that contemporary literature suggests there is scope for development of educational programmes to better equip nurses to meet patients' spiritual needs.

  20. The relationship between spirituality and burnout among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy; Rogoff, MaiLan

    2013-01-01

    Medical student burnout has been associated with depression, loss of empathy, and suicidal ideation. Spirituality has been identified in previous studies as a protective factor in coping with the stress but has not been examined as a factor in medical student burnout. An internet link to an anonymous survey was sent via email to medical students at a public northeastern medical school; 259/469 (55.2%) completed it. The survey included measures of spirituality, burnout, psychological distress, coping, and general happiness. A Pearson-r correlation showed significant inverse correlations between measures of spirituality and measures of psychological distress/burnout (r's ranging from -.62 to -.14; p's burnout remained significantly related to lower scores on both spirituality measures (FACIT-SP pStudents having higher levels of spiritual well being and daily spiritual experiences described themselves as more satisfied with their life in general, while students with low scores on spiritual well being and daily spiritual experiences had higher levels of psychological distress and burnout. Spirituality may therefore be a protective factor against burnout in medical students and future studies should explore potential causal relationships.

  1. Religion, spirituality, health and medicine: why should Indian physicians care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2007-01-01

    Religion, spirituality, health and medicine have common roots in the conceptual framework of relationship amongst human beings, nature and God. Of late, there has been a surge in interest in understanding the interplay of religion, spirituality, health and medicine, both in popular and scientific literature. A number of published empirical studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with better outcomes in physical and mental health. Despite some methodological limitations, these studies do point towards a positive association between religious involvement and better health. When faced with disease, disability and death, many patients would like physicians to address their emotional and spiritual needs, as well. The renewed interest in the interaction of religion and spirituality with health and medicine has significant implications in the Indian context. Although religion is translated as dharma in major Indian languages, dharma and religion are etymologically different and dharma is closer to spirituality than religion as an organized institution. Religion and spirituality play important roles in the lives of millions of Indians and therefore, Indian physicians need to respectfully acknowledge religious issues and address the spiritual needs of their patients. Incorporating religion and spirituality into health and medicine may also go a long way in making the practice of medicine more holistic, ethical and compassionate. It may also offer new opportunities to learn more about Ayurveda and other traditional systems of medicine and have more enriched understanding and collaborative interaction between different systems of medicine. Indian physicians may also find religion and spirituality significant and fulfilling in their own lives.

  2. Concepts of spirituality prevailing among undergraduate medical students in Delhi

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    Shantanu Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spirituality is considered one of the determinants of health. Various studies have documented its role in the management of psychological illnesses such as schizophrenia, and anxiety disorders. Doctors often lack skills to do spiritual assessment of the patients. Aim: The current study was conducted among the 1st year undergraduate medical students to find out their ideas and thoughts about spirituality using self-administered questionnaire. Methodology: This was a college based cross sectional study wherein 168 students were interviewed using semistructured, self administered questionnaire. Ethical clearance was obtained from Institutional ethical committee.Results: Most of the students (93.5% believed in spirituality, but only about half (49% of them had complete knowledge about it. Only psychological disorders and chronic diseases were labeled by students who need spirituality as a modality of treatment. Girls linked spirituality with God more than boys. A formal training in spirituality is not essential according to 43% of the subjects. Conclusion: The undergraduates need to understand the importance of this dimension of health. A mere gain in knowledge about spiritual strength available in some of the textbooks would not be able to orient doctors sufficiently to apply it in their practice. Future Direction: Skill building and practicing the culture of spiritual counseling among health workers is the need of hour.

  3. Learning Culture, Spirituality and Local Knowledge: Implications for African Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefa Dei, George J.

    2002-09-01

    (Learning, Culture, Spirituality and Local Knowedge: Implications for African Schooling) - Using a Ghanaian case study, this paper looks at the relevance and implications of local knowledge, culture and spirituality for understanding and implementing educational change in Africa. It examines how teachers, educators, and students use local cultural knowledge about self, personhood and community. Among the critical issues raised are: How do subjects understand the nature, impact and implications of spirituality for schooling and education? What is the role of spirituality, culture, language and social politics in knowledge production? What contribution does the local cultural knowledge base make to the search for genuine educational options in Africa?

  4. Spirituality and uncertainty at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Pam Shockey; Berry, Devon M

    2014-01-01

    To examine the theoretical congruency between uncertainty and spirituality at the end of life (EOL). Relevant empirical and theoretical articles using the key words spirituality, uncertainty, terminal illness, and similar derivatives were drawn from the databases of CINAHL®, MEDLINE®, PsycINFO, and SocINDEX. Spirituality and uncertainty were compared for theoretical congruency based on five general categories: prevalence, temporality, interpretation, quality, and directionality. The categories were drawn from the uncertainty literature and looked at the ability of spirituality and uncertainty to contribute to or detract from health. This article presents an innovative way of viewing how spirituality is experienced at the EOL. The likelihood that uncertainty and spirituality can coexist as a simultaneous and even blended construct that influences the EOL is supported and warrants additional exploration. Health professionals must recognize the prevalence of spiritual uncertainty in the lives of their patients and understand the need to frequently assess for spiritual uncertainty. Specific recommendations are provided to guide professionals in addressing spiritual uncertainty with patients.

  5. Spirituality in Renal Supportive Care: A Thematic Review

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    Richard Egan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease is marked by a reduced life expectancy and a high symptom burden. For those who reach end-stage renal disease, the prognosis is poor, and this combined with the growing prevalence of the disease necessitates supportive and palliative care programmes that will address people’s psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs. While there is variation between countries, research reveals that many renal specialist nurses and doctors are reluctant to address spirituality, initiate end-of-life conversations or implement conservative treatment plans early. Yet, other studies indicate that the provision of palliative care services, which includes the spiritual dimension, can reduce symptom burden, assist patients in making advanced directives/plans and improve health-related quality of life. This review brings together the current literature related to renal supportive care and spirituality under the following sections and themes. The introduction and background sections situate spirituality in both healthcare generally and chronic kidney disease. Gaps in the provision of chronic kidney disease spiritual care are then considered, followed by a discussion of the palliative care model related to chronic kidney disease and spirituality. Chronic kidney disease spiritual needs and care approaches are discussed with reference to advanced care planning, hope, grief and relationships. A particular focus on quality of life is developed, with spirituality named as a key dimension. Finally, further challenges, such as culture, training and limitations, are explicated.

  6. Spirituality and Quaker Approaches to Substance Use and Addiction

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    Helena Chambers

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers has held a consistent testimony of abstinence and moderation regarding alcohol and other substances. This paper outlines the historical background, and describes modern Quaker understandings of moderation. It then outlines hitherto unpublished results regarding spirituality from the only study to date about Quaker behaviour and atttitudes regarding substance use. The association between low substance use and religiosity is established in the literature, but the role of spirituality is less defined. This study methodology allowed an unusually detailed analysis of different aspects of spirituality. Results generally support Miller’s suggestion that idiographic spirituality may have a role in resilience to higher substance use. However, spiritual practice through prayer/meditation emerges as having a more consistent role in the Quaker sample—a finding that is of interest and potential significance in considerations of resilience and recovery. The community dimension of shared spiritual attitudes towards substance use, and the spiritual values that underlie the interpretation of testimony, are also explored. The congruence that some Quakers find with the spiritual approaches of Alcoholics Anonymous is also discussed. It is concluded that spirituality is a significant factor in a Quaker balance that can mitigate immoderate use and support recovery from addiction, without, in general, excluding those who use at higher levels.

  7. Correlates of self-perceptions of spirituality in American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Leila; Powell, Lynda H; Musick, Marc A; Pargament, Kenneth I; Thoresen, Carl E; Williams, David; Underwood, Lynn; Ory, Marcia A

    2002-01-01

    To advance knowledge in the study of spirituality and physical health, we examined sociodemographic, behavioral, and attitudinal correlates of self-perceptions of spirituality. Participants were a nationally representative sample of 1,422 adult respondents to the 1998 General Social Survey. They were asked, among other things, to rate themselves on the depth of their spirituality and the depth of their religiousness. Results indicated that, after adjustment for religiousness, self-perceptions of spirituality were positively correlated with being female (r = .07, p religious or spiritual activities (range in correlations = .12-.38, all p religiousness. The spiritual and religious group had a higherfrequency of attending services, praying, meditating, reading the Bible, and daily spiritual experience than any of the other 3 groups (all differences p religious-only group (p intolerant than either of the nonreligious groups (p intolerance to the religious-only group. We conclude that sociodemographicfactors could confound any observed association between spirituality and health and should be controlled. Moreover, individuals who perceive themselves to be both spiritual and religious may be at particularly low risk for morbidity and mortality based on their good psychological status and ongoing restorative activities.

  8. Utilization of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Nursing Practice in Public Hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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    Sandhya Chandramohan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the views of professional nurses in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa regarding the role of spirituality and spiritual care in nursing practice and investigated whether professional nurses utilize spiritually based care in nursing practice. A cross-sectional descriptive design using multistage random sampling was utilized. Five hundred and fifty questionnaires were distributed to professional nurses between December 2012 and February 2013. A total of 385 participants completed the survey questionnaire, resulting in a 77% response rate. Data was analyzed using SSPS 0.20. The data revealed that nurses see spirituality and spiritual care as an important dimension of nursing practice but need greater preparedness. Nurses need to be effectively prepared to deal with the complexity of providing ethically based personalized spiritual care in an increasingly diverse society.

  9. The Four Domains Model: Connecting Spirituality, Health and Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    John Fisher

    2011-01-01

    At our core, or coeur, we humans are spiritual beings. Spirituality can be viewed in a variety of ways from a traditional understanding of spirituality as an expression of religiosity, in search of the sacred, through to a humanistic view of spirituality devoid of religion. Health is also multi-faceted, with increasing evidence reporting the relationship of spirituality with physical, mental, emotional, social and vocational well-being. This paper presents spiritual health as a, if not THE, f...

  10. [FROM PASTORAL CARE TO SPIRITUAL CARE - TRANSFORMING THE CONCEPTION OF THE ROLE OF THE SPIRITUAL CARE PROVIDER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Michael; Bentur, Netta; Rei Koren, Ziv; Bar Sela, Gil

    2017-11-01

    Spirituality is a difficult concept to define, one that is often understood differently by different cultures and religious communities. Illness constitutes a dramatic change in the ongoing flow and norms of a person's life, raising questions of the value or meaning of life, questions of self-worth, and questions of forgiveness, to ourselves and others. The profession of spiritual care comes to provide support in these areas. Originally focused on religious care, the profession has shifted to providing care for general spiritual well-being, where professionals care for all patients regardless of religion. This survey presents the impact of spiritual well-being on patients in times of serious illness, as distinct from religious well-being, and the role of the spiritual care provider in supporting patients who are in spiritual distress. Studies demonstrate the connection between spiritual or religious well-being and various clinical measures for advanced illness. Studies of spiritual well-being, as distinct from religious well-being, found a direct connection between higher spiritual well-being and reduced depression and despair among cancer and AIDS patients and improved survival rates among patients with congestive heart failure. Religious struggle has been found to correlate with lowered survival rates for hospitalized elderly patients, and with more prolonged hospital stays among patients with congestive heart failure. Negative religious coping has been found to correlate with depression, anxiety, and decreased quality of life among patients undergoing bone-marrow transplants, cancer patients, and patients with end-stage renal disease. In order to integrate the spiritual care provider into the multidisciplinary hospital team, a model has been proposed for staff to perform a short spiritual history at intake relating to patients' beliefs and the importance they hold for the patient. The staff person learns to be attentive to key points indicating a referral to

  11. The association between adolescent spirituality and voluntary sexual activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, D W; DuRant, R H; Harris, T L; Daniel, J H; Obeidallah, D; Goodman, E

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the spectrum of adolescent spirituality and to determine the association between dimensions of spirituality and voluntary sexual activity (VSA) in adolescents. A sample of 141 consecutive youth aged 11-25 years presenting to an urban, hospital-based adolescent medicine clinic completed a 153-item instrument assessing sociodemographics, psychosocial parameters, and eight specific aspects of spirituality including: (1) religious attendance, (2) religious importance, (3) intrinsic and (4) extrinsic religious motivation, (5) belief in God, (6) belief in divine support, (7) existential aspects of spirituality, and (8) spiritual interconnectedness. Adolescents were also asked about VSA. Sixty-one percent of respondents were African-American and 67.4%, female; mean age was 16.0+/-2.4 years. Adolescent religious attendance was equally distributed across the categories from "none" to "weekly or greater" attendance. Over 90% felt religion was somewhat important in their lives. Over 85% reported belief in God. Fifty-six percent of respondents reported a history of VSA. Greater importance of religion (p = 0.035) and higher spiritual interconnectedness with friends (p = 0.033) were inversely associated with VSA. A multiple logistic regression model including age, gender, race, socioeconomic status, and specific denomination of religious faith, importance of religion, and spiritual interconnectedness found that spiritual interconnectedness with friends (OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.85, 0.99) and age (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.34, 2.28) were independent predictors of VSA. Spirituality is a common facet of adolescents' lives. Younger age and higher spiritual interconnectedness, particularly interconnectedness among spiritual friends, are independently associated with a lower likelihood of VSA.

  12. Spirituality and religion in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Sian; Puchalski, Christina M; Sherman, Susan N; Mrus, Joseph M; Peterman, Amy H; Feinberg, Judith; Pargament, Kenneth I; Justice, Amy C; Leonard, Anthony C; Tsevat, Joel

    2006-12-01

    Spirituality and religion are often central issues for patients dealing with chronic illness. The purpose of this study is to characterize spirituality/religion in a large and diverse sample of patients with HIV/AIDS by using several measures of spirituality/religion, to examine associations between spirituality/religion and a number of demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables, and to assess changes in levels of spirituality over 12 to 18 months. We interviewed 450 patients from 4 clinical sites. Spirituality/religion was assessed by using 8 measures: the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spirituality-Expanded scale (meaning/peace, faith, and overall spirituality); the Duke Religion Index (organized and nonorganized religious activities, and intrinsic religiosity); and the Brief RCOPE scale (positive and negative religious coping). Covariates included demographics and clinical characteristics, HIV symptoms, health status, social support, self-esteem, optimism, and depressive symptoms. The patients' mean (SD) age was 43.3 (8.4) years; 387 (86%) were male; 246 (55%) were minorities; and 358 (80%) indicated a specific religious preference. Ninety-five (23%) participants attended religious services weekly, and 143 (32%) engaged in prayer or meditation at least daily. Three hundred thirty-nine (75%) patients said that their illness had strengthened their faith at least a little, and patients used positive religious coping strategies (e.g., sought God's love and care) more often than negative ones (e.g., wondered whether God has abandoned me; Pself-esteem, greater life satisfaction, and lower overall functioning (R2=.16 to .74). Mean levels of spirituality did not change significantly over 12 to 18 months. Most patients with HIV/AIDS belonged to an organized religion and use their religion to cope with their illness. Patients with greater optimism, greater self-esteem, greater life satisfaction, minorities, and patients who drink less alcohol tend

  13. BIMBINGAN SPIRITUAL BERBASIS NILAI-NILAI BUDAYA

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    Asep Solikin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study departed from the need of guidance of the Pantura society who experiences an alienation and a loss of meaning in the personal and social lives due to the absence of a relevant strategy to protect their lives. The people who were unable to get counsel were those who ultimately needed a spiritual counselors who could give direction to the emptiness of life they experienced. This study is aimed at finding the strategic formulation of the spiritual guidance based on the cultural values of the Hindu Buddhist Dayak Tribes of Bumi Segandhu Indramayu consisting of guidance of pepe, kungkum , blegir, and ngaji rasa which were relevant to develop a dimension of sense of the religiosity on the meaningfulness of life and diversity of their members. Accordingly, with the Bumi Segandhu spiritual guidance strategy, every individual could achieve an optimal development and achievement of self-actualization in the middle of the community after attending a spiritual guidance in this community. Bumi Segandhu spiritual guidance was the guidance strategy to develop the dimensions of religiosity of the Hindu Buddhist Dayak community of Bumi Segandhu Indramayu. Their participation in spiritual guidance was expected to provide an understanding, appreciation and practice of the meaningful lives after returning to their community.الملخص: كانت خلفية هذا البحث حاجات المجتمع في السواحل الشمالية (Pantura إلى التوجيهات والتوعيات الدينية، وهم عاشوا منعزلين وضاع عنهم معنى الحياة الفردية والحياة الاجتماعية. وهذا لعدم الاستراتيجية المناسبة للمحافظة على حياتهم. احتاج هذا المجتمع الضعيف دينيا إلى التوعيات الدينية لتوجيه حياتهم إلى ما هو أفضل. يهدف هذا البحث إلى الحصول على خطوات

  14. Remembering as a Crucial Spiritual Tool : Pierre Favre's Spiritual Life in the «Memoriale»

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Favre (16th century) is usually admired especially for his gift for spiritual accompaniment. In this article, I would like to show that Favre may inspire not only for his way of dealing with others, but also for his way of dealing with his own soul as recored in his Journal, the Memoriale.

  15. Spirituality and Counselling: Are Counsellors Prepared to Integrate Religion and Spirituality into Therapeutic Work with Clients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    An online survey of 341 Registered Clinical Counsellors in British Columbia was used to understand how therapists view and integrate spirituality and religion in their practice. Therapists were asked about their education and training in this realm, and about their perceived abilities, comfort, and competence when working with religious and/or…

  16. Adolescent Spiritual Exemplars: Exploring Spirituality in the Lives of Diverse Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Pamela Ebstyne; Clardy, Casey E.; Ramos, Jenel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to develop theory about psychological constructs relevant to spiritual development in diverse adolescents. Exemplar and Consensual Qualitative Research methods were used to explore 30 interviews of adolescents aged 12 to 21 years ("M" = 17.73 years) representing eight religions and six countries from around…

  17. "Wearing My Spiritual Jacket": The Role of Spirituality as a Coping Mechanism among African American Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, LeConté J.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing evidence in the theoretical literature regarding the importance of religion and religiosity in people's lives, particularly concerning their health and well-being. Spirituality, a related but different concept, has been less well studied, especially empirically, but shows promise as a mechanism for coping with deleterious social…

  18. Young People and Spirituality: The Need for a Spiritual Foundation for Australian Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    The "Adelaide Declaration on National Goals for Schooling in the Twenty-First Century" provides a mandate for discussion of the spiritual within secular state schooling, but this discussion has never occurred. This is a serious omission given what could be called an "undercurrent of concern" for the ways in which young people…

  19. Dreams and spirituality : A handbook for ministry, spiritual direction and counselling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koet, B.J.; Adams, Kate; Koning, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Dreams and Spirituality is a pastoral handbook that offers a comprehensive overview of the nature of dreams as understood from a range of diverse professional perspectives. Dreams are a universal phenomenon, feature frequently in biblical narratives and have a long established role in religious

  20. Drug Resistance versus Spiritual Resistance: A Comparative Analysis from the Perspective of Spiritual Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Baqer Mohammadi Laini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Taking into account a few principles concerning human being, it becomes plausible that the human spirit would also have a similar reaction to spiritual “medicine” provided to it. In order to better understand how this is possible, we must consider the means by which the human spirit becomes resistant to spiritual remedies and compare them with the resistance developed by the body against physical drugs. As such, this research aimed at creating a comparative analysis between the elements that cause the human spirit to become resistant against spiritual remedies in comparison to the body’s resistance against physical treatments (e.g. drugs and other physical treatment. Methods: The research at hand highlights the conclusions of an overall study of the Holy Quran, books of Islamic narration, and extensive Internet research concerning this subject. With these resources, the various aspects of the spirit’s resistance against spiritual remedies were discussed in detail. Results: According to Holy Quran and Islamic narrations: Based on the expectations which God has of man, his heart (i.e. spirit has the potential to fall under one of two categories – positive or negative. An afflicted heart may at times, like an afflicted body, become resistant against a remedy designed to cure it. In both cases of physical or metaphysical resistance, the underlying element that causes this resistance as well as the symptoms which accompany it are similar to one another. Having considered the teachings found in religious texts, this research discovered the underlying causes of spiritual resistance, and outlined some solutions which can prevent this issue from arising in the first place. Conclusion: Based on the standards of health and spiritual wellbeing as outlined in Holy Quran, it is said that some hearts are unhealthy and require treatment and healing. In Holy Quran, there is also no doubt in it, guidance to the God wary

  1. The neglected context: The growing impact of modernity on the South African population and its spiritual, economic and ecological consequences

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    Klaus N�rnberger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Humanity seems to be drifting like a rudderless raft towards a cataract. The main factors are the growth of the human population, the escalation of material expectations, the exploding discrepancies between affluent and marginalised population groups and the impact of these growth processes on the natural environment. The modern claim to mastery, ownership and entitlement and its spectacular successes has led to unprecedented power without a concomitant growth in responsibility. In spiritual and cultural terms, modernity undermines all traditional certainties, values and constraints. The South African population is engulfed in a messy transition from African traditionalist, to modern and postmodern assumptions. The most reticent citizens are the least competitive and the most marginalised. The Christian faith, rooted as it is in tradition and geared to spiritual concerns, is no match for the power of the modern mindset. To regain its redemptive relevance, it needs fundamental reconceptualisations. The article closes with a few starting points for such a project.

  2. “We both just trusted and leaned on the Lord”: A qualitative study of religiousness and spirituality among African American breast cancer survivors and their caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Katherine Regan; Burris, Jessica L.; Heiney, Sue P.; Ruppel, Megan Baker; Ford, Marvella E.; Zapka, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Most breast cancer survivorship research focuses on the general population of survivors. Scant research investigates the potentially unique experiences of minorities, especially during and after the difficult transition from primary treatment to post-treatment. This qualitative study explored African American breast cancer survivors’ and caregivers’ quality-of-life in the post-treatment period with a focus on social and spiritual well-being. Methods Participants included a convenience sample of African American women with stage I-III breast cancer (N=23) who completed treatment 6–24 months before enrollment. Primary caregivers (N=22) included friends, spouses and other family members (21 complete dyads). Participants completed separate semi-structured telephone interviews. Template analysis was used to evaluate themes related to religiousness and spirituality, both across and within dyads. Results After treatment, religiousness and spirituality played a major role in both survivors’ and caregivers’ lives by: 1) providing global guidance, 2) guiding illness management efforts and 3) facilitating recovery. Participants described a spiritual connectedness with God and others in their social networks. Dyad members shared the goal of keeping a positive attitude and described positive growth from cancer. Few future concerns were expressed due to the belief that survivors were healed and “done” with cancer. Beyond practical and emotional support, provision of spiritual assistance was common. Conclusions Results highlight the principal, positive role of religiousness and spirituality for African American breast cancer survivors and caregivers after treatment. Findings emphasize the need to assess the importance of religious and spiritual beliefs and practices, and if appropriate, to provide resources that promote spiritual well-being. PMID:24578149

  3. "We both just trusted and leaned on the Lord": a qualitative study of religiousness and spirituality among African American breast cancer survivors and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Katherine Regan; Burris, Jessica L; Heiney, Sue P; Ruppel, Megan Baker; Ford, Marvella E; Zapka, Jane

    2014-09-01

    Most breast cancer (BC) survivorship research focuses on the general population of survivors. Scant research investigates the potentially unique experiences of minorities, especially during and after the difficult transition from primary treatment to post-treatment. This qualitative study explored African American BC survivors' and caregivers' quality-of-life in the post-treatment period with a focus on social and spiritual well-being. Participants included a convenience sample of African American women with stage I-III BC (N = 23) who completed treatment 6-24 months before enrollment. Primary caregivers (N = 22) included friends, spouses and other family members (21 complete dyads). Participants completed separate semi-structured telephone interviews. Template analysis was used to evaluate themes related to religiousness and spirituality, both across and within dyads. After treatment, religiousness and spirituality played a major role in both survivors' and caregivers' lives by: (1) providing global guidance, (2) guiding illness management efforts and (3) facilitating recovery. Participants described a spiritual connectedness with God and others in their social networks. Dyad members shared the goal of keeping a positive attitude and described positive growth from cancer. Few future concerns were expressed due to the belief that survivors were healed and "done" with cancer. Beyond practical and emotional support, provision of spiritual assistance was common. Results highlight the principal, positive role of religiousness and spirituality for African American BC survivors and caregivers after treatment. Findings emphasize the need to assess the importance of religious and spiritual beliefs and practices, and if appropriate, to provide resources that promote spiritual well-being.

  4. An exploration of the extent of inclusion of spirituality and spiritual care concepts in core nursing textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Murphy, Maryanne; Neill, Freda; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Holistic care that encompasses a spiritual dimension is an expectation in modern healthcare (Rothman, 2009). Increasing attention is being paid to the role of nurses in providing spiritual care to patients. However nurses lack specific skills and expertise in this area (Lundmark, 2006; Timmins, 2010; RCN, 2011), and the extent to which their undergraduate education prepares them for this role is unclear. There is often an absence of clear direction about what to teach undergraduate nursing students. The extent to which core textbooks direct student studies in this area is not known. There is some evidence that some of these fundamental core textbooks provide insufficient direction (Pesut, 2008), thus gaps in knowledge and care provision in this field could be exacerbated. The aim of this study is to examine the extent to which spiritual care concepts are addressed in core nursing textbooks. Five hundred and forty three books were sampled from the Nursing and Midwifery Core Collection list (UK) (Tomlinsons, 2010) representing 94% of the total (n=580). A survey, the Spirituality Textbook Analysis Tool (STAT), was developed and used to collect data. One hundred and thirty of the books included content related to spirituality and religion. However there was little consistency in the core nursing textbooks with regard to direction for providing spiritual care. Thirty eight percent of the books defined spiritual care and 36% provided an outline of the role of the nurse in providing this. While some books advocated the assessment of patients' spiritual needs (32%) few referred specifically to assessment tools. It is essential that nurses are adequately prepared to address the spiritual needs of patients. While there are numerous spiritual care texts that deal solely with this issue for nurses, there is an argument emerging that core nursing texts used by nursing students ought to encompass spiritual care elements. Lack of specific focus on this field, by these key

  5. Exploring Spiritual Beliefs in Relation to Adlerian Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, Patricia J.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes one counselor's exploration of her spiritual beliefs in relation to Adler's theory of counseling and human development in an effort to move toward ideological consistency and to enhance competence in addressing spiritual dimensions of clients' development. (Contains 34 references.) (GCP)

  6. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  7. Religion, spirituality, health and medicine: Why should Indian physicians care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2007-01-01

    Religion, spirituality, health and medicine have common roots in the conceptual framework of relationship amongst human beings, nature and God. Of late, there has been a surge in interest in understanding the interplay of religion, spirituality, health and medicine, both in popular and scientific

  8. Spirituality in Nursing: An Overview of Research Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Martins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality has been widely considered important for patients’ health and for healthcare practice and is related to connectedness, meaning in life, and transcendence. Research concerning spirituality is growing rapidly, and the implementation of spiritual care should be based on evidence. This literature review aims to describe the methods that have been used in nursing research focusing on spirituality. The electronic search on databases through EBSCOhost identified 2091 citations, and a total of 231 studies were included. The methods used in research on spirituality in nursing are mostly quantitative (52.4%, but some are qualitative (42.8% and mixed (4.8%. Regarding the quantitative research, most studies are observational (90.9%, and these are mainly descriptive (82.7% and correlational (17.3%. Most studies used a cross-sectional design (98.7%, and few used longitudinal design (1.3%. The qualitative research is descriptive (39.4%, phenomenological (26.3%, and grounded theory (14.1%. Research on spirituality in nursing is based on both main paradigms (quantitative and qualitative, but also on mixed methods. Studies have mainly been conducted using cross-sectional designs when compared to longitudinal designs. The latter seem to constitute a gap in nursing knowledge and evidence regarding the changes of spirituality over time, which is particularly important for nurses’ delivery of spiritual care.

  9. Clarifying the relation between spirituality and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdal, Lori; MacDonald, Douglas A

    2013-04-01

    Koenig (J Nerv Ment Dis 196:349-355, 2008) and others have asserted that measures of spirituality used to investigate its association with health seem to present a misleading picture of the relationship because of evidence suggesting that spirituality has become conceptually confounded with well-being. To evaluate this claim, the present study used a sample of 247 university students to explore the relation of a multidimensional model of spirituality with several different forms of well-being and the association of both with a two-factor model of social desirability. Correlational and regression analyses revealed that, although there is some evidence of an association, it is generally of low effect size and seems to differ as a function of how spirituality is defined. More importantly, however, there was the finding that existential well-being, a concept often incorporated into definitions of spirituality and a part of the measurement model used in this study, is virtually uncorrelated with explicitly spiritual and religious variables but shows a pattern of association with measures of well-being and social desirability, which suggests that it would be better conceptualized as a form of well-being and not spirituality. The article concludes with a discussion of the meaning of the findings for understanding the spirituality-health literature and suggestions for future research.

  10. Breaking Bread: Spirituality, Food and Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Jane

    2005-01-01

    The spiritual aspect of early childhood education is supported by the early childhood curriculum in Aotearoa New Zealand, "Te Whariki". Research in three different early childhood settings presents new perspectives on the everyday experiences of children in terms of spirituality. Each setting formed a case study that included the voices…

  11. Four Links between Child Theology and Children's Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, Vivienne

    2011-01-01

    It is my thesis that the Child Theology Movement is a new and significant aspect of cultural change within the Christian church that will have resonance with the wider community, affecting parenting behaviour as well as spiritual and religious education. This paper examines some of the aspects of children's spirituality that link to and have value…

  12. Afrikaner spirituality: A complex mixture | Oliver | HTS Teologiese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article argues that the perception that Afrikaner spirituality is and has always been founded mainly or only upon the Calvinistic tradition is a misconception. Nineteenth century Afrikaner spiritualism consisted of a mixture of theology, philosophy and a way of adapting to extreme living conditions. These factors, although ...

  13. Spiritual and Religious Considerations of Michigan Counseling Association Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeland, Jennifer M.; Anderson, Mary L.; Bischof, Gary H.; Will, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated Michigan Counseling Association members' perceptions of spirituality and religion in the therapeutic process. Specifically, this study sought to find out if spirituality and religion were important in the lives of counselors; how they define these concepts; if they have received training in working with these issues in…

  14. Spiritual vs. Religious: Perspectives from Today's Undergraduate Catholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Dawn V.

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary American college students simultaneously express both increased interest in spirituality and declining interest in traditional religion. Recent research recognizes the trend of young adults separating spirituality from religion, but utilizes varied definitions of each term developed by the researchers. This study asks students…

  15. Spirituality, theology and the critical mind | de Villiers | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay investigates aspects of the critical nature of spirituality as a discipline. It first analyses how a recent publication on philosophy critiques the role of the critical mind in contemporary philosophy and how it reclaims spirituality as solution for what went wrong. In a next section it discusses similar criticism of traditional ...

  16. Spirituality, depression and quality of life in medical students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-22

    Mar 22, 2016 ... Open Access part of patient management.7 In psychiatry, there is evidence of a positive association between spirituality and treatment outcomes for depression, anxiety, substance abuse and suicide.8. Multiple studies, both longitudinal and cross- sectional, have shown that spirituality has an unequivocal.

  17. Workplace Spirituality, Computer Self-Efficacy And Emotional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There should therefore, be an ongoing facilitation of self-development for lecturers through opportunities for computer skills acquisition, role identification and role performance to manage emotional labour and the cold fact that spirituality is a key player in human functioning. Keywords: Workplace Spirituality, Computer ...

  18. Asian Shades of Spirituality: Implications for Multicultural School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Fred J.; Green, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the current practice of school counseling, little consideration is given to the spiritual background of students of Asian cultures. Although there is a body of literature on Asian culture in counseling, the authors could find remarkably few articles pertaining to counseling students in the context of Asian religious and spiritual traditions. In…

  19. Experiencing Shame: Collegiate Alcohol Abuse, Religiosity, and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Giordano, Amanda L.; Holm, Jessica M.; Bevly, Cynthia M.; Sender, Kristy M.; Ramsey, Zachary B.; Abernathy, Meagan R.

    2017-01-01

    Previous researchers have established the relationship between substance abuse and shame and religiosity/spirituality and shame. This study investigated the associations among shame, religiosity, spirituality, and drinking behavior in a college student sample (N = 310). Participants classified as hazardous drinkers reported higher levels of shame…

  20. Religion, an obstacle to workplace spirituality and employee wellness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Bester

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A desperate need for employee wellness is echoed in work-related stories. Workplace spirituality is presented as an integral part of achieving and maintaining employee wellness. However, there is an observed gap of spirituality in employee wellness programmes and in the absence of the workplace spiritual helper in multidisciplinary wellness teams. Using a postfoundational notion of practical theology, I have explored one of the reasons for this gap, namely workplace spirituality�s association to religion. When spirituality is viewed through the lens of religion, it is overlooked as a vehicle of help. This is a consequence of the obstacles of the taboo of religious discussion, the complexity of religious plurality, the dominant voice of secularism and unhelpful religiosity. A proposal is made for a definition of spirituality that describes the relationship between spirituality and religion that overcomes the religionrelated obstacles to the development of workplace spirituality and so enable spirituality�s contribution in wellness.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The research includes an interdisciplinary collaboration with a Human Resource (HR manager, social worker, arts therapist, clinical pastoral counsellor, medical practitioner, psychologist, businessperson and two psychiatrists that underscores the collaborative effort in wellness. There is an intradisciplinary challenge to those who restrict the view of spirituality to the experience of religion.