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Sample records for spirillum serpens cell

  1. Analysis of the cell wall and lipopolysaccharide of Spirillum serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, I R; Murray, R G

    1975-12-01

    Isolated walls of Spirillum serpens VHA contained lipid, lipopolysaccharide, and protein in amounts similar to those of other gram-negative organisms. The loosely bound lipids consisted mainly of phosphatidylethanolamine, lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol. Lipopolysaccharide was tightly bound to the wall and could only be removed in a substantial amount after digestion of the wall with Pronase. The lipopolysaccharide contained L-glycero-D-mannoheptose, rhamnose, glucosamine, ethanolamine, and phosphate in common with many of the lipopolysaccharides isolated from the Enterobacteriaceae. However, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonic acid was not detected. Several unidentified sugars were present. The fatty acid composition resembled that found in lipopolysaccharides isolated from various pseudomonads. Two major regions were identified in the polysaccharide moiety, one apparently corresponding to the core polysaccharide and the other corresponding to the side-chain polysaccharide as in enterobacterial and pseudomonad lipopolysaccharides. The side chains were obtained as low-molecular-weight material and their structure was partially elucidated by the isolation and partial characterization of N-acetylglucosaminyl-(1 leads to 4)-rhamnose.

  2. Alterations in the cell wall of Spirillum serpens VHL early in its association with Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellen, J E; Starr, M P

    1976-05-03

    In both freeze-etched and critical-point dried preparations examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, the outer surfaces of the cells of Spirillum serpens VHL assume a wrinkled appearance 10-15 min after challenge by Bdellovibrion bacteriovorus 109D. This wrinkling effect is believed (on circumstantial evidence) to be caused by the bdellovibrio's disruption of the cell wall lipoprotein of the Spirillum. With the exception of those topological changes caused by wrinkling, the outer membrane of the Spirillum cell wall retains a normal appearance, as viewed in freeze-etched preparations, even after the Spirillum cell has been converted into a bdelloplast. Although the peptidoglycan layer of the Spirillum cell presumably is weakened somewhat by the invading Bdellovibrio, evidence obtained from freeze-fractured preparations of Spirillum bdelloplasts suggests that the peptidoglycan remains as a discrete cell wall layer, even though the Spirillum cell wall apparently has lost much of its rigidity. That the peptidoglycan backbone remains essentially intact, even after the Spirillum cell has been entered by the Bdellovibrio, is supported by the observation that the soluble amino sugar content of the culture medium, as determined by chemical analysis, does not rise even 5.0 h after the association of the Bdellovibrio with the Spirillum has begun.

  3. Isolation and chemical structure of the peptidoglycan of Spirillum serpens cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, P E; Ensign, J C

    1968-01-01

    The peptidoglycan layer of Spirillum serpens cell walls was isolated from intact cells after treatment with sodium dodecylsulfate and digestion with Pronase. The isolated peptidoglycan contained glucosamine, muramic acid, alanine, glutamic acid, and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the approximate molar ratio of 1:1:2:1:1. Aspartic acid and glycine were the only other amino acids found in significant quantities. N-terminal amino acid analyses of the tetrapeptide amino acids in the peptidoglycan revealed that 54% of the diaminopimelic acid molecules are involved in cross-linkage between tetrapeptides. This amount of cross-linkage is greater than that found in the peptidoglycan of previously studied cell walls of gram-negative bacteria. The polysaccharide backbone was isolated, after myxobacter AL-1 enzyme digestion of the peptidoglycan, by fractionation with ECTEOLA-cellulose and Sephadex G-100. An average length of 99 hexosamines for the polysaccharide chains was found (ratio of total hexosamines to reducing end groups).

  4. Protein-lipid-lipopolysaccharide association in the superficial layer of Spirillum serpens cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, I R; Murray, R G

    1978-02-01

    The backing layer of the Spirillum serpens VHA cell wall, which supports and is bonded to the outer, structured protein layer, was isolated and shown to be similar in composition to the same elements of the outer membrane. It contained a lipopolysaccharide that was similar, but not identical, to that of the intact wall and the same phospholipids. The interaction of the isolated wall lipopolysaccharide with the loosely bound wall lipids provided lamellae, whose surfaces were an effective template for a lifelike reassembly of the isolated outer-layer hexagonal protein in the presence of Ca2+. Assembly did not take place on pure lipopolysaccharide, which dispersed in differing forms. A lipid-lipopolysaccharide-water interface appeared to be required as a template surface for the assembly. Lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was able to replace that of S. serpens in the template. These observations suggest that lipid-lipopolysaccharide complexes are highly ordered, and this order is important to the nucleation and assembly of the protein array.

  5. Formation of bacterial flagella. I. Demonstration of a functional flagellin pool in spirillum serpens and bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R J; Gordee, E Z

    1966-02-01

    Martinez, R. J. (University of California, Los Angeles), and E. Z. Gordee. Formation of bacterial flagella. I. Demonstration of a functional flagellin pool in Spirillum serpens and Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 91:870-875. 1966-Exponentially growing cultures of Spirillum serpens and Bacillus subtilis regained motility and flagella within one generation after mechanical deflagellation. Regeneration of flagella occurred in both cultures in the presence of chloramphenicol at concentrations shown to inhibit flagellin synthesis. Cells labeled with C(14)-amino acids regenerated radioactive flagella in the presence of chloramphenicol. A conditional mutant of S. serpens (T-45) was isolated. This strain did not produce flagella when grown at 45 C, but formed the organelles upon temperature shift to 30 C, even in the presence of chloramphenicol. A reduction of intracellular antibody-precipitable flagellin counts in labeled S. serpens T-45 occurred concomitant with the generation of flagella at 30 C. The data suggest that the flagella of S. serpens and B. subtilis are formed from a pool of intracellular flagellin proteins.

  6. Structure of the surface layer protein of the outer membrane of Spirillum serpens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M.; Chiu, W.; Grano, D.

    1979-01-01

    The outer membrane of the Gram negative bacterium, Spirillum serpens VHA, possesses an ordered surface-layer protein. A morphological model of this protein is proposed on the basis of electron micrographs that have been obtained of unstained, hydrated specimens as well as of negatively stained specimens. The molecular weight of the protein monomer in this model is consistent with the surface-layer protein molecular weight obtained by gel electrophoresis and estimated to be 140,000. In addition, gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of proteins of MW approx. = 35,000 and MW approx. = 78,000, which remain associated with the outer membrane under conditions where the ordered surface-layer protein is released in soluble form.

  7. Substructure and in vitro assembly of the outer, structured layer of Spirillum serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmire, F L; Murray, R G

    1976-01-01

    Electron micrographs of disintegrating units of the outer, structured (HP) layer of Spirillum serpens and of the isolated protein obtained from the HP layer revealed V- and Y-shaped and linear profiles. Interpretation of these forms, influenced by the seemingly trimeric form of the isolated protein and by biochemical data, suggested that the protein subunits were identical and Y shaped. A model is proposed for the assembly of the Y-shaped subunits to form a hexagon composed of two triads (three Y-shaped subunits each). The isolated protein adsorbed to a template of wall fragments (basal layer) to the same degree (over 90%) in high concentrations of Na+, K+ (5 X 10(-2) M), Ca2+, Sr2+, and Mg2+ (10(-2) M). At a lower concentration (4 x 10(-5) M) of the cations there was differential adsorption of the protein. Adsorption to the template in the presence of each cation, followed by dilution, also led to differential release of the protein. The adsorption of the protein to the basal layer was correlated with reassembly of the HP layer on the template. The mechanisms seem to be: (i) an ionic strength-dependent reassembly, which results in an HP layer loosely attached to the template (this layer is easily dissociated by decreasing the ionic strength); and (ii) a cation-specific (Ca2+ or Sr2+, but not Mg2+, Na+, or K+) mechanism independent of ionic strength. In this latter case, the specific cations presumably form strong noncovalent "salt" linkages between triads and the basal layer, enabling stable hexagons and the HP layer to be formed.

  8. Cell envelope associations of Aquaspirillum serpens flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulton, J W; Murray, R G

    1978-12-01

    Specific regions of the cell envelope associated with the flagellar basal complex of the gram-negative bacterium Aquaspirillum (Spirillum) serpens were identified by studying each of the envelope layers: outer membrane, mucopeptide, and plasma membrane. The outer membrane around the flagella insertion site was differentiated by concentric membrane rings and central perforations surrounded by a closely set collar. The perforations in both the outer membrane and the isolated mucopeptide layer were of a size accomodating the central rod of the basal complex but smaller than either the L or the P disks. The P disk of the complex may lie between the mucopeptide and the outer membrane. Electron microscopy of intact, spheroplasted, or autolyzed preparations did not adequately resolve the location of the inner pair of disks of the basal complex. Freeze-etching, however, revealed differentiation within the plasma membrane that appeared to be related to the basal complex. The convex fracture face showed depressions which are interpreted as impressions of a disk surrounded by a set of evenly spaced macromolecular studs and containing a central "plug" interpreted as the central rod. In thin sections, blebs, which appear to be associated with the flagellar apparatus, were seen on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane. Superimposing the dimensions of the flagellar basal complex and the spacings of the cell envelope layers and using the position of the L disk within the outer membrane for reference, showed that the S disk might be within and the M disk beneath the plasma membrane. A tentative model was developed for comparison with that based on the structure of the Escherichia coli basal complex.

  9. Cell wall proteins of Aquaspirillum serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, S F; Murray, R G

    1981-06-01

    The Triton X-100-insoluble wall fraction of Aquaspirillum serpens VHA contained three major proteins: the regularly structured (RS) superficial protein (molecular weight 140,000) and two peptidoglycan-associated proteins (molecular weights, 32,000 and 33,000). The molecular arrangement and interactions of the outer membrane and RS proteins were examined with the use of bifunctional cross-linking reagents. The peptidoglycan-associated and RS proteins were not readily cross-linked in either homo- or heteropolymers. This suggests that the free amino groups are not suitably disposed for cross-linking. Some high-molecular-weight multimers of the RS protein were produced, but the subunit structure of the RS array was not stabilized by cross-linking. The peptidoglycan-associated proteins were cross-linked to high-molecular-weight multimers, but no dimers or trimers were produced. This result suggests that these proteins exist in the outer membrane as multimers larger than trimers.

  10. Chryseolinea serpens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.J.; Alkawally, M.; Brady, A.L.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Dunfield, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    An aerobic chemoheterotrophic gliding bacterium, designated RYG(T), was isolated from a soil in Germany. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, thin rods (0.4-0.6 mu m in width and 2.0-5.5 gm in length). Cells multiplied by normal cell division and no resting stages were observed. Colonies were yellow and

  11. Regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication in Vero cells by Psychotria serpens: relationship to gene expression, DNA replication, and protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Y C; Chen, C C; Tsai, W J; Ho, Y H

    2001-08-01

    Inhibitory effects of ethanolic extracts from seven Chinese herbs on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication were investigated. From a bioassay-guided fractionation procedure, PS-A-6 was isolated from Psychotria serpens (P. serpens), which suppressed HSV-1 multiplication in Vero cells without apparent cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition experiments suggested that the inhibitory action of PS-A-6 on HSV-1 replication was not through blocking of virus adsorption. In an attempt to further localize the point in the HSV-1 replication cycle where arrest occurred, a set of key regulatory events leading to viral multiplication was examined, including viral gene expression, DNA replication, and structural protein synthesis. The results indicated that gB mRNA and protein expression in Vero cells were impeded by PS-A-6. Southern blot analysis showed that HSV-1 DNA replication in Vero cells was arrested by PS-A-6. In addition, PS-A-6 decreased thymidine kinase (tk) and ICP27 mRNA expression in the cells. The mechanisms of antiviral action of PS-A-6 seem to be mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of early transcripts of HSV-1, such as tk and ICP27 mRNAs, arresting HSV-1 DNA synthesis and gB gene expression in Vero cells. Plans are underway for the isolation of pure compounds from PS-A-6 and elucidation of their mechanism of action.

  12. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars. Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation. The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  13. In vitro selection of Phytomonas serpens cells resistant to the calpain inhibitor MDL28170: alterations in fitness and expression of the major peptidases and efflux pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Simone S C; Gonçalves, Inês C; Ennes-Vidal, Vitor; Lopes, Angela H C S; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; D'Ávila-Levy, Claudia M; Santos, André L S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2018-03-01

    The species Phytomonas serpens is known to express some molecules displaying similarity to those described in trypanosomatids pathogenic to humans, such as peptidases from Trypanosoma cruzi (cruzipain) and Leishmania spp. (gp63). In this work, a population of P. serpens resistant to the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 at 70 µ m (MDLR population) was selected by culturing promastigotes in increasing concentrations of the drug. The only relevant ultrastructural difference between wild-type (WT) and MDLR promastigotes was the presence of microvesicles within the flagellar pocket of the latter. MDLR population also showed an increased reactivity to anti-cruzipain antibody as well as a higher papain-like proteolytic activity, while the expression of calpain-like molecules cross-reactive to anti-Dm-calpain (from Drosophila melanogaster) antibody and calcium-dependent cysteine peptidase activity were decreased. Gp63-like molecules also presented a diminished expression in MDLR population, which is probably correlated to the reduction in the parasite adhesion to the salivary glands of the insect vector Oncopeltus fasciatus. A lower accumulation of Rhodamine 123 was detected in MDLR cells when compared with the WT population, a phenotype that was reversed when MDLR cells were treated with cyclosporin A and verapamil. Collectively, our results may help in the understanding of the roles of calpain inhibitors in trypanosomatids.

  14. Structural analysis of the surface-layer protein of spirillum serpens by high-resolution electron microscopy

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    Wu, W.H.; Glaeser, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In order to understand the detailed association of the macro-molecules of the structure of the protein, a high resolution structural analysis was performed. Large, single layered arrays of the surface layer protein have been obtained for this purpose by means of extensive heating in high CaCl/sub 2/. The computer processed image reveals a pore of about 10 Angstrom diameter at the 6-fold symmetry center; the handedness of the images is quite evident. The individual molecular envelope of the protein monomers are apparent and details of the protein-protein contact at the three-fold lattice positions emerge.

  15. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector.

  16. Antifungal isopimaranes from Hypoestes serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoamiaranjanahary, L; Guilet, D; Marston, A; Randimbivololona, F; Hostettmann, K

    2003-09-01

    Five isopimarane diterpenes (7beta-hydroxyisopimara-8,15-dien-14-one, 14alpha-hydroxyisopimara-7,15-dien-1-one, 1beta,14alpha-dihydroxyisopimara-7,15-diene, 7beta-hydroxyisopimara-8(14),15-dien-1-one and 7beta-acetoxyisopimara-8(14),15-dien-1-one) have been isolated from the leaves of Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae). All compounds exhibited antifungal activity against both the plant pathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum and the yeast Candida albicans; two of them also displayed an acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The structures of the compounds were determined by means of spectrometric methods, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments and MS analysis.

  17. Extracellular metalloproteinases in Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Alane B; Almeida, Flávia V S; Bronzato, Leandro S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2003-03-01

    The detection of extracellular proteinases in Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid isolated from tomato fruits, is demonstrated in this paper. Maximal production occurred at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth. These enzymes exhibited selective substrate utilization in SDS-PAGE, being more active with gelatin; hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin were not degraded. Three proteinases were detected in SDS-PAGE-gelatin, with apparent molecular masses between 94 and 70 kDa. The proteolytic activity was completely blocked by 1,10-phenanthroline and strongly inhibited by EDTA, whereas a partial inhibition was observed with trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) and soybean trypsin inhibitor; phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride weakly inhibited the enzymes. This inhibition profile indicated that these extracellular proteinases belong to the metalloproteinase class.

  18. Characterization of kinetoplast DNA from Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá-Carvalho, D; Perez-Morga, D; Traub-Cseko, Y M

    1993-01-01

    The restriction enzyme digestion of kinetoplast DNA from four Phytomonas serpens isolates shows an overall similar band pattern. One minicircle from isolate 30T was cloned and sequenced, showing low levels of homology but the same general features and organization as described for minicircles of other trypanosomatids. Extensive regions of the minicircle are composed by G and T on the H strand. These regions are very repetitive and similar to regions in a minicircle of Crithidia oncopelti and to telomeric sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conserved Sequence Block 3, present in all trypanosomatids, is one nucleotide different from the consensus in P. serpens and provides a basis to differentiate P. serpens from other trypanosomatids. Electron microscopy of kinetoplast DNA evidenced a network with organization similar to other trypanosomatids and the measurement of minicircles confirmed the size of about 1.45 kb of the sequenced minicircle.

  19. Body, nuclear, and ciliary changes during conjugation of Protospathidium serpens (Ciliophora, Haptoria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuidong; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2004-01-01

    We studied cell size and shape, nuclear changes, and the ciliary pattern during conjugation of Protospathidium serpens, using protargol impregnation and morphometry. Preliminary data were gathered from Epispathidium ascendens and Apertospathula armata. Conjugation of P. serpens is temporary, isogamic, and without preconjugation divisions. Pair formation is heteropolar, and the partners unite obliquely with the oral bulge. The body becomes smaller and broader during conjugation, but no basic changes occur in the ciliary pattern. Conjugation and nuclear reconstruction follow the usual mode of ciliates. However, some peculiarities occur: only two of the four synkaryon derivatives of the second synkaryon division enter the third division and generate four macronuclear anlagen, which fuse to a single, long macronucleus strand. During conjugation, E. ascendens unites obliquely as P. serpens, while A. armata can pair dorsal-to-dorsal surface, ventral-to-dorsal surface, or obliquely as P. serpens. The nuclear processes of these three species are also rather different, showing a considerable diversity in union modes and nuclear events of spathidiids; E. ascendens even has preconjugation division. Confirming previous data, the present study shows convincingly that most of the spathidiid nuclear variability is caused by reconstruction processes occurring in post-dividers, exconjugants and, possibly, exautogamonts. When these specimens are removed from the populations, spathidiid species are as stable (or variable) as other ciliate species.

  20. Antifungal diterpenes from Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoamiaranjanahary, Lalao; Marston, Andrew; Guilet, David; Schenk, Kurt; Randimbivololona, Fanantenanirainy; Hostettmann, Kurt

    2003-02-01

    Two new diterpenes, fusicoserpenol A and dolabeserpenoic acid A, with antifungal activity, were isolated from leaves of Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae). Their structures were elucidated by means of spectrometric methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments and MS analysis. X-ray crystallographic analysis confirmed the structure of fusicoserpenol A and established the relative configuration.

  1. A new diterpene from Hypoestes serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamihaja, B; Martin, M T; Rasoanaivo, P; Frappier, F

    2001-02-01

    From a defatted chloroform extract of the aerial parts of Hypoestes serpens a new diterpene exhibiting relaxant activity on isolated rat aorta was obtained. The structure of this compound, named serpendione (1), was fully established by the interpretation of its spectral data.

  2. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection.

  3. Sera of Chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens

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    Viviane K Graça-de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These fagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identifed, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identifed proteins were classifed into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  4. Sera of chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça-de Souza, Viviane K; Monteiro-Góes, Viviane; Manque, Patrício; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Corrêa, Paulo R C; Buck, Gregory A; Ávila, Andréa R; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco A; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F

    2010-01-01

    The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These flagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identified, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identified proteins were classified into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  5. Phytomonas serpens: immunological similarities with the human trypanosomatid pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Elias, Camila G R; Vermelho, Alane B; Branquinha, Marta H

    2007-07-01

    The present review provides an overview of recent discoveries concerning the immunological similarities between Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, and human trypanosomatid pathogens, with special emphasis on peptidases. Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi express peptidases that are well-known virulence factors, named leishmanolysin and cruzipain. P. serpens synthesizes two distinct classes of proteolytic enzymes, metallo- and cysteine-type peptidases, that share common epitopes with leishmanolysin and cruzipain, respectively. The leishmanolysin-like and cruzipain-like molecules from P. serpens participate in several biological processes including cellular growth and adhesion to the salivary glands of Oncopeltus fasciatus, a phytophagous insect experimental model. Since previous reports demonstrated that immunization of mice with P. serpens induced a partial protective immune response against T. cruzi, this plant trypanosomatid may be a suitable candidate for vaccine studies. Moreover, comparative approaches in the Trypanosomatidae family may be useful to understand kinetoplastid biology, biochemistry and evolution.

  6. Chromenes from Peperomia serpens (Sw.) Loudon (Piperaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga Kitamura, Rodrigo O; Romoff, Paulete; Young, Maria Cláudia M; Kato, Massuo J; Lago, João Henrique G

    2006-11-01

    Chromatographic separation of the CH2Cl2 extract from leaves of Peperomia serpens yielded two chromenes [5-hydroxy-8-(3',7'-dimethylocta-2',6'-dienyl)-2,2,7-trimethyl-2H-1-chromene (1) and 5-hydroxy-8-(3'-methyl-2'-butenyl)-2,2,7-trimethyl-2H-1-chromene-6-carboxylic acid (2)], besides the known chromene [methyl 5-hydroxy-2,2,7-trimethyl-2H-1-chromene-6-carboxylate (3)] and the flavonoid, dihydrooroxylin (4). Their structural elucidation were achieved by spectroscopic analyses. The antifungal activities of the CH2Cl2 extract and the isolated chromenes were measured bioautographically against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum, when it was found that the crude extract showed higher activity as compared to the pure compounds.

  7. Interferometer observations of cluster formation in Serpens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan

    1999-10-01

    One of the primary science goals of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array is to image star forming regions in unprecedented detail and sensitivity. Here, we present BIMA observations of a young embedded stellar group in Serpens that demonstrate some of the issues in this field that ALMA may address in the future. The high resolution of the interferometer enables us to to follow the structure, dynamics, and chemistry of the overall cluster forming cloud down to the scale of individual star forming cores. There is an approximately equal mix of cores with and without continuum sources suggesting that new stars are continually being added to the group. There is evidence for large scale collapse onto the cluster with concentrations toward regions where the velocity dispersion is at a local minimum. There are also significant differences in relative abundances throughout the cluster indicating that molecule formation and depletion timescales are comparable to or less than dynamical timescales for core formation and that chemistry may be used as a signature of their evolution. We discuss a scenario for cluster formation through the condensation and collapse of individual cores via turbulent dissipation and point out a few ways in which ALMA may contribute to future studies.

  8. Differential expression of cruzipain- and gp63-like molecules in the phytoflagellate trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens induced by exogenous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Chagas, Michel G; Souza-Gonçalves, Ana Luiza; Pascarelli, Bernardo M O; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2012-01-01

    Phytomonas serpens synthesizes metallo- and cysteine-proteases that are related to gp63 and cruzipain, respectively, two virulence factors produced by pathogenic trypanosomatids. Here, we described the cellular distribution of gp63- and cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens through immunocytochemistry and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Both proteases were detected in distinct cellular compartments, presenting co-localization in membrane domains and intracellular regions. Subsequently, we showed that exogenous proteins modulated the production of both protease classes, but in different ways. Regarding the metalloprotease, only fetal bovine serum (FBS) influenced the gp63 expression, reducing its surface exposition (≈30%). Conversely, the cruzipain-like molecule was differentially modulated according to the proteins: human and bovine albumins reduced its expression around 50% and 35%, respectively; mucin and FBS did not alter its production, while IgG and hemoglobin drastically enhanced its surface exposition around 7- and 11-fold, respectively. Additionally, hemoglobin induced an augmentation in the cell-associated cruzipain-like activity in a dose-dependent manner. A twofold increase of the secreted cruzipain-like protein was detected after parasite incubation with 1% hemoglobin compared to the parasites incubated in PBS-glucose. The results showed the ability of P. serpens in modulating the expression and the activity of proteolytic enzymes after exposition to exogenous proteins, with emphasis in its cruzipain-like molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Descriptions of Protospathidium serpens (Kahl, 1930) and P. fraterculum n. sp. (Ciliophora, Haptoria), two species based on different resting cyst morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuidong; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2005-01-01

    Protospathidium serpens (Kahl, 1930) is frequent in semiterrestrial and terrestrial habitats worldwide. Conventionally, all populations are considered as conspecific because they have very similar overall morphologies and morphometrics. We studied in detail not only the morphology of the vegetative cells but also the resting cysts using live observation, protargol impregnation, and scanning electron microscopy. These revealed a cryptic diversity and biogeographic pattern in details of the dorsal brush and cyst wall morphology. The cyst wall is spiny in the Austrian specimens, while smooth in the South African and Antarctic populations. Accordingly, P. serpens consists of at least two species: P. serpens (with spiny cyst wall) and P. fraterculum n. sp. (with smooth cyst wall); the latter is probably composed of two distinct taxa differing by the absence (South African)/presence (Antarctic) of a monokinetidal bristle tail in brush row 3, the number of dikinetids comprising brush row 1 (seven versus three), and the total number of brush dikinetids (29 versus 17). Protospathidium serpens is neotypified with the new population from Austria. The significance of resting cyst morphology is discussed with respect to alpha-taxonomy and overall ciliate diversity.

  10. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mansur Medina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L., which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic, a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT, which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  11. Mechanisms of growth inhibition of Phytomonas serpens by the alkaloids tomatine and tomatidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jorge Mansur; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes; Moreira, Otacilio C; Atella, Geórgia; Souza, Wanderley de; Barrabin, Hector

    2015-02-01

    Phytomonas serpens are flagellates in the family Trypanosomatidae that parasitise the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which results in fruits with low commercial value. The tomato glycoalkaloid tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine inhibit the growth of P. serpens in axenic cultures. Tomatine, like many other saponins, induces permeabilisation of the cell membrane and a loss of cell content, including the cytosolic enzyme pyruvate kinase. In contrast, tomatidine does not cause permeabilisation of membranes, but instead provokes morphological changes, including vacuolisation. Phytomonas treated with tomatidine show an increased accumulation of labelled neutral lipids (BODYPY-palmitic), a notable decrease in the amount of C24-alkylated sterols and an increase in zymosterol content. These results are consistent with the inhibition of 24-sterol methyltransferase (SMT), which is an important enzyme that is responsible for the methylation of sterols at the 24 position. We propose that the main target of tomatidine is the sterols biosynthetic pathway, specifically, inhibition of the 24-SMT. Altogether, the results obtained in the present paper suggest a more general effect of alkaloids in trypanosomatids, which opens potential therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of the diseases caused by these pathogens.

  12. The biochemical characterization of two phosphate transport systems in Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Bernardo, Rodrigo; Gomes-Vieira, André Luiz; Carvalho-Kelly, Luiz Fernando; Russo-Abrahão, Thais; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (P i ) is an essential nutrient for all organisms because it is required for a variety of biochemical processes, such as signal transduction and the synthesis of phosphate-containing biomolecules. Assays of 32 P i uptake performed in the absence or in the presence of Na + indicated the existence of a Na + -dependent and a Na + -independent P i transporter in Phytomonas serpens. Phylogenetic analysis of two hypothetical protein sequences of Phytomonas (EM1) showed similarities to the high-affinity P i transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Pho84, a Na + -independent P i transporter, and Pho89, a Na + -dependent P i transporter. Plasma membrane depolarization by FCCP, an H + ionophore, strongly decreased P i uptake via both Na + -independent and Na + -dependent carriers, indicating that a membrane potential is essential for P i influx. In addition, the furosemide-sensitive Na + -pump activity in the cells grown in low P i conditions was found to be higher than the activity detected in the plasma membrane of cells cultivated at high P i concentration, suggesting that the up-regulation of the Na + -ATPase pump could be related to the increase of P i uptake by the Pho89p Na + :P i symporter. Here we characterize for the first time two inorganic phosphate transporters powered by Na + and H + gradients and activated by low P i availability in the phytopathogen P. serpens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Narnavirus in the Trypanosomatid Protist Plant Pathogen Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopyants, Natalia S; Lye, Lon-Fye; Dobson, Deborah E; Lukeš, Julius; Beverley, Stephen M

    2016-07-28

    We describe here a new RNA virus (PserNV1) from the plant protist parasite Phytomonas serpens (family Trypanosomatidae, Kinetoplastida, supergroup Excavata). The properties of PserNV1 permit assignment to the genus Narnavirus (Narnaviridae), the first reported from a host other than fungi or oomycetes. Copyright © 2016 Akopyants et al.

  14. Partial kinetoplast-mitochondrial gene organization and expression in the respiratory deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, D A; Nawathean, P; Scheel, J

    1999-04-30

    In plant-dwelling trypanosomatids from the genus Phytomonas, mitochondrial functions, such as cytochrome mediated respiration, ATP production and Krebs cycle, are missing, and cell energetics is based on the glycolysis. Using Blue Native/Tricine-SDS two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis, we observed that mitochondrial respiratory Complexes III (cytochrome bc1) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase) were absent in Phytomonas serpens; however, Complex V (ATPase) was present. A deletion of the genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COIII) and apocytochrome b (Cyb) was identified within the 6234 bp sequenced region of the 31 kb maxicircle kinetoplast DNA. Genes, found in this region, include 12S and 9S ribosomal RNAs, subunits 7, 8 and 9 of NADH dehydrogenase (ND7, ND8 and ND9) and subunit 6 of ATPase (A6 or MURF4), as well as the genes (MURF1, MURF5 and G3) with unknown function. Most genes are actively transcribed and some mRNAs are edited. Fully edited mRNAs for A6 and G3 were abundant, while edited ND7 transcripts were rare, and only partially edited and pre-edited transcripts for ND8 were detected. The data show that the mitochondrial genome of P. serpens is functional, although its functions may be limited to expressing the ATPase and, possibly, NADH dehydrogenase complexes.

  15. Biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles by using Viola serpens extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To formulate a biological approach for the biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles using aqueous extracts of leaves of Viola serpens which is considered as a ecofriendly method as it does not include any harmful chemicals. Methods: The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-vis spectroscopy analysis, scanning electron microscopy analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. Results: Scanning electron microscopy analysis study revealed that synthesized silver nanoparticles were of an average size of 80–90 nm. Crystalline nature of synthesized silver nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Conclusions: The leaves of Viola serpens can be a potent source for the biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The outcome of the study can lead to the development of a novel drug for biomedical field.

  16. Solid carbon monoxide in the Serpens dark cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiar, J. E.; Adamson, A. J.; Kerr, T. H.; Whittet, D. C. B.

    1994-01-01

    The 4.67 micrometer absorption feature of solid CO is an important signature of grain mantles in molecular clouds. This paper presents new observations of solid CO absorption in the spectra of four infrared sources in and behind the Serpens dark cloud. We also present supplementary 2.0-2.5 micrometer spectra which clarify the nature of selected sources. Solid CO profiles are compared with models based on laboratory data. In common with previous studies of other clouds, we find that the observed profiles are consistent with the presence of two distinct phases of CO-bearing ice, one dominated either by CO itself or by CO mixed with absorption relative to that of the water-ice feature at 3.1 micrometers is unusually high in Serpens: we deduce column densities for CO and H2O in solid form and conclude that the mean CO abundance in dust is 40% of the H2O abundance, compared with values in the range 0%-30% typical of other molecular clouds. On the basis of its 2.0-2.5 micrometer spectrum and near-infrared colors, we deduce the infrared source CK 2 to be a K5-M0 III field star situated behind the Serpens cloud and suffering 40-50 mag of visual extinction. Assuming empirical correlations between extinction and total (gas + dust) CO column density, we estimate the CO depletion (i.e., the fraction of interstellar CO in the line of sight tied up in grains) to be approximately 40% in the intracloud medium of the Serpens cloud, comparable with previous estimates for the Taurus dark cloud, and much higher than that found in the environments of protostellar objects.

  17. Phylogeny and taxonomy of species in the Grosmannia serpens complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tuan A; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Grosmannia serpens was first described from pine in Italy in 1936 and it has been recorded subsequently from many countries in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The fungus is vectored primarily by root-infesting bark beetles and has been reported to contribute to pine-root diseases in Italy and South Africa. The objective of this study was to consider the identity of a global collection of isolates not previously available and using DNA sequence-based comparisons not previously applied to most of these isolates. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS2-LSU, actin, beta-tubulin, calmodulin and translation elongation factor-1 alpha sequences revealed that these morphologically similar isolates represent a complex of five cryptic species. Grosmannia serpens sensu stricto thus is redefined and comprises only isolates from Italy including the ex-type isolate. The ex-type isolate of Verticicladiella alacris was shown to be distinct from G. serpens, and a new holomorphic species, G. alacris, is described. The teleomorph state of G. alacris was obtained through mating studies in the laboratory, confirming that this species is heterothallic. Most of the available isolates, including those from South Africa, USA, France, Portugal and some from Spain, represent G. alacris. The remaining three taxa, known only in their anamorph states, are described as the new species Leptographium gibbsii for isolates from the UK, L. yamaokae for isolates from Japan and L. castellanum for isolates from Spain and the Dominican Republic.

  18. Horizontal gene transfer confers fermentative metabolism in the respiratory-deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienne, Susan; Pappas, Georgios; Benabdellah, Karim; González, Antonio; Zingales, Bianca

    2012-04-01

    Among trypanosomatids, the genus Phytomonas is the only one specifically adapted to infect plants. These hosts provide a particular habitat with a plentiful supply of carbohydrates. Phytomonas sp. lacks a cytochrome-mediated respiratory chain and Krebs cycle, and ATP production relies predominantly on glycolysis. We have characterised the complete gene encoding a putative pyruvate/indolepyruvate decarboxylase (PDC/IPDC) (548 amino acids) of P. serpens, that displays high amino acid sequence similarity with phytobacteria and Leishmania enzymes. No orthologous PDC/IPDC genes were found in Trypanosoma cruzi or T. brucei. Conservation of the PDC/IPDC gene sequence was verified in 14 Phytomonas isolates. A phylogenetic analysis shows that Phytomonas protein is robustly monophyletic with Leishmania spp. and C. fasciculata enzymes. In the trees this clade appears as a sister group of indolepyruvate decarboxylases of γ-proteobacteria. This supports the proposition that a horizontal gene transfer event from a donor phytobacteria to a recipient ancestral trypanosome has occurred prior to the separation between Phytomonas, Leishmania and Crithidia. We have measured the PDC activity in P. serpens cell extracts. The enzyme has a Km value for pyruvate of 1.4mM. The acquisition of a PDC, a key enzyme in alcoholic fermentation, explains earlier observations that ethanol is one of the major end-products of glucose catabolism under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This represents an alternative and necessary route to reoxidise part of the NADH produced in the highly demanding glycolytic pathway and highlights the importance of this type of event in metabolic adaptation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Star formation in clusters: early sub-clustering in the Serpens core

    OpenAIRE

    Testi, L.; Sargent, A. I.; Olmi, L.; Onello, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    We present high resolution interferometric and single dish observations of molecular gas in the Serpens cluster-forming core. Star formation does not appear to be homogeneous throughout the core, but is localised in spatially- and kinematically-separated sub-clusters. The stellar (or proto-stellar) density in each of the sub-clusters is much higher than the mean for the entire Serpens cluster. This is the first observational evidence for the hierarchical fragmentation of proto-cluster cores s...

  20. Auxin production by the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens and auxin homoeostasis in infected tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienne, Susan; Freschi, Luciano; Vidotto, Vanessa F; De Souza, Tiago A; Purgatto, Eduardo; Zingales, Bianca

    2014-09-01

    Previously we have characterized the complete gene encoding a pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC)/indolepyruvate decarboxylase (IPDC) of Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid highly abundant in tomato fruits. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the clade that contains the trypanosomatid protein behaves as a sister group of IPDCs of γ-proteobacteria. Since IPDCs are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the ability for IAA production by P. serpens was investigated. Similar to many microorganisms, the production of IAA and related indolic compounds, quantified by high performance liquid chromatography, increased in P. serpens media in response to amounts of tryptophan. The auxin functionality was confirmed in the hypocotyl elongation assay. In tomato fruits inoculated with P. serpens the concentration of free IAA had no significant variation, whereas increased levels of IAA-amide and IAA-ester conjugates were observed. The data suggest that the auxin produced by the flagellate is converted to IAA conjugates, keeping unaltered the concentration of free IAA. Ethanol also accumulated in P. serpens-conditioned media, as the result of a PDC activity. In the article we discuss the hypothesis of the bifunctionality of P. serpens PDC/IPDC and provide a three-dimensional model of the enzyme.

  1. The Fragmentation and Stability of Hierarchical Structure in Serpens South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, R. K.; Bourke, T. L.; Di Francesco, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Myers, P. C.

    2016-12-01

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in molecular clouds, and have been recently argued to play an important role in regulating the size and mass of embedded clumps through fragmentation and mass accretion. Here, we reveal the dynamical state and fragmentation of filamentary molecular gas associated with the Serpens South protocluster through analysis of wide (˜ 4 {pc}× 4 {pc}) observations of NH3 (1, 1) and (2, 2) inversion transitions with the Green Bank Telescope. Detailed modeling of the NH3 lines reveals that the kinematics of the cluster and surrounding filaments are complex. We identify hierarchical structure using a dendrogram analysis of the NH3 emission. The distance between neighbor structures that are embedded within the same parent structure is generally greater than expected from a spherical Jeans analysis, and is in better agreement with cylindrical fragmentation models. The NH3 line width-size relation is flat, and average gas motions are sub- or trans-sonic over all physical scales observed. Subsonic regions extend far beyond the typical 0.1 pc scale previously identified in star-forming cores. As a result, we find a strong trend of decreasing virial parameter with increasing structure mass in Serpens South. Extremely low virial parameters on the largest scales probed by our data suggest that the previously observed, ordered magnetic field is insufficient to support the region against collapse, in agreement with large radial infall motions previously measured toward some of the filaments. A more complex magnetic field configuration in the dense gas, however, may be able to support the filaments.

  2. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Shimajiri, Yoshito [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Yonekura, Yoshinori [Center for Astronomy, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Kameno, Seiji [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Crdova 3107 Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Momose, Munetake [Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Nakajima, Taku, E-mail: fumitaka.nakamura@nao.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  3. Gp63-like molecules in Phytomonas serpens: possible role in the insect interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Santos, Lívia O; Marinho, Fernanda A; Dias, Felipe A; Lopes, Angela H; Santos, André L S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that metallopeptidase inhibitors (EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline) were able to arrest Phytomonas serpens growth in distinct patterns. This parasite released exclusively metallopeptidases to the extracellular environment, whereas in cellular extracts only cysteine peptidases were detected. In addition, an extracellular polypeptide of 60 kDa reacted in Western blotting probed with polyclonal antibody raised against gp63 of Leishmania amazonensis. In the cellular parasite extract, this antibody recognized bands migrating at 63 and 52 kDa, which partitioned on both aqueous and membrane-rich fractions. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the gp63-like molecules have a surface location. Moreover, phospholipase C (PLC)-treated parasites reduced the number of gp63-positive cells. The anti-cross-reacting determinant (CRD) and anti-gp63 antibodies recognized the 60-kDa band in the supernatant from PLC-treated cells, suggesting that this protein is glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored to the plasma membrane. This is the first report on the presence of gp63-like molecules in members of the Phytomonas genus. The pretreatment of the parasites with anti-gp63 antibody significantly diminished their adhesion index to explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus, suggesting a potential involvement of the gp63-like molecules in the adhesive process of this plant trypanosomatid.

  4. Components of the regular surface array of Aquaspirillum serpens MW5 and their assembly in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kist, M L; Murray, R G

    1984-02-01

    The two-layered regular surface array of Aquaspirillum serpens MW5 was removed from cell envelopes and dissociated into subunits by treatment with 6 M urea. The surface components reassembled onto an outer membrane surface and self-assembled into planar sheets in vitro in the presence of Ca2+ or Sr2+. The two layers were removed sequentially from cell envelopes by a two-step extraction procedure involving initial treatment with a high-pH buffer to remove the outermost surface layer and subsequent treatment with 6 M urea to remove the innermost layer. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the outer and inner layers of the array were composed of two proteins with molecular weights of 125,000 and 150,000, respectively. The two layers assembled sequentially; the 150,000-molecular-weight protein formed an array on an outer membrane surface, and the 125,000-molecular-weight protein required that array as a template for its in vitro assembly.

  5. Protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi provided by oral immunization with Phytomonas serpens: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinge-Filho, P; Peron, J P S; de Moura, T R; Menolli, R A; Graça, V K; Estevão, D; Tadokoro, C E; Jankevicius, J V; Rizzo, L V

    2005-01-31

    We have previously demonstrated that Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoa that causes Chagas' disease. These antigens are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in Balb/c mice. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 mice treated with the nitric oxide inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG, 50 mg kg(-1)) infected with T. cruzi, were used to demonstrate the role of nitric oxide (NO) to host protection against T. cruzi infection achieved by oral immunization with live P. serpens. A reduction in parasitaemia and an increase in survival were observed in C57BL/6 infected mice and previously immunized with P. serpens, when compared to non-immunized mice. iNOS (KO) mice immunized and C57BL/6 immunized and treated with AG presented parasitaemia and mortality rates comparable to those of infected and non-immunized mice. By itself, immunization with P. serpens did not induce inflammation in the myocardium, but C57BL/6 mice so immunized showed fewer amastigotes nests in the heart following an acute T. cruzi infection than those in non-immunized mice. These results suggest that protective immunity against T. cruzi infection induced by immunization with P. serpens is dependent upon enhanced NO production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection.

  6. Chemical composition, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in rodents of the essential oil of Peperomia serpens (Sw.) Loud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, B G; Silva, A S B; Souza, G E P; Figueiredo, J G; Cunha, F Q; Lahlou, S; da Silva, J K R; Maia, J G S; Sousa, P J C

    2011-11-18

    Peperomia serpens (Piperaceae), popularly known as "carrapatinho", is an epiphyte herbaceous liana grown wild on different host trees in the Amazon rainforest. Its leaves are largely used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat inflammation, pain and asthma. This study investigated the effects of essential oil of Peperomia serpens (EOPs) in standard rodent models of pain and inflammation. The antinociceptive activity was evaluated using chemical (acetic acid and formalin) and thermal (hot plate) models of nociception in mice whereas the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan- and dextran-induced paw edema tests in rats croton oil-induced ear edema, as well as cell migration, rolling and adhesion induced by carrageenan in mice. Additionally, phytochemical analysis of the EOPs has been also performed. Chemical composition of the EOPs was analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Twenty-four compounds, representing 89.6% of total oil, were identified. (E)-Nerolidol (38.0%), ledol (27.1%), α-humulene (11.5%), (E)-caryophyllene (4.0%) and α-eudesmol (2.7%) were found to be the major constituents of the oil. Oral pretreatment with EOPs (62.5-500 mg/kg) significantly reduced the writhing number evoked by acetic acid injection, with an ED(50) value of 188.8 mg/kg that was used thereafter in all tests. EOPs had no significant effect on hot plate test but reduced the licking time in both phases of the formalin test, an effect that was not significantly altered by naloxone (0.4 mg/kg, s.c.). EOPs inhibited the edema formation induced by carrageenan and dextran in rats. In mice, EOPs inhibited the edema formation by croton oil as well as the leukocyte and neutrophil migration, the rolling and the adhesion of leukocytes. These data show for the first time that EOPs has a significant and peripheral antinociceptive effect that seems unrelated to interaction with the opioid system. EOPs also displays a significant anti-inflammatory effect in

  7. Structure of the regular surface layer of Aquaspirillum serpens MW5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M; Murray, R G

    1982-04-01

    The structure of the regular surface layer of Aquaspirillum serpens MW5 has been investigated by electon microscopy supplemented by computer image processing and least-squares analysis. The layer has a ribbed appearance, both on the bacterium and in isolated, negatively stained fragments. However, detailed analysis indicated that the layer was composed of two hexagonal sheets having p6mm symmetry and a = 16 nm. One sheet was staggered by one half repeat along a (1,0) line of the p6nm lattice relative to the second so that, in projection, the pattern of the composite layer was a translational moiré, characterized by a series of ribs spaced 16 nm apart. The ribbed layer had cmm symmetry with a = 32 nm and b = 18.5 nm. Analysis of this pattern indicated that the two p6nm hexagonal sheets were unevenly stained, and this was confirmed by using least-squares methods to simulate the observed pattern by combining two hexagonal patterns. The general structure of the layer was consistent with a role as a selective and protective barrier on the cell surface.

  8. Cysteine peptidases in the tomato trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens: influence of growth conditions, similarities with cruzipain and secretion to the extracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Pereira, Fernanda M; Dias, Felipe A; Silva, Thiago L A; Lopes, Angela H C S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2008-12-01

    We have characterized the cysteine peptidase production by Phytomonas serpens, a tomato trypanosomatid. The parasites were cultivated in four distinct media, since growth conditions could modulate the synthesis of bioactive molecules. The proteolytic profile has not changed qualitatively regardless the media, showing two peptidases of 38 and 40kDa; however, few quantitative changes were observed including a drastic reduction (around 70%) on the 40 and 38kDa peptidase activities when parasites were grown in yeast extract and liver infusion trypticase medium, respectively, in comparison with parasites cultured in Warren medium. The time-span of growth did not significantly alter the protein and peptidase expression. The proteolytic activities were blocked by classical cysteine peptidase inhibitors (E-64, leupeptin, and cystatin), being more active at pH 5.0 and showing complete dependence to reducing agents (dithiothreitol and l-cysteine) for full activity. The cysteine peptidases were able to hydrolyze several proteinaceous substrates, including salivary gland proteins from Oncopeltus fasciatus, suggesting broad substrate utilization. By means of agglutination, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting analyses we showed that both cysteine peptidases produced by P. serpens share common epitopes with cruzipain, the major cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, our data suggest that the 40kDa cysteine peptidase was located at the P. serpens cell surface, attached to membrane domains via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. The 40kDa peptidase was also detected in the cell-free culture supernatant, in an active form, which suggests secretion of this peptidase to the extracellular environment.

  9. Oral exposure to Phytomonas serpens attenuates thrombocytopenia and leukopenia during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rosiane V; Malvezi, Aparecida D; Augusto, Leonardo da Silva; Kian, Danielle; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia H; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Rizzo, Luiz V; Schenkman, Sergio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2013-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS), which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease.

  10. Microsatellite markers for Grosmannia alacris (Ophiostomataceae, Ascomycota) and other species in the G. serpens complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tuan A; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Zanzot, James W; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2012-05-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the pine-infecting fungus, Grosmannia alacris. Sixteen microsatellite markers were developed by using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR)-PCRs and 454 sequencing methods. Seven of these markers showed polymorphisms for a South African population of G. alacris, and 13 markers showed polymorphism when European isolates were included. Most of the primer pairs also amplified four closely related species: G. serpens, Leptographium gibbsii, L. castellanum, and L. yamaokae. These new markers will be useful for population studies of G. alacris and other species in the G. serpens complex.

  11. Expressed sequence tags from the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Georgios J; Benabdellah, Karim; Zingales, Bianca; González, Antonio

    2005-08-01

    We have generated 2190 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a cDNA library of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. Upon processing and clustering the set of 1893 accepted sequences was reduced to 697 clusters consisting of 452 singletons and 245 contigs. Functional categories were assigned based on BLAST searches against a database of the eukaryotic orthologous groups of proteins (KOG). Thirty six percent of the generated sequences showed no hits against the KOG database and 39.6% presented similarity to the KOG classes corresponding to translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis. The most populated cluster contained 45 ESTs homologous to members of the glucose transporter family. This fact can be immediately correlated to the reported Phytomonas dependence on anaerobic glycolytic ATP production due to the lack of cytochrome-mediated respiratory chain. In this context, not only a number of enzymes of the glycolytic pathway were identified but also of the Krebs cycle as well as specific components of the respiratory chain. The data here reported, including a few hundred unique sequences and the description of tandemly repeated motifs and putative transcript stability motifs at untranslated mRNA ends, represent an initial approach to overcome the lack of information on the molecular biology of this organism.

  12. FILAMENTARY ACCRETION FLOWS IN THE EMBEDDED SERPENS SOUTH PROTOCLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, Philip C.; Bourke, Tyler L. [Radio and Geoastronomy Division, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS-42, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A.; Wilson, Grant W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hedden, Abigail, E-mail: kirkh@mcmaster.ca [Army Research Labs, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    One puzzle in understanding how stars form in clusters is the source of mass-is all of the mass in place before the first stars are born, or is there an extended period when the cluster accretes material which can continuously fuel the star formation process? We use a multi-line spectral survey of the southern filament associated with the Serpens South embedded cluster-forming region in order to determine if mass is accreting from the filament onto the cluster, and whether the accretion rate is significant. Our analysis suggests that material is flowing along the filament's long axis at a rate of {approx}30 M{sub Sun} Myr{sup -1} (inferred from the N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity gradient along the filament), and radially contracting onto the filament at {approx}130 M{sub Sun} Myr{sup -1} (inferred from HNC self-absorption). These accretion rates are sufficient to supply mass to the central cluster at a similar rate to the current star formation rate in the cluster. Filamentary accretion flows may therefore be very important in the ongoing evolution of this cluster.

  13. Chryseolinea serpens gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong-Jae; Alkawally, Mariam; Brady, Allyson L; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Dunfield, Peter F

    2013-02-01

    An aerobic chemoheterotrophic gliding bacterium, designated RYG(T), was isolated from a soil in Germany. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, thin rods (0.4-0.6 µm in width and 2.0-5.5 µm in length). Cells multiplied by normal cell division and no resting stages were observed. Colonies were yellow and displayed swarming edges. Gliding motility was observed in wet mounts. Strain RYG(T) grew at pH 5.6-7.7 (optimum pH 6.6-7.0), at 13-37 °C (optimum 25-30 °C) and with 0-1.0 % NaCl (optimum 0-0.1 %). The isolate was incapable of atmospheric nitrogen fixation and grew on most mono- and disaccharides as well as a few polysaccharides and organic acids. The predominant menaquinone was MK-7, the major cellular fatty acids were C(16 : 1)ω5c and iso-C(15 : 0) and the major intact polar lipids were composed of phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives and two unknown series. The DNA G+C content was 49.9 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes, class Cytophagia, order Cytophagales, but was only distantly related to any cultured bacteria. The closest relatives were Ohtaekwangia koreensis 3B-2(T) and Ohtaekwangia kribbensis 10AO(T) (both 93 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). We propose a novel genus and species, Chryseolinea serpens gen. nov., sp. nov.. Strain RYG(T) ( = DSM 24574(T) = ATCC BAA-2075(T)) is the type strain.

  14. The Physical Structure of Protoplanetary Disks : The Serpens Cluster Compared with Other Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, I.; Merín, B.; Pontoppidan, K.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions are presented for 94 young stars surrounded by disks in the Serpens Molecular Cloud, based on photometry and Spitzer/IRS spectra. Most of the stars have spectroscopically determined spectral types. Taking a distance to the cloud of 415 pc rather than 259 pc, the

  15. The hemoglobin system of the serpent eel Ophisurus serpens: structural and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Barbara; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Messana, Irene; Sanna, Maria Teresa; Castagnola, Massimo; Iavarone, Federica; Coluccia, Elisabetta; Giardina, Bruno; Olianas, Alessandra

    2013-10-01

    The hemoglobin system of the serpent eel Ophisurus serpens was structurally and functionally characterized with the aim of comparing it to the hemoglobin system of other fish species, as oxygen loading under the severe habitat conditions experienced by O. serpens could have necessitated specific adaptation mechanisms during evolution. The hemoglobin system of O. serpens includes one cathodic and four anodic components. The molecular mass of the α and β chains of the cathodic component as well as the 2 α and 4 β of the anodic components were determined. Analysis of the intact α and β chains from cathodic hemoglobin and their proteolytic digestion products by high-resolution MS and MS/MS experiments resulted in 92 and 95 % sequence coverage of the α and β globins, respectively. The oxygen binding properties of both hemoglobin components were analyzed with respect to their interactions with their physiological effectors. Stripped cathodic hemoglobin displayed the highest oxygen affinity among Anguilliformes with no significant effect of pH on O2-affinity. In the presence of both chloride and organic phosphates, O2-affinity was strongly reduced, and cooperativity was enhanced; moreover, cathodic hemoglobin contains two indistinguishable GTP-binding sites. Stripped anodic hemoglobins exhibited both low O2-affinity and low cooperativity and a larger Bohr effect than cathodic hemoglobin. The cathodic hemoglobin of O. serpens and the corresponding component of Conger conger share the greatest structural and functional similarity among hemoglobin systems of Anguilliformes studied to date, consistent with their phylogenetic relationship.

  16. ERUPTIVE VARIABLE STARS AND OUTFLOWS IN SERPENS NW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodapp, Klaus W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Chini, Rolf; Watermann, Ramon; Lemke, Roland, E-mail: hodapp@ifa.hawaii.edu [Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Astronomisches Institut, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    We study the outflow activity, photometric variability, and morphology of three very young stellar objects in the Serpens NW star-forming region: OO Serpentis, EC 37 (V370 Ser), and EC 53 (V371 Ser). High spatial resolution Keck/NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics images obtained in 2007 and 2009 in broadband K and in a narrowband filter centered on the 1-0 S(1) emission line of H{sub 2} allow us to identify the outflows from all three objects. We also present new, seeing-limited data on the photometric evolution of the OO Ser reflection nebula and re-analyze previously published data. We find that OO Ser declined in brightness from its outburst peak in 1995 to about 2003, but that this decline has recently stopped and actually reversed itself in some areas of the reflection nebula. The morphology and proper motions of the shock fronts MHO 2218 near EC 37 suggest that they all originate in EC 37 and that this is an outflow seen nearly along its axis. We identify an H{sub 2} jet emerging from the cometary nebula EC 53. The star illuminating EC 53 is periodically variable with a period of 543 days and has a close-by, non-variable companion at a projected distance of 92 AU. We argue that the periodic variability is the result of accretion instabilities triggered by another very close, not directly observable, binary companion and that EC 53 can be understood in the model of a multiple system developing into a hierarchical configuration.

  17. Large proper motions in the remarkable triple radio source in Serpens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L.F.; Curiel, S.; Moran, J.M.; Mirabel, I.F.; Roth, M. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA) Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico) Universidad de Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico) Observatorio Interamericano de Cerro Tololo, La Serena (Chile))

    1989-11-01

    The triple radio source in the Serpens star formation region consists of a central object and two lobes with spectral indices characteristic of nonthermal emission. Measurements made at the Arecibo Observatory and the VLA indicate that this triple source is probably associated with the Serpens star-forming region. A weak, circularly polarized 1667 MHz OH maser detected at Arecibo has been observed with the VLA and found to coincide in position to within 1 arcsec with the central source. The position of this central source also falls within the position error ellipsoid of IRAS 18273+0113. VLA observations at 6 cm clearly show that the outer components are moving away from the central source. The angular motion of each component with respect to the central one is 1.3 + or - 0.2 arcsec, implying velocities of 300 + or - 100 km/s at a distance of 500 + or - 200 pc. 36 refs.

  18. Sequences with high propensity to form G-quartet structures in kinetoplast DNA from Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá-Carvalho, D; Traub-Cseko, Y M

    1995-06-01

    Naturally occurring sequences containing repetitive guanine motifs have the potential to form tetraplex DNA. Phytomonas serpens minicircle DNA shows some regions where one strand is composed mainly of G and T (GT regions). These regions contain several stretches of contiguous guanines. An oligonucleotide was constructed with the sequence corresponding to one of these regions (Phyto-GT). It was demonstrated by native gel electrophoresis and methylation protection that Phyto-GT forms tetramolecular (G4), bimolecular (G'2) and unimolecular (G4') structures stabilized through G-quartets. Tetraplex DNA formation by this sequence could have biological relevance as it can be formed in physiological conditions and GT regions comprise approximately one-third of P. serpens and Crithidia oncopelti minicircles.

  19. NEW X-RAY-SELECTED PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE MEMBERS OF THE SERPENS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Isa [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1402, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Van der Laan, Margriet [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Brown, Joanna M., E-mail: oliveira@astro.as.utexas.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The study of young stars no longer surrounded by disks can greatly add to our understanding of how protoplanetary disks evolve and planets form. We have used VLT/FLAMES optical spectroscopy to confirm the youth and membership of 19 new young diskless stars in the Serpens Molecular Cloud, identified at X-ray wavelengths. Spectral types, effective temperatures, and stellar luminosities were determined using optical spectra and optical/near-infrared photometry. Stellar masses and ages were derived based on pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks. The results yield remarkable similarities for age and mass distribution between the diskless and disk-bearing stellar populations in Serpens. We discuss the important implications these similarities may have on the standard picture of disk evolution.

  20. A MULTIWAVELENGTH CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTO-BROWN-DWARF CANDIDATES IN SERPENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, B.; Caselli, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Vorobyov, E. [Institute of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna 1180 (Austria); Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don 344090 (Russian Federation); Harsono, D. [Universitt Heidelberg, Zentrum fr Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Tikare, K. [IRAP, BP 44346-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Gonzalez-Martin, O., E-mail: briaz@mpe.mpg.de [Instituto de Radioastronoma y Astrofsica (IRyA), UNAM, Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro # 8701, Col. Ex Hacienda San José de la Huerta, Morelia, Michoacán, C.P. 58089 (Mexico)

    2016-11-10

    We present results from a deep submillimeter survey in the Serpens Main and Serpens/G3–G6 clusters, conducted with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA-2) at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We have combined near- and mid-infrared spectroscopy, Herschel PACS far-infrared photometry, submillimeter continuum, and molecular gas line observations, with the aim of conducting a detailed multiwavelength characterization of “proto-brown-dwarf” (proto-BD) candidates in Serpens. We have performed continuum and line radiative transfer modeling and have considered various classification schemes to understand the structure and the evolutionary stage of the system. We have identified four proto-BD candidates, of which the lowest-luminosity source has an L {sub bol} ∼ 0.05 L {sub ☉}. Two of these candidates show characteristics consistent with Stage 0/I systems, while the other two are Stage I-T/Class Flat systems with tenuous envelopes. Our work has also revealed a ∼20% fraction of misidentified Class 0/I/Flat sources that show characteristics consistent with Class II edge-on disk systems. We have set constraints on the mass of the central object using the measured bolometric luminosities and numerical simulations of stellar evolution. Considering the available gas+dust mass reservoir and the current mass of the central source, three of these candidates are likely to evolve into BDs.

  1. Oral exposure to Phytomonas serpens attenuates thrombocytopenia and leukopenia during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane V da Silva

    Full Text Available Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS, which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease.

  2. Wide field CO J = 3 → 2 mapping of the Serpens cloud core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionatos, Odyssefs; Nisini, Brunella; Codella, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    . Aims. The main objective of the paper is to study the overall outflow distribution and its association with the young population of the Serpens Core cluster. In addition, the paper addresses the correlation of the outflow momentum flux with the bolometric luminosity of their driving sources using...... this homogeneous dataset for a single star-forming site. Methods. An area comprising 460″ × 230″ of the Serpens cloud core was mapped in 12CO J = 3 → 2 with the HARP-B heterodyne array at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope; J = 3 → 2 observations are more sensitive tracers of hot outflow gas than lower...... but two outflow/core pairs in our sample tend to have a projected orientation spanning roughly NW-SE. The overall momentum driven by outflows in Serpens lies between 3.2 and 5.1 × 10-1 M⊙ km s-1, the kinetic energy from 4.3 to 6.7 × 1043 erg, and momentum flux is between 2.8 and 4.4 × 10-4 M⊙ km s-1 yr-1...

  3. Evaluation of a Serpens species bacterin for treatment of digital dermatitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew P; Alley, Mark L; Smith, Geof W

    2012-12-01

    Digital dermatitis is a major cause of lameness in many dairy herds and represents a detriment to milk production, reproductive efficiency, productive lifespan and welfare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic use of a Serpens species bacterin in a dairy herd known to have a significant prevalence of lameness due to digital dermatitis. Seventy-six mature lactating Holsteins were enrolled in this study. Group 1 (n=38) received three injections of a Serpens species bacterin at four-week intervals (weeks 0, 4, and 8) while group 2 (n=38) received only adjuvant. Blood samples were obtained prior to the first injection at week 0 and again at week 12 to evaluate antibody responses. Locomotion and digital dermatitis lesion measurements were performed at weeks 0, 12 and 18. Although Serpens-associated antibody titers increased from week 0 to 12 in vaccinated cows; the prevalence of digital dermatitis, the percentage of cows identified as clinically lame and the average width of digital dermatitis lesions did not differ from week 0 to 12 or from week 0 to 18 between groups. The results of this study indicate a lack of any clinical efficacy associated with vaccination in this herd, although inoculation with the bacterin did stimulate a measurable antibody response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction in electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grano, D.A.

    1979-05-01

    The development and implementation of a versatile system of image processing programs for electron microscopy is described. Both high-dose, negatively stained specimens and low-dose, unstained specimens can be analyzed by this system. The theory behind image analysis in electron microscopy is described together with the practical aspects of computer processing of electron micrographs. The Fourier transform of cylindrically symmetric objects is studied in some detail. The range of structural deductions that may be made from the Fourier transforms of projections of such objects is discussed. The methods of 2-D image filtering are applied to high-dose images of negatively stained gap junction membranes and to frozen, hydrated, low-dose images of the hexagonally packed protein component of Spirillum serpens cell wall. The computer processed Spirillum specimen reveals the presence of Y-linkers similar to those seen in negatively stained preparations. Computer processing of the gap junction images makes the presence of a central staining pit more obvious. The techniques of 3-D helical reconstruction are applied to high-dose images of negatively stained T4 bacteriophage tails, to demonstrate the successful transfer of the IBM-based MRC helical reconstruction programs to our Control Data corporation computer system. Finally, the tubular structures found in preparations of Spirillum serpens cell wall are analyzed by Fourier methods.

  5. Phytomonas serpens: caracterização da piruvato/indolpiruvato descarboxilase e funcionalidade da auxina produzida.

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Ienne da Silva Vançan

    2012-01-01

    Um gene que codifica uma piruvato/indolpiruvato descarboxilase (PDC/IPDC) está presente no tripanossomatídeo de plantas Phytomonas serpens. A PDC atua na fermentação alcoólica, enquanto que a IPDC atua na biossíntese do fitormônio ácido indol-3-acético (AIA). Análises filogenéticas indicam que a PDC/IPDC de P. serpens é monofilética com IPDCs de gama-proteobactérias, sugerindo um evento de transferência horizontal gênica. A análise de meios de cultura de P. serpens confirma a produção de etan...

  6. THE PHYSICAL STRUCTURE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: THE SERPENS CLUSTER COMPARED WITH OTHER REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Isa; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Merin, Bruno [Herschel Science Center, European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA), P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada (Madrid) (Spain); Pontoppidan, Klaus M., E-mail: oliveira@astro.as.utexas.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Spectral energy distributions are presented for 94 young stars surrounded by disks in the Serpens Molecular Cloud, based on photometry and Spitzer/IRS spectra. Most of the stars have spectroscopically determined spectral types. Taking a distance to the cloud of 415 pc rather than 259 pc, the distribution of ages is shifted to lower values, in the 1-3 Myr range, with a tail up to 10 Myr. The mass distribution spans 0.2-1.2 M {sub Sun }, with median mass of 0.7 M {sub Sun }. The distribution of fractional disk luminosities in Serpens resembles that of the young Taurus Molecular Cloud, with most disks consistent with optically thick, passively irradiated disks in a variety of disk geometries (L {sub disk}/L {sub star} {approx} 0.1). In contrast, the distributions for the older Upper Scorpius and {eta} Chamaeleontis clusters are dominated by optically thin lower luminosity disks (L {sub disk}/L {sub star} {approx} 0.02). This evolution in fractional disk luminosities is concurrent with that of disk fractions: with time disks become fainter and the disk fractions decrease. The actively accreting and non-accreting stars (based on H{alpha} data) in Serpens show very similar distributions in fractional disk luminosities, differing only in the brighter tail dominated by strongly accreting stars. In contrast with a sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars, the T Tauri stars in Serpens do not have a clear separation in fractional disk luminosities for different disk geometries: both flared and flat disks present wider, overlapping distributions. This result is consistent with previous suggestions of a faster evolution for disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. Furthermore, the results for the mineralogy of the dust in the disk surface (grain sizes, temperatures and crystallinity fractions, as derived from Spitzer/IRS spectra) do not show any correlation to either stellar and disk characteristics or mean cluster age in the 1-10 Myr range probed here. A possible explanation for the lack of

  7. Magnetic fields and star formation: evidence from imaging polarimetry of the Serpens Reflection Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren-Smith, R.F.; Draper, P.W.; Scarrott, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    CCD imaging of the Serpens bipolar reflection nebula shows it to be surrounded by dark material having spiral density structure. Multi-colour polarization mapping also reveals details of the surrounding magnetic field, indicating that this also has spiral structure. These observations are discussed along with current ideas about the role of magnetic fields during star formation. An interpretation involving the non-axisymmetric magnetically braked collapse of a protostellar cloud is proposed and a resulting magnetic field configuration is described which can account for the observations. Evidence is also discussed for the formation of a binary star system within the nebula, resulting from the fragmentation of a magnetized protostellar disc.

  8. A SPITZER SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISK DUST IN THE YOUNG SERPENS CLOUD : HOW DO DUST CHARACTERISTICS EVOLVE WITH TIME?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, Isa; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Merin, Bruno; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Lahuis, Fred; Geers, Vincent C.; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Olofsson, Johan; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Brown, Joanna M.

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) mid-infrared (5-35 mu m) spectra of a complete flux-limited sample (>= 3 mJy at 8 mu m) of young stellar object (YSO) candidates selected on the basis of their infrared colors in the Serpens Molecular Cloud. Spectra of 147 sources are presented and

  9. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF FILAMENTS IN THE SERPENS SOUTH MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-López, M.; Looney, L.; Lee, K.; Segura-Cox, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana—Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Arce, H. G.; Plunkett, A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Mundy, L. G.; Storm, S.; Teuben, P. J.; Pound, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Isella, A.; Kauffmann, J. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tobin, J. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rosolowsky, E. [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Kwon, W. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747-AD Groningen (Netherlands); Ostriker, E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Tassis, K. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Shirley, Y. L., E-mail: manferna@gmail.com [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0) map of the Serpens South molecular cloud obtained as part of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey. The observations cover 250 arcmin{sup 2} and fully sample structures from 3000 AU to 3 pc with a velocity resolution of 0.16 km s{sup –1}, and they can be used to constrain the origin and evolution of molecular cloud filaments. The spatial distribution of the N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is characterized by long filaments that resemble those observed in the dust continuum emission by Herschel. However, the gas filaments are typically narrower such that, in some cases, two or three quasi-parallel N{sub 2}H{sup +} filaments comprise a single observed dust continuum filament. The difference between the dust and gas filament widths casts doubt on Herschel ability to resolve the Serpens South filaments. Some molecular filaments show velocity gradients along their major axis, and two are characterized by a steep velocity gradient in the direction perpendicular to the filament axis. The observed velocity gradient along one of these filaments was previously postulated as evidence for mass infall toward the central cluster, but these kind of gradients can be interpreted as projection of large-scale turbulence.

  10. THE GOULD’S BELT VERY LARGE ARRAY SURVEY. II. THE SERPENS REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L.; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico); Mioduszewski, Amy J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Domenici Science Operations Center, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dzib, Sergio A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Torres, Rosa M. [Instituto de Astronomía y Meteorología, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Vallarta 2602, Col. Arcos Vallarta, 44130, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México (Mexico); Boden, Andrew F. [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hartmann, Lee; Kounkel, Marina A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); II, Neal J. Evans [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Briceño, Cesar [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Tobin, John, E-mail: g.ortiz@crya.unam.mx [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-05-20

    We present deep (∼17 μJy) radio continuum observations of the Serpens molecular cloud, the Serpens south cluster, and the W40 region obtained using the Very Large Array in its A configuration. We detect a total of 146 sources, 29 of which are young stellar objects (YSOs), 2 of which are BV stars, and 5 more of which are associated with phenomena related to YSOs. Based on their radio variability and spectral index, we propose that about 16 of the remaining 110 unclassified sources are also YSOs. For approximately 65% of the known YSOs detected here as radio sources, the emission is most likely non-thermal and related to stellar coronal activity. As also recently observed in Ophiuchus, our sample of YSOs with X-ray counterparts lies below the fiducial Güdel and Benz relation. Finally, we analyze the proper motions of nine sources in the W40 region. This allows us to better constrain the membership of the radio sources in the region.

  11. Defined medium for Aquaspirillum serpens VHL effective in batch and continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, G E; Murray, R G

    1980-01-01

    A defined medium for Aquaspirillum serpens VHL allows the replacement of the complex media now in use. It was developed by batch culture methods but supports growth in continuous culture. A basal salts medium supplemented with L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, and L-glutamic acid provided the best growth (turbidity), as long as ammonium chloride was omitted. Ammonium chloride caused either a lag or a reduction or a complete inhibition of the growth of A. serpens VHL on the above amino acids and other organic supplements depending on the combination used. Ammonium sulfate and ammonium hydroxide with L-glutamic acid allowed growth, but the lag period was increased in shake flask cultures. Vitamins, cysteine hydrochloride, and carbon dioxide had no effect on the growth rate. Viability (less than 50%) was inadequate to maintain continuous culture with L-glutamic acid as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Combinations of amino and carboxylic acids were then tested and, of these, L-glutamic acid (1 g/liter) and L-histidine (75 mg/liter) without ammonium chloride in the basal salts medium supported growth in batch and continuous culture. L-Glutamic acid was the limiting substrate for growth.

  12. Rotenone-sensitive mitochondrial potential in Phytomonas serpens: electrophoretic Ca(2+) accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Barrabin, Hector

    2004-06-07

    Phytomonas sp. are flagellated trypanosomatid plant parasites that cause diseases of economic importance in plantations of coffee, oil palm, cassava and coconuts. Here we investigated Ca(2+) uptake by the vanadate-insensitive compartments using permeabilized Phytomonas serpens promastigotes. This uptake occurs at a rate of 1.13+/-0.23 nmol Ca(2+) mg x protein(-1) min(-1). It is completely abolished by the H(+) ionophore FCCP and by valinomycin and nigericin. It is also inhibited by 2 microM ruthenium red, which, at this low concentration, is known to inhibit the mitochondrial calcium uniport. Furthermore, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) and propylgallate, specific inhibitors of the alternative oxidase in plant and parasite mitochondria, are also effective as inhibitors of the Ca(2+) transport. These compounds abolish the membrane potential that is monitored with safranine O. Rotenone, an inhibitor of NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, can also dissipate 100% of the membrane potential. It is suggested that the mitochondria of P. serpens can be energized via oxidation of NADH in a pathway involving the NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase and the alternative oxidase to regenerate the ubiquinone. The electrochemical H(+) gradient can be used to promote Ca(2+) uptake by the mitochondria.

  13. Long-term observations of x-ray sources: The aquila-serpens-scutum region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priedhorsky, W.C.; Terrell, J.

    1984-05-15

    We present long-term (1969-1976) observations of galactic X-ray sources in the Aquila-Serpens-Scutum region. Data were obtained by the 3--12 keV detector on the Vela 5B satellite. The time histories of nine sources were derived from sky maps of this confused region: Scutum X-1, 4U 1823--00, 4U 1915--05, Aquila X-1, Serpens X-1, 4U 1907+09, A1850-087, 4U 1901+03, and 4U 1957+11. These observations reveal new long-term variations for several sources. AqlX-1, which averages about one eruption per year, is shown to have an underlying cycle of 122-125 days, with an rms phase walk of 10% per cycle. A regular 199 day period is observed from the vicinity of 4U 1915-05. This period appears too long to reconcile with the standard model of that system as a low-mass binary with a 50 minute period. The OB system 4U 1907+09 shows a possible 41.6 day period, with substantial phase jitter. We discuss these variations as possible precessions in binary systems.

  14. Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi that are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breganó, José Wander; Picão, Renata Cristina; Graça, Viviane Krominski; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Itow Jankevicius, Shiduca; Pinge Filho, P; Jankevicius, José Vítor

    2003-12-05

    The immune cross-reactivity between Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, and Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid that infects tomatoes, was studied. Sera from patients with Chagas' disease presented a strong reactivity with P. serpens antigens by conventional serological assays such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and direct agglutination test (DAT), confirmed after cross-absorption experiments. The results show that this protozoan is highly immunogenic and that rabbit and mouse hyperimmune serum raised against T. cruzi or P. serpens was able to recognize both T. cruzi and P. serpens antigens in immunofluorescence and agglutination assays. The antigenic cross-reactivity between T. cruzi and P. serpens was also demonstrated in vivo. BALB/c mice immunized by the intraperitoneal or oral route with P. serpens and later challenged with a lethal inoculum of T. cruzi blood forms showed a significant decrease in parasitemia and increase in survival compared to controls. A practical implication of these findings is that the ingestion by humans or animals of living plant trypanosomatids present in naturally infected edible fruits could potentially prime the immune response to T. cruzi antigens and interfere with the development of T. cruzi infection.

  15. TMRT OBSERVATIONS OF CARBON-CHAIN MOLECULES IN SERPENS SOUTH 1a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Juan; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Junzhi; Chen, Xi; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bing; Wang, Jin-Qing; Zuo, Xiu-Ting; Fan, Qing-Yuan; Hong, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Bin; Liang, Shi-Guang; Ling, Quan-Bao; Liu, Qing-Hui; Qian, Zhi-Han; Zhang, Xiu-Zhong; Zhong, Wei-Ye; Ye, Shu-Hua, E-mail: lijuan@shao.ac.cn [Department of Radio Science and Technology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, 80 Nandan RD, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2016-06-20

    We report Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope (TMRT) detections of several long carbon-chain molecules in the C and Ku bands, including HC{sub 3}N, HC{sub 5}N, HC{sub 7}N, HC{sub 9}N, C{sub 3}S, C{sub 6}H, and C{sub 8}H toward the starless cloud Serpens South 1a. We detected some transitions (HC{sub 9}N J = 13–12, F = 12–11, and F = 14–13; H{sup 13}CCCN J = 2–1, F = 1–0, and F = 1–1; HC{sup 13}CCN J = 2–1, F = 2–2, F = 1–0, and F = 1–1; HCC{sup 13}CN J = 2–1, F = 1–0, and F = 1–1) and resolved some hyperfine components (HC{sub 5}N J = 6–5, F = 5–4; H{sup 13}CCCN J = 2–1, F = 2–1) for the first time in the interstellar medium. The column densities of these carbon-chain molecules in the range 10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} are comparable to two carbon-chain molecule rich sources, TMC-1 and Lupus-1A. The abundance ratios are 1.00:(1.11 ± 0.15):(1.47 ± 0.18) for [H{sup 13}CCCN]:[HC{sup 13}CCN]:[HCC{sup 13}CN]. This result implies that the {sup 13}C isotope is also concentrated in the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen atom in HC{sub 3}N in Serpens South 1a, which is similar to TMC-1. The [HC{sub 3}N]/[H{sup 13}CCCN] ratio of 78 ± 9, the [HC{sub 3}N]/[HC{sup 13}CCN] ratio of 70 ± 8, and the [HC{sub 3}N]/[HCC{sup 13}CN] ratio of 53 ± 4 are also comparable to those in TMC-1. Serpens South 1a proves to be a suitable testing ground for understanding carbon-chain chemistry.

  16. Characterization of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in the trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermáková, Petra; Verner, Zdenek; Man, Petr; Lukes, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2007-06-01

    NADH dehydrogenase activity was characterized in the mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid flagellate parasitizing plants. Two different high molecular weight NADH dehydrogenases were characterized by native PAGE and detected by direct in-gel activity staining. The association of NADH dehydrogenase activities with two distinct multisubunit complexes was revealed in the second dimension performed under denaturing conditions. One subunit present in both complexes cross-reacted with the antibody against the 39 kDa subunit of bovine complex I. Out of several subunits analyzed by MS, one contained a domain characteristic for the LYR family subunit of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases. Spectrophotometric measurement of the NADH:ubiquinone 10 and NADH:ferricyanide dehydrogenase activities revealed their different sensitivities to rotenone, piericidin, and diphenyl iodonium.

  17. Diffusive shock acceleration in the lobes of the Serpens triple radio source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crusius-Watzel, A.R. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Recent observations of the triple radio source in the Serpens star formation region have shown large proper motions of the lobes. Their radio spectral index is characteristic of nonthermal emission. The possibility that this is synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons is investigated. Particle acceleration can occur at the bow shock (bullet and jet model) or at the jet termination shock. The rates for ion-neutral damping and for the self-excitation of magnetic field fluctuations are compared. High levels of MHD turbulence and/or high Alfvenic Mach numbers are required to produce a power-law energy spectrum of electrons up to Lorentz factors of 1000. Diffusive shock acceleration of particles is then very efficient. 26 refs.

  18. The immune response of hemocytes of the insect Oncopeltus fasciatus against the flagellate Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves e Silva, Thiago L; Vasconcellos, Luiz R C; Lopes, Angela H; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2013-01-01

    The genus Phytomonas includes parasites that are etiological agents of important plant diseases, especially in Central and South America. These parasites are transmitted to plants via the bite of an infected phytophagous hemipteran. Despite the economic impact of these parasites, many basic questions regarding the genus Phytomonas remain unanswered, such as the mechanism by which the parasites cope with the immune response of the insect vector. In this report, using a model of systemic infection, we describe the function of Oncopeltus fasciatus hemocytes in the immune response towards the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens. Hemocytes respond to infection by trapping parasites in nodular structures and phagocytizing the parasites. In electron microscopy of hemocytes, parasites were located inside vacuoles, which appear fused with lysosomes. The parasites reached the O. fasciatus salivary glands at least six hours post-infection. After 72 hours post-infection, many parasites were attached to the salivary gland outer surface. Thus, the cellular responses did not kill all the parasites.

  19. Regeneration of multiple shoots from petiole callus of Viola serpens Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Umashankar Radheshyam; Gurav, Arun Manohar; Sharma, Prakash Chandra

    2013-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to develop methodology for in vitro propagation and rapid multiplication of Viola serpens Wall. using petiole explant. The MS medium supplemented with 2, 4-D (6.78 μm) was found most suitable for callus induction in petiole explant. The best growth response and higher rate of shoot regeneration from petiole callus was observed on MS medium containing BAP (11.10 μm) as the average number of shoots could be increased to 36.4 on fourth successive subculturing. Higher rooting response with larger number of roots were observed in shoots inoculated on the half-strength MS medium supplemented with IBA (19.68 μm).

  20. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DENSE GAS IN SERPENS MAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katherine I.; Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, PO Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Ostriker, Eve C. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kwon, Woojin [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Kauffmann, Jens [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69 D-53121, Bonn Germany (Germany); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Volgenau, N. H. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tassis, Konstantinos, E-mail: ijlee9@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), HCO{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), and HCN (J = 1 → 0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 arcmin{sup 2} of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of ∼7''. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of ∼0.2 pc and widths of ∼0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.

  1. The dynamical state of the Serpens South filamentary infrared dark cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Awazu, Yuya; Onishi, Toshikazu [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimajiri, Yoshito [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1805 (Japan); Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Yoshida, Hiroshige [Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Higuchi, Aya E., E-mail: fumitaka.nakamura@nao.ac.jp [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107 OFC 129, Vitacura (Chile)

    2013-11-20

    We present the results of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0) observations toward Serpens South, the nearest cluster-forming, infrared dark cloud. The physical quantities are derived by fitting the hyperfine structure of N{sub 2}H{sup +}. The Herschel and 1.1 mm continuum maps show that a parsec-scale filament fragments into three clumps with radii of 0.1-0.2 pc and masses of 40-230 M {sub ☉}. We find that the clumps contain smaller-scale (∼0.04 pc) structures, i.e., dense cores. We identify 70 cores by applying CLUMPFIND to the N{sub 2}H{sup +} data cube. In the central cluster-forming clump, the excitation temperature and line-width tend to be large, presumably due to protostellar outflow feedback and stellar radiation. However, for all the clumps, the virial ratios are evaluated to be 0.1-0.3, indicating that the internal motions play only a minor role in the clump support. The clumps exhibit no free fall but exhibit low-velocity infall, and thus the clumps should be supported by additional forces. The most promising force is the globally ordered magnetic field observed toward this region. We propose that the Serpens South filament was close to magnetically critical and ambipolar diffusion triggered the cluster formation. We find that the northern clump, which shows no active star formation, has a mass and radius comparable to the central cluster-forming clump and is therefore a likely candidate of a pre-protocluster clump. The initial condition for cluster formation is likely to be a magnetically supported clump of cold, quiescent gas. This appears to contradict the accretion-driven turbulence scenario, for which the turbulence in the clumps is maintained by the accretion flow.

  2. In vitro culture and apogamy: Alternative pathway in the life cycle of the moss Amblystegium serpens (Amblystegiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetić Tijana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro culture of the moss Amblystegium serpens (Amblystegiaceae was established on hormone-free Murashige and Skoog (MS medium that contained a half amount of MS micro- and macro- mineral salts and vitamins, 100 mg/l myoinositol, 30 g/l sucrose, and 0.70% (w/v agar. Spores were germinated and primary protonema developed on the above medium at 16 h day/8 h night 25±2ºC, 60-70% air humidity, and irradiance of 47 μmol/m2s. Three months after development of primary protonema, seven sporophytes appeared directly from primary protonema without generation alternation. The phenomenon of apogamous sporophyte formation is very rare, both in nature and under in vitro conditions. This is the first report of apogamy induced by Amblystegium serpens.

  3. Translational initiation in Leishmania tarentolae and Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida) is strongly influenced by pre-ATG triplet and its 5' sequence context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, Julius; Paris, Zdenek; Regmi, Sandesh; Breitling, Reinhard; Mureev, Sergey; Kushnir, Susanna; Pyatkov, Konstantin; Jirků, Milan; Alexandrov, Kirill A

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the influence of sequence context of translation initiation codon on translation efficiency in Kinetoplastida, we constructed a library of expression plasmids randomized in the three nucleotides prefacing ATG of a reporter gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). All 64 possible combinations of pre-ATG triplets were individually stably integrated into the rDNA locus of Leishmania tarentolae and the resulting cell lines were assessed for EGFP expression. The expression levels were quantified directly by measuring the fluorescence of EGFP protein in living cells and confirmed by Western blotting. We observed a strong influence of the pre-ATG triplet on the level of protein expression over a 20-fold range. To understand the degree of evolutionary conservation of the observed effect, we transformed Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid parasite of plants, with a subset of the constructs. The pattern of translational efficiency mediated by individual pre-ATG triplets in this species was similar to that observed in L. tarentolae. However, the pattern of translational efficiency of two other proteins (red fluorescent protein and tetracycline repressor) containing selected pre-ATG triplets did not correlate with either EGFP or each other. Thus, we conclude that a conserved mechanism of translation initiation site selection exists in kinetoplastids that is strongly influenced not only by the pre-ATG sequences but also by the coding region of the gene.

  4. Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Protostellar Outflow Sources in Serpens with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis; Chrysostomou; Matthews; Jenness; Ray

    2000-02-20

    Submillimeter polarimetric measurements of the 850 µm dust continuum emission associated with the class 0/I protostars in the Serpens dark cloud core are presented. The data are used to infer the magnetic field morphology in the region. Dust grain alignment in accretion flows and/or outflows is also briefly considered. The polarization vectors around the SMM-NW cluster of sources are more ordered than those observed near the SMM-SE cluster. Toward SMM-NW, the vectors are generally orientated north-south; between the intensity peaks in the SMM-SE region, the vectors are approximately east-west. In both regions, we suggest that the polarization pattern may be dictated by a large-scale magnetic field. We consider whether the rough northwest-southeast ridge of submillimeter sources was formed via cloud collapse along field lines that run perpendicular to this ridge. However, our data offer only very tentative support for this hypothesis. We further note that, although overall the polarization pattern in Serpens does not appear to be affected by the many outflows in the region, toward the most luminous source, SMM 1, the source of the Serpens radio jet, the vectors deviate considerably from the general pattern, instead being roughly perpendicular to the flow axis, as one would expect from a B-field oriented parallel with the flow.

  5. The immune response of hemocytes of the insect Oncopeltus fasciatus against the flagellate Phytomonas serpens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago L Alves e Silva

    Full Text Available The genus Phytomonas includes parasites that are etiological agents of important plant diseases, especially in Central and South America. These parasites are transmitted to plants via the bite of an infected phytophagous hemipteran. Despite the economic impact of these parasites, many basic questions regarding the genus Phytomonas remain unanswered, such as the mechanism by which the parasites cope with the immune response of the insect vector. In this report, using a model of systemic infection, we describe the function of Oncopeltus fasciatus hemocytes in the immune response towards the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens. Hemocytes respond to infection by trapping parasites in nodular structures and phagocytizing the parasites. In electron microscopy of hemocytes, parasites were located inside vacuoles, which appear fused with lysosomes. The parasites reached the O. fasciatus salivary glands at least six hours post-infection. After 72 hours post-infection, many parasites were attached to the salivary gland outer surface. Thus, the cellular responses did not kill all the parasites.

  6. NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in the kinetoplasts of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Halphen, Diego; Maslov, Dmitri A

    2004-03-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity is present in mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens. Rotenone at 2-10 microM inhibited the activity 50-75%, indicating that it belongs to respiratory complex I. The activity was also inhibited 50-60% in the presence of 10-30 nM atovaquone suggesting that inhibition of complex I represents a likely mechanism of the known antileishmanial activity of this drug. The complex was partially purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and gel-filtration on Sepharose CL-2B. The NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in this preparation was completely inactivated by 20 nM atovaquone. The partially purified complex was present in a low amount and its subunits could not be discerned by staining with Coomassie. However, one of its components, a homologue of the 39 kDa subunit of the bovine complex I, was identified immunochemically in the original lysate and in the partially purified material.

  7. INVESTIGATING PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PROTOSTELLAR JETS: THE TRIPLE RADIO CONTINUUM SOURCE IN SERPENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Valotto, Carlos [Instituto de Astronomía Teórica y Experimental, (IATE-UNC), X5000BGR Córdoba (Argentina); Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (IRyA-UNAM), 58089 Morelia, México (Mexico); Araudo, Anabella [University of Oxford, Astrophysics, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Torrelles, José M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC-IEEC) and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB-IEEC), Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Anglada, Guillem [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Camino Bajo de Huétor 50, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Martí, Josep [Dept. de Física, EPS de Jaén, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, A3-402, E-23071 Jaén (Spain)

    2016-02-10

    While most protostellar jets present free–free emission at radio wavelengths, synchrotron emission has also been proposed to be present in a handful of these objects. The presence of nonthermal emission has been inferred by negative spectral indices at centimeter wavelengths. In one case (the HH 80-81 jet arising from a massive protostar), its synchrotron nature was confirmed by the detection of linearly polarized radio emission. One of the main consequences of these results is that synchrotron emission implies the presence of relativistic particles among the nonrelativistic material of these jets. Therefore, an acceleration mechanism should be taking place. The most probable scenario is that particles are accelerated when the jets strongly impact against the dense envelope surrounding the protostar. Here we present an analysis of radio observations obtained with the Very Large Array of the triple radio source in the Serpens star-forming region. This object is known to be a radio jet arising from an intermediate-mass protostar. It is also one of the first protostellar jets where the presence of nonthermal emission was proposed. We analyze the dynamics of the jet and the nature of the emission and discuss these issues in the context of the physical parameters of the jet and the particle acceleration phenomenon.

  8. Paepalanthus serpens, a new microendemic species of Eriocaulaceae from the Espinhaço Range, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echternacht, Livia; Trovó, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe and illustrate Paepalanthus serpens, a microendemic species of Eriocaulaceae from the Espinhaço Range. The species is known from a single population growing in rocky areas of the Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais. It is placed in Paepalanthus ser. Paepalanthus, and is easily distinguished from its congeneric species by its elongated, lignescent stem, thickened by the marcescent sheaths of the linear leaves, which are arranged in a rosette at the stem apex, scapes equalling the leaf height, and capitulae with straw-coloured involucral bracts. Comparisons with the morphologically similar species are provided, as well as comments on distribution, ecology, phenology and conservation status. PMID:25931972

  9. Paepalanthus serpens, a new microendemic species of Eriocaulaceae from the Espinhaço Range, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Echternacht

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe and illustrate Paepalanthus serpens, a microendemic species of Eriocaulaceae from the Espinhaço Range. The species is known from a single population growing in rocky areas of the Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais. It is placed in Paepalanthus ser. Paepalanthus, and is easily distinguished from its congeneric species by its elongated, lignescent stem, thickened by the marcescent sheaths of the linear leaves, which are arranged in a rosette at the stem apex, scapes equalling the leaf height, and capitulae with straw-coloured involucral bracts. Comparisons with the morphologically similar species are provided, as well as comments on distribution, ecology, phenology and conservation status.

  10. Constraints on the Neutron Star and Inner Accretion Flow in Serpens X-1 Using Nustar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. M.; Parker, M. L.; Fuerst, F.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Tendulkar, S.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Chakrabarty, D.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We report on an observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1, made with NuSTAR. The extraordinary sensitivity afforded by NuSTAR facilitated the detection of a clear, robust, relativistic Fe K emission line from the inner disk. A relativistic profile is required over a single Gaussian line from any charge state of Fe at the 5 sigma level of confidence, and any two Gaussians of equal width at the same confidence. The Compton back-scattering "hump" peaking in the 10-20 keV band is detected for the first time in a neutron star X-ray binary. Fits with relativistically blurred disk reflection models suggest that the disk likely extends close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) or stellar surface. The best-fit blurred reflection models constrain the gravitational redshift from the stellar surface to be ZnS (is) greater than 0.16. The data are broadly compatible with the disk extending to the ISCO; in that case,ZnS(is) greater than 0.22 and RNS (is) less than12.6 km (assuming MnS = 1.4 solar mass and a = 0, where a = cJ/GM2). If the star is as large or larger than its ISCO, or if the effective reflecting disk leaks across the ISCO to the surface, the redshift constraints become measurements. We discuss our results in the context of efforts to measure fundamental properties of neutron stars, and models for accretion onto compact objects.

  11. THE MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION LAW IN THE OPHIUCHUS, PERSEUS, AND SERPENS MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Mundy, Lee G.; Lai, Shih-Ping; Evans, Neal J. II

    2009-01-01

    We compute the mid-IR extinction law from 3.6 to 24 μm in three molecular clouds-Ophiuchus, Perseus, and Serpens-by combining data from the 'Cores to Disks' Spitzer Legacy Science program with deep JHK s imaging. Using a new technique, we are able to calculate the line-of-sight (LOS) extinction law toward each background star in our fields. With these LOS measurements, we create, for the first time, maps of the χ 2 deviation of the data from two extinction law models. Because our χ 2 maps have the same spatial resolution as our extinction maps, we can directly observe the changing extinction law as a function of the total column density. In the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands, 3.6-8 μm, we see evidence for grain growth. Below A K s = 0.5, our extinction law is well fitted by the Weingartner and Draine R V = 3.1 diffuse interstellar-medium dust model. As the extinction increases, our law gradually flattens, and for A K s ≥1, the data are more consistent with the Weingartner and Draine R V = 5.5 model that uses larger maximum dust grain sizes. At 24 μm, our extinction law is 2-4 times higher than the values predicted by theoretical dust models, but is more consistent with the observational results of Flaherty et al. Finally, from our χ 2 maps we identify a region in Perseus where the IRAC extinction law is anomalously high considering its column density. A steeper near-IR extinction law than the one we have assumed may partially explain the IRAC extinction law in this region.

  12. Episodic molecular outflow in the very young protostellar cluster Serpens South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunkett, Adele L; Arce, Héctor G; Mardones, Diego; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunham, Michael M; Fernández-López, Manuel; Gallardo, José; Corder, Stuartt A

    2015-11-05

    The loss of mass from protostars, in the form of a jet or outflow, is a necessary counterpart to protostellar mass accretion. Outflow ejection events probably vary in their velocity and/or in the rate of mass loss. Such 'episodic' ejection events have been observed during the class 0 protostellar phase (the early accretion stage), and continue during the subsequent class I phase that marks the first one million years of star formation. Previously observed episodic-ejection sources were relatively isolated; however, the most common sites of star formation are clusters. Outflows link protostars with their environment and provide a viable source of the turbulence that is necessary for regulating star formation in clusters, but it is not known how an accretion-driven jet or outflow in a clustered environment manifests itself in its earliest stage. This early stage is important in establishing the initial conditions for momentum and energy transfer to the environment as the protostar and cluster evolve. Here we report that an outflow from a young, class 0 protostar, at the hub of the very active and filamentary Serpens South protostellar cluster, shows unambiguous episodic events. The (12)C(16)O (J = 2-1) emission from the protostar reveals 22 distinct features of outflow ejecta, the most recent having the highest velocity. The outflow forms bipolar lobes--one of the first detectable signs of star formation--which originate from the peak of 1-mm continuum emission. Emission from the surrounding C(18)O envelope shows kinematics consistent with rotation and an infall of material onto the protostar. The data suggest that episodic, accretion-driven outflow begins in the earliest phase of protostellar evolution, and that the outflow remains intact in a very clustered environment, probably providing efficient momentum transfer for driving turbulence.

  13. Search for gravitational redshifted absorption lines in LMXB Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Hiroki; Done, Chris; Paerels, Frits; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin

    2018-04-01

    The equation of state for ultradense matter can be tested from observations of the ratio of mass to radius of neutron stars. This could be measured precisely from the redshift of a narrow line produced on the surface. X-rays bursts have been intensively searched for such features, but so far without detection. Here instead we search for redshifted lines in the persistent emission, where the accretion flow dominates over the surface emission. We discuss the requirements for narrow lines to be produced, and show that narrow absorption lines from highly ionized iron can potentially be observable in accreting low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs; low B field) that have either low spin or low inclination so that Doppler broadening is small. This selects Serpens X-1 as the only potential candidate persistent LMXB due to its low inclination. Including surface models in the broad-band accretion flow model predicts that the absorption line from He-like iron at 6.7 keV should be redshifted to ˜5.1-5.7 keV (10-15 km for 1.4 M⊙) and have an equivalent width of 0.8-8 eV for surface temperatures of 7-10 × 106 K. We use the high-resolution Chandra grating data to give a firm upper limit of 2-3 eV for an absorption line at ˜5 keV. We discuss possible reasons for this lack of detection (the surface temperature and the geometry of the boundary layer etc.). Future instruments with better sensitivity are required in order to explore the existence of such features.

  14. SERPENS CLUSTER B AND VV SER OBSERVED WITH HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION AT 70, 160, AND 350 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, Paul; Dunham, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on diffraction-limited observations in the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter of the Cluster B region of Serpens (G3-G6 Cluster) and of the Herbig Be star to the south, VV Ser. The observations were made with the Spitzer/MIPS instrument in fine-scale mode at 70 μm, in a normal mapping mode at 160 μm (VV Ser only), and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II) camera at 350 μm (Cluster B only). We use these data to define the spectral energy distributions of the tightly grouped members of Cluster B, many of whose spectral energy distribution (SED)'s peak in the FIR. We compare our results to those of the c2d survey of Serpens and to published models for the FIR emission from VV Ser. We find that values of L bol and T bol calculated with our new photometry show only modest changes from previous values, and that most source SED classifications remain unchanged.

  15. Structural analysis of the surface-layer protein of Aquaspirillium serpens by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W.H.

    1983-07-01

    Aquaspirillum serpens possesses a surface layer protein exhibiting a regular hexagonal packing of the morphological subunits (HP-protein). A method was developed to isolate large quantities of outer wall fragments of Aquaspirillum serpens. Two models for crystal formation were presented in this thesis. Low dose, low temperature electron microscopy were applied to the frozen hydrated specimens of HP-protein. Computer image processing was applied to selected areas of micrographs. Statistical analysis showed the existence of peaks above a local background. For those peaks identified, the adjusted phases were determined to be close to 0 or 180. A computer processed image of the frozen hydrated specimen was obtained with a resolution of 13.70 A. Structural details at 6.9 A were preserved and were retrieved in the image of the frozen hydrated specimen. A method was developed where the specimen was negatively stained, air dried, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and transferred to the high resolution cold stage (NSFT). A computer processed image with a resolution of 13.70 A was obtained for the specimen prepared by the NSFT method. Structural details at 5.7 A were preserved and retrieved in the image of the specimen prepared by the NSFT method. The computer processed images for the two methods appear to be fairly different. In the NSFT method both protein and stain seem to contribute image contrast making interpretation difficult. An advantage of the NSFT method is ease with which high quality micrographs can be taken.

  16. Structure and chemistry in the northwestern condensation of the Serpens molecular cloud core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmullin, Joseph P.; Mundy, Lee G.; Wilking, Bruce A.; Hezel, T.; Blake, Geoff A.

    1994-01-01

    We present single-dish and interferometric observations of gas and dust in the core of the Serpens molecular cloud, focusing on the northwestern condensation. Single-dish molecular line observations are used to probe the structure and chemistry of the condensation while high-resolution images of CS and CH30H are combined with continuum observations from lambda = 1.3 mm to lambda = 3.5 cm to study the subcondensations and overall distribution of dust. For the northwestern condensation, we derive a characteristic density of 3 x 10(exp 5)/ cu cm and an estimated total mass of approximately 70 solar mass. We find compact molecular emission associated with the far-infrared source S68 FIRS 1, and with a newly detected subcondensation named S68 N. Comparison of the large-and small-scale emission reveals that most of the material in the northwest condensation is not directly associated with these compact sources, suggesting a youthful age for this region. CO J = 1 approaches 0 observations indicate widespread outflow activity. However, no unique association of embedded objects with outflows is possible with our observations. The SiO emission is found to be extended with the overall emission centered about S68 FIRS 1; the offset of the peak emission from all of the known continuum sources and the coincidence between the blueshifted SiO emission and blueshifted high-velocity gas traced by CO and CS is consistent with formation of SiO in shocks. Derived abundances of CO and HCO(+) are consistent with quiescent and other star-forming regions while CS, HCN, and H2CO abundances indicate mild depletions within the condensation. Spectral energy distribution fits to S68 FIRS 1 indicate a modest luminosity (50-60 solar luminosity), implying that it is a low-mass (0.5-3 solar mass) young stellar object. Radio continuum observations of the triple source toward S68 FIRS 1 indicate that the lobe emission is varying on timescales less than or equal to 1 yr while the central component is

  17. Three-dimensional structure of the surface layer protein of Aquaspirilium serpens VHA determined by electron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, M.R.; Downing, K.H.; Wu, W.H.; Glaeser, R.M.

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the protein which forms the S layer of Aquaspirilium serpens strain VHA has been determined by electron microscopy. Structures have been reconstructed to a resolution of about 1.6 nm for single-layered specimens and about 4 nm for two-layered specimens. The structure, which has hexagonal symmetry, consists of a core in the shape of a cup, with six projections arising from the rim of the cup to join adjacent subunits at the threefold symmetry axes. The model is consistent with edge views of the S layer which have been obtained in this and other work. It is now clear from this work and from three-dimensional reconstructions of other bacterial S layers that a wide diversity exists in the morphology of surface layers.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of the surface layer protein of Aquaspirillum serpens VHA determined by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, M R; Downing, K H; Wu, W H; Glaeser, R M

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the protein which forms the S layer of Aquaspirillum serpens strain VHA has been determined by electron microscopy. Structures have been reconstructed to a resolution of about 1.6 nm for single-layered specimens and about 4 nm for two-layered specimens. The structure, which has hexagonal symmetry, consists of a core in the shape of a cup, with six projections arising from the rim of the cup to join adjacent subunits at the threefold symmetry axes. The model is consistent with edge views of the S layer which have been obtained in this and other work. It is now clear from this work and from three-dimensional reconstructions of other bacterial S layers that a wide diversity exists in the morphology of surface layers.

  19. Envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects in the Serpens Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerheijde, M. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Salverda, J. M.; Blake, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Aperture-synthesis and single-dish (sub-) millimeter molecular-line and continuum observations reveal in great detail the envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects (SMM 1 = FIRS 1, SMM 2, SMM 3, SMM 4) in the densely star-forming Serpens Molecular Cloud. SMM 1, 3, and 4 show partially resolved (>2" = 800 AU) continuum emission in the beam of the Owens Valley Millimeter Array at lambda = 3.4-1.4 mm. The continuum visibilities accurately constrain the density structure in the envelopes, which can be described by a radial power law with slope -2.0 +/- 0.5 on scales of 300 to 8000 AU. Inferred envelope masses within a radius of 8000 AU are 8.7, 3.0, and 5.3 Msolar for SMM 1, 3, and 4, respectively. A point source with 20%-30% of the total flux at 1.1 mm is required to fit the observations on long baselines, corresponding to warm envelope material within approximately 100 AU or a circumstellar disk. No continuum emission is detected interferometrically toward SMM 2, corresponding to an upper limit of 0.2 Msolar assuming Td = 24 K. The lack of any compact dust emission suggests that the SMM 2 core does not contain a central protostar. Aperture-synthesis observations of the 13CO, C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, HCN, H13CN, N2H+ 1-0, SiO 2-1, and SO 2(2)-1(1) transitions reveal compact emission toward SMM 1, 3, and 4. SMM 2 shows only a number of clumps scattered throughout the primary field of view, supporting the conclusion that this core does not contain a central star. The compact molecular emission around SMM 1, 3, and 4 traces 5"-10" (2000-4000 AU) diameter cores that correspond to the densest regions of the envelopes, as well as material directly associated with the molecular outflow. Especially prominent are the optically thick HCN and HCO+ lines that show up brightly along the walls of the outflow cavities. SO and SiO trace shocked material, where their abundances may be enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude over dark-cloud values. A total of 31 molecular

  20. The JCMT Transient Survey: Detection of Submillimeter Variability in a Class I Protostar EC 53 in Serpens Main

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Mairs, Steve; Johnstone, Doug; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Kang, Sung-ju; Kang, Miju; Cho, Jungyeon; The JCMT Transient Team

    2017-11-01

    During the protostellar phase of stellar evolution, accretion onto the star is expected to be variable, but this suspected variability has been difficult to detect because protostars are deeply embedded. In this paper, we describe a submillimeter luminosity burst of the Class I protostar EC 53 in Serpens Main, the first variable found during our dedicated JCMT/SCUBA-2 monitoring program of eight nearby star-forming regions. EC 53 remained quiescent for the first six months of our survey, from 2016 February to August. The submillimeter emission began to brighten in 2016 September, reached a peak brightness of 1.5 times the faint state, and has been decaying slowly since 2017 February. The change in submillimeter brightness is interpreted as dust heating in the envelope, generated by a luminosity increase of the protostar of a factor of ≥4. The 850 μm light curve resembles the historical K-band light curve, which varies by a factor of ˜6 with a 543 period and is interpreted as accretion variability excited by interactions between the accretion disk and a close binary system. The predictable detections of accretion variability observed at both near-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths make the system a unique test-bed, enabling us to capture the moment of the accretion burst and to study the consequences of the outburst on the protostellar disk and envelope.

  1. Serpens endocrania symmetrica (SES): a new term and a possible clue for identifying intrathoracic disease in skeletal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, Israel; Greenwald, Charles M; Latimer, Bruce; Jellema, Lyman M; Wish-Baratz, Susanne; Eshed, Vered; Dutour, Olivier; Rothschild, Bruce M

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes a phenomenon in the endocranial plate, which we have termed "serpens endocrania symmetrica" (SES), and discusses its value as a diagnostic tool. The affected discolored bone area exhibits disruption of the endocranial surface, lending it a maze-like appearance. Histological sections demonstrate that the process is limited to the most superficial portion of the endocranium, with no diploic and ectocranial involvement (sinus areas excepted). Adult skulls (n = 1,884) from the Hamann-Todd collection (HTH), housed at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, were utilized for the present study. SES was recognized in 32 of the 1,884 skulls studied (1.7%). The frequency of SES among individuals reported to have died from tuberculosis (TB) was 4.4%. The rate of SES in the non-TB sample was only 0.53%. The locations were as follows: limited to sinus area, 28.1%; calvarium (excluding the sinuses), 46.9%; sinus + calvarium, 25.0%. SES was bilateral in 90.9% of cases. Twenty-five of the 32 individuals (78.1%) with SES in the HTH collection had tuberculosis specifically listed as the cause of death. Six of the other 7 individuals had infections other than TB. In 29 of the 32 individuals with SES, infection involved structures within the thorax. As SES was also associated with another osteological phenomenon known to represent pulmonary disease, i.e., hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA; 68.0% of SES individuals also had HOA), SES may be of diagnostic value in paleopathology for the recognition of intrathoracic disease, and perhaps tuberculosis. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. CONSTRAINTS ON THE NEUTRON STAR AND INNER ACCRETION FLOW IN SERPENS X-1 USING NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1046 (United States); Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Tendulkar, S.; Harrison, F. A.; Rana, V. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bachetti, M.; Barret, D. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Toulouse (France); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Tomsick, J. A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chakrabarty, D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [Danish Technical University, Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, C. J.; Paerels, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Natalucci, L. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (INAF), Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, Roma I-00133 (Italy); Stern, D. K. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, W. W., E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We report on an observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1, made with NuSTAR. The extraordinary sensitivity afforded by NuSTAR facilitated the detection of a clear, robust, relativistic Fe K emission line from the inner disk. A relativistic profile is required over a single Gaussian line from any charge state of Fe at the 5σ level of confidence, and any two Gaussians of equal width at the same confidence. The Compton back-scattering ''hump'' peaking in the 10-20 keV band is detected for the first time in a neutron star X-ray binary. Fits with relativistically blurred disk reflection models suggest that the disk likely extends close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) or stellar surface. The best-fit blurred reflection models constrain the gravitational redshift from the stellar surface to be z {sub NS} ≥ 0.16. The data are broadly compatible with the disk extending to the ISCO; in that case, z {sub NS} ≥ 0.22 and R {sub NS} ≤ 12.6 km (assuming M {sub NS} = 1.4 M {sub ☉} and a = 0, where a = cJ/GM {sup 2}). If the star is as large or larger than its ISCO, or if the effective reflecting disk leaks across the ISCO to the surface, the redshift constraints become measurements. We discuss our results in the context of efforts to measure fundamental properties of neutron stars, and models for accretion onto compact objects.

  3. A TEST OF THE NATURE OF THE FE K LINE IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SERPENS X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI48109-1046 (United States); Barret, Didier [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Toulouse (France); Fabian, Andy C.; Parker, Michael L. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); D’Aì, Antonino [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Bhattacharyya, Sudip [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Burderi, Luciano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, SP Monserrato-Sestu, KM 0.7, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy); Salvo, Tiziana Di; Iaria, Rosario [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Universitá di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Egron, Elise [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Homan, Jeroen [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue 37-582D, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lin, Dacheng [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Miller, M. Coleman, E-mail: ft8320@wayne.edu [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Broad Fe K emission lines have been widely observed in the X-ray spectra of black hole systems as well as in neutron star systems. The intrinsically narrow Fe K fluorescent line is generally believed to be part of the reflection spectrum originating in an illuminated accretion disk which is broadened by strong relativistic effects. However, the nature of the lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) has been a matter of debate. We therefore obtained the longest, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a neutron star LMXB to date with a 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observation of Serpens X-1. The observation was taken under the “continuous clocking” mode, and thus was free of photon pile-up effects. We carry out a systematic analysis and find that the blurred reflection model fits the Fe line of Serpens X-1 significantly better than a broad Gaussian component does, implying that the relativistic reflection scenario is much preferred. Chandra HETGS also provides a highest spectral resolution view of the Fe K region and we find no strong evidence for additional narrow lines.

  4. Identification, molecular and functional characterization of calmodulin gene of Phytomonas serpens 15T that shares high similarity with its pathogenic counterparts Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos Brasil; Graça-de Souza, Viviane Krominski; Lancheros, César Armando Contreras; Monteiro-Góes, Viviane; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Goldenberg, Samuel; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2011-03-01

    In trypanosomatids, Ca²+-binding proteins can affect parasite growth, differentiation and invasion. Due to their importance for parasite maintenance, they become an attractive target for drug discovery and design. Phytomonas serpens 15T is a non-human pathogenic trypanosomatid that expresses important protein homologs of human pathogenic trypanosomatids. In this study, the coding sequence of calmodulin, a Ca²+-binding protein, of P. serpens 15T was cloned and characterized. The encoded polypeptide (CaMP) displayed high amino acid identity to homolog protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and four helix-loop-helix motifs were found. CaMP sequence analysis showed 20 amino acid substitutions compared to its mammalian counterparts. This gene is located on a chromosomal band with estimated size of 1,300 kb and two transcripts were detected by Northern blot analysis. A polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant protein recognized a polypeptide with an estimated size of 17 kDa in log-phase promastigote extracts. The recombinant CaMP retains its Ca²+-binding capacity.

  5. Reclassification of Serpens flexibilis Hespell 1977 as Pseudomonas flexibilis comb. nov., with Pseudomonas tuomuerensis Xin et al. 2009 as a later heterotypic synonym.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Su-Kyoung; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Cho, Yong-Joon; Yi, Hana

    2015-12-01

    Serpens flexibilis was proposed in 1977 and approved in 1980 without the 16S rRNA gene sequence information. The sequence of S. flexibilis became available in 2010, after the publication of Pseudomonas tuomuerensis in 2009. Our preliminary phylogenetic analyses indicated that these two strains share high sequence similarity and therefore showed strong potential to be united into a single species. To clarify the taxonomic status of the two species, a polyphasic taxonomy study was conducted including whole genome sequencing. The value of average nucleotide identity (ANI) and digital DNA-DNA hybridization (dDDH) between the genome sequences of S. flexibilis ATCC 29606(T) and P. tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) were 98.1% and 89.0%, respectively. The phenotypic and chemotaxonomic properties including enzymatic activities, substrate utilization profiles, and fatty acids, supported that the two taxa have no pronounced difference and should thus constitute a single species. Therefore, we propose to transfer Serpens flexibilis Hespell 1977 to the genus Pseudomonas as Pseudomonas flexibilis comb. nov. (type strain=ATCC 29606(T)), with Pseudomonas tuomuerensis Xin et al. 2009 as a later heterotypic synonym of Pseudomonas flexibilis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE INNER DISK RADIUS WITH FLUX IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SERPENS X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1046 (United States); Bhattacharyya, Sudip [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Strohmayer, Tod E., E-mail: ft8320@wayne.edu [X-Ray Astrophysics Lab, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ∼8 R {sub G}, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L / L {sub Edd} ∼ 0.4–0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  7. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia - Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of approx. 8 R(sub G), which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L(sub Edd) approx. 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  8. Large Area, High Resolution N2H+ studies of dense gas in the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee

    2014-07-01

    Star formation in molecular clouds occurs over a wide range of spatial scales and physical densities. Understanding the origin of dense cores thus requires linking the structure and kinematics of gas and dust from cloud to core scales. The CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy) is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged five diverse regions of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds in N2H+ (J=1-0), totaling over 800 square arcminutes. The observations have 7’’ angular resolution (~0.01 pc spatial resolution) to probe dense gas down to core scales, and use combined interferometric and single-dish data to fully recover line emission up to parsec scales. CLASSy observations are complete, and this talk will focus on three science results. First, the dense gas in regions with existing star formation has complex hierarchical structure. We present a non-binary dendrogram analysis for all regions and show that dense gas hierarchy correlates with star formation activity. Second, well-resolved velocity information for each dendrogram-identified structure allows a new way of looking at linewidth-size relations in clouds. Specifically, we find that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with structure size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity increases strongly with structure size. We argue that the typical line-of-sight depth of a cloud can be estimated from these relations, and that our regions have depths that are several times less than their extent on the plane of the sky. This finding is consistent with numerical simulations of molecular cloud turbulence that show that high-density sheets are a generic result. Third, N2H+ is a good tracer of cold, dense gas in filaments; we resolve multiple beams across many filaments, some of which are narrower than 0.1 pc. The centroid velocity fields of several filaments show gradients perpendicular to their major axis, which is a common feature in filaments formed from numerical

  9. Discovery of two new x-ray burst sources XB1812-12 in Serpens and XB1940-04 in Aquila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Toshio; Inoue, Hajime; Koyama, Katsuji

    1984-01-01

    Two new X-ray burst sources XB1812-12 and XB1940-04 have been discovered in Serpens and in Aquila region, respectively, from Hakucho observations. The location of XB1812-12 coincides with that of 4U1812- 12/3A1812-121 which was once reported as the transient X-ray source Ser X-2 in 1965. In the error box of XB1940-04, there is no reported or cataloged X-ray source. Including XB1812-12,8 out of 27 X-ray burst sources have been identified with transient X-ray sources. The higher energy band from XB1812-12 exhibits a double-peaked profile.

  10. Comparative analysis of respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation in Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Zdeněk; Cermáková, Petra; Skodová, Ingrid; Kováčová, Bianka; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular parasites living in a wide range of host environments, which to large extent shaped their mitochondrial energy metabolism, resulting in quite large differences even among closely related flagellates. In a comparative manner, we analyzed the activities and composition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in four species (Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and Trypanosoma brucei), which represent the main model trypanosomatids. Moreover, we measured the activity of mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the overall oxygen consumption and the mitochondrial membrane potential in each species. The comparative analysis suggests an inverse relationship between the activities of respiratory complexes I and II, as well as the overall activity of the canonical complexes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our comparative analysis shows that mitochondrial functions are highly variable in these versatile parasites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The absence of genes for cytochrome c oxidase and reductase subunits in maxicircle kinetoplast DNA of the respiration-deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawathean, P; Maslov, D A

    2000-08-01

    By completing the sequencing of the maxicircle conserved region in the kinetoplast DNA of Phytomonas serpens, we showed that the genes for subunits I and II (COI and COII) of cytochrome c oxidase in this organism were missing. We had previously shown that the genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III and apocytochrome b were also missing. These deletions did not affect the structure or expression of the remaining genes. Partial editing of the mRNA for NADH dehydrogenase subunit 8, previously found in strain IG from insects, was complete in two other strains isolated from plants. The appearance of a novel maxicircle gene for MURF2 block I gRNA, which substitutes for the gene missing due to the COII gene deletion, may illustrate a general mechanism for the origin of gRNAs.

  12. Epoxynemanione A, nemanifuranones A-F, and nemanilactones A-C, from Nemania serpens, an endophytic fungus isolated from Riesling grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf; Sørensen, Dan; Jenkins, Hilary A; Ejim, Linda; Capretta, Alfredo; Sumarah, Mark W

    2017-08-01

    Ten polyketide specialized metabolites, epoxynemanione A, nemanifuranones A-F, and nemanilactones A-C, were isolated from the culture filtrate of Nemania serpens (Pers.) Grey (1821), an endophytic fungus from a Riesling grapevine (Vitis vinifera) found in Canada's Niagara region. Additionally, four known metabolites 2-(hydroxymethyl)-3-methoxy-benzoic acid, phyllostine, 5-methylmellein and a nordammarane triterpenoid were isolated. A related known metabolite 2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxy-2,4-dimethyl-5-trans-propenylfuran-3-one has also been included for structural and biological comparison to the nemanifuranones. The latter was isolated from the culture filtrates of Mollisia nigrescens, an endophytic fungus from the leaves and stems of lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) found in the Acadian forest of Nova Scotia, Canada. Their structures were elucidated based on 1D and 2D NMR, HRESIMS measurements, X-ray crystallographic analysis of nemanifuranone A, the nordammarane triterpenoid and 2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxy-2,4-dimethyl-5-trans-propenylfuran-3-one compounds, and comparison of NOE and vicinal 1 H- 1 H coupling constants to literature data for relative stereochemical assignments. Nemanifuranone A possesses a rare C2 hemiacetal and was active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Demonstration of mRNA editing and localization of guide RNA genes in kinetoplast-mitochondria of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, D A; Hollar, L; Haghighat, P; Nawathean, P

    1998-06-01

    Maxicircle molecules of kDNA in several isolates of Phytomonas were detected by hybridization with the 12S rRNA gene probe from Leishmania tarentolae. The estimated size of maxicircles is isolate-specific and varies from 27 to 36 kb. Fully edited and polyadenylated mRNA for kinetoplast-encoded ribosomal protein S12 (RPS12) was found in the steady-state kinetoplast RNA isolated from Phytomonas serpens strain 1G. Two minicircles (1.45 kb) from this strain were also sequenced. Each minicircle contains two 120 bp conserved regions positioned 180 degrees apart, a region enriched with G and T bases and a variable region. One minicircle encodes a gRNA for the first block of editing of RPSl2 mRNA, and the other encodes a gRNA with unknown function. A gRNA gene for the second block of RPSl2 was found on a minicircle sequenced previously. On each minicircle, a gRNA gene is located in the variable region in a similar position and orientation with respect to the conserved regions.

  14. Susceptibility of Phytomonas serpens to calpain inhibitors in vitro: interference on the proliferation, ultrastructure, cysteine peptidase expression and interaction with the invertebrate host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Santiago Carvalho de Oliveira

    Full Text Available A pleiotropic response to the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 was detected in the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens. Ultrastructural studies revealed that MDL28170 caused mitochondrial swelling, shortening of flagellum and disruption of trans Golgi network. This effect was correlated to the inhibition in processing of cruzipain-like molecules, which presented an increase in expression paralleled by decreased proteolytic activity. Concomitantly, a calcium-dependent cysteine peptidase was detected in the parasite extract, the activity of which was repressed by pre-incubation of parasites with MDL28170. Flow cytometry and Western blotting analyses revealed the differential expression of calpain-like proteins (CALPs in response to the pre-incubation of parasites with the MDL28170, and confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed their surface location. The interaction of promastigotes with explanted salivary glands of the insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was reduced when parasites were pre-treated with MDL28170, which was correlated to reduced levels of surface cruzipain-like and gp63-like molecules. Treatment of parasites with anti-Drosophila melanogaster (Dm calpain antibody also decreased the adhesion process. Additionally, parasites recovered from the interaction process presented higher levels of surface cruzipain-like and gp63-like molecules, with similar levels of CALPs cross-reactive to anti-Dm-calpain antibody. The results confirm the importance of exploring the use of calpain inhibitors in studying parasites’ physiology.

  15. Susceptibility of Phytomonas serpens to calpain inhibitors in vitro: interference on the proliferation, ultrastructure, cysteine peptidase expression and interaction with the invertebrate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Simone Santiago Carvalho de; Gonçalves, Diego de Souza; Garcia-Gomes, Aline Dos Santos; Gonçalves, Inês Correa; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo; Lopes, Angela Hampshire de Carvalho Santos; D'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Santos, André Luis Souza Dos; Branquinha, Marta Helena

    2017-01-01

    A pleiotropic response to the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 was detected in the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens. Ultrastructural studies revealed that MDL28170 caused mitochondrial swelling, shortening of flagellum and disruption of trans Golgi network. This effect was correlated to the inhibition in processing of cruzipain-like molecules, which presented an increase in expression paralleled by decreased proteolytic activity. Concomitantly, a calcium-dependent cysteine peptidase was detected in the parasite extract, the activity of which was repressed by pre-incubation of parasites with MDL28170. Flow cytometry and Western blotting analyses revealed the differential expression of calpain-like proteins (CALPs) in response to the pre-incubation of parasites with the MDL28170, and confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed their surface location. The interaction of promastigotes with explanted salivary glands of the insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was reduced when parasites were pre-treated with MDL28170, which was correlated to reduced levels of surface cruzipain-like and gp63-like molecules. Treatment of parasites with anti-Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) calpain antibody also decreased the adhesion process. Additionally, parasites recovered from the interaction process presented higher levels of surface cruzipain-like and gp63-like molecules, with similar levels of CALPs cross-reactive to anti-Dm-calpain antibody. The results confirm the importance of exploring the use of calpain inhibitors in studying parasites' physiology.

  16. Dust, ice and gas in time (DIGIT): Herschel and Spitzer spectro-imaging of SMM3 and SMM4 in Serpens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionatos, O.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Green, J. D.; Herczeg, G. J.; Evans, N. J.; Kristensen, L. E.; Lindberg, J. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Mid- and far-infrared observations of the environment around embedded protostars reveal a plethora of high excitation molecular and atomic emission lines. Different mechanisms for the origin of these lines have been proposed, including shocks induced by protostellar jets and radiation or heating by the embedded protostar of its immediate surroundings. Aims: By studying of the most important molecular and atomic coolants, we aim at constraining the physical conditions around the embedded protostars SMM3 and SMM4 in the Serpens molecular cloud core and measuring the CO/H2 ratio in warm gas. Methods: Spectro-imaging observations from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) and the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) provide an almost complete wavelength coverage between 5 and 200 μm. Within this range, emission from all major molecular (H2, CO, H2O and OH) and many atomic ([OI], [CII], [FeII], [SiII] and [SI]) coolants of excited gas are detected. Emission line maps reveal the morphology of the observed emission and indicate associations between the different species. The excitation conditions for molecular species are assessed through rotational diagrams. Emission lines from major coolants are compared to the results of steady-state C- and J-type shock models. Results: Line emission tends to peak at distances of ~10-20″ from the protostellar sources with all but [CII] peaking at the positions of outflow shocks seen in near-IR and sub-millimeter interferometric observations. The [CII] emission pattern suggests that it is most likely excited from energetic UV radiation originating from the nearby flat-spectrum source SMM6. Excitation analysis indicates that H2 and CO originate in gas at two distinct rotational temperatures of ~300 K and 1000 K, while the excitation temperature for H2O and OH is ~100-200 K. The morphological and physical association between CO and H2 suggests a common excitation mechanism, which allows direct

  17. Circular intensity differential scattering of light by helical structures. II. Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, C.; Maestre, M.F.; Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1980-12-15

    Analysis and numerical calculations were made of the total scattering and differential scattering of circularly polarized light by helices as models of chiral structures. The differential scattering patterns are much more sensitive than the total scattering to helical parameters. For large helices the angular dependence of these patterns show lobes which alternate in sign. The number of lobes and the positions of the zeros directly measure the ratios of radius and pitch to wavelength. The signs depend on the sense of the helix. The results are compared with measured circular intensity differential scattering of membranes from the bacterium Spirillum serpens. Good qualitative agreement is obtained.

  18. Optical polarization in the Serpens Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.J.; Scarrott, S.M. (Durham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Taylor, K.N.R. (New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). School of Physics)

    1983-03-01

    Optical polarization maps are presented that indicate that the object is a reflection nebula illuminated by a highly obscured star that is itself seen through magnetically aligned grains. It is proposed that the dust grains overlying the central region of the nebula including the illuminating star are aligned by the local galactic magnetic field that permeates the dark cloud in which the nebula is situated. The formation of the nebula is discussed.

  19. Serpens X-1 observed by INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masetti, N.; Foschini, L.; Palazzi, E.

    2004-01-01

    Here we report results of an INTEGRAL-AO1 observation of the X-ray burst and atoll source Ser X-1 performed in May 2003. The object was observed for a total on-source time of 400 ks but nearly 8degrees off-axis due to its amalgamation with an observation of SS 433, the pointing target source. Ser...

  20. Serpens X-1 observed by INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masetti, N.; Foschini, L.; Palazzi, E.

    2004-01-01

    -1 has been clearly detected up to 30 keV with unprecedented positional accuracy for high-energy emission. The 20-30 keV light curve showed substantial variability during the observation. Comparison with previous observations indicates that the source was in its high ("banana") state and displayed...

  1. X-ray burst observations of Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajno, M.; Basinska, E. M.; Cominsky, L. R.; Marshall, F. J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-seven X-ray bursts observed with SAS 3 in the period 1976 July to 1979 March are reported. Their general features (e.g., maximum burst flux, integrated burst flux, spectral hardness, and rise time) and the relations between them are discussed. Also a comparison is made between these burst features and the associated persistent X-ray flux. The latter appears to be correlated with the maximum burst flux; the temperature of the plasma that produces the persistent flux is roughly proportional to this flux.

  2. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair ... body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  3. Cell-cell channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baluška, F; Volkmann, Dieter; Barlow, P. W

    2006-01-01

    ...-Negative Bacteria Pheromone-Responsive Conjugative Plasmids in E. faecalis Nonpheromone-Responsive Plasmids in G+ Bacteria 21 22 27 28 Section II: Ciliate Cells 3. The Tetrahymena Conjugation Ju...

  4. Fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooie, D. T.; Harrington, B. C., III; Mayfield, M. J.; Parsons, E. L.

    1992-07-01

    The primary objective of DOE's Fossil Energy Fuel Cell program is to fund the development of key fuel cell technologies in a manner that maximizes private sector participation and in a way that will give contractors the opportunity for a competitive posture, early market entry, and long-term market growth. This summary includes an overview of the Fuel Cell program, an elementary explanation of how fuel cells operate, and a synopsis of the three major fuel cell technologies sponsored by the DOE/Fossil Energy Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell program, the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell program, and the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell program.

  5. Characterization of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in the trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, P.; Verner, Zdeněk; Man, Petr; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 274, č. 12 (2007), s. 3150-3158 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032; GA ČR GA204/06/1558 Grant - others:Vedecká grantová agentúra Ministerstva školstva SR a Slovenskej akadémie vied(SK) VEGA(SK) VEGA1/3241/06; Comenius University(SK) UK/139/2006; Comenius University(SK) UK/247/2007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : NADH dehydrogenase * complex I * Phytomonas * respiratory chain * trypanosomatid Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2007

  6. [The use of serpens for treating patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo, E B; Chekhonin, V P; Riabukhin, I A; Grigor'ev, M E

    1996-01-01

    320 mg of serpense was given daily to 24 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) for 2 months. Control check-ups were performed each 30 days. The effect was judged by the patient's condition (I-PSS), quality of life, residual urine, the gland size, urodynamic picture and level of prostatic specific antigen (PSA). The response of BPH to serpense was noticeable, especially at the first stage of the disease (66.7%). Reduced serum PSA in serpense-treated patients may be explained by peripheral selective inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase or, rather, by anti-inflammatory action of the drug. Antidropsical and antiinflammatory actions of serpense suggest its possible efficacy in chronic prostatitis.

  7. Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell motility is a fascinating example of cell behavior which is fundamentally important to a number of biological and pathological processes. It is based on a complex self-organized mechano-chemical machine consisting of cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. In general, the cytoskeleton is responsible for the movement of the entire cell and for movements within the cell. The main challenge in the field of cell motility is to develop a complete physical description on how and why cells move. For this purpose new ways of modeling the properties of biological cells have to be found. This long term goal can only be achieved if new experimental techniques are developed to extract physical information from these living systems and if theoretical models are found which bridge the gap between molecular and mesoscopic length scales. Cell Motility gives an authoritative overview of the fundamental biological facts, theoretical models, and current experimental developments in this fascinating area.

  8. Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Kiela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an overview of photovoltaic cells that are currently manufactured and those being developed, including one or several p-n junction, organic and dye-sensitized cells using quantum dots. The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of various photovoltaic cells, identifies the main parameters, explains the main reasons for the losses that may occur in photovoltaic cells and looks at the ways to minimize them.Article in Lithuanian

  9. Electrochemical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising a negative electrode, an electrolyte and a positive electrode in which the positive electrode structure comprises a lithium cobalt manganese oxide of the composition Li¿2?Co¿y?Mn¿2-y?O¿4? where 0 ... for capacity losses in lithium ion cells and lithium-alloy cells....

  10. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... stem cells blog from the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Learn About Stem Cells From Lab to You ...

  11. Cell suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, E.; Coffigny, H.

    2000-01-01

    In the fight of the cell against the damages caused to its DNA by genotoxic agents and specially by ionizing radiations, the p53 protein plays a central part. It intervenes in the proliferation control and the differentiation but also in the keeping of genome integrity. It can direct the damages cells toward suicide, or apoptosis, to avoid the risk of tumor appearance that would be fatal to the whole organism. That is by the disordered state of cells suicide programs that the tumor cells are going to develop. The knowledge of apoptosis mechanisms, to eventually start them on demand, rises up broad hopes in the cancer therapy. (N.C.)

  12. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...

  13. Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  14. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    '. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products....

  15. Solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Moriaki; Hayashibara, Mitsuo

    1988-08-18

    Concerning the exsisting solar cell utilizing wavelength transition, the area of the solar cell element necessary for unit electric power output can be made small, but transition efficiency of the solar cell as a whole including a plastic plate with phosphor is not high. This invention concerns a solar cell which is appropriate for transferring the light within a wide spectrum range of the sunlight to electricilty efficiently, utilizes wavelength transition and has high efficiency per unit area. In other words, the solar cell of this invention has the feature of providing in parallel with a photoelectric transfer layer a layer of wavelength transitioning material (phosphor) which absorbs the light within the range of wavelength of low photoelectric transfer efficiency at the photoelectric transfer layer and emits the light within the range of wavelength in which the photoelectric transfer rate is high on the light incident side of the photoelectric transfer layer. (5 figs)

  16. Bi-Cell Unit for Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patent concerns a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell . The bi-cell unit is comprised of two electrode packs. Each of the electrode packs includes an...invention relates in general to a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell and in particular, to a bi-cell unit for a hydrazine-air fuel cell .

  17. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  18. Electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redey, L.I.; Myles, K.M.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-02

    An electrochemical cell is described with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated {beta}{double_prime} alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof. 8 figs.

  19. Electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1 to 10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

  20. Solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method of producing solar cells is described which consists of producing a substantially monocrystalline tubular body of silicon or other suitable semiconductor material, treating this body to form an annular rectifying junction and then cutting it longitudinally to form a number of nearly flat ribbons from which the solar cells are fabricated. The P=N rectifying junction produced by the formation of silicon dioxide on the layers at the inner and outer surfaces of the body can be formed by ion-implantation or diffusion. (U.K.)

  1. Lignite microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulankina, M.A.; Lysak, L.V.; Zvyagintsev, D.G. [Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Moscow (Russian Federation). Faculty of Soil Science

    2007-03-15

    The first demonstration that samples of lignite at a depth of 10 m are considerably enriched in bacteria is reported. According to direct microscopy, the abundance of bacteria was about 10{sup 7} cells/g. About 70% of cells had intact cell membranes and small size, which points to their anabiotic state. The fungal mycelium length was no more than 1 m. Lignite inoculation onto solid glucose-yeast-peptone medium allowed us to isolate bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Micrococcus, Spirillum, and Cytophaga. Representatives of the genera Penicillium and Trichoderma were identified on Czapek medium. Moistening of lignite powder increased the microbial respiration rate and microbial and fungal abundance but did not increase their generic diversity. This finding suggests that the studied microorganisms are autochthonous to lignite.

  2. Tuning Collective Cell Migration by Cell-Cell Junction Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.; Mayor, R.

    2017-01-01

    Collective cell migration critically depends on cell-cell interactions coupled to a dynamic actin cytoskeleton. Important cell-cell adhesion receptor systems implicated in controlling collective movements include cadherins, immunoglobulin superfamily members (L1CAM, NCAM, ALCAM), Ephrin/Eph

  3. Energy storage cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulia, N.V.

    1980-01-01

    The book deals with the characteristics and potentialities of energy storage cells of various types. Attention is given to electrical energy storage cells (electrochemical, electrostatic, and electrodynamic cells), mechanical energy storage cells (mechanical flywheel storage cells), and hybrid storage systems.

  4. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Squamous cell carcinoma Overview Squamous cell carcinoma: This man's skin ... a squamous cell carcinoma on his face. Squamous cell carcinoma: Overview Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a ...

  5. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... ISSCR Get Involved Media © 2015 International Society for Stem Cell Research Terms of Use Disclaimer Privacy Policy

  6. Electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.H.; Kubala, D.M.; Bennett, R.J.

    1977-01-13

    The high energy densities of primary cells on the basis of lithium or sodium as anode material, liquid cathode materials and nonaqueous electrolytes could not previously be fully utilised, because volume changes appearing during the discharge process inside the cell lead to an increase of cell impedance. In order to overcome this disadvantage, according to the invention a tube consisting of carbon which is slotted in the longitudinal direction is used as the cathode current collector. It is elastic in the radial direction and exerts an even pressure in the beaker-shaped cell vessel on the separator and therefore on the anode material touching the inner wall of the vessel. In order to achieve the elastic deformability of the cathode current collector, acetylene soot is used, to which are added as described in the invention, elastomers and/or mixed polymers in quantities of 10 to 30% by weight. Further claims concern the use of at least one oxyhalide of an element of groups V or VI or a halide of an element of groups IV, V or VI of the periodic table in the cathode solution.

  7. Potent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    It seems hard to believe that Dolly the cloned sheep was born 10 years ago, kindling furious arguments over the prospects and ethics of cloning a human. Today, the controversy over cloning is entwined, often confused, with concerns over the use of human embryonic stem cells. Most people are unclear what cloning is, and they know even less when it…

  8. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  9. Stem Cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 3. Stem Cells: A Dormant Volcano Within Our Body? Devaveena Dey Annapoorni Rangarajan. General Article Volume 12 Issue 3 March 2007 pp 27-34. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  11. Fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi.

    1989-05-22

    This invention aims to maintain a long-term operation with stable cell output characteristics by uniformly supplying an electrolyte from the reserver to the matrix layer over the entire matrix layer, and further to prevent the excessive wetting of the catalyst layer by smoothly absorbing the volume change of the electrolyte, caused by the repeated stop/start-up of the fuel cell, within the reserver system. For this purpose, in this invention, an electrolyte transport layer, which connects with an electrolyte reservor formed at the electrode end, is partly formed between the electrode material and the catalyst layer; a catalyst layer, which faces the electrolyte transport layer, has through-holes, which connect to the matrix, dispersely distributed. The electrolyte-transport layer is a thin sheet of a hydrophilic fibers which are non-wovens of such fibers as carbon, silicon carbide, silicon nitride or inorganic oxides. 11 figs.

  12. Tuning Collective Cell Migration by Cell-Cell Junction Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Peter; Mayor, Roberto

    2017-04-03

    Collective cell migration critically depends on cell-cell interactions coupled to a dynamic actin cytoskeleton. Important cell-cell adhesion receptor systems implicated in controlling collective movements include cadherins, immunoglobulin superfamily members (L1CAM, NCAM, ALCAM), Ephrin/Eph receptors, Slit/Robo, connexins and integrins, and an adaptive array of intracellular adapter and signaling proteins. Depending on molecular composition and signaling context, cell-cell junctions adapt their shape and stability, and this gradual junction plasticity enables different types of collective cell movements such as epithelial sheet and cluster migration, branching morphogenesis and sprouting, collective network migration, as well as coordinated individual-cell migration and streaming. Thereby, plasticity of cell-cell junction composition and turnover defines the type of collective movements in epithelial, mesenchymal, neuronal, and immune cells, and defines migration coordination, anchorage, and cell dissociation. We here review cell-cell adhesion systems and their functions in different types of collective cell migration as key regulators of collective plasticity. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. Electrorefining cell evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, M.C.; Thomas, R.L. (ed.)

    1989-04-14

    Operational characteristics of the LANL electrorefining cell, a modified LANL electrorefining cell, and an advanced electrorefining cell (known as the CRAC cell) were determined. Average process yields achieved were: 75% for the LANL cell, 82% for the modified LANL cell, and 86% for the CRAC cell. All product metal from the LANL and modified LANL cells was within foundry specifications. Metal from one run in the CRAC cell exceeded foundry specifications for tantalum. The LANL and modified LANL cells were simple in design and operation, but product separation was more labor intensive than with the CRAC cell. The CRAC cell was more complicated in design but remained relatively simple in operation. A decision analysis concluded that the modified LANL cell was the preferred cell. It was recommended that the modified LANL cell be implemented by the Plutonium Recovery Project at Rocky Flats and that development of the CRAC cell continue. 8 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Basal cell carcinoma Overview Basal cell carcinoma: This skin cancer ... that has received years of sun exposure. Basal cell carcinoma: Overview Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the ...

  15. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthy cells replace damaged cells in adult organisms. Stem cell research is one of the most fascinating areas of ... as with many expanding fields of scientific inquiry, research on stem cells raises scientific questions as rapidly as it generates ...

  16. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  17. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  18. Potency of Stem Cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Potency of Stem Cells. Totipotent Stem Cells (Zygote + first 2 divisions). -Can form placenta, embryo, and any cell of the body. Pluripotent (Embryonic Stem Cells). -Can form any cell of the body but can not form placenta, hence no embryo. Multipotent (Adult stem cells).

  19. The complete far-infrared and submillimeter spectrum of the Class 0 protostar Serpens SMM1 obtained with Herschel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Goicoechea, Javier; Cernicharo, J.; Karska, A.

    2012-01-01

    ) pure rotational lines. The observed line luminosity is dominated by CO (~54%), H2O (~22%), [OI] (~12%) and OH (~9%) emission. A non-LTE radiative transfer model allowed us to quantify the contribution of the 3 different temperature components suggested by the 12CO rotational ladder (Tk(hot)~800 K, Tk...... show more extended emission that we associate with the cool entrained outflow gas. Fast dissociative J-shocks (v_s > 60 km s^-1) as well as lower velocity non-dissociative shocks (v_s...

  20. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  1. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxin; Sun, Wenji; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; Page, Carly; Younger, Kenisha M; Tiper, Irina V; Frieman, Matthew; Kimball, Amy S; Webb, Tonya J

    2014-06-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma.

  2. Epithelial cell polarity, stem cells and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2011-01-01

    After years of extensive scientific discovery much has been learned about the networks that regulate epithelial homeostasis. Loss of expression or functional activity of cell adhesion and cell polarity proteins (including the PAR, crumbs (CRB) and scribble (SCRIB) complexes) is intricately related......, deregulation of adhesion and polarity proteins can cause misoriented cell divisions and increased self-renewal of adult epithelial stem cells. In this Review, we highlight some advances in the understanding of how loss of epithelial cell polarity contributes to tumorigenesis....

  3. Modeling cell-in-cell structure into its biological significance

    OpenAIRE

    He, M-f; Wang, S; Wang, Y; Wang, X-n

    2013-01-01

    Although cell-in-cell structure was noted 100 years ago, the molecular mechanisms of ?entering' and the destination of cell-in-cell remain largely unclear. It takes place among the same type of cells (homotypic cell-in-cell) or different types of cells (heterotypic cell-in-cell). Cell-in-cell formation affects both effector cells and their host cells in multiple aspects, while cell-in-cell death is under more intensive investigation. Given that cell-in-cell has an important role in maintainin...

  4. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  5. Host cell reactivation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Benane, S.G.; Stafford, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was determined in cultured Potoroo (a marsupial) and human cells under lighting conditions which promoted photereactivation. Photoreactivation was readily demonstrated for herpes virus in two lines of Potoroo cells with dose reduction factors of 0.7 to 0.8 for ovary cells and 0.5 to 0.7 for kidney cells. Light from Blacklite (near UV) lamps was more effective than from Daylight (mostly visible) lamps, suggesting that near UV radiation was more effecient for photoreactivation in Potoroo cells. The quantitative and qualitative aspects of this photoreactivation were similar to those reported for a similar virus infecting chick embryo cells. UV-survival curves of herpes virus in Potoroo cells indicated a high level of 'dark' host cell reactivation. No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated vaccinia virus in Potoroo cells. A similar photoreactivation study was done using special control lighting (lambda>600 nm) and human cells with normal repair and with cells deficient in excision repair (XP). No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated herpes virus in either human cell with either Blacklite or Daylight lamps as the sources of photoreactivating light. This result contrasts with a report of photoreactivation for a herpes virus in the same XP cells using incandescent lamps. (author)

  6. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  7. Are mesenchymal stromal cells immune cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be promising agents for the treatment of immunological disease. Although originally identified as precursor cells for mesenchymal lineages, in vitro studies have demonstrated that MSCs possess diverse immune regulatory capacities.

  8. Galvanic cells: setting up the Daniell cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Milla González, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    With the reagents (0.05M copper nitrate solution, 0.05M zinc nitrate solution) and material (glassware, potentiometer, electric wire) availabe in the laboratory, the user must set up the Daniell cell. Different configurations can be possible if the half cells are filled with either electrolyte solution. The cell connections to the measuring device can also be changed. In all instances, an explanation of the set up cell is obtained as well as of the measured potential difference.

  9. Inside the Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > Inside the Cell Inside the Cell Seeing Cells Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy Spotlight The Cell’s Mailroom The Proteasome: The Cell’s Trash Processor in ...

  10. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Long-term self-renewal Meiosis Mesenchymal stem cells Mesoderm Microenvironment Mitosis Multipotent Neural stem cell Neurons Oligodendrocyte ... layers. The three layers are the ectoderm , the mesoderm , and the endoderm . Hematopoietic stem cell - A stem ...

  11. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  12. [Natural killer cells complot with dendritic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elżbieta; Duś, Danuta

    2013-03-18

    Dendritic cells (DC) were initially considered as antigen presenting cells participating in the polarization of the immune response. Further understanding of their biology allowed determining their additional functions such as immunoregulatory and cytotoxicity. Until recently natural killer (NK) cells were known as a homogeneous population of lymphocytes capable of non-specific recognizing and eliminating target cells. Now it is widely accepted that NK cells, as a heterogeneous population, may also possess immunomodulatory functions. Moreover, the most recent analysis of the interactions between DC and NK cells revealed the exceptional functions of these cells. As a result of these studies the existence of bitypic cell population was postulated. The distinguishing features of these hybrid cells are: the expression of surface receptors typical for NK cells and DC, the cytotoxic activity, the production of interferons as well as their ability to present antigen after prior stimulation. Despite the lack of strong direct evidence that the same cell can be both cytotoxic and effectively present the antigen at the same time, there are experimental findings suggesting that generated ex vivo bitypic cells may be used in antitumor therapy. 

  13. NK cells and T cells: mirror images?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, R.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of MHC class I molecules protects cells against lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. It is possible that NK cells are 'educated' to recognize self MHC class I molecules and that the combination of self peptide and MHC class I molecule blocks NK-mediated lysis. Here, Rogier Versteeg

  14. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  15. Cell control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This extensive report provides an essential overview of cells and their use as factory automation building blocks. The following issues are discussed in depth: Cell integration Cell software and standards Future technologies applied to cells Plus Cell control applications including: - rotary parts manufacturing - diesel engine component development - general cell control development at the General Electric Corporation - a vendor list.

  16. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Established to investigate, integrate, testand verifyperformance and technology readiness offuel cell systems and fuel reformers for use with...

  17. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  18. The hallmarks of cell-cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Javier M; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2017-12-15

    Cell-cell fusion is essential for fertilization and organ development. Dedicated proteins known as fusogens are responsible for mediating membrane fusion. However, until recently, these proteins either remained unidentified or were poorly understood at the mechanistic level. Here, we review how fusogens surmount multiple energy barriers to mediate cell-cell fusion. We describe how early preparatory steps bring membranes to a distance of ∼10 nm, while fusogens act in the final approach between membranes. The mechanical force exerted by cell fusogens and the accompanying lipidic rearrangements constitute the hallmarks of cell-cell fusion. Finally, we discuss the relationship between viral and eukaryotic fusogens, highlight a classification scheme regrouping a superfamily of fusogens called Fusexins, and propose new questions and avenues of enquiry. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Cell mechanics: a dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiaxiang; Li, Yizeng; Vig, Dhruv K.; Sun, Sean X.

    2017-03-01

    Under the microscope, eukaryotic animal cells can adopt a variety of different shapes and sizes. These cells also move and deform, and the physical mechanisms driving these movements and shape changes are important in fundamental cell biology, tissue mechanics, as well as disease biology. This article reviews some of the basic mechanical concepts in cells, emphasizing continuum mechanics description of cytoskeletal networks and hydrodynamic flows across the cell membrane. We discuss how cells can generate movement and shape changes by controlling mass fluxes at the cell boundary. These mass fluxes can come from polymerization/depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton, as well as osmotic and hydraulic pressure-driven flow of water across the cell membrane. By combining hydraulic pressure control with force balance conditions at the cell surface, we discuss a quantitative mechanism of cell shape and volume control. The broad consequences of this model on cell mechanosensation and tissue mechanics are outlined.

  20. [Exosomes and Immune Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Naohiro

    2017-05-01

    In addition to the cytokines and cytotoxic granules, exosomes have been known as the intercellular communicator and cytotoxic missile of immune cells for the past decade. It has been well known that mature dendritic cell(DC)-derived exosomes participate in the T cell and natural killer(NK)cell activation, while immature DCs secrete tolerogenic exosomes for regulatory T(Treg)cell generation. Treg cell-derived EVs act as a suppressor against pathogenic type-1 T helper(Th1)cell responses. CD8+ T cells produce tumoricidal exosomes for preventing tumor invasion and metastasis transiently after T cell receptor(TCR)-mediated stimulation. Thus, immune cells produce functional exosomes in the activation state- and/or differentiation stage-dependent manner. In this review, the role of immune cell-derived exosomes will be introduced, focusing mainly on immune reaction against tumor.

  1. Tracking adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context,

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  3. Mammalian cell biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: the effects of N-ethyl-maleimide and hydroxyurea on hamster cells in culture; sensitization of synchronized human cells to x rays by N-ethylmaleimide; sensitization of hypoxic mammalian cells with a sulfhydryl inhibitor; damage interaction due to ionizing and nonionizing radiation in mammalian cells; DNA damage relative to radioinduced cell killing; spurious photolability of DNA labeled with methyl- 14 C-thymidine; radioinduced malignant transformation of cultured mouse cells; a comparison of properties of uv and near uv light relative to cell function and DNA damage; Monte Carlo simulation of DNA damage and repair mechanisms; and radiobiology of fast neutrons

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwood, Nicole J.; Dazzi, Francesco; Zaher, Walid

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth...... and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoiesis. These cells have been described as important immunoregulators due to their ability to suppress T cells proliferation. MSC can also directly contribute to tissue repair by migrating to sites of injury and providing a source of cells...

  6. Removable hot cell liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgibbon, F.J.; Shaffer, D.S.; Ledbetter, J.M.; Wood, W.T.

    1978-01-01

    In 1959 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposed design requirements for an alpha-gamma box system. Among the requirements was a provision for conveniently removing a contaminated cell liner (alpha-gamma box) from an operating cell. Various situations, such as a change in program direction, outmoded equipment, or an unexpected development, could result in a decision to replace a cell liner and reuse the cell for another purpose. The contaminated cell liners could either be stored temporarily for possible future use or disposed of at the LASL contaminated Waste Disposal Area. LASL's experience removing used hot cell liners from operating cells is described

  7. Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kitada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is a strategy with great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and many types of stem cells, including neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells, are considered candidates for transplantation therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells are a great therapeutic cell source because they are easy accessible and can be expanded from patients or donor mesenchymal tissues without posing serious ethical and technical problems. They have trophic effects for protecting damaged tissues as well as differentiation ability to generate a broad spectrum of cells, including dopamine neurons, which contribute to the replenishment of lost cells in Parkinson's disease. This paper focuses mainly on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic cell source and discusses their potential clinical application in Parkinson's disease.

  8. NK Cell Exhaustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jiacheng; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer cells are important effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system, playing critical roles in antitumor and anti-infection host defense. Tumor progression or chronic infections, however, usually leads to exhaustion of NK cells, thus limiting the antitumor/infection potential of NK cells. In many tumors or chronic infections, multiple mechanisms might contribute to the exhaustion of NK cells, such as dysregulated NK cell receptors signaling, as well as suppressive effects by regulatory cells or soluble factors within the microenvironment. Better understanding of the characteristics, as well as the underlying mechanisms of NK cell exhaustion, not only should increase our understanding of the basic biology of NK cells but also could reveal novel NK cell-based antitumor/infection targets. Here, we provide an overview of our current knowledge on NK cell exhaustion in tumors, and in chronic infections. PMID:28702032

  9. Fuel cells seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

  10. Cell fusion of bone marrow cells and somatic cell reprogramming by embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bonde, Sabrina; Pedram, Mehrdad; Stultz, Ryan; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is a curative treatment for many diseases, including leukemia, autoimmune diseases, and a number of immunodeficiencies. Recently, it was claimed that bone marrow cells transdifferentiate, a much desired property as bone marrow cells are abundant and therefore could be used in regenerative medicine to treat incurable chronic diseases. Using a Cre/loxP system, we studied cell fusion after bone marrow transplantation. Fused cells were chiefly Gr-1+, a myeloid cell mar...

  11. Quantitative characterization of cell behaviors through cell cycle progression via automated cell tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Wang

    Full Text Available Cell behaviors are reflections of intracellular tension dynamics and play important roles in many cellular processes. In this study, temporal variations in cell geometry and cell motion through cell cycle progression were quantitatively characterized via automated cell tracking for MCF-10A non-transformed breast cells, MCF-7 non-invasive breast cancer cells, and MDA-MB-231 highly metastatic breast cancer cells. A new cell segmentation method, which combines the threshold method and our modified edge based active contour method, was applied to optimize cell boundary detection for all cells in the field-of-view. An automated cell-tracking program was implemented to conduct live cell tracking over 40 hours for the three cell lines. The cell boundary and location information was measured and aligned with cell cycle progression with constructed cell lineage trees. Cell behaviors were studied in terms of cell geometry and cell motion. For cell geometry, cell area and cell axis ratio were investigated. For cell motion, instantaneous migration speed, cell motion type, as well as cell motion range were analyzed. We applied a cell-based approach that allows us to examine and compare temporal variations of cell behavior along with cell cycle progression at a single cell level. Cell body geometry along with distribution of peripheral protrusion structures appears to be associated with cell motion features. Migration speed together with motion type and motion ranges are required to distinguish the three cell-lines examined. We found that cells dividing or overlapping vertically are unique features of cell malignancy for both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas abrupt changes in cell body geometry and cell motion during mitosis are unique to highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, our live cell tracking system serves as an invaluable tool to identify cell behaviors that are unique to malignant and/or highly metastatic breast cancer cells.

  12. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  13. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  14. What are Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadshah Farhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem cells are those that can only form specific cells in the body such as blood cells based. Based on the sources of stem cells we have three types of these cells: Autologous: Sources of the patient own cells are (Autologous either the cells from patient own body or his or her cord blood. For this type of transplant the physician now usually collects the periphery rather than morrow because the procedure is easier on like a bane morrow harvest it take place outside of an operating room, and the patient does not to be under general unsetting . Allogenic: Sources of stem cells from another donore are primarily relatives (familial allogenic or completely unrelated donors. Xenogenic: In these stem cells from different species are transplanted e .g striatal porcine fetal mesan cephalic (FVM xenotransplants for Parkinson’s disease. On sites of isolation such as embryo, umbilical cord and other body tissues stem cells are named embnyonic, cord blood, and adult stem cells. The scope of results and clinical application of stem cells are such as: Neurodegenerative conditions (MS,ALS, Parkinson’s, Stroke, Ocular disorders- Glaucoma, retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, Auto Immune Conditions (Lupus, MS,R. arthritis, Diabetes, etc, Viral Conditions (Hepatitis C and AIDS, Heart Disease, Adrenal Disorders, Injury(Nerve, Brain, etc, Anti aging (hair, skin, weight control, overall well being/preventive, Emotional disorders, Organ / Tissue Cancers, Blood cancers, Blood diseases

  15. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment.

  16. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by

  17. Regulation of cell polarity by cell adhesion receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebnet, Klaus; Kummer, Daniel; Steinbacher, Tim; Singh, Amrita; Nakayama, Masanori; Matis, Maja

    2017-07-22

    The ability of cells to polarize is an intrinsic property of almost all cells and is required for the devlopment of most multicellular organisms. To develop cell polarity, cells integrate various signals derived from intrinsic as well as extrinsic sources. In the recent years, cell-cell adhesion receptors have turned out as important regulators of cellular polarization. By interacting with conserved cell polarity proteins, they regulate the recruitment of polarity complexes to specific sites of cell-cell adhesion. By initiating intracellular signaling cascades at those sites, they trigger their specific subcellular activation. Not surprisingly, cell-cell adhesion receptors regulate diverse aspects of cell polarity, including apico-basal polarity in epithelial and endothelial cells, front-to-rear polarity in collectively migrating cells, and planar cell polarity during organ development. Here, we review the recent developments highlighting the central roles of cell-cell adhesion molecules in the development of cell polarity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell cycle control by components of cell anchorage

    OpenAIRE

    Gad, Annica

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular factors, such as growth factors and cell anchorage to the extracellular matrix, control when and where cells may proliferate. This control is abolished when a normal cell transforms into a tumour cell. The control of cell proliferation by cell anchorage was elusive and less well studied than the control by growth factors. Therefore, we aimed to clarify at what points in the cell cycle and through which molecular mechanisms cell anchorage controls cell cycle pro...

  19. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  20. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  1. Sickle Cell Trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell trait toolkit » Sickle cell trait fact sheet » SCT and Athletes Some people with SCT have been ... ill. Recommendations on Screening of Student Athletes for SCT Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders ...

  2. Antioxidants: Protecting Healthy Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Nutrients Antioxidants - Protecting Healthy Cells Print Email Antioxidants - Protecting Healthy Cells Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, ... to cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancers. Antioxidants — such as vitamins C and E and carotenoids, ...

  3. Fuel cells: Project Volta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vellone, R.; Di Mario, F.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses research and development in the field of fuel cell power plants. Reference is made to the Italian research Project Volta. Problems related to research program financing and fuel cell power plant marketing are discussed.

  4. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  5. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  6. Fluorescence live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate FP constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS. RAW MATERIAL SELECTION INFLUENCES POLARIZATION BUT IS NOT A SINGLE CONTROLLING FACTOR. AVAILABLE...DATA INDICATES THAT AN INTERRELATIONSHIP OF POROSITY, AVERAGE PORE VOLUME, AND PERMEABILITY CONTRIBUTES TO ELECTRODE FUEL CELL BEHAVIOR.

  8. Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nevus syndrome Basal cell nevus syndrome - face References Evans DG, Farndon PA. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. ... A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  9. Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... H, Shuda M, Chang Y, et al . “Clonal integration of a polyomavirus in human Merkel cell carcinoma.” ... look at it under the microscope. This process continues until the surgeon no longer sees cancer cells. ...

  10. Separators for electrochemical cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Steven Allen; Anakor, Ifenna Kingsley; Farrell, Greg Robert

    2018-01-16

    Provided are separators for use in an electrochemical cell comprising (a) an inorganic oxide and (b) an organic polymer, wherein the inorganic oxide comprises organic substituents. Also provided are electrochemical cells comprising such separators.

  11. Dendritic cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Paul J; Lyerly, H Kim; Clay, Timothy M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2007-05-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to stimulate tumor antigen-specific T cell responses in preclinical studies. Consequently, there has been intense interest in developing dendritic cell based cancer vaccines. A variety of methods for generating dendritic cells, loading them with tumor antigens, and administering them to patients have been described. In recent years, a number of early phase clinical trials have been performed and have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of dendritic cell immunotherapies. A number of these trials have generated valuable preliminary data regarding the clinical and immunologic response to DC-based immunotherapy. The emphasis of dendritic cell immunotherapy research is increasingly shifting toward the development of strategies to increase the potency of dendritic cell vaccine preparations.

  12. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  13. NIA Aging Cell Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To facilitate aging research on cells in culture, the NIA provides support for the NIA Aging Cell Repository, located at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research...

  14. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwood, Nicole J.; Dazzi, Francesco; Zaher, Walid

    2012-01-01

    and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoiesis. These cells have been described as important immunoregulators due to their ability to suppress T cells proliferation. MSC can also directly contribute to tissue repair by migrating to sites of injury and providing a source of cells......Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth...... for differentiation and/or providing bystander support for resident stromal cells. This chapter discusses the cellular and molecular properties of MSC, the mechanisms by which they can modulate immune responses and the clinical applications of MSC in disorders such as graft-versus-host disease and aplastic anaemia...

  16. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  17. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies......-review provides general strategy guides for the broad range of applications of rational engineering of cell factories....

  18. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  19. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  20. USSR Report, Life Sciences Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-04

    wheat Saratovskaya-52 as a lectin preparation. Interaction of wheat lectin with Azospirillum brasilense Sp 7, Spirillum azotocolligens 129 and...microorganisms studied. The high agglutination level during interaction of wheat lectin with Azospirillum brasilense, an associative microorganism for

  1. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by either of 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are ...

  2. Red blood cell production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming a cell called a proerythroblast, it will develop into a new red blood cell. The formation of a red blood ...

  3. Criticality in cell differentiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indrani Bose

    2017-11-09

    Nov 9, 2017 ... Cell differentiation is an important process in living organisms. Differentiation is mostly based on binary decisions with the progenitor cells choosing between two specific lineages. The differentiation dynamics have both deterministic and stochastic components. Several theoretical studies suggest that cell ...

  4. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells independe...

  5. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human

  6. Textured perovskite cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Tezsevin, Y.; Barink, M.

    2017-01-01

    Most research of texturization of solar cells has been devoted to Si based cells. For perovskites, it was assumed that texturization would not have much of an impact because of the relatively low refractive indexes lead to relatively low reflection as compared to the Si based cells. However, our

  7. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  8. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  9. Criticality in cell differentiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cell differentiation is an important process in living organisms. Differentiation is mostly based on binary decisions with theprogenitor cells choosing between two specific lineages. The differentiation dynamics have both deterministic andstochastic components. Several theoretical studies suggest that cell differentiation is a ...

  10. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sickle cell gene on to their kids. Symptoms of sickle cell disease Anemia is a common symptom of SCD. It occurs from a lack of ... SCD cannot be prevented since it is genetic. Sickle cell disease treatment ... of SCD, your symptoms, and your overall health. Most treatment options aim ...

  11. Sickle cell test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells that carries oxygen. In sickle cell disease, a person has two abnormal hemoglobin S genes. A person with sickle cell trait has only one of these abnormal genes and no symptoms, or only mild ones. This test does not ...

  12. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to

  13. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmi, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  14. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  15. Mutagenesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burki, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Mutagenic processes in synchronous cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells have been studied. There is a difference in the induction of mutants by ultraviolet light during the cell cycle. There appears to be a sensitive period in the middle of the G1 stage of the cell cycle suggesting some mutagenic mechanism is present at that time. Studies indicate that mutation induction during the cell cycle is also mutagen specific since exposure to ethyl nitrosourea in the same system produces different results. Two clones have been isolated which are ultrasensitive to ultraviolet light. These cells are being used to determine if this hypermutability is cell-cycle dependent, related to cell cycle biochemistry, or to repair processes independent of cell cycle. Tritium and bromodeoxyuridine induced damage to synchronously dividing cell cultures are also being studied in relation to DNA replication. Cell killing by ionizing radiation is also related to the cell cycle. Sensitive times in the cell cycle for mutation induction by ionization radiation are identified

  16. Mast cell activation disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Blood basophils also participate in allergic and other inflammatory reactions in the same way as mast cells.4. The capacity of mast cells and basophil to release mediators of anaphylaxis in response to cell activation, also termed releasability, depends on a number of different factors, including the primary underlying disease ...

  17. Nanostructured Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Michal Jędrzej; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    Recent forecasts for alternative energy generation predict emerging importance of supporting state of art photovoltaic solar cells with their organic equivalents. Despite their significantly lower efficiency, number of application niches are suitable for organic solar cells. This work reveals...... the principles of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells fabrication as well as summarises major differences in physics of their operation....

  18. Spermatogonial stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de rooij, D. G.; Grootegoed, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The mammalian seminiferous epithelium consists of a highly complex yet well-organized cell population, with germ cells in mitosis and meiosis and postmeiotic cells undergoing transformation to become spermatozoa. To study the factors which control renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem

  19. Place Cells, Grid Cells, Attractors, and Remapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J. Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Place and grid cells are thought to use a mixture of external sensory information and internal attractor dynamics to organize their activity. Attractor dynamics may explain both why neurons react coherently following sufficiently large changes to the environment (discrete attractors and how firing patterns move smoothly from one representation to the next as an animal moves through space (continuous attractors. However, some features of place cell behavior, such as the sometimes independent responsiveness of place cells to environmental change (called “remapping”, seem hard to reconcile with attractor dynamics. This paper suggests that the explanation may be found in an anatomical separation of the two attractor systems coupled with a dynamic contextual modulation of the connection matrix between the two systems, with new learning being back-propagated into the matrix. Such a scheme could explain how place cells sometimes behave coherently and sometimes independently.

  20. When Blood Cells Bend: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe April 2012 Print this issue When Blood Cells Bend Understanding Sickle Cell Disease Send us your ... Diabetes? Sound Health Wise Choices Living with Sickle Cell Disease See a sickle cell disease expert regularly. ...

  1. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  2. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  3. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  4. Fuel Cell/Electrochemical Cell Voltage Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a new fuel cell individual-cell-voltage monitor that can be directly connected to a multi-cell fuel cell stack for direct substack power provisioning. It can also provide voltage isolation for applications in high-voltage fuel cell stacks. The technology consists of basic modules, each with an 8- to 16-cell input electrical measurement connection port. For each basic module, a power input connection would be provided for direct connection to a sub-stack of fuel cells in series within the larger stack. This power connection would allow for module power to be available in the range of 9-15 volts DC. The relatively low voltage differences that the module would encounter from the input electrical measurement connection port, coupled with the fact that the module's operating power is supplied by the same substack voltage input (and so will be at similar voltage), provides for elimination of high-commonmode voltage issues within each module. Within each module, there would be options for analog-to-digital conversion and data transfer schemes. Each module would also include a data-output/communication port. Each of these ports would be required to be either non-electrical (e.g., optically isolated) or electrically isolated. This is necessary to account for the fact that the plurality of modules attached to the stack will normally be at a range of voltages approaching the full range of the fuel cell stack operating voltages. A communications/ data bus could interface with the several basic modules. Options have been identified for command inputs from the spacecraft vehicle controller, and for output-status/data feeds to the vehicle.

  5. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheong J; Dosch, Joseph; Simeone, Diane M

    2008-06-10

    Cellular heterogeneity in cancer was observed decades ago by studies in mice which showed that distinct subpopulations of cells within a tumor mass are capable of driving tumorigenesis. Conceptualized from this finding was the stem-cell hypothesis for cancer, which suggests that only a specific subset of cancer cells within each tumor is responsible for tumor initiation and propagation, termed tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent data has been provided to support the existence of CSCs in human blood cell-derived cancers and solid organ tumors of the breast, brain, prostate, colon, and skin. Study of human pancreatic cancers has also revealed a specific subpopulation of cancer cells that possess the characteristics of CSCs. These pancreatic cancer stem cells express the cell surface markers CD44, CD24, and epithelial-specific antigen, and represent 0.5% to 1.0% of all pancreatic cancer cells. Along with the properties of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, pancreatic CSCs display upregulation of important developmental genes that maintain self-renewal in normal stem cells, including Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and BMI-1. Signaling cascades that are integral in tumor metastasis are also upregulated in the pancreatic CSC. Understanding the biologic behavior and the molecular pathways that regulate growth, survival, and metastasis of pancreatic CSCs will help to identify novel therapeutic approaches to treat this dismal disease.

  6. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  7. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  8. Enteroendocrine cell types revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme; Lund, Mari L

    2013-01-01

    The GI-tract is profoundly involved in the control of metabolism through peptide hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells scattered throughout the gut mucosa. A large number of recently generated transgenic reporter mice have allowed for direct characterization of biochemical and cell...... biological properties of these previously highly elusive enteroendocrine cells. In particular the surprisingly broad co-expression of six functionally related hormones in the intestinal enteroendocrine cells indicates that it should be possible to control not only the hormone secretion but also the type...... and number of enteroendocrine cells. However, this will require a more deep understanding of the factors controlling differentiation, gene expression and specification of the enteroendocrine cells during their weekly renewal from progenitor cells in the crypts of the mucosa....

  9. Stem Cell Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dah-Jiun; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa L; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Ellenson, Lora H; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2018-01-24

    Rapid advances in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have opened new opportunities for better understanding disease pathogenesis and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment approaches. Many stem cell niches are well defined anatomically, thereby allowing their routine pathological evaluation during disease initiation and progression. Evaluation of the consequences of genetic manipulations in stem cells and investigation of the roles of stem cells in regenerative medicine and pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer require significant expertise in pathology for accurate interpretation of novel findings. Therefore, there is an urgent need for developing stem cell pathology as a discipline to facilitate stem cell research and regenerative medicine. This review provides examples of anatomically defined niches suitable for evaluation by diagnostic pathologists, describes neoplastic lesions associated with them, and discusses further directions of stem cell pathology.

  10. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... understood. The mouse is a widely used model of mammary gland development, both directly by studying the mouse mammary epithelial cells themselves and indirectly, by studying development, morphogenesis, differentiation and carcinogenesis of xenotransplanted human breast epithelium in vivo. While in early...... studies, human or mouse epithelium was implanted as fragments into the mouse gland, more recent technical progress has allowed the self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential of distinct cell populations or even individual cells to be interrogated. Here, we review and discuss similarities...

  11. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (T FH ) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of T FH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on T FH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate T FH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing T FH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138 + plasma and IgD - CD27 + memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented T FH cell development. Added to T FH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3 + CXCR5 + PD-1 + follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on T FH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control T FH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the T FH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the T FH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Well-Controlled Cell-Trapping Systems for Investigating Heterogeneous Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Koki; Abe, Yuta; Inoue, Kosuke; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kawano, Ryuji; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2018-03-01

    Microfluidic systems have been developed for patterning single cells to study cell-cell interactions. However, patterning multiple types of cells to understand heterogeneous cell-cell interactions remains difficult. Here, it is aimed to develop a cell-trapping device to assemble multiple types of cells in the well-controlled order and morphology. This device mainly comprises a parylene sheet for assembling cells and a microcomb for controlling the cell-trapping area. The cell-trapping area is controlled by moving the parylene sheet on an SU-8 microcomb using tweezers. Gentle downward flow is used as a driving force for the cell-trapping. The assembly of cells on a parylene sheet with round and line-shaped apertures is demonstrated. The cell-cell contacts of the trapped cells are then investigated by direct cell-cell transfer of calcein via connexin nanopores. Finally, using the device with a system for controlling the cell-trapping area, three different types of cells in the well-controlled order are assembled. The correct cell order rate obtained using the device is 27.9%, which is higher than that obtained without the sliding parylene system (0.74%). Furthermore, the occurrence of cell-cell contact between the three cell types assembled is verified. This cell-patterning device will be a useful tool for investigating heterogeneous cell-cell interactions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Involvement of plant stem cells or stem cell-like cells in dedifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei eJiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation.

  14. What is Sickle Cell Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Congenital Anemias Including Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) and Beta-Thalassemia. Are you an adult with sickle cell disease ... Severe Congenital Anemias Including Sickle Cell Disease and Beta-Thalassemia. Are you 16 or older with sickle cell ...

  15. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  16. Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran S. Chaudhry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of only a finite number of tobacco toxins have been studied. Here, we describe exposure of cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells to low concentrations of tobacco carcinogens: nickel sulphate, benzo(bfluoranthene, N-nitrosodiethylamine, and 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK. After a 24-hour exposure, EGFR was expressed in cell membrane and cytoplasm, BCL-2 was expressed only in the irregular nuclei of large atypical cells, MKI67 was expressed in nuclei with no staining in larger cells, cytoplasmic BIRC5 with stronger nuclear staining was seen in large atypical cells, and nuclear TP53 was strongly expressed in all cells. After only a 24-hour exposure, cells exhibited atypical nuclear and cytoplasmic features. After a 48-hour exposure, EGFR staining was localized to the nucleus, BCL-2 was slightly decreased in intensity, BIRC5 was localized to the cytoplasm, and TP53 staining was increased in small and large cells. BCL2L1 was expressed in both the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells at 24- and 48-hour exposures. We illustrate that short-termexposure of a bronchial epithelial cell line to smoking-equivalent concentrations of tobacco carcinogens alters the expression of key proliferation regulatory genes, EGFR, BCL-2, BCL2L1, BIRC5, TP53, and MKI67, similar to that reported in biopsy specimens of pulmonary epithelium described to be preneoplastic lesions.

  17. Mast Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  18. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daland, Geneva A.; Isaacs, Raphael

    1927-01-01

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells. PMID:19869329

  19. Simple Cell Balance Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven D.; Byers, Jerry W.; Martin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed for continuous cell voltage balancing for rechargeable batteries (e.g. lithium ion batteries). A resistor divider chain is provided that generates a set of voltages representing the ideal cell voltage (the voltage of each cell should be as if the cells were perfectly balanced). An operational amplifier circuit with an added current buffer stage generates the ideal voltage with a very high degree of accuracy, using the concept of negative feedback. The ideal voltages are each connected to the corresponding cell through a current- limiting resistance. Over time, having the cell connected to the ideal voltage provides a balancing current that moves the cell voltage very close to that ideal level. In effect, it adjusts the current of each cell during charging, discharging, and standby periods to force the cell voltages to be equal to the ideal voltages generated by the resistor divider. The device also includes solid-state switches that disconnect the circuit from the battery so that it will not discharge the battery during storage. This solution requires relatively few parts and is, therefore, of lower cost and of increased reliability due to the fewer failure modes. Additionally, this design uses very little power. A preliminary model predicts a power usage of 0.18 W for an 8-cell battery. This approach is applicable to a wide range of battery capacities and voltages.

  20. NKT cells in leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Chimal, Jaime; Hernández-Ruiz, Joselín; Becker, Ingeborg

    2017-04-01

    The role of NKT cells in the resistance or susceptibility towards Leishmania infections remains to be defined, since controversial data persist. The response of these cells seems to depend on many variables such as the infection site, the number of infecting parasites, the virulence of the strain and the Leishmania species. We here revise the activation pathways leading to NKT cell activation. NKT cells can be activated by the direct pathway, in which Leishmania glycolipids are presented by CD1d molecules on antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC), leading to the secretion of diverse cytokines by NKT. NKT cells can also be activated by the indirect pathway, in which Leishmania glycolipids, such as LPG, stimulate TLR2 in DC, inducing their IL-12 production, which in turn activates NKT cells. The review further analyzes the role of NKT cells in disease development, both in humans as in mouse models. Finally we propose the activation of NKT cells for controlling Leishmania infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Biology of Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Grahame J; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Trapp, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental roles of Schwann cells during peripheral nerve formation and regeneration have been recognized for more than 100 years, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that integrate Schwann cell and axonal functions continue to be elucidated. Derived from the embryonic neural crest, Schwann cells differentiate into myelinating cells or bundle multiple unmyelinated axons into Remak fibers. Axons dictate which differentiation path Schwann cells follow, and recent studies have established that axonal neuregulin1 signaling via ErbB2/B3 receptors on Schwann cells is essential for Schwann cell myelination. Extracellular matrix production and interactions mediated by specific integrin and dystroglycan complexes are also critical requisites for Schwann cell-axon interactions. Myelination entails expansion and specialization of the Schwann cell plasma membrane over millimeter distances. Many of the myelin-specific proteins have been identified, and transgenic manipulation of myelin genes have provided novel insights into myelin protein function, including maintenance of axonal integrity and survival. Cellular events that facilitate myelination, including microtubule-based protein and mRNA targeting, and actin based locomotion, have also begun to be understood. Arguably, the most remarkable facet of Schwann cell biology, however, is their vigorous response to axonal damage. Degradation of myelin, dedifferentiation, division, production of axonotrophic factors, and remyelination all underpin the substantial regenerative capacity of the Schwann cells and peripheral nerves. Many of these properties are not shared by CNS fibers, which are myelinated by oligodendrocytes. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms responsible for the complex biology of Schwann cells continues to have practical benefits in identifying novel therapeutic targets not only for Schwann cell-specific diseases but other disorders in which axons degenerate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. The Use of Bryophytes as Indicators of Hydric Soils and Wetland Hydrology during Wetland Delineations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    intertidal zone. Campylium stellatum and Bryum capillare were the most abundant. Didymodon rigidulus, Mnium hornum, and Amblystegium serpens were also...cuspidatum (= Plagiomnium cuspidatum) (FAC) Thuidium recognitum (FAC) Amblystegium juratzkanum (= Amblystegium serpens var...FAC) Amblystegium juratzkanum (= Amblystegium serpens var. juratzkanum)) (FACU) Brachythecium salebrosum (FACU) ERDC/CRREL TR-10-9 58

  3. Heme detection in parasitic protists of the group Trypanosomatidae

    OpenAIRE

    KOVÁŘOVÁ, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with detection of heme in three different species of the group Trypanosomatidae: Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania tarentolae and Phytomonas serpens. The main goal was to improve the current knowledge about heme metabolism in Phytomonas serpens. It was found that P. serpens does not require heme for growth, though it does ingest it if available.

  4. Solar cell shingle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Sidorak, L. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A solar cell shingle was made of an array of solar cells on a lower portion of a substantially rectangular shingle substrate made of fiberglass cloth or the like. The solar cells may be encapsulated in flourinated ethylene propylene or some other weatherproof translucent or transparent encapsulant to form a combined electrical module and a roof shingle. The interconnected solar cells were connected to connectors at the edge of the substrate through a connection to a common electrical bus or busses. An overlap area was arranged to receive the overlap of a cooperating similar shingle so that the cell portion of the cooperating shingle may overlie the overlap area of the roof shingle. Accordingly, the same shingle serves the double function of an ordinary roof shingle which may be applied in the usual way and an array of cooperating solar cells from which electrical energy may be collected.

  5. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment...... to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...

  6. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  7. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    Rational approaches to modifying cells to make molecules of interest are of substantial economic and scientific interest. Most of these efforts aim at the production of native metabolites, expression of heterologous biosynthetic pathways, or protein expression. Reviews of these topics have largely...... focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies...... in the field, all applicable to multiple types of cells and products, and proven successful in multiple major cell types. These apply to three major categories: production of native metabolites and/or bioactives, heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways, and protein expression. This meta...

  8. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitkumar B Pandav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  9. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  10. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    de Faria, J

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  11. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  12. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  13. Different cell fates from cell-cell interactions: core architectures of two-cell bistable networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouault, Hervé; Hakim, Vincent

    2012-02-08

    The acquisition of different fates by cells that are initially in the same state is central to development. Here, we investigate the possible structures of bistable genetic networks that can allow two identical cells to acquire different fates through cell-cell interactions. Cell-autonomous bistable networks have been previously sampled using an evolutionary algorithm. We extend this evolutionary procedure to take into account interactions between cells. We obtain a variety of simple bistable networks that we classify into major subtypes. Some have long been proposed in the context of lateral inhibition through the Notch-Delta pathway, some have been more recently considered and others appear to be new and based on mechanisms not previously considered. The results highlight the role of posttranscriptional interactions and particularly of protein complexation and sequestration, which can replace cooperativity in transcriptional interactions. Some bistable networks are entirely based on posttranscriptional interactions and the simplest of these is found to lead, upon a single parameter change, to oscillations in the two cells with opposite phases. We provide qualitative explanations as well as mathematical analyses of the dynamical behaviors of various created networks. The results should help to identify and understand genetic structures implicated in cell-cell interactions and differentiation. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial Cell Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Weibel, Douglas B

    2017-07-25

    Cellular mechanical properties play an integral role in bacterial survival and adaptation. Historically, the bacterial cell wall and, in particular, the layer of polymeric material called the peptidoglycan were the elements to which cell mechanics could be primarily attributed. Disrupting the biochemical machinery that assembles the peptidoglycan (e.g., using the β-lactam family of antibiotics) alters the structure of this material, leads to mechanical defects, and results in cell lysis. Decades after the discovery of peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes, the mechanisms that underlie their positioning and regulation are still not entirely understood. In addition, recent evidence suggests a diverse group of other biochemical elements influence bacterial cell mechanics, may be regulated by new cellular mechanisms, and may be triggered in different environmental contexts to enable cell adaptation and survival. This review summarizes the contributions that different biomolecular components of the cell wall (e.g., lipopolysaccharides, wall and lipoteichoic acids, lipid bilayers, peptidoglycan, and proteins) make to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell mechanics. We discuss the contribution of individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in cell mechanics and the tools that make it possible to quantitatively decipher the biochemical machinery that contributes to bacterial cell mechanics. Advances in this area may provide insight into new biology and influence the development of antibacterial chemotherapies.

  15. Atmospheric Absorption Cell Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    was adequate for making empty cell measurements and filling the cell with artificial atmospheres. The procedure used in pumping and fillin the cell...carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide. The artificial atmospheres in the cell used for these measurements are summarized in Table IV. Figures...LD_l -_10J J« LUZ . jr-U «—• »r—• «-CD CO — Q- —a CD -j" \\z — OC I — h- \\_IC\\J CM LUD -ÜU T 1 r 00*001 00󈧌 00*09 00*0

  16. Cancer stem cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-05-24

    Cancer is now viewed as a stem cell disease. There is still no consensus on the metabolic characteristics of cancer stem cells, with several studies indicating that they are mainly glycolytic and others pointing instead to mitochondrial metabolism as their principal source of energy. Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes. Determining the role of cancer stem cell metabolism in carcinogenesis has become a major focus in cancer research, and substantial efforts are conducted towards discovering clinical targets.

  17. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  18. Littoral Cells 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Littoral cells along the California Coast. Originally digitized by Melanie Coyne from the Assessment and Atlas of Shoreline Erosion Along the California Coast...

  19. Microencapsulation Of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium; Kendall, James M.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental technique, living cells and other biological materials encapsulated within submillimeter-diameter liquid-filled spheres. Sphere material biocompatible, tough, and compliant. Semipermeable, permitting relatively small molecules to move into and out of sphere core but preventing passage of large molecules. New technique promises to make such spherical capsules at high rates and in uniform, controllable sizes. Capsules injected into patient through ordinary hypodermic needle. Promising application for technique in treatment of diabetes. Also used to encapsulate pituitary cells and thyroid hormone adrenocortical cells for treatment of other hormonal disorders, to encapsulate other secreting cells for transplantation, and to package variety of pharmaceutical products and agricultural chemicals for controlled release.

  20. Applications of Cell Microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Emmanuel C

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to provide an overview of the different purposes for which the cell microencapsulation technology can be used. These include immunoisolation of non-autologous cells used for cell therapy; immobilization of cells for localized (targeted) delivery of therapeutic products to ablate, repair, or regenerate tissue; simultaneous delivery of multiple therapeutic agents in cell therapy; spatial compartmentalization of cells in complex tissue engineering; expansion of cells in culture; and production of different probiotics and metabolites for industrial applications. For each of these applications, specific examples are provided to illustrate how the microencapsulation technology can be utilized to achieve the purpose. However, successful use of the cell microencapsulation technology for whatever purpose will ultimately depend upon careful consideration for the choice of the encapsulating polymers, the method of fabrication (cross-linking) of the microbeads, which affects the permselectivity, the biocompatibility and the mechanical strength of the microbeads as well as environmental parameters such as temperature, humidity, osmotic pressure, and storage solutions.The various applications discussed in this chapter are illustrated in the different chapters of this book and where appropriate relevant images of the microencapsulation products are provided. It is hoped that this outline of the different applications of cell microencapsulation would provide a good platform for tissue engineers, scientists, and clinicians to design novel tissue constructs and products for therapeutic and industrial applications.

  1. A brief history of T cell help to B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Shane

    2015-03-01

    In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cells, I take a look back at the history of T cell help to B cells, which was discovered 47 years ago. In addition, I summarize and categorize the distinct molecules that are expressed by CD4(+) T cells that constitute 'help' to B cells, and particularly the molecules expressed by T follicular helper (TFH) cells, which are the specialized providers of help to B cells.

  2. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  3. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance

  4. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Glycoprotein on cell surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, T.

    1975-01-01

    There are conjugated polysaccharides in cell membranes and outside of animal cells, and they play important role in the control of cell behavior. In this paper, the studies on the glycoprotein on cell surfaces are reported. It was found that the glycoprotein on cell surfaces have both N-glycoside type and O-glycoside type saccharic chains. Therefore it can be concluded that the basic structure of the saccharic chains in the glycoprotein on cell surfaces is similar to that of blood serum and body fluid. The main glycoprotein in the membranes of red blood corpuscles has been studied most in detail, and it also has both types of saccharic chains. The glycoprotein in liver cell membranes was found to have only the saccharic chains of acid type and to be in different pattern from that in endoplasmic reticula and nuclear membranes, which also has the saccharic chains of neutral type. The structure of the saccharic chains of H-2 antigen, i.e. the peculiar glycoprotein on the surfaces of lymph system cells, has been studied, and it is similar to the saccharic chains of glycoprotein in blood serum. The saccharic chain structures of H-2 antigen and TL antigen are different. TL, H-2 (D), Lna and H-2 (K) are the glycoprotein on cell surfaces, and are independent molecules. The analysis of the saccharic chain patterns on cell surfaces was carried out, and it was shown that the acid type saccharic chains were similar to those of ordinary glycoprotein, because the enzyme of pneumococci hydrolyzed most of the acid type saccharic chains. The change of the saccharic chain patterns of glycoprotein on cell surfaces owing to canceration and multiplication is complex matter. (Kako, I.)

  6. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  7. Single-cell sequencing in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lu; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-04-15

    Cell-to-cell variation and heterogeneity are fundamental and intrinsic characteristics of stem cell populations, but these differences are masked when bulk cells are used for omic analysis. Single-cell sequencing technologies serve as powerful tools to dissect cellular heterogeneity comprehensively and to identify distinct phenotypic cell types, even within a 'homogeneous' stem cell population. These technologies, including single-cell genome, epigenome, and transcriptome sequencing technologies, have been developing rapidly in recent years. The application of these methods to different types of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells, has led to exciting new findings in the stem cell field. In this review, we discuss the recent progress as well as future perspectives in the methodologies and applications of single-cell omic sequencing technologies.

  8. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  9. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...

  10. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are clonogenic, non-haematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages e.g. neuronal-like cells. Several methods...

  12. Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the hydrogen and fuel cells. It presents the hydrogen technology from the production to the distribution and storage, the issues as motor fuel and fuel cells, the challenge for vehicles applications and the Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  13. T-cell costimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1996-01-01

    The CD40L molecule expressed by CD4+ regulatory T lymphocytes is known to deliver signals that activate B cells and macrophages. It now appears that CD40L regulates T cells themselves, during both their development and their participation in adaptive immune responses....

  14. Cell phone explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Alok; Kanchan, Tanuj; Nepal, Samata; Pandey, Bhuwan Raj

    2016-03-01

    Cell phone explosions and resultant burn injuries are rarely reported in the scientific literature. We report a case of cell phone explosion that occurred when a young male was listening to music while the mobile was plugged in for charging. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. The Constitution by Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhut, Stephanie; Jones, Megan

    2010-01-01

    On their visit to the National Archives Experience in Washington, D.C., students in Jenni Ashley and Gay Brock's U.S. history classes at the Potomac School in McLean, Virginia, participated in a pilot program called "The Constitution by Cell." Armed with their cell phones, a basic understanding of the Constitution, and a willingness to…

  16. MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A novel microbial fuel cell construction for the generation of electrical energy. The microbial fuel cell comprises: (i) an anode electrode, (ii) a cathode chamber, said cathode chamber comprising an in let through which an influent enters the cathode chamber, an outlet through which an effluent...

  17. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafman, Laura L.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  18. T-cell count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... count URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003516.htm T-cell count To use the sharing features on this ... as hepatitis or mononucleosis Lower than normal T-cell levels may be due to: Acute viral infections Aging Cancer Immune system diseases, such as HIV/AIDS ...

  19. Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    In proposed fuel-cell system, methanol converted to hydrogen in two places. External fuel processor converts only part of methanol. Remaining methanol converted in fuel cell itself, in reaction at anode. As result, size of fuel processor reduced, system efficiency increased, and cost lowered.

  20. Mesangial cell biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abboud, Hanna E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

  1. Mesangial cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Hanna E., E-mail: Abboud@uthscsa.edu

    2012-05-15

    Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

  2. Perovskite Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organic–inorganic halide perovskite, a newcomerin the solar cell industry has proved its potential forincreasing efficiency rapidly from 3.8% in 2009 to 22.1% in2016. High efficiency, flexibility, and cell architecture of theemerging hybrid halide perovskite have caught the attentionof researchers and technologists in the field.

  3. Fuel cell sesquicentennial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of fuel cell technology is summarized, and the potential for utility-type fuel cell installations is assessed on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the construction of the first fuel cell by Sir William Grove. The only functional fuel-cell systems developed to date, the hydrogen-oxygen cells used by NASA, are indicated, and hydrazine and alcohol (methanol) cells are considered. Areas requiring development before the implementation of fuel cells as general purpose utility-type electric generators include catalysts for naturally occurring hydrocarbons or processes for low-cost methanol or hydrazine production, efficient means of scrubbing and enriching air, self-regulating systems, and 15- to 20-fold power density increases. It is argued that although ideas for eliminating certain of the above-mentioned problems have been proposed, fuel-cell systems can never be expected to equal the efficiency, reliability and low cost of conventional power plants, and thus developmental support should be discontinued.

  4. Cystic Granular Cell Ameloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Thillaikarasi, Rathnavel; Balaji, Jayaram; Gupta, Bhawna; Ilayarja, Vadivel; Vani, Nandimandalam Venkata; Vidula, Balachander; Saravanan, Balasubramaniam; Ponniah, Irulandy

    2010-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive benign epithelial odontogenic tumor, while unicystic ameloblastoma is a relatively less aggressive variant. Although rare in unicystic or cystic ameloblastoma, granular cell change in ameloblastoma is a recognized phenomenon. The purpose of the present article is to report a case of cystic granular cell ameloblastoma in 34-year old female.

  5. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  6. Biosensors for Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Son, Kyungjin; Liu, Ying; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors first appeared several decades ago to address the need for monitoring physiological parameters such as oxygen or glucose in biological fluids such as blood. More recently, a new wave of biosensors has emerged in order to provide more nuanced and granular information about the composition and function of living cells. Such biosensors exist at the confluence of technology and medicine and often strive to connect cell phenotype or function to physiological or pathophysiological processes. Our review aims to describe some of the key technological aspects of biosensors being developed for cell analysis. The technological aspects covered in our review include biorecognition elements used for biosensor construction, methods for integrating cells with biosensors, approaches to single-cell analysis, and the use of nanostructured biosensors for cell analysis. Our hope is that the spectrum of possibilities for cell analysis described in this review may pique the interest of biomedical scientists and engineers and may spur new collaborations in the area of using biosensors for cell analysis.

  7. Solar cell concentrating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, H.P.; Sharma, V.K.; Agarwal, R.K.

    1986-11-01

    This study reviews fabrication techniques and testing facilities for different solar cells under concentration which have been developed and tested. It is also aimed to examine solar energy concentrators which are prospective candidates for photovoltaic concentrator systems. This may provide an impetus to the scientists working in the area of solar cell technology

  8. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  9. Mammary gland stem cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mammary gland stem cells (MaSC) have not been identified in spite of extensive research spanning over several decades. This has been primarily due to the complexity of mammary gland structure and its development, cell heterogeneity in the mammary gland and the insufficient knowledge about MaSC markers.

  10. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  11. Normal Untreated Jurkat Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions. These Jurkat cells, a human acute T-cell leukemia was obtained to evaluate three types of potential experimental stressors: a) Temperature elevation; b) Serum starvation; and c) Centrifugal force. The data from previous spaceflight experiments showed that actin filaments and cell shape are significantly different for the control. These normal cells serve as the baseline for future spaceflight experiments.

  12. Fuel cells : emerging markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaghan Jerram, L.; Adamson, K.A.; Butler, J.; Huleatt-James, N.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation highlighted the findings of the 2009 review of the fuel cell industry and emerging markets as they appeared in Fuel Cell Today (FCT), a benchmark document on global fuel cell activity. Since 2008, the industry has seen a 50 per cent increase in fuel cell systems shipped, from 12,000 units to 18,000 units. Applications have increased for backup power for datacentres, telecoms and light duty vehicles. The 2009 review focused on emerging markets which include non-traditional regions that may experience considerable diffusion of fuel cells within the next 5 year forecast period. The 2009 review included an analysis on the United Arab Emirates, Mexico, Brazil and India and reviewed primary drivers, likely applications for near-term adoption, and government and private sector activity in these regions. The presentation provided a forecast of the global state of the industry in terms of shipments as well as a forecast of countries with emerging markets

  13. Cell manipulation in microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available. (topical review)

  14. Solar cell radiation handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  15. Toward sustainable fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2016-01-01

    A quarter of humanity's current energy consumption is used for transportation (1). Low-temperature hydrogen fuel cells offer much promise for replacing this colossal use of fossil fuels with renewables; these fuel cells produce negligible emissions and have a mileage and filling time equal to a r......% of the annual automotive vehicle production. Lowering the Pt loading in a fuel cell to a sustainable level requires the reactivity of Pt to be tuned so that it accelerates oxygen reduction more effectively (3). Two reports in this issue address this challenge (4, 5)....... to a regular gasoline car. However, current fuel cells require 0.25 g of platinum (Pt) per kilowatt of power (2) as catalysts to drive the electrode reactions. If the entire global annual production of Pt were devoted to fuel cell vehicles, fewer than 10 million vehicles could be produced each year, a mere 10...

  16. HTPEM Fuel Cell Impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg

    As part of the process to create a fossil free Denmark by 2050, there is a need for the development of new energy technologies with higher efficiencies than the current technologies. Fuel cells, that can generate electricity at higher efficiencies than conventional combustion engines, can...... potentially play an important role in the energy system of the future. One of the fuel cell technologies, that receives much attention from the Danish scientific community is high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cells based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) with phosphoric acid as proton conductor....... This type of fuel cell operates at higher temperature than comparable fuel cell types and they distinguish themselves by high CO tolerance. Platinum based catalysts have their efficiency reduced by CO and the effect is more pronounced at low temperature. This Ph.D. Thesis investigates this type of fuel...

  17. Cell fusions in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Bjerregaard, Bolette; Talts, Jan Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Cell fusions are important to fertilization, placentation, development of skeletal muscle and bone, calcium homeostasis and the immune defense system. Additionally, cell fusions participate in tissue repair and may be important to cancer development and progression. A large number of factors appear...... to regulate cell fusions, including receptors and ligands, membrane domain organizing proteins, proteases, signaling molecules and fusogenic proteins forming alpha-helical bundles that bring membranes close together. The syncytin family of proteins represent true fusogens and the founding member, syncytin-1......, has been documented to be involved in fusions between placental trophoblasts, between cancer cells and between cancer cells and host ells. We review the literature with emphasis on the syncytin family and propose that syncytins may represent universal fusogens in primates and rodents, which work...

  18. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process....... It facilitates the understanding of the task and structure of cell controllers and uses this knowledge directly in the implementation of the system. By applying generic models CCE facilitates reuse of software components and maintenance of applications. In many enterprises, software makes up an increasing part...

  19. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  20. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  1. Time evolution of cell size distributions in dense cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khain, Evgeniy

    2015-03-01

    Living cells in a dense system are all in contact with each other. The common assumption is that such cells stop dividing due to a lack of space. Recent experimental observations have shown, however, that cells continue dividing for a while, but other cells in the system must shrink, to allow the newborn cells to grow to a normal size. Due to these ``pressure'' effects, the average cell size dramatically decreases with time, and the dispersion in cell sizes decreases, too. The collective cell behavior becomes even more complex when the system is expanding: cells near the edges are larger and migrate faster, while cells deep inside the colony are smaller and move slower. This exciting experimental data still needs to be described theoretically, incorporating the distribution of cell sizes in the system. We propose a mathematical model for time evolution of cell size distribution both in a closed and open system. The model incorporates cell proliferation, cell growth after division, cell shrinking due to ``pressure'' from other cells, and possible cell detachment from the interface of a growing colony. This research sheds light on physical and biological mechanisms of cell response to a dense environment and on the role of mechanical stresses in determining the distribution of cell sizes in the system.

  2. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  3. Immunology of Langerhans Cells

    OpenAIRE

    TAMAKI,Kunihiko

    1990-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) are antigen-presenting cells residing in the epidermis of the skin. These cells show characteristic dendritic features and are continually repopulated by precursor cells originating in bone marrow. In this review, we will discuss about the characteristics of these cells.

  4. Quantitative imaging of epithelial cell scattering identifies specific inhibitors of cell motility and cell-cell dissociation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerke, D.; le Duc, Q.; Blonk, I.; Kerstens, A.; Spanjaard, E.; Machacek, M.; Danuser, G.; de Rooij, J.

    2012-01-01

    The scattering of cultured epithelial cells in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a model system that recapitulates key features of metastatic cell behavior in vitro, including disruption of cell-cell adhesions and induction of cell migration. We have developed image analysis tools that

  5. Radioresistance and hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi

    1989-01-01

    Current progress to explore further understanding of tumor hypoxia was reviewed. At subcellular level, hypoxia induces specific proteins, inhibits DNA synthesis as well as initiation of DNA replicon. Radioresistant characteristics of hypoxic cells is questioned in condition where irradiated cells were kept hypoxia during colony formation. Chronically hypoxic cells recovered from the inner layer of V79 multicellular spheroids are more sensitive to radiation than those from the oxic, outer layer. A novel sandwich culture method, which enables to reoxygenate chronic hypoxia, implies that chronically hypoxic cells are less sensitive to radiation after reoxygenation than oxic cells. For in vivo tumor, two types of tumor hypoxia are reported: diffusion-limited, chronic hypoxia and perfusion-limited, acute hypoxia. Evidence supporting the existence of perfusion-limited hypoxia is provided by an elegant method using vital staining and cell sorter. Data of our own laboratory also implies 2 types of tumor hypoxia; fractional hypoxia and incomplete hypoxia. Fractional hypoxia corresponds to a radioresistant tail on a biphasic tumor cell survival curves while tumors with incomplete hypoxia demonstrate only single component with radioresistant characteristics, instead. (author)

  6. Basic cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, J W

    1990-01-01

    This article will describe the basic techniques required for successful cell culture. It will also act to introduce some of the other chapters in this volume. It is not intended, as this volume is not, to describe the establishment of a tissue culture laboratory, nor to provide a historical or theoretical survey of cell culture. There are several books that adequately cover these areas, including the now somewhat dated but still valuable volume by Paul (1), the multi-authored Methods in Enzymology volume edited by Jakoby and Pastan (2), and the new edition of Freshney (3). Instead, this chapter's focus will be on the techniques for establishing primary rodent cell cultures from embryos and adult skin, maintaining and subculturing these fibro-blasts and their transformed derivatives, and the isolation of genetically pure strains. The cells described are all derived from Chinese hamsters since, to date, these cells, have proved to be the most useful for somatic cell genetics (4,5). The techniques, however, are generally applicable to most fibroblastic cell types.

  7. Cell line provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshney, R Ian

    2002-07-01

    Cultured cell lines have become an extremely valuable resource, both in academic research and in industrial biotechnology. However, their value is frequently compromised by misidentification and undetected microbial contamination. As detailed elsewhere in this volume, the technology, both simple and sophisticated, is available to remedy the problems of misidentification and contamination, given the will to apply it. Combined with proper records of the origin and history of the cell line, assays for authentication and contamination contribute to the provenance of the cell line. Detailed records should start from the initiation or receipt of the cell line, and should incorporate data on the donor as well as the tissue from which the cell line was derived, should continue with details of maintenance, and include any accidental as well as deliberate deviations from normal maintenance. Records should also contain details of authentication and regular checks for contamination. With this information, preferably stored in a database, and suitable backed up, the provenance of the cell line so created makes the cell line a much more valuable resource, fit for validation in industrial applications and more likely to provide reproducible experimental results when disseminated for research in other laboratories.

  8. Llgl1 Connects Cell Polarity with Cell-Cell Adhesion in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossin, Yves; Lee, Minhui; Klezovitch, Olga; Kon, Elif; Cossard, Alexia; Lien, Wen-Hui; Fernandez, Tania E; Cooper, Jonathan A; Vasioukhin, Valera

    2017-06-05

    Malformations of the cerebral cortex (MCCs) are devastating developmental disorders. We report here that mice with embryonic neural stem-cell-specific deletion of Llgl1 (Nestin-Cre/Llgl1 fl/fl ), a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila cell polarity gene lgl, exhibit MCCs resembling severe periventricular heterotopia (PH). Immunohistochemical analyses and live cortical imaging of PH formation revealed that disruption of apical junctional complexes (AJCs) was responsible for PH in Nestin-Cre/Llgl1 fl/fl brains. While it is well known that cell polarity proteins govern the formation of AJCs, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. We show that LLGL1 directly binds to and promotes internalization of N-cadherin, and N-cadherin/LLGL1 interaction is inhibited by atypical protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of LLGL1, restricting the accumulation of AJCs to the basolateral-apical boundary. Disruption of the N-cadherin-LLGL1 interaction during cortical development in vivo is sufficient for PH. These findings reveal a mechanism responsible for the physical and functional connection between cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion machineries in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of Cell Cycle Dynamics using Probabilistic Cell Cycle Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Schupp, Jane E.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we develop asynchronous probabilistic cell cycle models to quantitatively assess the effect of ionizing radiation on a human colon cancer cell line. We use both synchronous and asynchronous cell populations and follow treated cells for up to 2 cell cycle times. The model outputs quantify the changes in cell cycle dynamics following ionizing radiation treatment, principally in the duration of both G1 and G2/M phases. PMID:22254270

  10. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2 , CALR , or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Conversion of primordial germ cells to pluripotent stem cells: methods for cell tracking and culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are unipotent cells committed to germ lineage: PGCs can only differentiate into gametes in vivo. However, upon fertilization, germ cells acquire the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body, including germ cells. Therefore, germ cells are thought to have the potential for pluripotency. PGCs can convert to pluripotent stem cells in vitro when cultured under specific conditions that include bFGF, LIF, and the membrane-bound form of SCF (mSCF). Here, the culture conditions which efficiently convert PGCs to pluripotent embryonic germ (EG) cells are described, as well as methods used for identifying pluripotent candidate cells during culture.

  12. PLUTONIUM ELECTROREFINING CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, L.J. Jr.; Leary, J.A.; Bjorklund, C.W.; Maraman, W.J.

    1963-07-16

    Electrorefining cells for obtaining 99.98% plutonium are described. The cells consist of an impure liquid plutonium anode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-- alkali or alkaline earth metal chloanode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-alkali or alkaline earth metal chloride electrolyte, and a nonreactive cathode, all being contained in nonreactive ceramic containers which separate anode from cathode by a short distance and define a gap for the collection of the purified liquid plutonium deposited on the cathode. Important features of these cells are the addition of stirrer blades on the anode lead and a large cathode surface to insure a low current density. (AEC)

  13. Protoparvovirus cell entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ros, Carlos; Bayat, Nooshin; Wolfisberg, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    and oncolytic activities while being nonpathogenic for humans. The PtPVs invade and replicate within the nucleus making extensive use of the transport, transcription and replication machineries of the host cells. In order to reach the nucleus, PtPVs need to cross over several intracellular barriers and traffic...... through different cell compartments, which limit their infection efficiency. In this review we summarize molecular interactions, capsid structural transitions and hijacking of cellular processes, by which the PtPVs enter and deliver their single-stranded DNA genome into the host cell nucleus...

  14. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  15. Solar cell array interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  16. Fuel cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotevski, Darko

    2003-01-01

    Fuel cell systems are an entirely different approach to the production of electricity than traditional technologies. They are similar to the batteries in that both produce direct current through electrochemical process. There are six types of fuel cells each with a different type of electrolyte, but they all share certain important characteristics: high electrical efficiency, low environmental impact and fuel flexibility. Fuel cells serve a variety of applications: stationary power plants, transport vehicles and portable power. That is why world wide efforts are addressed to improvement of this technology. (Original)

  17. The effect of foxp3-overexpressing Treg cells on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiangzhou; Yu, Zigang; Xue, Lei; Wang, Jiabin; Li, Jun; Liu, Degang; Yang, Qiang; Lin, Yihui

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the novel mechanisms of forkhead box protein P3 (foxp3) in T regulatory (Treg) cells in lung cancer behavior. Treg cells were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and then co‑cultured with 95D cells. A plasmid overexpressing foxp3 was constructed and transfected into Treg cells and an MTS assay was performed to assess cell viability. Flow cytometry was performed to evaluate cell apoptosis and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure mRNA expression. A Transwell assay was used to assess cell invasion. Treg cells were successfully isolated from peripheral blood with purity of 94.26%. Foxp3 expression in Treg cells was significantly increased following co‑culture with 95D cells, while matrix metalloproteinase‑9 expression was upregulated in 95D cells co‑cultured with Treg cells. The apoptosis, invasion and migration abilities of 95D cells were suppressed by co‑culture with Treg cells, whereas the adhesive ability was enhanced. Foxp3 overexpression in Treg cells enhanced the viability and invasiveness of 95D cells, whereas cell adhesion and migration were decreased. The results of the present study demonstrate that the viability and invasiveness of 95D cells are enhanced by foxp3 overexpression in Treg cells, indicating that increased levels of foxp3 in the tumor microenvironment may promote tumor cell growth.

  18. WideCells Group PLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Peter

    2017-07-01

    WideCells Group PLC (Manchester, UK) is a global stem cell services company with the aim of leading a transformation in cord blood banking and stem cell treatment. There are three key divisions: WideCells, WideAcademy and CellPlan. WideCells provides contract, collaborative and in-house research, and stem cell processing and storage facilities for a wide range of human tissues. WideAcademy, the education and training branch of the WideCells Group, aims to become the thought leader in stem cell technology, influencing and informing the next generation of healthcare professionals working in stem cell technology. CellPlan is a first-of-its-kind medical insurance plan to make stem cell treatment accessible and affordable by providing access to renowned specialists and hospitals globally with financial cover for cord blood transplantation and for participation in clinical trials using cord blood.

  19. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, such as hemoglobin SC disease or sickle beta thalassemia . How Is Sickle Cell Disease Diagnosed? Sickle cell ... Test: Hemoglobin Electrophoresis Prenatal Genetic Counseling Genetic Testing Beta Thalassemia Sickle Cell Disease The Truth About Transfusions About ...

  20. Fuel cells: Problems and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, AK; Ramesh, KV; Kannan, AM

    1986-01-01

    n recent years, fuel cell technology has advanced significantly. Field trials on certain types of fuel cells have shown promise for electrical use. This article reviews the electrochemistry, problems and prospects of fuel cell systems.

  1. Cell Adhesions: Actin-Based Modules that Mediate Cell-Extracellular Matrix and Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Alexia; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Nelson, W. James; Bianchini, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    Cell adhesions link cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, and depend on interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. Both cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites contain discrete, yet overlapping functional modules. These modules establish physical association with the actin cytoskeleton, locally modulate actin organization and dynamics, and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. Interplay between these modules generates distinct actin architectures that underlie different stages, types, and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions. Actomyosin contractility is required to generate mature, stable adhesions, as well as sense and translate the mechanical properties of the cellular environment to changes in cell organization and behavior. In this chapter we discuss the organization and function of different adhesion modules and how they interact with the actin cytoskeleton. We highlight the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in adhesions, and how adhesion molecules mediate crosstalk between cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites. PMID:28679638

  2. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth / For Teens / Stem Cell Transplants What's ... Take to Recover? Coping Print What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  3. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2016-12-20

    The present invention includes an integrated planar, series connected fuel cell system having electrochemical cells electrically connected via interconnects, wherein the anodes of the electrochemical cells are protected against Ni loss and migration via an engineered porous anode barrier layer.

  4. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 13. Prat J. Ovarian sex cord - stromal and steroid cell tumors. In: Mutter GL, Prat J, eds. Pathology of ...

  5. FUEL CELLS IN ENERGY PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiaoyu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study fuel cells. They convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emmission of pollutants. This thesis provides an overview of fuel cell technology.The basic working principle of fuel cells and the basic fuel cell system components are introduced in this thesis. The properties, advantages, disadvantages and applications of six different kinds of fuel cells are introduced. Then the efficiency of each fuel cell is p...

  6. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...... includes multipoint intermolecular interactions that probably involve aggregation of both polymorphic and monomorphic T cell surface molecules. Such aggregations have been shown in vitro to markedly enhance and, in some cases, induce T cell activation. The production of T-derived lymphokines that have been...... implicated in B cell activation is dependent on the T cell receptor for antigen and its associated CD3 signalling complex. T-dependent help for B cell activation is therefore similarly MHC-restricted and involves T-B intercellular interaction. Recent reports that describe antigen-independent B cell...

  7. Mast cells & Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike eJönsson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Classically, allergy depends on IgE antibodies and on high-affinity IgE receptors expressed by mast cells and basophils. This long accepted IgE/FcεRI/mast cell paradigm, on which the definition of immediate hypersensitivity was based in the Gell and Coomb’s classification, appears too reductionist. Recently accumulated evidence indeed requires that not only IgE but also IgG antibodies, that not only FcεRI but also FcγR of the different types, that not only mast cells and basophils but also neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, and other myeloid cells by considered as important players in allergy. This view markedly changes our understanding of allergic diseases and, possibly, their treatment.

  8. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  9. Hurthle Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breath Hurthle cell cancer Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  10. Schwann Cell Myelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are essential for the rapid propagation of action potentials by saltatory conduction. They form as the result of reciprocal interactions between axons and Schwann cells. Extrinsic signals from the axon, and the extracellular matrix, drive Schwann cells to adopt a myelinating fate, whereas myelination reorganizes the axon for its role in conduction and is essential for its integrity. Here, we review our current understanding of the development, molecular organization, and function of myelinating Schwann cells. Recent findings into the extrinsic signals that drive Schwann cell myelination, their cognate receptors, and the downstream intracellular signaling pathways they activate will be described. Together, these studies provide important new insights into how these pathways converge to activate the transcriptional cascade of myelination and remodel the actin cytoskeleton that is critical for morphogenesis of the myelin sheath. PMID:26054742

  11. Lipocytes (fat cells) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to energy output, there is no expansion of fat cells (lipocytes) to accommodate excess. It is only when more calories are taken in than used that the extra fat is stored in the lipocytes and the person ...

  12. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  13. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  14. Conjugated Polymer Solar Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paraschuk, Dmitry Y

    2006-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Moscow State University as follows: Conjugated polymers are promising materials for many photonics applications, in particular, for photovoltaic and solar cell devices...

  15. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  16. White Blood Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... sample? Analysis of cell surface proteins Chromosomal analysis Cultures for bacteria Determination of the original arrangement of ...

  17. Plasma Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... sample? Analysis of cell surface proteins Chromosomal analysis Cultures for bacteria Determination of the original arrangement of ...

  18. Fuel cells flows study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riva, R.; Bador, B.; Marchand, M.; Lebaigue, O.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel cells are energy converters, which directly and continuously produce electricity from paired oxidation reduction-reactions: In most cases, the reactants are oxygen and hydrogen with water as residue. There are several types of fuel cells using various electrolytes and working at different temperatures. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells are, in particular, studied in the GESTEAU facility. PEMFC performance is chiefly limited by two thermal-hydraulic phenomena: the drying of membranes and the flooding of gas distributors. Up to now, work has been focused on water flooding of gas channels. This has showed the influence of flow type on the electrical behaviour of the cells and the results obtained have led to proposals for new duct geometries. (authors)

  19. Managing sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Claster, Susan; Vichinsky, Elliott P

    2003-01-01

    Advances are being made in the management of sickle cell disease for all age groups. This review discusses the progress in amelioration of symptoms, problems unique to particular age groups, and the types of drugs and treatments currently under investigation

  20. Cell Centred Database (CCDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Cell Centered Database (CCDB) is a web accessible database for high resolution 2D, 3D and 4D data from light and electron microscopy, including correlated imaging.

  1. Sperm cell proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Rafael; de Mateo, Sara; Estanyol, Josep Maria

    2009-02-01

    The spermatozoon is an accessible cell which can be easily purified and therefore it is particularly well suited for proteomic analysis. It is also an extremely differentiated cell with very marked genetic, cellular, functional and chromatin changes as compared to other cells, and has profound implications for fertility, embryo development and heredity. The recent developments in MS have boosted the potential for identification and study of the sperm proteins. Catalogues of hundreds to thousands of spermatozoan proteins in human and in model species are becoming available setting up the basis for subsequent research, diagnostic applications and the development of specific treatments. The present article reviews the available scientific publications dealing with the composition and function of the sperm cell using an MS proteomic approach.

  2. Beta Cell Breakthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough islets into a patient to achieve insulin independence." The so-called "Edmonton protocol" has some major ... in response to Melton's article in Cell, Baylor College of Medicine researcher Jake Kushner, MD, argued that ...

  3. T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Lymphoma (AITL) is a rare, aggressive type accounting for about seven percent of all patients with ... 100 Buildings Worldwide Will Join the Lymphoma Research Foundation to Light Red to Raise Awareness for Blood ...

  4. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  5. CAM and NK Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Takeda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that tumor development, outgrowth and metastasis are under the surveillance of the immune system. Although both innate and acquired immune systems play roles, innate immunity is the spearhead against tumors. Recent studies have revealed the critical role of natural killer (NK cells in immune surveillance and that NK cell activity is considerably influenced by various agents, such as environmental factors, stress, foods and drugs. Some of these NK cell stimulants have been used in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM since ancient times. Therefore, the value of CAM should be re-evaluated from this point of view. In this review, we overview the intimate correlation between NK cell functions and CAM agents, and discuss possible underlying mechanisms mediating this. In particular, neuro-immune crosstalk and receptors for CAM agents are the most important and interesting candidates for such mechanisms.

  6. Renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lining of very small tubes (tubules) in the kidney. ... Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... Follow your provider's recommendations in the treatment of kidney disorders, especially those that may require dialysis.

  7. Nanodiamond internalization in cells and the cell uptake mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevedentseva, E.; Hong, S.-F.; Huang, K.-J.; Chiang, I.-T.; Lee, C.-Y.; Tseng, Y.-T.; Cheng, C.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Cell type-dependent penetration of nanodiamond in living cells is one of the important factors for using nanodiamond as cellular markers/labels, for drug delivery as well as for other biomedical applications. In this work, internalization of 100 nm nanodiamonds by A549 lung human adenocarcinoma cell, Beas-2b non-tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cell, and HFL-1 fibroblast-like human fetal lung cell is studied and compared. The penetration of nanodiamond into the cells was observed using confocal fluorescence imaging and Raman imaging methods. Visualization of the nanodiamond in cells allows comparison of the internalization for diamond nanoparticles in cancer A549 cell, non-cancer HFL-1, and Beas-2b cells. The dose-dependent and time-dependent behavior of nanodiamond uptake is observed in both cancer as well as non-cancer cells. The mechanism of nanodiamond uptake by cancer and non-cancer cells is analyzed by blocking different pathways. The uptake of nanodiamond in both cancer and non-cancer cells was found predominantly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In spite of observed similarity in the uptake mechanism for cancer and non-cancer cells, the nanodiamond uptake for cancer cell quantitatively exceeds the uptake for non-cancer cells, for the studied cell lines. The observed difference in internalization of nanodiamond by cancer and non-cancer cells is discussed

  8. Nanodiamond internalization in cells and the cell uptake mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevedentseva, E. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics (China); Hong, S.-F.; Huang, K.-J. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Life Sciences (China); Chiang, I.-T.; Lee, C.-Y. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics (China); Tseng, Y.-T. [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Life Sciences (China); Cheng, C.-L., E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics (China)

    2013-08-15

    Cell type-dependent penetration of nanodiamond in living cells is one of the important factors for using nanodiamond as cellular markers/labels, for drug delivery as well as for other biomedical applications. In this work, internalization of 100 nm nanodiamonds by A549 lung human adenocarcinoma cell, Beas-2b non-tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cell, and HFL-1 fibroblast-like human fetal lung cell is studied and compared. The penetration of nanodiamond into the cells was observed using confocal fluorescence imaging and Raman imaging methods. Visualization of the nanodiamond in cells allows comparison of the internalization for diamond nanoparticles in cancer A549 cell, non-cancer HFL-1, and Beas-2b cells. The dose-dependent and time-dependent behavior of nanodiamond uptake is observed in both cancer as well as non-cancer cells. The mechanism of nanodiamond uptake by cancer and non-cancer cells is analyzed by blocking different pathways. The uptake of nanodiamond in both cancer and non-cancer cells was found predominantly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In spite of observed similarity in the uptake mechanism for cancer and non-cancer cells, the nanodiamond uptake for cancer cell quantitatively exceeds the uptake for non-cancer cells, for the studied cell lines. The observed difference in internalization of nanodiamond by cancer and non-cancer cells is discussed.

  9. Liquid fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorii L. Soloveichik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented.

  10. Liquid fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented.

  11. Liquid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Summary The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented. PMID:25247123

  12. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  13. Stem cells in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixia; Li, Junqin; Niu, Xuping; Liu, Ruifeng; Chang, Wenjuan; Zhao, Xincheng; Wang, Qiang; Li, Xinhua; Yin, Guohua; Zhang, Kaiming

    2017-06-01

    Psoriasis is a complex chronic relapsing inflammatory disease. Although the exact mechanism remains unknown, it is commonly accepted that the development of psoriasis is a result of multi-system interactions among the epidermis, dermis, blood vessels, immune system, neuroendocrine system, metabolic system, and hematopoietic system. Many cell types have been confirmed to participate in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Here, we review the stem cell abnormalities related to psoriasis that have been investigated recently. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Mouse ES cell-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Future stem cell-based therapies will benefit from the new discoveries being made on pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells. Understanding the genes regulating pluripotency has opened new opportunities to generate patient-tailored therapies. However, protocols for deriving progenitor cells of therapeutic grade from these pluripotent stem cells are not yet worked out. In particular the potential of these cells in treating diseases when compared to their adult progenitor counterparts is unknown. This is crucial work that needs to be studied in detail because we will need to determine engraftment potential of these cells and their ability for multi-lineage engraftment in the in vivo setting before any clinical applications. The ability of these cells to engraft is dependent on their expression of cell surface markers which guide their homing patterns. In this review, I discuss murine hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from mouse ES cells. Stem cells in the bone marrow are found in the bone marrow niches. Our knowledge of the bone marrow niches is growing and will ultimately lead to improved clinical transplantation of bone marrow cells. We are, however, a long way in appreciating how hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate and populate lymphoid tissues. One of the variables in generating hematopoietic progenitor cells is that different labs use different approaches in generating progenitor cells. In some cases, the ES cell lines used show some variability as well. The cell culture media used by the different investigators highly influence the maturation level of the cells and their homing patterns. Here, mouse ES cell-derived progenitor cells are discussed.

  15. Avian Primordial Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Takahiro; Miyahara, Daichi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Germ cells transmit genetic information to the next generation through gametogenesis. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first germ-cell population established during development, and are the common origins of both oocytes and spermatogonia. Unlike in other species, PGCs in birds undergo blood circulation to migrate toward the genital ridge, and are one of the major biological properties of avian PGCs. Germ cells enter meiosis and arrest at prophase I during embryogenesis in females, whereas in males they enter mitotic arrest during embryogenesis and enter meiosis only after birth. In chicken, gonadal sex differentiation occurs as early as embryonic day 6, but meiotic initiation of female germ cells starts from a relatively late stage (embryonic day 15.5). Retinoic acid controls meiotic entry in developing chicken gonads through the expressions of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2, a major retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme, and cytochrome P450 family 26, subfamily B member 1, a major retinoic acid-degrading enzyme. The other major biological property of avian PGCs is that they can be propagated in vitro for the long term, and this technique is useful for investigating proliferation mechanisms. The main factor involved in chicken PGC proliferation is fibroblast growth factor 2, which activates the signaling of MEK/ERK and thus promotes the cell cycle and anti-apoptosis. Furthermore, the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling is indispensable for the proliferation and survival of chicken PGCs.

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Hatzimichael

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eleftheria Hatzimichael1, Mark Tuthill21Department of Haematology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College National Health Service Trust, London, UKAbstract: More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications.Keywords: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complications

  17. Live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Richard

    2014-01-01

    It would be hard to argue that live-cell imaging has not changed our view of biology. The past 10 years have seen an explosion of interest in imaging cellular processes, down to the molecular level. There are now many advanced techniques being applied to live cell imaging. However, cellular health is often under appreciated. For many researchers, if the cell at the end of the experiment has not gone into apoptosis or is blebbed beyond recognition, than all is well. This is simply incorrect. There are many factors that need to be considered when performing live-cell imaging in order to maintain cellular health such as: imaging modality, media, temperature, humidity, PH, osmolality, and photon dose. The wavelength of illuminating light, and the total photon dose that the cells are exposed to, comprise two of the most important and controllable parameters of live-cell imaging. The lowest photon dose that achieves a measureable metric for the experimental question should be used, not the dose that produces cover photo quality images. This is paramount to ensure that the cellular processes being investigated are in their in vitro state and not shifted to an alternate pathway due to environmental stress. The timing of the mitosis is an ideal canary in the gold mine, in that any stress induced from the imaging will result in the increased length of mitosis, thus providing a control model for the current imagining conditions.

  18. Microbial Cell Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Sullivan, Claretta [Eastern Virginia Medical School; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is finding increasing application in a variety of fields including microbiology. Until the emergence of AFM, techniques for ivnestigating processes in single microbes were limited. From a biologist's perspective, the fact that AFM can be used to generate high-resolution images in buffers or media is its most appealing feature as live-cell imaging can be pursued. Imaging living cells by AFM allows dynamic biological events to be studied, at the nanoscale, in real time. Few areas of biological research have as much to gain as microbiology from the application of AFM. Whereas the scale of microbes places them near the limit of resolution for light microscopy. AFM is well suited for the study of structures on the order of a micron or less. Although electron microscopy techniques have been the standard for high-resolution imaging of microbes, AFM is quickly gaining favor for several reasons. First, fixatives that impair biological activity are not required. Second, AFM is capable of detecting forces in the pN range, and precise control of the force applied to the cantilever can be maintained. This combination facilitates the evaluation of physical characteristics of microbes. Third, rather than yielding the composite, statistical average of cell populations, as is the case with many biochemical assays, the behavior of single cells can be monitored. Despite the potential of AFM in microbiology, there are several limitations that must be considered. For example, the time required to record an image allows for the study of gross events such as cell division or membrane degradation from an antibiotic but precludes the evaluation of biological reactions and events that happen in just fractions of a second. Additionally, the AFM is a topographical tool and is restricted to imaging surfaces. Therefore, it cannot be used to look inside cells as with opticla and transmission electron microscopes. other practical considerations are the

  19. Microfluidics for single cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant

    Isolation and manipulation of single cells have gained an increasing interest from researchers because of the heterogeneity of cells from the same cell culture. Single cell analysis can ensure a better understanding of differences between individual cells and potentially solve a variety of clinical...... problems. In this thesis lab on a chip systems for rare single cell analysis are investigated. The focus was to develop a commercial, disposable device for circulating tumour cell (CTC) analysis. Such a device must be able to separate rare cells from blood samples and subsequently capture the specific...... cells, and simultaneously be fabricated and operated at low costs and be user-friendly. These challenges were addressed through development of two microfluidic devices, one for rare cell isolation based on pinched flow fractionation (PFF) and one for single cell capture based on hydrodynamic trapping...

  20. Germline and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reik, Wolf; Surani, M Azim

    2015-11-02

    Epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role in the germline and imprinting cycle. Germ cells show extensive epigenetic programming in preparation for the generation of the totipotent state, which in turn leads to the establishment of pluripotent cells in blastocysts. The latter are the cells from which pluripotent embryonic stem cells are derived and maintained in culture. Following blastocyst implantation, postimplantation epiblast cells develop, which give rise to all somatic cells as well as primordial germ cells, the precursors of sperm and eggs. Pluripotent stem cells in culture can be induced to undergo differentiation into somatic cells and germ cells in culture. Understanding the natural cycles of epigenetic reprogramming that occur in the germline will allow the generation of better and more versatile stem cells for both therapeutic and research purposes. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...... responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells...

  2. Bidirectional regulation between B cells and T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margry, B.

    2014-01-01

    B cells were often thought of as simple precursors of end-stage effector cells that are merely in charge of antibody production. Research in the last decades has shown that B cells possess important other roles as well, including their involvement in the regulation and functioning of T cell-mediated

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... failure was induced in vitro into hepatocytes-like cells by three cell culture media (serum-free medium (group 1), auto serum-containing medium (group 2) and medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) (group 3)). Cell morphology, cell growth curve, amount of urea and glycogen and mRNA expressions of ALB, ...

  4. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Establishment of cell lines with rat spermatogonial stem cell characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, Ans M. M.; Roepers-Gajadien, Hermien L.; Gademan, Iris S.; Creemers, Laura B.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; van Dissel-Emiliani, Federica M. F.

    2002-01-01

    Spermatogonial cell lines were established by transfecting a mixed population of purified rat A(s) (stem cells), A(pr) and A(al) spermatogonia with SV40 large T antigen. Two cell lines were characterized and found to express Hsp90alpha and oct-4, specific markers for germ cells and A spermatogonia,

  6. Optimizing cell viability in droplet-based cell deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Jan; Visser, C.W.; Henke, S.J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Biofabrication commonly involves the use of liquid droplets to transport cells to the printed structure. However, the viability of the cells after impact is poorly controlled and understood, hampering applications including cell spraying, inkjet bioprinting, and laser-assisted cell transfer. Here,

  7. Fuel Cell Electrodes for Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cell Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the design and evaluation of a hydrogen-air fuel cell module for use in a portable hydrid fuel cell -battery system. The fuel ... cell module consists of a stack of 20 single assemblies. Each assembly contains 2 electrically independent cells with a common electrolyte compartment

  8. Cell supermarket: Adipose tissue as a source of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adipose tissue is derived from numerous sources, and in recent years has been shown to provide numerous cells from what seemingly was a population of homogeneous adipocytes. Considering the types of cells that adipose tissue-derived cells may form, these cells may be useful in a variety of clinical ...

  9. Stabilization Of Apoptotic Cells: Generation Of Zombie Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Sánchez Alcázar

    2015-08-01

    Stabilization of apoptotic cells can be used for reliable detection and quantification of apoptosis in cultured cells and may allow a safer administration of apoptotic cells in clinical applications. Furthermore, it opens new avenues in the functional reconstruction of apoptotic cells for longer preservation.

  10. An Effective Feedback Loop between Cell-Cell Contact Duration and Morphogen Signaling Determines Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vanessa; Lang, Moritz; Krens, S F Gabriel; Pradhan, Saurabh J; Shamipour, Shayan; Sako, Keisuke; Sikora, Mateusz; Guet, Călin C; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2017-10-23

    Cell-cell contact formation constitutes an essential step in evolution, leading to the differentiation of specialized cell types. However, remarkably little is known about whether and how the interplay between contact formation and fate specification affects development. Here, we identify a positive feedback loop between cell-cell contact duration, morphogen signaling, and mesendoderm cell-fate specification during zebrafish gastrulation. We show that long-lasting cell-cell contacts enhance the competence of prechordal plate (ppl) progenitor cells to respond to Nodal signaling, required for ppl cell-fate specification. We further show that Nodal signaling promotes ppl cell-cell contact duration, generating a positive feedback loop between ppl cell-cell contact duration and cell-fate specification. Finally, by combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we show that this feedback determines whether anterior axial mesendoderm cells become ppl or, instead, turn into endoderm. Thus, the interdependent activities of cell-cell signaling and contact formation control fate diversification within the developing embryo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. β-Cell regeneration through the transdifferentiation of pancreatic cells: Pancreatic progenitor cells in the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic progenitor cell research has been in the spotlight, as these cells have the potential to replace pancreatic β-cells for the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetic patients with the absence or reduction of pancreatic β-cells. During the past few decades, the successful treatment of diabetes through transplantation of the whole pancreas or isolated islets has nearly been achieved. However, novel sources of pancreatic islets or insulin-producing cells are required to provide sufficient amounts of donor tissues. To overcome this limitation, the use of pancreatic progenitor cells is gaining more attention. In particular, pancreatic exocrine cells, such as duct epithelial cells and acinar cells, are attractive candidates for β-cell regeneration because of their differentiation potential and pancreatic lineage characteristics. It has been assumed that β-cell neogenesis from pancreatic progenitor cells could occur in pancreatic ducts in the postnatal stage. Several studies have shown that insulin-producing cells can arise in the duct tissue of the adult pancreas. Acinar cells also might have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. The present review summarizes recent progress in research on the transdifferentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, especially duct and acinar cells.

  12. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  13. Plant cell wall polysaccharide analysis during cell elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoyuan

    Plant cell walls are complex structures whose composition and architecture are important to various cellular activities. Plant cell elongation requires a high level of rearrangement of the cell wall polymers to enable cell expansion. However, the cell wall polysaccharides dynamics during plant cell...... elongation is poorly understood. This PhD project aims to elucidate the cell wall compositional and structural change during cell elongation by using Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP), microscopic techniques and molecular modifications of cell wall polysaccharide. Developing cotton fibre......, pea and Arabidopsis thaliana were selected as research models to investigate different types of cell elongation, developmental elongation and tropism elongation. A set of comprehensive analysis covering 4 cotton species and 11 time points suggests that non-cellulosic polysaccharides contribute...

  14. Reprogramming of retinoblastoma cancer cells into cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Fengming; Hirashima, Kanji; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Takizawa-Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2017-01-22

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in pediatric patients. It develops rapidly in the retina and can be fatal if not treated promptly. It has been proposed that a small population of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), initiate tumorigenesis from immature tissue stem cells or progenitor cells. Reprogramming technology, which can convert mature cells into pluripotent stem cells (iPS), provides the possibility of transducing malignant cancer cells back to CSCs, a type of early stage of cancer. We herein took advantage of reprogramming technology to induce CSCs from retinoblastoma cancer cells. In the present study, the 4 Yamanaka transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-myc, were transduced into retinoblastoma cells (Rbc51). iPS-like colonies were observed 15 days after transduction and showed significantly enhanced CSC properties. The gene and protein expression levels of pluripotent stem cell markers (Tra-1-60, Oct4, Nanog) and cancer stem cell markers (CD133, CD44) were up-regulated in transduced Rbc51 cells compared to control cells. Moreover, iPS-like CSCs could be sorted using the Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) method. A sphere formation assay demonstrated spheroid formation in transduced Rbc51 cells cultured in serum free media, and these spheroids could be differentiated into Pax6-, Nestin-positive neural progenitors and rhodopsin- and recoverin-positive mature retinal cells. The cell viability after 5-Fu exposure was higher in transduced Rbc51 cells. In conclusion, CSCs were generated from retinoblastoma cancer cells using reprogramming technology. Our novel method can generate CSCs, the study of which can lead to better understanding of cancer-specific initiation, cancer epigenetics, and the overlapping mechanisms of cancer development and pluripotent stem cell behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell proliferation alterations in Chlorella cells under stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rioboo, Carmen; O'Connor, Jose Enrique; Prado, Raquel; Herrero, Concepcion; Cid, Angeles

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about growth and proliferation in relation to the cell cycle regulation of algae. The lack of knowledge is even greater when referring to the potential toxic effects of pollutants on microalgal cell division. To assess the effect of terbutryn, a triazine herbicide, on the proliferation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris three flow cytometric approaches were used: (1) in vivo cell division using 5-,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining was measured, (2) the growth kinetics were determined by cytometric cell counting and (3) cell viability was evaluated with the membrane-impermeable double-stranded nucleic acid stain propidium iodide (PI). The results obtained in the growth kinetics study using CFSE to identify the microalgal cell progeny were consistent with those determined by cytometric cell counting. In all C. vulgaris cultures, each mother cell had undergone only one round of division through the 96 h of assay and the cell division occurred during the dark period. Cell division of the cultures exposed to the herbicide was asynchronous. Terbutryn altered the normal number of daughter cells (4 autospores) obtained from each mother cell. The number was only two in the cultures treated with 250 nM. The duration of the lag phase after the exposure to terbutryn could be dependent on the existence of a critical cell size to activate cytoplasmic division. Cell size, complexity and fluorescence of chlorophyll a of the microalgal cells presented a marked light/dark (day/night) cycle, except in the non-dividing 500 nM cultures, where terbutryn arrested cell division at the beginning of the cycle. Viability results showed that terbutryn has an algastatic effect in C. vulgaris cells at this concentration. The rapid and precise determination of cell proliferation by CFSE staining has allowed us to develop a model for assessing both the cell cycle of C. vulgaris and the in vivo effects of pollutants on growth and

  16. Cell proliferation alterations in Chlorella cells under stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioboo, Carmen [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); O' Connor, Jose Enrique [Laboratorio de Citomica, Unidad Mixta de Investigacion CIPF-UVEG, Centro de Investigacion Principe Felipe, Avda. Autopista del Saler, 16, 46013 Valencia (Spain); Prado, Raquel; Herrero, Concepcion [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, Angeles, E-mail: cid@udc.es [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain)

    2009-09-14

    Very little is known about growth and proliferation in relation to the cell cycle regulation of algae. The lack of knowledge is even greater when referring to the potential toxic effects of pollutants on microalgal cell division. To assess the effect of terbutryn, a triazine herbicide, on the proliferation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris three flow cytometric approaches were used: (1) in vivo cell division using 5-,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining was measured, (2) the growth kinetics were determined by cytometric cell counting and (3) cell viability was evaluated with the membrane-impermeable double-stranded nucleic acid stain propidium iodide (PI). The results obtained in the growth kinetics study using CFSE to identify the microalgal cell progeny were consistent with those determined by cytometric cell counting. In all C. vulgaris cultures, each mother cell had undergone only one round of division through the 96 h of assay and the cell division occurred during the dark period. Cell division of the cultures exposed to the herbicide was asynchronous. Terbutryn altered the normal number of daughter cells (4 autospores) obtained from each mother cell. The number was only two in the cultures treated with 250 nM. The duration of the lag phase after the exposure to terbutryn could be dependent on the existence of a critical cell size to activate cytoplasmic division. Cell size, complexity and fluorescence of chlorophyll a of the microalgal cells presented a marked light/dark (day/night) cycle, except in the non-dividing 500 nM cultures, where terbutryn arrested cell division at the beginning of the cycle. Viability results showed that terbutryn has an algastatic effect in C. vulgaris cells at this concentration. The rapid and precise determination of cell proliferation by CFSE staining has allowed us to develop a model for assessing both the cell cycle of C. vulgaris and the in vivo effects of pollutants on growth and

  17. Basal cell carcinoma: pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer in humans, which typically appears over the sun-exposed skin as a slow-growing, locally invasive lesion that rarely metastasizes. Although the exact etiology of BCC is unknown, there exists a well-established relationship between BCC and the pilo-sebaceous unit, and it is currently thought to originate from pluri-potential cells in the basal layer of the epidermis or the follicle. The patched/hedgehog intracellular signaling pathway plays a central role in both sporadic BCCs and nevoid BCC syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). This pathway is vital for the regulation of cell growth, and differentiation and loss of inhibition of this pathway is associated with development of BCC. The sonic hedgehog protein is the most relevant to BCC; nevertheless, the Patched (PTCH) protein is the ligand-binding component of the hedgehog receptor complex in the cell membrane. The other protein member of the receptor complex, smoothened (SMO), is responsible for transducing hedgehog signaling to downstream genes, leading to abnormal cell proliferation. The importance of this pathway is highlighted by the successful use in advanced forms of BCC of vismodegib, a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, that selectively inhibits SMO. The UV-specific nucleotide changes in the tumor suppressor genes, TP53 and PTCH, have also been implicated in the development of BCC.

  18. Limbal stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Merle

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in limbal stem cell transplantation. In addition to harvesting stem cells from a cadaver or a live related donor, it is now possible to cultivate limbal stem cells in vitro and then transplant them onto the recipient bed. A clear understanding of the basic disease pathology and a correct assessment of the extent of stem cell deficiency are essential. A holistic approach towards management of limbal stem cell deficiency is needed. This also includes management of the underlying systemic disease, ocular adnexal pathology and dry eye. Conjunctival limbal autografts from the healthy contralateral eye are performed for unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, tissue may be harvested from a cadaver or a living related donor; prolonged immunosuppression is needed to avoid allograft rejection in such cases. This review describes the surgical techniques, postoperative treatment regimes (including immunosuppression for allografts, the complications and their management. The short and long-term outcomes of the various modalities reported in the literature are also described.

  19. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  20. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  1. RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF PRIMARY CELLS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    ABSTRACT. Evaluation of the reliability of a primary cell took place in three stages: 192 cells went through a slow-discharged test. A designed experiment was conducted on 144 cells; there were three factors in the experiment: Storage temperature (three levels), thermal shock (two levels) and date code (two levels). 16 cells ...

  2. Sickle Cell Crisis (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis) KidsHealth / For Teens / Sickle Cell ... drepanocíticas (Crisis de dolor) What Is a Sickle Cell Crisis? Sickle cell disease changes the shape of ...

  3. Stem Cells in Burn Eschar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, V. C.; Vlig, M.; van Milligen-Kummer, F.J.; de Vries, S.I.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares mesenchymal cells isolated from excised burn wound eschar with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and dermal fibroblasts in their ability to conform to the requirements for multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). A population of multipotent stem cells in burn eschar could be an

  4. Sickle Cell Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Sickle Cell Disease What's in ... Well? Print en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is a blood disorder that's ...

  5. Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NETL

    2004-11-01

    Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

  6. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Growing awareness of heterogeneity in cells of microbial populations has emphasized the importance of advanced microscopy for visualization and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell variation. In this review, we highlight some of the recent advances in confocal...... for visualization of variation between cells in phenotypic traits such as gene expression....

  7. Primordial germ cell-like cells differentiated in vitro from skin-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Linher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that stem cells isolated from fetal porcine skin have the potential to form oocyte-like cells (OLCs in vitro. However, primordial germ cells (PGCs, which must also be specified during the stem cell differentiation to give rise to these putative oocytes at more advanced stages of culture, were not systematically characterized. The current study tested the hypothesis that a morphologically distinct population of cells derived from skin stem cells prior to OLC formation corresponds to putative PGCs, which differentiate further into more mature gametes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When induced to differentiate in an appropriate microenvironment, a subpopulation of morphologically distinct cells, some of which are alkaline phosphatase (AP-positive, also express Oct4, Fragilis, Stella, Dazl, and Vasa, which are markers indicative of germ cell formation. A known differentially methylated region (DMR within the H19 gene locus, which is demethylated in oocytes after establishment of the maternal imprint, is hypomethylated in PGC-like cells compared to undifferentiated skin-derived stem cells, suggesting that the putative germ cell population undergoes imprint erasure. Additional evidence supporting the germ cell identity of in vitro-generated PGC-like cells is that, when labeled with a Dazl-GFP reporter, these cells further differentiate into GFP-positive OLCs. SIGNIFICANCE: The ability to generate germ cell precursors from somatic stem cells may provide an in vitro model to study some of the unanswered questions surrounding early germ cell formation.

  8. Cell-cell interactions mediate cytoskeleton organization and collective endothelial cell chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the role of cell-cell and cell-ligand interactions in cytoskeleton organization of endothelial cells (ECs) and their directional migration within a microfluidic device. The migration of ECs in response to a biochemical factor was studied. Mathematical analysis of the cell migration pathways and cellular cytoskeleton revealed that directional migration, migration persistence length, migration speed, and cytoskeletal stress fiber alignment can be mediated by the level of cell contacts as well as the presence or absence of a biochemical polarizing factor. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, higher cell density and more frequent cell contacts has a reinforcing effect on collective cell chemotaxis. In contrast, in the absence of a polarizing factor, high cell density can decrease or suppress the ability of the cells to migrate. Also, the correlation of actin stress fiber organization and alignment with directional migration of ECs was investigated. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, stress fibers within the cytoskeleton of ECs can be significantly aligned parallel to the gradient direction when the cells have higher level of contacts. The results also show that the organization and alignment of actin stress fibers is mediated by cell adhesion junctions during collective cell migration and introduce cell-cell interactions as a key factor during collective cell chemotaxis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  10. Characterization of dominant giant rod-shaped magnetotactic bacteria from a low tide zone of the China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zhaojie; Zhang, Wenyan; Chen, Yiran; Pan, Hongmiao; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2017-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a group of Gram-negative bacteria that synthesize magnetic crystals, enabling them to navigate in relation to magnetic field lines. Morphologies of magnetotactic bacteria include spirillum, coccoid, rod, vibrio, and multicellular morphotypes. The coccid shape is generally the most abundant morphotype among magnetotactic bacteria. Here we describe a species of giant rod-shaped magnetotactic bacteria (designated QR-1) collected from sediment in the low tide zone of Huiquan Bay (Yellow Sea, China). This morphotype accounted for 90% of the magnetotactic bacteria collected, and the only taxonomic group which was detected in the sampling site. Microscopy analysis revealed that QR-1 cells averaged (6.71±1.03)×(1.54±0.20) μm in size, and contained in each cell 42-146 magnetosomes that are arranged in a bundle formed one to four chains along the long axis of the cell. The QR-1 cells displayed axial magnetotaxis with an average velocity of 70±28 μm/s. Transmission electron microscopy based analysis showed that QR-1 cells had two tufts of flagella at each end. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that QR-1 together with three other rod-shaped uncultivated magnetotactic bacteria are clustered into a deep branch of Alphaproteobacteria.

  11. Materials as stem cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  12. The role of Rap1 in cell-cell junction formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, M.R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Both epithelial and endothelial cells form cell-cell junctions at the cell-cell contacts to maintain tissue integrity. Proper regulation of cell-cell junctions is required for the organisation of the tissue and to prevent leakage of blood vessels. In endothelial cells, the cell-cell junctions are

  13. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro

  14. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  15. Fuel cells in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, G. [Technische Univ., Berlin (Germany); Hoehlein, B. [Research Center Juelich (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    A promising new power source for electric drive systems is the fuel cell technology with hydrogen as energy input. The worldwide fuel cell development concentrates on basic research efforts aiming at improving this new technology and at developing applications that might reach market maturity in the very near future. Due to the progress achieved, the interest is now steadily turning to the development of overall systems such as demonstration plants for different purposes: electricity generation, drive systems for road vehicles, ships and railroads. This paper does not present results concerning the market potential of fuel cells in transportation but rather addresses some questions and reflections that are subject to further research of both engineers and economists. Some joint effort of this research will be conducted under the umbrella of the IEA Implementing Agreement 026 - Annex X, but there is a lot more to be done in this challenging but also promising fields. (EG) 18 refs.

  16. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  17. Characterization of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, J.; Tuominen, E.; Nybergh, K.; Ezer, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Sinkkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Electrical and Communications Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Photovoltaic research began at the Electron Physics Laboratory of the Helsinki University of Tehnology in 1993, when the laboratory joined the national NEMO 2 research program. During the early stages of the photovoltaic research the main objective was to establish necessary measurement and characterisation routines, as well as to develop the fabrication process. The fabrication process development work has been supported by characterisation and theoretical modelling of the solar cells. Theoretical investigations have been concerned with systematic studies of solar cell parameters, such as diffusion lengths, surface recombination velocities and junction depths. The main result of the modelling and characterisation work is a method which is based on a Laplace transform of the so-called spatial collection efficiency function of the cell. The basic objective of the research has been to develop a fabrication process cheap enough to be suitable for commercial production

  18. Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Risø National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 °C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6A/cm2 with app. 30% H2 + 70% H2O in the inlet...... it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US$/kg H2 with an electricity price of 1.3 US¢/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test ofabout two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 °C, -0.5 A/cm2 with 50 vol% H2 the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h...

  19. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the determination of trace elements in nucleic acids and histones in human leukaemic cells by activation analysis are reported. The Cr 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Sb 2+ content of DNA and RNA of leukaemic cells compared to that of lymphocytes from a patient with infectious mononucleosis or a normal donor are shown tabulated. Similar comparisons are shown for the same trace metal content of histones isolated from the same type of cells. It is felt that the results afford further interesting speculation that trace metals may be involved in the interactions between histones and DNA (especially at the binding sites of histones to DNA), which affect transcription characteristics. (U.K.)

  20. ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE, EMF (CELLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, M.D.; Feldberg, S.W.

    1998-09-16

    The voltage or electric potential difference across the terminals of a cell when no current is drawn from it. The emf of a cell is the sum of the electric potential differences (PDs) produced by a separation of charges (electrons or ions) that can occur at each phase boundary (or interface) in the cell. The magnitude of each PD depends on the chemical nature of the two contacting phases. Thus, at the interface between two different metals, some electrons will have moved from the metal with a higher free energy of electrons to the metal with a lower free energy of electrons. The resultant charge separation will produce a PD (just as charge separation produces a voltage across a capacitor) that, at equilibrium, exactly opposes further electron flow. Similarly, PDs can be produced when electrons partition across a metal/solution interface or metal/solid interface, and when ions partition across a solution/membrane/solution interface.

  1. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  2. Dense pattern optical multipass cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Joel A [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-01-13

    A multiple pass optical cell and method comprising providing a pair of opposed cylindrical mirrors having curved axes with substantially equal focal lengths, positioning an entrance hole for introducing light into the cell and an exit hole for extracting light from the cell, wherein the entrance hole and exit hole are coextensive or non-coextensive, introducing light into the cell through the entrance hole, and extracting light from the cell through the exit hole.

  3. Dense pattern multiple pass cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Joel A.; Bomse, David S.

    2010-09-21

    An optical cell and a method of operating an optical cell comprising employing a first mirror comprising a first hole therein at approximately a center of the first mirror and through which laser light enters the cell, employing a second mirror comprising a second hole therein at approximately a center of the second mirror and through which laser light exits the cell, and forming a Lissajous pattern of spots on the mirrors by repeated reflection of laser light entering the cell.

  4. Radiosensitivity of mesothelioma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haekkinen, A.M.; Laasonen, A.; Linnainmaa, K.; Mattson, K.; Pyrhoenen, S.

    1996-01-01

    The present study was carried out in order to examine the radiosensitivity of malignant pleural mesothelioma cell lines. Cell kinetics, radiation-induced delay of the cell cycle and DNA ploidy of the cell lines were also determined. For comparison an HeLa and a human foetal fibroblast cell line were simultaneously explored. Six previously cytogenetically and histologically characterized mesothelioma tumor cell lines were applied. A rapid tiazolyl blue microtiter (MTT) assay was used to analyze radiosensitivity and cell kinetics and DNA ploidy of the cultured cells were determined by flow cytometry. The survival fraction after a dose of 2 Gy (SF2), parameters α and β of the linear quadratic model (LQ-model) and mean inactivation dose (D MID ) were also estimated. The DNA index of four cell lines equaled 1.0 and two cell lines equaled 1.5 and 1.6. Different mesothelioma cell lines showed a great variation in radiosensitivity. Mean survival fraction after a radiation dose of 2 Gy (SF2) was 0.60 and ranged from 0.36 to 0.81 and mean α value was 0.26 (range 0.48-0.083). The SF2 of the most sensitive diploid mesothelioma cell line was 0.36: Less than that of the foetal fibroblast cell line (0.49). The survival fractions (0.81 and 0.74) of the two most resistant cell lines, which also were aneuploid, were equal to that of the HeLa cell line (0.78). The α/β ratios of the most sensitive cell lines were almost an order of magnitude greater than those of the two most resistant cell lines. Radiation-induced delay of the most resistant aneuploid cell line was similar to that of HeLa cells but in the most sensitive (diploid cells) there was practically no entry into the G1 phase following the 2 Gy radiation dose during 36 h. (orig.)

  5. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  6. Clear cell chondrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.; David, R.; Cierney, G. III

    1985-01-01

    The clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic features of three cases of clear cell chondrosarcoma are described. On radiographs, this rather benign-appearing tumor resembles a chondroblastoma when it occurs at the end of a long bone, and may occasionally show a calcified matrix. However, it has distinctive tumor cells with a centrally placed vesicular nucleus surrounded by clear cytoplasm. The lesion has a low-grade malignancy and is amenable to en bloc surgical resection, which results in a much better prognosis than that of conventional chondrosarcoma.

  7. Iron sulphide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaoui, A.; Tributsch, H.

    1984-12-01

    The abundant, naturally occurring natural compound pyrite (FeS2) can be used as a semiconducting material for photoelectrochemical and photovoltaic solar cells. Unlike most of the intensively studied photoactive materials, pyrite solar cell production would never be limited by the availability of the elements or by their compatibility with the environment. An energy gap of 0.95 eV has been determined for pyrite, and it is noted that the theoretical efficiency limit for solar energy conversion in this material is of the order of 15-20 percent.

  8. Rectenna solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Moddel, Garret

    2013-01-01

    Rectenna Solar Cells discusses antenna-coupled diode solar cells, an emerging technology that has the potential to provide ultra-high efficiency, low-cost solar energy conversion. This book will provide an overview of solar rectennas, and provide thorough descriptions of the two main components: the diode, and the optical antenna. The editors discuss the science, design, modeling, and manufacturing of the antennas coupled with the diodes. The book will provide concepts to understanding the challenges, fabrication technologies, and materials required to develop rectenna structures. Written by e

  9. The illuminated plant cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Jaideep

    2007-11-01

    The past decade has provided biologists with a palette of genetically encoded, multicolored fluorescent proteins. The living plant cell turned into a 'coloring book' and today, nearly every text-book organelle has been highlighted in scintillating fluorescent colors. This review provides a concise listing of the earliest representative fluorescent-protein probes used to highlight various targets within the plant cell, and introduces the idea of using the numerous multicolor, subcellular probes for the development of an early intracellular response profile of plants.

  10. Characterization of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, J.; Tuominen, E.; Nybergh, K.; Ezer, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Sinkkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Electrical and Communications Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Photovoltaic research in the Electron Physics Laboratory started in 1993, when laboratory joined the national TEKES/NEMO 2 research program. Since the beginning of the project, characterization as well as experimentally orientated development of the fabrication process of the solar cells were carried out parallery. The process development research started by the initiatives of the Finnish industry. At the moment a large amount of the laboratory personnel works on solar cell research and the financing comes mainly from external projects. The funding for the research has come from TEKES, Ministry of Education, Finnish Academy, GETA graduate school, special equipment grants of the university, and from the laboratory

  11. Printed biofuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Jia, Wenzhao

    2016-11-22

    Methods, systems, and devices are disclosed for implementing a biofuel cell device for extracting energy from a biofuel. In one aspect, a biofuel cell device includes a substrate, an anode including a catalyst to facilitate the conversion of a fuel in a biological fluid in an oxidative process that releases electrons captured at the anode, thereby extracting energy from the fuel substance, a cathode configured on the substrate adjacent to the anode and separated from the anode by a spacing region, and a load electrically coupled to the anode and cathode via electrical interconnects to obtain the extracted energy as electrical energy.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  13. Fingerprints in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, K.

    1994-01-01

    Gene research has shown that factors causing cancer, or carcinogens, may leave marks typical of each particular carcinogen (fingerprints) in the genotype of the cell. Radiation, for instance, may leave such fingerprints in a cancer cell. In particular, the discovery of a gene called p53 has yielded much new information on fingerprints. It has been discovered, for example, that toxic fungus and UV-radiation each leave fingerprints in the p53 gene. Based on the detection of fingerprints, it may be possible in the future to tell a cancer patient what factor had trigged the maglinancy

  14. Silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, W R; Neitzert, H C

    2006-01-01

    The world of today must face up to two contradictory energy problems: on the one hand, there is the sharply growing consumer demand in countries such as China and India. On the other hand, natural resources are dwindling. Moreover, many of those countries which still possess substantial gas and oil supplies are politically unstable. As a result, renewable natural energy sources have received great attention. Among these, solar-cell technology is one of the most promising candidates. However, there still remains the problem of the manufacturing costs of such cells. Many attempts have been made

  15. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Walvekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the most common epithelial malignancy affecting the oral cavity. The most common sites for the development are lateral surface of tongue and floor of mouth; the least common sites are soft palate, gingiva, and buccal mucosa. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma can mimic a multitude of oral lesions and enlargements, especially those of inflammatory origin. In addition, predisposing and presenting factors are different from those of other OSCCs. Careful examination as well as routine biopsy are crucial for accurate diagnosis.

  16. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  17. Constant Flux of Spatial Niche Partitioning through High-Resolution Sampling of Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuang; Gilder, Stuart A; Orsi, William D; Zhao, Xiangyu; Petersen, Nikolai

    2017-10-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) swim along magnetic field lines in water. They are found in aquatic habitats throughout the world, yet knowledge of their spatial and temporal distribution remains limited. To help remedy this, we took MTB-bearing sediment from a natural pond, mixed the thoroughly homogenized sediment into two replicate aquaria, and then counted three dominant MTB morphotypes (coccus, spirillum, and rod-shaped MTB cells) at a high spatiotemporal sampling resolution: 36 discrete points in replicate aquaria were sampled every ∼30 days over 198 days. Population centers of the MTB coccus and MTB spirillum morphotypes moved in continual flux, yet they consistently inhabited separate locations, displaying significant anticorrelation. Rod-shaped MTB were initially concentrated toward the northern end of the aquaria, but at the end of the experiment, they were most densely populated toward the south. The finding that the total number of MTB cells increased over time during the experiment argues that population reorganization arose from relative changes in cell division and death and not from migration. The maximum net growth rates were 10, 3, and 1 doublings day -1 and average net growth rates were 0.24, 0.11, and 0.02 doublings day -1 for MTB cocci, MTB spirilla, and rod-shaped MTB, respectively; minimum growth rates for all three morphotypes were -0.03 doublings day -1 Our results suggest that MTB cocci and MTB spirilla occupy distinctly different niches: their horizontal positioning in sediment is anticorrelated and under constant flux. IMPORTANCE Little is known about the horizontal distribution of magnetotactic bacteria in sediment or how the distribution changes over time. We therefore measured three dominant magnetotactic bacterium morphotypes at 36 places in two replicate aquaria each month for 7 months. We found that the spatial positioning of population centers changed over time and that the two most abundant morphotypes (MTB cocci and MTB spirilla

  18. Translational initiation in Leishmania tarentolae and Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida) is strongly influenced by pre-ATG triplet and its 5´ sequence context

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Julius; Paris, Zdeněk; Regmi, Sandesh; Breitling, R.; Mureev, S.; Kushnir, S.; Pyatkov, K.; Jirků, Milan; Alexandrov, K. A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 2 (2006), s. 125-132 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS600220554 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) AL484/5-3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Kinetoplastida * translation * initiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.641, year: 2006

  19. The X-ray source Serpens X-1 - Ariel 5 observations and discussion of models for the spectrum and time variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, M. J.; Engel, A. R.; Quenby, J. J.; Carpenter, G. F.; Bell-Burnell, S. J.; Davison, P. J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data from Ariel 5 on the spectral shape and time variability of Ser X-1 are presented, and possible explanations for the observations are discussed in terms of current theoretical suggestions for source emission. The observations are summarized in the form of a light curve for 3-7.6-keV photons. The data are fitted with a power law of index -2.3, which yields a hydrogen column density of (1.1 + or - 0.4) x 10 to the 22nd power atoms/sq cm. No persistent periodicity of amplitude greater than 5% of the steady flux is found, but evidence of statistically significant burst activity is obtained. Various emission mechanisms are considered for the time-averaged spectrum and the X-ray bursts. It is suggested that the inverse Compton mechanism is a likely cause for the emission from this source and that the source is radiating near the Eddington limit.

  20. Dust, ice and gas in time (DIGIT) : Herschel and Spitzer spectro-imaging of SMM3 and SMM4 in Serpens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dionatos, O.; Jørgensen, J.; Green, J.; Herczeg, G.; Evans, N.; Kristensen, L.; Lindberg, J.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Mid- and far-infrared observations of the environment around embedded protostars reveal a plethora of high excitation molecular and atomic emission lines. Different mechanisms for the origin of these lines have been proposed, including shocks induced by protostellar jets and radiation or

  1. Comparative analysis of respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation in Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verner, Zdeněk; Čermáková, P.; Škodová, Ingrid; Kováčová, B.; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 1 (2014), s. 55-65 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA MŠk LH12104 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrion * oxidative phosphorylation * Trypanosoma * Leishmania * Phytomonas * Crithidia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.787, year: 2014

  2. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  3. Recent Progress in Cell Reprogramming Technology for Cell Transplantation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells opened the gate for reprogramming technology with which we can change the cell fate through overexpression of master transcriptional factors. Now we can prepare various kinds of neuronal cells directly induced from somatic cells. It has been reported that overexpression of a neuron-specific transcriptional factors might change the cell fate of endogenous astroglia to neuronal cells in vivo. In addition, some research groups demonstrated that chemical compound can induce chemical-induced neuronal cells, without transcriptional factors overexpression. In this review, we briefly review recent progress in the induced neuronal (iN) cells, and discuss the possibility of application for cell transplantation therapy.

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  5. Bio optofluidics cell sorter: cell-BOCS concept and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Tue; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-03-01

    The cell-BOCS is a novel microfluidics based cell-sorting instrument utilizing next generation optical trapping technology developed at the Technical University of Denmark. It is targeted emerging bio-medical research and diagnostics markets where it for certain applications offers a number of advantages over conventional fluorescence activated cell-sorting (FACSTM) technology. Advantages include gentle handling of cells, sterile sorting, easy operation, small footprint and lower cost allowing out-of-core-facility use. Application examples are found within sorting of fragile transfected cells, high value samples and primary cell lines, where traditional FACS technology has limited application due to it's droplet-based approach to cell-sorting. In the diagnostics field, in particular applying the cell-BOCS for isolating pure populations of circulating tumor cells is an area that has generated a lot of interest.

  6. Microencapsulating and Banking Living Cells for Cell-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wujie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge to the eventual success of the emerging cell-based medicine such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and cell transplantation is the limited availability of the desired cell sources. This challenge can be addressed by cell microencapsulation to overcome the undesired immune response (i.e., to achieve immunoisolation so that non-autologous cells can be used to treat human diseases, and by cell/tissue preservation to bank living cells for wide distribution to end users so that they are readily available when needed in the future. This review summarizes the status quo of research in both cell microencapsulation and banking the microencapsulated cells. It is concluded with a brief outlook of future research directions in this important field.

  7. Stochastic models for cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalin, Evgeny; Sun, Sean

    2013-03-01

    The probability of cell division per unit time strongly depends of age of cells, i.e., time elapsed since their birth. The theory of cell populations in the age-time representation is systematically applied for modeling cell division for different spreads in generation times. We use stochastic simulations to address the same issue at the level of individual cells. Our approach unlike deterministic theory enables to analyze the size fluctuations of cell colonies at different growth conditions (in the absence and in the presence of cell death, for initially synchronized and asynchronous cell populations, for conditions of restricted growth). We find the simple quantitative relation between the asymptotic values of relative size fluctuations around mean values for initially synchronized cell populations under growth and the coefficients of variation of generation times. Effect of initial age distribution for asynchronous growth of cell cultures is also studied by simulations. The influence of constant cell death on fluctuations of sizes of cell populations is found to be essential even for small cell death rates, i.e., for realistic growth conditions. The stochastic model is generalized for biologically relevant case that involves both cell reproduction and cell differentiation.

  8. Fuel Cell Testing - Degradation of Fuel Cells and its Impact on Fuel Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    PFRANG Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play a major role in the future energy supply, especially polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells could become an integral part in future cars. Reduction of degradation of fuel cell performance while keeping fuel cell cost under control is the key for an introduction into mass markets.

  9. Focal Adhesion Kinase regulates cell-cell contact formation in epithelial cells via modulation of Rho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Playford, Martin P.; Vadali, Kavita; Cai Xinming; Burridge, Keith; Schaller, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and survival. Recent studies have also implicated FAK in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Here, evidence is presented showing that siRNA-mediated suppression of FAK levels in NBT-II cells and expression of dominant negative mutants of FAK caused loss of epithelial cell morphology and inhibited the formation of cell-cell adhesions. Rac and Rho have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cell adhesions and can be regulated by FAK signaling. Expression of active Rac or Rho in NBT-II cells disrupted formation of cell-cell contacts, thus promoting a phenotype similar to FAK-depleted cells. The loss of intercellular contacts in FAK-depleted cells is prevented upon expression of a dominant negative Rho mutant, but not a dominant negative Rac mutant. Inhibition of FAK decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP and elevated the level of GTP-bound Rho. This suggests that FAK regulates cell-cell contact formation by regulation of Rho

  10. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  11. Sertoli cells maintain Leydig cell number and peritubular myoid cell activity in the adult mouse testis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Rebourcet

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health.

  12. Cell wall, cytoskeleton, and cell expansion in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2014-04-01

    To accommodate two seemingly contradictory biological roles in plant physiology, providing both the rigid structural support of plant cells and the adjustable elasticity needed for cell expansion, the composition of the plant cell wall has evolved to become an intricate network of cellulosic, hemicellulosic, and pectic polysaccharides and protein. Due to its complexity, many aspects of the cell wall influence plant cell expansion, and many new and insightful observations and technologies are forthcoming. The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers and the roles of the variety of proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis continue to be characterized. The interactions within the cell wall polymer network and the modification of these interactions provide insight into how the plant cell wall provides its dual function. The complex cell wall architecture is controlled and organized in part by the dynamic intracellular cytoskeleton and by diverse trafficking pathways of the cell wall polymers and cell wall-related machinery. Meanwhile, the cell wall is continually influenced by hormonal and integrity sensing stimuli that are perceived by the cell. These many processes cooperate to construct, maintain, and manipulate the intricate plant cell wall--an essential structure for the sustaining of the plant stature, growth, and life.

  13. Choosing Cell Fate Through a Dynamic Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyue; Hartman, Amaleah; Guo, Shangqin

    2015-01-01

    A close relationship between proliferation and cell fate specification has been well documented in many developmental systems. In addition to the gradual cell fate changes accompanying normal development and tissue homeostasis, it is now commonly appreciated that cell fate could also undergo drastic changes, as illustrated by the induction of pluripotency from many differentiated somatic cell types during the process of Yamanaka reprogramming. Strikingly, the drastic cell fate change induced by Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc) is preceded by extensive cell cycle acceleration. Prompted by our recent discovery that progression toward pluripotency from rare somatic cells could bypass the stochastic phase of reprogramming and that a key feature of these somatic cells is an ultrafast cell cycle (~8 h/cycle), we assess whether cell cycle dynamics could provide a general framework for controlling cell fate. Several potential mechanisms on how cell cycle dynamics may impact cell fate determination by regulating chromatin, key transcription factor concentration, or their interactions are discussed. Specific challenges and implications for studying and manipulating cell fate are considered.

  14. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular events leading to the establishment of cancer initiating cells and how these mechanisms relate to cellular transitions during tumourigenesis. We use an in vitro system to recapitulate changes in CRC cells at the invasive front (mesenchymal-like cells) and central mass (epithelial-like cells) of tumours. We show that the mesoderm inducer BRACHYURY is expressed in a subpopulation of CRC cells that resemble invasive front mesenchymal-like cells, where it acts to impose characteristics of CSCs in a fully reversible manner, suggesting reversible formation and modulation of such cells. BRACHYURY, itself regulated by the oncogene β-catenin, influences NANOG and other 'stemness' markers including a panel of markers defining CRC-CSC whose presence has been linked to poor patient prognosis. Similar regulation of NANOG through BRACHYURY was observed in other cells lines, suggesting this might be a pathway common to cancer cells undergoing mesenchymal transition. We suggest that BRACHYURY may regulate NANOG in mesenchymal-like CRC cells to impose a 'plastic-state', allowing competence of cells to respond to signals prompting invasion or metastasis. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  15. Chromosome aberrations and cell survival in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremp, J.

    1981-01-01

    A possible correlation between chromosome aberrations and reduced proliferation capacity or cell death was investigated. Synchronized Chinese hamster fibroblast cells were irradiated with 300 rad of x rays in early G 1 . Despite synchronization the cells reached the subsequent mitosis at different times. The frequency of chromosome aberrations was determined in the postirradiation division at 2-h intervals. The highest frequency occurred in cells with a first cell cycle of medium length. The colony-forming ability of mitotic cells was measured in parallel samples by following the progress of individual mitoses. The proportion of cells forming macrocolonies decreased with increasing cell cycle length, and the number of non-colony-forming cells increased. Irrespective of various first cell cycle lengths and different frequencies of chromosome aberrations, the number of cells forming microcolonies remained constant. A correlation was found between the absence of chromosome aberrations and the ability of cells to form macrocolonies. However, cells with a long first cell cycle formed fewer macrocolonies than expected

  16. Asymmetric cell division in polyploid giant cancer cells and low eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Yijia; Zhang, Shiwu

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is critical for generating cell diversity in low eukaryotic organisms. We previously have reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) induced by cobalt chloride demonstrate the ability to use an evolutionarily conserved process for renewal and fast reproduction, which is normally confined to simpler organisms. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which reproduces by asymmetric cell division, has long been a model for asymmetric cell division studies. PGCCs produce daughter cells asymmetrically in a manner similar to yeast, in that both use budding for cell polarization and cytokinesis. Here, we review the results of recent studies and discuss the similarities in the budding process between yeast and PGCCs.

  17. Selfish cells in altruistic cell society - a theoretical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, M

    1993-09-01

    In multicellular organisms, internal evolution of individual cells is strictly forbidden and 'evolutional' DNA replication should be performed only by the sexual reproduction system. Wholistic negative control system called 'homeostasis' serves all service to germ line cells. All somatic cells are altruistic to the germ line cells. However, in malignant tumors, it seems that individual cells replicate and behave 'selfishly' and evolve against the internal microenvironment. Tumor cells only express the occult selfishness which is programmed in normal cells a priori. This phenomenon is based on the failure of identical DNA replication, and results in 'autonomy' and 'anomie' of cellular society as shown in tumor cells. Genetic programs of normal cells connote this cellular autonomy and anomie introduced by the deletion of regulators on structure genes. It is rather paradoxical that the somatic cells get their freedom from wholistic negative regulation programmed internally. However, this is not a true paradox, since multicellular organisms have clearly been evolved from 'monads' in which cells proliferate without wholistic regulation. Somatic cells revolt against germ cell DNA, called 'selfish replicator' by Dawkins. It is an inevitable destiny that the 'selfishness' coded in genome should be revenged by itself. Selfish replicator in germ cell line should be revolted by its selfishness in the expansion of somatic cells, since they have an orthogenesis to get more selfishness in order to increase their genome. Tumor heterogeneity and progression can be fully explained by this self-contradictory process which produces heterogeneous gene copies different from the original clone in the tumor, although 'selfish' gene replication is the final target of being. Furthermore, we have to discard the concept of clonality of tumor cells since genetic instability is a fundamental feature of tumors. Finally, tumor cells and proto-oncogenes can be considered as the ultimate parasite

  18. Activation of glioma cells generates immune tolerant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Wu, Wei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Ren, Gang; Fan, Wenhai

    2014-12-12

    Therapeutic outcomes of glioma are currently not encouraging. Tumor tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of glioma. It is reported that micro RNAs (miR) are associated with tumor development. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-92a in the development of tolerant natural killer T (NKT) cells. In this study, U87 cells (a human glioma cell line) and primary glioma cells were prepared. The assessment of miR-92a was performed by real time RT-PCR. The expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 in NKT cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results showed that abundant IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells were detected in glioma tissue. Cultures of glioma cells and NKT cells induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in NKT cells. Glioma cells expressed miR-92a; the latter played a critical role in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 expression in NKT cells. The expression of the antitumor molecules, including perforin, Fas ligand, and interferon-γ, was significantly attenuated compared with control NKT cells. The IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells showed less capability in the induction of apoptosis in glioma cells, but showed the immune suppressor functions on CD8(+) T cell activities. We conclude that glioma-derived miR-92a induces IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells; this fraction of NKT cells can suppress cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Cell biology of mesangial cells: the third cell that maintains the glomerular capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Hidetake; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2017-03-01

    The renal glomerulus consists of glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells, which cooperate with each other for glomerular filtration. We have produced monoclonal antibodies against glomerular cells in order to identify different types of glomerular cells. Among these antibodies, the E30 clone specifically recognizes the Thy1.1 molecule expressed on mesangial cells. An injection of this antibody into rats resulted in mesangial cell-specific injury within 15 min, and induced mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis in a reproducible manner. We examined the role of mesangial cells in glomerular function using several experimental tools, including an E30-induced nephritis model, mesangial cell culture, and the deletion of specific genes. Herein, we describe the characterization of E30-induced nephritis, formation of the glomerular capillary network, mesangial matrix turnover, and intercellular signaling between glomerular cells. New molecules that are involved in a wide variety of mesangial cell functions are also introduced.

  20. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  1. Fake news portrayals of stem cells and stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro R; Murdoch, Blake; Caulfield, Timothy

    2017-10-01

    This study examines how stem cells and stem cell research are portrayed on websites deemed to be purveyors of distorted and dubious information. Content analysis was conducted on 224 articles from 2015 to 2016, compiled by searching with the keywords 'stem cell(s)' on a list of websites flagged for containing either 'fake' or 'junk science' news. Articles contained various exaggerated positive and negative claims about stem cells and stem cell science, health and science related conspiracy theories, and statements promoting fear and mistrust of conventional medicine. Findings demonstrate the existence of organized misinformation networks, which may lead the public away from accurate information and facilitate a polarization of public discourse.

  2. Development of PEM fuel cell technology at international fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The PEM technology has not developed to the level of phosphoric acid fuel cells. Several factors have held the technology development back such as high membrane cost, sensitivity of PEM fuel cells to low level of carbon monoxide impurities, the requirement to maintain full humidification of the cell, and the need to pressurize the fuel cell in order to achieve the performance targets. International Fuel Cells has identified a hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell concept that leverages recent research advances to overcome major economic and technical obstacles.

  3. 2-Aminopurine overrides multiple cell cycle checkpoints in BHK cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, P R; Margolis, R L

    1992-01-01

    BHK cells blocked at any of several points in the cell cycle override their drug-induced arrest and proceed in the cycle when exposed concurrently to the protein kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine (2-AP). For cells arrested at various points in interphase, 2-AP-induced cell cycle progression is made evident by arrival of the drug-treated cell population in mitosis. Cells that have escaped from mimosine G1 arrest, from hydroxyurea or aphidicolin S-phase arrest, or from VM-26-induced G2 arrest subs...

  4. NASA Facts, Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The design and function of solar cells as a source of electrical power for unmanned space vehicles is described in this pamphlet written for high school physical science students. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  5. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable sca...

  6. Granular Cell Tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrosis within the tumor was absent, no mitosis was. Granular cell tumors are seldom diagnosed identified in the section and the edges of the accurately clinically. The lesion in this case was sample were tumor free (Figure 2). mistaken for a sebaceous cyst and following ulceration resembled carcinoma of the vulvar.

  7. Cell Membrane Coating Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H; Kroll, Ashley V; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-03-27

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutic, prevention, and detection modalities have the potential to greatly impact how diseases are diagnosed and managed in the clinic. With the wide range of nanomaterials available, the rational design of nanocarriers on an application-specific basis has become increasingly commonplace. Here, a comprehensive overview is provided on an emerging platform: cell-membrane-coating nanotechnology. As a fundamental unit of biology, cells carry out a wide range of functions, including the remarkable ability to interface and interact with their surrounding environment. Instead of attempting to replicate such functions via synthetic techniques, researchers are now directly leveraging naturally derived cell membranes as a means of bestowing nanoparticles with enhanced biointerfacing capabilities. This top-down technique is facile, highly generalizable, and has the potential to greatly augment existing nanocarriers. Further, the introduction of a natural membrane substrate onto nanoparticles surfaces has enabled additional applications beyond those traditionally associated with nanomedicine. Despite its relative youth, there exists an impressive body of literature on cell membrane coating, which is covered here in detail. Overall, there is still significant room for development, as researchers continue to refine existing workflows while finding new and exciting applications that can take advantage of this developing technology. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Criticality in cell differentiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indrani Bose

    2017-11-09

    Nov 9, 2017 ... diverse as ecosystems, financial markets, population biology and complex diseases (Scheffer et al. 2009, 2012). Similar studies on the signatures of regime .... and in the maintenance of homeostasis in adult tissues. (Semrau and van Oudenaarden 2015). Cell differentiation occurs when the undifferentiated ...

  9. The cell phone dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, J.; Wiedemann, P.

    2008-01-01

    It is explored if and how the Media generate social technophobias and in particular provoke antagonism against Cell Phones. The role of science and politics in this context is discussed. The authors caution against a progressive creation of hysteria in risk debates. (orig.)

  10. Infections and endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Tymen T.; Mairuhu, Albert T. A.; de Kruif, Martijn D.; Klein, Saskia K.; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; ten Cate, Hugo; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Levi, Marcel; van Gorp, Eric C. M.

    2003-01-01

    Systemic infection by various pathogens interacts with the endothelium and may result in altered coagulation, vasculitis and atherosclerosis. Endothelium plays a role in the initiation and regulation of both coagulation and fibrinolysis. Exposure of endothelial cells may lead to rapid activation of

  11. Goblet cell carcinoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ingrid Holst; Holt, Nanna; Langer, Seppo W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids (GCCs) exhibit neuroendocrine and adenocarcinoma features. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Analysis of demography, pathology, prognostic markers, treatment and survival in 83 GCC patients (f/m: 56/27) diagnosed 1992-2013. RESULTS: Median age for f/m was 59...

  12. Cell Phone RF Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article in "Physics Today," Meredith and Redish emphasized the need to make introductory physics courses beneficial for life sciences majors. In this study, a lab activity is proposed to measure the intensity of electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones and connect these measurements to various standards, biological…

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  14. Reliance Cell Operator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Reliance Cell Operator. Reliance was the only bidder for cellular licences for Assam and NE. Services allowed only in Guwahati and Shillong due to “security reasons”. Only major cities in the country with only one operator.

  15. FUEL CELL BIBLIOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    References in this bibliography on fuel cells are arranged alphabetically by the authors. References for which no author is cited are arranged alphabetically by title under the general heading, Anon. The numerous references cover the time period of 1895 to 1961.

  16. Criticality in cell differentiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The differentiation dynamics have both deterministic andstochastic components. Several theoretical studies suggest that cell differentiation is a bifurcation phenomenon, well-knownin dynamical systems theory. The bifurcation point has the character of a critical point with the system dynamics exhibitingspecific features in its ...

  17. Mammalian cell biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the molecular biology and functional changes in cultured mammalian cells following exposure to x radiation, uv radiation, fission neutrons, or various chemical environmental pollutants alone or in combinations. Emphasis was placed on the separate and combined effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons released during combustion of fossil fuels and ionizing and nonionizing radiations. Sun lamps, which emit a continuous spectrum of near ultraviolet light of 290 nm to 315 nm were used for studies of predictive cell killing due to sunlight. Results showed that exposure to uv light (254 nm) may not be adequate to predict effects produced by sunlight. Data are included from studies on single-strand breaks and repair in DNA of cultured hamster cells exposed to uv or nearultraviolet light. The possible interactions of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)-anthracene (DmBA) alone or combined with exposure to x radiation, uv radiation (254 nm) or near ultraviolet simulating sunlight were compared for effects on cell survival

  18. Cell Towers and Songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Michelle; Mesa, Jennifer; Milton, Katie

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how our common addiction to cell phones was used to launch a discussion about their use, impacts on the environment, and connections to issues of civic concern. By encouraging middle school science students to adopt the perspectives of special-interest groups debating communication tower restrictions designed to protect…

  19. Fuel cell electronics packaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuang, Ken; Easler, Keith

    2007-01-01

    ... more energy independent. Despite the fact that the primary focus of the new initiative revolved around automotive technologies, the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative was crafted into a balanced program that benefited a wide range of technologies and applications, including micro, portable, stationary fuel cells. This massive effort was given an addition...

  20. Cell control with agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir Peter Boots; Ir. Dick van Schenk Brill

    2000-01-01

    A software system is described that uses the agent concept in the Cell Control layer. Important design goals are: the system continues as good as possible after a process crash, crashed processes are recreated whenever possible, and equivalent workstations are allocated dynamically. This project is

  1. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    Trace metals were measured by neutron-activation analyses in purified nucleic acids and histone(s) of lymphocytes from patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia or infectious mononucleosis, and from normal donors. DNA isolated from lymphocytes of a patient with infectious mononucleosis and a normal donor showed a high content of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , whereas DNA of lymphoblasts from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia had a lower content of these trace metals, but the Co 2+ content was 20-fold higher than in DNA of normal donor lymphocytic cells. Total histones from leukaemic cells had higher contents of most of the trace metals except for Zn 2+ , which was present in lesser concentration than in histones from normal donor lymphocytic cells. Lysine-rich (F1) histones showed lower contents of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ and Co 2+ , whereas arginine-rich (F3) histones had significantly higher contents of these trace metals. These observations may be of interest in that F3 histones more effectively inhibit RNA synthesis in human lymphocytic cells than do other species of histones. (author)

  2. Sickle cell anemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    to chronic pain, strokes and premature death has been reported by CBS News,. U.S.A. in background of the fact that ..... Since the pain of sickle cell ane- mia comes from blood vessels be- ing blocked off, another method ... from the umbilical cord and placenta at child birth. Cord blood transplants are especially promising for ...

  3. Eukaryotic Cell Panorama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. This report describes the scientific results that support an illustration of a eukaryotic cell, enlarged by one million times to show the distribution and arrangement of macromolecules. The panoramic cross section includes eight panels that extend…

  4. Unmasking circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennenhuis, Joost Franciscus

    2017-01-01

    The number of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) that can be isolated from blood of cancer patients is prognostic for the course of the disease. A higher number of CTCs correlates with a worse prognosis. A change from a higher number to a lower number of CTCs indicates a benefit of the current treatment

  5. Intraosseous acinic cell carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-17

    Dec 17, 2011 ... provisional diagnosis of benign odontogenic tumor was given. Intraosseous acinic cell carcinoma. V Hiremath, N Mishra1, SG Patil2. Departments of Oral Pathology and 1Oral Medicine and Radiology, Mansarovar Dental College, Bhopal, 2 Department Of. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, H.K.E' S.N. Dental ...

  6. Nature's Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Nature's Solar Cell. Stephen Suresh Gautham Nadig. Research News Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 102-104. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/02/0102-0104 ...

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  8. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  9. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  10. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades......, but the mechanisms involved are still not clarified. In this review the information obtained in previous studies is recapitulated together with some of the current attempts to resolve the controversy in the field: identification of the putative progenitor cells, identification of the factors involved...

  11. Dendritic cell neoplasms: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairouz, Sebastien; Hashash, Jana; Kabbara, Wadih; McHayleh, Wassim; Tabbara, Imad A

    2007-10-01

    Dendritic cell neoplasms are rare tumors that are being recognized with increasing frequency. They were previously classified as lymphomas, sarcomas, or histiocytic neoplasms. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies dendritic cell neoplasms into five groups: Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, Langerhans' cell sarcoma, Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, and Dendritic cell sarcoma, not specified otherwise (Jaffe, World Health Organization classification of tumors 2001; 273-289). Recently, Pileri et al. provided a comprehensive immunohistochemical classification of histiocytic and dendritic cell tumors (Pileri et al., Histopathology 2002;59:161-167). In this article, a concise overview regarding the pathological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of follicular dendritic, interdigitating dendritic, and Langerhans' cell tumors is presented.

  12. Clear cells in acral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuth, M; Spötl, L; Zelger, B; Weinlich, G; Zelger, B

    2001-01-01

    Acral melanoma may present clinically and histologically with atypical features causing a delay in proper diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency of a histological variant with clear cell changes. Clinical information, hematoxylin & eosin stained paraffin sections and immunohistochemical staining profiles were reviewed in 49 cases of acral melanoma. Twenty-one (43%) specimens contained tumor cells with clear cell changes in focal areas, whereas in 7 (14%) specimens clear cells were the major tumor constituting cells. The tumor thickness ranged from melanoma in situ to 14 mm. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated weak staining for S100 and HMB45 as well as strong positivity for Melan A and NK1C3. Recognition of clear cell features is important since differential diagnosis includes a variety of other clear cell malignancies, among them metastasis from renal cell carcinoma, clear cell sarcoma and hidradenocarcinoma.

  13. BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED HARDWARE CELL ARCHITECTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed is a system comprising: - a reconfigurable hardware platform; - a plurality of hardware units defined as cells adapted to be programmed to provide self-organization and self-maintenance of the system by means of implementing a program expressed in a programming language defined as DNA...... language, where each cell is adapted to communicate with one or more other cells in the system, and where the system further comprises a converter program adapted to convert keywords from the DNA language to a binary DNA code; where the self-organisation comprises that the DNA code is transmitted to one...... or more of the cells, and each of the one or more cells is adapted to determine its function in the system; where if a fault occurs in a first cell and the first cell ceases to perform its function, self-maintenance is performed by that the system transmits information to the cells that the first cell has...

  14. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...

  15. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  16. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, Bill [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Gangi, Jennifer [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Curtin, Sandra [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Delmont, Elizabeth [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  17. Memory B and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitetta, E S; Berton, M T; Burger, C; Kepron, M; Lee, W T; Yin, X M

    1991-01-01

    Three remarkable and unique features of the immune system are specificity, diversity, and memory. Immunological memory involves both T and B cells and results in a secondary antibody response that is faster, of higher affinity, and results in the secretion of non-IgM isotypes of Ig. In this review we discuss the properties of memory T and B cells, their specific receptors, and the events which occur both in the nucleus and on the cell surface during generation and activation of these cells. Although memory T and B cells use different mechanisms to elaborate memory, there are a number of interesting analogies: lymphokines vs antibodies and affinity maturation of B cell antigen receptors vs upregulation of adhesion molecules on T cells. Finally, we discuss the importance of these cells in health and disease and suggest what impact additional information about these cells might have on the manipulation of the immune response.

  18. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  19. Cell division cycle 20 promotes cell proliferation and invasion and inhibits apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guanning; Ma, Xu; Lv, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Cdc20 (cell division cycle 20 homologue) has been reported to exhibit an oncogenic role in human tumorigenesis. However, the function of Cdc20 in osteosarcoma (OS) has not been investigated. In the current study, we aim to explore the role of Cdc20 in human OS cells. Multiple approaches were used to measure cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration and invasion in OS cells after depletion of Cdc20 or overexpression of Cdc20. We found that down-regulation of Cdc20 inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and triggered cell cycle arrest in OS cells. Moreover, Cdc20 down-regulation let to inhibition of cell migration and invasion in OS cells. Consistently, overexpression of Cdc20 in OS cells promoted cell growth, inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, our Western blotting results showed that overexpression of Cdc20 reduced the expression of Bim and p21, whereas depletion of Cdc20 upregulated Bim and p21 levels in OS cells. Altogether, our findings demonstrated that Cdc20 exerts its oncogenic role partly due to regulation of Bim and p21 in OS cells, suggesting that targeting Cdc20 could be useful for the treatment of OS.

  20. Single-Cell Expression Profiling and Proteomics of Primordial Germ Cells, Spermatogonial Stem Cells, Adult Germ Stem Cells, and Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Skutella, Thomas

    2018-01-04

    The mammalian germ cells, cell assemblies, tissues, and organs during development and maturation have been extensively studied at the tissue level. However, to investigate and understand the fundamental insights at the molecular basis of germ and stem cells, their cell fate plasticity, and determination, it is of most importance to analyze at the large scale on the single-cell level through different biological windows. Here, modern molecular techniques optimized for single-cell analysis, including single fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) or microfluidic high-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for single-cell gene expression and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) for protein profiling, have been established and are still getting optimized.This review aims on describing and discussing recent single-cell expression profiling and proteomics of different types of human germ cells, including primordial germ cells (PGCs), spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs), and oocytes.