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Sample records for spiral zone plates

  1. Fabrication techniques of X-ray spiral zone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Nan; Zhu Xiaoli; Li Hailiang; Xie Changqing

    2010-01-01

    The techniques to make X-ray spiral zone plates using electron beam and X-ray lithography were studied. A master mask was fabricated on polyimide membrane by E-beam lithography and micro-electroplating. Spiral zone plates were efficiently replicated by X-ray lithography and micro-electroplating. By combining the techniques, spiral zone plates at 1 keV were successfully fabricate. With an outermost zone width of the 200 nm, and the gold absorbers thickness of 700 nm, the high quality zone plates can be used for X-ray phase contrast microscopy.(authors)

  2. Heat transfer studies on spiral plate heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajavel Rangasamy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the heat transfer coefficients in a spiral plate heat exchanger are investigated. The test section consists of a plate of width 0.3150 m, thickness 0.001 m and mean hydraulic diameter of 0.01 m. The mass flow rate of hot water (hot fluid is varying from 0.5 to 0.8 kg/s and the mass flow rate of cold water (cold fluid varies from 0.4 to 0.7 kg/s. Experiments have been conducted by varying the mass flow rate, temperature, and pressure of cold fluid, keeping the mass flow rate of hot fluid constant. The effects of relevant parameters on spiral plate heat exchanger are investigated. The data obtained from the experimental study are compared with the theoretical data. Besides, a new correlation for the Nusselt number which can be used for practical applications is proposed.

  3. Fresnel zone plates: their suitability for X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, P. S.; Debnath, D.; Nandi, A.; Yadav, V. K.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Rao, A. R.; Girish, V.

    It has been suggested in the recent literature that zone plates may be used to obtain high resolution imaging in X-rays. Here two zone plates are kept in the collimator and the shadow of the entrance zone plate cast by the source onto the exit zone plate falls on the detector plane which could be an array of CZTs for example. We simulate patterns generated by shadow?casting and show how the pattern changes with the nature of the source. We also show how the source pattern is reproduced from the shadows. We briefly mention the merits and demerits of the zone plates over the coded mask apertures (CAMs).

  4. Cambrian spiral-plated echinoderms from Gondwana reveal the earliest pentaradial body plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew B.; Zamora, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Echinoderms are unique among animal phyla in having a pentaradial body plan, and their fossil record provides critical data on how this novel organization came about by revealing intermediate stages. Here, we report a spiral-plated animal from the early Cambrian of Morocco that is the most primitive pentaradial echinoderm yet discovered. It is intermediate between helicoplacoids (a bizarre group of spiral-bodied echinoderms) and crown-group pentaradiate echinoderms. By filling an important gap, this fossil reveals the common pattern that underpins the body plans of the two major echinoderm clades (pelmatozoans and eleutherozoans), showing that differential growth played an important role in their divergence. It also adds to the striking disparity of novel body plans appearing in the Cambrian explosion. PMID:23804624

  5. Cambrian spiral-plated echinoderms from Gondwana reveal the earliest pentaradial body plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew B; Zamora, Samuel

    2013-08-22

    Echinoderms are unique among animal phyla in having a pentaradial body plan, and their fossil record provides critical data on how this novel organization came about by revealing intermediate stages. Here, we report a spiral-plated animal from the early Cambrian of Morocco that is the most primitive pentaradial echinoderm yet discovered. It is intermediate between helicoplacoids (a bizarre group of spiral-bodied echinoderms) and crown-group pentaradiate echinoderms. By filling an important gap, this fossil reveals the common pattern that underpins the body plans of the two major echinoderm clades (pelmatozoans and eleutherozoans), showing that differential growth played an important role in their divergence. It also adds to the striking disparity of novel body plans appearing in the Cambrian explosion.

  6. Heat transfer to immiscible liquid mixtures in a spiral plate heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sathiyan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents new predictive correlations for heat transfer to immiscible liquid-liquid mixtures in a spiral plate heat exchanger. Liquid-liquid heat transfer studies were carried out in spiral plate heat exchangers for the water-octane, water-kerosene, and water-dodecane systems. For each composition of the mixture, the mass flow rate of the cold fluid was varied, keeping that of the hot fluid and the fluid inlet temperatures constant. Two-phase cold flow rates were in the laminar range, while the hot fluid flow was turbulent. Calculations of the LMTD (log mean temperature difference correction factor showed that the flow was countercurrent. Heat transfer coefficients of the two-phase liquids were found to be strongly dependent on the composition of the liquid mixture and exhibited abrupt transitions as a function of the compositions. Given the absence of predictive correlations in the literature that sufficiently capture this compositiondependence, new empirical correlations were developed using part of the experimental data, with the composition of the cold fluid as an explicit variable. Statistical analysis of the regression yielded satisfactory results. The correlations were tested against the rest of the experimental data and were found to predict heat transfer coefficients within ± 15%. These preliminary studies should be useful in designing compact exchangers for handling two-phase water-organics mixtures.

  7. Vortex beam production and contrast enhancement from a magnetic spiral phase plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, A.M.; Loudon, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Electron vortex beam probes offer the possibility of mapping magnetic moments with atomic resolution. In this work we consider using the stray magnetic field produced from a narrow ferromagnetic rod magnetised along its long axis to produce a vortex beam probe, as an alternative to the currently used holographic apertures or gratings. We show through numerical modelling, electron holography observations and direct imaging of the electron probe, that a long narrow ferromagnetic rod induces a phase shift in the wave-function of passing electrons that approximately describes a helix in the regions near its ends. Directing this rod towards the optical axis of a charged-particle beam probe forming system at a limiting aperture position, with the free-end sufficiently close to the axis, is shown to offer a point spread function composed of vortex modes, with evidence of this appearing in observations of the electron probe formed from inserting a micro-fabricated CoFe rod into the beam path of a 300 keV transmission electron microscope (TEM). If the rod is arranged to contain the magnetic flux of h/e, thus producing a maximum phase shift of 2π, it produces a simple spiral-like phase contrast transfer function for weak phase objects. In this arrangement the ferromagnetic rod can be used as a phase plate, positioned at the objective aperture position of a TEM, yielding enhanced image contrast which is simulated to be intermediate between comparable Zernike and Hilbert phase plates. Though this aspect of the phase plate performance is not demonstrated here, agreement between our observations and models for the probe formed from an example rod containing a magnetic flux of ∼2.35h/e, indicate this phase plate arrangement could be a simple means of enhancing contrast and gaining additional information from TEM imaged weak phase samples, while also offering the capability to produce vortex beam probes. However, steps still need to be taken to either remove or improve the

  8. Heat transfer studies in a spiral plate heat exchanger for water: palm oil two phase system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramachandran

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies were conducted in a spiral plate heat exchanger with hot water as the service fluid and the two-phase system of water – palm oil in different mass fractions and flow rates as the cold process fluid. The two phase heat transfer coefficients were correlated with Reynolds numbers (Re in the form h = a Re m, adopting an approach available in literature for two phase fluid flow. The heat transfer coefficients were also related to the mass fraction of palm oil for identical Reynolds numbers. The two-phase multiplier (ratio of the heat transfer coefficient of the two phase fluid and that of the single phase fluid was correlated with the Lockhart Martinelli parameter in a polynomial form. This enables prediction of the two-phase coefficients using single-phase data. The predicted coefficients showed a spread of ± 10 % in the laminar range.

  9. Maskless, parallel patterning with zone-plate array lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D. J. D.; Gil, Dario; Menon, Rajesh; Mondol, Mark K.; Smith, Henry I.; Anderson, Erik H.

    1999-01-01

    Zone-plate array lithography (ZPAL) is a maskless lithography scheme that uses an array of shuttered zone plates to print arbitrary patterns on a substrate. An experimental ultraviolet ZPAL system has been constructed and used to simultaneously expose nine different patterns with a 3x3 array of zone plates in a quasidot-matrix fashion. We present exposed patterns, describe the system design and construction, and discuss issues essential to a functional ZPAL system. We also discuss another ZPAL system which operates with 4.5 nm x radiation from a point source. We present simulations which show that, with our existing x-ray zone plates and this system, we should be able to achieve 55 nm resolution. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  10. Zone Plates for Hard X-Ray FEL Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, D.; Holmberg, A.; Sinn, H.; Vogt, U.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated theoretically the use of zone plates for the focusing of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). In a finite-element simulation the heat load on zone plates placed in the high intensity x-ray beam was simulated for four different zone plate materials: gold, iridium, tungsten, and CVD diamond. The main result of the calculations is that all zone plates remain below the melting temperature throughout a full XFEL pulse train of 3000 pulses. However, if the zone plate is placed in the direct beam it will experience large and rapid temperature fluctuations on the order of 300 K. The situation is relaxed if the optic is placed behind a monochromator and the fluctuations are reduced to around 20 K. Besides heat load, the maximization of the total efficiency of the complete optical system is an important issue. We calculated the efficiency of different zone plates and monochromator systems and found that the final beam size of the XFEL in combination with its monochromaticity will be important parameters.

  11. An elastic plate model for interseismic deformation in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Ravi V. S.; Simons, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Geodetic observations of interseismic surface deformation in the vicinity of subduction zones are frequently interpreted using simple kinematic elastic dislocation models (EDM). In this theoretical study, we develop a kinematic EDM that simulates plate subduction over the interseismic period (the elastic subducting plate model (ESPM)) having only 2 more degrees of freedom than the well-established back slip model (BSM): an elastic plate thickness and the fraction of flexural stresses due to bending at the trench that are released continuously. Unlike the BSM, in which steady state deformation in both plates is assumed to be negligible, the ESPM includes deformation in the subducting and overriding plates (owing to plate thickness), while still preserving the correct sense of convergence velocity between the subducting and overriding plates, as well as zero net steady state vertical offset between the two plates when integrated over many seismic cycles. The ESPM links elastic plate flexure processes to interseismic deformation and helps clarify under what conditions the BSM is appropriate for fitting interseismic geodetic data at convergent margins. We show that the ESPM is identical to the BSM in the limiting case of zero plate thickness, thereby providing an alternative motivation for the BSM. The ESPM also provides a consistent convention for applying the BSM to any megathrust interface geometry. Even in the case of nonnegligible plate thickness, the deformation field predicted by the ESPM reduces to that of the BSM if stresses related to plate flexure at the trench are released either continuously and completely at shallow depths during the interseismic period or deep in the subduction zone (below ˜100 km). However, if at least a portion of these stresses are not continuously released in the shallow portion of the subduction zone (via seismic or aseismic events), then the predicted surface velocities of these two models can differ significantly at horizontal

  12. Development of background reduced Fresnel phase zone plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamari, Yohei; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    In study of hot and dense plasma, a high spatial resolution (a few microns) x-ray imaging is very important to observe these plasmas. The Fresnel phase zone plate (FPZP) consists of alternately material and transparent circular annuli placed concentrically, which image x rays using diffraction x rays from all annuli. FPZP have imaged 4.7-4.77 keV x rays with 2.2 μm spatial resolution. However FPZP has a problem that background level is comparable to signal level. In subtraction of background, the error of 10% is caused. For the accurate background subtraction, we designed new FPZP, which consist of three β layers of a transparent zone and two material zones. The new design FPZP parameters (thickness of material zones, each zone width) have been optimized, and in that optimum design signal-to-background ratio is 4 times better than conventional two layers FPZP

  13. The Okhotsk Plate and the Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, David; Mackey, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone transitions from spreading at rates of ~ 25mm/yr in the North Atlantic, to compression at rates of ~ 5mm/yr in the region of the Okhotsk plate. Because the pole of rotation between Eurasia and North America lies more or less on their mutual boundary, there is a linear change in rate along the boundary, and regions near the euler pole are subject to extremely low deformation rates. The Okhotsk - Eurasia - North America triple junction lies slightly south of the rotation pole, placing the Okhotsk plate entirely in a weakly contractional setting. Regions near the triple junction absorb 1mm/yr contraction. Further south, towards the shoreline of the Okhotsk sea, up to 5 mm/yr contraction may be absorbed within the plate. How shortening is accommodated across the boundary remains an open question. One possibility is wholesale extrusion of the entire Okhotsk plate (or possibly its northwestern corner) along two plate boundary strike slip faults (Eurasia-Okhostk and North America Okhotsk). The problem with this model is that the seismic record does not presently clearly support it, with the largest events distributed both within the plate interior and on its boundaries. This may suggest that instead, the Okhotsk plate, and particularly its north-western end, consists of a series of smaller blocks which shuffle against each other, partially accommodating extrusion, but also permitting some internal deformation and change of shape of the Okhotsk plate itself. We present analyses of the very sparse seismic record from the region, as well as geometric-kinematic, tectonic models of the possible deformation of northwest Okhotsk to try to better understand the different probabilities of how this slowly deforming plate boundary zone is behaving.

  14. Diffraction of plane waves by finite-radius spiral phase plates of integer and fractional topological charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2009-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the plane-wave diffraction by a finite-radius circular spiral phase plate (SPP) with integer and fractional topological charge and with variable transmission coefficients inside and outside of the plate edge is presented. We characterize the effect of varying the transmission coefficients and the parameters of the SPP on the propagated field. The vortex structure for integer and fractional phase step of the SPPs with and without phase apodization at the plate edge is also analyzed. The consideration of the interference between the light crossing the SPP and the light that undergoes no phase alteration at the aperture plane reveals new and interesting phenomena associated to this classical problem.

  15. Zone plate imaging of 14-MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Lane, S.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    At Livermore we are interested in imaging the thermonuclear burn region of fusion targets irradiated at our Nova laser facility. We expect compressed core diameters to be 10's of microns, and would like images with better than 10-μm resolution. Alpha particle images provided the first direct information about the thermonuclear burn geometry in thin walled exploding pusher targets. In future high density target experiments, only highly penetrating radiations like the 14-MeV neutrons will escape the target core to provide information about the burn region. To make the measurement with a neutron ''pinhole'' camera requires a 10μm pinhole through about 10 cm of material and 10 14 to 10 15 source neutrons. Penumbral imaging offers some improvement over a pinhole. Zone plate coded imaging (ZPCI) techniques are particularly well suited for imaging small objects like the compressed core of a laser fusion target. We have been using ZPCI techniques to image nonpenetrating radiations like x rays and alpha particles for about 10 years. The techniques are well developed. Imaging penetrating radiations like 14-MeV neutrons using ZPCI techniques has several possible advantages. The large solid angle subtended by the Zone plate might substantially reduce the required target neutron yield needed to produce a useful image, and a neutron zone plate system with 10-μm resolution might be easier to fabricate and characterize than a pinhole system. This paper explores the use of ZPCI techniques with penetrating radiation

  16. Geophysical Limitations on the Habitable Zone: Volcanism and Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Lena; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Planets are typically classified as potentially life-bearing planets (i.e. habitable planets) if they are rocky planets and if a liquid (e.g. water) could exist at the surface. The latter depends on several factors, like for example the amount of available solar energy, greenhouse effects in the atmosphere and an efficient CO2-cycle. However, the definition of the habitable zone should be updated to include possible geophysical constraints, that could potentially influence the CO2-cycle. Planets like Mars without plate tectonics and no or only limited volcanic events can only be considered to be habitable at the inner boundary of the habitable zone, since the greenhouse effect needed to ensure liquid surface water farther away from the sun is strongly reduced. We investigate if the planet mass as well as the interior structure can set constraints on the occurrence of plate tectonics and outgassing, and therefore affect the habitable zone, using both parameterized evolution models [1] and mantle convection simulations [1,2]. We find that plate tectonics, if it occurs, always leads to sufficient volcanic outgassing and therefore greenhouse effect needed for the outer boundary of the habitable zone (several tens of bar CO2), see also [3]. One-plate planets, however, may suffer strong volcanic limitations. The existence of a dense-enough CO2 atmosphere allowing for the carbon-silicate cycle and release of carbon at the outer boundary of the habitable zone may be strongly limited for planets: 1) without plate tectonics, 2) with a large planet mass, and/or 3) a high iron content. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office through the Planet Topers alliance, and results within the collaboration of the COST Action TD 1308. References Noack, L., Rivoldini, A., and Van Hoolst, T.: CHIC - Coupling Habitability, Interior and Crust, INFOCOMP 2015, ISSN 2308-3484, ISBN 978

  17. Finite thickness effect of a zone plate on focusing hard x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, W.B.; Chrzas, J.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Spatial resolution and focusing efficiency are two important properties of a zone plate in x-ray focusing applications. A general expression of the zone plate equation describing its zone registration is derived from the interference of spherical waves emited from two mutually coherent point sources. An analytical expression of the focusing efficiency in terms of the zone plate thickness and x-ray refractive indices of the zones is also derived. Validity condition for using this expression is considered. Thickness required for obtaining adequate focusing efficiency is calculated as a function of x-ray energy for several representative materials. The spatial resolution of a finite thickness zone plate is worse than that of an infinetly thin zone plate. which is approximately equal to the smallest zone width of the zone plate. The effect of the finite thickness on the spatial resolution is considered

  18. Mechanical design of multiple zone plates precision alignment apparatus for hard X-ray focusing in twenty-nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Liu, Jie; Gleber, Sophie C.; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Lai, Barry; Maser, Jorg M.; Roehrig, Christian; Wojcik, Michael J.; Vogt, Franz Stefan

    2017-04-04

    An enhanced mechanical design of multiple zone plates precision alignment apparatus for hard x-ray focusing in a twenty-nanometer scale is provided. The precision alignment apparatus includes a zone plate alignment base frame; a plurality of zone plates; and a plurality of zone plate holders, each said zone plate holder for mounting and aligning a respective zone plate for hard x-ray focusing. At least one respective positioning stage drives and positions each respective zone plate holder. Each respective positioning stage is mounted on the zone plate alignment base frame. A respective linkage component connects each respective positioning stage and the respective zone plate holder. The zone plate alignment base frame, each zone plate holder and each linkage component is formed of a selected material for providing thermal expansion stability and positioning stability for the precision alignment apparatus.

  19. Hard-X-ray Zone Plates: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syue-Ren Wu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The technology to focus hard-X-rays (photon energy larger than 1–2 keV has made great progress in the past three years. The progress was particularly spectacular for lenses based on the Fresnel zone plate concept. The spatial resolution notably increased by a factor of three, opening up entirely new domains of application, specifically in biomedical research. As we shall see, this evolution is the result of a painstaking optimization of many different aspects rather than of a single technical breakthrough.

  20. Zone-plate coded imaging of thermonuclear burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1978-01-01

    The first high-resolution, direct images of the region of thermonuclear burn in laser fusion experiments have been produced using a novel, two-step imaging technique called zone-plate coded imaging. This technique is extremely versatile and well suited for the microscopy of laser fusion targets. It has a tomographic capability, which provides three-dimensional images of the source distribution. It is equally useful for imaging x-ray and particle emissions. Since this technique is much more sensitive than competing imaging techniques, it permits us to investigate low-intensity sources

  1. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, David C., E-mail: david.calvo@nrl.navy.mil; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N. [Acoustics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-06

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens.

  2. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, David C.; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N.

    2015-07-01

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens.

  3. Thin Fresnel zone plate lenses for focusing underwater sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, David C.; Thangawng, Abel L.; Nicholas, Michael; Layman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    A Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens of the Soret type creates a focus by constructive interference of waves diffracted through open annular zones in an opaque screen. For underwater sound below MHz frequencies, a large FZP that blocks sound using high-impedance, dense materials would have practical disadvantages. We experimentally and numerically investigate an alternative approach of creating a FZP with thin (0.4λ) acoustically opaque zones made of soft silicone rubber foam attached to a thin (0.1λ) transparent rubber substrate. An ultra-thin (0.0068λ) FZP that achieves higher gain is also proposed and simulated which uses low-volume fraction, bubble-like resonant air ring cavities to construct opaque zones. Laboratory measurements at 200 kHz indicate that the rubber foam can be accurately modeled as a lossy fluid with an acoustic impedance approximately 1/10 that of water. Measured focal gains up to 20 dB agree with theoretical predictions for normal and oblique incidence. The measured focal radius of 0.68λ (peak-to-null) agrees with the Rayleigh diffraction limit prediction of 0.61 λ/NA (NA = 0.88) for a low-aberration lens

  4. Phase zone plate based scanning x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legnini, D.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Chrzas, J.

    1992-01-01

    A scanning microscope capable of investigating materials in the x-ray region from 5-25 keV with a spatial resolution on the order of 1 μm has been constructed and experimentally demonstrated. A phase zone plate is used as a focusing element concentrating photons at a series of diffraction orders spaced along the optical axis. A sample is positioned at one of these focal planes and raster scanned across the small focal spot for imaging or micro-analysis. Use and characterization of the microscope requires precise alignment of the zone plate and its optical axis along the x-ray beam direction. Also needed are accurate, reproducible positioning of an order selection aperture and sample. Operation at different focal orders involves large translations of sample and aperture along the optical axis as well as adjustment of the aperture to sample distance. A motion control, data acquisition, and display system has been developed to meet these requirements of sample and detector positioning. Design considerations and results obtained from use of the microscope for imaging at first through fourth order focal planes are discussed

  5. Spiral phase plates with radial discontinuities for the generation of multiring orbital angular momentum beams: fabrication, characterization, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Carli, Marta; Romanato, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    A design of spiral phase plates for the generation of multiring beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is presented. Besides the usual helical profile, these phase plates present radial π-discontinuities in correspondence of the zeros of the associated Laguerre polynomials. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography over glass substrates coated with a polymethylmethacrylate resist layer. The optical response was analyzed and the purity of the generated beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The far-field intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analysis with a Mach-Zehnder setup. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order OAM beams with nonzero radial index. An application consisting of the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is presented and described. A numerical code based on an iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under OAM beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements for anticounterfeiting applications.

  6. Experimental demonstration of producing high resolution zone plates by spatial-frequency multiplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, W.B.; Howells, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    In an earlier publication, the possibility of producing high resolution zone plates for x-ray applications by spatial-frequency multiplication was analyzed theoretically. The theory predicted that for a daughter zone plate generated from the interference of mth and nth diffraction orders of a parent zone plate, its primary focal spot size and focal length are one (m + n)th of their counterparts of the parent zone plate, respectively. It was also shown that a zone plate with the outermost zone width of as small as 13.8 nm might be produced by this technique. In this paper, we report an experiment which we carried out with laser light (λ = 4166A) for demonstrating this technique. In addition, an outlook for producing high resolution zone plates for x-ray application is briefly discussed

  7. Spiral phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams with non-zero radial index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffato, G.; Carli, M.; Massari, M.; Romanato, F.

    2015-03-01

    The work of design, fabrication and characterization of spiral phase plates for the generation of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with non-null radial index is presented. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography on polymethylmethacrylate layers over glass substrates. The optical response of these phase optical elements was measured and the purity of the experimental beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The farfield intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analyses. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams. A novel application consisting in the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is shown. A numerical code based on iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of the phase pattern of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under LG beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements.

  8. Hidden Earthquake Potential in Plate Boundary Transition Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Kevin P.; Herman, Matthew; Govers, Rob

    2017-04-01

    Plate boundaries can exhibit spatially abrupt changes in their long-term tectonic deformation (and associated kinematics) at triple junctions and other sites of changes in plate boundary structure. How earthquake behavior responds to these abrupt tectonic changes is unclear. The situation may be additionally obscured by the effects of superimposed deformational signals - juxtaposed short-term (earthquake cycle) kinematics may combine to produce a net deformational signal that does not reflect intuition about the actual strain accumulation in the region. Two examples of this effect are in the vicinity of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ) along the west coast of North America, and at the southern end of the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand. In the region immediately north of the MTJ, GPS-based observed crustal displacements (relative to North America (NAm)) are intermediate between Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) motions. With distance north, these displacements rotate to become more aligned with JdF - NAm displacements, i.e. to motions expected along a coupled subduction interface. The deviation of GPS motions from the coupled subduction interface signal near the MTJ has been previously interpreted to reflect clock-wise rotation of a coastal, crustal block and/or reduced coupling at the southern Cascadia margin. The geologic record of crustal deformation near the MTJ reflects the combined effects of northward crustal shortening (on geologic time scales) associated with the MTJ Crustal Conveyor (Furlong and Govers, 1999) overprinted onto the subduction earthquake cycle signal. With this interpretation, the Cascadia subduction margin appears to be well-coupled along its entire length, consistent with paleo-seismic records of large earthquake ruptures extending to its southern limit. At the Hikurangi to Alpine Fault transition in New Zealand, plate interactions switch from subduction to oblique translation as a consequence of changes in lithospheric structure of

  9. X-ray zone plates fabricated using electron-beam and x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, D.C.; Flanders, D.C.; Ceglio, N.M.; Smith, H.I.

    1979-01-01

    Fresnel zone plate patterns, free of spherical abberation, with diameters of up to 0.63 mm and linewidths as small as 1000 A were fabricated on polyimide-membrane x-ray masks using scanning electron beam lithography Distortion of the electron beam scan raster was reduced to < 2500 A over a 2 mm x 2 mm field by applying deflection corrections, while viewing the distortion using a moire method. C/sub k/ x-ray lithography was used to replicate the zone plate pattern in thick PMMA over a 100 A thick plating base on a glass substrate. Zones plates in 1.3 μm thick gold were fabricated by plating, and made free-standing by removal of the plating base and the supporting glass substrate. Zone plates were tested as imaging elements with visible light and soft x-rays

  10. X-ray zone plates fabricated using electron-beam and x-ray lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, D.C.; Flanders, D.C.; Ceglio, N.M.; Smith, H.I.

    1979-01-01

    Fresnel zone plate patterns, free of spherical abberation, with diameters of up to 0.63 mm and linewidths as small as 1000 A were fabricated on polyimide-membrane x-ray masks using scanning electron beam lithography Distortion of the electron beam scan raster was reduced to < 2500 A over a 2 mm x 2 mm field by applying deflection corrections, while viewing the distortion using a moire method. C/sub k/ x-ray lithography was used to replicate the zone plate pattern in thick PMMA over a 100 A thick plating base on a glass substrate. Zones plates in 1.3 ..mu..m thick gold were fabricated by plating, and made free-standing by removal of the plating base and the supporting glass substrate. Zone plates were tested as imaging elements with visible light and soft x-rays.

  11. Computer simulation of heat transfer in zone plate optics exposed to x-ray FEL radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, D.; Holmberg, A.; Sinn, H.; Vogt, U.

    2011-06-01

    Zone plates are circular diffraction gratings that can provide diffraction-limited nano-focusing of x-ray radiation. When designing zone plates for X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources special attention has to be made concerning the high intensity of the sources. Absorption of x-rays in the zone material can lead to significant temperature increases in a single pulse and potentially destroy the zone plate. The zone plate might also be damaged as a result of temperature build up and/or temperature fluctuations on longer time scales. In this work we simulate the heat transfer in a zone plate on a substrate as it is exposed to XFEL radiation. This is done in a Finite Element Method model where each new x-ray pulse is treated as an instantaneous heat source and the temperature evolution between pulses is calculated by solving the heat equation. We use this model to simulate different zone plate and substrate designs and source parameters. Results for both the 8 keV source at LCLS and the 12.4 keV source at the European XFEL are presented. We simulate zone plates made of high Z metals such as gold, tungsten and iridium as well as zone plates made of low Z materials such as diamond. In the case of metal zone plates we investigate the influence of substrate material by comparing silicon and diamond substrates. We also study the effect of different cooling temperatures and cooling schemes. The results give valuable indications on the temperature behavior to expect and can serve as a basis for future experimental investigations of zone plates exposed to XFEL radiation.

  12. An Electron-Beam Profile Monitor Using Fresnel Zone Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Norio; Sakai, Hiroshi; Iida, Kensuke; Shinoe, Kenji; Takaki, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masami; Hayano, Hitoshi; Muto, Toshiya; Nomura, Masaharu; Kamiya, Yukihide; Koseki, Tadashi; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Nobutada; Nakayama, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a beam profile monitor using two Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) at the KEK-ATF (Accelerator Test Facility) damping ring to measure small electron-beam sizes for low-emittance synchrotron radiation sources. The monitor has a structure of an X-ray microscope, where two FZPs constitute an X-ray imaging optics. In the monitor system, the synchrotron radiation from the electron beam at the bending magnet is monochromatized to 3.235-keV X-rays by a crystal monochromator and the transverse electron-beam image is twenty-times magnified by the two FZPs and detected on an X-ray CCD camera. This monitor has the following advantages: (1) high spatial resolution, (2) non-destructive measurement, (3) real-time monitoring, and (4) direct electron-beam imaging. With the beam profile monitor, we have succeeded in obtaining a clear electron-beam image and measuring the extremely small beam size less than 10 μm. The measured magnification of the imaging optics was in good agreement with the design value

  13. Phase zone plates as condensers for the Gottingen scanning x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilkenbach, R.; Thieme

    1987-01-01

    With the Gottingen scanning x-ray microscope the synchrotron source is image by x-ray optics into a monochromatic small scan spot, through which a specimen can be moved. Hereby one part of the optics, the condenser zone plate and a pinhole, works as a linear monochromator in the wavelength region of λ = 2.36 nm to λ = 4.5 nm. The efficiency of such a condenser should be as high as possible to minimize the loss of radiation. Phase zone plates have a four times higher efficiency in the first order of diffraction than amplitude zone plates. Two condenser zone plates, KZP4 and KZP5, have been constructed so that they are well suited for the use in the scanning microscope. These zone plates have been made holographically by superposing two wavefronts of laser light in an specific designed optical arrangement and exposing the zone plate structure into a photoresist. Using reactive ion etching (RIE) the structure has been transformed into Germanium. The thickness of the zone plate has been chosen to show at λ = 2.36 nm a phase effect. The efficiency has been measured at the Berliner Elektronenspeircherring Gesellschaft fur Synchrotronstrahlung m.b.H., Berlin

  14. Plate coupling across the northern Manila subduction zone deduced from mantle lithosphere buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2017-12-01

    The Manila subduction zone is located at the plate boundary where the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) moves northwestward toward the Eurasian plate (EU) with a high convergence rate. However, historically, no large earthquakes greater than Mw7 have been observed across the northern Manila subduction zone. The poorly understood plate interaction between these two plates in this region creates significant issues for evaluating the seismic hazard. Therefore, the variation of mantle lithospheric buoyancy is calculated to evaluate the plate coupling status across the northern Manila subduction zone, based on recently published forward gravity modeling constrained by the results of the P-wave seismic crustal structure of the TAIGER (Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research) project. The results indicate weak plate coupling between the PSP and EU, which could be related to the release of the overriding PSP from the descending EU's dragging force, which was deduced from the higher elevation of the Luzon arc and the fore-arc basin northward toward the Taiwan orogen. Moreover, serpentinized peridotite is present above the plate boundary and is distributed more widely and thickly closer to offshore southern Taiwan orogen. We suggest that low plate coupling may facilitate the uplifting of serpentinized mantle material up to the plate boundary.

  15. Pervasive seismic low-velocity zones within stagnant plates in the mantle transition zone: Thermal or compositional origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauzin, B.; Kim, S.; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2017-11-01

    We exploit conversions between P and S waves for large-scale, high-resolution imaging of the mantle transition zone beneath Northwest Pacific and the margin of Eastern Asia. We find pervasive reflectivity concentrated in two bands with apparent wave-speed reduction of -2% to -4% about 50 km thick at the top of the transition zone and 100 km thick at the bottom. This negative reflectivity associated with the scattered-waves at depth is interpreted jointly with larger-scale mantle tomographic images, and is shown to delineate the stagnant portions of the subducted Pacific plate in the transition zone, with largely positive shear-wave velocity contrasts. The upper reflectivity zone connects to broad low-velocity regions below major intra-plate volcanoes, whereas the lower zone coincides locally with the occurrence of deep-focus earthquakes along the East Asia margin. Similar reflectivity is found in Pacific Northwest of the USA. We demonstrate that the thermal signature of plates alone is not sufficient to explain such features. Alternative explanations for these reflective zones include kinetic effects on olivine phase transitions (meta-stability), compositional heterogeneities within and above stagnant plates, complex wave-propagation effects in the heterogeneous slab structure, or a combination of such factors. We speculate that part of the negative reflectivity is the signature of compositional heterogeneities, as revealed by numerous other studies of seismic scattering throughout the mantle, and that such features could be widespread across the globe.

  16. Subduction zone trench migration : Slab driven or overriding-plate-driven?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    Subduction zones on Earth, and their associated trenches and hinges, migrate with respect to the overriding plate, as indicated by overriding plate deformation (e.g. backarc extension or backarc shortening), and migrate with respect to hotspot and no-net-rotation reference frames (global or

  17. Abrupt Upper-Plate Tilting Upon Slab-Transition-Zone Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, F.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    During its sinking, the remnant of a surface plate crosses and interacts with multiple boundaries in Earth's interior. The most-prominent dynamic interaction arises at the upper-mantle transition zone where the sinking plate is strongly affected by the higher-viscosity lower mantle. Within our numerical model, we unravel, for the first time, that this very collision of the sinking slab with the transition zone induces a sudden, dramatic downward tilt of the upper plate towards the subduction trench. The slab-transition zone collision sets parts of the higher-viscosity lower mantle in motion. Naturally, this then induces an overall larger return flow cell that, at its onset, tilts the upper plate abruptly by around 0.05 degrees and over around 10 Millions of years. Such a significant and abrupt variation in surface topography should be clearly visible in temporal geologic records of large-scale surface elevation and might explain continental-wide tilting as observed in Australia since the Eocene or North America during the Phanerozoic. Unravelling this crucial mantle-lithosphere interaction was possible thanks to state-of-the-art numerical modelling (powered by StagYY; Tackley 2008, PEPI) and post-processing (powered by StagLab; www.fabiocrameri.ch/software). The new model that is introduced here to study the dynamically self-consistent temporal evolution of subduction features accurate subduction-zone topography, robust single-sided plate sinking, stronger plates close to laboratory values, an upper-mantle phase transition and, crucially, simple continents at a free surface. A novel, fully-automated post-processing includes physical model diagnostics like slab geometry, mantle flow pattern, upper-plate tilt angle and trench location.

  18. Subducting an old subduction zone sideways provides insights into what controls plate coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyners, Martin; Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Bannister, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    The Hikurangi Plateau has had two episodes of subduction beneath New Zealand - firstly at ca. 100 Ma during north-south convergence with Gondwana, and currently during east-west convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates. As a result of this ninety-degree change in convergence direction, an old subduction zone is now being subducted sideways, and the tectonic history of the subducted plate varies dramatically along the strike of the Hikurangi Margin. Here we identify the location of the underplated Hikurangi Plateau along the shallow part of the Hikurangi Margin, using results from both relocated seismicity and seismic tomography. Next we decipher the tectonic history of the plateau along strike, particularly in terms of the hydration state of the plateau, and the nature of any sedimentary rock units capping the plateau. We then use this information to understand plate coupling at two scales: on the large scale, the southward transition from typical subduction in the North Island to continental collision in the South Island; and at a smaller scale, the strong lateral change from a high deficit in slip rate at the plate interface in the southern North Island to a low deficit in slip rate in the northeastern North Island. We find that the southward transition from subduction to continental collision is controlled by the plateau being more dehydrated to the south, as a result of being more deeply subducted at the Gondwana margin. The southward transition from localized slip at the plate interface to distributed upper plate deformation with no active plate interface occurs in Cook Strait and is relatively sharp. The high deficit in slip rate at the plate interface in the southern North Island is likely due to a relatively smooth plate interface from sedimentary rocks capping the Hikurangi Plateau, an impermeable terrane in the overlying plate, and the hydrated plateau acting in concert to produce an interseismically sealed plate interface. Further northeast

  19. Progress in the fabrication of high aspect ratio zone plates by soft x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divan, R.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N. A.; Lai, B.; Assoufid, L.; Leondard, Q.; Cerrina, F.

    2002-01-01

    Fabrication of Fresnel zone plates for the hard x-ray spectral region combines the challenge of high lateral resolution (∼100 nm) with a large thickness requirement for the phase-shifting material (0.5-3 (micro)m). For achieving a high resolution, the initial mask was fabricated by e-beam lithography and gold electroforming. To prevent the collapse of the structures between the developing and electroforming processes, drying was completely eliminated. Fabrication errors, such as nonuniform gold electroplating and collapse of structures, were systematically analyzed and largely eliminated. We optimized the exposure and developing processes for 950k and 2200k polymethylmethacrylate of different thicknesses and various adhesion promoters. We discuss the effects of these fabrication steps on the zone plate's resolution and aspect ratio. Fresnel zone plates with 110 nm outermost zone width, 150 (micro)m diameter, and 1.3 (micro)m gold thickness were fabricated. Preliminary evaluation of the FZPs was done by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The FZP focusing performance was characterized at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  20. Seismic evidence for deep fluid circulation in the overriding plate of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauzin, B.; Reynard, B.; Bodin, T.; Perrillat, J. P.; Debayle, E.

    2015-12-01

    In subduction zones, non-volcanic tremors are associated with fluid circulations (Obara, 2002). Their sources are often located on the interplate boundary (Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Shelly et al, 2006; La Rocca, 2009), consistent with fluids released by the dehydration of subducted plates (Hacker et al., 2003). Reports of tremors in the overriding continental crust of several subduction zones in the world (Kao et al., 2005; Payero et al., 2008; Ide, 2012) suggest fluid circulation at shallower depths but potential fluid paths are poorly documented. Here we obtained seismic observations from receiver functions that evidence the close association between the shallow tremor zone, electrical conductivity, and tectonic features of the Cascadia overriding plate. A seismic discontinuity near 15 km depth in the crust of the overriding North American plate is attributed to the Conrad discontinuity. This interface is segmented, and its interruption is spatially correlated with conductive regions and shallow swarms of seismicity and non-volcanic tremors. These observations suggest that shallow fluid circulation, tremors and seismicity are controlled by fault zones limiting blocks of accreted terranes in the overriding plate (Brudzinski and Allen, 2007). These zones constitute fluid "escape" routes that may contribute unloading fluid pressure on the megathrust. Obara, K. (2002). Science, 296, 1679-1681. Rogers, G., & Dragert, H. (2003). Science, 300, 1942-1943. Shelly, D. R., et al. (2006). Nature, 442, 188-191. La Rocca, M., et al. (2009). Science, 323, 620-623. Kao, H., et al. (2005). Nature, 436, 841-844. Payero, J. S., et al. (2008). Geophysical Research Letters, 35. Ide, S. (2012). Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 117. Brudzinski, M. R., & Allen, R. M. (2007). Geology, 35, 907-910.

  1. Microarray Cluster Analysis of Irradiated Growth Plate Zones Following Laser Microdissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damron, Timothy A.; Zhang Mingliang; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Middleton, Frank A.; Horton, Jason A.; Margulies, Bryan M.; Strauss, Judith A.; Farnum, Cornelia E.; Spadaro, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Genes and pathways involved in early growth plate chondrocyte recovery after fractionated irradiation were sought as potential targets for selective radiorecovery modulation. Materials and Methods: Three groups of six 5-week male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent fractionated irradiation to the right tibiae over 5 days, totaling 17.5 Gy, and then were killed at 7, 11, and 16 days after the first radiotherapy fraction. The growth plates were collected from the proximal tibiae bilaterally and subsequently underwent laser microdissection to separate reserve, perichondral, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones. Differential gene expression was analyzed between irradiated right and nonirradiated left tibia using RAE230 2.0 GeneChip microarray, compared between zones and time points and subjected to functional pathway cluster analysis with real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected results. Results: Each zone had a number of pathways showing enrichment after the pattern of hypothesized importance to growth plate recovery, yet few met the strictest criteria. The proliferative and hypertrophic zones showed both the greatest number of genes with a 10-fold right/left change at 7 days after initiation of irradiation and enrichment of the most functional pathways involved in bone, cartilage, matrix, or skeletal development. Six genes confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction to have early upregulation included insulin-like growth factor 2, procollagen type I alpha 2, matrix metallopeptidase 9, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, fibromodulin, and aggrecan 1. Conclusions: Nine overlapping pathways in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones (skeletal development, ossification, bone remodeling, cartilage development, extracellular matrix structural constituent, proteinaceous extracellular matrix, collagen, extracellular matrix, and extracellular matrix part) may play key roles in early growth plate radiorecovery.

  2. Monochromatization of femtosecond XUV light pulses with the use of reflection zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metje, Jan; Borgwardt, Mario; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Kothe, Alexander; Engel, Nicholas; Wilke, Martin; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Erko, Alexei; Kiyan, Igor Yu; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-05-05

    We report on a newly built laser-based tabletop setup which enables generation of femtosecond light pulses in the XUV range employing the process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a gas medium. The spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of the XUV beam are presented. Monochromatization of XUV light with minimum temporal pulse distortion is the central issue of this work. Off-center reflection zone plates are shown to be advantageous when selection of a desired harmonic is carried out with the use of a single optical element. A cross correlation technique was applied to characterize the performance of the zone plates in the time domain. By using laser pulses of 25 fs length to pump the HHG process, a pulse duration of 45 fs for monochromatized harmonics was achieved in the present setup.

  3. Optical Trapping of Beads and Jurkat Cells Using Micromachined Fresnel Zone Plate Integrated with Microfluidic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ju-Nan; Hu, Han-Zhong

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a method for trapping beads and cells using a single-beam optical tweezer and a Fresnel zone plate integrated with a microfluidic chip. The experimental results show that a laser power of 2.4 mW is sufficient to trap 3-µm-diameter polystyrene beads, while a laser power of 1.5 mW is sufficient to trap individual Jurkat cells. The Fresnel zone plate developed in this study has many advantages, including a small size, a straightforward fabrication process, and a simple integration with microfluidic chips. Consequently, it provides an ideal solution for the trapping of a wide range of biological cells for analysis purposes.

  4. Subwavelength and directional control of flexural waves in zone-folding induced topological plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Chen, Chun-Wei; Yang, Jinkyu

    2018-02-01

    Inspired by the quantum spin Hall effect shown by topological insulators, we propose a plate structure that can be used to demonstrate the pseudospin Hall effect for flexural waves. The system consists of a thin plate with periodically arranged resonators mounted on its top surface. We extend a technique based on the plane-wave expansion method to identify a double Dirac cone emerging due to the zone-folding in frequency band structures. This particular design allows us to move the double Dirac cone to a lower frequency than the resonating frequency of local resonators. We then manipulate the pattern of local resonators to open subwavelength Bragg band gaps that are topologically distinct. Building on this method, we verify numerically that a waveguide at an interface between two topologically distinct resonating plate structures can be used for guiding low-frequency, spin-dependent one-way flexural waves along a desired path with bends.

  5. Heterogeneity in Subducting Slab Influences Fluid Properties, Plate Coupling and Volcanism: Hikurangi Subduction Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.; Reyners, M.; Bannister, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    Seismicity distribution and 3-D models of P- and S-attenuation (1/Q) in the Hikurangi subduction zone, in the North Island of New Zealand, show large variation along-arc in the fluid properties of the subducting slab. Volcanism is also non-uniform, with extremely productive rhyolitic volcanism localized to the central Taupo Volcanic zone, and subduction without volcanism in the southern North Island. Plate coupling varies with heterogeneous slip deficit in the northern section, low slip deficit in the central section, and high slip deficit (strong coupling) in the south. Heterogeneous initial hydration and varied dehydration history both are inferred to play roles. The Hikurangi Plateau (large igneous province) has been subducted beneath New Zealand twice - firstly at ca. 105-100 Ma during north-south convergence with Gondwana, and currently during east-west convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates along the Hikurangi subduction zone. It has an uneven downdip edge which has produced spatially and temporally localized stalls in subduction rate. The mantle wedge under the rhyolitic section has a very low Q feature centred at 50-125 km depth, which directly overlies a 150-km long zone of dense seismicity. This seismicity occurs below a sharp transition in the downdip extent of the Hikurangi Plateau, where difficulty subducting the buoyant plateau would have created a zone of increased faulting and hydration that spent a longer time in the outer-rise yielding zone, compared with areas to the north and south. At shallow depths this section has unusually high fracture permeability from the two episodes of bending, but it did not experience dehydration during Gondwana subduction. This central section at plate interface depths less than 50-km has low Q in the slab crust, showing that it is extremely fluid rich, and it exhibits weak plate coupling with both deep and shallow slow-slip events. In contrast in the southern section, where there is a large deficit in

  6. Logarithmic Spiral

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    anti-clockwise direction and we get a right-handed spiral. (Figure 2). We know that the derivative of eX is also eX. Various properties of logarithmic spiral depend on this property of eX. Properties of Logarithmic Spiral. 1. The most important property of a logarithmic spiral is that r (i.e. the distance from the origin) increases.

  7. Fresnel zone plate with apodized aperture for hard X-ray Gaussian beam optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Itabashi, Seiichi; Oda, Masatoshi

    2017-05-01

    Fresnel zone plates with apodized apertures [apodization FZPs (A-FZPs)] have been developed to realise Gaussian beam optics in the hard X-ray region. The designed zone depth of A-FZPs gradually decreases from the center to peripheral regions. Such a zone structure forms a Gaussian-like smooth-shouldered aperture function which optically behaves as an apodization filter and produces a Gaussian-like focusing spot profile. Optical properties of two types of A-FZP, i.e. a circular type and a one-dimensional type, have been evaluated by using a microbeam knife-edge scan test, and have been carefully compared with those of normal FZP optics. Advantages of using A-FZPs are introduced.

  8. Fresnel zone plate telescopes for X-ray imaging II: numerical simulations with parallel and diverging beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Debnath, Dipak; Rao, A. R.; Nandi, Anuj; Yadav, Vipin K.; Girish, V.

    2009-12-01

    We present the results of simulations of shadows cast by a zone plate telescope which may have one to four pairs of zone plates. From the shadows we reconstruct the images under various circumstances. We discuss physical basis of the resolution of the telescope and demonstrate this by our simulations. We allow the source to be at a finite distance (diverging beam) as well as at an infinite distance (parallel beam) and show that the resolution is worsened when the source is nearby. By reconstructing the zone plates in a way that both the zone plates subtend the same solid angles at the source, we obtain back high resolution even for sources at a finite distance. We present simulated results for the observation of the galactic center and show that the sources of varying intensities may be reconstructed with accuracy. Results of these simulations would be of immense use in interpreting the X-ray images from recently launched CORONAS-PHOTON satellite.

  9. The potential influence of subduction zone polarity on overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    A geodynamic model exists, the westward lithospheric drift model, in which the variety of overriding plate deformation, trench migration and slab dip angles is explained by the polarity of subduction zones. The model predicts overriding plate extension, a fixed trench and a steep slab dip for

  10. Spiral tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Asadiyan, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Spiral Tectonics (ST) is a new window to global tectonics introduced as alternative model for Plate Tectonics (PT). ST based upon Dahw(rolling) and Tahw(spreading) dynamics. Analogues to electric and magnetic components in the electromagnetic theory we could consider Dahw and Tahw as components of geodynamics, when one component increases the other decreases and vice versa. They are changed to each other during geological history. D-component represents continental crust and T-component represents oceanic crust. D and T are two arm of spiral-cell. T-arm 180 degree lags behind D-arm so named Retard-arm with respect to D or Forward-arm. It seems primary cell injected several billions years ago from Earth's center therefore the Earth's core was built up first then mantel and finally the crust was build up. Crust building initiate from Arabia (Mecca). As the universe extended gravitation wave swirled the earth fractaly along cycloid path from big to small scale. In global scale (order-0) ST collect continents in one side and abandoned Pacific Ocean in the other side. Recent researches also show two mantels upwelling in opposite side of the Earth: one under Africa (tectonic pose) and the other under Pacific Ocean (tectonic tail). In higher order (order-1) ST build up Africa in one side and S.America in the other side therefore left Atlantic Ocean meandered in between. In order-n e.g. Khoor Musa and Bandar-Deylam bay are seen meandered easterly in the Iranian part but Khoor Abdullah and Kuwait bay meandered westerly in the Arabian part, they are distributed symmetrically with respect to axis of Persian Gulf(PG), these two are fractal components of easterly Caspian-wing and westerly Black Sea-wing which split up from Anatoly. Caspian Sea and Black Sea make two legs of Y-like structure, this shape completely fitted with GPS-velocity map which start from PG and split up in the Catastrophic Point(Anatoly). We could consider PG as remnants of Ancient Ocean which spent up

  11. Note: Reflection zone plates as highly resolving broadband optics for soft X-ray laboratory spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, A; Meurer, T; Kanngießer, B; Mantouvalou, I

    2018-02-01

    The resolving power and relative efficiency of two off-axis reflection zone plates (RZPs) in the soft X-ray range between 1 nm and 5 nm were investigated. RZPs focus only a very narrow bandwidth around the design wavelength. By misaligning the RZP, the focused wavelength can be tuned through a much wider spectral range. Using a laser-produced plasma source, we demonstrate that a single RZP can be efficiently used for spectroscopy at arbitrary wavelengths in the investigated soft X-ray range.

  12. Beam propagation modeling of modified volume Fresnel zone plates fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisungsitthisunti, Pornsak; Ersoy, Okan K; Xu, Xianfan

    2009-01-01

    Light diffraction by volume Fresnel zone plates (VFZPs) is simulated by the Hankel transform beam propagation method (Hankel BPM). The method utilizes circularly symmetric geometry and small step propagation to calculate the diffracted wave fields by VFZP layers. It is shown that fast and accurate diffraction results can be obtained with the Hankel BPM. The results show an excellent agreement with the scalar diffraction theory and the experimental results. The numerical method allows more comprehensive studies of the VFZP parameters to achieve higher diffraction efficiency.

  13. Spiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hargittai, Istvan

    1992-01-01

    From the tiny twisted biological molecules to the gargantuan curling arms of many galaxies, the physical world contains a startling repetition of spiral patterns. Today, researchers have a keen interest in identifying, measuring, and defining these patterns in scientific terms. Spirals play an important role in the growth processes of many biological forms and organisms. Also, through time, humans have imitated spiral motifs in their art forms, and invented new and unusual spirals which have no counterparts in the natural world. Therefore, one goal of this multiauthored book is to stress the c

  14. Mantle constraints on the plate tectonic evolution of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction zone and the South Fiji Basin region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W.P.; Spakman, W.

    2012-01-01

    The Tonga–Kermadec–Hikurangi subduction zone is a major plate boundary in the Southwest Pacific region, where the Pacific plate subducts westward underneath the Australian plate. Considerable controversy exists regarding the Cenozoic evolution of this subduction zone, its connection with

  15. Mantle constraints on the plate tectonic evolution of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction zone and the South Fiji Basin region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Spakman, W.

    The Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction zone is a major plate boundary in the Southwest Pacific region, where the Pacific plate subducts westward underneath the Australian plate. Considerable controversy exists regarding the Cenozoic evolution of this subduction zone, its connection with the

  16. A simplified fabrication process of Fresnel zone plates with controlling proximity effect correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Chul; Kim, Deuk Su; Kim, Ki Nam; Kim, Kyung Min; Seo, Chang Ho; Yoo, Jung Jae; Lee, Dong Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) for soft X-ray microscopy with an energy range of 284 eV to 540 eV are designed and fabricated in a simple method. An adequate aspect ratio of the resist mold for electroplating was obtained by the proximity effect correction technology for an incident electron beam on a single thick layer resist. Without additional complicated reactive ion etching, a sufficient electro plating mold for nickel structures was fabricated. The overall fabrication procedures which involve a mix-and-match overlay technique for electron beam lithography and an optic exposure system that centers the membrane on the nanostructures, and hybrid silicon etching technology in junction with deep anisotropy and a KOH wet method in order to release the backside Si substrates of the Si3N4 membranes with no deformation of FZPs are introduced. High quality nanostructures with minimum outermost zone widths of 50 nm and diameters of 120 microm were fabricated with simplified fabrication process and with cost-effective.

  17. Danger zones for flexor tendons in volar plating of distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Sonya P; Ljungquist, Karin L; Huang, Jerry I

    2015-06-01

    To define a danger zone for volar plates using magnetic resonance imaging by analyzing the position of the flexor tendons at risk around the watershed line. We analyzed 40 wrist magnetic resonance images. The location of the flexor pollicus longus (FPL) and index flexor digitorum profundus (FDPi) tendons was recorded at 3 and 6 mm proximal to the watershed line of the distal radius. We measured the distance between the volar margin of the distal radius and the FPL and FDPi tendons, and the coronal position of the tendons. At a point 3 mm proximal to the watershed line, FPL and FDPi were located on average 2.6 and 2.2 mm anterior to the volar margin of the distal radius. This distance increased to 4.7 and 5.3 mm at a point 6 mm proximal to the watershed line. The FPL and FDPi were located at 57% and 42% of the total width of the distal radius from the sigmoid notch at 3 mm from the watershed, and at 66% and 46% at 6 mm from the watershed. Surgeons should be aware of the close proximity of the flexor tendons to the volar cortex of the distal radius proximal to the watershed line and their radial to ulnar position. Three millimeters proximal to the watershed line, plate placement more than 2 mm anterior to the volar cortex or the use of plates thicker than 2 mm poses a high risk for directly contacting flexor tendons. This article may prove to be helpful in avoiding flexor tendon injury during volar plate fixation. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Repeating Deep Very Low Frequency Earthquakes: An Evidence of Transition Zone between Brittle and Ductile Zone along Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arai, R.

    2017-12-01

    Recently slow or low frequency seismic and geodetic events are focused under recognition of important role in tectonic process. The most western region of Ryukyu trench, Yaeyama Islands, is very active area of these type events. It has semiannual-like slow slip (Heki et.al., 2008; Nishimura et.al.,2014) and very frequent shallow very low frequency earthquakes near trench zone (Ando et.al.,2012; Nakamura et.al.,2014). Arai et.al.(2016) identified clear reverse phase discontinuity along plate boundary by air-gun survey, suggesting existence of low velocity layer including fluid. The subducting fluid layer is considered to control slip characteristics. On the other hand, deep low frequency earthquake and tremor observed at south-western Honshu and Shikoku of Japan are not identified well due to lack of high-quality seismic network. A broadband seismic station(ISG/PS) of Pacific21 network is operating in last 20 years that locates on occurrence potential area of low frequency earthquake. We tried to review continuous broadband record, searching low frequency earthquakes. In pilot survey, we found three very low frequency seismic events which are dominant in less than 0.1Hz component and are not listed in earthquake catalogue. Source locates about 50km depth and at transition area between slow slip event and active area of general earthquake along plate boundary. To detect small and/or hidden very low frequency earthquake, we applied matched filter analysis to continuous three components waveform data using pre-reviewed seismogram as template signal. 12 events with high correlation are picked up in last 10 years. Most events have very similar waveform, which means characteristics of repeating deep very low frequency earthquake. The event history of very low frequency earthquake is not related with one of slow slip event in this region. In Yaeyama region, low frequency earthquake, general earthquake and slow slip event occur dividing in space and have apparent

  19. Seismic attenuation structure beneath Nazca Plate subduction zone in southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, H.; Kim, Y.; Clayton, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    We estimate seismic attenuation in terms of quality factors, QP and QS using P and S phases, respectively, beneath Nazca Plate subduction zone between 10°S and 18.5°S latitude in southern Peru. We first relocate 298 earthquakes with magnitude ranges of 4.0-6.5 and depth ranges of 20-280 km. We measure t*, which is an integrated attenuation through the seismic raypath between the regional earthquakes and stations. The measured t* are inverted to construct three-dimensional attenuation structures of southern Peru. Checkerboard test results for both QP and QS structures ensure good resolution in the slab-dip transition zone between flat and normal slab subduction down to a depth of 200 km. Both QP and QS results show higher attenuation continued down to a depth of 50 km beneath volcanic arc and also beneath the Quimsachata volcano, the northernmost young volcano, located far east of the main volcanic front. We also observe high attenuation in mantle wedge especially beneath the normal subduction region in both QP and QS (100-130 in QP and 100-125 in QS) and slightly higher QP and QS beneath the flat-subduction and slab-dip transition regions. We plan to relate measured attenuation in the mantle wedge to material properties such as viscosity to understand the subduction zone dynamics.

  20. Subcrustal earthquakes in the plate boundary zone of New Zealand's South Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, C. M.; Stern, T. A.; Townend, J.; Sheehan, A. F.; Molnar, P. H.; Collins, J. A.; Karalliyadda, S.; Bourguignon, S.; Bannister, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Sporadic, intermediate-depth earthquakes have been observed for ~40 years in the vicinity of the Alpine Fault, a 460 km-long transpressive fault forming the western boundary of the Southern Alps. The Alpine Fault represents the plate boundary between the Australian and Pacific Plates in New Zealand and links two subduction zones of opposite polarity in the North and South. Several earthquakes at depths of 59-85 km have been recorded by the Southern Alps Microearthquake Borehole Array (SAMBA) since its deployment in November 2008. Due to large numbers of impulsive phase arrivals, focal mechanisms were obtained for these events during routine processing. In 2009 and early 2010, several additional temporary seismometer networks were operating in the central Southern Alps (Alpine Fault Array ALFA, Deep Fault Drilling Project 2010 DFDP10) and the offshore region west of the South Island (Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa MOANA). To gain more insight about the cause and mechanism of these deep events, a comprehensive analysis has been performed incorporating data from all available instruments. Accurate hypocentres of 22 earthquakes (ML<4) and focal mechanisms of at least 14 events have been obtained. The focal mechanisms reveal that reverse faulting predominates at depth in the continental collision zone between the Pacific and Australian Plates. The intermediate-depth events occur below the Moho discontinuity, which has been mapped in detail using wide-angle reflection/refraction data obtained during the South Island Geophysical Transect (SIGHT) project in 1995/96. Although the cause for these subcrustal earthquakes is not yet clear, they have previously been interpreted to result from intra-continental subduction (Reyners 1987), high shear-strain gradients due to depressed geotherms and viscous deformation of mantle lithosphere (Kohler and Eberhart-Phillips 2003). On the basis of the locations and mechanisms obtained using SAMBA, we have argued that

  1. Extended residence time centrifugal contactor design modification and centrifugal contactor vane plate valving apparatus for extending mixing zone residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2017-06-06

    The present invention provides an annular centrifugal contactor, having a housing adapted to receive a plurality of flowing liquids; a rotor on the interior of the housing; an annular mixing zone, wherein the annular mixing zone has a plurality of fluid retention reservoirs with ingress apertures near the bottom of the annular mixing zone and egress apertures located above the ingress apertures of the annular mixing zone; and an adjustable vane plate stem, wherein the stem can be raised to restrict the flow of a liquid into the rotor or lowered to increase the flow of the liquid into the rotor.

  2. Comparison of earthquake source parameters and interseismic plate coupling variations in global subduction zones (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, S. L.; Moyer, P. A.; Stankova-Pursley, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geodetically determined interseismic coupling variations have been found in subduction zones worldwide. These coupling variations have been linked to heterogeneities in interplate fault frictional conditions. These connections to fault friction imply that observed coupling variations are also important in influencing details in earthquake rupture behavior. Because of the wealth of newly available geodetic models along many subduction zones, it is now possible to examine detailed variations in coupling and compare to seismicity characteristics. Here we use a large catalog of earthquake source time functions and slip models for moderate to large magnitude earthquakes to explore these connections, comparing earthquake source parameters with available models of geodetic coupling along segments of the Japan, Kurile, Kamchatka, Peru, Chile, and Alaska subduction zones. In addition, we use published geodetic results along the Costa Rica margin to compare with source parameters of small magnitude earthquakes recorded with an onshore-offshore network of seismometers. For the moderate to large magnitude earthquakes, preliminary results suggest a complex relationship between earthquake parameters and estimates of strongly and weakly coupled segments of the plate interface. For example, along the Kamchatka subduction zone, these earthquakes occur primarily along the transition between strong and weak coupling, with significant heterogeneity in the pattern of moment scaled duration with respect to the coupling estimates. The longest scaled duration event in this catalog occurred in a region of strong coupling. Earthquakes along the transition between strong and weakly coupled exhibited the most complexity in the source time functions. Use of small magnitude (0.5 earthquake spectra, with higher corner frequencies and higher mean apparent stress for earthquakes that occur in along the Osa Peninsula relative to the Nicoya Peninsula, mimicking the along-strike variations in

  3. Development of a high-resolution electron-beam profile monitor using Fresnel zone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Norio; Sakai, Hiroshi; Muto, Toshiya; Hayano, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    We present a high-resolution and real-time beam profile monitor using Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) developed in the KEK-ATF damping ring. The monitor system has an X-ray imaging optics with two FZPs. In this monitor, the synchrotron radiation from the electron beam at the bending magnet is monochromatized by a crystal monochromator and the transverse electron beam image is twenty-times magnified by the two FZPs and detected on an X-ray CCD camera. The expected spatial resolution for the selected photon energy of 3.235 keV is less than 1 μm. With the beam profile monitor, we succeeded in obtaining a clear electron-beam image and measuring the extremely small beam size less than 10 μm. It is greatly expected that the beam profile monitor will be used in high-brilliance light sources and low-emittance accelerators. (author)

  4. Reflection zone plate wavelength-dispersive spectrometer for ultra-light elements measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Aljoša; Anklamm, Lars; Firsov, Anatoly; Firsov, Alexander; Löchel, Heike; Sokolov, Andrey; Gubzhokov, Renat; Erko, Alexei

    2015-11-16

    We have developed an electron beam excitation ultra-soft X-ray add-on device for a scanning electron microscope with a reflective zone plate mulichannel spectrometer in order to analyse ultra-light elements such as Li and B. This spectrometer has high (λ/Δλ~100) resolving power in the energy range of 45 eV - 1120 eV. Metallic Li samples were examined and fluorescence spectra successfully measured. Energy resolution of 0.49 eV was measured in the ultra-low energy range using the Al L(2,3) line at 71 eV. High sensitivity of Boron detection was demonstrated on a B(4)C sample with layer thicknesses of 1-50 nm, detecting an amount of metallic Boron as small as ~0.57 fg.

  5. X-ray Fourier transform holography by amplitude-division-type Fresnel zone plate interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyan, Minas; Haroutunyan, Levon

    2018-01-01

    A two-block X-ray Fresnel zone plate system forms two-beams - a plane wave and a spherical wave - which interfere at the focal distance of the virtual source of the spherical wave. An object placed in the path of the plane wave forms an object wave and the spherical wave is the reference wave. The recorded intensity distribution is the Fourier transform hologram of the object. Analytical and numerical calculations show the possibilities of this scheme to record the hologram and reconstruct the object image. Examples of recording holograms of a one-dimensional cosine-like grating and a two-dimensional grid object as well as reconstruction of the images are considered.

  6. Towards Realization of an Atomic deBroglie Microscope: Helium Atom Focusing Using Fresnel Zone Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, R. B.; Grisenti, R. I.; Rehbein, S.; Schmahl, G.; Toennies, J. P.; Wöll, Ch.

    1999-10-01

    Virtually all focusing microscopes currently employ either photons or electrons as the imaging medium, largely due to the ease with which these two species can be focused. On the basis of other factors - resolution, contrast, and sample damage - a helium atom would often be preferred, particularly in the microscopy of solid surfaces. The focusing of a neutral atom beam has proven difficult, however. This work reports the successful focusing of a neutral, ground state, ^4He atom beam using custom, state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plates. Glass microskimmers of aperture as small as 1 micron diameter were used to define the incident beam. At only moderate demagnification (x 0.40), a focused spot diameter of Raster scans across 15 and 25 micron wide slits have been recorded, demonstrating transmission scanning helium deBroglie microscopy at this near-micron resolution.

  7. Formation of a contact zone during compression of a plate with an elliptic hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikova, M. E.

    2010-05-01

    The problem of compression of a thin plate with an elliptic hole is considered. It is assumed that increasing the distant compressive load can lead to contact of opposite regions of the boundaries of the ellipse. The problem is solved within the framework of a modified Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale model and an elastoplastic analog of the Griffith problem for an ellipse using the Goodier and Kanninen model. The critical fracture parameters providing an equilibrium configuration of the system are determined from a sufficient strength criterion representing a system of two equations, one of which specifies the absence of partial overlapping of the upper and lower surfaces of the contact zone, and the other is a deformation criterion of critical opening of the ellipse. The compression-induced deformation of the boundaries of ellipses with various curvature radii at the top is shown by the example of annealed copper having nanostructure.

  8. Depth compensating calculation method of computer-generated holograms using symmetry and similarity of zone plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Gong, Guanghong; Li, Ni

    2017-10-01

    Computer-generated hologram (CGH) is a promising 3D display technology while it is challenged by heavy computation load and vast memory requirement. To solve these problems, a depth compensating CGH calculation method based on symmetry and similarity of zone plates is proposed and implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU). An improved LUT method is put forward to compute the distances between object points and hologram pixels in the XY direction. The concept of depth compensating factor is defined and used for calculating the holograms of points with different depth positions instead of layer-based methods. The proposed method is suitable for arbitrary sampling objects with lower memory usage and higher computational efficiency compared to other CGH methods. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by numerical and optical experiments.

  9. Femtosecond high-resolution hard X-ray spectroscopy using reflection zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löchel, Heike; Braig, Christoph; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Siewert, Frank; Baumgärtel, Peter; Firsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexei

    2015-04-06

    An off-axis total external reflection zone plate is applied to wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry in the range from 7.8 keV to 9.0 keV. The resolving power E/ΔE of up to 1.1 × 10(2), demonstrated in a synchrotron proof-of-concept experiment, competes well with existing energy-dispersive instruments in this spectral range. In conjunction with the detection efficiency of (2.2 ± 0.6)%, providing a fairly constant count rate across the 1.2 keV band, the temporal pulse elongation to no more than 1.5 × 10(-15) s opens the door to wide-range, ultra-fast hard X-ray spectroscopy at free-electron lasers (FELs).

  10. Digital in-line X-ray holography with zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, R; Gorniak, T; Nisius, T; Christophis, C; Pettitt, M E; Staier, F; Wilhein, T; Rehbein, S; Grunze, M; Rosenhahn, A

    2011-07-01

    Single pulse imaging with radiation provided by free-electron laser sources is a promising approach towards X-ray microscopy, which is expected to provide high resolution images of biological samples unaffected by radiation damage. One fully coherent imaging technique for this purpose is digital in-line holography. Key to its successful application is the creation of X-ray point sources with high photon flux. In this study we applied zone plates to create such point sources with synchrotron radiation provided by the storage ring BESSY II. The obtained, divergent light cone is applied to holographic microscopy of biological objects such as critical point dried Navicula perminuta diatoms and human cells using photons with an energy of 250 eV. Compared to conventional experiments employing pinholes, exposure times are reduced by two orders of magnitude. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolving seismogenic plate boundary megathrust and mega-splay faults in subduction zone (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, G.; Hamahashi, M.; Fukuchi, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kameda, J.; Kitamura, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Kawasaki, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the fault mechanism and its relationship to the sesimo-tsunamigenesis is a key of the scientific targets of subduction zone and therefore NantroSEIZE project of IODP and future new drilling project of International Ocean Discovery Program keeps focusing on that. Mega-splay fault branched from plate boundary megathrust in subduction zone is located around the border between outer and inner wedges and is considered to cause great earthquake and tsunami such as 1960 Alaska earthquake, 1944 and 1946 Nankai-Tonankai earthquakes, and 2004 Sumatra earthquakes. Seismic reflection studies for the mega-splay fault in 2D and 3D in the Nankai forearc present the reflector with negative or positive polarities with various amplitudes and suggest complicated petrophysical properties and condition of the fault and its surroundings. The Nankai mega-splay fault at a depth of ~5km is going to be drilled and cored by NantroSEIZE experiments and is expected for great progress of understanding of the fault mechanics. Before drilling the really targeted seismogenic fault, we are conducting many exercises of geophysical and geological observations. The core-log-seismic integrated exercise for the exhumed mega-splay fault by drilling was operated for the Nobeoka thrust in the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan. The Nobeoka thrust was once buried in the depth >~10km and suffered maximum temperature >~300 dgree C. As the core recovery is ~99%, perfect correlation between the core and logging data is possible. Thickness of the fault zone is >200 m with a ~50 cm thick central fault core dividing the phyllitic hanging wall and the footwall of broken-melange like cataclasite. A-few-meter-thick discrete damage zones with fault cores are recognized by difference in physical properties and visual deformation textures at several horizons in the fault zone. Host rocks for those damaged zones are completely lithified cataclasites with abundant mineral veins, which record the older and deeper

  12. Seismic Imaging of the southern Rivera Plate and Jalisco Block Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, D.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez, Q. J.; Carrillo de la Cruz, J. L.; Danobeitia, J.; Bartolome, R.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of structural aspects and high seismic activity risk of the Jalisco Block makes the Pacific Coast of Mexico in one of the most attractive region for geophysical investigations. Furthermore, tectonic studies in this interesting geological region of the Rivera-North American contact zone, carried out during last two years by TSUJAL Project, are currently providing numerous geophysical results. In this study, we present the most relevant results in the southeastern part of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block area crossing the Mesoamerican Trench from to the east of Rivera Fracture Zone to La Huerta region (Jalisco state). Along this profile, we have combined wide-angle, multichannel seismic, multibeam bathymetry and seismicity data. The marine seismic sources used in this profile aboard RRS James Cook consisted of 12 guns divided in 4 subarrays of 3 guns each, with a total capacity of 5800 in3, shooting every 50 m and providing 1773 shots in a line of 89 km long. These sources were initially designed to recover multichannel seismic data, but 7 seismic portable stations were deployed perpendicular to the coast to register those sources providing a wide-angle offshore-onshore seismic transect of 130 km length with NE-SW orientation. The MCS data were also acquired aboard the RRS James Cook using a 5.85 km long digital streamer deployed at 10 m depth with 468 active channels. The WAS and MCS data processing and interpretation joined bathymetry afford new information about the geometry of southern Rivera Plate subducting under Jalisco Block with a dip angle of 14°, seismic images of the continental accretionary wedge and, also, the deep and shallow crustal structure along this profile up to maximum depth of 35 km.

  13. Pinhole diffraction holography for fabrication of high-resolution Fresnel zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sankha S; Solak, Harun H; David, Christian; van der Veen, J Friso

    2014-01-27

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) play an essential role in high spatial resolution x-ray imaging and analysis of materials in many fields. These diffractive lenses are commonly made by serial writing techniques such as electron beam or focused ion beam lithography. Here we show that pinhole diffraction holography has potential to generate FZP patterns that are free from aberrations and imperfections that may be present in alternative fabrication techniques. In this presented method, FZPs are fabricated by recording interference pattern of a spherical wave generated by diffraction through a pinhole, illuminated with coherent plane wave at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength. Fundamental and practical issues involved in formation and recording of the interference pattern are considered. It is found that resolution of the produced FZP is directly related to the diameter of the pinhole used and the pinhole size cannot be made arbitrarily small as the transmission of EUV or x-ray light through small pinholes diminishes due to poor refractive index contrast found between materials in these spectral ranges. We also find that the practical restrictions on exposure time due to the light intensity available from current sources directly imposes a limit on the number of zones that can be printed with this method. Therefore a trade-off between the resolution and the FZP diameter exists. Overall, we find that this method can be used to fabricate aberration free FZPs down to a resolution of about 10 nm.

  14. Imaging the deep structures of the convergent plates along the Ecuadorian subduction zone through receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Regnier, M. M.; Font, Y.; Nocquet, J. M.; Segovia, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Ecuadorian subduction zone was affected by several large M>7.5 earthquakes. While we have low resolution on the 1942, 1958 earthquakes rupture zones extension, the 2016 Pedernales earthquake, that occurs at the same location than the 1942 earthquake, give strong constraints on the deep limit of the seismogenic zone. This downdip limit is caused by the onset of plasticity at a critical temperature (> 350-450 °C for crustal materials, or serpentinized mantle wedge, and eventually > 700 °C for dry mantle). However we still don't know exactly where is the upper plate Moho and therefore what controls the downdip limit of Ecuadorian large earthquakes seismogenic zone. For several years Géoazur and IG-EPN have maintained permanent and temporary networks (ADN and JUAN projects) along the margin to register the subduction zone seismological activity. Although Ecuador is not a good place to perform receiver function due to its position with respect to the worldwide teleseismic sources, the very long time deployment compensate this issue. We performed a frequency dependent receiver function analysis to derive (1) the thickness of the downgoing plate, (2) the interplate depth and (3) the upper plate Moho. These constraints give the frame to interpretation on the seismogenic zone of the 2016 Pedernales earthquake.

  15. Lithospheric Structure of the Incoming Nazca Plate Adjacent to the 2014 Iquique Earthquake Rupture Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, E. K.; Trehu, A. M.; Davenport, K. K.; Roland, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    The 2014 Iquique Mw 8.1 earthquake occurred within a 500-km long segment of the Peru-Chile subduction zone that had not experienced a significant earthquake since 1877. This event did not fill the entire seismic gap and details of the deformation, along with local gravity anomalies, point to a geologic control on slip behavior. To better constrain along-strike changes in geologic or morphologic features and the correlation with earthquake rupture, the 2016 PICTURES (Pisagua-Iquique Crustal Tomography to Understand the Region of the Earthquake Source) experiment collected multichannel seismic (MCS) and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from across the deformation front and incoming Nazca plate within the area of the 2014 earthquake. Here, we provide a first look at MCS reflection data from this experiment that images the Nazca plate along an uninterrupted 170 km line perpendicular to the region of greatest slip, acquired using the R/V Langseth's 12.5 km streamer and 6600 cc gun array. We summarize structural features of the incoming oceanic lithosphere and present a preliminary 2D velocity model that spans the Nazca outer rise to the trench along the Iquique Ridge (IR). The IR represents a broad, high oceanic feature (HOF) that roughly spans the entire seismic gap. The source of buoyancy and reduced seismic velocities of the IR swell are thought to be produced by isostatically compensated, overthickened crust or anomalously low density mantle due to heating or serpentinization, and we explore these two hypotheses using our preliminary velocity model. Past outer rise deformation modeling suggests a significant bending moment and vertical force at the trench axis, a source for broad, homogenous coupling as the HOF converges the margin. However, decreased incoming sediment and rough topography associated with numerous large seamounts may also lead to a thin subduction channel, influencing heterogeneous rupture behavior. Seaward of the Iquique 2014 event, our initial

  16. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motions in 2D Models of Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    While slab pull is considered the dominant force controlling plate motion and speed, its magnitude is controlled by slab behavior in the mantle, where tomographic studies show a wide range of possibilities from direct penetration to folding, or stagnation directly above the lower mantle (e.g. Fukao et al., 2009). Geodynamic studies have investigated various parameters, such as plate age and two phase transitions, to recreate observed behavior (e.g. Běhounková and Cízková, 2008). However, past geodynamic models have left out known slab characteristics that may have a large impact on slab behavior and our understanding of subduction processes. Mineral experiments and seismic observations have indicated the existence of additional phase transitions in the mantle transition zone that may produce buoyancy forces large enough to affect the descent of a subducting slab (e.g. Ricard et al., 2005). The current study systematically tests different common assumptions used in geodynamic models: kinematic versus free-slip boundary conditions, the effects of adiabatic heating, viscous dissipation and latent heat, compositional layering and a more complete suite of phase transitions. Final models have a complete energy equation, with eclogite, harzburgite and pyrolite lithosphere compositional layers, and seven composition-dependent phase transitions within the olivine, pyroxene and garnet polymorph minerals. Results show important feedback loops between different assumptions and new behavior from the most complete models. Kinematic models show slab weakening or breaking above the 660 km boundary and between compositional layers. The behavior in dynamic models with a free-moving trench and overriding plate is compared to the more commonly found kinematic models. The new behavior may have important implications for the depth distribution of deep earthquakes within the slab. Though the thermodynamic parameters of certain phase transitions may be uncertain, their presence and

  17. A subduction zone reference frame based on slab geometry and subduction partitioning of plate motion and trench migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2011-01-01

    The geometry of subducted slabs that interact with the transition zone depends critically on the partitioning of the subduction velocity (v S⊥) at the surface into its subducting plate motion component (vSP⊥) and trench migration component (vT⊥). Geodynamic models of progressive subduction

  18. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    ’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through...... the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature...... of academic teaching and lecturing into account....

  19. Is the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone an ancient plate boundary of Baltica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Mikolajczak, Mateusz; Krzywiec, Piotr; Malinowski, Michal; Buffenmyer, Vinton; Lewandowski, Marek

    2015-12-01

    The Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ) is generally regarded as a fossil plate boundary in Europe that extends 2000 km from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea. We used an integrated approach merging potential fields and seismic data to explore crustal architecture across the TTZ in central Poland. The aim of the study was to test whether the TTZ coincides with an early Paleozoic (Caledonian) suture formed through the closure of the Tornquist Ocean along the SW Baltica margin. The suture is presumed to separate the East European Craton (EEC) from the Paleozoic terranes of Western Europe. Two seismic reflection lines from the PolandSPAN™ experiment were used to image the deep structure at the SW margin of the EEC. Lines PL-5300 and PL-5400 run NE-SW in central and northern Poland, respectively. The seismic interpretation down to top of basement was integrated with 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling to highlight the structure of the deep crust. Both the gravity and magnetic models show a suture that welds together two blocks at the base of crust. However, top of basement above the suture dips uniformly to the SW and is overlain by undisturbed lower Paleozoic and younger sediments. By implication, the suture must have developed in the Precambrian and both crustal blocks amalgamated belong to the EEC. Consequently, the Caledonian suture, formed by the closure of the Tornquist Ocean between Avalonia and Baltica, must be located farther southwest beneath thick upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments.

  20. The Iceland Plate Boundary Zone: Propagating Rifts, Migrating Transforms, and Rift-Parallel Strike-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karson, J. A.

    2017-11-01

    Unlike most of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the North America/Eurasia plate boundary in Iceland lies above sea level where magmatic and tectonic processes can be directly investigated in subaerial exposures. Accordingly, geologic processes in Iceland have long been recognized as possible analogs for seafloor spreading in the submerged parts of the mid-ocean ridge system. Combining existing and new data from across Iceland provides an integrated view of this active, mostly subaerial plate boundary. The broad Iceland plate boundary zone includes segmented rift zones linked by transform fault zones. Rift propagation and transform fault migration away from the Iceland hotspot rearrange the plate boundary configuration resulting in widespread deformation of older crust and reactivation of spreading-related structures. Rift propagation results in block rotations that are accommodated by widespread, rift-parallel, strike-slip faulting. The geometry and kinematics of faulting in Iceland may have implications for spreading processes elsewhere on the mid-ocean ridge system where rift propagation and transform migration occur.

  1. Rheological responses to plate boundary deformation at the Eastern Volcanic Zone in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariqul Islam, Md.; Sturkell, Erik

    2017-10-01

    Located on the mid-Atlantic ridge, Iceland allows for direct measurement of crustal deformation. Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ), Iceland, and crustal deformation of the rift near its southern end at 64°N show a spreading rate of 13.8 ± 1.8 mm yr- 1. About 90% of the deformation occurs in an 80 to 90-km wide zone. To understand how the rheology of the lithosphere influences rifting, we applied a thermo-mechanical stretching model that includes thermal states in Iceland using temperature- and stress-dependent wet and dry olivine rheology. We attempt to reproduce the thermal structure of a rift by defining 700 °C from 5- to 15-km depth at the rift axis that leads to variation in rheological structure, and to estimate the layer (from surface to a depth of 700 °C) where the elastic deformation of the lithosphere is the greatest. At a fixed spreading rate, the deformation field is controlled by the sub-surface thermal state. The vertical subsidence rate at the ridge axis increases almost linearly as the half-velocity increases. The best fitted model suggests a thermal gradient of 54 °C km- 1 at depth below where 700 °C occurs at the ridge axis. The models have little sensitivity to the wet or dry olivine rheology. Estimated viscosity is 1 × 1019 Pa s at 20-km depth at the ridge axis and 1 × 1018 Pa s up to 100-km depth in the model. The spreading rate influences the tangential (non-linearity) shape of the deformation field, and a change in spreading rate affects the deformation field the most. After spreading velocity, the model's second most sensitive parameter is the location of the 700 °C at the rift axis. The thermomechanical model confirms that the rheological responses at the central part of the rift zone in the EVZ, Iceland caused of plate spreading is nonlinear, comparable with surface deformation observed by GPS measurement.

  2. The Beynon Gabor zone plate: a new tool for de Broglie matter waves and hard X-rays? An off axis and focus intensity investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Martin M; Vial, Alexandre M; Stamnes, Jakob J; Holst, Bodil

    2013-11-18

    Optical elements based on Fresnel zones are used in a range of applications, from X-ray telescopy to microscopy and recently also in the manipulation of de Broglie matter waves. In 1992 Beynon and co-workers presented a binary Gabor type zone plate (henceforth referred to as the Beynon Gabor zone plate). Because this zone plate has no higher order foci, it is in principle a very attractive candidate for focusing of de Broglie matter waves and in some cases X-rays. So far the Beynon Gabor zone plate investigations presented in the literature have concentrated on the intensity distribution along the optical axis and in the focal plane. Here we present a detailed numerical investigation of the Beynon Gabor zone plate, including an investigation of the off-optical axis, off focal plane intensity distribution for point source illumination. We show that at integer fractions of the focal length, the beam becomes nearly toroidal (doughnut-shaped). This offers potentially interesting new possibilities for de Broglie matter wave and X-ray optics, for example in STED-like applications. We further show that the increased intensity at the focal point predicted in the literature for a particular Beynon Gabor zone plate transmission function configuration is an artifact due to the lack of sampling nodes. We support our calculations with experimental measurements in the visible light range, using a Beynon Gabor zone plate fabricated with electron beam lithography.

  3. Geodetic constraints on areal changes in the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone: What controls Basin and Range extension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreemer, Corné; Hammond, William C.

    2007-10-01

    Using ˜1500 geodetic velocities we model the present-day spatial patterns of areal changes inside the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone. From this model we show that between the central Gulf of California and the Queen Charlotte Islands there is no significant net change in surface area. This zero net areal-change result allows us to relate regions of areal growth to areas of equivalent contraction elsewhere within the plate boundary zone. We find that areal growth of the Basin and Range province (BRP) and its eastern margin (˜5.2 ± 0.1 × 103 m2/yr) is balanced by areal reduction near northwestern California between 38°N and 42°N. The San Andreas fault system south of 38°N and the plate boundary zone north of ˜42°N (including the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridge systems) each have no significant net areal change. Our results suggest a kinematic relationship between extension in the BRP and contraction near the northern California Coast Ranges and Klamath Mountains. From these observations we propose that, although BRP extension may be caused by internal forces, the southernmost Cascadia subduction zone provides a “window of escape” that acts as a stress guide to BRP extension as well as northwestward Sierra Nevada motion. Such a dynamic model is consistent with independent findings that (1) the least principal horizontal stress orientations in the BRP are toward northern California, (2) extension directions in the BRP have changed orientation to track the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction, and (3) the southernmost Cascadia subduction zone is a relatively weak plate boundary.

  4. Fresnel zone-plate based X-ray microscopy in Zernike phase contrast with sub-50 nm resolution at NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Jie; Li Wenjie; Tian Jinping; Liu Longhua; Xiong Ying; Liu Gang; Wu Ziyu; Tian Yangchao [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (China); Liu Yijin [School of Physics (China); Yue Zhengbo; Yu Hanqing [Laboratory of Environmental Engineering, School of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230029 (China); Wang Chunru, E-mail: ychtian@ustc.edu.c [Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10060 (China)

    2009-09-01

    A transmission X-ray microscope using Fresnel zone-plates (FZPs) has been installed at U7A beamline of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The objective FZP with 45 nm outermost zone width delivers a sub-50 nm resolution. A gold phase ring with 2.5 {mu}m thickness and 4 {mu}m width was placed at the focal plane of the objective FZP at 8 keV to produce a negative Zernike phase contrast. A series of samples were used to test the performance of the Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy.

  5. Fresnel zone-plate based X-ray microscopy in Zernike phase contrast with sub-50 nm resolution at NSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie; Li Wenjie; Tian Jinping; Liu Longhua; Xiong Ying; Liu Gang; Wu Ziyu; Tian Yangchao; Liu Yijin; Yue Zhengbo; Yu Hanqing; Wang Chunru

    2009-01-01

    A transmission X-ray microscope using Fresnel zone-plates (FZPs) has been installed at U7A beamline of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The objective FZP with 45 nm outermost zone width delivers a sub-50 nm resolution. A gold phase ring with 2.5 μm thickness and 4 μm width was placed at the focal plane of the objective FZP at 8 keV to produce a negative Zernike phase contrast. A series of samples were used to test the performance of the Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy.

  6. Faster scanning and higher resolution: new setup for multilayer zone plate imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Markus; Soltau, Jakob; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    Hard x-ray imaging methods are routinely used in two and three spatial dimensions to tackle challenging scientific questions of the 21st century, e.g. catalytic processes in energy research and bio-physical experiments on the single-cell level [1-3]. Among the most important experimental techniques are scanning SAXS to probe the local orientation of filaments and fluorescence mapping to quantify the local composition. The routinely available spot size has been reduced to few tens of nanometres; but the real-space resolution of these techniques can degrade by (i) vibration or drift, and (ii) spreading of beam damage, especially for soft condensed matter on small length scales. We have recently developed new Multilayer Zone Plate (MZP) optics for focusing hard (14 keV) and very hard (60 keV to above 100 keV) x-rays down to spot sizes presumably on 5 or 10nm scale. Here we report on recent progress on a new MZP based sample scanner, and how to tackle beam damage spread. The Eiger detector synchronized to a piezo scanner enables to scan in a 2D continuous mode fields of view larger than 20μm squared, or for high resolution down to (virtual) pixel sizes of below 2nm, in about three minutes for 255×255 points (90 seconds after further improvements). Nano-SAXS measurements with more than one million real-space pixels, each containing a full diffraction image, can be carried out in less than one hour, as we have shown using a Siemens star test pattern.

  7. A phase retrieval method for X-ray microscopy based on a π / 2-biased X-ray zone-plate pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minxi; Wang, Xiaofang

    2018-03-01

    A method for X-ray imaging and phase retrieval of a sample is proposed, wherein a zone-plate pair with a bias of π / 2 is used to take only twice differential-interference-contrast images of the sample via reverse projection. The images of the sample and its reverse projection have the same absorption but opposite differential phase shift signals, which are post-processed to quantitatively retrieve the phase shift and the absorption of the sample. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the spatial resolution of the retrieved results could attain the Rayleigh limit of a single zone plate in the zone-plate pair.

  8. The Impact of Surface Bending, A Complete Mineralogical Model and Movement of the Overriding Plate on Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Katrina Marie

    Modern observations of subduction zones provide only snapshots of a complex geologic system that can last tens of millions of years. Surface velocity measurements and seismic tomography images provide information on the possible forces acting on the plate and influencing slab shape and behavior. Modern subduction zones exhibit a wide range of behavior, from the rapidly rolling back Tonga subduction zone (where the trench is moving toward the subducting plate) to stationary trenches to trench advance (where the trench is moving toward the overriding plate). Slabs may also stagnate at 660 km while others directly penetrate into the lower mantle. Numerical models can combine observations and laboratory data to test and study possible forces that may explain the wide variety of behavior observed in modern subduction zones. Past numerical model studies have not studied the impact on subduction zone behavior from: composition-dependent phase transitions, a complete mineralogical model and movement of the overriding plate. Here we show that: 1) weakening of the subducting plate can be observed from the forebulge to the trench using highly detailed bathymetry and gravity measurement tracks parallel to the trench, 2) using a complete mineralogy model is important for accurate numerical models because incomplete approximations may overestimate slab stagnation and slab rollback, 3) in free subduction models, the complete mineralogy model creates a strong feedback loop between broad slab folds and trench velocities, and 4) the movement of the overriding plate is very important for slab rollback. Results presented in Chapter 1 indicate that the rheology in the numerical models should produce weakening in the slab as it bends into the trench, which is observed in the models of Chapter 2 and 3. Past published models can be analyzed in relation to Chapter 2 and 3 to determine if their conclusions are skewed by an overestimation of slab stagnation or trench rollback. The presented

  9. Punctuated Neogene tectonics and stratigraphy of the African-Iberian plate-boundary zone: concurrent development of Betic-Rif basins (southern Spain, northern Morocco)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sissingh, W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper integrates the sequence stratigraphic and tectonic data related to the Neogene geodynamic and palaeogeographic development of the African-Iberian plate boundary zone between Spain and Morocco. Though the dating of individual tectonostratigraphic sequences and their delimiting sequence

  10. The spiral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bibace, Roger; Kharlamov, Nikita

    2013-01-01

    ’s work with Bernard Kaplan on symbol formation is a primer on this idea. This paper examines the idea of spirality and develops the notion of dynamic coexistence that can clarify the issue of directionality of development; that is, what is the general trajectory or ground plan that development assumes....... Directionality is discussed in terms of the organism-in-environment unfolding over time as the unit of developmental analysis. Thinking on this issue has proceeded from the nature–nurture debates, to recognition of the interaction of external and internal processes, to transactions between the organism...

  11. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Gee

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+ and neural plate border zone (pax3(+, while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland, as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the

  12. Digital filtering of scintigrams and an investigation into the application of the fresnel zone plate in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, C.J.M. van den

    1976-01-01

    By lack of media large enough to obtain a gamma-lens gamma radiation imaging detectors are based on collimation by absorbence. At present, routine static studies in Nuclear Medicine generally make use of gamma cameras equiped with conventional collimators of limited resolution characterized by their impulse response function. Two methods of improvement of scintigraphic imaging are investigated in this thesis: i) Digital filtering of scintigrams obtained with a conventional collimator (Chapter III); ii) Use of alternative collimation techniques i.e. the use of coded apertures, especially of Zone Plates

  13. Preliminary design of a zone plate based hard X-ray monochromatic diffraction nanoprobe for materials studies at APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhonghou; Liu, Wenjun; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Shu, Deming; Xu, Ruqing; Schmidt, Oliver

    2013-09-01

    Aiming at studies of the micro/nano-structures of a broad range materials and electronic devices, Advance Photon Source (APS) is developing a dedicated diffraction nanoprobe (DNP) beamline for the needs arising from a multidiscipline research community. As a part of the APS Upgrade Project, the planed facility, named Sub-micron 3-D Diffraction (S3DD) beamline1, integrates the K-B mirror based polychromatic Laue diffraction and the Fresnel zone-plate based monochromatic diffraction techniques that currently support 3D/2D microdiffraction programs at the 34-ID-E and 2-ID-D of the APS, respectively. Both diffraction nanoprobes are designed to have a 50-nm or better special resolution. The zone-plate based monochromatic DNP has been preliminarily designed and will be constructed at the sector 34-ID. It uses an APS-3.0-cm period or APS-3.3-cm period undulator, a liquid-nitrogen cooled mirror as its first optics, and a water cooled small gap silicon double-crystal monochromator with an energy range of 5-30 keV. A set of zone plates have been designed to optimize for focusing efficiency and the working distance based on the attainable beamline length and the beam coherence. To ensure the nanoprobe performance, high stiffness and high precision flexure stage systems have been designed or demonstrated for optics mounting and sample scanning, and high precision temperature control of the experimental station will be implemented to reduce thermal instability. Designed nanoprobe beamline has a good management on thermal power loading on optical components and allows high degree of the preservation of beam brilliance for high focal flux and coherence. Integrated with variety of X-ray techniques, planed facility provides nano-XRD capability with the maximum reciprocal space accessibility and allows micro/nano-spectroscopy studies with K-edge electron binding energies of most elements down to Vanadium in the periodic table. We will discuss the preliminary design of the zone-plate

  14. Irradiation effects on weld heat-affected zone and plate materials (series 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness (ductile and brittle) of the HAZ of welds and of A 302 grade B (A302B) plate materials typical of those used fabricating older RPVs. The initial plate material of emphasis will be A302B steel, not the A302B modified with nickel additions. This decision was made by the NRC following a survey of the materials of construction for RPBs in operating U.S. nuclear plants. Reference 1 was used for the preliminary survey, and the information from that report was revised by NRC staff based on information contained in the licensee responses to Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, open-quotes Reactor Vessel Structural Integrity, 10CFR50.54(f).close quotes The resulting survey showed a total of eight RPVs with A302B, ten with A302B (modified), and one with A302 grade A plate. Table 5.1 in the previous semiannual report provides a summary of that survey. For the HAZ portion of the program, the intent is to examine HAZ material in the A302B (i.e., with low nickel content) and in A302B (modified) or A533B-1 (i.e., with medium nickel content). During this reporting period, two specific plates were identified as being applicable to this task. One plate is A302B and the other is A302B (modified). The A302B plate (43 x 42 x 7 in.) will be prepared for welding, while the A302B (modified) plate already contains a commercially produced weld (heat 33A277, Linde 0091 flux). These plates were identified from a list of ten materials provided by Mr. E. Biemiller of Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC). The materials have been requested from YAEC for use in this irradiation task, and arrangements are being made with YAEC for procurement of the plates mentioned above

  15. Crustal movements at a divergent plate boundary: interplay between volcano deformation, geothermal processes, and plate spreading in the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland since 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Ofeigsson, Benedikt G.; Sturkell, Erik; Islam, Tariqul

    2014-05-01

    Iceland is a subaerial part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where the divergent plate boundary between the North-American and Eurasian Plates can be studied. The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland, comprised of several volcanic systems, is particularly well suited to study interplay between volcanoes, geothermal areas and plate spreading, as the zone is relatively simple and accommodates the full spreading of the plates (18.6 mm/yr in a direction of 105 degrees according to NUVEL-1A predictions). The most recent volcanic activity in the area was the Krafla rifting episode (1975-1984). In 2007-2008 two intrusive events were detected: one in Upptypingar and the other in Þeistareykir. Extensive crustal deformation studies have been carried out in the NVZ; we report the results of recent GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) studies focusing on Krafla, Þeistareykir and Askja volcanic systems in the NVZ. An extensive GPS survey was undertaken in 2013, with over 135 stations occupied. This data was evaluated in conjunction with data acquired since 2008, to generate a velocity field spanning this entire time period. In addition to an existing continuous GPS (cGPS) station, three cGPS stations were installed in the area in 2011-2012. The 2008-2013 GPS velocities were compared to earlier GPS results, and complementary analysis of InSAR images was undertaken. Earlier studies have shown that the Krafla caldera underwent uplift during 1984-1989, followed by subsidence. Since 1995, the maximum subsidence in Krafla has shifted from directly above the shallow magma chamber towards an array of boreholes (geothermal exploitation) in Leirbotnar. Similar subsidence has been observed around another array of boreholes in Bjarnaflag, 7 km further south. The most significant signal on the velocities calculated from campaign GPS data over the 5 year period, is plate spreading with an E-W velocity of about 12 mm/yr over a 30 km wide area. However it also shows an

  16. A zone plate soft x-ray microscope using monochromatized undulator radiation at the beamline NE1B of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Kagoshima, Y.; Miyahara, T.; Ando, M.; Aoki, S.; Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.; Kern, D.

    1995-01-01

    A soft x-ray microscope has been developed at the beamline NE1B of the 6.5-GeV TRISTAN Accumulation Ring (AR). It makes use of undulator radiation as its source and a zone plate with the outermost zone width of 50 nm as its imaging element. It has two main features. First, the undulator radiation is monochromatized by a grazing incidence grating monochromator to match to the monochromaticity requirement of the zone plate. Second, a visible light prefocus unit consisting of two objectives has been designed and installed in the x-ray microscope. The x-ray optical system of the microscope can be adjusted easily, quickly, and precisely by using this unit. The microscope can resolve 55-nm lines and spaces in a zone plate test pattern

  17. Effect of plate thickness on bending radius and energy dissipation at the subduction zone hinge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irvine, D. N.; Schellart, W. P.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the thickness of subducting oceanic plates being identified as a control on slab and hinge behavior during subduction, there have been few attempts to quantify its effect with fully dynamic models. This paper presents a series of dynamic laboratory experiments of progressive subduction of a

  18. Diapir versus along-channel ascent of crustal material during plate convergence: constrained by the thermal structure of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M. Q.; Li, Z. H.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal rocks can be subducted to mantle depths, interact with the mantle wedge, and then exhume to the crustal depth again, which is generally considered as the mechanism for the formation of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in nature. The crustal rocks undergo dehydration and melting at subarc depths, giving rise to fluids that metasomatize and weaken the overlying mantle wedge. There are generally two ways for the material ascent from subarc depths: one is along subduction channel; the other is through the mantle wedge by diapir. In order to study the conditions and dynamics of these contrasting material ascent modes, systematic petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical models are constructed with variable thicknesses of the overriding and subducting continental plates, ages of the subducting oceanic plate, as well as the plate convergence rates. The model results suggest that the thermal structures of subduction zones control the thermal condition and fluid/melt activity at the slab-mantle interface in subcontinental subduction channels, which further strongly affect the material transportation and ascent mode. Thick overriding continental plate and low-angle subduction style induced by young subducting oceanic plate both contribute to the formation of relatively cold subduction channels with strong overriding mantle wedge, where the along-channel exhumation occurs exclusively to result in the exhumation of HP-UHP metamorphic rocks. In contrast, thin overriding lithosphere and steep subduction style induced by old subducting oceanic plate are the favorable conditions for hot subduction channels, which lead to significant hydration and metasomatism, melting and weakening of the overriding mantle wedge and thus cause the ascent of mantle wedge-derived melts by diapir through the mantle wedge. This may corresponds to the origination of continental arc volcanism from mafic to ultramafic metasomatites in the bottom of the mantle wedge. In addition, the plate

  19. [Healing of spiral fractures in the sheep tibia comparing different methods--osteosynthesis with internal fixation, interlocking nailing and dynamic compression plate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, R; Schlegel, U; Kessler, S B; Cordey, J; Perren, S M; Schweiberer, L

    1995-12-01

    The healing process of spiral fractures of the sheep tibia was investigated in an experiment with simulated clinical conditions. The effects of conventional internal fixation techniques with the DCP and the intramedullary nail are compared with those of internal fixation with the spine fixator. The internal fixation techniques are described in terms of their bending stiffness when mounted on the fractured bone. The in vivo investigation was documented clinically and radiographically and the post mortem specimens were evaluated histologically. The bending stiffness of the healed bone was assessed in relation to the contralateral side. After application of the DCP, primary healing took place and extensive transcortical necrosis occurred in the implant bed. Intramedullary nailing led to secondary healing and to necrosis of the inner cortex close to the endosteum. After internal fixation with the spine fixator, gap healing took place and no cortical necrosis was observed. The clinical course was generally good after all procedures. The histological evaluation shows that damage to the vascularity of the bone can only be avoided by using the spine fixator. This principle seems to be appropriate for the purposes of biological internal fixation.

  20. Rheology of the Indian and Tarim plates in the Karakoram continent-to-continent collision zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Caporali

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Bouguer gravity anomalies in the region of Western Himalayas, Karakoram and Tien Shan show large negative values, but classical isostatic models are insufficient to account for the detailed pattern of the observed anomalies. In the past years the gravimetric surveys in the Karakoram done by Marussi, Caputo and others in 1954 have been extended and intensified. The full body of available gravimetric data, including the pendulum observations by De Filippi and Hedin at the beginning of this century, have been re-analyzed. Terrain corrections have been computed systematically for all available data using a unique algorithm and Digital Terrain Model. The isostatic anomalies along a profile from the Indo-Gangetic foredeep, across the Karakoram range and terminating in the Tarim basin show the oscillating values already noted by Marussi. It is here proposed that this oscillatory pattern can be explained by a model in which the convergent boundaries of the Indian and Tarim plates deform by elastic flexure, besides isostasy. The gravity data constrain the numerical values of the model parameters, particularly the flexural rigidity of the plates. For the Indian plate the best fitting value of the flexural rigidity is D = 5 1024 N m, a value very similar to those reported in Central Himalaya. The flexural rigidity of the Tarim plate turns out to be considerably larger D = 7 1025 N m, which makes the Tarim more rigid than the neighboring Central Tibet. Both plates are loaded by an estimated shear stress of 7 1012 N m-1 located in a region corresponding to the Nanga Parbat Haramosh syntaxis. It is concluded that the Indo-Asian continental collision in the Western Himalaya and Karakoram resulted in the development of flexural basins on both sides, unlike the Central Himalaya where the collision produced a flexural basin, the Ganga basin, to the south and, to the north, the indentation of an isostatically supported Tibetan block with possible rheological

  1. Sub-crustal earthquakes within the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone beneath the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, C. M.; Stern, T. A.; Townend, J.; Bourguignon, S.; Sheehan, A.; Smith, E. G. C.

    2013-08-01

    Sub-crustal earthquakes have been observed sporadically for ∼40 years in the central South Island of New Zealand. We report on 20 events recorded between December 2008 and February 2012 near the Alpine Fault in the continental collision zone between the Australian and Pacific plates. A subset of 18 events at depths of 47-74 km occurs south of Mt. Cook and together with recently reported tremor locations indicates along-strike variations in deformation behaviour along the plate boundary. The sub-crustal earthquakes south of Mt. Cook increase in depth, frequency and size southwards towards the Puysegur subduction zone. Focal mechanisms could be determined for 14 earthquakes and exhibit predominantly strike-slip and reverse faulting solutions. Stress inversion analysis of the focal mechanisms yields a stress field favouring oblique-reverse faulting. We interpret the geographic and vertical distributions of these sub-crustal events in relation to a previously proposed tectonic model of a remnant passive margin that formed south of New Zealand in the Eocene and was overridden when dextral strike-slip motion initiated on the Alpine Fault. We infer that sub-crustal earthquakes occur along the leading edge of this structure, which is attached to the continental Australian crust.

  2. Safe zone for placement of talar screws when fusing the ankle with an anterior plating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Andrew; Dedini, Russell; Dini, Monara

    2015-06-01

    Ankle fusions fixed with anterior plates use fluoroscopic guidance to direct screws toward the subtalar joint. Special imaging views that visualize the subtalar joint are difficult to use and can be unreliable. This study evaluated whether a single lateral ankle view would provide adequate information to judge whether a screw penetrated the subtalar joint and identified strategies that would improve this technique. In 5 cadaveric ankles fixed with anterior plates, talar screws were placed up to the subtalar joint without penetration using lateral fluoroscopy to guide screw length. After dissection, the true distance from the screw tip to subchondral surface was measured. In addition, 4 readers measured the perceived distance from screw tip to subchondral surface using direct lateral, 10 degrees cephalad tilt lateral, and 10 degrees caudal tilt lateral fluoroscopic images on 2 separate occasions. Nineteen (63%) of 30 screws penetrated the subchondral bone, and screw length determined using fluoroscopy was significantly longer than screw length measured directly (29.4 ± 5.5 mm vs 27.3 ± 8.5 mm, P = .014). Measurement of screw tip to bone distance demonstrated a high level of within-reader (kappa = .871, P plates may minimize screw penetration into the subtalar joint and diminish development of subtalar arthropathy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Hurricane Spiral Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Thomas A.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    1993-10-01

    The spiral bands that occur in tropical cyclones can be conveniently divided into two classes-outer bands and inner bands. Evidence is presented here that the outer bands form as the result of nonlinear effects during the breakdown of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) through barotropic instability. In this process a zonal strip of high potential vorticity (the ITCZ shear zone or monsoon trough) begins to distort in a varicose fashion, with the potential vorticity (PV) becoming pooled in local regions that are connected by filaments of high PV. As the pooled regions become more axisymmetric, the filaments become thinner and begin to wrap around the PV centers.It is argued that inner bands form in a different manner. As a tropical cyclone intensifies due to latent heat release, the PV field becomes nearly circular with the highest values of PV in the cyclone center. The radial gradient of PV provides a state on which PV waves (the generalization of Rossby waves) can propagate. The nonlinear breaking of PV waves then leads to an irreversible distortion of the PV contours and a downgradient flux of PV. The continuation of this proem tends to erode the high PV core of the tropical cyclone, to produce a surrounding surf zone, and hence to spread the PV horizontally. In a similar fashion, inner bands can also form by the merger of a vortex with a patch of relatively high PV air. As the merger proem occurs the patch of PV is quickly elongated and wrapped around the vortex. The resulting vortex is generally larger in horizontal extent and exhibits a spiral band of PV.When the formation of outer and inner bands is interpreted in the context of a normal-mode spectral model, they emerge as slow manifold phenomena; that is, they have both rotational and (balanced or slaved) gravitational mode aspects. In this sense, regarding them as simply gravity waves leads to an incomplete dynamical picture.

  4. The subtropical nutrient spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, William J.; Doney, Scott C.

    2003-12-01

    We present an extended series of observations and more comprehensive analysis of a tracer-based measure of new production in the Sargasso Sea near Bermuda using the 3He flux gauge technique. The estimated annually averaged nitrate flux of 0.84 ± 0.26 mol m-2 yr-1 constitutes only that nitrate physically transported to the euphotic zone, not nitrogen from biological sources (e.g., nitrogen fixation or zooplankton migration). We show that the flux estimate is quantitatively consistent with other observations, including decade timescale evolution of the 3H + 3He inventory in the main thermocline and export production estimates. However, we argue that the flux cannot be supplied in the long term by local diapycnal or isopycnal processes. These considerations lead us to propose a three-dimensional pathway whereby nutrients remineralized within the main thermocline are returned to the seasonally accessible layers within the subtropical gyre. We describe this mechanism, which we call "the nutrient spiral," as a sequence of steps where (1) nutrient-rich thermocline waters are entrained into the Gulf Stream, (2) enhanced diapycnal mixing moves nutrients upward onto lighter densities, (3) detrainment and enhanced isopycnal mixing injects these waters into the seasonally accessible layer of the gyre recirculation region, and (4) the nutrients become available to biota via eddy heaving and wintertime convection. The spiral is closed when nutrients are utilized, exported, and then remineralized within the thermocline. We present evidence regarding the characteristics of the spiral and discuss some implications of its operation within the biogeochemical cycle of the subtropical ocean.

  5. Pool Structures: A New Type of Interaction Zones of Lithospheric Plate Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garetskyi, R. G.; Leonov, M. G.

    2018-02-01

    Study of tectono-geodynamic clusters of the continental lithosphere (the Sloboda cluster of the East European Platform and the Pamir cluster of Central Asia) permitted identification of pool structures, which are a specific type of zone of intraplate interaction of rock masses.

  6. Lithosphere Structure of the Rivera Plate - Jalisco Block Contact Zone: Septentrional Region of the Islas Marías (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Ávalos, L. A.; Nunez, D.; Escalona-Alcazar, F. D. J.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Danobeitia, J.

    2017-12-01

    The western margin of Mexico is a tectonic complex region where large earthquakes occurred with very destructive consequences, including the generation of big tsunamis. This fact is mainly the result of the Rivera plate subduction beneath the North American plate and the Jalisco Block implying a high potential seismic risk. In the north, between the Tamayo Fracture Zone and the Mesoamerican Trench, the Islas Marías region is a complex tectonic limit within the interaction of the Rivera plate oceanic crust and the Jalisco Block continental crust. In order to know the shallow and deep structure of the Rivera plate - Jalisco Block contact zone and to be able to determine these potential seismic sources, the TSUJAL geophysical experiment was carried out from 2012 to 2016. As part of this project, we present the results of the processed and analyzed MCS and WAS data along the TS09 and RTSIM01 seismic transects, respectively, across the septentrional region of Islas Marías. These marine seismic lines are coincident with 110 km length for MCS and 240 km for WAS, and perpendicular to the coastline with SW-NE orientation. The seismic sources used in this work aboard RRS James Cook consisted of 12 guns with a total capacity for WAS data of 5800 in3 every 120 s and 3540 in3 every 50 m for MCS data. The MCS data were acquired with a 5.85 km length streamer with a 468 active channels, while the WAS data were recorded by a network of 4 OBS and 27 land seismic stations. After data processing and joint interpretation, it was possible to determine that shallow structure is mainly constituted by normal faults associated to graben structures forming sedimentary basins with non-deformed sediments in the basement. While the deep structure is characterized by depths from 9 to 12 km in the oceanic crust and 18 to 21 km in the continental crust. The deepest layers of the upper mantle were determined up to 35 km depth. In this study, it was possible to calculate a dip angle between 6

  7. Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide—U.S. Geological Survey subduction zone science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Ludwig, Kristin A.; Bekins, Barbara; Brocher, Thomas M.; Brock, John C.; Brothers, Daniel; Chaytor, Jason D.; Frankel, Arthur; Geist, Eric L.; Haney, Matt; Hickman, Stephen H.; Leith, William S.; Roeloffs, Evelyn A.; Schulz, William H.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Wallace, Kristi; Watt, Janet; Wein, Anne M.

    2017-06-19

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information and tools to build resilience in communities exposed to subduction zone earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions. Improving the application of USGS science to successfully reduce risk from these events relies on whole community efforts, with continuing partnerships among scientists and stakeholders, including researchers from universities, other government labs and private industry, land-use planners, engineers, policy-makers, emergency managers and responders, business owners, insurance providers, the media, and the general public.Motivated by recent technological advances and increased awareness of our growing vulnerability to subduction-zone hazards, the USGS is uniquely positioned to take a major step forward in the science it conducts and products it provides, building on its tradition of using long-term monitoring and research to develop effective products for hazard mitigation. This science plan provides a blueprint both for prioritizing USGS science activities and for delineating USGS interests and potential participation in subduction zone science supported by its partners.The activities in this plan address many USGS stakeholder needs:High-fidelity tools and user-tailored information that facilitate increasingly more targeted, neighborhood-scale decisions to mitigate risks more cost-effectively and ensure post-event operability. Such tools may include maps, tables, and simulated earthquake ground-motion records conveying shaking intensity and frequency. These facilitate the prioritization of retrofitting of vulnerable infrastructure;Information to guide local land-use and response planning to minimize development in likely hazardous zones (for example, databases, maps, and scenario documents to guide evacuation route planning in communities near volcanoes, along coastlines vulnerable to tsunamis, and built on landslide-prone terrain);New tools

  8. High efficiency and flexible working distance digital in-line holographic microscopy based on Fresnel zone plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Hua, Yilei; Yang, Fan; Li, Fanxing; Hu, Song; Yan, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Traditional digital in-line holography suffers from twin-image noise problems and extremely short working distances between the object and light source. Here, we propose lensless Fourier transform digital in-line holographic microscopy based on a single optical element. A Fresnel zone plate is used to split the incident light into two parts: one is scattered along the original direction, the other is gathered at a focal point and the sample is put behind the focus. The interference fringe pattern, formed by the two beams, is recorded digitally by a CCD camera. A novel reconstruction algorithm is proposed to present the object image. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem, improving the image contrast with high efficiency, and increasing the flexibility of the working distance. Furthermore, a wide field of view and no contact make it a promising tool for the study of materials science, biology and microelectronics.

  9. Quasi-kinoform type multilayer zone plate with high diffraction efficiency for high-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, S; Yasumoto, M; Kamijo, N; Uesugi, K; Takeuchi, A; Terada, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2009-01-01

    Fresnel zone plate (FZP) with high diffraction efficiency leads to high performance X-ray microscopy with the reduction of the radiation damage to biological specimens. In order to attain high diffraction efficiency in high energy X-ray region, we have developed multilevel-type (6-step) multilayer FZPs with the diameter of 70 micron. The efficiencies of two FZPs were evaluated at the BL20XU beamline of SPring-8. For one FZP, the peak efficiency for the 1st-order diffraction of 51% has been obtained at 70 keV. The efficiencies higher than 40% have been achieved in the wide energy range of 70-90 keV. That for the 2nd-order diffraction of 46% has been obtained at 37.5 keV.

  10. High spatial resolution X-UV Fresnel zone plates imaging; Imagerie a haute resolution spatiale dans le domaine X-UV a l'aide de lentilles a zone de Fresnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichet-Thomasset, M

    1999-07-01

    The goal of this work is to study the capabilities of imaging of Fresnel zone plates in the 1.5. and 2 keV X-ray range for the imaging of laser-produced plasmas. The diagnostic is composed of a Fresnel zone plate with good imaging capabilities and a multilayer mirror to select the spectral emission bandwidth of the plasma we want to study. This diagnostic was evaluated at the Centre d'Etudes de Limeil-Valenton experiments to study spatial resolution with this kind of X-ray source. The images we obtained showed that there is no geometric aberrations over an object field of several millimetre. Fresnen zone plates are often used for monochromatic biological objects imaging in the water window around 400 eV but they offer large prospects for laser produced plasma imaging. (author)

  11. A double seismic zone in the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge of the Nazca Plate (32°S), central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, M.; Monfret, T.; Pardo, M.; Ranalli, G.; Nolet, G.

    2013-07-01

    The region of central Chile offers a unique opportunity to study the links between the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge, the flat slab, the double seismic zone (DSZ), and the absence of modern volcanism. Here we report the presence and characteristics of the first observed DSZ within the intermediate-depth Nazca slab using two temporary seismic catalogs (Ovalle 1999 and Chile Argentina Seismological Measurement Experiment). The lower plane of seismicity (LP) is located 20-25 km below the upper plane, begins at 50 km depth, and merges with the lower plane at 120 km depth, where the slab becomes horizontal. Focal mechanism analysis and stress tensor calculations indicate that the slab's state of stress is dominantly controlled by plate convergence and overriding crust thickness: Above 60-70 km depth, the slab is in horizontal compression, and below, it is in horizontal extension, parallel to plate convergence, which can be accounted for by vertical loading of the overriding lithosphere. Focal mechanisms below 60-70 km depth are strongly correlated with offshore outer rise bend faults, suggesting the reactivation of preexisting faults below this depth. The large interplane distances for all Nazca DSZs can be related to the slab's unusually cold thermal structure with respect to its age. Since LPs globally seem to mimic mantle mineral dehydration paths, we suggest that fluid migration and dehydration embrittlement provide the mechanism necessary to weaken the rock and that the stress field determines the direction of rupture.

  12. Dynamics of interplate domain in subduction zones: influence of rheological parameters and subducting plate age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arcay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the subduction interplate domain are likely to affect not only the seismogenic potential of the subduction area but also the overall subduction process, as it influences its viability. Numerical simulations are performed to model the long-term equilibrium state of the subduction interplate when the diving lithosphere interacts with both the overriding plate and the surrounding convective mantle. The thermomechanical model combines a non-Newtonian viscous rheology and a pseudo-brittle rheology. Rock strength here depends on depth, temperature and stress, for both oceanic crust and mantle rocks. I study the evolution through time of, on one hand, the brittle-ductile transition (BDT depth, zBDT, and, on the other hand, of the kinematic decoupling depth, zdec, simulated along the subduction interplate. The results show that both a high friction and a low ductile strength at the asthenospheric wedge tip shallow zBDT. The influence of the weak material activation energy is of second order but not negligible. zBDT becomes dependent on the ductile strength increase with depth (activation volume if the BDT occurs at the interplate decoupling depth. Regarding the interplate decoupling depth, it is shallowed (1 significantly if mantle viscosity at asthenospheric wedge tip is low, (2 if the difference in mantle and interplate activation energy is weak, and (3 if the activation volume is increased. Very low friction coefficients and/or low asthenospheric viscosities promote zBDT = zdec. I then present how the subducting lithosphere age affects the brittle-ductile transition depth and the kinematic decoupling depth in this model. Simulations show that a rheological model in which the respective activation energies of mantle and interplate material are too close hinders the mechanical decoupling at the down-dip extent of the interplate

  13. Variations of b-values preceding large earthquakes in the shallow subduction zones of Cocos and Nazca plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhanek, Ota; Persson, Leif; Nuannin, Paiboon

    2018-03-01

    The potential of b-value variations as a medium-term (months, years) precursor was investigated by focusing on the eight largest earthquakes, Mw ≥ 7.0, occurring between January 2000 and April 2010 in the shallow subduction zones of Cocos and Nazca plates. The available ISC and NEIC lists of events are complete for threshold magnitudes 4.3 (4569 events) and 4.6 (2742 events), respectively. Spatial and temporal perturbations of b were investigated in six regions surrounding the eight largest shocks. A technique of moving spatial- and temporal-windows was applied. Deduced b-values reveal large variations between 0.6 and 2.2. All eight earthquakes took place within regions of low b and were all preceded by significant drops in b-values. Observed correspondence between low b and the occurrence of large earthquakes suggests that b(t) has a potential to be employed in medium-term earthquake predictions in subduction zones of Central and South America.

  14. The Spiral of Euroscepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galpin, Charlotte; Trenz, Hans-Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Media scholars have increasingly examined the effects of a negativity bias that applies to political news. In the ‘spiral of cynicism’, journalist preferences for negative news correspond to public demands for sensational news. We argue that this spiral of cynicism in EU news results in a ‘spiral...

  15. Frictional properties of silicic to calcareous ooze on the Cocos Plate entering the Costa Rica Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, A.; Kameda, J.; Ujiie, K.

    2012-12-01

    Here we report experimental results on the frictional properties of the cover sediments on the Cocos plate incoming into the erosive Costa Rica subduction zone. Mechanical properties of the incoming sediments to subduction plate boundaries are essential to constrain subduction-related faulting processes. However, knowledge of the frictional properties of sediments composed of abundant biogenic component, such as spicules, diatoms, and radiolarians are limited. Experimental samples were silicic to calcareous ooze collected at a reference site (Site U1381) off shore Osa Peninsula during IODP Expedition 334 (Vannucchi et al., 2012). To be used in the experiments, the discrete samples was disaggregated, oven dried at 60 degrees centigrade for 24 hours. The experimental fault is composed of a 24.9 mm diameter cylinder of gabbro cut perpendicularly to the cylinder axis in two halves that are ground to obtain rough wall surfaces, and re-assembled with an intervening thin layer (~1.0 mm) disaggregated sample. Frictional experiments have been performed using a rotary-shear friction testing machine, at normal stresses up to 5 MPa, over a range of slip velocities from 0.0026 mm/s to 1.3 m/s, with more than ~150 mm of displacements for water saturated condition. Experimental results reveal that friction values at slow slip velocities (v ~30 mm/s), steady state friction decreases dramatically. For example, at a velocity of 260 mm/s, the friction coefficient for samples U1381A-9R and -10R show a gradual decrease with a large weakening displacement toward the establishment of a nearly constant level of friction at ~0.1. The velocity weakening behavior at slow velocities could provide a condition to initiate unstable fault motion at shallow depths along the subduction channel if the input sediments are incorporated into faulting. On the contrary, neutral to velocity strengthening behavior observed for intermediate velocities could stabilize the propagation process of earthquake

  16. Decametre scale, spiral-shaped landforms in Elysium Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balme, M. R.; Gallagher, C.

    2012-04-01

    We present the discovery of a new type of landform that is apparently confined to one or two locations in western Elysium Planitia, Mars. In planview, these landforms consist of spirals, a few tens of metres across, defined by low furrows and ridges. They appear singly or in loose groups or chains and are generally double-armed with a visual similarity to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability forms. About 100 examples have been found, over 90% of which occur in a single image. Almost all the examples seen have "anti-clockwise" rotation (from the edge to the centre); less than a fifth spiral the other way. The spirals are found only in the polygonised elements of a terrain type known as Platy-Ridged-Polygonised (PRP) terrain. This distinctive surface displays a tripartite morphology comprising: 1) well-defined, kilometre-scale plates of rubbly material (clast-sizes up to a few meters in diameters), 2) complex patterns of sinuous to sub-linear rubbly ridges that are often many kilometres long, less than a few tens of metres across and less than a few metres in height, and 3) clast-free zones between the plates that display decametre scale polygonally patterned ground defined by networks of furrows and grooves. PRP terrain appears to represent the "frozen" remnants of a once liquid medium: it is extremely flat with margins defining an equipotential surface; infills craters and drapes low relief terrain; can be traced up through the 300 km long Athabasca Vallis outflow channel to a source region consisting of a pair of large (km-wide) fractures called the Cerberus Fossae. The origin of the PRP material is debated: some authors favour extremely fluid, voluminous and turbulently emplaced lavas (e.g. Keszthelyi et al., Geochem. Geophys. Geosys., 2003), others argue that this material represents a debris-covered relict frozen sea or ocean (e.g. Murray et al., Nature, 2005). The spirals, which are visible only in HiRISE images with sub-metre spatial resolution, have been observed in

  17. Distribution and migration of aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Ogasawara Islands intraplate normal-faulting earthquake related to a fracture zone in the Pacific plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; No, Tetsuo; Kaiho, Yuka; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamashita, Mikiya; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    describe the aftershocks of a Mw 7.4 intraplate normal-faulting earthquake that occurred 150 km east Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, on 21 December 2010. It occurred beneath the outer trench slope of the Izu-Ogasawara trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Aftershock observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) began soon after the earthquake and multichannel seismic reflection surveys were conducted across the aftershock area. Aftershocks were distributed in a NW-SE belt 140 km long, oblique to the N-S trench axis. They formed three subparallel lineations along a fracture zone in the Pacific plate. The OBS observations combined with data from stations on Chichi-jima and Haha-jima Islands revealed a migration of the aftershock activity. The first hour, which likely outlines the main shock rupture, was limited to an 80 km long area in the central part of the subsequent aftershock area. The first hour activity occurred mainly around, and appears to have been influenced by, nearby large seamounts and oceanic plateau, such as the Ogasawara Plateau and the Uyeda Ridge. Over the following days, the aftershocks expanded beyond or into these seamounts and plateau. The aftershock distribution and migration suggest that crustal heterogeneities related to a fracture zone and large seamounts and oceanic plateau in the incoming Pacific plate affected the rupture of the main shock. Such preexisting structures may influence intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in other regions of plate flexure prior to subduction.

  18. Low surface brightness spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanishin, W.

    1980-01-01

    This dissertation presents an observational overview of a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) spiral galaxies. The sample galaxies were chosen to have low surface brightness disks and indications of spiral structure visible on the Palomar Sky Survey. They are of sufficient angular size (diameter > 2.5 arcmin), to allow detailed surface photometry using Mayall 4-m prime focus plates. The major findings of this dissertation are: (1) The average disk central surface brightness of the LSB galaxies is 22.88 magnitude/arcsec 2 in the B passband. (2) From broadband color measurements of the old stellar population, we infer a low average stellar metallicity, on the order of 1/5 solar. (3) The spectra and optical colors of the HII regions in the LSB galaxies indicate a lack of hot ionizing stars compared to HII regions in other late-type galaxies. (4) The average surface mass density, measured within the radius containing half the total mass, is less than half that of a sample of normal late-type spirals. (5) The average LSB galaxy neutral hydrogen mass to blue luminosity ratio is about 0.6, significantly higher than in a sample of normal late-type galaxies. (6) We find no conclusive evidence of an abnormal mass-to-light ratio in the LSB galaxies. (7) Some of the LSB galaxies exhibit well-developed density wave patterns. (8) A very crude calculation shows the lower metallicity of the LSB galaxies compared with normal late-type spirals might be explained simply by the deficiency of massive stars in the LSB galaxies

  19. Research on performance of upstream pumping mechanical seal with different deep spiral groove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q; Chen, H L; Liu, T; Liu, Y H; Liu, Z B; Liu, D H

    2012-01-01

    As one new type of mechanical seal, Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal has been widely used in fluid machinery. In this paper, structure of spiral groove is innovatively optimized to improve performance of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with Spiral Groove: keeping the dam zone and the weir zone not changed, changing the bottom shape of spiral groove only, substituting different deep spiral groove for equal deep spiral groove. The simulation on Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with different deep spiral grooves is done using FVM method. According to calculation, the performances of opening force and pressure distribution on seals face are obtained. Five types of spiral grooves are analyzed, namely equal deep spiral groove, circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, circumferential divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, radial convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove and radial divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove. This paper works on twenty-five working conditions. The results indicate the performances of circumferential divergent 2-ladder different deep spiral groove are better than the others, with more opening force and better stabilization, while with the same leakage. The outcome provides theoretical support for application of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove.

  20. Research on performance of upstream pumping mechanical seal with different deep spiral groove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Chen, H. L.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y. H.; Liu, Z. B.; Liu, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    As one new type of mechanical seal, Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal has been widely used in fluid machinery. In this paper, structure of spiral groove is innovatively optimized to improve performance of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with Spiral Groove: keeping the dam zone and the weir zone not changed, changing the bottom shape of spiral groove only, substituting different deep spiral groove for equal deep spiral groove. The simulation on Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with different deep spiral grooves is done using FVM method. According to calculation, the performances of opening force and pressure distribution on seals face are obtained. Five types of spiral grooves are analyzed, namely equal deep spiral groove, circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, circumferential divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, radial convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove and radial divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove. This paper works on twenty-five working conditions. The results indicate the performances of circumferential divergent 2-ladder different deep spiral groove are better than the others, with more opening force and better stabilization, while with the same leakage. The outcome provides theoretical support for application of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove.

  1. Efficient focusing of 8 keV X-rays with multilayer Fresnel zone plates fabricated by atomic layer deposition and focused ion beam milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Marcel; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Weigand, Markus; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication and performance of multilayer Al 2 O 3 /Ta 2 O 5 Fresnel zone plates in the hard X-ray range and a discussion of possible future developments considering available materials are reported. Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) recently showed significant improvement by focusing soft X-rays down to ∼10 nm. In contrast to soft X-rays, generally a very high aspect ratio FZP is needed for efficient focusing of hard X-rays. Therefore, FZPs had limited success in the hard X-ray range owing to difficulties of manufacturing high-aspect-ratio zone plates using conventional techniques. Here, employing a method of fabrication based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling, FZPs with very high aspect ratios were prepared. Such multilayer FZPs with outermost zone widths of 10 and 35 nm and aspect ratios of up to 243 were tested for their focusing properties at 8 keV and shown to focus hard X-rays efficiently. This success was enabled by the outstanding layer quality thanks to ALD. Via the use of FIB for slicing the multilayer structures, desired aspect ratios could be obtained by precisely controlling the thickness. Experimental diffraction efficiencies of multilayer FZPs fabricated via this combination reached up to 15.58% at 8 keV. In addition, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy experiments at 1.5 keV were carried out using one of the multilayer FZPs and resolved a 60 nm feature size. Finally, the prospective of different material combinations with various outermost zone widths at 8 and 17 keV is discussed in the light of the coupled wave theory and the thin-grating approximation. Al 2 O 3 /Ir is outlined as a promising future material candidate for extremely high resolution with a theoretical efficiency of more than 20% for as small an outermost zone width as 10 nm at 17 keV

  2. Scanning hard X-ray microscope with tantalum phase zone plate at the Hyogo-BL (BL24XU) of SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Kagoshima, Y; Ibuki, T; Yokoyama, Y; Hashida, T; Yokoyama, K; Takeda, S; Urakawa, M; Miyamoto, N; Tsusaka, Y; Matsui, J; Aino, M

    2001-01-01

    A scanning hard X-ray microscope using a phase zone plate made of tantalum as its X-ray focusing device is in operation at the Hyogo-BL (BL24XU) of SPring-8. The X-ray microbeam has a size of 0.8 mu mx0.7 mu m at the photon energy of 10 keV, which can make visible structures as fine as 250-nm line-and-space pattern. The photon flux density at the sample position is approx 2x10 sup 9 phs/s/mu m sup 2 and the gain of the phase zone plate is approx 3000. The minimum detection limits irradiated by the microbeam are evaluated to be around 10 ppm for some trace elements contained in standard reference materials of glass matrices. X-ray images obtained so far demonstrate a high feasibility of the microscope.

  3. Three-dimensional model of plate geometry and velocity model for Nankai Trough seismogenic zone based on results from structural studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, A.; Shimomura, N.; Kodaira, S.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Takahashi, N.; Kaneda, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In the Nankai Trough subduction seismogenic zone, the Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes had often occurred simultaneously, and caused a great event. In order to reduce a great deal of damage to coastal area from both strong ground motion and tsunami generation, it is necessary to understand rupture synchronization and segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake. For a precise estimate of the rupture zone of the Nankai megathrust event based on the knowledge of realistic earthquake cycle and variation of magnitude, it is important to know the geometry and property of the plate boundary of the subduction seismogenic zone. To improve a physical model of the Nankai Trough seismogenic zone, the large-scale high-resolution wide-angle and reflection (MCS) seismic study, and long-term observation has been conducted since 2008. Marine active source seismic data have been acquired along grid two-dimensional profiles having the total length of ~800km every year. A three-dimensional seismic tomography using active and passive seismic data observed both land and ocean bottom stations have been also performed. From those data, we found that several strong lateral variations of the subducting Philippine Sea plate and overriding plate corresponding to margins of coseismic rupture zone of historical large event occurred along the Nankai Trough. Particularly a possible prominent reflector for the forearc Moho is recently imaged in the offshore side in the Kii channel at the depth of ~18km which is shallower than those of other area along the Nankai Trough. Such a drastic variation of the overriding plate might be related to the existence of the segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake. Based on our results derived from seismic studies, we have tried to make a geometrical model of the Philippine Sea plate and a three-dimensional velocity structure model of the Nankai Trough seismogenic zone. In this presentation, we will summarize major results of out seismic studies, and

  4. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a spiral startup staged sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Miller, David Scott [Katy, TX

    2009-12-15

    Methods for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include treating a first zone of the formation. Treatment of a plurality of zones of the formation may be begun at selected times after the treatment of the first zone begins. The treatment of at least two successively treated zones may begin at a selected time after treatment of the previous zone begins. At least two of the successively treated zones may be adjacent to the zone treated previously. The successive treatment of the zones proceeds in an outward, substantially spiral sequence from the first zone so that the treatment of the zones may move substantially spirally outwards towards a boundary of the treatment area.

  5. Triangular spiral tilings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushida, Takamichi; Hizume, Akio; Yamagishi, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    The topology of spiral tilings is intimately related to phyllotaxis theory and continued fractions. A quadrilateral spiral tiling is determined by a suitable chosen triple (ζ, m, n), where ζ element of D/R, and m and n are relatively prime integers. We give a simple characterization when (ζ, m, n) produce a triangular spiral tiling. When m and n are fixed, the admissible generators ζ form a curve in the unit disk. The family of triangular spiral tilings with opposed parastichy pairs (m, n) is parameterized by the divergence angle arg (ζ), while triangular spiral tilings with non-opposed parastichy pairs are parameterized by the plastochrone ratio 1/|ζ|. The generators for triangular spiral tilings with opposed parastichy pairs are not dense in the complex parameter space, while those with non-opposed parastichy pairs are dense. The proofs will be given in a general setting of spiral multiple tilings. We present paper-folding (origami) sheets that build spiral towers whose top-down views are triangular tilings. (paper)

  6. Spiral Countercurrent Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoichiro; Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    For many years, high-speed countercurrent chromatography conducted in open tubing coils has been widely used for the separation of natural and synthetic compounds. In this method, the retention of the stationary phase is solely provided by the Archimedean screw effect by rotating the coiled column in the centrifugal force field. However, the system fails to retain enough of the stationary phase for polar solvent systems such as the aqueous–aqueous polymer phase systems. To address this problem, the geometry of the coiled channel was modified to a spiral configuration so that the system could utilize the radially acting centrifugal force. This successfully improved the retention of the stationary phase. Two different types of spiral columns were fabricated: the spiral disk assembly, made by stacking multiple plastic disks with single or four interwoven spiral channels connected in series, and the spiral tube assembly, made by inserting the tetrafluoroethylene tubing into a spiral frame (spiral tube support). The capabilities of these column assemblies were successfully demonstrated by separations of peptides and proteins with polar two-phase solvent systems whose stationary phases had not been well retained in the earlier multilayer coil separation column for high-speed countercurrent chromatography. PMID:23833207

  7. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  8. Spiral photon sieves apodized by digital prolate spheroidal window for the generation of hard-x-ray vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Shi, Lina; Liu, Ming

    2010-06-01

    We extend the work of photon sieves to spiral photon sieves (SPSs) for the generation of a hard-x-ray vortex. A robust digital prolate spheroidal window, which has an optimal energy concentration at low frequencies, was used to adjust the number of pinholes on each ring of the SPS. It was demonstrated that an SPS has better spatial resolution and lower background than a spiral zone plate using the specified smallest structures condition. The intensity at the center of the dark core is difficult to damp to true zero, primarily owing to current limitations of high-aspect-ratio metal nanostructures. The diameter of the dark core increases as the charge value increases. However, the FWHM of the doughnut-shaped ring and background will also increase. Our results pave the way toward the design of high-performance SPSs for the generation of a hard-x-ray vortex.

  9. Spiral finned crucible pot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soemowidagdo, Arianto Leman; Tiwan, Widarto, Ardian, Aan

    2018-02-01

    Innovation on a crucible furnace to increase its efficiency in aluminum melting has been done. The innovation was a spiral finned crucible pot. The inclination of the spiral finned was vary of 5, 10, 15, and 20 degrees. The spiral finned effects was determined from the performance test result. A crucible pot without fin was also tested as a control. The crucible pot was examined at the same process condition. The crucible pot with the inclined fin of 10 degrees gives an optimum performance. It gives effective heating rate so that more efficient in LPG consumption. Therefore it saves energy in the aluminum melting process.

  10. Role of the offshore Pedro Banks left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in the plate tectonic evolution of the northern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.; Saunders, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous workers, mainly mapping onland active faults on Caribbean islands, defined the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone as a 200-km-wide bounded by two active and parallel strike-slip faults: the Oriente fault along the northern edge of the Cayman trough with a GPS rate of 14 mm/yr, and and the Enriquillo-Plaintain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) with a rate of 5-7 mm/yr. In this study we use 5,000 km of industry and academic data from the Nicaraguan Rise south and southwest of the EPGFZ in the maritime areas of Jamaica, Honduras, and Colombia to define an offshore, 700-km-long, active, left-lateral strike-slip fault in what has previously been considered the stable interior of the Caribbean plate as determined from plate-wide GPS studies. The fault was named by previous workers as the Pedro Banks fault zone because a 100-km-long segment of the fault forms an escarpment along the Pedro carbonate bank of the Nicaraguan Rise. Two fault segments of the PBFZ are defined: the 400-km-long eastern segment that exhibits large negative flower structures 10-50 km in width, with faults segments rupturing the sea floor as defined by high resolution 2D seismic data, and a 300-km-long western segment that is defined by a narrow zone of anomalous seismicity first observed by previous workers. The western end of the PBFZ terminates on a Quaternary rift structure, the San Andres rift, associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism and thickening trends indicating initial rifting in the Late Miocene. The southern end of the San Andreas rift terminates on the western Hess fault which also exhibits active strands consistent with left-lateral, strike-slip faults. The total length of the PBFZ-San Andres rift-Southern Hess escarpment fault is 1,200 km and traverses the entire western end of the Caribbean plate. Our interpretation is similar to previous models that have proposed the "stable" western Caribbean plate is broken by this fault whose rate of displacement is less than the threshold

  11. Spiral 2 Week

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of this meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the Spiral-2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. Different issues have been tackled particularly the equipment around Spiral-2 like injectors, cryo-modules or beam diagnostics, a workshop was devoted to other facilities dedicated to radioactive ion beam production. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  12. Spiral 2 Week

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The main goal of this meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the Spiral-2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. Different issues have been tackled particularly the equipment around Spiral-2 like injectors, cryo-modules or beam diagnostics, a workshop was devoted to other facilities dedicated to radioactive ion beam production. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  13. Segmentation along the Queen Charlotte Fault: The long-lived influence of plate-motion rotation and Explorer Ridge fracture zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. C.; Walton, M. A. L.; Brothers, D. S.; Haeussler, P. J.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Conrad, J. E.; Kluesner, J.; Andrews, B. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) generally tracks the flow line for Pacific/North America (Pa/NA) relative motion since 20 Ma, indicating that the plate boundary localized along an optimally oriented small circle geometry. Rotation in Pa/NA motion at 10—12 Ma caused the QCF south of 53 N to be oblique to plate motion by 10—20. This oblique convergence appears to be accommodated in part by underthrusting of the Pacific Plate beneath Haida Gwaii and in part by slip on faults west of the QCF. On the west side of the QCF, a series of ridges and small basins oriented subparallel to either the QCF or relative plate motion form a 40-km-wide terrace. New high-resolution seismic reflection data image the seaward edge of the ridges as a vertical contact between horizontal or sometimes downwarped deep-sea sediments and west-vergent anticlinal structures within the ridges, supporting earlier interpretations that these ridges have accommodated some component of oblique motion. We argue that the ridges originated as step overs from fracture zones on Explorer Ridge, analogous to the current fault geometry at the southernmost end of the QCF. There, the Revere-Dellwood Fracture Zone (RDFZ) overlaps the QCF for 120 km and connects to the QCF via a more-optimally oriented extensional right step. 3.9—6.4 Mw strike-slip earthquakes along the RDFZ and a lack of contractional seafloor morphologies along the QCF south of the RDFZ-QCF right step suggest that the step over and reactivation along the RDFZ accommodates a majority of plate motion in this region. Kinematic reconstruction of ridges from 54—56 N indicates that they also originated in a similar location, potentially as right steps from either the RDFZ or Sovanco Fracture Zone. Similarly, the RDFZ flow path is coincident with a truncation of seafloor magnetic anomalies and the outer edge of the ridge-bounded terrace, which both parallel the QCF since at least the onset of Explorer Ridge spreading at 8 Ma. The RDFZ-QCF right

  14. The Influence of the Distributor Plate on the Bottom Zone of a Fluidized Bed Approaching the Transition from Bubbling to Turbulent Fluidization

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, J. M.; Pinho, C.; Figueiredo, R.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of the bottom zone of a narrow fluidized bed, from bubbling to turbulent regimes, was studied in a cold model of 0.1 m i.d. and 1.3 m high. Tested distributor types were perforated perspex plates, with six different perforation grids, metallic mesh and porous ceramic, with pressures drops ranging from 0.05 to 350 kPa, corresponding to superficial air velocities from 0.1 to 2.3m s-1. Group B silica ballotini, within the range 0.355-0.425 mm, were used as bed material. The experime...

  15. The Ionian and Alfeo-Etna fault zones : New segments of an evolving plate boundary in the central Mediterranean Sea?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.; Artoni, A.; Carlini, M.; Faccenna, C.; Ferranti, L.; Gasperini, L.; Govers, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/108173836; Klaeschen, D.; Monaco, C.; Neri, G.; Nijholt, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413306674; Orecchio, B.; Wortel, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068439202

    2016-01-01

    The Calabrian Arc is a narrow subduction-rollback system resulting from Africa/Eurasia plate convergence. While crustal shortening is taken up in the accretionary wedge, transtensive deformation accounts for margin segmentation along transverse lithospheric faults. One of these structures is the

  16. Plasma Generator Using Spiral Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowski, George N. (Inventor); Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Ticatch, Larry A. (Inventor); Smith, Laura J. (Inventor); Koppen, Sandra V. (Inventor); Nguyen, Truong X. (Inventor); Ely, Jay J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A plasma generator includes a pair of identical spiraled electrical conductors separated by dielectric material. Both spiraled conductors have inductance and capacitance wherein, in the presence of a time-varying electromagnetic field, the spiraled conductors resonate to generate a harmonic electromagnetic field response. The spiraled conductors lie in parallel planes and partially overlap one another in a direction perpendicular to the parallel planes. The geometric centers of the spiraled conductors define endpoints of a line that is non-perpendicular with respect to the parallel planes. A voltage source coupled across the spiraled conductors applies a voltage sufficient to generate a plasma in at least a portion of the dielectric material.

  17. The 2017 Mw8.2 Tres Picos, Mexico Earthquake, an intraslab rupture crossing the Tehuantepec Fracture Zone stopped by a tear in the Cocos Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, S.; Zeng, H.; WANG, X.; Qiu, Q.; Wang, T.; Li, L.; Chen, M.; Hermawan, I.; Wang, Y.; Tapponnier, P.; Barbot, S.

    2017-12-01

    On September 7th 2017, an Mw 8.2 intraslab earthquake ruptured beneath the Tehuantepec seismic gap in the Mexico subduction zone. We conducted a comprehensive investigation to characterize the earthquake rupture, including high-resolution back-projection, mainshock and large aftershocks relocation, aftershock moment tensor inversion, finite rupture model inversion jointly inverted from seismic waveform, static/high-rate GPS and InSAR images, and tsunami modeling. The back-projection results delineate a unilateral northwestward rupture about 150 km in length and 60s in duration, with a stable average rupture speed of 2.8 km/s. To reconcile multiple datasets, we used a two-segment fault geometry with near vertical dip angle (78°), and the second segment strikes slightly northward oriented, to mimic the rupture across the Tehuantepec Fracture Zone (FTZ) that separates the rupture into two segments. The joint inversion shows that the slip southeastern of TFZ dominates the moment release in the depth range of 30-50km during the first 40s. The second rupture segment released about 15% of the total moment, but with relatively larger contribution to the high-rate GPS, static geodetic and tide gauges data. Most of the large aftershocks occurred in the shallower part of the slab, with dominant thrust focal mechanism in agreement with slab bending. In contrast, the mainshock initiated at greater depth inside the slab, on a fault that may have formed near the trench and was reactivated by slab unbending, and was perhaps facilitated by dehydration. The comparison between the rupture model and the free air gravity anomaly suggests that the rupture was blocked westward by a low gravity anomaly zone. We interpret the difference in subducting speed and slab age across the TFZ and the Cocos plate gravity anomaly to be responsible for the abrupt stopping of the rupture at a tear zone inside the diving Cocos plate. Whether this earthquake will enhance future rupture on the plate

  18. The spinning ball spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupeux, Guillaume; Le Goff, Anne; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the trajectory of a fast revolving solid ball moving in a fluid of comparable density. As the ball slows down owing to drag, its trajectory follows an exponential spiral as long as the rotation speed remains constant: at the characteristic distance L where the ball speed is significantly affected by the drag, the bending of the trajectory increases, surprisingly. Later, the rotation speed decreases, which makes the ball follow a second kind of spiral, also described in the paper. Finally, the use of these highly curved trajectories is shown to be relevant to sports.

  19. Quarkyonic Chiral Spirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toru, Kojo; Hidaka, Y.; Pisarski, R.; McLerran, L.

    2010-01-01

    We argue the properties of confining dense quark matter, 'quarkyonic' matter, from the viewpoint of both bulk properties and excitation modes. After a brief review of confining aspects, the chiral breaking/restoration will be discussed. We argue that the strong infrared correlations induce the chiral spiral, i.e., the spatial modulation of the chiral condensate which breaks the chiral symmetry locally but restore it globally. The effective dimensional reduction takes place, allowing us to analyzing the system as 2D model in which several exact results can be explicitly derived. We also discuss the excitation spectra, both mesonic and baryonic ones, on the chiral spiral. (author)

  20. Stress Orientations and Strain Rates in the Upper Plate of a `Locked' subduction zone, at southernmost North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanzia, D. A. D.; Lamb, S. H.; Savage, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    The southern North Island, New Zealand is located at the southern Hikurangi Margin, where the Pacific Plate is obliquely subducting westward underneath the Australian Plate. The orientations of the principle stresses in the overriding plate are determined from microseismic focal mechanisms detected and located using the temporary SAHKE and permanent GeoNet seismic array operating during 2009-2010. The microseismic earthquakes are located with the NonLinLoc method, using a New Zealand specific 3D velocity model; only those earthquakes located above the modelled subduction plate interface are used. Strain rate parameters calculations are calculated using cGPS velocities from 56 stations located from the central North Island to the northernmost South Island, New Zealand. In the region west of the Tararua-range-bounding Wairarapa fault (the Western region), the orientations of stresses indicate a normal regime (S1: vertical; S2 & S3: horizontal), with SHmax trending ENE. In the Central Basin region (east of the Wairarapa fault) the orientations of the stresses indicate a reverse regime (S3: vertical; S1 & S2: horizontal), with SHmax orientated NW. The low seismicity rates in the Eastern region make the results unreliable. There is a distinct difference between the strain rate and vorticity on either side the Wairarapa fault. Strain rate and vorticity rates increase west and decreased east of the Wairarapa; this correlates well with the pattern of observed seismicity. The southern North Island is predominately contracting, except for a region on the West coast, where some expansion is occurs. This pattern of expansion in the West and contraction in the center of the study area, calculated from cGPS, is similar the stress inversion results calculated from focal mechanisms. These similarities suggest that the present stress and strain rates are collinear, as occurs in isotropic media.

  1. Miocene uplift of the NE Greenland margin linked to plate tectonics: Seismic evidence from the Greenland Fracture Zone, NE Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing Andreasen, Arne; Japsen, Peter; Watts, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    Tectonic models predict that, following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their post-rift evolution. However, post-breakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses to ...... by plate tectonic forces, induced perhaps by a change in the Iceland plume (a hot pulse) and/or by changes in intra-plate stresses related to global tectonics.......Tectonic models predict that, following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their post-rift evolution. However, post-breakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses...... backstripping. We explain the thermo-mechanical coupling and the deposition of contourites by the formation of a continuous plate boundary along the Mohns and Knipovich ridges, leading to an accelerated widening of the Fram Strait. We demonstrate that the IMU event is linked to onset of uplift and massive shelf...

  2. Tracking Target and Spiral Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming G.; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2002-01-01

    A new algorithm for analyzing the evolution of patterns of spiral and target waves in large aspect ratio chemical systems is introduced. The algorithm does not depend on finding the spiral tip but locates the center of the pattern by a new concept, called the spiral focus, which is defined by the...

  3. Are spiral galaxies heavy smokers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.; Disney, M.; Phillipps, S

    1990-01-01

    The dustiness of spiral galaxies is discussed. Starburst galaxies and the shortage of truly bright spiral galaxies is cited as evidence that spiral galaxies are far dustier than has been thought. The possibility is considered that the dust may be hiding missing mass

  4. Spiraling into Transformative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranton, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how technical and vocational learning may spiral into transformative learning. Transformative learning theory is reviewed and the learning tasks of critical theory are used to integrate various approaches to transformative learning. With this as a foundation, the article explores how transformative learning can be fostered in…

  5. Archimedean Voronoi spiral tilings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi

    2018-01-01

    We study the transition of the number of spirals (called parastichy in the theory of phyllotaxis) within a Voronoi tiling for Archimedean spiral lattices. The transition of local parastichy numbers within a tiling is regarded as a transition at the base site point in a continuous family of tilings. This gives a natural description of the quasiperiodic structure of the grain boundaries. It is proved that the number of tiles in the grain boundaries are denominators of rational approximations of the argument (called the divergence angle) of the generator. The local parastichy numbers are non-decreasing functions of the plastochron parameter. The bifurcation diagram of local parastichy numbers has a Farey tree structure. We also prove Richards’ formula of spiral phyllotaxis in the case of Archimedean Voronoi spiral tilings, and show that, if the divergence angle is a quadratic irrational number, then the shapes of tiles in the grain boundaries are close to rectangles. If the divergence angle is linearly equivalent to the golden section, then the shape of tiles in the grain boundaries is close to square.

  6. Properties of spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuser, J.

    1989-10-01

    The present thesis deals with the calculation and the study of the application possibilities of single and double spiral resonators. The main aim was the development and the construction of reliable and effective high-power spiral resonators for the UNILAC of the GSI in Darmstadt and the H - -injector for the storage ring HERA of DESY in Hamburg. After the presentation of the construction and the properties of spiral resonators and their description by oscillating-circuit models the theoretical foundations of the bunching are presented and some examples of a rebuncher and debuncher and their influence on the longitudinal particle dynamics are shown. After the description of the characteristic accelerator quantities by means of an oscillating-circuit model and the theory of an inhomogeneous λ/4 line it is shown, how the resonance frequency and the efficiency of single and double spiral resonators can be calculated from the geometrical quantities of the structure. In the following the dependence of the maximal reachable resonator voltage in dependence on the gap width and the surface of the drift tubes is studied. Furthermore the high-power resonators are presented, which were built for the different applications for the GSI in Darmstadt, DESY in Hamburg, and for the FOM Institute in Amsterdam. (orig./HSI) [de

  7. Mantle enrichment by volatiles as the Nazca plate subducts beneath the Payenia backarc of the Southern Volcanic Zone, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frederik Ejvang

    , minerals, fluid and melt inclusions from the Payenia backarc province of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone. Major emphasis has been on olivine hosted melt inclusions. The study gives evidence for the role of fluids in the metasomatism of the backarc mantle, and outlines the trend of the variation...... of the metasomatism in Payenia, which is also characterized by a variation in oxidation state and other geochemical parameters of the melt inclusions, and is moreover related to mantle lithological variations. The mantle metasomatism by melts of subducted crust and fluid-borne enrichment is quantitatively modelled......, the origin of Chlorine is explained via slab-derived fluids, and the contrast between backarc and frontal arc magmas is discussed. These results add to the understanding of the origin of the complexities in the mantle wedge under arc-backarc in a subduction zone which has transition to flat slab conditions...

  8. A double seismic zone in the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge of the Nazca Plate (32 degrees S), central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Marot, M.; Monfret, T.; Pardo, M.; Ranalli, G.; Nolet, G.

    2013-01-01

    The region of central Chile offers a unique opportunity to study the links between the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge, the flat slab, the double seismic zone (DSZ), and the absence of modern volcanism. Here we report the presence and characteristics of the first observed DSZ within the intermediate-depth Nazca slab using two temporary seismic catalogs (Ovalle 1999 and Chile Argentina Seismological Measurement Experiment). The lower plane of seismicity (LP) is located 20-25km below the upper ...

  9. Mesozoic strike-slip movement of the Dunhua-Mishan Fault Zone in NE China: A response to oceanic plate subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhu, Guang; Zhang, Shuai; Gu, Chengchuan; Li, Yunjian; Su, Nan; Xiao, Shiye

    2018-01-01

    The NE-striking Dunhua-Mishan Fault Zone (DMFZ) is one of two branches of the continental-scale sinistral Tan-Lu Fault Zone in NE China. The field data presented here indicate that the ca. 1000 km long DMFZ records two phases of sinistral faulting. The structures produced by these two phases of faulting include NE-SW-striking ductile shear belts and brittle faults, respectively. Mylonite-hosted microstructures and quartz c-axis fabrics suggest deformation temperatures of 450 °C-500 °C for the ductile shear belts. Combining new zircon U-Pb dates for 14 igneous rock samples analyzed during this study with the geology of this region indicates these shear belts formed during the earliest Early Cretaceous. This phase of sinistral displacement represents the initial formation of the DMFZ in response to the northward propagation of the Tan-Lu Fault Zone into NE China. A phase of Early Cretaceous rifting was followed by a second phase of sinistral faulting at 102-96 Ma, as evidenced by our new U-Pb ages for associated igneous rocks. Combining our new data with the results of previous research indicates that the DFMZ records a four-stage Cretaceous evolutionary history, where initial sinistral faulting at the beginning of the Early Cretaceous gave way to rifting during the rest of the Early Cretaceous. This was followed by a second phase of sinistral faulting at the beginning of the Late Cretaceous and a second phase of local rifting during the rest of the Late Cretaceous. The Cretaceous evolution of the DMFZ records the synchronous tectonic evolution of the NE China continent bordering the Pacific Ocean. Two phases of regional N-S compression generated the two phases of sinistral faulting within the DMFZ, whereas two-stage regional extension generated the two phases of rifting. The two compressive events were the result of the rapid low-angle subduction of the Izanagi and Pacific plates, whereas the two-stage extension was caused by the roll-back of these respective

  10. X-ray holographic microscopy with zone plates applied to biological samples in the water window using 3rd harmonic radiation from the free-electron laser FLASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorniak, T; Heine, R; Mancuso, A P; Staier, F; Christophis, C; Pettitt, M E; Sakdinawat, A; Treusch, R; Guerassimova, N; Feldhaus, J; Gutt, C; Grübel, G; Eisebitt, S; Beyer, A; Gölzhäuser, A; Weckert, E; Grunze, M; Vartanyants, I A; Rosenhahn, A

    2011-06-06

    The imaging of hydrated biological samples - especially in the energy window of 284-540 eV, where water does not obscure the signal of soft organic matter and biologically relevant elements - is of tremendous interest for life sciences. Free-electron lasers can provide highly intense and coherent pulses, which allow single pulse imaging to overcome resolution limits set by radiation damage. One current challenge is to match both the desired energy and the intensity of the light source. We present the first images of dehydrated biological material acquired with 3rd harmonic radiation from FLASH by digital in-line zone plate holography as one step towards the vision of imaging hydrated biological material with photons in the water window. We also demonstrate the first application of ultrathin molecular sheets as suitable substrates for future free-electron laser experiments with biological samples in the form of a rat fibroblast cell and marine biofouling bacteria Cobetia marina.

  11. Instruments of RT-2 experiment onboard CORONAS-PHOTON and their test and evaluation III: Coded Aperture Mask and Fresnel Zone Plates in RT-2/CZT payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Anuj; Palit, S.; Debnath, D.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Kotoch, T. B.; Sarkar, R.; Yadav, Vipin K.; Girish, V.; Rao, A. R.; Bhattacharya, D.

    2011-02-01

    Imaging in hard X-rays of any astrophysical source with high angular resolution is a challenging job. Shadow-casting technique is one of the most viable options for imaging in hard X-rays. We have used two different types of shadow-casters, namely, Coded Aperture Mask (CAM) and Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) pair and two types of pixellated solid-state detectors, namely, CZT and CMOS in RT-2/CZT payload, the hard X-ray imaging instrument onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. In this paper, we present the results of simulations with different combinations of coders (CAM & FZP) and detectors that are employed in the RT-2/CZT payload. We discuss the possibility of detecting transient Solar flares with good angular resolution for various combinations. Simulated results are compared with laboratory experiments to verify the consistency of the designed configuration.

  12. Effects of semiclassical spiral fluctuations on hole dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, I. J.; Manuel, L. O.; Trumper, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a single hole coupled to the spiral fluctuations related to the magnetic ground states of the antiferromagnetic J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model on a square lattice. Using exact diagonalization on finite size clusters and the self-consistent Born approximation in the thermodynamic limit, we find, as a general feature, a strong reduction of the quasiparticle weight along the spiral phases of the magnetic phase diagram. For an important region of the Brillouin zone the hole spectral functions are completely incoherent, whereas at low energies the spectral weight is redistributed on several irregular peaks. We find a characteristic value of the spiral pitch Q=(0.7,0.7)π, for which the available phase space for hole scattering is maximum. We argue that this behavior is due to the nontrivial interference of the magnon-assisted and the free-hopping mechanism for hole motion, characteristic of a hole coupled to semiclassical spiral fluctuations.

  13. Widespread remagnetizations and a new view of Neogene tectonic rotations within the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Christopher J.; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2008-03-01

    Large, clockwise, vertical axis tectonic rotations of the Hikurangi margin, East Coast, New Zealand, have been inferred over both geological and contemporary timescales, from paleomagnetic and geodetic data, respectively. Previous interpretations of paleomagnetic data have laterally divided the margin into independently rotating domains; this is not a feature of the short-term velocity field, and it is also difficult to reconcile with the large-scale boundary forces driving the rotation. New paleomagnetic results, rigorously constrained by field tests, demonstrate that late diagenetic growth of the iron sulfide greigite has remagnetized up to 65% of sampled localities on the Hikurangi margin. When these remagnetizations are accounted for, similar rates, magnitudes, and timings of tectonic rotation can be inferred for the entire Hikurangi margin south of the Raukumara Peninsula in the last 7-10 Ma. Numerous large (50-80°) declination anomalies from magnetizations acquired in the late Miocene require much greater rates of rotation (8-14° Ma-1) than the presently observed rate of 3-4° Ma-1, which is only likely to be characteristic of the tectonic regime established since 1-2 Ma. These new results are consistent with both long- and short-term deformation on the Hikurangi margin being driven by realignment of the subducting Pacific plate, with collision of the Hikurangi Plateau in the late Miocene potentially being key to both the initiation of tectonic rotations and the widespread remagnetization of Neogene sediments. However, accommodating faster, more coherent rotation of the Hikurangi margin in Neogene reconstructions of the New Zealand plate boundary region, particularly in the late Miocene, remains a challenge.

  14. Theory of spiral structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The density wave theory of galactic spirals has now developed into a form suitable for consideration by experts in Applied Mechanics. On the one hand, comparison of theoretical deductions with observational data has convinced astrophysicists of the validity of the basic physical picture and the calculated results. On the other hand, the dynamical problems of a stellar system, such as those concerning the origin of spiral structure in galaxies, have not been completely solved. This paper reviews the current status of such developments, including a brief summary of comparison with observations. A particularly important mechanism, currently called the mechanism of energy exchange, is described in some detail. The mathematical problems and the physical processes involved are similar to those occurring in certain instability mechanisms in the 'magnetic bottle' designed for plasma containment. Speculations are given on the future developments of the theory and on observational programs. (Auth.)

  15. Spiral 2 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop.

  16. Slip-dependent weakening on shallow plate boundary fault in the Japan subduction zone: shallow coseismic slip facilitated by foreshock afterslip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshi; Ikari, Matt; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kopf, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of role of slow earthquakes as they relate to the occurrence of both megathrust earthquakes and tsunami earthquakes is necessary to mitigate these disasters in the near future. Laboratory shearing experiments is one of important approach to evaluate these relationships. Here, we use powdered gouge samples from JFAST (IODP Expedition 343) Hole C0019E, core sample 17R-1, which is the plate boundary fault zone in the Japan Trench subduction zone. In this region, both large coseismic slip during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake as well as discrete slow slip events (SSE) have occurred. Experiments were conducted in a single-direct shear apparatus under normal stress of 16 MPa, with total shear displacements of up to 16 mm. We evaluate the slip-dependence of friction by extracting the velocity-dependent friction parameters a, b, and Dc , and also measure the rate of change in friction coefficient with shear displacement as the slip-dependence of friction. We report that in friction experiments using the Tohoku fault zone samples, an increase in sliding velocity exceeding that of earthquake afterslip can induce a change from steady-state frictional strength or slip hardening friction to slip-weakening frictional behavior. Our results show that the slip weakening is observed when the slip velocity exceeds 3.7 × 10-6 m/s during our experiments, while steady-state frictional strength or slip hardening is observed below 1 × 10-6 m/s. In the Japan Trench region, two slow events prior to the mainshock were observed in the mainshock area with a coseismic slip exceeding 30 m . One event is an episodic SSE with a slip velocity of 0.1 × 10-6 , and the other is afterslip after the largest Tohoku earthquake foreshock with a slip velocity exceeding 2 × 10-6 m/s. Our experiments show that slip-weakening friction should be expected at the afterslip rate, suggesting that the afterslip may have facilitated the large coseismic slip during the mainshock on the plate boundary

  17. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  18. Complete Fabrication of a Traversable 3 µm Thick NbN Film Superconducting Coil with Cu plated layer of 42m in Length in a Spiral Three-Storied Trench Engraved in a Si Wafer of 76.2 mm in Diameter Formed by MEMS Technology for a Compact SMES with High Energy Storage Volume Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Iguchi, Nobuhiro; Adachi, Kazuhiro; Ichiki, Akihisa; Hioki, Tatsumi; Hsu, Che-Wei; Sato, Ryoto; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Noh, Joo-Hyong; Sakurahara, Yuuske; Okabe, Kyohei; Takai, Osamu; Honma, Hideo; Watanabe, Hideo; Sakoda, Hitoshi; Sasagawa, Hiroaki; Doy, Hideyuki; Zhou, Shuliang; Hori, H.; Nishikawa, Shigeaki; Nozaki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2017-09-01

    Based on the concept of a novel approach to make a compact SMES unit composed of a stack of Si wafers using MEMS process proposed previously, a complete fabrication of a traversable 3 µam thick NbN film superconducting coil lined with Cu plated layer of 42m in length in a spiral three-storied trench engraved in and extended over a whole Si-wafer of 76.2 mm in diameter was attained for the first time. With decrease in temperature, the DC resistivity showed a metallic decrease indicating the current pass was in the Cu plated layer and then made a sudden fall to residual contact resistance indicating the shift of current pass from the Cu plated layer to the NbN film at the critical temperature Tc of 15.5K by superconducting transition. The temperature dependence of I-V curve showed the increase in the critical current with decrease in the temperature and the highest critical current measured was 220 mA at 4K which is five times as large as that obtained in the test fabrication as the experimental proof of concept presented in the previous report. This completion of a one wafer superconducting NbN coil is an indispensable step for the next proof of concept of fabrication of series-connected two wafer coils via superconductive joint which will read to series connected 600 wafer coils finally, and for replacement of NbN by high Tc superconductor such as YBa2Cu3O7-x for operation under the cold energy of liquid hydrogen or liquid nitrogen.

  19. Geochemistry of subalkaline and alkaline extrusives from the Kermanshah ophiolite, Zagros Suture Zone, Western Iran: implications for Tethyan plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, A. Mohamad; Hassanipak, A. A.

    1999-06-01

    The Kermanshah ophiolite is a highly dismembered ophiolite complex that is located in western Iran and belongs to the Zagros orogenic system. The igneous rocks of this complex consist of both mantle and crustal suites and include peridotites (dunite and harzburgite), cumulate gabbros, diorites, and a volcanic sequence that exhibits a wide range in composition from subalkaline basalts to alkaline basalts to trachytes. The associated sedimentary rocks include a variety of Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous deep- and shallow-water sedimentary rocks (e.g., dolomite, limestone, and pelagic sediments, including umber). Also present are extensive units of radiolarian chert. The geochemical data clearly identifies some of the volcanic rocks to have formed from two distinct types of basaltic melts: (i) those of the subalkaline suite, which formed from an initial melt with a light rare earth elements (LREE) enriched signature and incompatible trace element patterns that suggest an island arc affinity; and (ii) those of the alkaline suite with LREE-enriched signature and incompatible trace element patterns that are virtually identical to typical oceanic island basalt (OIB) pattern. The data also suggests that the trachytes were derived from the alkaline source, with fractionation controlled by extensive removal of plagioclase and to a lesser extent clinopyroxene. The presence of compositionally diverse volcanics together with the occurrence of a variety of Triassic-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks and radiolarian chert indicate that the studied volcanic rocks from the Kermanshah ophiolite represent off-axis volcanic units that were formed in intraplate oceanic island and island arc environments in an oceanic basin. They were located on the eastern and northern flanks of one of the spreading centers of a ridge-transform fault system that connected Troodos to Oman prior to its subduction under the Eurasian plate.

  20. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  1. Accurate measurements of vadose zone fluxes using automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters: A synopsis of results from the Spydia research facility, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhling, Thomas; Barkle, Greg; Stenger, Roland; Moorhead, Brian; Wall, Aaron; Clague, Juliet

    2014-05-01

    Automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters (AETLs) are arguably the most accurate method to measure unsaturated water and contaminant fluxes below the root zone at the scale of up to 1 m². The AETL technique utilizes a porous sintered stainless-steel plate to provide a comparatively large sampling area with a continuously controlled vacuum that is in "equilibrium" with the surrounding vadose zone matric pressure to ensure measured fluxes represent those under undisturbed conditions. This novel lysimeter technique was used at an intensive research site for investigations of contaminant pathways from the land surface to the groundwater on a sheep and beef farm under pastoral land use in the Tutaeuaua subcatchment, New Zealand. The Spydia research facility was constructed in 2005 and was fully operational between 2006 and 2011. Extending from a central access caisson, 15 separately controlled AETLs with 0.2 m² surface area were installed at five depths between 0.4 m and 5.1 m into the undisturbed volcanic vadose zone materials. The unique setup of the facility ensured minimum interference of the experimental equipment and external factors with the measurements. Over the period of more than five years, a comprehensive data set was collected at each of the 15 AETL locations which comprises of time series of soil water flux, pressure head, volumetric water contents, and soil temperature. The soil water was regularly analysed for EC, pH, dissolved carbon, various nitrogen compounds (including nitrate, ammonia, and organic N), phosphorus, bromide, chloride, sulphate, silica, and a range of other major ions, as well as for various metals. Climate data was measured directly at the site (rainfall) and a climate station at 500m distance. The shallow groundwater was sampled at three different depths directly from the Spydia caisson and at various observation wells surrounding the facility. Two tracer experiments were conducted at the site in 2009 and 2010. In the 2009

  2. Three phase spiral liver Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanyanja, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to perform rapid back-to-back spiral acquisitions is an important recent technical advantage of spiral CT. this allows imaging of the upper abdomen (liver) during peak arterial enhancement (arterial phase) and during peak hepatic parenchymal enhancement (portal venous phase). Breatheld spiral CT has completely replaced dynamic incremental CT for evaluation of the liver. in selected patients with hyper vascular metastasis (hepatoma, neuroendocrine tumors, renal cell carcinoma, etc.) a biphasic examination is performed with one spiral acquisition obtained during the hepatic arterial phase and a second acquisition during the portal venous phase

  3. The thermal effects of steady-state slab-driven mantle flow above a subducting plate: the Cascadia subduction zone and backarc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, C. A.; Wang, K.; Hyndman, Roy D.; He, Jiangheng

    2004-06-01

    At subduction zones, geophysical and geochemical observations indicate that the arc and backarc regions are hot, in spite of the cooling effects of a subducting plate. At the well-studied Cascadia subduction zone, high mantle temperatures persist for over 500 km into the backarc, with little lateral variation. These high temperatures are even more surprising due to the juxtaposition of the hot Cascadia backarc against the thick, cold North America craton lithosphere. Given that local heat sources appear to be negligible, mantle flow is required to transport heat into the wedge and backarc. We have examined the thermal effects of mantle flow induced by traction along the top of the subducting plate. Through systematic tests of the backarc model boundary, we have shown that the model thermal structure of the wedge is primarily determined by the assumed temperatures along this boundary. To get high temperatures in the wedge, it is necessary for flow to mine heat from depth, either by using a temperature-dependent rheology, or by introducing a deep cold boundary through a thick adjacent lithosphere, consistent with the presence of a craton. Regardless of the thermal conditions along the backarc boundary, flow within an isoviscous wedge is too slow to transport a significant amount of heat into the wedge corner. With a more realistic stress- and temperature-dependent wedge rheology, flow is focused into the wedge corner, resulting in rapid flow upward toward the corner and enhanced temperatures below the arc, compatible with temperatures required for arc magma generation. However, this strong flow focusing produces a nearly stagnant region further landward in the shallow backarc mantle, where model temperatures and heat flow are much lower than observed. Observations of high backarc temperatures, particularly in areas that have not undergone recent extension, provide an important constraint on wedge dynamics. None of the models of simple traction-driven flow were able

  4. The perfect shape spiral stories

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    This book uses the spiral shape as a key to a multitude of strange and seemingly disparate stories about art, nature, science, mathematics, and the human endeavour. In a way, the book is itself organized as a spiral, with almost disconnected chapters circling around and closing in on the common theme. A particular strength of the book is its extremely cross-disciplinary nature - everything is fun, and everything is connected! At the same time, the author puts great emphasis on mathematical and scientific correctness, in contrast, perhaps, with some earlier books on spirals. Subjects include the mathematical properties of spirals, sea shells, sun flowers, Greek architecture, air ships, the history of mathematics, spiral galaxies, the anatomy of the human hand, the art of prehistoric Europe, Alfred Hitchcock, and spider webs, to name a few.

  5. GPS-determination of along-strike variation in Cascadia margin kinematics: Implications for relative plate motion, subduction zone coupling, and permanent deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Meghan; Johnson, Daniel J.; Rubin, Charles M.; Dragert, Herb; Wang, Kelin; Qamar, Anthony; Goldfinger, Chris

    2001-04-01

    High-precision GPS geodesy in the Pacific Northwest provides the first synoptic view of the along-strike variation in Cascadia margin kinematics. These results constrain interfering deformation fields in a region where typical earthquake recurrence intervals are one or more orders of magnitude longer than the decades-long history of seismic monitoring and where geologic studies are sparse. Interseismic strain accumulation contributes greatly to GPS station velocities along the coast. After correction for a simple elastic dislocation model, important residual motions remain, especially south of the international border. The magnitude of northward forearc motion increases southward from western Washington (3-7 mm/yr) to northern and central Oregon (˜9 mm/yr), consistent with oblique convergence and geologic constraints on permanent deformation. The margin-parallel strain gradient, concentrated in western Washington across the populated Puget Lowlands, compares in magnitude to shortening across the Los Angeles Basin. Thus crustal faulting also contributes to seismic hazard. Farther south in southern Oregon, north-westward velocities reflect the influence of Pacific-North America motion and impingement of the Sierra Nevada block on the Pacific Northwest. In contrast to previous notions, some deformation related to the Eastern California shear zone crosses northernmost California in the vicinity of the Klamath Mountains and feeds out to the Gorda plate margin.

  6. Geochemistry, petrology and geodynamic setting of the Urumieh plutonic complex, Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, NW Iran: New implication for Arabian and Central Iranian plate collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Amin; Fazlnia, Abdolnaser; Jamei, Susan

    2018-03-01

    The Urumieh plutonic complex, in the northernmost part of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) of Iran, consists of ten basic-acidic units which formed in response to subduction and continental collision of the SSZ with the Arabian plate to the south during Mid-Late Cretaceous times. Geochemically, the plutonic unit is divided into three distinct groups: I-type, S-type and A-type that mainly belong to calc-alkalic series. The I-type intrusions, especially mafic members, are enriched in LREE and LILE and possibly formed from metasomatized mantle wedge during the subduction of the Neo-Tethys oceanic crust beneath the SSZ. The felsic I-type rocks are depleted in Ba, Sr, Nb, Ta, Ti and Eu, but enriched in Rb, Th, K, Ce, U and La. These data suggest that they formed in deep crustal levels via partial melting of crustal sources by injection of hot mantle magmas. The S-type rocks are characterized by low Na2O (<3.02 wt%), high LILE, relatively high values of molar Al2O3/(MgO+FeO) and K2O/Na2O ratios combined with low CaO/(MgO+FeO*) ratios. These features show that the S-type granites originated from partial melting of a metapelitic to metagreywacke source. The A-type alkali feldspar granites formed through the slab break off after the continental collision in northwestern Iran by decompression melting of crustal protolith. The author's new model implies that collision between Arabian margin and north SSZ initiated in the Late Cretaceous and completed until Late Paleocene. In contrast, in the southeast, subduction was active during this period of time, but collision presumably occurred during the Middle to Late Miocene.

  7. Measuring with the spiral reader

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The spiral reader shown here was at the time, together with the Shivamatic scanning system, the basic equipment used for measuring bubble chamber pictures. Anne Anton sits at the table. (See Photo Archive 7408343.)

  8. Spiral-shaped disinfection reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2015-08-20

    This disclosure includes disinfection reactors and processes for the disinfection of water. Some disinfection reactors include a body that defines an inlet, an outlet, and a spiral flow path between the inlet and the outlet, in which the body is configured to receive water and a disinfectant at the inlet such that the water is exposed to the disinfectant as the water flows through the spiral flow path. Also disclosed are processes for disinfecting water in such disinfection reactors.

  9. Spiral inlets for steam turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škach, Radek; Uher, Jan

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the design process of special nozzle blades for spiral inlets. Spiral inlets are used for the first stages of high pressure and intermediate pressure steam turbines with both reaction and impulse blades when throttling or sliding pressure control is applied. They improve the steam flow uniformity from the inlet pipe and thus decrease the aerodynamic losses. The proposed evaluation of the inlet angle is based on the free vortex law.

  10. Evolutionarily Conserved, Growth Plate Zone-Specific Regulation of the Matrilin-1 Promoter: L-Sox5/Sox6 and Nfi Factors Bound near TATA Finely Tune Activation by Sox9 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Andrea; Kénesi, Erzsébet; Rentsendorj, Otgonchimeg; Molnár, Annamária; Szénási, Tibor; Sinkó, Ildikó; Zvara, Ágnes; Thottathil Oommen, Sajit; Barta, Endre; Puskás, László G.; Lefebvre, Veronique; Kiss, Ibolya

    2011-01-01

    To help uncover the mechanisms underlying the staggered expression of cartilage-specific genes in the growth plate, we dissected the transcriptional mechanisms driving expression of the matrilin-1 gene (Matn1). We show that a unique assembly of evolutionarily conserved cis-acting elements in the Matn1 proximal promoter restricts expression to the proliferative and prehypertrophic zones of the growth plate. These elements functionally interact with distal elements and likewise are capable of restricting the domain of activity of a pancartilaginous Col2a1 enhancer. The proximal elements include a Pe1 element binding the chondrogenic L-Sox5, Sox6, and Sox9 proteins, a SI element binding Nfi proteins, and an initiator Ine element binding the Sox trio and other factors. Sox9 binding to Pe1 is indispensable for functional interaction with the distal promoter. Binding of L-Sox5/Sox6 to Ine and Nfib to SI modulates Sox9 transactivation in a protein dose-dependent manner, possibly to enhance Sox9 activity in early stages of chondrogenesis and repress it at later stages. Hence, our data suggest a novel model whereby Sox and Nfi proteins bind to conserved Matn1 proximal elements and functionally interact with each other to finely tune gene expression in specific zones of the cartilage growth plate. PMID:21173167

  11. Spiral Inflector For Compact Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Karamysheva, G A

    2004-01-01

    Compact cyclotron for explosives detection by nuclear resonance absorption of γ-rays in nitrogen is under development [1] Cyclotron will be equipped with the external ion source. The injection system consists of a double-drift beam bunching system, a spiral inflector, beam diagnostics, focusing and adjustment elements [2]. The spiral inflector for ion bending from axial to median plane is used. Computer model of spiral inflector for the Customs cyclotron is developed. 3D electrostatic field calculations of the designed inflector are performed. Calculated electric field map and magnetic field map of the cyclotron [3] are used for beam dynamic simulations. Numeric simulations are carried out for 500 particles using code for calculation of particle dynamics by integration of differential equations in Cartesian coordinate system written in MATLAB. Direct Coulomb particle-to-particle method is used to take into account space-charge effects.

  12. Spiralizations and tropisms in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, F; Piconese, S

    2001-12-01

    When Arabidopsis seedlings are grown on a hard-agar plate, their primary roots show characteristic spiralling movements, apparent as waves, coils and torsions, together with a slanting toward the right-hand side. All these movements are believed to be the result of three different processes acting on the roots: circumnutation, positive gravitropism and negative thigmotropism. The basic movement of the roots is described as that of a growing right-handed helix, which, because of the root tip hitting the agar plate, is continuously switched from the right-hand to the left-hand of the growth direction, and vice versa. This movement also produces a slanting root-growth direction toward the right-hand because of the incomplete waves made by the right-handed root to the left-hand. By contrast, the torsions seen in the coils and waves are interpreted as artefacts that form as an adaptation of the three-dimensional root helix to the flat two-dimensional agar surface.

  13. GANIL-SPIRAL1-SPIRAL2: Highlights and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.

    2010-06-01

    GANIL presently offers unique opportunities in nuclear physics and many other fields that arise from not only the provision of low-energy stable beams, fragmentation beams and re-accelerated radioactive species, but also from the availability of a wide range of state-of-the-art spectrometers and instrumentation. A few examples of recent highlights are presented. With the construction of SPIRAL2 over the next few years, GANIL is in a good position to retain its world-leading capability. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, will surpass by two order of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100*A to 1 mA), heavier ions (Ar up to Xe) at maximum energy of 14 MeV/n. Under the 7FP program of European Union called*Preparatory phase*, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4 M€ to build up an international consortium around this new venture. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and associated physics instruments in collaboration with EU and International partners will be presented.

  14. Quasicrystallography on the spiral of Archimedes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of a spiral lattice is discussed. Some examples of known mineral structures, namely clino asbestos, halloysite and cylindrite, are then interpreted in terms of this structural principle. An example of a synthetic sulphide catalyst spiral structure having atomic dimensions is also described. All of these inorganic spiral structures are based on the sprial of Archimedes. The principles for a new type of crystallography, based on the Archimedian spiral, are then presented. 45 refs., 8 figs

  15. Numerical Calibration of Cohesive Zone Energy for Plate Tearing Homogenization-Based Topology Optimization for High-Resolution Continuum, Frame and Truss Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felter, C. L.; RASMUSSEN, R.G.; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2017-01-01

    In a cohesive zone model, neighboring elements are connected by nonlinearsprings (instead of directly sharing a node) which are designed to i) absorb the fracture energy, ii) release the connection between elements in the fracture zone. Unfortunately ,it is often necessary to conduct lab tests...

  16. Inspired Spirals. Teaching Art with Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirals in nature, man-made objects, and art. Focuses on art that incorporates the spiral, including works by M. C. Escher and Frank Lloyd Wright, an African headdress, and a burial urn. Describes activities to help students make spirals of their own, such as constructing a coil clay pot. (CMK)

  17. The Spiral Pattern During Development*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-07

    Aug 7, 1971 ... which are destined to become the limb areas bud out laterally. Fig. 8. The early cells, which are destined to develop into the upper and the lower limbs, after lateral budding has occurred. Fig. 11 demonstrates the human embryo of about 5 mm. CR length and age of about 32 days. The spiral pattern is.

  18. A study of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wevers, B.M.H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Attempts have been made to look for possible correlations between integral properties of spiral galaxies as a function of morphological type. To investigate this problem, one needs the detailed distribution of both the gaseous and the stellar components for a well-defined sample of spiral galaxies. A sample of about 20 spiral galaxies was therefore defined; these galaxies were observed in the 21 cm neutral hydrogen line with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and in three broad-band optical colours with the 48-inch Palomar Smidt Telescope. First, an atlas of the combined radio and optical observations of 16 nearby northern-hemisphere spiral galaxies is presented. Luminosity profiles are discussed and the scale lengths of the exponential disks and extrapolated central surface brightnesses are derived, as well as radial color distributions; azimuthal surface brightness distributions and rotation curves. Possible correlations with optical features are investigated. It is found that 20 to 50 per cent of the total mass is in the disk. (Auth.)

  19. New mechanism of spiral wave initiation in a reaction-diffusion-mechanics system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the "classical vulnerable zone." Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the "classical," and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the "classical vulnerable zone." We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback.

  20. Using paleomagnetism to expand the observation time window of plate locking along subduction zones: evidence from the Chilean fore-arc sliver (38°S - 42°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Moreno, Catalina; Speranza, Fabio; Di Chiara, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Fore-arc crustal motion has been usually addressed by the analysis of earthquake slip vectors and, since the last twenty years, by velocity fields derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) data. Yet this observation time window (few decades) can be significantly shorter than a complete seismic cycle or constrained to interseismic periods where the postseismic deformation release, the vicinity of other important faults, and the slip partitioning in oblique subduction may hinder the finite deformation pattern. Paleomagnetic data may yield finite rotations occurring since rock formation, thus provide a much longer observation time span in the order of millions or tens of millions of years. The cumulative permanent or nonreversing deformation in function of the considered geological formation age can represent the average over many seismic cycles, thus significantly complement "instantaneous" information derived from seismic and GPS data. With the aim of evaluate the strike-variation and evolution of the plate coupling along the Chilean subduction zone, here we report on the paleomagnetism of 43 Oligocene-Pleistocene volcanic sites from the fore-arc sliver between 38°S and 42°S. Sites were gathered west of the 1000 km long Liquiñe-Ofqui dextral fault zone (LOFZ) that represents the eastern fore-arc sliver boundary. Nineteen reliable sites reveal that the fore arc is characterized by counterclockwise (CCW) rotations of variable magnitude, except at 40°S - 41°S, where ultrafast (>50°/Myr) clockwise (CW) rotations occur within a 30 km wide zone adjacent to the LOFZ. CCW rotation variability (even at close sites) and rapidity (>10°/Myr) suggest that the observed block rotation pattern is related to NW-SE seismically active sinistral faults crosscutting the whole fore arc. According to previously published data, CW rotations up to 170° also occur east of the LOFZ and have been related to ongoing LOFZ shear. We suggest that the occurrence and width of the eastern

  1. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  2. Plating laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamster, A.G.; Weitkamp, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lead plating of the prototype resonator has been conducted entirely in the plating laboratory at SUNY Stony Brook. Because of the considerable cost and inconvenience in transporting personnel and materials to and from Stony Brook, it is clearly impractical to plate all the resonators there. Furthermore, the high-beta resonator cannot be accommodated at Stony Brook without modifying the set up there. Consequently the authors are constructing a plating lab in-house

  3. Multiple mechanisms quench passive spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin; Dolley, Tim; Bonne, Nicolas J.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the properties of a sample of 35 nearby passive spiral galaxies in order to determine their dominant quenching mechanism(s). All five low-mass (M⋆ environments. We postulate that cluster-scale gas stripping and heating mechanisms operating only in rich clusters are required to quench low-mass passive spirals, and ram-pressure stripping and strangulation are obvious candidates. For higher mass passive spirals, while trends are present, the story is less clear. The passive spiral bar fraction is high: 74 ± 15 per cent, compared with 36 ± 5 per cent for a mass, redshift and T-type matched comparison sample of star-forming spiral galaxies. The high mass passive spirals occur mostly, but not exclusively, in groups, and can be central or satellite galaxies. The passive spiral group fraction of 74 ± 15 per cent is similar to that of the comparison sample of star-forming galaxies at 61 ± 7 per cent. We find evidence for both quenching via internal structure and environment in our passive spiral sample, though some galaxies have evidence of neither. From this, we conclude no one mechanism is responsible for quenching star formation in passive spiral galaxies - rather, a mixture of mechanisms is required to produce the passive spiral distribution we see today.

  4. Plate interior polyphase fault systems and sedimentary basin evolution: A case study of the East Gobi Basin and East Gobi Fault Zone, southeastern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, Matthew J.; Johnson, Cari L.; Webb, Laura E.

    2018-01-01

    Structural interpretation of 2-D seismic reflection data and subsurface-outcrop correlations reveal six distinct phases of deformation recorded in the Paleozoic basement rocks and Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin fill of the East Gobi Basin (EGB), southeastern Mongolia. These phases include arc accretion and arc-continent collision in late Paleozoic time, Late Triassic sinistral shear-zone development, Early Jurassic fold and thrust belt style shortening, Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous extension and rift basin development, middle Cretaceous shortening with basin inversion and regional unconformity development, and Late Cretaceous-Oligocene thermal subsidence with renewed Paleogene left-lateral strike slip faulting across the fault zone. The five post-amalgamation deformation phases are localized along the East Gobi Fault Zone, suggesting that preexisting structures and boundary conditions exert fundamental controls on the long term evolution of intracontinental basins such as the EGB. Subsurface geophysical data and outcrop correlations demonstrate that the main subbasins of the EGB contain major differences in basement metamorphic and structural fabrics, basin fill patterns, and distinct Mesozoic-Cenozoic fault generations. Potential causes related to far-field boundary conditions and other driving factors are suggested for each of the major deformation phases.

  5. Semiclassical dynamics, Berry curvature, and spiral holonomy in optical quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Stephen; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2018-04-01

    We describe the theory of the dynamics of atoms in two-dimensional quasicrystalline optical lattices. We focus on a regime of shallow lattice depths under which the applied force can cause Landau-Zener tunneling past a dense hierarchy of gaps in the quasiperiodic energy spectrum. We derive conditions on the external force that allow for a "semiadiabatic" regime in which semiclassical equations of motion can apply, leading to Bloch oscillations between the edges of a pseudo-Brillouin-zone. We verify this semiclassical theory by comparing to the results of an exact numerical solution. Interesting features appear in the semiclassical dynamics for the quasicrystal for a particle driven in a cyclic trajectory around the corner of the pseudo-Brillouin-zone: The particle fails to return to its initial state, providing a realization of a "spiral holonomy" in the dynamics. We show that there can appear anomalous velocity contributions, associated with nonzero Berry curvature. We relate these to the Berry phase associated with the spiral holonomy, and show how the Berry curvature can be accessed from the semiclassical dynamics. Finally, by identifying the pseudo-Brillouin-zone as a higher genus surface, we show that the Chern number classification for periodic systems can be extended to a quasicrystal, thereby determining a topological index for the system.

  6. Deformation of the Northwestern Okhotsk Plate: How is it happening?

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, D.; Fujita, K.; Mackey, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Eurasia (EU) – North America (NA) plate boundary zone across Northeast Asia still presents many open questions within the plate tectonic paradigm. Constraining the geometry and number of plates or microplates present in the plate boundary zone is especially difficult because of the location of the EU-NA euler pole close to or even upon the EU-NA boundary. One of the major challenges remains the geometry of the Okhotsk plate (OK). whose northwestern portion terminates on ...

  7. Spiral 2 the scientific objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    The French ministry of research took the decision to build Spiral-2 in May 2005. Its construction costs are estimated to 130 million euros while its operating costs will near 8.5 million euros per year. The construction works will last 5 years. The Spiral-2 facility is based on a high power, superconducting driver Linac, which will deliver a high intensity, 40 MeV deuteron beam as well as a variety of heavy-ion beams with mass over charge ratio equal to 3 and energy up to 14.5 MeV/nucleon. Using a carbon converter, fast neutrons from the breakup of the 5 mA of deuterons impinging on a uranium carbide target will induce a rate of up to 10 14 fissions/s. The radioactive ion beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to 140 will be of the order of 10 6 to 10 11 particles/s surpassing by one or two orders-of-magnitude any existing facility in the world. A direct irradiation of the UC 2 target with 3,4 He, 6,7 Li or 12 C may also be used. Different production targets will be used to produce high-intensity beams of light radioactive species with the Isol technique. The extracted radioactive ion beam will be accelerated to energies up to 20 MeV/nucleons by the existing Cime cyclotron. One of the most important features of the future Ganil accelerator complex will be the capability of delivering up to 5 stable or radioactive beams simultaneously in the energy range from the keV to several tens of MeV/nucleons. The document details also the future contribution of Spiral-2 concerning the structure of exotic nuclei, the thermodynamical aspects of nuclear matter, nucleosynthesis, the fundamental basic interactions, and the use of neutrons. (A.C.)

  8. Spiral 2 the scientific objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    The French ministry of research took the decision to build Spiral-2 in May 2005. Its construction costs are estimated to 130 million euros while its operating costs will near 8.5 million euros per year. The construction works will last 5 years. The Spiral-2 facility is based on a high power, superconducting driver Linac, which will deliver a high intensity, 40 MeV deuteron beam as well as a variety of heavy-ion beams with mass over charge ratio equal to 3 and energy up to 14.5 MeV/nucleon. Using a carbon converter, fast neutrons from the breakup of the 5 mA of deuterons impinging on a uranium carbide target will induce a rate of up to 10{sup 14} fissions/s. The radioactive ion beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to 140 will be of the order of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 11} particles/s surpassing by one or two orders-of-magnitude any existing facility in the world. A direct irradiation of the UC{sub 2} target with {sup 3,4}He, {sup 6,7}Li or {sup 12}C may also be used. Different production targets will be used to produce high-intensity beams of light radioactive species with the Isol technique. The extracted radioactive ion beam will be accelerated to energies up to 20 MeV/nucleons by the existing Cime cyclotron. One of the most important features of the future Ganil accelerator complex will be the capability of delivering up to 5 stable or radioactive beams simultaneously in the energy range from the keV to several tens of MeV/nucleons. The document details also the future contribution of Spiral-2 concerning the structure of exotic nuclei, the thermodynamical aspects of nuclear matter, nucleosynthesis, the fundamental basic interactions, and the use of neutrons. (A.C.)

  9. The rotation of spiral galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, V C

    1983-06-24

    There is accumulating evidence that as much as 90 percent of the mass of the universe is nonluminous and is clumped, halo-like, around individual galaxies. The gravitational force of this dark matter is presumed to be responsible for the high rotational velocities of stars and gas in the disks of spiral galaxie. At present, the form of the dark matter is unknown. Possible candidates span a range in mass of 10(70), from non-zero-mass neutrinos to massive black holes.

  10. The DESIR Facility at SPIRAL2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Beams from the low-energy branch of the separator spectrometer S3 and from SPIRAL1 will allow complementary studies of refrac- tory elements produced by means of fusion reactions as well as of light and intense exotic beams, respectively. Keywords. SPIRAL2; low-energy facility; nuclear physics; weak interaction; astro-.

  11. ANGULAR-MOMENTUM IN BINARY SPIRAL GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTERLOO, T

    In order to investigate the relative orientations of spiral galaxies in pairs, the distribution of the angle between the spin-vectors for a new sample of 40 binary spiral galaxies is determined. From this distribution it is found, contrary to an earlier result obtained by Helou (1984), that there is

  12. Scaling effects in spiral capsule robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Hu, Rong; Chen, Bai; Tang, Yong; Xu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Spiral capsule robots can be applied to human gastrointestinal tracts and blood vessels. Because of significant variations in the sizes of the inner diameters of the intestines as well as blood vessels, this research has been unable to meet the requirements for medical applications. By applying the fluid dynamic equations, using the computational fluid dynamics method, to a robot axial length ranging from 10 -5 to 10 -2  m, the operational performance indicators (axial driving force, load torque, and maximum fluid pressure on the pipe wall) of the spiral capsule robot and the fluid turbulent intensity around the robot spiral surfaces was numerically calculated in a straight rigid pipe filled with fluid. The reasonableness and validity of the calculation method adopted in this study were verified by the consistency of the calculated values by the computational fluid dynamics method and the experimental values from a relevant literature. The results show that the greater the fluid turbulent intensity, the greater the impact of the fluid turbulence on the driving performance of the spiral capsule robot and the higher the energy consumption of the robot. For the same level of size of the robot, the axial driving force, the load torque, and the maximum fluid pressure on the pipe wall of the outer spiral robot were larger than those of the inner spiral robot. For different requirements of the operating environment, we can choose a certain kind of spiral capsule robot. This study provides a theoretical foundation for spiral capsule robots.

  13. QS Spiral: Visualizing Periodic Quantified Self Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Cuttone, Andrea; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose an interactive visualization technique QS Spiral that aims to capture the periodic properties of quantified self data and let the user explore those recurring patterns. The approach is based on time-series data visualized as a spiral structure. The interactivity includes ...

  14. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Scott R.; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy. Some (75%) or all (100%) of the damaged zone was cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and plates that had been repaired.

  15. Analisa Kekuatan Spiral Bevel Gear Dengan Variasi Sudut Spiral Menggunakan Metode Elemen Hingga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deta Rachmat Andika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Seiring perkembangan zaman,  teknologi roda gigi dituntut untuk mampu mentransmisikan daya yang besar dengan efisiensi yang besar pula. Pada jenis intersecting shaft gear, tipe roda gigi payung spiral (spiral bevel gear  merupakan perkembangan dari roda gigi payung bergigi lurus (straight bevel gear. Kelebihan dari spiral bevel gear antara  lain adalah kemampuan transmisi daya dan efisiensi yang lebih besar pada geometri yang sama serta tidak terlalu berisik. Akan tetapi spiral bevel gear juga mempunyai kelemahan jika dibandingkan dengan straight bevel gear. Selain proses manufaktur yang lebih rumit, profil lengkung gigi spiral ini membuat distribusi tegangan yang terjadi menjadi lebih rumit untuk dimodelkan dengan persamaan matematika. Salah satu pendekatan yang dapat dilakukan adalah dengan menggunakan metode elemen hingga. Penelitian diawali dengan membuat model dari straight bevel gear dan juga spiral bevel gear yang sudut spiralnya divariasikan 20, 35, dan 45 derajat. Model dibuat dengan dimensi yang sama baik diameter maupun jumlah gigi gear. Langkah selanjutnya yaitu perhitungan analitis pada straight bevel gear dimana hasilnya akan dibandingkan dengan hasil simulasi statis. Setelah eror yang terjadi dibawah 15% maka dilakukan simulasi dinamis pada semua model yang telah dibuat yaitu straight bevel dan juga spira bevel gear. Hasil yang didapatkan dari penelitian ini adalah secara keseluruhan spiral bevel gear lebih kuat daripada straight bevel gear pada dimensi dan beban yang sama jika dilihat dari lebih kecilnya tegangan bending dan tegangan kontak maksimum yang terjadi. Tegangan terbesar terjadi pada jenis straight bevel gear baik pada tegangan bending maupun tegangan kontak sedangkan spiral bevel gear dengan variasi sudut Seiring spiral 35 mempunyai nilai tegangan terkecil. Prosntase selisih tegangan bending maksimum yang terjadi antara straight bevel gear dan spiral bevel gear dengan variasi sudut spiral 35 derajat  sebesar 44

  16. On Density Waves in Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbol, P.; Patsis, P. A.

    The spiral structure of five ordinary spiral galaxies was studied using deep BVIK' surface photometry maps obtained at the 2.2m ESO/MPI telescope. The detailed shape of the arms was analyzed in terms of the spiral density wave theory. Grand design spirals were found on the K' maps in all five galaxies although at least two would be classified as flocculent on the blue images. In several of the galaxies, bulges with weak oval distortion (~10%) were observed. Dust spirals also continue, in some cases, inside the ILR where the stellar arms terminate. This emphasizes the strong bias of morphological classifications of spiral galaxies based on blue image due to dust and young stars. The 2--armed spirals were systematically found to be wound tighter on I than on K' maps suggesting the existence of a density wave. Locations of the ILR and the 4/1 resonance were estimated based on the arm morphology and the amplitude ratio between the m = 2,4 Fourier components. The wavenumber of the stellar 2--armed pattern is increasing towards the ILR which could suggest that the density wave is associated to the long waved branch of the dispersion relation. A possible scenario is discussed.

  17. Spiral arms in thermally stratified protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Attila; Rosotti, Giovanni P.

    2018-02-01

    Spiral arms have been observed in nearly a dozen protoplanetary discs in near-infrared scattered light and recently also in the submillimetre continuum. While one of the most compelling explanations is that they are driven by planetary or stellar companions, in all but one cases such companions have not yet been detected and there is even ambiguity on whether the planet should be located inside or outside the spirals. Here, we use 3D hydrodynamic simulations to study the morphology of spiral density waves launched by embedded planets taking into account the vertical temperature gradient, a natural consequence of stellar irradiation. Our simulations show that the pitch angle of the spirals in thermally stratified discs is the lowest in the disc mid-plane and increases towards the disc surface. We combine the hydrodynamic simulations with 3D radiative transfer calculations to predict that the pitch angle of planetary spirals observed in the near-infrared is higher than in the submillimetre. We also find that in both cases the spirals converge towards the planet. This provides a new powerful observational method to determine if the perturbing planet is inside or outside the spirals, as well as map the thermal stratification of the disc.

  18. A comparison of GPS solutions for strain and SKS fast directions: Implications for modes of shear in the mantle of a plate boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlie, N.; Stern, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    The strain rate and vertical velocity fields for New Zealand are computed using GPS data from GEONET (NZ) collected during the past decade. Two domains for shear in the mantle are inferred by comparing the principal shortening direction with the fast direction of shear wave splitting. Beneath the central- southern part of the South Island the strains are low and its unclear if irrotational strain is taking place or if the splitting here is dominated by anisotropy in the asthenosphere. In contrast, data for the central and northern South Island suggest simple shear is dominant and distributed over a zone 200 km wide. An analysis of the major strike-slip faults confirms that the strike of the major South Island fault systems makes a 60±15 deg. angle with the shortening direction. A map of the vertical component of GEONET GPS velocities shows regions of surface uplift >5mm/y in both the central South and North Islands. While the pattern of uplift in central South Island is consistent with known geology, the rate of uplift in the central North Island is an order of magnitude higher than the geological rate estimated on a my timescale.

  19. Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Ludwig, Kristin A.

    2017-06-19

    Most of the world’s earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are caused by the continuous motions of the many tectonic plates that make up the Earth’s outer shell. The most powerful of these natural hazards occur in subduction zones, where two plates collide and one is thrust beneath another. The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) “Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide—A USGS Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science” is a blueprint for building the crucial scientific foundation needed to inform the policies and practices that can make our Nation more resilient to subduction zone-related hazards.

  20. INFLUENCE OF CUTTING ZONE COOLING METHOD ON CHIP FORMING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Feldshtein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an influence of a cutting zone cooling method on the chip shape and thickening ratio while turning R35 steel with the hardness of НВ 1250 МРа. Cutting with various types of cooling - dry, compressed air and emulsion fog has been investigated in the paper. OPORTET RG-2 emulsol with emulsion concentration of 4% has been used as an active substation. Cutting tool is a turning cutter with a changeable square plate SNUN120408 made of Р25 hard alloy with multilayer wear-resistant coating, upper titanium nitride layer. Front plate surface is flat. Range of cutting speeds - 80-450 m/min, motions - 0,1-0,5 mm/rev, emulsion flow - 1,5-3,5 g/min and compressed air - 4,5-7,0 m3/h, cutting depth - 1,0 mm. In order to reduce a number of single investigations it is possible to use plans based on ЛПх-sequences.It has been shown that the method for cutting zone cooling exerts significant influence on conditions for chip formation. Regression equation describing influence of machining conditions on Ка-chip thickening ratio has been obtained in the paper. The range of cutting modes is extended while using emulsion fog for cooling. In the process of these modes chip is formed in the shape of short spiral fragments or elements. Favourable form of chips is ensured while using the following rate of emulsion - not more than 2 g/min. The investigations have made it possible to determine conditions required for cooling emulsion fog. In this case it has been observed minimum values in chip thickening ratio and chip shape that ensures its easy removal from cutting zone. While making dry turning values of Ка is higher not less than 15 % in comparison with other methods for cutting zone cooling.

  1. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  2. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe : [Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  3. Magnetic spiral arms in galaxy haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, R. N.

    2017-08-01

    We seek the conditions for a steady mean field galactic dynamo. The parameter set is reduced to those appearing in the α2 and α/ω dynamo, namely velocity amplitudes, and the ratio of sub-scale helicity to diffusivity. The parameters can be allowed to vary on conical spirals. We analyse the mean field dynamo equations in terms of scale invariant logarithmic spiral modes and special exact solutions. Compatible scale invariant gravitational spiral arms are introduced and illustrated in an appendix, but the detailed dynamical interaction with the magnetic field is left for another work. As a result of planar magnetic spirals `lifting' into the halo, multiple sign changes in average rotation measures forming a regular pattern on each side of the galactic minor axis, are predicted. Such changes have recently been detected in the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies-an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) survey.

  4. Cylindrical spirals in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, S; Karpati, G; Robitaille, Y; Melmed, C

    1979-01-01

    Muscle biopsies from two patients revealed that numerous type 2 fibers contained large abnormal areas filled with cylindrical spirals. The cytochemical profile of these cylindrical spirals was sufficiently characteristic that they could be distinguished from tubular aggregates. Their electron microscopic appearance was unmistakable. Their origin and significance are uncertain. The diverse nature of the patients' conditions (cramps and malignancy, and an unusual form of spinocerebellar degeneration) indicate that these abnormal structures are not disease specific.

  5. Wavelet Scattering on the Pitch Spiral

    OpenAIRE

    Lostanlen, Vincent; Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We present a new representation of harmonic sounds that linearizes the dynamics of pitch and spectral envelope, while remaining stable to deformations in the time-frequency plane. It is an instance of the scattering transform, a generic operator which cascades wavelet convolutions and modulus nonlinearities. It is derived from the pitch spiral, in that convolutions are successively performed in time, log-frequency, and octave index. We give a closed-form approximation of spiral scattering coe...

  6. Dark matter in spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albada, T.S. van; Sancisi, R.

    1986-01-01

    Mass models of spiral galaxies based on the observed light distribution, assuming constant M/L for bulge and disc, are able to reproduce the observed rotation curves in the inner regions, but fail to do so increasingly towards and beyond the edge of the visible material. The discrepancy in the outer region can be accounted for by invoking dark matter; some galaxies require at least four times as much dark matter as luminous matter. There is no evidence for a dependence on galaxy luminosity or morphological type. Various arguments support the idea that a distribution of visible matter with constant M/L is responsible for the circular velocity in the inner region, i.e. inside approximately 2.5 disc scalelengths. Luminous matter and dark matter seem to 'conspire' to produce the flat observed rotation curves in the outer region. It seems unlikely that this coupling between disc and halo results from the large-scale gravitational interaction between the two components. Attempts to determine the shape of dark halos have not yet produced convincing results. (author)

  7. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L) J , as a function of (g – i) versus (i – J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  8. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A., E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx, E-mail: martinez@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089 (Mexico)

    2013-03-10

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L){sub J}, as a function of (g - i) versus (i - J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  9. Chiralities of spiral waves and their transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jun-ting; Cai, Mei-chun; Li, Bing-wei; Zhang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    The chiralities of spiral waves usually refer to their rotation directions (the turning orientations of the spiral temporal movements as time elapses) and their curl directions (the winding orientations of the spiral spatial geometrical structures themselves). Traditionally, they are the same as each other. Namely, they are both clockwise or both counterclockwise. Moreover, the chiralities are determined by the topological charges of spiral waves, and thus they are conserved quantities. After the inwardly propagating spirals were experimentally observed, the relationship between the chiralities and the one between the chiralities and the topological charges are no longer preserved. The chiralities thus become more complex than ever before. As a result, there is now a desire to further study them. In this paper, the chiralities and their transition properties for all kinds of spiral waves are systemically studied in the framework of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and the general relationships both between the chiralities and between the chiralities and the topological charges are obtained. The investigation of some other models, such as the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, the nonuniform Oregonator model, the modified standard model, etc., is also discussed for comparison.

  10. Six Decades of Spiral Density Wave Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Frank H.

    2016-09-01

    The theory of spiral density waves had its origin approximately six decades ago in an attempt to reconcile the winding dilemma of material spiral arms in flattened disk galaxies. We begin with the earliest calculations of linear and nonlinear spiral density waves in disk galaxies, in which the hypothesis of quasi-stationary spiral structure (QSSS) plays a central role. The earliest success was the prediction of the nonlinear compression of the interstellar medium and its embedded magnetic field; the earliest failure, seemingly, was not detecting color gradients associated with the migration of OB stars whose formation is triggered downstream from the spiral shock front. We give the reasons for this apparent failure with an update on the current status of the problem of OB star formation, including its relationship to the feathering substructure of galactic spiral arms. Infrared images can show two-armed, grand design spirals, even when the optical and UV images show flocculent structures. We suggest how the nonlinear response of the interstellar gas, coupled with overlapping subharmonic resonances, might introduce chaotic behavior in the dynamics of the interstellar medium and Population I objects, even though the underlying forces to which they are subject are regular. We then move to a discussion of resonantly forced spiral density waves in a planetary ring and their relationship to the ideas of disk truncation, and the shepherding of narrow rings by satellites orbiting nearby. The back reaction of the rings on the satellites led to the prediction of planet migration in protoplanetary disks, which has had widespread application in the exploding data sets concerning hot Jupiters and extrasolar planetary systems. We then return to the issue of global normal modes in the stellar disk of spiral galaxies and its relationship to the QSSS hypothesis, where the central theoretical concepts involve waves with negative and positive surface densities of energy and angular

  11. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension. 1. Introduction. Plate boundaries are the zones where most earth dynamics are focussed. The complexity of tectonic boundaries draws attention to them as the largest earthquakes are felt in these areas and they elicit the natural hazard of ...

  12. Some INDRA experiments on SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cussol, D.; Orr, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    A panel joining members of INDRA collaboration and physicists off collaboration was gathered to debate the question whether the INDRA detector, designed to study multifragmentation with beams of stable nuclei, could be used also in experiments with beams of exotic nuclei. Four experiments were discussed as well as the implied detector modifications. In the frame of experiments with SISSI the study of the multifragmentation as a function of N/Z of the system should answer questions related to the system stability as a function of N/Z and origin of the particles emitted during the collision. Among the experiments with SPIRAL to study de-excitation of hot nuclei the following topics were examined: nuclear stability as a function of N/Z, α-n competition, emission of neutron-rich particles as a function of N/Z, evolution of emission modes near the shell closure. The de-excitation of the resonant excited states through 2p decay will be studied in the following three channels: 1p-1p sequential decay, un-correlated simultaneous 2p emission and correlated simultaneous 2p emission ( 2 He emission). Such experiments were carried out on 6 Be, 12 O and 14 O. The only first two channels were observed so far. The 16 Ne could be a good candidate to observe the third channel. Finally sub-barrier Coulomb fusion experiments were also discussed. Concerning the modifications to be undertaken on INDRA detector two were obvious: a modification at the level of electronics to make possible time-of-flight measurements with silicon detectors and transformations of ionization chambers in Bragg chambers. Simulation studies are under way to test the pertinence and validity of the solution

  13. Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Keel, William C.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4mag for the ugri passbands (estimating 0.3mag of extinction in z band). We split the sample into `bulgy' (early-type) and `discy' (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or fDeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of `bulgy' spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of `discy' spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disc ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with discy spirals at Mr ~ -21.5mag having the most reddening - more than twice as much as both the lowest luminosity and most massive, bulge-dominated spirals. An increase in dust content is well known for more luminous galaxies, but the decrease of the trend for the most luminous has not been observed before and may be related to their lower levels of recent star formation. We compare our results with the latest dust attenuation models of Tuffs et al. We find that the model reproduces the observed trends reasonably well but overpredicts the amount of u-band attenuation in edge-on galaxies. This could be an inadequacy in the Milky Way extinction law (when applied to external galaxies), but more likely indicates the need for a wider range of dust-star geometries. We end by discussing the effects of dust on large galaxy surveys and emphasize that these effects will become important as we push to higher precision measurements of galaxy properties and their clustering. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than

  14. A Dual Role of Upper Zone of Growth Plate and Cartilage Matrix-Associated Protein in Human and Mouse Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Inhibition of Aggrecanases and Promotion of Bone Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michael; Menges, Stefanie; Eitzinger, Nicole; Geßlein, Maria; Botschner, Renate; Wormser, Laura; Distler, Alfiya; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Dietel, Katharina; Distler, Jörg; Beyer, Christian; Gelse, Kolja; Engelke, Klaus; Koenders, Marije I; van den Berg, Wim; von der Mark, Klaus; Schett, Georg

    2017-06-01

    Cartilage damage and subchondral bone changes are closely connected in osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, how these processes are interlinked is, to date, incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanistic role of a cartilage-derived protein, upper zone of growth plate and cartilage matrix-associated protein (UCMA), in osteoarthritis-related cartilage and bone changes. UCMA expression was assessed in healthy and osteoarthritic human and mouse cartilage. For analysis of cartilage and bone changes, osteoarthritis was induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) in wild-type (WT) and Ucma-deficient mice. UCMA-collagen interactions, the effect of UCMA on aggrecanase activity, and the impact of recombinant UCMA on osteoclast differentiation were studied in vitro. UCMA was found to be overexpressed in human and mouse osteoarthritic cartilage. DMM-triggered cartilage changes, including increased structural damage, proteoglycan loss, and chondrocyte cell death, were aggravated in Ucma-deficient mice compared to WT littermates, thereby demonstrating the potential chondroprotective effects of UCMA. Moreover, UCMA inhibited ADAMTS-dependent aggrecanase activity and directly interacted with cartilage-specific collagen types. In contrast, osteoarthritis-related bone changes were significantly reduced in Ucma-deficient mice, showing less pronounced osteophyte formation and subchondral bone sclerosis. Mechanistically, UCMA directly promoted osteoclast differentiation in vitro. UCMA appears to link cartilage with bone changes in osteoarthritis by supporting cartilage integrity as an endogenous inhibitor of aggrecanases while also promoting osteoclastogenesis and subchondral bone turnover. Thus, UCMA represents an important link between cartilage and bone in osteoarthritis. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Spiral CT manifestations of spherical pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohong; Yang Hongwei; Xu Chunmin; Qin Xiu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the Spiral CT manifestations and differential diagnosis of spherical pneumonia. Methods: 18 cases of spherical pneumonia and 20 cases of peripheral pulmonary carcinoma were selected, both of them were confirmed by clinic and/or pathology. The SCT findings of both groups were compared retrospectively. Results: Main spiral CT findings of spherical pneumonia were showed as followings: square or triangular lesions adjacent to pleura; with irregular shape, blurry, slightly lobulated margin, sometimes with halo sign. Small inflammatory patches and intensified vascular markings around the lesions were seen. Lesions became smaller or vanished after short-term anti-inflammatory treatment. Conclusion: Spherical pneumonia showed some characteristics on Spiral CT scan, which are helpful in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this disease. (authors)

  16. Graphite target for the spiral project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Bertrand, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Loiselet, M. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author). 5 refs.

  17. Photometry and mass modeling of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent estimates of the relative contributions of dark and luminous matter to the mass of spiral galaxies are reviewed. In these studies, the galactic mass distribution is modeled on the basis of photometric and kinematic observational data. The accuracy of current photometry is discussed; the three-dimensional structure of spiral galaxies and the techniques used in bulge-disk decomposition are examined; and mass models incorporating rotation curves are presented. The disk mass/luminosity ratios in the red band (corrected for internal extinction) are found to range from 1.6 to 3.2, with no particular radius at which dark matter dominates. 20 references

  18. Archimedean Spiral Antenna Calibration Procedures to Increase the Downrange Resolution of a SFCW Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Nicolaescu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the calibration procedures of an Archimedean spiral antenna used for a stepped frequency continuous wave radar (SFCW, which works from 400 MHz to 4845 MHz. Two procedures are investigated, one based on an error-term flow graph for the frequency signal and the second based on a reference metallic plate located at a certain distance from the ground in order to identify the phase dispersion given by the antenna. In the second case, the received signal is passed in time domain by applying an ifft, the multiple reflections are removed and the phase variation due to the time propagation is subtracted. After phase correction, the time domain response as well as the side lobes level is decreased. The antenna system made up of two Archimedean spirals is employed by SFCW radar that operates with a frequency step of 35 MHz.

  19. Adaptation of the control system in view of SPIRAL integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecorche, E.

    1998-01-01

    As soon as the collaboration between the SPIRAL project and the Control Group has been defined, the first implementation of the SPIRAL control system started following various directions. Both the global hardware and software architectures has been specified and some practical works have been undertaken such as the Ethernet network installation or the first SPIRAL oriented software design and coding. (authors)

  20. The dynamics of the spiral galaxy M81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, H.C.D.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed comparison of the observations of the spiral galaxy M81 with the density-wave theory for tightly-wound spirals is presented. In particular, hydrogen-line observations are compared with the nonlinear density-wave theory for the gas with the aim of constructing a density-wave model for the spiral galaxy M81

  1. Geometric studies on variable radius spiral cone-beam scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Yangbo; Zhu Jiehua; Wang Ge

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to perform geometric studies on cone-beam CT scanning along a three-dimensional (3D) spiral of variable radius. First, the background for variable radius spiral cone-beam scanning is given in the context of electron-beam CT/micro-CT. Then, necessary and sufficient conditions are proved for existence and uniqueness of PI lines inside the variable radius 3D spiral. These results are necessary steps toward exact cone-beam reconstruction from a 3D spiral scan of variable radius, adapting Katsevich's formula for the standard helical cone-beam scanning. It is shown in the paper that when the longitudinally projected planar spiral is not always convex toward the origin, the PI line may not be unique in the envelope defined by the tangents of the spiral. This situation can be avoided by using planar spirals whose curvatures are always positive. Using such a spiral, a longitudinally homogeneous region inside the corresponding 3D spiral is constructed in which any point is passed by one and only one PI line, provided the angle ω between planar spiral's tangent and radius is bounded by vertical bar ω-90 deg. vertical bar ≤ε for some positive ε≤32.48 deg. If the radius varies monotonically, this region is larger and one may allow ε≤51.85 deg. Examples for 3D spirals based on logarithmic and Archimedean spirals are given. The corresponding generalized Tam-Danielsson detection windows are also formulated

  2. A nutrient’s downstream spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indicators of a stream’s ability to remove nutrients provide insights on watershed integrity and stream habitat characteristics that are needed to help managers to restore stream ecosystem services. We used the Tracer Additon Spiraling Characterization Curve (TASCC) to mea...

  3. The Distribution of Mass in Spiral Galaxies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaters, Rob; Andersen, David; Bershady, Matthew; Verheijen, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about the content and distribution of dark matter in spiral galaxies. Mass modeling of any rotation curve can yield an alarming range of results - from entirely halo-dominated, centrally- concentrated dark distributions, to disk-dominated inner potentials with shallow, low density

  4. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1983-01-01

    Correlations between optical surface brightness and the radio properties of spiral galaxies are investigated. It is found that galaxies with high surface brightness are more likely to be strong continuum radio sources and that galaxies with low surface brightness have high 21-cm line emission. (author)

  5. Logarithmic spiral trajectories generated by Solar sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetto, Marco; Niccolai, Lorenzo; Quarta, Alessandro A.; Mengali, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    Analytic solutions to continuous thrust-propelled trajectories are available in a few cases only. An interesting case is offered by the logarithmic spiral, that is, a trajectory characterized by a constant flight path angle and a fixed thrust vector direction in an orbital reference frame. The logarithmic spiral is important from a practical point of view, because it may be passively maintained by a Solar sail-based spacecraft. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic study concerning the possibility of inserting a Solar sail-based spacecraft into a heliocentric logarithmic spiral trajectory without using any impulsive maneuver. The required conditions to be met by the sail in terms of attitude angle, propulsive performance, parking orbit characteristics, and initial position are thoroughly investigated. The closed-form variations of the osculating orbital parameters are analyzed, and the obtained analytical results are used for investigating the phasing maneuver of a Solar sail along an elliptic heliocentric orbit. In this mission scenario, the phasing orbit is composed of two symmetric logarithmic spiral trajectories connected with a coasting arc.

  6. Importance of packing in spiral defect chaos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We develop two measures to characterize the geometry of patterns exhibited by the state of spiral defect chaos, a weakly turbulent regime of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. These describe the packing of contiguous stripes within the pattern by quantifying their length and nearest-neighbor distributions. The distributions ...

  7. High-displacement spiral piezoelectric actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, F.; Kholkin, A. L.; Jadidian, B.; Safari, A.

    1999-10-01

    A high-displacement piezoelectric actuator, employing spiral geometry of a curved piezoelectric strip is described. The monolithic actuators are fabricated using a layered manufacturing technique, fused deposition of ceramics, which is capable of prototyping electroceramic components with complex shapes. The spiral actuators (2-3 cm in diameter) consisted of 4-5 turns of a lead zirconate titanate ceramic strip with an effective length up to 28 cm. The width was varied from 0.9 to 1.75 mm with a height of 3 mm. When driven by the electric field applied across the width of the spiral wall, the tip of the actuator was found to displace in both radial and tangential directions. The tangential displacement of the tip was about 210 μm under the field of 5 kV/cm. Both the displacement and resonant frequency of the spirals could be tailored by changing the effective length and wall width. The blocking force of the actuator in tangential direction was about 1 N under the field of 5 kV/cm. These properties are advantageous for high-displacement low-force applications where bimorph or monomorph actuators are currently employed.

  8. The Spiral Curriculum. Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The Spiral Curriculum is predicated on cognitive theory advanced by Jerome Bruner (1960), who wrote, "We begin with the hypothesis that any subject can be taught in some intellectually honest form to any child at any stage of development." In other words, even the most complex material, if properly structured and presented, can be understood by…

  9. Nobeyama CO Atlas of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, N.; Nakai, N.; Sorai, K.; Sato, N..; Yamauchi, A.; Tosaki, T.; Shioya, Y.; Vila-Vilaró, B.; Nishiyama, K.; Ishihara, Y.; Cepa, J.

    BEARS is a 25-beam focal plane array receiver mounted on the Nobeyama 45-m telescope. The combination of the large dish size of the telescope with the excellent performance of this receiver makes it an ideal tool for mapping observations of extended regions of the sky. We present here one of its current applications in a CO mapping survey of nearby spiral galaxies.

  10. A section of a spiral coal chute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtin, V.N.; Gorodilov, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    A section of a spiral coal chute includes a housing with support brackets. It differs in that to decrease the amount of work necessary for assembly, each support bracket is made with a guide slot and equipped with a pull-out cantilever in the shape of a fork which covers the slot from the lateral sides.

  11. Biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouwenvelder, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems High quality drinking water can be produced with membrane filtration processes like reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Because the global demand for fresh clean water is increasing, these membrane technologies will increase in importance in the

  12. Indonesian Landforms and Plate Tectonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Th. Verstappen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.103The horizontal configuration and vertical dimension of the landforms occurring in the tectonically unstable parts of Indonesia were resulted in the first place from plate tectonics. Most of them date from the Quaternary and endogenous forces are ongoing. Three major plates – the northward moving Indo-Australian Plate, the south-eastward moving SE-Asian Plate and the westward moving Pacific Plate - meet at a plate triple-junction situated in the south of New Guinea’s Bird’s Head. The narrow North-Moluccan plate is interposed between the Asia and Pacific. It tapers out northward in the Philippine Mobile Belt and is gradually disappearing. The greatest relief amplitudes occur near the plate boundaries: deep ocean trenches are associated with subduction zones and mountain ranges with collision belts. The landforms of the more stable areas of the plates date back to a more remote past and, where emerged, have a more subdued relief that is in the first place related to the resistance of the rocks to humid tropical weathering Rising mountain ranges and emerging island arcs are subjected to rapid humid-tropical river erosions and mass movements. The erosion products accumulate in adjacent sedimentary basins where their increasing weight causes subsidence by gravity and isostatic compensations. Living and raised coral reefs, volcanoes, and fault scarps are important geomorphic indicators of active plate tectonics. Compartmental faults may strongly affect island arcs stretching perpendicular to the plate movement. This is the case on Java. Transcurrent faults and related pull-apart basins are a leading factor where plates meet at an angle, such as on Sumatra. The most complicated situation exists near the triple-junction and in the Moluccas. Modern research methods, such as GPS measurements of plate movements and absolute dating of volcanic outbursts and raised coral reefs are important tools. The mega-landforms resulting

  13. SPIRAL2 at GANIL: Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.

    2008-05-01

    To pursue the investigation of a new territory of nuclei with extreme N/Z called ``terra incognita'' several projects, all aiming at the increase by several orders of magnitude of the RIB intensities are now under discussions worldwide. In Europe, two major new projects have been approved recently FAIRatGSI using the so-called ``in-flight'' method and SPIRAL2atGANIL, based on the ISOL method. Both projects were selected in the European Strategic Roadmap For research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The main goal of SPIRAL2 is clearly to extend our knowledge of the limit of existence and the structure of nuclei deeply in the medium and heavy mass region (A = 60 to 140) which is to day an almost unexplored continent. SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting driver LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities for exotic species in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, of the order of 106 to 1010 pps will surpass by two order of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100 μA to 1 mA), heavier ions up to Ar at 14 MeV/n producing also proton rich exotic nuclei. In applied areas SPIRAL2 is considered as a powerful variable energy neutron source, a must to study the impact of nuclear fission and fusion on materials. The intensities of these unstable species are excellent opportunities for new tracers and diagnostics either for solid state, material or for radiobiological science and medicine. The ``Go'' decision has been taken in May 2005. The investments and personnel costs amount to 190 M€, for the construction period 2006-2012. Construction of the SPIRAL2 facility is shared by ten French laboratories and a network of international partners. Under the 7FP program of European Union

  14. Nutrient spiraling in streams and river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Doyle, Martin W.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past 3 decades, nutrient spiraling has become a unifying paradigm for stream biogeochemical research. This paper presents (1) a quantitative synthesis of the nutrient spiraling literature and (2) application of these data to elucidate trends in nutrient spiraling within stream networks. Results are based on 404 individual experiments on ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) from 52 published studies. Sixty-nine percent of the experiments were performed in first- and second-order streams, and 31% were performed in third- to fifth-order streams. Uptake lengths, Sw, of NH4 (median = 86 m) and PO4 (median = 96 m) were significantly different (α = 0.05) than NO3 (median = 236 m). Areal uptake rates of NH4 (median = 28 μg m-2 min-1) were significantly different than NO3 and PO4 (median = 15 and 14 μg m-2 min-1, respectively). There were significant differences among NH4, NO3, and PO4 uptake velocity (median = 5, 1, and 2 mm min-1, respectively). Correlation analysis results were equivocal on the effect of transient storage on nutrient spiraling. Application of these data to a stream network model showed that recycling (defined here as stream length ÷ Sw) of NH4 and NO3 generally increased with stream order, while PO4 recycling remained constant along a first- to fifth-order stream gradient. Within this hypothetical stream network, cumulative NH4 uptake decreased slightly with stream order, while cumulative NO3 and PO4 uptake increased with stream order. These data suggest the importance of larger rivers to nutrient spiraling and the need to consider how stream networks affect nutrient flux between terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

  15. GANIL-SPIRAL2: A new era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, Sydney

    2011-05-01

    GANIL presently offers unique opportunities in nuclear physics and many other fields that arise from not only the provision of low-energy stable beams, fragmentation beams and re-accelerated radioactive species, but also from the availability of a wide range of state-of-the-art spectrometers and instrumentation. A few examples of recent highlights are discussed in the present paper. With the construction of SPIRAL2 over the next few years, GANIL is in a good position to retain its world-leading capability. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more than 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, will surpass by two orders of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100 μA to 1 mA), heavier ions (Ar up to Xe) at maximum energy of 14 MeV/n. Under the 7FP program of European Union called *Preparatory phase*, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4M€ to build up an international consortium around this new venture. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and associated physics instruments in collaboration with EU and International partners will be presented.

  16. Three-dimensional dynamic models of subducting plate-overriding plate-upper mantle interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Clio; Schellart, W. P.

    2013-01-01

    We present fully dynamic generic three-dimensional laboratory models of progressive subduction with an overriding plate and a weak subduction zone interface. Overriding plate thickness (TOP) is varied systematically (in the range 0-2.5 cm scaling to 0-125 km) to investigate its effect on subduction

  17. Spiral analysis-improved clinical utility with center detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, Qiping; Kurtis, Mónica M; Floyd, Alicia G; Smith, Whitney A; Pullman, Seth L

    2008-06-30

    Spiral analysis is a computerized method that measures human motor performance from handwritten Archimedean spirals. It quantifies normal motor activity, and detects early disease as well as dysfunction in patients with movement disorders. The clinical utility of spiral analysis is based on kinematic and dynamic indices derived from the original spiral trace, which must be detected and transformed into mathematical expressions with great precision. Accurately determining the center of the spiral and reducing spurious low frequency noise caused by center selection error is important to the analysis. Handwritten spirals do not all start at the same point, even when marked on paper, and drawing artifacts are not easily filtered without distortion of the spiral data and corruption of the performance indices. In this report, we describe a method for detecting the optimal spiral center and reducing the unwanted drawing artifacts. To demonstrate overall improvement to spiral analysis, we study the impact of the optimal spiral center detection in different frequency domains separately and find that it notably improves the clinical spiral measurement accuracy in low frequency domains.

  18. Hypersonic evanescent waves generated with a planar spiral coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, A C; Araya-Kleinsteuber, B; Sethi, R S; Mehta, H M; Lowe, C R

    2003-09-01

    A planar spiral coil has been used to induce hypersonic evanescent waves in a quartz substrate with the unique ability to focus the acoustic wave down onto the chemical recognition layer. These special sensing conditions were achieved by investigating the application of a radio frequency current to a coaxial waveguide and spiral coil, so that wideband repeating electrical resonance conditions could be established over the MHz to GHz frequency range. At a selected operating frequency of 1.09 GHz, the evanescent wave depth of a quartz crystal hypersonic resonance is reduced to 17 nm, minimising unwanted coupling to the bulk fluid. Verification of the validity of the hypersonic resonance was carried out by characterising the system electrically and acoustically: Impedance calculations of the combined coil and coaxial waveguide demonstrated an excellent fit to the measured data, although above 400 MHz a transition zone was identified where unwanted impedance is parasitic of the coil influence efficiency, so the signal-to-noise ratio is reduced from 3000 to 300. Acoustic quartz crystal resonances at intervals of precisely 13.2138 MHz spacing, from the 6.6 MHz ultrasonic range and onto the desired hypersonic range above 1 GHz, were incrementally detected. Q factor measurements demonstrated that reductions in energy lost from the resonator to the fluid interface were consistent with the anticipated shrinkage of the evanescent wave with increasing operating frequency. Amplitude and frequency reduction in contact with a glucose solution was demonstrated at 1.09 GHz. The complex physical conditions arising at the solid-liquid interface under hypersonic entrainment are discussed with respect to acceleration induced slippage, rupture, longitudinal and shear radiation and multiphase relaxation affects.

  19. Convergent plate margin dynamics : New perspectives from structural geology, geophysics and geodynamic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Rawlinson, N.

    2010-01-01

    Convergent plate margins occur when two adjoining tectonic plates come together to form either a subduction zone, where at least one of the converging plates is oceanic and plunges beneath the other into the mantle, or a collision zone, where two continents or a continent and a magmatic arc collide.

  20. The Role of Spiral Multidetector Dynamic CT in the Study of Williams-Campbell Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scioscio, V. di; Zompatori, M.; Mistura, I.; Montanari, P.; Santilli, L.; Luccaroni, R.; Sverzellati, N. [Medical Univ. of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Policlinic (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-10-15

    Williams-Campbell syndrome is a cystic bronchiectatic disease secondary to deficiency or defect of cartilaginous plates in the wall of the airways. In the literature, two main forms are suggested: congenital and acquired (post-infectious). The most frequent symptoms are represented by recurrent pulmonary infections from childhood. Multislice spiral dynamic CT has a major role in the study of cystic pulmonary disease and in differentiating Williams-Campbell syndrome from the other causes of cystic bronchiectasis, in which even lung function tests can give deceptive results.

  1. Fast spiral-scan atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, I A; Reza Moheimani, S O

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new scanning technique for fast atomic force microscopy. In this method, the sample is scanned in a spiral pattern instead of the well established raster pattern. A spiral scan can be produced by applying single frequency cosine and sine signals with slowly varying amplitudes to the x-axis and y-axis of an atomic force microscope (AFM) scanner respectively. The use of the single tone input signals allows the scanner to move at high speeds without exciting the mechanical resonance of the device and with relatively small control efforts. Experimental results obtained by implementing this technique on a commercial AFM indicate that high-quality images can be generated at scan frequencies well beyond the raster scans.

  2. Spiral optical designs for nonimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Pablo; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.; Vilaplana, Juan; Buljan, Marina

    2011-10-01

    Manufacturing technologies as injection molding or embossing specify their production limits for minimum radii of the vertices or draft angle for demolding, for instance. In some demanding nonimaging applications, these restrictions may limit the system optical efficiency or affect the generation of undesired artifacts on the illumination pattern. A novel manufacturing concept is presented here, in which the optical surfaces are not obtained from the usual revolution symmetry with respect to a central axis (z axis), but they are calculated as free-form surfaces describing a spiral trajectory around z axis. The main advantage of this new concept lies in the manufacturing process: a molded piece can be easily separated from its mold just by applying a combination of rotational movement around axis z and linear movement along axis z, even for negative draft angles. Some of these spiral symmetry examples will be shown here, as well as their simulated results.

  3. Star distribution in the Orion spiral arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basharina, T.S.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.; Filippova, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the Orion spiral arm is studied by numerical experiments, assuming that in each direction considered the star distribution along the line of sight is a combination of two Gaussian laws. The corresponding parameters are evaluated for four Milky Way fields; the bimodal laws now fit the observations by the chi 2 criterion. In the Orion arm the line-of-sight star densities follow asymmetric curves, steeper at the outer edge of the arm

  4. Dark and visible matter in spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persic, M.; Salucci, P.; Durham Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Exploiting relevant information from the profiles of rotation curves, we calculate the dark-to-luminous mass ratio within the disc size for a sample of 43 spiral galaxies. The values we find, while proving the ubiquitous presence of dark matter, vary with luminosity. Faint and bright galaxies are found to be respectively halo- and disc-dominated in the disc regions. The luminosity sequence turns out to be a dark-to-luminous sequence. (author)

  5. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1983-01-01

    It is proposed that Freeman's discovery that the extrapolated central surface brightness of spiral galaxies is approximately constant can be simply explained if the galaxies contain a spheroidal component which dominates the light in their outer isophotes. Calculations of an effective central surface brightness indicate a wide spread of values. This requires either a wide spread in disc properties or significant spheroidal components or, most probably, both. (author)

  6. Spiral-arm instability: giant clump formation via fragmentation of a galactic spiral arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2018-03-01

    Fragmentation of a spiral arm is thought to drive the formation of giant clumps in galaxies. Using linear perturbation analysis for self-gravitating spiral arms, we derive an instability parameter and define the conditions for clump formation. We extend our analysis to multicomponent systems that consist of gas and stars in an external potential. We then perform numerical simulations of isolated disc galaxies with isothermal gas, and compare the results with the prediction of our analytic model. Our model describes accurately the evolution of the spiral arms in our simulations, even when spiral arms dynamically interact with one another. We show that most of the giant clumps formed in the simulated disc galaxies satisfy the instability condition. The clump masses predicted by our model are in agreement with the simulation results, but the growth time-scale of unstable perturbations is overestimated by a factor of a few. We also apply our instability analysis to derive scaling relations of clump properties. The expected scaling relation between the clump size, velocity dispersion, and circular velocity is slightly different from that given by the Toomre instability analyses, but neither is inconsistent with currently available observations. We argue that the spiral-arm instability is a viable formation mechanism of giant clumps in gas-rich disc galaxies.

  7. Incorporating hydrologic variability into nutrient spiraling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Martin W.

    2005-09-01

    Nutrient spiraling describes the path of a nutrient molecule within a stream ecosystem, combining the biochemical cycling processes with the downstream driving force of stream discharge. To date, nutrient spiraling approaches have been hampered by their inability to deal with fluctuating flows, as most studies have characterized nutrient retention within only a small range of discharges near base flow. Here hydrologic variability is incorporated into nutrient spiraling theory by drawing on the fluvial geomorphic concept of effective discharge. The effective discharge for nutrient retention is proposed to be that discharge which, over long periods of time, is responsible for the greatest portion of nutrient retention. A developed analytical model predicts that the effective discharge for nutrient retention will equal the modal discharge for small streams or those with little discharge variability. As modal discharge increases or discharge variability increases, the effective discharge becomes increasingly less than the modal discharge. In addition to the effective discharge, a new metric is proposed, the functionally equivalent discharge, which is the single discharge that will reproduce the magnitude of nutrient retention generated by the full hydrologic frequency distribution when all discharge takes place at that rate. The functionally equivalent discharge was found to be the same as the modal discharge at low hydrologic variability, but increasingly different from the modal discharge at large hydrologic variability. The functionally equivalent discharge provides a simple quantitative means of incorporating hydrologic variability into long-term nutrient budgets.

  8. Frequency wavenumber design of spiral macro fiber composite directional transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Matteo; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    This work is focused on design and testing of a novel class of transducers for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), able to perform directional interrogation of plate-like structures. These transducers leverage guided waves (GWs), and in particular Lamb waves, that have emerged as a very prominent option for assessing the state of a structure during operation. GW-SHM approaches greatly benefit from the use of transducers with controllable directional characteristics, so that selective scanning of a surface can be performed to locate damage, impacts, or cracks. In the concepts that we propose, continuous beam steering and directional actuation are achieved through proper selection of the excitation frequency. The design procedure takes advantage of the wavenumber representation of the device, and formulates the problem using a Fourier-based approach. The active layer of the transducer is made of piezoelectric fibers embedded into an epoxy matrix, allowing the device to be flexible, and thus suitable for application on non{ at surfaces. Proper shaping of the electrodes pattern through a compensation function allows taking into account the anisotropy level introduced by the active layer. The resulting spiral frequency steerable acoustic actuator is a configuration that features (i) enhanced performance, (ii) reduced complexity, and (iii) reduced hardware requirements of such devices.

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pacific Islanders American Indian/Alaska Native Programs Older Adults Family Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs EXPO ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ...

  10. Florida: A Jurassic transform plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitgord, Kim D.; Popenoe, Peter; Schouten, Hans

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic, gravity, seismic, and deep drill hole data integrated with plate tectonic reconstructions substantiate the existence of a transform plate boundary across southern Florida during the Jurassic. On the basis of this integrated suite of data the pre-Cretaceous Florida-Bahamas region can be divided into the pre-Jurassic North American plate, Jurassic marginal rift basins, and a broad Jurassic transform zone including stranded blocks of pre-Mesozoic continental crust. Major tectonic units include the Suwannee basin in northern Florida containing Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, a central Florida basement complex of Paleozoic age crystalline rock, the west Florida platform composed of stranded blocks of continental crust, the south Georgia rift containing Triassic sedimentary rocks which overlie block-faulted Suwannee basin sedimentary rocks, the Late Triassic-Jurassic age Apalachicola rift basin, and the Jurassic age south Florida, Bahamas, and Blake Plateau marginal rift basins. The major tectonic units are bounded by basement hinge zones and fracture zones (FZ). The basement hinge zone represents the block-faulted edge of the North American plate, separating Paleozoic and older crustal rocks from Jurassic rifted crust beneath the marginal basins. Fracture zones separate Mesozoic marginal sedimentary basins and include the Blake Spur FZ, Jacksonville FZ, Bahamas FZ, and Cuba FZ, bounding the Blake Plateau, Bahamas, south Florida, and southeastern Gulf of Mexico basins. The Bahamas FZ is the most important of all these features because its northwest extension coincides with the Gulf basin marginal fault zone, forming the southern edge of the North American plate during the Jurassic. The limited space between the North American and the South American/African plates requires that the Jurassic transform zone, connecting the Central Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico spreading systems, was located between the Bahamas and Cuba FZ's in the region of southern Florida. Our

  11. Ablation acceleration of macroparticle in spiral magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1981-05-01

    The rocket motion of macroparticles heated by energetic pulses in a spiral magnetic field was studied. The purpose of the present work is to study the ablation acceleration of a macroparticle in a spiral magnetic field with the help of the law of conservation of angular momentum. The basic equation of motion of ablatively accelerated projectile in a spiral magnetic field was derived. Any rocket which is ejecting fully ionized plasma in an intense magnetic field with rotational transform is able to have spin by the law of conservation of momentum. The effect of spiral magnetic field on macroparticle acceleration is discussed. The necessary mass ratio increase exponentially with respect to the field parameter. The spiral field should be employed with care to have only to stabilize the position of macroparticles. As conclusion, it can be said that the ablation acceleration of the projectile in a spiral field can give the accelerated body spin quite easily. (Kato, T.)

  12. Mechanical response of spiral interconnect arrays for highly stretchable electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Qaiser, Nadeem

    2017-11-21

    A spiral interconnect array is a commonly used architecture for stretchable electronics, which accommodates large deformations during stretching. Here, we show the effect of different geometrical morphologies on the deformation behavior of the spiral island network. We use numerical modeling to calculate the stresses and strains in the spiral interconnects under the prescribed displacement of 1000 μm. Our result shows that spiral arm elongation depends on the angular position of that particular spiral in the array. We also introduce the concept of a unit-cell, which fairly replicates the deformation mechanism for full complex hexagon, diamond, and square shaped arrays. The spiral interconnects which are axially connected between displaced and fixed islands attain higher stretchability and thus experience the maximum deformations. We perform tensile testing of 3D printed replica and find that experimental observations corroborate with theoretical study.

  13. Wave-particle dualism of spiral waves dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktasheva, I V; Biktashev, V N

    2003-02-01

    We demonstrate and explain a wave-particle dualism of such classical macroscopic phenomena as spiral waves in active media. That means although spiral waves appear as nonlocal processes involving the whole medium, they respond to small perturbations as effectively localized entities. The dualism appears as an emergent property of a nonlinear field and is mathematically expressed in terms of the spiral waves response functions, which are essentially nonzero only in the vicinity of the spiral wave core. Knowledge of the response functions allows quantitatively accurate prediction of the spiral wave drift due to small perturbations of any nature, which makes them as fundamental characteristics for spiral waves as mass is for the condensed matter.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of breathers in the spiral structures of magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, V. V., E-mail: kiselev@imp.uran.ru; Raskovalov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The structure and properties of pulsating solitons (breathers) in the spiral structures of magnets are analyzed within the sine-Gordon model. The breather core pulsations are shown to be accompanied by local shifts and oscillations of the spiral structure with the formation of “precursors” and “tails” in the moving soliton. The possibilities for the observation and excitation of breathers in the spiral structures of magnets and multiferroics are discussed.

  15. Cochlea and other spiral forms in nature and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stanković, Predrag; Štrbac, Mile; Tomić, Irina; Ćetković, Mila

    2012-01-01

    The original appearance of the cochlea and the specific shape of a spiral are interesting for both the scientists and artists. Yet, a correlation between the cochlea and the spiral forms in nature and art has been very rarely mentioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible correlation between the cochlea and the other spiral objects in nature, as well as the artistic presentation of the spiral forms. We explored data related to many natural objects and examined 13,625 artworks created by 2049 artists. We also dissected 2 human cochleas and prepared histologic slices of a rat cochlea. The cochlea is a spiral, cone-shaped osseous structure that resembles certain other spiral forms in nature. It was noticed that parts of some plants are arranged in a spiral manner, often according to Fibonacci numbers. Certain animals, their parts, or their products also represent various types of spirals. Many of them, including the cochlea, belong to the logarithmic type. Nature created spiral forms in the living world to pack a larger number of structures in a limited space and also to improve their function. Because the cochlea and other spiral forms have a certain aesthetic value, many artists presented them in their works of art. There is a mathematical and geometric correlation between the cochlea and natural spiral objects, and the same functional reason for their formation. The artists' imagery added a new aspect to those domains. Obviously, the creativity of nature and Homo sapiens has no limits--like the infinite distal part of the spiral. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. SPIRAL2 Week 2012 - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staley, F.; Jacquemet, M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Bertrand, P.; Tuske, O.; Caruso, A.; Leyge, J.F.; Perrot, L.; Di Giacomo, M.; Ausset, P.; Moscatello, M.H.; Savalle, A.; Rannou, B.; Lambert, M.; Petit, E.; Hulin, X.; Barre-Boscher, N.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.; Tecchio, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the 5. edition of the SPIRAL2 Week is to present and discuss the current status of the SPIRAL2 project in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. The program of the meeting will include presentations on scientific and technical developments related to the baseline project, experiments and theory. The main topics to be discussed at the conference are: -) physics and detectors at SPIRAL2, -) driver accelerators, -) production of radioactive ion beams (RIB), -) safety, -) buildings and infrastructure, -) RIB facilities worldwide, and -) SPIRAL2 preparatory phase. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  17. Algorithms for computing efficient, electric-propulsion, spiralling trajectories

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop techniques for rapidly designing many-revolution, electric-propulsion, spiralling trajectories, including the effects of shadowing, gravity harmonics, and...

  18. Self-regulated model of galactic spiral structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartin, Daniel; Khanna, Gaurav

    2002-01-01

    The presence of spiral structure in isolated galaxies is a problem that has only been partially explained by theoretical models. Because the rate and pattern of star formation in the disk must depend only on mechanisms internal to the disk, we may think of the spiral galaxy as a self-regulated system far from equilibrium. This paper uses this idea to look at a reaction-diffusion model for the formation of spiral structures in certain types of galaxies. In numerical runs of the model, spiral structure forms and persists over several revolutions of the disk, but eventually dies out.

  19. Spread of the spiraling white fly Aleurodicus dispersus (Homoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spread of the spiraling white fly Aleurodicus dispersus (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and its parasitoids Encarcia species (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) on horticultural plants in Northwest and Central Nigeria.

  20. Topological Signatures in the Electronic Structure of Graphene Spirals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avdoshenko, Stas.M.; Koskinen, Pekka; Sevincli, Haldun

    2013-01-01

    and graphene systems. Here, we introduce topologically distinct graphene forms - graphene spirals - and employ density-functional theory to investigate their geometric and electronic properties. We found that the spiral topology gives rise to an intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit splitting. Through a Hamiltonian...... constrained by space curvature, graphene spirals have topologically protected states due to time-reversal symmetry. In addition, we argue that the synthesis of such graphene spirals is feasible and can be achieved through advanced bottom-up experimental routes that we indicate in this work....

  1. Delamination, upper plate extension, and plate margin complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kosuke; Gerya, Taras; Willett, Sean

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the syn- and post-subduction margin evolution with respect to extension, lithospheric removal, and magmatic and topographic consequences by employing 3D geodynamic models. In all experiments, regions of extended partial melting are overlain by up to 3 km high plateaus. There is complex geometric entanglement between upper mantle, partially molten rocks, and lithosphere, which is thermally eroded, over hundreds of kilometers across the plate contact. A complex lithosphere-asthenosphere-boundary features elongated anomalies at scales of few tens to hundred kilometers. First-order, synthetic seismic anomaly patterns, based on thermodynamic velocities which are tabulated for model p,T conditions, are accordingly complex. Passive margin geometry variations in the lower plate effect consistent and inherited differences in dynamic evolution. Promontories along the margin tend to trigger three stages of evolution: 1) a magmatic arc; 2) a lower plate, eduction-like exhumation of buried continental crust in domal patterns of few tens of km wavelength; and subsequently, 3) the formation of extended zones on the upper plate which lack a lithospheric mantle, undergo partial extension, and feature lower crustal melting. Slab break-off is consistently favoured in locations where the lower plate margin is relatively recessed. Concerning the classical removal mechanisms, transitions and co-evolution between delamination, convective thinning, and upper-plate extension are gradual and these modes are not mutually exclusive. Almost complete mixed-mode removal and extension can be compared to the Aegean. Slab window formation by margin geometry variation produces characteristic uplift patterns that are comparable to the Apennines, where higher uplift rates could be a consequence of incipient necking of the slab below central Calabria.

  2. Numerical investigation of unsteady detonation waves in combustion chamber using Shchelkin spirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Repaka Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available : Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE is considered to be a propulsive system of future air vehicles. The main objective is to minimizing the Deflagration to Detonation transition run-up distance and time by placing Shchelkin spiral with varying pitch length. Here we have considered blockage-area ratio is 0.5 as optimal value from review of previous studies. In the present study the detonation initiation and propagation is modeled numerically using commercial CFD codes GAMBIT and FLUENT. The unsteady and two-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equation is used to simulate the model. Fuel-air mixture of Hydrogen-air is used for better efficiency of PDE. It is very simple straight tube with Shchelkin spirals, one of the methods which is used to initiate detonation is creation of high pressure and temperature chamber region with 0.5cm from closed end of tube where shock will generate and transition into low pressure and temperature region propagates towards end of the tube. Two different zones namely high and low pressure zones are used as interface in modeling and patching has been used to fill the zones with hydrogen and oxygen with different pressure and temperatures hence shock leads to propagate inside the combustion chamber.

  3. Virtual bronchoscopy based on spiral CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Haubner, Michael; Krapichler, Christian; Schuhmann, Dietrich; Seemann, Mark; Fuerst, H.; Reiser, Maximilian

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: To improve the diagnosis of pathologic modified airways, a visualization system has been developed and tested based on the techniques of digital image analysis, synthesis of spiral CT and the visualization by methods of virtual reality. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with pathologic modifications of the airways (tumors, obstructions) were examined with Spiral-CT. The three-dimensional shape of the airways and the lung tissue is defined by a semiautomatic volume growing method and a following geometric surface reconstruction. This is the basis of a multidimensional display system which visualizes volumes, surfaces and computation results simultaneously. To enable the intuitive and immersive inspection of the airways a virtual reality system, consisting of two graphic engines, a head mounted display system, data gloves and specialized software was integrated. Results: In 20 cases the extension of the pathologic modification of the airways could be visualized with the virtual bronchoscopy. The user interacts with and manipulates the 3D model of the airways in an intuitive and immersive way. In contrast to previously proposed virtual bronchoscopy systems the described method permits truly interactive navigation and detailed exploration of anatomic structures. The system enables a user oriented and fast inspection of the volumetric image data. Conclusion: To support radiological diagnosis with additional information in an easy to use and fast way a virtual bronchoscopy system was developed. It enables the immersive and intuitive interaction with 3D Spiral CTs by truly 3D navigation within the airway system. The complex anatomy of the central tracheobronchial system could be clearly visualized. Peripheral bronchi are displayed up to 5th degree.

  4. An updated digital model of plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Peter

    2003-03-01

    A global set of present plate boundaries on the Earth is presented in digital form. Most come from sources in the literature. A few boundaries are newly interpreted from topography, volcanism, and/or seismicity, taking into account relative plate velocities from magnetic anomalies, moment tensor solutions, and/or geodesy. In addition to the 14 large plates whose motion was described by the NUVEL-1A poles (Africa, Antarctica, Arabia, Australia, Caribbean, Cocos, Eurasia, India, Juan de Fuca, Nazca, North America, Pacific, Philippine Sea, South America), model PB2002 includes 38 small plates (Okhotsk, Amur, Yangtze, Okinawa, Sunda, Burma, Molucca Sea, Banda Sea, Timor, Birds Head, Maoke, Caroline, Mariana, North Bismarck, Manus, South Bismarck, Solomon Sea, Woodlark, New Hebrides, Conway Reef, Balmoral Reef, Futuna, Niuafo'ou, Tonga, Kermadec, Rivera, Galapagos, Easter, Juan Fernandez, Panama, North Andes, Altiplano, Shetland, Scotia, Sandwich, Aegean Sea, Anatolia, Somalia), for a total of 52 plates. No attempt is made to divide the Alps-Persia-Tibet mountain belt, the Philippine Islands, the Peruvian Andes, the Sierras Pampeanas, or the California-Nevada zone of dextral transtension into plates; instead, they are designated as "orogens" in which this plate model is not expected to be accurate. The cumulative-number/area distribution for this model follows a power law for plates with areas between 0.002 and 1 steradian. Departure from this scaling at the small-plate end suggests that future work is very likely to define more very small plates within the orogens. The model is presented in four digital files: a set of plate boundary segments; a set of plate outlines; a set of outlines of the orogens; and a table of characteristics of each digitization step along plate boundaries, including estimated relative velocity vector and classification into one of 7 types (continental convergence zone, continental transform fault, continental rift, oceanic spreading ridge

  5. Production and post acceleration scheme for spiral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibet, D.

    2001-01-01

    SPIRAL, the R.I.B. facility of GANIL uses heavy ion beams to produce radioactive atoms inside a thick target. Atoms are ionised in a compact permanent magnet ECR ion source. The compact cyclotron CIME accelerates the radioactive ions in an energy range from 1.7 to 25 MeV/u. The cyclotron acts as a mass separator with resolving power of 2500. Plastic scintillator and silicon detectors are used to tune the machine at a very low intensity. An overview of the facility, stable beam tests results and the R and D program will be presented. (authors)

  6. Controls and automation in the SPIRAL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bothner, U.; Boulot, A.; Maherault, J.; Martial, L.

    1999-01-01

    The control and automation team of the R and D of Accelerator-Exotic Beam Department has had in the framework of SPIRAL collaboration the following tasks: 1. automation of the resonator high frequency equipment of the CIME cyclotron; 2. automation of the vacuum equipment, i.e. the low energy line (TBE), the CIME cyclotron, the low energy line (BE); 3. automation of load safety for power supply; 4. for each of these tasks a circuitry file based on the SCHEMA software has been worked out. The programs required in the automation of load safety for power supply (STEP5, PROTOOL, DESIGNER 4.1) were developed and implemented for PC

  7. Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies star

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Keel, William C.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24 276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4 mag for the ugri passbands (estimating 0.3 mag of extinction in z band). We split the sample into ‘bulgy’ (early-type) and ‘discy’ (late-typ...

  8. Toward a transport-based analysis of nutrient spiraling and uptake in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient addition experiments are designed to study the cycling of nutrients in stream ecosystems where hydrologic and nonhydrologic processes determine nutrient fate. Because of the importance of hydrologic processes in stream ecosystems, a conceptual model known as nutrient spiraling is frequently employed. A central part of the nutrient spiraling approach is the determination of uptake length (SW), the average distance traveled by dissolved nutrients in the water column before uptake. Although the nutrient spiraling concept has been an invaluable tool in stream ecology, the current practice of estimating uptake length from steady-state nutrient data using linear regression (called here the "SW approach") presents a number of limitations. These limitations are identified by comparing the exponential SW equation with analytical solutions of a stream solute transport model. This comparison indicates that (1) SW, is an aggregate measure of uptake that does not distinguish between main channel and storage zone processes, (2) SW, is an integrated measure of numerous hydrologie and nonhydrologic processes-this process integration may lead to difficulties in interpretation when comparing estimates of SW, and (3) estimates of uptake velocity and areal uptake rate (Vf and U) based on S W, are not independent of system hydrology. Given these findings, a transport-based approach to nutrient spiraling is presented for steady-state and time-series data sets. The transport-based approach for time-series data sets is suggested for future research on nutrient uptake as it provides a number of benefits, including the ability to (1) separately quantify main channel and storage zone uptake, (2) quantify specific hydrologic and nonhydrologic processes using various model parameters (process separation), (3) estimate uptake velocities and areal uptake rates that are independent of hydrologic effects, and (4) use short-term, non-plateau nutrient additions such that the effects of

  9. 2D array based on fermat spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, O.; Martín, C. J.; Godoy, G.; Ullate, L. G.

    2010-01-01

    The main challenge faced by 3D ultrasonic imaging with 2D array transducer is the large number of elements required to achieve an acceptable level of quality in the images. Therefore, the optimization of the array layout to reduce the number of active elements in the aperture has been a research topic in the last years. Nowadays, CMUT array technology has made viable the production of 2D arrays with larger flexibility on elements size, shape and position. This is opening new options in 2D array design, allowing to revise as viable alternatives others layouts that had been studied in the past, like circular and Archimedes spiral layout. In this work the problem of designing an imaging system array with a diameter of 60 λ and a limited number of elements using the Fermat spiral layout has been studied. This study has been done for two different numbers of electronic channels (N = 128 and N = 256). As summary, a general discussion of the results and the most interesting cases are presented.

  10. Spiral-shaped reactor for water disinfection

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane

    2016-04-20

    Chlorine-based processes are still widely used for water disinfection. The disinfection process for municipal water consumption is usually carried out in large tanks, specifically designed to verify several hydraulic and disinfection criteria. The hydrodynamic behavior of contact tanks of different shapes, each with an approximate total volume of 50,000 m3, was analyzed by solving turbulent momentum transport equations with a computational fluid dynamics code, namely ANSYS fluent. Numerical experiments of a tracer pulse were performed for each design to generate flow through curves and investigate species residence time distribution for different inlet flow rates, ranging from 3 to 12 m3 s−1. A new nature-inspired Conch tank design whose shape follows an Archimedean spiral was then developed. The spiral design is shown to strongly outperform the other tanks’ designs for all the selected plug flow criteria with an enhancement in efficiency, less short circuiting, and an order of magnitude improvement in mixing and dispersion. Moreover, following the intensification philosophy, after 50% reduction in its size, the new design retains its properties and still gives far better results than the classical shapes.

  11. A phenomenological theory for polarization flop in spiral multiferroic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    driven polarization flop in TbMnO3. The Néel wall-like magnetic structure in spiral multiferroics induces a space-dependent internal magnetic field which exerts a torque on spins to rotate bc-spiral to abspiral. The external magnetic field is argued ...

  12. A phenomenological theory for polarization flop in spiral multiferroic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a space-dependent internal magnetic field which exerts a torque on spins to rotate bc-spiral to ab- spiral. The external ... Fv; 75.85.+t. Electric control of magnetization and magnetic control of polarization have been long ... divergence of magnetization, an internal field is induced which has important physical. Figure 1. ab ...

  13. On galaxy spiral arms' nature as revealed by rotation frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roca-Fabrega, Santi; Valenzuela, Octavio; Figueras, Francesca; Romero-Gomez, Merce; Velazquez, Hector; Antoja Castelltort, Teresa; Pichardo, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution N-body simulations using different codes and initial condition techniques reveal two different behaviours for the rotation frequency of transient spiral arms like structures. Whereas unbarred discs present spiral arms nearly corotating with disc particles, strong barred models

  14. Star formation and the surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    The (blue) surface brightness of spiral galaxies is significantly correlated with their Hα linewidth. This can be most plausibly interpreted as a correlation of surface brightness with star formation rate. There is also a significant difference in surface brightness between galaxies forming stars in a grand design spiral pattern and those with floc star formation regions. (author)

  15. Up the Down Spiral with English: Guidelines, Project Insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catholic Board of Education, Diocese of Cleveland, OH.

    This curriculum guide presents the philosophy, objectives, and processes which unify a student-centered English program based on Jerome Bruner's concept of the spiral curriculum. To illustrate the spiraling of the learning process (i.e., engagement, perception, interpretation, evaluation, and personal integration), the theme of "hero" is traced…

  16. The cold interstellar medium - An HI view of spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancisi, R; Bender, R; Davies, RL

    1996-01-01

    An HI view of spiral galaxies is presented. In the first part the standard picture of isolated, normal spiral galaxies is briefly reviewed. In the second part attention is drawn to all those phenomena, such as tidal interactions, accretion and mergers, that depend on the galaxy environment and seem

  17. Analysis of Biaxially Stressed Bridge Deck Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Bondum, Tommi Højer

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate state analysis of bridge deck plates at the intersection zone between main girders and transverse beams is complicated by biaxial membrane stresses, which may be in compression or tension in either direction depending on the bridge configuration and the specific location. This paper...

  18. Topographic Beta Spiral and Onshore Intrusion of the Kuroshio Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, De-Zhou; Huang, Rui Xin; Yin, Bao-shu; Feng, Xing-Ru; Chen, Hai-ying; Qi, Ji-Feng; Xu, Ling-jing; Shi, Yun-long; Cui, Xuan; Gao, Guan-Dong; Benthuysen, Jessica A.

    2018-01-01

    The Kuroshio intrusion plays a vitally important role in carrying nutrients to marginal seas. However, the key mechanism leading to the Kuroshio intrusion remains unclear. In this study we postulate a mechanism: when the Kuroshio runs onto steep topography northeast of Taiwan, the strong inertia gives rise to upwelling over topography, leading to a left-hand spiral in the stratified ocean. This is called the topographic beta spiral, which is a major player regulating the Kuroshio intrusion; this spiral can be inferred from hydrographic surveys. In the world oceans, the topographic beta spirals can be induced by upwelling generated by strong currents running onto steep topography. This is a vital mechanism regulating onshore intruding flow and the cross-shelf transport of energy and nutrients from the Kuroshio Current to the East China Sea. This topographic beta spiral reveals a long-term missing link between the oceanic general circulation theory and shelf dynamic theory.

  19. Spatial and mass distributions of molecular clouds and spiral structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, J.; Valdes, F.; National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ)

    1987-01-01

    The growth of molecular clouds resulting from cloud-cloud collisions and coalescence in the Galactic ring between 4 and 8 kpc are modeled, taking into account the presence of a spiral potential and the mutual cloud-cloud gravitational attraction. The mean lifetime of molecular clouds is determined to be about 200 million years. The clouds are present in both spiral arm and interarm regions, but a spiral pattern in their spatial distribution is clearly discernible, with the more massive clouds showing a stronger correlation with the spiral arms. As viewed from within the Galactic disk, however, it is very difficult to ascertain that the molecular cloud distribution in longitude-velocity space has a spiral pattern. 19 references

  20. Some statistical properties of spiral galaxies along the Hubble sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Jun-liang; Zhang, Fei-peng; Peng, Qiu-he

    A statistical study has been made for the variations along the Hubble sequence, os such parameters as the degree of tightness of winding of spiral arm λ, the pitch angle μ, the flatness of the disk H/ D25 and the thickness H along the Hubble sequence for 365 spiral galaxies published in A&Ap Supplement Series. The mean values of these quantities for the various Hubble types have been obtained for the first time. The results of the statistics show clearly 1) that the Hubble classification of spiral galaxies is one which has only a qualitative and statistical significance, and 2) that the dispersion relation in the density wave theory is valid for most spiral galaxies, i.e., the arms of most spiral galaxies satisfy the requirements of being tightly wound.

  1. The Effects of Spiral Taping Treatment on Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jae-Ok

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate the effects of spiral taping treatment on low back pain. Methods : 420 low back pain patients were treated with spiral taping or spiral taping plus herbal medicine, and no other treatments such as acupuncture, herbal acupuncture, and chiropractic therapy were added. We evaluated the improvement by physical examination and pain. Results : 364 patients felt no pain or inconvenience of daily life and 43 patients showed improvement of pain or symptom after 1 month of treatment. 13 patients showed same pain with before treatment. Conclusions : These results suggest spiral taping treatments contribute to the improvement of low back pain. Further study is needed for the confirmation of this effect of spiral taping treatments on low back pain.

  2. Imaging of head and neck tumors -- methods: CT, spiral-CT, multislice-spiral-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Ulrich E-mail: baum@idr.med.uni-erlangen.de; Greess, Holger; Lell, Michael; Noemayr, Anton; Lenz, Martin

    2000-03-01

    Spiral-CT is standard for imaging neck tumors. In correspondence with other groups we routinely use spiral-CT with thin slices (3 mm), a pitch of 1.3-1.5 and an overlapping reconstruction increment (2-3 mm). In patients with dental fillings a short additional spiral parallel to the corpus of the mandible reduces artifacts behind the dental arches and improves the diagnostic value of CT. For the assessment of the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the palate and paranasal sinuses an additional examination in the coronal plane is helpful. Secondary coronal reconstructions of axial scans are helpful in the evaluation of the crossing of the midline by small tumors of the tongue base or palate. For an optimal vascular or tissue contrast a sufficient volume of contrast medium and a start delay greater than 70-80 s are necessary. In our opinion the best results can be achieved with a volume of 150 ml, a flow of 2.5 ml/s and a start delay of 80 s. Dynamic enhanced CT is only necessary in some special cases. There is clear indication for dynamic enhanced CT where a glomus tumor is suspected. Additional functional CT imaging during i-phonation and/or Valsalva's maneuver are of great importance to prove vocal cords mobility. Therefore, imaging during i-phonation is an elemental part of every thorough examination of the hypopharynx and larynx region. Multislice-spiral-CT allows almost isotropic imaging of the head and neck region and improves the assessment of tumor spread and lymph node metastases in arbitrary oblique planes. Thin structures (the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the hard palate) as well as the floor of the mouth can be evaluated sufficiently with multiplanar reformations. Usually, additional coronal scanning is not necessary with multislice-spiral-CT. Multislice-spiral-CT is especially advantageous in defining the critical relationships of tumor and lymph node metastases and for functional imaging of the hypopharynx and larynx not only in the

  3. Imaging of head and neck tumors -- methods: CT, spiral-CT, multislice-spiral-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Ulrich; Greess, Holger; Lell, Michael; Noemayr, Anton; Lenz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Spiral-CT is standard for imaging neck tumors. In correspondence with other groups we routinely use spiral-CT with thin slices (3 mm), a pitch of 1.3-1.5 and an overlapping reconstruction increment (2-3 mm). In patients with dental fillings a short additional spiral parallel to the corpus of the mandible reduces artifacts behind the dental arches and improves the diagnostic value of CT. For the assessment of the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the palate and paranasal sinuses an additional examination in the coronal plane is helpful. Secondary coronal reconstructions of axial scans are helpful in the evaluation of the crossing of the midline by small tumors of the tongue base or palate. For an optimal vascular or tissue contrast a sufficient volume of contrast medium and a start delay greater than 70-80 s are necessary. In our opinion the best results can be achieved with a volume of 150 ml, a flow of 2.5 ml/s and a start delay of 80 s. Dynamic enhanced CT is only necessary in some special cases. There is clear indication for dynamic enhanced CT where a glomus tumor is suspected. Additional functional CT imaging during i-phonation and/or Valsalva's maneuver are of great importance to prove vocal cords mobility. Therefore, imaging during i-phonation is an elemental part of every thorough examination of the hypopharynx and larynx region. Multislice-spiral-CT allows almost isotropic imaging of the head and neck region and improves the assessment of tumor spread and lymph node metastases in arbitrary oblique planes. Thin structures (the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the hard palate) as well as the floor of the mouth can be evaluated sufficiently with multiplanar reformations. Usually, additional coronal scanning is not necessary with multislice-spiral-CT. Multislice-spiral-CT is especially advantageous in defining the critical relationships of tumor and lymph node metastases and for functional imaging of the hypopharynx and larynx not only in the

  4. MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

    2013-12-01

    MACMA (Multi-Agent Convective MAntle) is a tool developed to simulate evolutive plate tectonics and mantle convection in a 2-D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012). The model relies mainly on a force balance to compute the velocity of each plate, and on empirical rules to determine how plate boundaries move and evolve. It includes first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. The MACMA interface was designed to be user-friendly and a simple use of the simulator can be achieved without any prerequisite knowledge in fluid dynamics, mantle rheology, nor in numerical methods. As a preliminary study, the simulator was used by a few students from bachelor's degree to master's degree levels. An initial configuration for plate tectonics has to be created before starting a simulation: the number and types of plate boundaries (ridge, subduction, passive margins) has to be defined and seafloor ages must be given. A simple but interesting exercise consists in letting students build such an initial configuration: they must analyze a map of tectonic plates, choose a 2-D section and examine carefully a map of seafloor ages. Students mentioned that the exercise made them realize that the 3-D spherical structure of plate tectonics does not translate directly in a simple 2-D section, as opposed to what is usually shown in books. Physical parameters: e.g. mantle viscosity, number of layers to consider in the mantle (upper and lower mantle, possible asthenosphere), initial time and mantle temperature, have to be chosen, and students can use this virtual lab to see how different scenarios emerge when parameters are varied. Very importantly, the direct visualization of the mobility of plate

  5. A Method to Automate Identification of Spiral Arms in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Christina K.; Mercer, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present our preliminary results in identifying the spiral arms of NGC 6946 using a nearest-neighbors analysis. NGC 6946 is grand design spiral galaxy with well-defined arms. The spiral arms were previously identified in an Hα image and traced out by Matonick, D. et al., ApJS, 113, 333, (1997) by visual inspection. We want to develop a computer algorithm that will identify the spiral arms automatically. Once the spiral arms have been found digitally, we can use this information to compare the spiral arms with the locations of compact objects such as supernova remnants and perform statistical tests, for example, to determine if the supernova remnants are associated with the spiral arms. We are using the publicly available program PyFITS, a development project of the Science Software Branch at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) that is available for software download from STScI, to perform a computer-based image analysis. We have written python macros that interact with the already written image manipulation and display features of PyFITS to perform the image analysis and implement a nearest-neighbors algorithm to identify and link the centers of the high emission regions from the spiral arm regions. Our code currently identifies the centers of the high emission regions, but more work is needed to link up these sites and draw out the spiral arms. Future work includes improving the code to better identify spiral arms and converting the code to work on the Astropy, a community-developed core Python package for Astronomy (Robitaille, T. P., et al. A&A 558, A33, 2013).

  6. Electromagnetic, flow and thermal study of a miniature planar spiral transformer with planar, spiral windings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. DUMITRU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mathematical modeling and numerical simulation results for a miniature, planar, spiral transformer (MPST fabricated in micro-electromechanical MEMS technology. When the MPST is magnetic nanofluid cored, magnetization body forces occur, entraining it into a complex flow. This particular MPST design is then compared with other competing solutions concerning the lumped (circuit parameters. Finally, the heat transfer problem is solved for different electromagnetic working conditions to assess the thermal loads inside the MPST.

  7. Spiral model pilot project information model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was an evaluation of the Spiral Model (SM) development approach to allow NASA Marshall to develop an experience base of that software management methodology. A discussion is presented of the Information Model (IM) that was used as part of the SM methodology. A key concept of the SM is the establishment of an IM to be used by management to track the progress of a project. The IM is the set of metrics that is to be measured and reported throughout the life of the project. These metrics measure both the product and the process to ensure the quality of the final delivery item and to ensure the project met programmatic guidelines. The beauty of the SM, along with the IM, is the ability to measure not only the correctness of the specification and implementation of the requirements but to also obtain a measure of customer satisfaction.

  8. Paleomagnetic evidence for vertical-axis rotations of crustal blocks in the Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea: Miocene to present-day kinematics in one of the world's most rapidly extending plate boundary zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Elizabeth A.; Little, Timothy A.; Turner, Gillian M.; Wallace, Laura M.; Ellis, Susan

    2015-07-01

    The continental Woodlark Rift, in SE Papua New Guinea lies west of a propagating oceanic spreading center in the Woodlark Basin and is currently one of few places on Earth where active continental breakup is thought to be occurring. Here north-south extension is localized on a few major normal faults. We determined characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) components from demagnetization profiles of >300 individual specimens. From these, 157 components contribute to paleomagnetic directions for six formations. We compare Early Miocene (˜20 Ma) to Late Pliocene (3.0 ± 0.5) ChRM mean directions, at four localities, with contemporaneous expected field directions corresponding to the Australian Plate. Time-varying finite rotations from Cape Vogel Peninsula (28-12°) suggest anticlockwise rotation had begun by ˜15 Ma. This rotation may have been accompanied by rifting, ˜7 Ma earlier than previously inferred. Furthermore, that early extension may have occurred south of the present rift, and that deformation later migrated north of the Peninsula. Pliocene vertical-axis rotations are consistent with GPS-determined plate motions, suggesting that contemporary rift kinematics were established by ˜3 Ma. Finite anticlockwise rotation (10.1 ± 7.6°) in the Amphlett Islands is accordant with seafloor spreading in the Woodlark Basin, suggesting this locality has seen the full Woodlark plate motion since 3 Ma. Clockwise rotation of the Goodenough Bay Block (-6.5 ± 11.2°) since the Late Miocene has accomplished transfer of deformation between major extensional corridors, and an especially rapid local rotation (-16.3 ± 9.5°) in NW Normanby Island may suggest an incipient dextral transfer fault.

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Student Resources History of Diabetes Resources for School Projects How to Reference Our Site Diabetes Basics Myths ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ...

  10. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  11. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger ...

  13. Williamson Polishing & Plating Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson Polishing & Plating Co. Inc. was a plating shop located in the Martindale-Brightwood neighborhood of Indianapolis. The facility conducted job shop polishing and electroplating services. The vacant site contains a 14,651-square-foot building.

  14. Processing fine stainless-steel slag using spiral concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Eric R; Klima, Mark S

    2008-04-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of spiral concentration to process a fine (-1 mm) stainless-steel slag was evaluated. Specifically, testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a high metal content stainless steel product and a low metal content aggregate product. This involved investigating a key operating variable for both five-and seven-turn spiral concentrators. The raw slag and spiral products were characterized to determine their respective size and metal distributions. Separation testing was carried out using the two full-scale spiral concentrators to evaluate the effects of feed solids concentration on spiral performance at solids feed rates ranging from 15 to 30 kg/min. The results indicated that under certain conditions, a high-quality metal fraction could be produced. For example, using the five-turn spiral, a product containing 95% metal was obtained at a low metal recovery. Both spirals were ineffective at concentrating the aggregate fraction. Overall, the feed solids concentration did not significantly affect the quality or recoveries of the products, particularly for feed solids concentrations less than 35% by weight. In order to improve the metal recoveries and to produce a low-metal aggregate material, reprocessing of the product streams and/or additional liberation of the raw slag would be required.

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma : usefulness of two and three phase spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of each phases in two and three phase spiral CT in the detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Two phase spiral CT images of 18 patients and three phase spiral CT images of 12 patients with pathologically-proven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were retrospectively compared. Using a single spiral scan, images of early and delayed phases were obtained at 43 seconds and 2{approx}3minutes respectively initiating the after administration of 100-120cc of contrast material (2{approx}3cc/sec), Images of arterial, portal and delayed phases were also obtained at 25 and 60 seconds, and 3{approx}4minutes, respectively, by the use of a double spiral scan. CT scans were performed with 10mm collimation at 1:1 pitch table speed. Contrast between the tumor and adjacent pancreatic parenchyma were compared and graded and enhancement pattern of the tumor were analysed together. In 12 patients (66.7%), images of the early phase were superior to those of the delayed phase. images of the portal phase were superior to those of the arterial phase. Enhancement of tumor was seen in four patients;all tumors were less than 3cm in size. The early phase of two phase spiral CT is superior to the delayed phase and the portal phase of three phase spiral CT is superior to the arterial phase. Both arterial and portal phases are superior to the delayed phase.

  16. Spiral Antenna-Coupled Microbridge Structures for THz Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Jun; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Yadong

    2017-12-01

    Bolometer sensor is a good candidate for THz imaging due to its compact system, low cost, and wideband operation. Based on infrared microbolometer structures, two kinds of antenna-coupled microbridge structures are proposed with different spiral antennas: spiral antenna on support layer and spiral antenna with extended legs. Aiming at applications in detection and imaging, simulations are carried out mainly for optimized absorption at 2.52 THz, which is the radiation frequency of far-infrared CO 2 lasers. The effects of rotation angle, line width, and spacing of the spiral antenna on THz wave absorption of microbridge structures are discussed. Spiral antenna, with extended legs, is a good solution for high absorption rate at low absorption frequency and can be used as electrode lead simultaneously for simplified manufacturing process. A spiral antenna-coupled microbridge structure with an absorption rate of more than 75% at 2.52 THz is achieved by optimizing the structure parameters. This research demonstrates the use of different spiral antennas for enhanced and tunable THz absorption of microbridge structures and provides an effective way to fabricate THz microbolometer detectors with great potential in the application of real-time THz imaging.

  17. Vibration of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraverty, Snehashish

    2008-01-01

    Plates are integral parts of most engineering structures and their vibration analysis is required for safe design. This work provides a comprehensive introduction to vibration theory and analysis of two-dimensional plates. It offers information on vibration problems along with a discussion of various plate geometries and boundary conditions.

  18. A Software Development Simulation Model of a Spiral Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Malone, Linda

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for simulation models of software development processes other than the waterfall because processes such as spiral development are becoming more and more popular. The use of a spiral process can make the inherently difficult job of cost and schedule estimation even more challenging due to its evolutionary nature, but this allows for a more flexible process that can better meet customers' needs. This paper will present a discrete event simulation model of spiral development that can be used to analyze cost and schedule effects of using such a process in comparison to a waterfall process.

  19. Comments on H. Arp 'The persistent problem of spiral galaxies'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1987-04-01

    In his paper 'The persistent problem of Spiral Galaxies' H. Arp criticises the standard theory of spiral galaxies and demonstrates that introduction of plasma theory is necessary in order to understand the structure of spiral galaxies. In the present paper arguments are given in support of Arp's theory and suggestions are made how Arp's ideas should be developed. An important result of Arp's new approach is that there is no convincing argument for the belief that there is a 'missing mass'. This is important from a cosmological point of view. (author)

  20. Harmonic oscillator in an elastic medium with a spiral dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, A. V. D. M.; Bakke, K.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the behaviour of a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator in an elastic medium that possesses a spiral dislocation (an edge dislocation). We show that the Schrödinger equation for harmonic oscillator in the presence of a spiral dislocation can be solved analytically. Further, we discuss the effects of this topological defect on the confinement to a hard-wall confining potential. In both cases, we analyse if the effects of the topology of the spiral dislocation gives rise to an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect for bound states.

  1. Differentiation between sarcoidosis and Hodgkin’s lymphoma based on mediastinal lymph node involvement pattern: Evaluation using spiral CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrian, Payam; Ebrahimzadeh, Seyed Amir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the specific and detailed anatomic sites and morphologic characteristics of mediastinal lymph nodes on spiral computed tomography for the purpose of differentiation between sarcoidosis and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Anatomical distribution of mediastinal lymph nodes on spiral CT was reviewed in 39 patients with sarcoidosis and 37 patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma using the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) lymph node map. Other morphologic features such as lymph node calcification or coalescence of adjacent lymph nodes were also compared. Zone 10 was involved more often in sarcoidosis than in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. On the other hand, there was a higher tendency for presence of zone 1 and 3 as well as retrocrural and internal mammary lymphadenopathy in Hodgkin’s lymphoma than in sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis presented with intranodal calcifications more often than Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Coalescence, pressure effect on adjacent structures and central cavitations were significantly more common in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Findings of the present study indicate that specific anatomical distribution and morphological patterns of mediastinal lymph nodes, as demonstrated on spiral CT, can be useful in differentiating sarcoidosis from Hodgkin’s lymphoma

  2. Analysis of a complex shape chain plate using Transmission Photoelasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasari N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Most chains are an assembly [1] of five parts namely, outer plate, inner plate, bush, pin and roller. Two inner plates are press fitted with two bushes to form an inner block assembly. The outer plates are press fitted with pins after keeping the pins through the assembled bushes of the inner block. Roller is a rotating member and placed over the bush during inner block assembly. Inner block assembly is the load transfer member from sprocket tooth. The outer block assembly helps in holding and also to pull the inner block over the sprocket teeth. If a chain length is in odd number of pitches, it requires an offset plate as shown in Figure 1 to connect two ends of the chain together to make chain endless. When the chain is assembled with an offset plate, the chain fatigue life was observed only 20 to 25% of the total life of a chain, assembled without an offset plate. The holes in the offset plate are of the same size as in the outer and inner plates respectively and it is a complex in shape chain plate. A inbuilt thinning zone at the centre of the chain plate as shown in Figure 1 is unavoidable. The stresses and its distribution in this complex shape chain plate geometry play a critical role in the fatigue life performance of a chain assembly. However, it is difficult identify the stress distribution and stress concentration zones precisely using only the conventional industrial friendly tools such as routine quality control test, breaking load test and numerical computations. In this context the transmission photoelastic technique has made it possible to identify the stress distribution, its concentration and also to quantify the stress and strain [2-3] at any point in the chain plate. This paper explains how transmission photoelastic technique is used to estimate the stress distribution and its concentration zones in a complex chain plate when it isloaded. An epoxy chain plate model was made through the casting method using a Perspex mould [2

  3. Mécanismes de la déformation en zones de plate-forme : méthode et application au bassin de Paris. Deuxième partie Deformation Mechanisms in Platform Zones: Method and Application to the Paris Basin. Part Two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremolieres P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available On se propose, dans cet article, de présenter une méthode d'étude structurale qui prend en compte aussi bien les données de terrain que celles de subsurface. L'étude des déformations par l'analyse microtectonique permet en général de remonter à la distribution des contraintes pour une période correspondant grossièrement aux phases de déformation paroxysmales. Par contre, dans les intervalles compris entre ces phases paroxysmales ou même lors des phases en distension, l'apport de l'analyse microtectonique est moindre ; dans ces cas, l'étude des variations d'épaisseur des sédiments, associée à une bonne connaissance de l'orientation des failles du substratum et de leur pendage permet parfois de préciser la nature des contraintes et, dans les conditions les plus favorables, d'estimer les directions de raccourcissement ou d'allongement. Dans une première partie, on développe l'aspect méthodologique en essayant de préciser : - la place de la microtectonique en Géologie structurale et les principaux faciès sédimentaires favorables à son utilisation ; - l'influence des principaux facteurs intervenant sur les déformations des séries sédimentaires en zone de plate-forme. Dans une deuxième partie, on insiste sur l'intérêt de l'analyse structurale, méthode souvent rapide et peu coûteuse, en exploration pétrolière. Notre expérience personnelle nous pousse à développer certains sujets, comme la réorientation des contraintes à proximité de certains accidents, la stylolithisation, etc. Enfin, on montre une application de la méthode au bassin de Paris. Il ne s'agit pas d'une étude à caractère exhaustif, mais on esssaye d'exposer, à l'aide de quelques exemples souvent très schématisés, la complémentarité de la micro-tectonique, d'une part, et de l'étude des variations d'épaisseurs des sédiments d'autre part. This article attempts to describe a structural analysis method which takes both field and subsurface

  4. Mécanismes de la déformation en zones de plate-forme : méthode et application au bassin de Paris. Première partie Deformation Mechanisms in Platform Zones: Method and Application to the Paris Basin. Part One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremolieres P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available On se propose, dans cet article, de présenter une méthode d'étude structurale qui prend en compte aussi bien les données de terrain que celles de subsurface. L'étude des déformations par l'analyse microtectonique permet en général de remonter à la distribution des contraintes pour une période correspondant grossièrement aux phases de déformation paroxysmales. Par contre, dans les intervalles compris entre ces phases paroxysmales ou même lors des phases en distension, l'apport de l'analyse microtectonique est moindre ; dans ces cas, l'étude des variations d'épaisseur des sédiments, associée à une bonne connaissance de l'orientation des failles du substratum et de leur pendage permet parfois de préciser la nature des contraintes et, dans les conditions les plus favorables, d'estimer les directions de raccourcissement ou d'allongement. Dans une première partie, on développe l'aspect méthodologique en essayant de préciser : - la place de la microtectonique en Géologie structurale et les principaux faciès sédimentaires favorables à son utilisation ; - l'influence des principaux facteurs intervenant sur les déformations des séries sédimentaires en zone de plate-forme. Dans une deuxième partie, on insiste sur l'intérêt de l'analyse structurale, méthode souvent rapide et peu coûteuse, en exploration pétrolière. Notre expérience personnelle nous pousse à développer certains sujets, comme la réorientation des contraintes à proximité de certains accidents, la stylolithisation, etc. Enfin, on montre une application de la méthode au bassin de Paris. Il ne s'agit pas d'une étude à caractère exhaustif, mais on esssaye d'exposer, à l'aide de quelques exemples souvent très schématisés, la complémentarité de la micro-tectonique, d'une part, et de l'étude des variations d'épaisseurs des sédiments d'autre part. This article attempts to describe a structural analysis method which takes both field and subsurface

  5. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    1991-01-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load of adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  6. The generation of a complete spiral spot and multi split rings by focusing three circularly polarized vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiannong; Gao, Xiumin; Zhu, Linwei; Xu, Qinfeng; Ma, Wangzi

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate that a complete right-handed or left-handed spiral-shaped focus can be created by focusing circularly polarized and three spatially shifted vortex beams through high numerical objective. By dividing the back aperture into multi annular zones and applying an additional phase term, the multi focal spots aligned along z axis of individual three dimensional focal shapes can be generated. The spiral shaped focus provides a pathway of manipulating the micro-particles in a curved trajectory and opens up a possibility of measuring mechanical torque of biological large molecules such as DNA by chemically binding one end on the cover-glass. The multi focal spots aligned along the z axis can eliminate the need of z axis scanning in the direct laser writing fabrication of some metamaterials which is composed of three-dimensional array of specific shapes of building blocks.

  7. Software trends for both the GANIL and spiral control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.; Lecorche, E.

    1999-01-01

    The Ganil facility has been running with a new control system since 1993. Many improvements have been done since that time to bring new capabilities to the system. So, in February 1996, when the Spiral control system was designed, it was mainly considered as an extension of the Ganil control system. This paper briefly recalls the basic architecture of the whole control system and the main choices upon which it relies. Then it presents the new software trends, to show how the Spiral control system has been integrated alongside the existing one. The last part describe the new developments and the most significant functionalities it brings as seen from the operator point of view, with some emphasis about the application programs for beam tuning. Indeed, these new programs have to be provided both for the spiral tuning with exotic ions beams and for the coupling of the Spiral and older Ganil facilities. (authors)

  8. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  9. Measurement and structure of spiral wave response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Hans; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2017-09-01

    The rotating spiral waves that emerge in diverse natural and man-made systems typically exhibit a particle-like behaviour since their adjoint critical eigenmodes (response functions) are often seen to be localised around the spiral core. We present a simple method to numerically compute response functions for circular-core and meandering spirals by recording their drift response to many elementary perturbations. Although our method is computationally more expensive than solving the adjoint system, our technique is fully parallellisable, does not suffer from memory limitations and can be applied to experiments. For a cardiac tissue model with the linear spiral core, we find that the response functions are localised near the turning points of the trajectory.

  10. Data Fusion Tool for Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Antolick, Lance J.; Branning, Jeremy S.; Thomas, Josiah

    2014-01-01

    Tests were performed on two spiral bevel gear sets in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig to simulate the fielded failures of spiral bevel gears installed in a helicopter. Gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed on two or more gear or pinion teeth. During testing, gear health monitoring data was collected with two different health monitoring systems. Operational parameters were measured with a third data acquisition system. Tooth damage progression was documented with photographs taken at inspection intervals throughout the test. A software tool was developed for fusing the operational data and the vibration based gear condition indicator (CI) data collected from the two health monitoring systems. Results of this study illustrate the benefits of combining the data from all three systems to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears. The tool also enabled evaluation of the effectiveness of each CI with respect to operational conditions and fault mode.

  11. Relative frequencies of supernovae versus properties of spiral hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Nazaryan, T. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Petrosian, A. R.; Aramyan, L. S.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; de Lapparent, V.; Bertin, E.; Gomes, J. M.; Turatto, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present an analysis of SNe number ratios in spiral galaxies with different morphological subtypes, luminosities, sSFR, and metallicities, to provide important information about the physical properties of the progenitor populations.

  12. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Pinion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ural, Ani

    2003-01-01

    .... To obtain a more detailed understanding of the contact between a cracked pinion tooth in mesh with an uncracked gear tooth, three-dimensional contact analyses were performed on a spiral bevel gear...

  13. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  14. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimik, Soling; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re-entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the-art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral- or scroll-wave frequency ω, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane potential of the fibroblast and the number of fibroblasts attached to the myocytes on the stability of these waves. Finally, we show that the presence of GFDs can lead to the formation of spiral waves at high-frequency pacing.

  15. Mechanical obstacles to the movement of continent-bearing plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Selected geophysical problems associated with the concept of continental drift as an incidental corollary of plate movement are discussed. The problems include the absence of a suitable plate-driving mechanism for plates with continental leading edges, the absence of the low-velocity zone under shields, and continental roots of 400 to 700 km depths. It is shown that if continental drift occurs, it must use mechanisms not now understood, or that it may not occur at all, plate movement being confined to ocean basins.

  16. Dosimetry in dental radiology. Dentascan spiral CT versus panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, N.; Stecco, A.; Zatelli, G.

    1999-01-01

    The study compares the doses absorbed by the dentomaxillary area in spiral CT and panoramic examinations. The dose measurements demonstrate that patients receive smaller doses with panoramic radiography than with spiral CT with Dentascan. After following for some variations from instrumental differences, they are in substantial agreement with literature data. Further investigations are needed considering the radiobiological risk related to the growing spread of Dentascan examinations [it

  17. Scintigraphic diagnosis of spiral fracture in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein-Foucher, C.; Venel, H.; Lecouffe, P.; Ythier, H.; Legghe, R.; Marchandise, X.

    1988-01-01

    8 cases of unsuspected bone fracture in children, identified at bone scan are reported. Common features were the children's young age (1 to 3 years), the absence of clinical suspicion, the initially normal X-rays, the fracture type (spiral fracture of the tibia undisplaced), and the uniform appearance of the bone scan. These data confim the value of bone scan in limping children and suggest that spiral fracture of the tibia is a frequent and underdiagnosed condition in children [fr

  18. Lung studies with spiral CT. pitch 1 versus pitch 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoni Galloni, S.; Miceli, M.; Lipparino, M.; Burzi, M.; Gigli, F.; Rossi, M.S.; Santoli, G.; Guidarelli, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Spiral CT, the pitch is the ratio of the distance to tabletop travels per 360 degrees rotation to nominal slice width, expressed in mm. Performing Spiral CT examination with pitch 2 allows to reduce examination time, exposure and contrast dose, and X-ray tube overload. The authors investigated the yield of pitch 2 in lung parenchyma studies, particular relative to diagnostic image quality [it

  19. The accelerated ISOL technique and the SPIRAL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    2001-01-01

    The accelerated ISOL technique is presented as an introduction to the present status of the SPIRAL facility. SPIRAL is based on the very high intensity light and heavy ion beams available at GANIL. The facility will deliver radioactive beams with energies in the range between 1.7 A and 25 A MeV. The presently target-ion source production system, as well the new developments undertaken by the target ion-source group at GANIL are presented. (authors)

  20. ITRF2014 plate motion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, Zuheir; Métivier, Laurent; Rebischung, Paul; Rouby, Hélène; Collilieux, Xavier

    2017-06-01

    For various geodetic and geophysical applications, users need to have access to a plate motion model (PMM) that is consistent with the ITRF2014 frame. This paper describes the approach used for determining a PMM from the horizontal velocities of a subset of the ITRF2014 sites away from plate boundaries, Glacial Isostatic Adjustment regions and other deforming zones. In theory it would be necessary to include in the inversion model a translational motion vector (called in this paper origin rate bias, ORB) that would represent the relative motion between the ITRF2014 origin (long-term averaged centre of mass of the Earth as sensed by SLR) and the centre of tectonic plate motion. We show that in practice, the magnitude of the estimated ORB is strongly dependent on the selection of ITRF2014 sites used for the PMM adjustment. Its Z-component can in particular range between 0 and more than 1 mm yr-1 depending on the station network used, preventing any geophysical interpretation of the estimated value. Relying on rigorous statistical criteria, the site selection finally adopted for the ITRF2014-PMM adjustment leads to a relatively small ORB (0.30 ± 0.18 mm yr-1 in the Z-component), which is statistically insignificant at the 2-sigma level, but also according to an F-ratio test. Therefore we opted for an ITRF2014-PMM without estimating the ORB, which in turn accommodates geodetic applications that require access to the ITRF2014 frame through pure plate rotation poles.

  1. Noncontrast peripheral MRA with spiral echo train imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Samuel W; Mugler, John P; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Norton, Patrick T; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-03-01

    To develop a spin echo train sequence with spiral readout gradients with improved artery-vein contrast for noncontrast angiography. Venous T2 becomes shorter as the echo spacing is increased in echo train sequences, improving contrast. Spiral acquisitions, due to their data collection efficiency, facilitate long echo spacings without increasing scan times. Bloch equation simulations were performed to determine optimal sequence parameters, and the sequence was applied in five volunteers. In two volunteers, the sequence was performed with a range of echo times and echo spacings to compare with the theoretical contrast behavior. A Cartesian version of the sequence was used to compare contrast appearance with the spiral sequence. Additionally, spiral parallel imaging was optionally used to improve image resolution. In vivo, artery-vein contrast properties followed the general shape predicted by simulations, and good results were obtained in all stations. Compared with a Cartesian implementation, the spiral sequence had superior artery-vein contrast, better spatial resolution (1.2 mm(2) versus 1.5 mm(2) ), and was acquired in less time (1.4 min versus 7.5 min). The spiral spin echo train sequence can be used for flow-independent angiography to generate three-dimensional angiograms of the periphery quickly and without the use of contrast agents. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mechanics and spiral formation in the rat cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Nejad, T; Iannaccone, S; Rutherford, W; Iannaccone, P M; Foster, C D

    2015-01-01

    During the maturation of some mammals such as mice and rats, corneal epithelial cells tend to develop into patterns such as spirals over time. A better understanding of these patterns can help to understand how the organ develops and may give insight into some of the diseases affecting corneal development. In this paper, a framework for explaining the development of the epithelial cells forming spiral patterns due to the effect of tensile and shear strains is proposed. Using chimeric animals, made by combining embryonic cells from genetically distinguishable strains, we can observe the development of patterns in the cornea. Aggregates of cell progeny from one strain or the other called patches form as organs and tissue develop. The boundaries of these patches are fitted with logarithmic spirals on confocal images of adult rat corneas. To compare with observed patterns, we develop a three-dimensional large strain finite element model for the rat cornea under intraocular pressure to examine the strain distribution on the cornea surface. The model includes the effects of oriented and dispersed fibrils families throughout the cornea and a nearly incompressible matrix. Tracing the directions of critical strain vectors on the cornea surface leads to spiral-like curves that are compared to the observed logarithmic spirals. Good agreement between the observed and numerical curves supports the proposed assumption that shear and tensile strains facilitate sliding of epithelial cells to develop spiral patterns.

  3. Improved MRI thermometry with multiple-echo spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Michael; Butts Pauly, Kim

    2016-09-01

    Low-bandwidth PRF shift thermometry is used to guide HIFU ablation treatments. Low sampling bandwidth is needed for high signal-to-noise ratio with short acquisition times, but can lead to off-resonance artifacts. In this work, improved multiple-echo thermometry is presented that allows for high bandwidth and reduced artifacts. It is also demonstrated with spiral sampling, to improve the trade-off between resolution, speed, and measurement precision. Four multiple-echo thermometry sequences were tested in vivo, one using two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) sampling and three using spirals. The spiral sequences were individually optimized for resolution, for speed, and for precision. Multifrequency reconstruction was used to correct for off-resonance spiral artifacts. Additionally, two different multiecho temperature reconstructions were compared. Weighted combination of per-echo phase differences gave significantly better precision than least squares off-resonance estimation. Multiple-echo 2DFT sequence obtained precision similar to single-echo 2DFT, while greatly increasing sampling bandwidth. The multiecho spiral acquisitions achieved 2× better resolution, 2.9× better uncertainty, or 3.4× faster acquisition time, without negatively impacting the other two design parameters as compared to single-echo 2DFT. Multiecho spiral thermometry greatly improves the capabilities of temperature monitoring, and could improve transcranial treatment monitoring capabilities. Magn Reson Med 76:747-756, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Spiral instabilities in media supporting complex oscillations under periodic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qingyu; Li, Jun; Zhang, Kailong; Epstein, Irving R.

    2009-09-01

    The periodically forced Brusselator model displays temporal mixed-mode and quasiperiodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. We explore the behavior of such media as reaction-diffusion systems for investigating spiral instabilities. Besides near-core breakup and far-field breakup resulting from unstable modes in the radial direction or Doppler-induced instability (destabilization of the core's location), the observed complex phenomena include backfiring, spiral regeneration, and amplitude modulation from line defects. Amplitude modulation of spirals can evolve to chambered spirals resembling those found in nature, such as pine cones and sunflowers. When the forcing amplitude is increased, the spiral-tip meander evolves from simple rotation to complex petals, corresponding to transformation of the local dynamics from simple oscillations to mixed-mode, period-2, and quasiperiodic oscillations. The number of petals is related to the complexity of the mixed-mode oscillations. Spiral turbulence, standing waves, and homogeneous synchronization permeate the entire system when the forcing amplitude is further increased.

  5. Is There Really A North American Plate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, A.

    2011-12-01

    Lithospheric plates are typically identified from earthquake epicenters and evidence such as GPS movements. But no evidence indicates a plate boundary between the North American and South American Plates. Some plate maps show them separated by a transform boundary, but it is only a fracture zone. Other maps show an "undefined plate boundary" or put no boundary between these two plates (check Google images). Early plate maps showed a single large American Plate, quite narrow east of the Caribbean Plate (Le Pichon 1968, Morgan 1968). The North and South American Plates became established by the leading textbook Earth (Press & Siever 1974). On their map, from a Scientific American article by John Dewey (1972), these new plates were separated by an "uncertain plate boundary." The reasons for postulating a North American Plate were probably more psychological than geological. Each of the other continents of the world had its own plate, and North American geologists naturally wanted theirs. Similarly, European geographers used to view Europe as its own continent. A single large plate should again be hypothesized. But the term American Plate would now be ambiguous ("Which plate, North or South?") Perhaps future textbook authors could call it the "Two-American Plate." Textbook authors ultimately decide such global-tectonic matters. I became aware of textbook authors' opinions and influence from my research into the history of Alfred Wegener's continental drift (see Fixists vs. Mobilists by Krill 2011). Leading textbook author Charles Schuchert realized that continental drift would abolish his cherished paleogeographic models of large east-west continents (Eria, Gondwana) and small oceans (Poseiden, Nereis). He and his junior coauthors conspired to keep drift evidence out of their textbooks, from the 1934-editions until the 1969-editions (Physical Geology by Longwell et al. 1969, Historical Geology by Dunbar & Waage 1969). Their textbooks ruled in America. Textbooks

  6. High-Tc Superconducting Thick-Film Spiral Magnet: Development and Characterization of a Single Spiral Module

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinnis, W

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project was to make characterized and numerically model prototype modules of a new type of superconducting electromagnet based on stacked spirals of superconducting thick films...

  7. SPIRAL COUNTER-CURRENT CHROMATOGRAPHY OF SMALL MOLECULES, PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS USING THE SPIRAL TUBING SUPPORT ROTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.; Zehmer, John; Clayton, Adam; Pilon, Aprile

    2011-01-01

    An important advance in countercurrent chromatography (CCC) carried out in open flow-tubing coils, rotated in planetary centrifuges, is the new design to spread out the tubing in spirals. More spacing between the tubing was found to significantly increase the stationary phase retention, such that now all types of two-phase solvent systems can be used for liquid-liquid partition chromatography in the J-type planetary centrifuges. A spiral tubing support (STS) frame with circular channels was c...

  8. Clear New View of a Classic Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    ESO is releasing a beautiful image of the nearby galaxy Messier 83 taken by the HAWK-I instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The picture shows the galaxy in infrared light and demonstrates the impressive power of the camera to create one of the sharpest and most detailed pictures of Messier 83 ever taken from the ground. The galaxy Messier 83 (eso0825) is located about 15 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra (the Sea Serpent). It spans over 40 000 light-years, only 40 percent the size of the Milky Way, but in many ways is quite similar to our home galaxy, both in its spiral shape and the presence of a bar of stars across its centre. Messier 83 is famous among astronomers for its many supernovae: vast explosions that end the lives of some stars. Over the last century, six supernovae have been observed in Messier 83 - a record number that is matched by only one other galaxy. Even without supernovae, Messier 83 is one of the brightest nearby galaxies, visible using just binoculars. Messier 83 has been observed in the infrared part of the spectrum using HAWK-I [1], a powerful camera on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). When viewed in infrared light most of the obscuring dust that hides much of Messier 83 becomes transparent. The brightly lit gas around hot young stars in the spiral arms is also less prominent in infrared pictures. As a result much more of the structure of the galaxy and the vast hordes of its constituent stars can be seen. This clear view is important for astronomers looking for clusters of young stars, especially those hidden in dusty regions of the galaxy. Studying such star clusters was one of the main scientific goals of these observations [2]. When compared to earlier images, the acute vision of HAWK-I reveals far more stars within the galaxy. The combination of the huge mirror of the VLT, the large field of view and great sensitivity of the camera, and the superb observing conditions

  9. CHARACTERIZING SPIRAL ARM AND INTERARM STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreckel, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Meidt, S. [Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanc, G. A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Groves, B. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Adamo, A. [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Hughes, A., E-mail: kreckel@mpia.de [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2016-08-20

    Interarm star formation contributes significantly to a galaxy’s star formation budget and provides an opportunity to study stellar birthplaces unperturbed by spiral arm dynamics. Using optical integral field spectroscopy of the nearby galaxy NGC 628 with VLT/MUSE, we construct H α maps including detailed corrections for dust extinction and stellar absorption to identify 391 H ii regions at 35 pc resolution over 12 kpc{sup 2}. Using tracers sensitive to the underlying gravitational potential, we associate H ii regions with either arm (271) or interarm (120) environments. Using our full spectral coverage of each region, we find that most physical properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) of H ii regions are independent of environment. We calculate the fraction of H α luminosity due to the background of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contaminating each H ii region, and find the DIG surface brightness to be higher within H ii regions than in the surroundings, and slightly higher within arm H ii regions. Use of the temperature-sensitive [S ii]/H α line ratio instead of the H α surface brightness to identify the boundaries of H ii regions does not change this result. Using the dust attenuation as a tracer of the gas, we find depletion times consistent with previous work (2 × 10{sup 9} yr) with no differences between the arm and interarm, but this is very sensitive to the DIG correction. Unlike molecular clouds, which can be dynamically affected by the galactic environment, we see fairly consistent properties of H ii regions in both arm and interarm environments. This suggests either a difference in star formation and feedback in arms or a decoupling of dense star-forming clumps from the more extended surrounding molecular gas.

  10. The Globular Cluster System of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 7814

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2003-11-01

    We present the results of a wide-field photometric study of the globular cluster (GC) system of the edge-on Sab spiral NGC 7814. This is the first spiral to be fully analyzed from our survey of the GC systems of a large sample of galaxies beyond the Local Group. NGC 7814 is of particular interest because a previous study estimated that it has 500-1000 GCs, giving it the largest specific frequency (SN) known for a spiral. Understanding this galaxy's GC system is important in terms of our understanding of the GC populations of spirals in general and has implications for the formation of massive galaxies. We observed the galaxy in BVR filters with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope and used image classification and three-color photometry to select GC candidates. We also analyzed archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of NGC 7814, both to help quantify the contamination level of the WIYN GC candidate list and to detect GCs in the inner part of the galaxy halo. Combining HST data with high-quality ground-based images allows us to trace the entire radial extent of this galaxy's GC system and determine the total number of GCs directly through observation. We find that rather than being an especially high-SN spiral, NGC 7814 has <~200 GCs and SN~1, making it comparable to the two most well-studied spiral galaxies, the Milky Way and M31. We explore the implications of these results for models of the formation of galaxies and their GC systems. The initial results from our survey suggest that the GC systems of typical elliptical galaxies can be accounted for by the merger of two or more spirals, but that for highly luminous elliptical galaxies, additional physical processes may be needed.

  11. Global correlations between maximum magnitudes of subduction zone interface thrust earthquakes and physical parameters of subduction zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Rawlinson, N.

    2013-01-01

    The maximum earthquake magnitude recorded for subduction zone plate boundaries varies considerably on Earth, with some subduction zone segments producing giant subduction zone thrust earthquakes (e.g. Chile, Alaska, Sumatra-Andaman, Japan) and others producing relatively small earthquakes (e.g.

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Monthly In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  14. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I Eat? Making ... Forecast® magazine: wcie-meal-planning, . In this ... Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  15. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a ...

  16. Growth Plate Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause any lasting problems for your child or teen. Growth plates are areas of growing tissues that cause ... are replaced by solid bone. Who gets them? Growth plate injuries happen to children and teens. This injury happens twice as often in boys ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods ...

  18. Spiraling in Urban Streams: A Novel Approach to Link Geomorphic Structure with Ecosystem Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, R. A.; Lafrenz, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study is to quantify the relationship between channel complexity and nutrient spiraling along several reaches of an urbanized watershed in Portland, Oregon. Much research points to the effect urbanization has on watershed hydrology and nutrient loading at the watershed scale for various sized catchments. However the flux of nutrients over short reaches within a stream channel has been less studied because of the effort and costs associated with fieldwork and subsequent laboratory analysis of both surface and hyporheic water samples. In this study we explore a novel approach at capturing connectivity though nutrient spiraling along several short reaches (less than 100-meter) within the highly urbanized Fanno Creek watershed (4400 hectares). We measure channel complexity-sinuosity, bed material texture, organic matter-and use these measurements to determine spatial autocorrelation of 50 reaches in Fanno Creek, a small, urban watershed in Portland, Oregon. Using ion-selective electrodes, the fluxes of nitrate and ammonia are measured within each reach, which when combined with channel geometry and velocity measurements allow us to transform the values of nitrate and ammonia fluxes into spiraling metrics. Along each sampled reach, we collected three surface water samples to characterize nutrient amounts at the upstream, midstream, and downstream position of the reach. Two additional water samples were taken from the left and right bank hyporheic zones at a depth just below the armor layer of the channel bed using mini-piezometers and a hand-pumped vacuum device, which we constructed for this purpose. Adjacent to the hyporheic samples soil cores were collected and analyzed for organic matter composition, bulk density, and texture. We hypothesize that spiral metrics will respond significantly to the measured channel complexity values and will be a more robust predictor of nutrient flux than land cover characteristics in the area draining to each reach

  19. Dynamic study of the larynx with spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Yeon; Choi, Chang Ho; Yoon, Chi Soon; Kim, Yoon Gyoo; Nam, Sang Hwa; Kim, Kun Il; Kim, Byung Soo; Wang, Soo Guen

    1994-01-01

    It is essential to know the functional and morphologic changes of the larynx in the evaluation of laryngeal lesions. Conventional CT which has relatively long examination time is not suitable for this aim. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the capability of spiral CT in the dynamic study of the larynx and to know whether this new technique can replace conventional laryngography or not. Five healthy volunteers and 20 patients with laryngeal lesions underwent spiral dynamic CT scans with 3-dimensional reconstruction of the mucosal surface. A series of spiral CT scans were done while the volunteers performed various laryngeal positions to obtain the functional and morphologic information. The maneuvers used were: quite breathing, 'E' phonation, Valsalva maneuver, modified Valsalva maneuver, and a new method of our own, 'modified breath holding' technique. The patients were scanned when in quite breathing. Additional scans were obtained by using the 'modified breath holding' technique. The dynamic study with spiral CT could provide high resolutional images which nicely depicted the mobility of vocal cords and the mucosal changes of the laryngeal cavity in both healthy volunteer and patient groups. In patient group, the new 'modified breath holding' technique was easier and more reproducible than other maneuvers. Spiral CT allows a dynamic study of the larynx and can be a new alternative of laryngography

  20. On wave dark matter in spiral and barred galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F., México. (Mexico); Bray, Hubert L., E-mail: lmedina@fis.cinvestav.mx, E-mail: bray@math.duke.edu, E-mail: tmatos@fis.cinvestav.mx [Mathematics Department, Duke University, Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We recover spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxy simulations with a Wave Dark Matter (WDM) background (also known as Scalar Field Dark Matter (SFDM), Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) dark matter, and Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter). Here we show how the interaction between a baryonic disk and its Dark Matter Halo triggers the formation of spiral structures when the halo is allowed to have a triaxial shape and angular momentum. This is a more realistic picture within the WDM model since a non-spherical rotating halo seems to be more natural. By performing hydrodynamic simulations, along with earlier test particles simulations, we demonstrate another important way in which wave dark matter is consistent with observations. The common existence of bars in these simulations is particularly noteworthy. This may have consequences when trying to obtain information about the dark matter distribution in a galaxy, the mere presence of spiral arms or a bar usually indicates that baryonic matter dominates the central region and therefore observations, like rotation curves, may not tell us what the DM distribution is at the halo center. But here we show that spiral arms and bars can develop in DM dominated galaxies with a central density core without supposing its origin on mechanisms intrinsic to the baryonic matter.

  1. Spiral scan long object reconstruction through PI line reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, K C; Hu, J; Sourbelle, K

    2004-01-01

    The response of a point object in a cone beam (CB) spiral scan is analysed. Based on the result, a reconstruction algorithm for long object imaging in spiral scan cone beam CT is developed. A region-of-interest (ROI) of the long object is scanned with a detector smaller than the ROI, and a portion of it can be reconstructed without contamination from overlaying materials. The top and bottom surfaces of the ROI are defined by two sets of PI lines near the two ends of the spiral path. With this novel definition of the top and bottom ROI surfaces and through the use of projective geometry, it is straightforward to partition the cone beam image into regions corresponding to projections of the ROI, the overlaying objects or both. This also simplifies computation at source positions near the spiral ends, and makes it possible to reduce radiation exposure near the spiral ends substantially through simple hardware collimation. Simulation results to validate the algorithm are presented

  2. Continuing research on the classical spiraling photon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongrui

    2014-11-01

    Based no the classical spiraling photon model proposed by Hongrui Li, the laws of reflection, refraction of a single photon can be derived. Moreover, the polarization, total reflection, evanescent wave and Goos-Hanchen shift of a single photon can be elucidated. However, this photon model is still unfinished. Especially, the spiraling diameter of a photon is not definite. In this paper, the continuous research works on this new theory are reported. According to the facts that the diffraction limit of light and the smallest diameter of the focal spot of lenses are all equal to the wavelength λ of the light, we can get that the spiraling diameter of a photon equals to the wavelength λ, so we gain that the angle between the linear velocity of the spiraling photon υ and the component of the linear velocity in the forward direction υb is 45°, and the energy of a classical spiraling photon E = (1/2)mυ2 = (1/2)m2c2 = mc2. This coincides with Einstein's mass-energy relation. While it is obtained that the velocity of the evanescent wave in the vacuum is slower than the velocity of light in glass in straight line. In such a way, the optical fiber can slow the light down. In addition, the force analysis of a single photon in optical tweezers system is discussed. And the reason that the laser beam can capture the particle slightly downstream from the focal point can be explained.

  3. On wave dark matter in spiral and barred galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Matos, Tonatiuh; Bray, Hubert L.

    2015-01-01

    We recover spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxy simulations with a Wave Dark Matter (WDM) background (also known as Scalar Field Dark Matter (SFDM), Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) dark matter, and Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter). Here we show how the interaction between a baryonic disk and its Dark Matter Halo triggers the formation of spiral structures when the halo is allowed to have a triaxial shape and angular momentum. This is a more realistic picture within the WDM model since a non-spherical rotating halo seems to be more natural. By performing hydrodynamic simulations, along with earlier test particles simulations, we demonstrate another important way in which wave dark matter is consistent with observations. The common existence of bars in these simulations is particularly noteworthy. This may have consequences when trying to obtain information about the dark matter distribution in a galaxy, the mere presence of spiral arms or a bar usually indicates that baryonic matter dominates the central region and therefore observations, like rotation curves, may not tell us what the DM distribution is at the halo center. But here we show that spiral arms and bars can develop in DM dominated galaxies with a central density core without supposing its origin on mechanisms intrinsic to the baryonic matter

  4. Metallogeny of subduction zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokhtin N. O.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the multistage mechanism of the Earth's crust enrichment in ore elements in underthrust zones. The processes of metamorphism and the formation of hydrothermal solutions at pulling of the watered oceanic lithospheric plate into the subduction zone have been described. Some physical and chemical transformation regularities of structural-material complexes in these areas and mechanisms of the formation of ore deposits have been discussed. Spatio-temporal patterns of the localization of a number of endogenetic and exogenetic deposits have been described using metallogeny of the Ural and the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma Fold Belts as an example. It has been shown that in nature there are several effective mechanisms of the enrichment of the crust in ore minerals. One of them is the process of pulling into subduction zone of metalliferous sediments and ferromanganese crusts as well as seabed nodules, their metamorphic transformation, partial melting and transition of ore components into magmatic melts and mineralized fluids. In the future this leads to the release of ore material by magmas and hydrothermal solutions into the folded formations of island-arc and Andean types and the formation of igneous, metasomatic and hydrothermal deposits. Another, yet no less powerful natural mechanism of a conveyor enrichment of the crust in ore elements is the process of destruction and sedimentation of mineral deposits formed in the folded areas as well as the formation of placers and their transfer to the marginal parts of the continent. Later, during the collision of active and passive margins of two lithospheric plates, such as the collision of the Kolyma Massif with the eastern part of the Siberian craton in the middle of the Mesozoic there was a thrusting of a younger lithospheric plate over a more ancient one. As a result, the sedimentary sequences of the passive margin of the Siberian plate were submerged and partially melted by the basic magmas

  5. Volar fixed-angle plating of distal radius extension fractures: influence of plate position on secondary loss of reduction--a biomechanic study in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobetz, Herwig; Bryant, Adam L; Pokorny, Tom; Spitaler, Ralf; Leixnering, Martin; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2006-04-01

    Treatment of extension fractures of the distal radius with volar fixed-angle plates has become increasingly popular in the past 2 years. It has been observed clinically that placement of the distal screws as close as possible to the subchondral zone is crucial to maintain radial length after surgery. The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate radial shortening after plating with regard to plate position and (2) to evaluate whether plate position has an influence on the strength and rigidity of the plate-screw construct. An extra-articular fracture (AO classification, A3) was created in 7 pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaver radiuses. The radiuses then were plated with a volar distal radius locking compression plate. Seven plates were applied subchondrally; 7 plates were applied 4.5 mm to 7.5 mm proximal to the subchondral zone. The specimens were loaded with 800-N loads for 2,000 cycles to evaluate radial shortening in the 2 groups. Each specimen then was loaded to failure. Radial shortening was significantly greater when the distal screws were placed proximal to the subchondral zone. The amount of shortening after cyclic loading correlated significantly with the distance the distal screws were placed from the subchondral zone. Rigidity of the plate systems was significantly higher in radiuses in which the distal screws were placed close to the subchondral zone. To maintain radial length after volar fixed-angle plating, placement of the distal screws as subchondral as possible is essential. The subchondral plate-screw-bone constructs showed significantly greater rigidity, indicating higher resistance to postoperative loads and displacement forces.

  6. Lohse's historic plate archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, M.; Tsvetkova, K.; Richter, G.; Scholz, G.; Böhm, P.

    The description and the analysis of Oswald Lohse's astrophotographic plates, collected at the Astrophysical Observatory Potsdam in the period 1879 - 1889, are presented. 67 plates of the archive, taken with the greatest instrument of the observatory at that time - the refractor (D = 0.30 m, F = 5.40 m, scale = 38''/mm) and with the second heliographic objective (D = 0.13 m, F = 1.36 m, scale = 152''/mm) - - survived two world wars in relative good condition. The plate emulsions are from different manufacturers in the beginning of astrophotography (Gädicke, Schleussner, Beernaert, etc.). The sizes of the plates are usually 9x12 cm2, which corresponds to fields of 1.2deg and 5deg respectively for each instrument mentioned above. The average limiting magnitude is 13.0(pg). Besides of the plates received for technical experiments (work on photographic processes, testing of new instruments and methods of observations), the scientific observations follow programs for studies of planet surfaces, bright stars, some double stars, stellar clusters and nebulous objects. Lohse's archive is included into the Wide Field Plate Database (http://www.skyarchive.org) as the oldest systematic one, covering the fields of Orion (M42/43), Pleiades, h & chi Persei, M37, M3, M11, M13, M92, M31, etc. With the PDS 2020 GM+ microdensitometer of Münster University 10 archive plates were digitized.

  7. Extending the GANIL control system for the SPIRAL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecorche, E.

    1997-01-01

    The SPIRAL project under construction at GANIL aims to deliver radioactive ion beams to the physicists by the end of 1998. In 1996, it has been proposed to achieve most of the SPIRAL control system as an extension of the system currently in use at GANIL. Therefore the main features of the GANIL control system design are first recalled. Then the paper shows how the GANIL control system should have been upgraded and extended to integrate the SPIRAL project. This evolution had to cope with the specific needs brought by the new machine and to consider the size of the project which is around one third of the GANIL control system volume. Lastly current status of the system is given. (author)

  8. Spiral waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, James P.; Tyson, John J.

    1986-09-01

    The beautiful spiral waves of oxidation in the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction are the source of many interesting and important questions about periods structures in excitable media. It has long been known that these spirals are similar to involutes of circles, at least some distance from the center, but until now, no way has been known to determine the correct wavelength and frequency. In this paper, we show that the parameters of a spiral wave can be viwed s eigenvalues of a problem with unique solution. The critical ingredients of the theory are the effects of curvature on the propagation of wavefronts in two-dimensional media, and the dispersion of plane waves Our analytical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data for the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reagent.

  9. A Twin Spiral Planar Antenna for UWB Medical Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe A. Zito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A planar-spiral antenna to be used in an ultrawideband (UWB radar system for heart activity monitoring is presented. The antenna, named “twin,” is constituted by two spiral dipoles in a compact structure. The reflection coefficient at the feed point of the dipoles is lower than −8 dB over the 3–12 GHz band, while the two-dipoles coupling is about −20 dB. The radiated beam is perpendicular to the plane of the spiral, so the antenna is wearable and it may be an optimal radiator for a medical UWB radar for heart rate detection. The designed antenna has been also used to check some hypotheses about the UWB radar heart activity detection mechanism. The radiation impedance variation, caused by the thorax vibrations associated with heart activity, seems to be the most likely explanation of the UWB radar operation.

  10. The scientific objectives of the SPIRAL 2 Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, D.; Adoui, L.; Angelis, G. de

    2006-06-01

    The construction of SPIRAL 2 at GANIL will open completely new possibilities for parallel beam operation of the whole facility. The whole GANIL/SPIRAL/SPIRAL2 accelerator complex will allow for the simultaneous use of up to 5 different radioactive and stable beams. Several combinations of different beams delivered in parallel for experiments at low (keV/u), medium (few MeV/u) and high (up to 100 MeV/u) energies will be possible. Presently the GANIL/SPIRAL facility delivers about 60 weeks per year of stable and radioactive beams (up to 3 simultaneous beams). Thanks to SPIRAL 2 and the construction of a new beam line connecting the CIME cyclotron and the G1 and G2 experimental rooms the available beam time for experiments may be extended up to about 120 (up to 5 simultaneous beams) weeks per year. The chapters which follow a general introduction deal with the detailed questions to be addressed by experiments with the beams from SPIRAL2. In chapter 2 the many unanswered questions related to the structure of exotic nuclei are posed and the role of SPIRAL2 in answering them outlined. Chapter 3 deals with the dynamics and thermodynamics of asymmetric nuclear systems. Chapter 4 is concerned with questions of nuclear astrophysics which are intimately related to the properties of exotic nuclei. Chapter 5 indicates how the atomic nucleus can act as a laboratory for tests of the Standard model of Particle Physics and Chapter 6 shows how the production of intense fluxes of neutrons at SPIRAL2 make it an excellent tool to address both questions related to damage in materials of importance in nuclear installations and to the s- and r-processes of nucleosynthesis. In chapter 7 we turn to the application, of the radioactive beams from SPIRAL2 and the radionuclides produced by it, to study condensed matter and radiobiology. Finally in the eight and last chapter the reader can find an account of the historical development of the SPIRAL2 facility and this is followed by an outline of

  11. The scientific objectives of the SPIRAL 2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, D.; Adoui, L.; Angelis, G. de [GANIL, Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, BP 55027, 14076 Caen cedex 5 (France)] (and others)

    2006-06-15

    The construction of SPIRAL 2 at GANIL will open completely new possibilities for parallel beam operation of the whole facility. The whole GANIL/SPIRAL/SPIRAL2 accelerator complex will allow for the simultaneous use of up to 5 different radioactive and stable beams. Several combinations of different beams delivered in parallel for experiments at low (keV/u), medium (few MeV/u) and high (up to 100 MeV/u) energies will be possible. Presently the GANIL/SPIRAL facility delivers about 60 weeks per year of stable and radioactive beams (up to 3 simultaneous beams). Thanks to SPIRAL 2 and the construction of a new beam line connecting the CIME cyclotron and the G1 and G2 experimental rooms the available beam time for experiments may be extended up to about 120 (up to 5 simultaneous beams) weeks per year. The chapters which follow a general introduction deal with the detailed questions to be addressed by experiments with the beams from SPIRAL2. In chapter 2 the many unanswered questions related to the structure of exotic nuclei are posed and the role of SPIRAL2 in answering them outlined. Chapter 3 deals with the dynamics and thermodynamics of asymmetric nuclear systems. Chapter 4 is concerned with questions of nuclear astrophysics which are intimately related to the properties of exotic nuclei. Chapter 5 indicates how the atomic nucleus can act as a laboratory for tests of the Standard model of Particle Physics and Chapter 6 shows how the production of intense fluxes of neutrons at SPIRAL2 make it an excellent tool to address both questions related to damage in materials of importance in nuclear installations and to the s- and r-processes of nucleosynthesis. In chapter 7 we turn to the application, of the radioactive beams from SPIRAL2 and the radionuclides produced by it, to study condensed matter and radiobiology. Finally in the eight and last chapter the reader can find an account of the historical development of the SPIRAL2 facility and this is followed by an outline of

  12. Study on a new water purification equipment with spiral lamellas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X. R.

    2017-08-01

    A new water purification equipment was introduced, especially the section of spiral lamellas. Utilization of spiral lamellas made the sedimentation space reach to 100%, not only improving sedimentation efficiency and reducing the cover space, but also saving investment. Production test results showed that the new water purification equipment with spiral lamellas had characteristics of excellent treatment efficiency and high shock resistant capacity. As the treatment water volume was 240 m3/d, when the turbidity, CODMn and UV254 were 203 NTU, 1.90 mg/L and 0.030 cm-1 in raw water, they were 0.32 NTU, 0.72mg/L and 0.011 cm-1 respectively in effluent water, which could fully meet the drinking water hygiene requirement.

  13. A Spiral And Discipline-Oriented Curriculum In Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Hanson, Lars G.; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge

    2011-01-01

    This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging and Radi......This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging...... and Radiation Physics containing three disciplines: Imaging modalities, Radiation therapy and Image processing. The two imaging courses in the bachelor’s program and the first imaging course in the master’s program follow a spiral curriculum in which most disciplines are encountered in all courses...

  14. Auditory Mechanics of the Tectorial Membrane and the Cochlear Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review is timely and relevant since new experimental and theoretical findings suggest that cochlear mechanics from the nanoscale to the macroscale are affected by mechanical properties of the tectorial membrane and the spiral shape. Recent findings Main tectorial membrane themes covered are i) composition and morphology, ii) nanoscale mechanical interactions with the outer hair cell bundle, iii) macroscale longitudinal coupling, iv) fluid interaction with inner hair cell bundles, v) macroscale dynamics and waves. Main cochlear spiral themes are macroscale low-frequency energy focusing and microscale organ of Corti shear gain. Implications Findings from new experimental and theoretical models reveal exquisite sensitivity of cochlear mechanical performance to tectorial membrane structural organization, mechanics, and its positioning with respect to hair bundles. The cochlear spiral geometry is a major determinant of low frequency hearing. Suggestions are made for future research directions. PMID:21785353

  15. Spiral CT for cervical lymph node enlargement. Early clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkamp, H.J.; Keske, U.; Schedel, J.; Hosten, N.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    Spiral CT was performed before treatment in 35 patients with suspected cervical lymph node enlargement. By coronary and sagittal reconstruction it is possible to utilise the M/Q quotient which has become accepted as the result of sonographic and MRI examinations. It is now possible to obtain high diagnostic accuracy (97%) for distinguishing between reactive change from metastatic infiltration of lymph nodes (>8 mm) by using CT. Using spiral CT with 5 mm table movement, three patients diagnosed as stage N1 by axial CT were shown to be N2b. This represents a highly sensitive and highly specific method of lymph node diagnosis. Further diagnostic improvement derives from the ability to relate the lymph nodes to surrounding tissues. Spiral CT is also suitable for defining other space occupying lesions, e.g., the exact extent of retropharyngeal abscesses, abnormalities of the salivary glands or laryngocoeles. (orig.)

  16. Aluminum cathode plates in zinc electrowinning cells: microstructural and failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buarzaiga, M.; Dreisinger, D.; Tromans, D.; Gonzalez, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of aluminum cathode plates used in zinc electrowinning was analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Three principal phases dominated the microstructure: primary aluminum, uniformly distributed intermetallic particles, and round rosettes. The intermetallics exhibited blade shape morphology, light gray color, and were aligned in the rolling direction. The chemical composition of the intermetallic particles was consistent with FeAl 3 . Angular particles of elemental silicon were also detected. Failure characteristics of industrial cathode plates were analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Three distinct corrosion zones were identified on failed plates: Zone I below the electrolyte/air interface, Zone II 0-40 mm above the electrolyte/air interface, and Zone III 40-140 mm above the electrolyte/air interface. After 24 months in service, the corrosion damage in Zones I and III was equivalent to ca. 10% reduction in plate thickness. Zone II experienced the greatest corrosion damage; the reduction in plate thickness was ca. 80%. Some plates exhibited severe thinning and perforation, which occurred preferentially near the electrical contact edge. Plates often fail in service by fracture in Zone II. (author)

  17. Parabolic solar cooker: Cooking with heat pipe vs direct spiral copper tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Omotoyosi O.; Dobson, Robert T.

    2016-05-01

    Cooking with solar energy has been seen by many researchers as a solution to the challenges of poverty and hunger in the world. This is no exception in Africa, as solar coking is viewed as an avenue to eliminate the problem of food insecurity, insufficient energy supply for household and industrial cooking. There are several types of solar cookers that have been manufactured and highlighted in literature. The parabolic types of solar cookers are known to reach higher temperatures and therefore cook faster. These cookers are currently being developed for indoor cooking. This technology has however suffered low cooking efficiency and thus leads to underutilization of the high heat energy captured from the sun in the cooking. This has made parabolic solar cookers unable to compete with other conventional types of cookers. Several methods to maximize heat from the sun for indirect cooking has been developed, and the need to improve on them of utmost urgency. This paper investigates how to optimize the heat collected from the concentrating types of cookers by proposing and comparing two types of cooking sections: the spiral hot plate copper tube and the heat pipe plate. The system uses the concentrating solar parabolic dish technology to focus the sun on a conical cavity of copper tubes and the heat is stored inside an insulated tank which acts both as storage and cooking plate. The use of heat pipes to transfer heat between the oil storage and the cooking pot was compared to the use of a direct natural syphon principle which is achieved using copper tubes in spiral form like electric stove. An accurate theoretical analysis for the heat pipe cooker was achieved by solving the boiling and vaporization in the evaporator side and then balancing it with the condensation and liquid-vapour interaction in the condenser part while correct heat transfer, pressure and height balancing was calculated in the second experiment. The results show and compare the cooking time, boiling

  18. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  19. Caribbean plate tectonics from seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brink, U. S.; Villasenor, A.

    2012-12-01

    New seismic tomography in the Caribbean shows close links between the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and the geology of the overriding plate. Unlike most oceanic plates, the Caribbean plate lacks identifiable seafloor magnetic anomalies and fracture zones. The plate's history has therefore been inferred primarily from land geology along the plate boundary, which is complicated by large-scale shear deformation, and from finite rotations of surrounding plates.We used more than 14 million arrival times from 300,000 earthquakes to identify P-wave velocity anomalies. We relate the anomalies to the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and to patterns of earthquake activity, volcanism, topographic relief, and tectonic deformation. For example, we detect two separate slabs belonging to the North and South American plates, respectively, which appear to be responsible for morphologic and tectonic differences between the arcs of the Northern (from Guadeloupe northward) and Southern (from Dominica southward) Lesser Antilles. Variations in earthquake activity between Haiti and the Dominican Republic can be explained by a change in slab geometry from an underplated slab beneath Haiti to a subducting slab under the Dominican Republic. A shallow tear in the slab may explain the anomalously deep Puerto Rico Trench and the frequent earthquake swarms there. The westward shift in volcanic activity in the Northern Lesser Antilles from the Miocene Limestone Caribbees to the present arc can be attributed to the limit on convective flow imposed by the 3-D geometry of the slab at depth. A thinned South America slab under the southern Lesser Antilles may result from traction imposed on the slab by a wide forearc wedge. Variations in tectonic deformation of northern South America could be related to the location of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province north of the Maracaibo Block.

  20. Rediscovering the Giant Low Surface Brightness Spiral Galaxy Malin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaz, Gaspar

    2018-01-01

    I summarize the latest discoveries regarding this ramarkable diffuse and giant galaxy, the largest single spiral in the universe so far. I describe how the latest discoveries could have been done easily 20 years ago, but an incredible summation of facts and some astronomical sociology, keeped many of them undisclosed. I present the most conspicuous features of the giant spiral arms of Malin 1, including stellar density, colors, stellar populations and some modeling describing their past evolution to the current state. I conclude with pending issues regarding stellar formation in Malin 1, and the efforts to detect its elusive molecular gas.

  1. Initial clinical experience with spiral CT angiography in the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaa, J.; Stehling, M.K.; Costello, P.

    1993-01-01

    The latest developments in modern CT instruments, offering scanning times of a second, opened up new possibilities in CT imaging in combination with the spiral technique. The data set normally taken with single-breath-hold technique is free of respiratory artefacts and thus is a good basis for accurate 3D image reconstruction. Spiral CTA allows a non-invasive 3D imaging of various blood vessels. Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms of aorto-iliac bypass can be examined as outpatients within 15 minutes. (orig.) [de

  2. The color gradient in spiral galaxies: application to M 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segalovitz, A.

    1975-01-01

    The calculated development of the color of a star cluster is used to predict the expected color evolution, as a function of radius, in a spiral galaxy. It is assumed that the fraction of gas which is converted into stars during a spiral arm passage is a function of radius only. Applying this model to M 81, it is shown that the observed color and mass distributions can be explained by an initial disk-like gas distribution proportional to the inverse square of the radius and a consumption fraction which is an increasing function of radius. (orig.) [de

  3. Spiral CT angiography of the abdominal aorta and its branches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Gaa, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Spiral CT angiography (CTA) was performed on 19 patients for the pre-operative assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms and in 3 post-operative renal artery bypass patients. Spiral CTA performed during intravenous contrast infusion provided a volume of data that was reconstructed at thin increments. Images were edited and reformatted either as surface rendered three-dimensional or maximum intensity projection (MIP) displays. Final images were viewed in a cine-loop presentation of quality comparable to conventional angiograms. The entire aorta can be examined from the coeliac axis to mid-pelvis with only 107 ml of 60% contrast. (orig.)

  4. SPIRAL2 Week 2011 - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.; Jacquemet, M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Petit, E.; Biarrote, J.L.; Uriot, D.; Thuillier, T.; Peaucelle, C.; Barue, C.; Van Hille, C.; Bernaudin, P.E.; Galdemard, P.; Ausset, P.; Dolegieviez, P.; Levallois, R.; Marchetto, M.; Pasini, M.; Quiclet, M.; Danna, O.; Lunney, D.; Di Giacomo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the SPIRAL2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. The program of the meeting will include presentations on scientific and technical developments related to the baseline project, experiments and theory. The main topics to be discussed at the conference have been: -) Driver Accelerators, -) Production of radioactive ion beams (RIB), -) Safety, -) RIB Facilities Worldwide (FAIR, Riken Nishina Center, SPES project, FRIB project) -) FP7 SPIRAL2 Preparatory Phase, -) Experiments with RIB and Theory. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  5. Necessity for High Accuracy Rotation Curves in Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Blais-Ouellette, Sebastien; Carignan, Claude; Amram, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    In the last 20 years, rotation curves derived from H I kinematics obtained on radio synthesis instruments were used to probe the dark matter distribution in spiral and dwarf irregular galaxies. It is shown, with the aid of the Sd galaxy NGC 5585, that high resolution 2--D H II kinematics is necessary to determine accurately the mass distribution of spirals. New CFHT Fabry--Perot Hff observations are combined with low resolution Westerbork H I data to study its mass distribution. Using the com...

  6. A Spiral And Discipline-Oriented Curriculum In Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Hanson, Lars G.; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge

    2011-01-01

    This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging...... and Radiation Physics containing three disciplines: Imaging modalities, Radiation therapy and Image processing. The two imaging courses in the bachelor’s program and the first imaging course in the master’s program follow a spiral curriculum in which most disciplines are encountered in all courses...

  7. Resonant fields created by spiral electric currents in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Caldas, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of the resonant magnetic perturbations, created by electric currents in spirals, on the plasma confinement in a tokamak with circular section and large aspect ratio is investigated. These perturbations create magnetic islands around the rational magnetic surface which has the helicity of the helicoidal currents. The intensities of these currents are calculated in order to the magnetic islands reach the limiter or others rational surfaces, what could provoke the plasma disrupture. The electric current intensities are estimated, in two spiral sets with different helicities, which create a predominantly stocastic region among the rational magnetic surfaces with these helicities. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Origin choice and petal loss in the flower garden of spiral wave tip trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard A; Wikswo, John P; Otani, Niels F

    2009-09-01

    Rotating spiral waves have been observed in numerous biological and physical systems. These spiral waves can be stationary, meander, or even degenerate into multiple unstable rotating waves. The spatiotemporal behavior of spiral waves has been extensively quantified by tracking spiral wave tip trajectories. However, the precise methodology of identifying the spiral wave tip and its influence on the specific patterns of behavior remains a largely unexplored topic of research. Here we use a two-state variable FitzHugh-Nagumo model to simulate stationary and meandering spiral waves and examine the spatiotemporal representation of the system's state variables in both the real (i.e., physical) and state spaces. We show that mapping between these two spaces provides a method to demarcate the spiral wave tip as the center of rotation of the solution to the underlying nonlinear partial differential equations. This approach leads to the simplest tip trajectories by eliminating portions resulting from the rotational component of the spiral wave.

  9. Classifying and modelling spiral structures in hydrodynamic simulations of astrophysical discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, D. H.; Ramón-Fox, F. G.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate numerical techniques for automatic identification of individual spiral arms in hydrodynamic simulations of astrophysical discs. Building on our earlier work, which used tensor classification to identify regions that were `spiral-like', we can now obtain fits to spirals for individual arm elements. We show this process can even detect spirals in relatively flocculent spiral patterns, but the resulting fits to logarithmic `grand-design' spirals are less robust. Our methods not only permit the estimation of pitch angles, but also direct measurements of the spiral arm width and pattern speed. In principle, our techniques will allow the tracking of material as it passes through an arm. Our demonstration uses smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, but we stress that the method is suitable for any finite-element hydrodynamics system. We anticipate our techniques will be essential to studies of star formation in disc galaxies, and attempts to find the origin of recently observed spiral structure in protostellar discs.

  10. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but ... you have an easy portion control solution that works. Last Reviewed: October 8, 2015 Last Edited: September ...

  11. What's On Your Plate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what these nutrients do in your body and what foods they are found in. Plans for Healthy Living ... food choices. Get more nutrition information online with What's On Your Plate? Smart Food Choices for Healthy Aging from the National Institute ...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With ... been easier. It can be a challenge to manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best- ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ...

  14. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Edited: September 14, 2016 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: wcie-meal-planning, . In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten ...

  15. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ...

  16. Humvee Armor Plate Drilling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    When drilling holes in hard steel plate used in up-armor kits for Humvee light trucks, the Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama, requested the assistance of the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one side, cut it again so you will have three sections on your plate. Fill the largest ... home, the office, or somewhere in between, you have an easy portion control solution that works. Last ...

  18. Neutron imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1995-01-01

    Imaging plates have been used in the field of medical diagnosis since long ago, but their usefulness was verified as the two-dimensional detector for analyzing the X-ray crystalline structure of high bio molecules like protein, and they have contributed to the remarkable progress in this field. The great contribution is due to the excellent features, such as the detection efficiency of about 100%, the positional resolution smaller than 0.2 mm, the dynamic range of five digits, and the area of several hundreds mm square. The neutron imaging plates have not yet obtained the sufficient results. It was planned to construct the neutron diffractometer for biological matters, and to put imaging plate neutron detectors (IP-ND) to practical use as the detector. The research on the development of IP-NDs was carried out, and the IPp-NDs having the performance comparable with that for X-ray were able to be produced. Imaging plates are the integral type two-dimensional radiation detector using photostimulated luminescence matters, and their principle is explained. As to neutron imaging plates, the converter, neutron detection efficiency and the flight of secondary particles in photo-stimulated luminescence matters are described. As for the present state of development of neutron imaging plates, the IP-NDs made for trial, the dynamic range, the positional resolution, the detection efficiency and the kinds of converters, and the application of IP-NDs are reported. (K.I.)

  19. An improved design of spiral tube assembly for separation of proteins by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, Dhweeja; Ito, Yoichiro

    2015-10-30

    A new spiral tube assembly was designed to improve the column capacity and partition efficiency for protein separation. This spiral tube assembly has greater column capacity than the original tubing because of an increase in radial grooves from 4 to 12 to accommodate more spiral layers and 12 narrow spots instead of 4 in each circular loop to interrupt the laminar flow that causes sample band broadening. Standard PTFE tubing (1.6mm ID) and the modified flat-twisted tubing were used as the separation column. The performances of both assemblies were compared for separating three stable test proteins including cytochrome c, myoglobin, and lysozyme using a two phase aqueous-aqueous solvent system composed of polyethylene glycol 1000 (12.5% w/w) and dibasic potassium phosphate (12.5% w/w). All samples were run at 1, 2, 3, and 5mL/min at both 800rpm and 1000rpm. The separation of these three protein samples produced high stationary phase retentions at 1, 2, and 3mL/min, yet separated efficiently at 5mL/min in 40min. After comparing the separation efficiency in terms of the peak resolutions, theoretical plate numbers, and separation times, it was determined that the flat-twisted tubing was more effective in separating these protein samples. In order to validate the efficacy of this novel assembly, a mixture of five protein samples (cytochrome c, myoglobin, ovalbumin, lysozyme, and hemoglobin) were separated, under the optimal conditions established with these three protein samples, at 1mL/min with a revolution speed of 1000rpm. There were high stationary phase retentions of around 60%, with effective separations, demonstrating the efficiency of the flat-twisted spiral tube assembly. The separation time of 6h was a limitation but can potentially be shortened by improving the strength of the column that will permit an increase in revolution speed and flow rate. This novel spiral separation column will allow rapid and efficient separation of mixtures with high yield of the

  20. A novel design of spiral groove bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qing; Zou, Jun; Ruan, Xiaodong; Fu, Xin; Yang, Huayong

    2012-08-01

    Good washout is very important in spiral groove bearing (SGB) designs when applied to blood pumps due to the micrometer scales of lubrication films and groove depths. To improve washout, flow rate or leakage through SGBs should be as large as possible. However, this special goal violates conventional SGB designs in which no leakage is desired as the leakage would decrease load-carrying capacity significantly. So, a design concept is formed fulfilling the two goals of high load-carrying capacity and large flow rate: let groove width decrease along flow path and the mating surface of the rotor rotate with a direction facilitating the flow through the grooves. Under this concept, a novel SGB is designed, contrary to conventional ones, with groove width decreasing with increasing spiral radius. This SGB is mounted on the motionless upper plate of our designed centrifugal blood pump, with the mating surface of rotor rotating with a direction facilitating the outward flow. To assess SGB designs, a characteristic plane is originally presented relating to pressure-normalized load-carrying capacity and flow rate. Comparisons between various kinds of SGB designs are made, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results are plotted in this characteristic plane from which load/flow performances can be directly read out. CFD and comparison results show that the new designs have superior load/flow characteristics. However, the impact of SGB designs upon hemolysis/thrombus formation is still to be verified according to the concept presented. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2012, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Characterising the Alpine Fault Damage Zone using Fault Zone Guided Waves, South Westland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, J. D.; Gulley, A.; Boese, C. M.; Malin, P. E.; Townend, J.; Thurber, C. H.; Guo, B.; Sutherland, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fault Zone Guided Waves (FZGWs) are observed within New Zealand's transpressional continental plate boundary, the Alpine Fault, which is late in its typical seismic cycle. Distinctive dispersive seismic coda waves (~7-35 Hz), trapped within the low-velocity fault damage zone, have been recorded on three component 2 Hz borehole seismometers installed within 20 m of the principal slip zone in the shallow (SAMBA and WIZARD seismometer arrays allows spatio-temporal patterns of 2013 events to be analysed and the segmentation and low velocity zone depth extent further explored. Three layer, dispersion modeling of the low-velocity zone indicates a waveguide width of 60-200 m with a 10-40% reduction in S-wave velocity, similar to that inferred for the fault core of other mature plate boundary faults such as the San Andreas and North Anatolian Faults.

  2. Orientation of spiral galaxies in the local supercluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaaniste, J.A.; Saar, E.M.

    1977-01-01

    Two alternative models for the spatial orientation of galaxies - parallelism and perpendicularity of the planes of galaxies with respect to the supergalactic plane - are compared with the observed orientations of spiral galaxies within the volume of the radius of 50 Mpc. The first model does not agree with experimental data whereas the second one-perpendicularity of the planes - describes the above data well

  3. EM-wave absorption properties of hollow spiral iron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-01-01

    Hollow iron spiral particles were fabricated successfully by thermal decomposition method, and they were heat-treated at different temperatures in N 2 atmosphere. The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of hollow iron spiral particles were investigated ranging between 1 GHz and 18 GHz. The results indicated that the phase structures of the particles changed from amorphous to nanocrystal with the treating temperature rising, also causing the significant change in electromagnetic parameters and the reflection loss. The reflection loss could reach −33 dB at 16.2 GHz, indicating that the hollow iron spiral particles had the potential to be used in prepare the a high property EM-wave absorber. - Highlights: • Hollow iron spiral particles were fabricated by thermal decomposition method. • The particles changed from amorphous to nanocrystals with heat-treatment. • Particles’ EM-parameters have a great change after high temperature heat-treatment. • RL results show the particles have potential to be high property EM-wave absorber

  4. The thickness of the HI gas layer in spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicking, Floris Jan

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, in two inclined spiral galaxies, NGC 3198 and NGC 2403, the HI random velocity dispersion and layer thickness will be measured simultaneously. This will be done from the HI velocity dispersion field (the distribution on the sky of the observed HI line of sight velocity

  5. Teaching about Energy Through a Spiral Curriculum: Guiding Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    Conventional science instruction often fails to address or change students' misconceptions about physical phenomena. Students stubbornly cling to anthropocentric, causal, and product conceptions about energy. This article explores scientific and pedagogical arguments favoring development of a spiral curriculum for teaching energy in (Israeli)…

  6. Ultra wideband coplanar waveguide fed spiral antenna for humanitarian demining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    to 1 bandwidth with a return loss better than 10 dB from 0.4 to 3.8 GHz is presented. A wideband balun covering the frequency range of the antenna was developed. The constructed spiral antenna is very useful in a stepped frequency ground penetrating radar for humanitarian demining due to the very...

  7. Multivessel myocardial bridging in a patient with spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Timothy; Abdallah, Wissam; McNamara, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, usually confined to the left anterior descending (LAD), and correlates to the hypertrophic septum. We present a patient with unique spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and compression of all three coronary arteries corresponding to this hypertrophy pattern.

  8. Spiral intensity patterns in the internally pumped optical parametric oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter; Bache, Morten; Saffman, Mark

    2001-01-01

    We describe a nonlinear optical system that supports spiral pattern solutions in the field intensity. This new spatial structure is found to bifurcate above a secondary instability in the internally pumped optical parametric oscillator. The analytical predictions of threshold and spatial scale...

  9. Abundance analysis of giant H II regions in nearby spirals

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Angeles I.; Terlevich, E.; Pagel, B.E.J.; Vílchez, J.M; Edmunds, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica. Díaz, Angeles I. et al. Abundance analysis of giant H II regions in nearby spirals. Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica 21 (1990): 223-227

  10. A Spiral And Discipline-Oriented Curriculum In Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Hanson, Lars G.; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge

    2011-01-01

    . However, in the master’s program, such a tight schedule is impractical since students are likely to seek specialization. From a pedagogical point of view, the spiral curriculum is advantageous to use in the initial semesters where the teaching can be conducted so that the students can build...

  11. A combined optical, SEM and STM study of growth spirals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some novel results of a combined sequential study of growth spirals on the basal surface of the richly polytypic CdI2 crystals by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are presented and discussed. In confirmation of the known structural data, the STM pictures ...

  12. Learning in 3D Virtual Environments: Collaboration and Knowledge Spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Brian G.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine if learning occurred within a 3D virtual learning environment by determining if elements of collaboration and Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) knowledge spiral were present. A key portion of this research was the creation of a Virtual Learning Environment. This 3D VLE utilized the Torque Game Engine…

  13. Long term complications of the intraprostatic spiral. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J

    1992-01-01

    A 76-year-old man had an intraprostatic spiral inserted to relieve bladder outlet obstruction that was caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy. After 30 months numerous complications had arisen including severe encrustations, urethral stricture, and sclerosis of the bladder neck. Regular replaceme...

  14. Advanced Manufacture of Spiral Bevel and Hypoid Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmos Simon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an advanced method for the manufacture of spiral bevel and hypoid gears on CNC hypoid generators is proposed. The optmal head-cutter geometry and machine tool settings are determined to introduce the optimal tooth surface modifications into the teeth of spiral bevel and hypoid gears. The aim of these tooth surface modifications is to simultaneously reduce the tooth contact pressure and the transmission errors, to maximize the EHD load carrying capacity of the oil film, and to minimize power losses in the oil film. The proposed advanced method for the manufacture of spiral bevel and hypoid gears is based on machine tool setting variation on the cradle-type generator conducted by optimal polynomial functions and on the use of a CNC hypoid generator. An algorithm is developed for the execution of motions on the CNC hypoid generator using the optimal relations on the cradle-type machine. Effectiveness of the method was demonstrated by using spiral bevel and hypoid gear examples. Significant improvements in the operating characteristics of the gear pairs are achieved.

  15. Long term complications of the intraprostatic spiral. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J

    1992-01-01

    A 76-year-old man had an intraprostatic spiral inserted to relieve bladder outlet obstruction that was caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy. After 30 months numerous complications had arisen including severe encrustations, urethral stricture, and sclerosis of the bladder neck. Regular replacement...

  16. Multiferroic Magnetic Spirals Induced by Random Magnetic Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramucci, Andrea; Shinaoka, Hiroshi; Mostovoy, Maxim V.; Müller, Markus; Mudry, Christopher; Troyer, Matthias; Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2018-01-01

    Multiferroism can originate from the breaking of inversion symmetry caused by magnetic-spiral order. The usual mechanism for stabilizing a magnetic spiral is competition between magnetic exchange interactions differing by their range and sign, such as nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions. In insulating compounds, it is unusual for these interactions to be both comparable in magnitude and of a strength that can induce magnetic ordering at room temperature. Therefore, the onset temperatures for multiferroism through this mechanism are typically low. By considering a realistic model for multiferroic YBaCuFeO5 , we propose an alternative mechanism for magnetic-spiral order, and hence for multiferroism, that occurs at much higher temperatures. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations and electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory, that the Heisenberg model on a geometrically nonfrustrated lattice with only nearest-neighbor interactions can have a spiral phase up to high temperature when frustrating bonds are introduced randomly along a single crystallographic direction as caused, e.g., by a particular type of chemical disorder. This long-range correlated pattern of frustration avoids ferroelectrically inactive spin-glass order. Finally, we provide an intuitive explanation for this mechanism and discuss its generalization to other materials.

  17. Embedded spiral patterns in the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1835

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, S.; Kitayama, T.; Dotani, T.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the central region of the massive galaxy cluster, Abell 1835, obtained with the data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find distinctive spiral patterns in the cool core in the residual image of the X-ray surface brightness after its nominal profile is subtracted. The spiral patterns consist of two arms. One of them appears as positive, and the other appears as negative excesses in the residual image. Their sizes are ˜ 70 kpc and their morphologies are consistent with each other. We find that the spiral patterns extend from the cool core out to the hotter surrounding ICM. We analyze the X-ray spectra extracted from both regions. We obtain that the ICM properties are similar to those expected by gas sloshing. We also find that the ICM in the two regions of spiral patterns is near or is in pressure equilibrium. Abell 1835 may now be experiencing gas sloshing induced by an off-axis minor merger. These results have been already published (Ueda, Kitayama, & Dotani 2017, ApJ, 837, 34).

  18. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ledoux, X.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Bém, Pavel; Fischer, U.; Majerle, Mitja; Mrázek, Jaromír; Negoita, F.; Novák, Jan; Simakov, S. P.; Šimečková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, MAY (2014), s. 353-356 ISSN 0090-3752 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : SPIRAL-2 * Neutron For Science * time-of-flight Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.571, year: 2014

  19. The dynamics of the spiral structure in galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contopoulos, G.

    1979-01-01

    The basic ideas and current problems of the linear and non-linear theory of spiral structure are reviewed. Some recent work on the response density and possible self-consistent solutions of bars with an Inner Lindblad Resonance are described. (Auth.)

  20. Opaque spiral disks - Some empirical facts and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.

    1990-01-01

    Results for the Sb and Sc galaxies, as obtained from the analysis of the optical ESO-LV data, are reviewed, and the implied constraints for the properties of the absorbing components in spiral disks are discussed. An alternative interpretation of flat rotation curves and a revised extinction model

  1. SPIRAL (Sandia's Program for Information Retrieval and Listing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Leslie E.

    The general scope of SPIRAL is storage of free-flowing text information into a machine-readable library and recall of any portions of this stored information that are relevant to an inquiry. The major objectives in the design of the system were (1) to make it easy to use by persons unfamiliar with computer systems; and (2) to make it efficient, in…

  2. Ekman Spiral in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    thermocline (in temperature) and pycnocline (in density) (e.g., Kraus and Turner 1967; Garwood 1977; Chu and Garwood 1991; Steger et al. 1998; Chu et...spiral as a good statistical fit to low-frequency currents in a coastal strait. Science, 233, 470-472. Steger , J., Collins, C.A., and Chu, P.C. (1998

  3. THE MASS-DISTRIBUTION OF THE DWARF SPIRAL NGC-1560

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROEILS, AH

    H I synthesis observations with the WSRT and optical surface photometry of the dwarf spiral galaxy NGC 1560 are presented. This galaxy has an absolute luminosity of M(B) = -15.87. The observations show that the galaxy is gas rich, with an M(HI)/L(B) of 2.4. We obtained a very detailed rotation curve

  4. Evaluation of spiral CT in the diagnosis of ureteral diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiansheng; Li Kangyin; Chen Huyi; Qiang Haixia; Shen Guoqiang; Li Jing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the diagnostic value of spiral CT in ureteral diseases. Methods: Spiral CT urography (SCTU) was performed in 27 cases with ureteral diseases, including 9 cases of ureteral calculus, 5 carcinomas, 9 stenosis, 1 malformation, 1 inflammation and 2 fistula. Of the 27 cases,15 also underwent non-enhanced spiral CT scan and 10 received intravenous urography(IVU). Results: (1) Eight cases of radiolucent ureteral calculus were clearly showed by non-enhanced spiral CT. (2) On SCTU, the location and diameter of 9 ureteral calculus (8 radiolucent, 1 radiopaque) and enlargement of renal pelvis and ureter were displayed. Irregular ureteral wall, local rarefaction or obstruction of contrast medium in ureter were detected in 5 case of tumor. Ureteral lumen was narrowed gradually in 7 cases of simple ureteral stenosis without thickening of the wall. Two cases with ectopic vessel compression were clarified at the boundary of ureter and pelvis. 1 malformation with double renal pelvis and ureter was demonstrated. The location and direction of ureteral fistula were notified. Conclusion: SCTU is superior to IVU and conventional CT in improving diagnostic accuracy of ureteral disease

  5. Intervention of malignant biliary obstruction with Hanaro spiral stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sung Wook; Choo, Sung Wook; Pyeun, Yong Seon and others

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term patency of the Hanaro spiral stent (Solco Intermed, Seoul, Korea) when used as a palliative in patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Between April 1996 and July 1998, 39 patients with malignant biliary obstruction underwent percutaneous placement of 48 Hanaro spiral stents. The causes of obstruction were bile duct carcinoma (n=18), pancreatic carcinoma (n=8), metastatic lymphadenopathy (n=5), gallbladder carcinoma (n=5), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1) and other tumors (n=2). Using the kaplan-Meier method, patient survival and stet patency rates were estimated with regard to level of obstruction. As regards stent insertion, there was no technical failure. Overall 25- and 50-week survival rates for the entire patient group were 50 % and 11 %, respectively, while overall stent patency rates at 25 and 50 weeks were 42 % and 11 %, respectively. Twenty-five-week stent patency rates in patients with common bile duct (CBD) and hilar obstruction were 51 % and 18 %, respectively. The stent patency rates in the CBD obstruction group was significantly higher than that in the hilar obstruction group (p<0.05). In patients with CBD obstruction, the clinical efficacy of Hanaro spiral stent was superior to that in patients with hilar obstruction. However, Hanaro spiral stents showed a lower patency rate with regard to patient survival, and further investigation is required

  6. Flux flow and cleaning enhancement in a spiral membrane element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of backpulsing, into the permeate space of a 2.5 inch spiral wrap membrane, on the prevention of fouling (flux enhancement) was investigated experimentally. These experiments were performed using a 500 mg∙ℓ-1 dextrin solution and a 100 000 MCWO polypropylene membrane, with a feed pressure of 100 kPa ...

  7. Dark matter and rotation curves of spiral galaxies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Křížek, Filip; Somer, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, April (2016), s. 64-77 ISSN 1313-2709 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15052 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : red dwarf * dark matter * spiral galaxy Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.astro.bas.bg/AIJ/issues/n25/MKrizek.pdf

  8. Exact cone beam CT with a spiral scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, K.C.; Samarasekera, S.; Sauer, F.

    1998-01-01

    A method is developed which makes it possible to scan and reconstruct an object with cone beam x-rays in a spiral scan path with area detectors much shorter than the length of the object. The method is mathematically exact. If only a region of interest of the object is to be imaged, a top circle scan at the top level of the region of interest and a bottom circle scan at the bottom level of the region of interest are added. The height of the detector is required to cover only the distance between adjacent turns in the spiral projected at the detector. To reconstruct the object, the Radon transform for each plane intersecting the object is computed from the totality of the cone beam data. This is achieved by suitably combining the cone beam data taken at different source positions on the scan path; the angular range of the cone beam data required at each source position can be determined easily with a mask which is the spiral scan path projected on the detector from the current source position. The spiral scan algorithm has been successfully validated with simulated cone beam data. (author)

  9. Placement of Plantar Plates for Lapidus Arthrodesis: Anatomical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaass, Christian; Claassen, Leif; Daniilidis, Kiriakos; Fumy, Mariesol; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Schmiedl, Andreas; Ettinger, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    The modified Lapidus procedure is an accepted treatment option for patients with moderate to severe hallux valgus. Placing a plate plantar on the tension side of the arthrodesis has been shown to be biomechanically superior and has provided good clinical results. There is some concern about interference of the plantar placed plates on the tendon insertions. The purpose of this study was to determine a "safe zone" for plantar plate placement without irritation of the tendons. Twenty-nine embalmed right feet were used for this study. The anatomy of the insertion of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon and tibialis anterior (TA) tendon on the medial cuneiform and first metatarsal were analyzed. Six different plate designs for plantar plating of the first tarsometatarsal fusion were included. The fit to the bone and contact to tendon insertion were analyzed. The PL showed a main insertion to the first metatarsal and a lesser insertion to the medial cuneiform. The TA inserted onto the medial cuneiform and first metatarsal in all cases in our series. There was a "safe zone" between the TA and PL insertion areas for plate placement. Straight, Y- and U-shaped plates could be placed without compromising the tendon insertion. Depending on the design, even preshaped plates may have to be bent to allow a good fit to the plantar side of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Plantar plating for modified Lapidus arthrodesis can be safely performed, without damaging the plantar tendon insertion area of the PL and TA. The exact knowledge of the anatomy of the plantar region of the tarsometatarsal joint can help to improve plate placement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Model for Simulating a Spiral Software-Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Curley, Charles; Nayak, Umanath

    2010-01-01

    A discrete-event simulation model, and a computer program that implements the model, have been developed as means of analyzing a spiral software-development process. This model can be tailored to specific development environments for use by software project managers in making quantitative cases for deciding among different software-development processes, courses of action, and cost estimates. A spiral process can be contrasted with a waterfall process, which is a traditional process that consists of a sequence of activities that include analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, and support. A spiral process is an iterative process that can be regarded as a repeating modified waterfall process. Each iteration includes assessment of risk, analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, delivery, and evaluation. A key difference between a spiral and a waterfall process is that a spiral process can accommodate changes in requirements at each iteration, whereas in a waterfall process, requirements are considered to be fixed from the beginning and, therefore, a waterfall process is not flexible enough for some projects, especially those in which requirements are not known at the beginning or may change during development. For a given project, a spiral process may cost more and take more time than does a waterfall process, but may better satisfy a customer's expectations and needs. Models for simulating various waterfall processes have been developed previously, but until now, there have been no models for simulating spiral processes. The present spiral-process-simulating model and the software that implements it were developed by extending a discrete-event simulation process model of the IEEE 12207 Software Development Process, which was built using commercially available software known as the Process Analysis Tradeoff Tool (PATT). Typical inputs to PATT models include industry-average values of product size (expressed as number of lines of code

  11. Evolution of Gas Across Spiral Arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Melissa Nicole

    To investigate the dynamic evolution of gas across spiral arms, we conducted a detailed study of the gas and star formation along the spiral arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy, M51. This nearby, face-on spiral galaxy provides a unique laboratory to study the relationship between gas dynamics and star formation. The textbook picture of interstellar medium (ISM) evolution is rapidly changing. Molecular gas was once believed to form along spiral arms from the diffuse atomic gas in the inter-arm regions. Star formation occurs within giant molecular clouds during spiral arm passage. Lastly, the molecular gas is photo-dissociated back into atomic gas by massive stars on the downstream side of the spiral arm. Recent evidence, however, is revealing a new picture of the interstellar medium and the process of star formation. We seek development of a new picture by studying the development and evolution of molecular gas and the role of large scale galactic dynamics in organizing the interstellar medium. This thesis begins by presenting work measuring the geometrical offsets between interstellar gas and recent star formation. Interstellar gas is traced by atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO). Star formation is traced by ionized hydrogen recombination lines and infrared emission from dust warmed by young bright stars. Measuring these offsets can help determine the underlying large scale galactic dynamics. Along the spiral arms in M51, offsets between CO and the star formation tracers suggest that gas is flowing through the spiral arms, but the offsets do not show the expected signature of a single pattern speed and imply a more complicated pattern. This thesis also examines the intermediate stages of gas evolution, by studying a denser component of the ISM closer to which stars will form. Only a small percent of the bulk molecular gas will become dense enough to form stars. HCN and HCO+ probe densities ˜104 cm-3, where as the bulk gas is 500 cm-3. This thesis looks at HCN and

  12. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  13. Computerized spiral analysis using the iPad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Jonathan A; Christophe, Brandon; Seville, Audrey Rakovich; Garton, Andrew L A; Gupta, Vivek P; Bandin, Alexander J; Yu, Qiping; Pullman, Seth L

    2017-01-01

    Digital analysis of writing and drawing has become a valuable research and clinical tool for the study of upper limb motor dysfunction in patients with essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and related disorders. We developed a validated method of computerized spiral analysis of hand-drawn Archimedean spirals that provides insight into movement dynamics beyond subjective visual assessment using a Wacom graphics tablet. While the Wacom tablet method provides robust data, more widely available mobile technology platforms exist. We introduce a novel adaptation of the Wacom-based method for the collection of hand-drawn kinematic data using an Apple iPad. This iPad-based system is stand-alone, easy-to-use, can capture drawing data with either a finger or capacitive stylus, is precise, and potentially ubiquitous. The iPad-based system acquires position and time data that is fully compatible with our original spiral analysis program. All of the important indices including degree of severity, speed, presence of tremor, tremor amplitude, tremor frequency, variability of pressure, and tightness are calculated from the digital spiral data, which the application is able to transmit. While the iPad method is limited by current touch screen technology, it does collect data with acceptable congruence compared to the current Wacom-based method while providing the advantages of accessibility and ease of use. The iPad is capable of capturing precise digital spiral data for analysis of motor dysfunction while also providing a convenient, easy-to-use modality in clinics and potentially at home. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Effective dose in X-ray examinations: comparison between spiral CT and urography in the study of renal colic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Denaro, M; Bregant, P; Cupardo, F; De Guarrini, F; Rimondini, A; Pozzi Mucelli, R

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose in patients with renal colic undergoing spiral CT examination and IVU examination, and to verify the ability of the systems to measure the effective dose. Dose measurements were carried out for both diagnostic techniques by employing an anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) fitted inside the phantom. The data so obtained were compared with dose estimations based on published tables, which allow to obtain the effective dose on the basis of the experimental value of common dose indicators, the performance of the equipment and the setting of the acquisition parameters for such examinations. The absorbed dose inside the phantom had an homogeneous distribution during the spiral CT examination, while during the IVU there were significant differences in the absorbed dose between different zones of the body, due to the geometry of the x-ray beam. The mean effective dose, which corresponds to the average of values absorbed by males and females, measured by TLD dosimeters for spiral CT examination was 3.3 time that for IVU. For both spiral CT and IVU the dose to the male was significantly lower than that to the female, owing to the anatomic position of female gonads that are completely exposed to the x-ray radiations during the study, while male gonads lie outside of the exposed area. Both methods for estimating the effective dose in spiral CT, based on CTDI value, significantly underestimated the value derived from experimental TLDs measurement. The evaluation of effective dose in IVU, based on the measurement of the skin dose in air, overestimated the measurement performed by TLDs. Dose measurement performed by TLD dosimeters fitted inside an anthropomorphic phantom has the advantage of calculating experimentally the absorbed dose in different anatomic districts. However, the method is quite difficult, and introduces some imprecisions due to the simplified morphology of the phantom and the

  15. Cadmium plating replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  16. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  17. Planar Task Space Control of a Biarticular Manipulator Driven by Spiral Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaki bin Hj Shukor

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates upon a musculoskeletal-inspired robot manipulator using a prototype of the spiral motor developed in our laboratory. The spiral motors represent the antagonistic muscles due to the high forward/backward drivability without any gears or mechanisms. Modelling of the biarticular structure with spiral motor dynamics was presented and simulations were carried out to compare two control methods, Inverse Kinematics (IK and direct-Cartesian control, between monoarticular only structures and biarticular structures using the spiral motor. The results show the feasibility of the control, especially in maintaining air gaps within the spiral motor.

  18. Seismicity of the Earth 1900–2010 Australia plate and vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This map shows details of the Australia plate and vicinity not presented in Tarr and others (2010). The boundary of the Australia plate includes all fundamental plate boundary components: mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, arc-continent collisions, and large-offset transform faults. Along the southern edge of the plate the mid-ocean ridge separates the Australia and Antarctica plates and its behavior is straightforward. In contrast, the other boundary segments that ring the Australia plate represent some of the most seismically active elements of the global plate boundary system, and some of the most rapidly evolving plate interactions. As a result, there are some very complex structures which host many large and great earthquakes

  19. Plating on Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.; Jones, A.

    1979-03-01

    Zircaloy-2 is a difficult alloy to coat with an adherent electroplate because it easily forms a tenacious oxide film in air and aqueous solutions. Procedures reported in the literature and those developed at SLL for surmounting this problem were investigated. The best results were obtained when specimens were first etched in either an ammonium bifluoride/sulfuric acid or an ammonium bifluoride solution, plated, and then heated at 700 0 C for 1 hour in a constrained condition. Machining threads in the Zircaloy-2 for the purpose of providing sites for mechanical interlocking of the plating also proved satisfactory

  20. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  1. The Sorong Fault Zone, Indonesia: Mapping a Fault Zone Offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, S.; Hall, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Sorong Fault Zone is a left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in eastern Indonesia, extending westwards from the Bird's Head peninsula of West Papua towards Sulawesi. It is the result of interactions between the Pacific, Caroline, Philippine Sea, and Australian Plates and much of it is offshore. Previous research on the fault zone has been limited by the low resolution of available data offshore, leading to debates over the extent, location, and timing of movements, and the tectonic evolution of eastern Indonesia. Different studies have shown it north of the Sula Islands, truncated south of Halmahera, continuing to Sulawesi, or splaying into a horsetail fan of smaller faults. Recently acquired high resolution multibeam bathymetry of the seafloor (with a resolution of 15-25 meters), and 2D seismic lines, provide the opportunity to trace the fault offshore. The position of different strands can be identified. On land, SRTM topography shows that in the northern Bird's Head the fault zone is characterised by closely spaced E-W trending faults. NW of the Bird's Head offshore there is a fold and thrust belt which terminates some strands. To the west of the Bird's Head offshore the fault zone diverges into multiple strands trending ENE-WSW. Regions of Riedel shearing are evident west of the Bird's Head, indicating sinistral strike-slip motion. Further west, the ENE-WSW trending faults turn to an E-W trend and there are at least three fault zones situated immediately south of Halmahera, north of the Sula Islands, and between the islands of Sanana and Mangole where the fault system terminates in horsetail strands. South of the Sula islands some former normal faults at the continent-ocean boundary with the North Banda Sea are being reactivated as strike-slip faults. The fault zone does not currently reach Sulawesi. The new fault map differs from previous interpretations concerning the location, age and significance of different parts of the Sorong Fault Zone. Kinematic

  2. STAR FORMATION IN PARTIALLY GAS-DEPLETED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, James A.; Miner, Jesse; Levy, Lorenza; Robertson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Broadband B and R and Hα images have been obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon, Chile, for 29 spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster and for 18 spirals in non-cluster environments. Pegasus I is a spiral-rich cluster with a low-density intracluster medium and a low galaxy velocity dispersion. When combined with neutral hydrogen (H I) data obtained with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope, acquired by Levy et al. (2007) and by Springob et al. (2005b), we study the star formation rates in disk galaxies as a function of their H I deficiency. To quantify H I deficiency, we use the usual logarithmic deficiency parameter, DEF. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) is quantified by the logarithmic flux ratio of Hα flux to R-band flux, and thus roughly characterizes the logarithmic SFR per unit stellar mass. We find a clear correlation between the global SFR per unit stellar mass and DEF, such that the SFR is lower in more H I-deficient galaxies. This correlation appears to extend from the most gas-rich to the most gas-poor galaxies. We also find a correlation between the central SFR per unit mass relative to the global values, in the sense that the more H I-deficient galaxies have a higher central SFR per unit mass relative to their global SFR values than do gas-rich galaxies. In fact, approximately half of the H I-depleted galaxies have highly elevated SSFRs in their central regions, indicative of a transient evolutionary state. In addition, we find a correlation between gas depletion and the size of the Hα disk (relative to the R-band disk); H I-poor galaxies have truncated disks. Moreover, aside from the elevated central SSFR in many gas-poor spirals, the SSFR is otherwise lower in the Hα disks of gas-poor galaxies than in gas-rich spirals. Thus, both disk truncation and lowered SSFR levels within the star-forming part of the disks (aside from the enhanced nuclear SSFR) correlate with H I deficiency, and both phenomena are found to

  3. Shadows and spirals in the protoplanetary disk HD 100453

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benisty, M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; de Boer, J.; Lesur, G.; Dominik, C.; Dullemond, C. P.; Langlois, M.; Min, M.; Wagner, K.; Henning, T.; Juhasz, A.; Pinilla, P.; Facchini, S.; Apai, D.; van Boekel, R.; Garufi, A.; Ginski, C.; Ménard, F.; Pinte, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Zurlo, A.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Beuzit, J. L.; Chauvin, G.; Cudel, M.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Fontanive, C.; Gratton, R.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; LeCoroller, H.; Mouillet, D.; Mesa, D.; Sissa, E.; Vigan, A.; Antichi, J.; Buey, T.; Fusco, T.; Gisler, D.; Llored, M.; Magnard, Y.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Pragt, J.; Roelfsema, R.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Wildi, F.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Understanding the diversity of planets requires studying the morphology and physical conditions in the protoplanetary disks in which they form. Aims: We aim to study the structure of the 10 Myr old protoplanetary disk HD 100453, to detect features that can trace disk evolution and to understand the mechanisms that drive these features. Methods: We observed HD 100453 in polarized scattered light with VLT/SPHERE at optical (0.6 μm, 0.8 μm) and near-infrared (1.2 μm) wavelengths, reaching an angular resolution of 0.02'', and an inner working angle of 0.09''. Results: We spatially resolve the disk around HD 100453, and detect polarized scattered light up to 0.42'' ( 48 au). We detect a cavity, a rim with azimuthal brightness variations at an inclination of 38° with respect to our line of sight, two shadows and two symmetric spiral arms. The spiral arms originate near the location of the shadows, close to the semi major axis. We detect a faint feature in the SW that can be interpreted as the scattering surface of the bottom side of the disk, if the disk is tidally truncated by the M-dwarf companion currently seen at a projected distance of 119 au. We construct a radiative transfer model that accounts for the main characteristics of the features with an inner and outer disk misaligned by 72°. The azimuthal brightness variations along the rim are well reproduced with the scattering phase function of the model. While spirals can be triggered by the tidal interaction with the companion, the close proximity of the spirals to the shadows suggests that the shadows could also play a role. The change in stellar illumination along the rim induces an azimuthal variation of the scale height that can contribute to the brightness variations. Conclusions: Dark regions in polarized images of transition disks are now detected in a handful of disks and often interpreted as shadows due to a misaligned inner disk. However, the origin of such a misalignment in HD 100453, and

  4. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  5. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are ... Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten ...

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future-without-diabetes-2.html A Future Without Diabetes Donate towards research today and your gift will be matched. Donate ...

  7. The Plate Tectonics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meal-planning, . In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future-without-diabetes-1.html A Future ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home Find Your ... but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger portions of ... seven steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put a line down ...

  10. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With ... for Donations - ways-to-give-201710-hotelscom.html Ways to Give ... to help prevent and manage diabetes. Ask the Experts: Learn to Live Well ...

  11. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meal-planning, . In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future-without-diabetes-2.html A Future ...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ ... Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future-without-diabetes.html A Future Without Diabetes Donate towards research today and your gift will be matched. Donate Today We Can Help - we- ...

  14. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the ... way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ...

  15. Plate girders under bending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abspoel, R.; Dubina, D.; Ungureanu, V.

    2016-01-01

    In a material economy driven plate girder design, the lever arm between the flanges will increase. This leads to higher stiffness and bending moment resistance, but also to an in-crease of the web slenderness. This means that high strength steels can be used leading to a large reduction of the steel

  16. Coastal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The report entitled Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation : A Canadian Perspective, presents a summary of research regarding the impacts of climate change on key sectors over the past five years as it relates to Canada. This chapter on the coastal zone focuses on the impact of climate change on Canada's marine and Great Lakes coasts with tips on how to deal with the impacts associated with climate change in sensitive environments. This report is aimed at the sectors that will be most affected by adaptation decisions in the coastal zone, including fisheries, tourism, transportation and water resources. The impact of climate change in the coastal zone may include changes in water levels, wave patterns, storm surges, and thickness of seasonal ice cover. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects global average sea level will rise between 9 and 88 centimetres between 1990 to 2100, but not all areas of Canada will experience the same rate of future sea level change. The main physical impact would be shoreline change that could result in a range of biophysical and socio-economic impacts, some beneficial, some negative. The report focuses on issues related to infrastructure and communities in coastal regions. It is noted that appropriate human adaptation will play a vital role in reducing the extent of potential impacts by decreasing the vulnerability of average zone to climate change. The 3 main trends in coastal adaptation include: (1) increase in soft protection, retreat and accommodation, (2) reliance on technology such as geographic information systems to manage information, and (3) awareness of the need for coastal adaptation that is appropriate for local conditions. 61 refs., 7 figs

  17. Assembly and performance testing of a MEMS-based {mu}PEMFC with the help of a spiral micrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xigui; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xinxin; Xia, Baojia [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, Tao [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shanghai Institute of Space Power-Sources, Shanghai 200381 (China); Zheng, Dan [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2008-12-15

    In this work, a feasible and simple method of assembling a micro MEMS-based {mu}PEMFC (about 0.35 ml in volume and 0.65 g in weight) with the help of a spiral micrometer was proposed. The micrometer provided a constant pressure between the two flow field plates and MEA in assembling for a short term while a special epoxy resin was applied to seal the cell and provide long term pressure between the above components after removing the micrometer. Tests showed that the as-assembled cell had a reasonable performance, which was proved by the linear polarization and EIS experiments. The long term behavior of the {mu}PEMFC was stable in general except for some fluctuation along time. We concluded that this fluctuation was due to a combined effect of heat produced and water management, which the as-assembled {mu}PEMFC has its own ability to adjust. More importantly, this experiment demonstrated the full feasibility and great promise of assembling {mu}FCs with the help of a spiral micrometer. (author)

  18. Assembly and performance testing of a MEMS-based {mu}PEMFC with the help of a spiral micrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xigui [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)], E-mail: zhangxigui@mail.sim.ac.cn; Zhang Jian [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang Tao [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shanghai Institute of Space Power-Sources, Shanghai 200381 (China); Zheng Dan [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200233 (China); Li Xinxin; Xia Baojia [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Room 807, 8th Building, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2008-12-15

    In this work, a feasible and simple method of assembling a micro MEMS-based {mu}PEMFC (about 0.35 ml in volume and 0.65 g in weight) with the help of a spiral micrometer was proposed. The micrometer provided a constant pressure between the two flow field plates and MEA in assembling for a short term while a special epoxy resin was applied to seal the cell and provide long term pressure between the above components after removing the micrometer. Tests showed that the as-assembled cell had a reasonable performance, which was proved by the linear polarization and EIS experiments. The long term behavior of the {mu}PEMFC was stable in general except for some fluctuation along time. We concluded that this fluctuation was due to a combined effect of heat produced and water management, which the as-assembled {mu}PEMFC has its own ability to adjust. More importantly, this experiment demonstrated the full feasibility and great promise of assembling {mu}FCs with the help of a spiral micrometer.

  19. Deformation of the Northwestern Okhotsk Plate: How is it happening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, D.; Fujita, K.; Mackey, K.

    2009-09-01

    The Eurasia (EU) - North America (NA) plate boundary zone across Northeast Asia still presents many open questions within the plate tectonic paradigm. Constraining the geometry and number of plates or microplates present in the plate boundary zone is especially difficult because of the location of the EU-NA euler pole close to or even upon the EU-NA boundary. One of the major challenges remains the geometry of the Okhotsk plate (OK). whose northwestern portion terminates on the EU-OK-NA triple junction and is thus caught and compressed between converging EU and NA. We suggest that this leads to a coherent and understandable large scale deformation pattern of mostly northwest-southeast trending strike-slip faults which split Northwest OK into several extruding slivers. When the fault geometry is analysed together with space geodetic and focal mechanism data it suggests a central block which is extruding faster bordered east and west by progressively slower extruding blocks until the OK plate boundary faults are encountered. Taking into account elastic loading from both the intra-OK faults and the OK-Pacific (PA) boundary reconciles geodetic motions with geologic slip rates on at least the OK-NA boundary which corresponds to the Ulakhan fault.

  20. Galaxy interactions and star formation: Results of a survey of global H-alpha emission in spiral galaxies in 8 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C.

    1990-01-01

    Kennicutt and Kent (1983) have shown that the global H alpha emission from a spiral galaxy is an indicator of the formation rate of massive stars. Moss, Whittle and Irwin (1988) have surveyed two clusters (Abell 347 and 1367) for galaxies with H alpha emission using a high dispersion objective prism technique. The purpose of the survey is to investigate environmental effects on star formation in spiral galaxies, and in particular to ascertain whether star formation is enhanced in cluster spirals. Approximately 20 percent of CGCG galaxies were detected in emission. Two plates of excellent quality were obtained for each of the two clusters, and galaxies were only identified to have emission if this was detected on both plates of a plate pair. In this way, plate flaws and other spurious identifications of emission could be rejected, and weak emission confirmed. The results of this survey have been discussed by Moss (1987). The detected galaxies are of types SO-a and later. The frequency with which galaxies are detected in emission increases towards later morphological type as expected (cf. Kennicutt and Kent 1983). There is no evidence of any dependence of the frequency of detected emission on the absolute magnitude of the galaxy (cf. Moss and Whittle 1990), but there is a strong correlation between a disturbed morphological appearance of the galaxy and the detection of emission. Furthermore it is found that the emission is more centrally concentrated in those galaxies which show a disturbed morphology. It may be noted that the objective prism plate gives a spectrum of a 400 A region around rest wavelength H alpha, but superposed on this is the H alpha emission from the galaxy which, because the light is essentially monochromatic, results in a true two-dimensional image of the H alpha distribution. The visual appearance of the emission on the prism plates was classified according to its diffuseness on a 5 point scale (very diffuse, diffuse, intermediate, compact, and

  1. Curvature-driven bubbles or droplets on the spiral surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanpeng; Liu, Jianlin; Hou, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Directional motion of droplets or bubbles can often be observed in nature and our daily life, and this phenomenon holds great potential in many engineering areas. The study shows that droplets or bubbles can be driven to migrate perpetually on some special substrates, such as the Archimedean spiral, the logarithmic spiral and a cantilever sheet in large deflection. It is found that a bubble approaches or deviates from the position with highest curvature of the substrate, when it is on the concave or convex side. This fact is helpful to explain the repelling water capability of Nepenthes alata. Based on the force and energy analysis, the mechanism of the bubble migration is well addressed. These findings pave a new way to accurately manipulate droplet or bubble movement, which bring inspirations to the design of microfluidic and water harvesting devices, as well as oil displacement and ore filtration.

  2. Synchronized control of spiral CT scan for security inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jue; Jiang Zenghui; Wang Fuquan

    2008-01-01

    In security inspection system of spiral CT, the synchronization between removing and rotating, and the scan synchronization between rotating and sampling influence quality of image reconstruction, so it is difficulty and important that how to realize synchronized scan. According to the controlling demand of multi-slice Spiral CT, the method to realize synchronized scan is given. a synchronized control system is designed, in which we use a industrial PC as the control computer, use magnetic grids as position detectors, use alternating current servo motor and roller motor as drivers respectively drive moving axis and rotating axis. This method can solve the problem of synchronized scan, and has a feasibility and value of use. (authors)

  3. Status of the SPIRAL 2 LINAC cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghribi, A.; Bernaudin, P.-E.; Vassal, A.; Bonne, F.

    2017-07-01

    SPIRAL 2 is a state of the art superconducting linear accelerator expected to deliver some of the highest intensity rare isotope beams on earth. The project has been in development/design, fabrication and installation for over 10 years and is now reaching its final critical stages before commissioning. One of its most critical parts is a cryoplant and a cryodistribution system that feed the heart of the accelerator with the necessary refrigeration power and allow the required pressure and thermal regulation to be achieved and maintained in a reliable way. This paper summarises the latest updates of the cryogenic system before the first cool down trials. It also plots the strategies and R&D efforts undertaken to tackle some of the challenges that SPIRAL 2 is expected to face.

  4. Distributed temperature sensing using a SPIRAL configuration ultrasonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    Distributed temperature sensing has important applications in the long term monitoring of critical enclosures such as containment vessels, flue gas stacks, furnaces, underground storage tanks and buildings for fire risk. This paper presents novel techniques for such measurements, using wire in a spiral configuration and having special embodiments such a notch for obtaining wave reflections from desired locations. Transduction is performed using commercially available Piezo-electric crystal that is bonded to one end of the waveguide. Lower order axisymmetric guided ultrasonic modes were employed. Time of fight (TOF) differences between predefined reflectors located on the waveguides are used to infer temperature profile in a chamber with different temperatures. The L(0,1) wave mode (pulse echo approach) was generated/received in a spiral waveguide at different temperatures for this work. The ultrasonic measurements were compared with commercially available thermocouples.

  5. The Norma spiral arm: large-scale pitch angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2017-09-01

    In the inner Galaxy, we statistically find the mean pitch angle of the recently mapped Norma arm in two galactic quadrants (observed tangentially at galactic longitudes near l=328° and near l=20°), using the twin-tangent method, and obtain -13.7°± 1.4°. We compared with other measurements in the literature. Also, using the latest published data on pitch angle and the latest published data on the radial starting point of the four arms (R_{Gal} = 2.2 kpc) in each galactic quadrant, a revised velocity plot of the Norma spiral arm is made, along with other spiral arms in the Milky Way, in each Galactic quadrant.

  6. Spiral actin-polymerization waves can generate amoeboidal cell crawling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Kruse, K.

    2014-05-01

    Amoeboidal cell crawling on solid substrates is characterized by protrusions that seemingly appear randomly along the cell periphery and drive the cell forward. For many cell types, it is known that the protrusions result from polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, little is known about how the formation of protrusions is triggered and whether the appearance of subsequent protrusions is coordinated. Recently, the spontaneous formation of actin-polymerization waves was observed. These waves have been proposed to orchestrate the cytoskeletal dynamics during cell crawling. Here, we study the impact of cytoskeletal polymerization waves on cell migration using a phase-field approach. In addition to directionally moving cells, we find states reminiscent of amoeboidal cell crawling. In this framework, new protrusions are seen to emerge from a nucleation process, generating spiral actin waves in the cell interior. Nucleation of new spirals does not require noise, but occurs in a state that is apparently displaying spatio-temporal chaos.

  7. Chiral spiral induced by a strong magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuki Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modification of the chiral phase structure of QCD due to an external magnetic field. We first demonstrate how the effect of magnetic field can systematically be incorporated into a generalized Ginzburg-Landau framework. We then analyze the phase structure in the vicinity of the chiral critical point. In the chiral limit, the effect is found to be so drastic that it brings a “continent” of chiral spiral in the phase diagram, by which the chiral tricritical point is totally washed out. This is the case no matter how small the intensity of magnetic field is. On the other hand, the current quark mass protects the chiral critical point from a weak magnetic field. However, the critical point will eventually be covered by the chiral spiral phase as the magnetic field grows.

  8. Influence of lateral slab edge distance on plate velocity, trench velocity, and subduction partitioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Stegman, D. R.; Farrington, R. J.; Moresi, L.

    2011-01-01

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere occurs through both trenchward subducting plate motion and trench retreat. We investigate how subducting plate velocity, trench velocity and the partitioning of these two velocity components vary for individual subduction zone segments as a function of proximity to

  9. Congested subduction in New Zealand driving plate boundary reogranisation and accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, D.; Betts, P. G.; Moresi, L. N.; Ailleres, L.

    2017-12-01

    Oblique dextral convergence along the Australia-Pacific plate boundary in the SW Pacific is characterised by large scale changes in the lithospheric composition of the convergent plates. Unimpeded subduction along the Tonga-Kermadec Trench transitions to subduction that is congested by the Hikurangi Plateau along the Hikurangi Trench and then to micro-continent collision along the Alpine Fault. The Marlborough Fault Zone is located at the edge of the Campbell Micro-continent, providing the structural link between the congested Hikurangi Trench and Alpine Fault. The Marlborough Fault Zone displays a 120 km step-wise migration of the plate boundary since the mid-Miocene, resulting in 700,000 km3 of crust accreting from the Pacific to the Australian Plate. To understand how congested subduction along the Pacific-Australia Plate Boundary influences plate boundary re-organisation and accretion in the Marlborough Fault Zone, we present 3D numerical models to understand the influence of lithospheric heterogeneity on the evolution of plate boundary geometry and deformation. We compare this with present day plate boundary deformation characterised by GPS and earthquake focal mechanisms. Paleo-stress analysis from striation data shows a clockwise P-axis rotation from 66° to 118° since the Mid-Miocene, indicating plate boundary rotations of at least 52°. This rotation is driven by collision of the Hikurangi Plateau with the Hikurangi Trench during the indentation of the Campbell micro-continent. The rotation of plate boundary acts to minimise the width of the colliding Hikurangi Plateau, and allows the plate boundary to unlock southward. We interpret the indentation of the Campbell micro-continent and southward unlocking of the Hikurangi Megathrust to drive the southward migration of the plate boundary in the Marlborough Fault Zone, and in doing so have identified a previously undescribed mechanism of accretion, which we term "Subduction propagation accretion".

  10. Do microplates in subduction zones leave a geological record?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Joann M.; Lee, Jeffrey

    1994-12-01

    Active microplate boundaries in ocean-continent subduction zones may induce deformation of the overlying plate and spatial or geochemical variations in the volcanic arc. We discuss two modern cases. The first is the South Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate boundary in the Cascadia subduction zone, where there is little or no effect on the overriding plate and the oceanic plate takes up much of the deformation. The second case is the Cocos-Rivera plate boundary in the Middle America trench, where the overlying Colima graben contains substantial deformation in a zone extending from the trench to the volcanic arc and the sub-duction-related volcanism is spatially and geochemically complex. We apply these observations to boundaries of the Arguello, Monterey, Guadalupe, and Magdalena microplates, which existed in the subduction zone west of Baja California at various times from 20 to 12.5 Ma. The past positions of these boundaries relative to Baja California are constrained by global plate reconstructions, closure of the Gulf of California, and an estimate of extension in the Mexican Basin and Range province. Existing regional mapping and our additional reconnaissance mapping show that Paleocene to Eocene fluvial and marine sedimentary rocks south of Ensenada along the western Baja California peninsula and eastward to the mid-Miocene volcanic arc are undeformed. Limited available data reveal no major spatial or geochemical variations in the mid-Miocene volcanic arc that might correlate with the past positions of the microplate boundaries. Thus these microplate boundaries had little to no effect on the overriding continental plate. The nature of Guadalupe and Magdalena interactions with North America may have been closer to the South Gorda-Juan de Fuca example, with possible internal deformation of the microplates. The Monterey and Arguello microplates may have behaved like the modern Explorer plate, with largely strike-slip motion relative to North America during their last

  11. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, N.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil fungi fill many essential ecological and biogeochemical roles, e.g. decomposing litter, redistributing nutrients, and promoting biodiversity. Fairy ring fungi offer a rare glimpse into the otherwise opaque spatiotemporal dynamics of soil fungal growth, because subsurface mycelial patterns can be inferred from observations at the soil's surface. These observations can be made directly when the fungi send up fruiting bodies (e.g., mushrooms and toadstools), or indirectly via the effect the fungi have on neighboring organisms. Grasses in particular often temporarily thrive on the nutrients liberated by the fungus, creating bands of rich, dark green turf at the edge of the fungal mat. To date, only annular (the "ring" in fairy ring) and arc patterns have been described in the literature. We report observations of novel spiral and rotor pattern formation in fairy ring fungi, as seen in publically available high-resolution aerial imagery of 22 sites across the continental United States. To explain these new behaviors, we first demonstrate that a well-known model describing fairy ring formation is equivalent to the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model, which is known to support a wide range of dynamical behaviors, including annular traveling waves, rotors, spirals, and stable spatial patterns including spots and stripes. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation are then used to define the region of parameter space that supports spiral and rotor formation. We find that this region is adjacent to one within which typical fairy rings develop. Model results suggest simple experimental procedures that could potentially induce traditional ring structures to exhibit rotor or spiral dynamics. Intriguingly, the Gray-Scott model predicts that these same procedures could be used to solicit even richer patterns, including spots and stripes, which have not yet been identified in the field.

  12. Spiral model of procedural cycle of educational process management

    OpenAIRE

    Bezrukov Valery I.; Lukashina Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    The article analyzes the nature and characteristics of the spiral model Procedure educational systems management cycle. The authors identify patterns between the development of information and communication technologies and the transformation of the education management process, give the characteristics of the concept of “information literacy” and “Media Education”. Consider the design function, determine its potential in changing the traditional educational paradigm to the new - information....

  13. Scintigraphic diagnosis of spiral fracture in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein-Foucher, C.; Venel, H.; Legouffe, P.; Ythier, H.; Legghe, R.; Marchandise, X.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report 8 cases of unsuspected bone fracture in children, identified at bone scan. Common features were the children's young age (1 to 3 years), the absence of clinical suspicion, the initially normal X-rays, the fracture type (sprial fracture of the tibia undisplaced), and the uniform of appearance the bone scan. These data confirm the value of the bone scan in limping children and suggest that spiral fracture of the tibia is a frequent and underdiagnosed condition in children [fr

  14. Spontaneous spiral formation in two-dimensional oscillatory media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Petteri; Amemiya, Takashi; Ohmori, Takao; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    1999-08-01

    Computational studies of pattern formation in a modified Oregonator model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction is described. Initially inactive two-dimensional reaction media with an immobilized catalyst is connected to a reservoir of fresh reactants through a set of discrete points distributed randomly over the interphase surface. It is shown that the diffusion of reactants combined with oscillatory reaction kinetics can give rise to spontaneous spiral formation and phase waves.

  15. Bacterial adherence to self-reinforced polyglycolic acid and self-reinforced polylactic acid 96 urological spiral stents in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétas, A; Vuopio-Varkila, J; Siitonen, A; Välimaa, T; Talja, M; Taari, K

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial adherence to biodegradable self-reinforced polyglycolic acid (SR-PGA) and self-reinforced poly-DL-lactic acid (SR-PLA 96) spiral stents in vitro. They are used as temporary urethral stents in urology. Gold-plated metal wire, polyurethane and latex were used as controls. Materials were incubated up to 28 days in artificial urine, after which a bacterial suspension was added. After detaching by sonication the adhesive bacteria were analysed as colony forming units (CFUs) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Adhesion was more significantly correlated to stent bacterial type than to the tested material in both assays. No encrustation was seen on SR-PGA or SR-PLA 96. SR-PGA and SR-PLA 96 had no effect on the bacterial growth. In conclusion, the bacterial properties are equally or more important than the material properties in the adhesion process.

  16. Infrared emission and tidal interactions of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations of tidal interactions of spiral galaxies are used to attempt to understand recent discoveries about infrared (IR) emitting galaxies. It is found that the stronger tidal perturbation by a companion the more disk gas clouds are thrown into nucleus crossing orbits and the greater the velocity jumps crossing spiral arms. Both these tidally created characteristics would create more IR emission by high speed cloud collisions and more IR via effects of recently formed stars. This expectation at greater tidal perturbation matches the observation of greater IR emission for spiral galaxies with closer and/or more massive companions. The greater collision velocities found at stronger perturbations on the models will also result in higher dust temperature in the colliding clouds. In the IR pairs examined, most have only one member, the larger, detected and when both are detected, the larger is always the more luminous. In simulations and in a simple analytic description of the strong distance dependence of the tidal force, it is found that the big galaxy of a pair is more strongly affected than the small

  17. Ultra-precision turning of complex spiral optical delay line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Po; Fang, Fengzhou; Wang, Qichang

    2011-11-01

    Optical delay line (ODL) implements the vertical or depth scanning of optical coherence tomography, which is the most important factor affecting the scanning resolution and speed. The spinning spiral mirror is found as an excellent optical delay device because of the high-speed and high-repetition-rate. However, it is one difficult task to machine the mirror due to the special shape and precision requirement. In this paper, the spiral mirror with titled parabolic generatrix is proposed, and the ultra-precision turning method is studied for its machining using the spiral mathematic model. Another type of ODL with the segmental shape is also introduced and machined to make rotation balance for the mass equalization when scanning. The efficiency improvement is considered in details, including the rough cutting with the 5- axis milling machine, the machining coordinates unification, and the selection of layer direction in turning. The onmachine measuring method based on stylus gauge is designed to analyze the shape deviation. The air bearing is used as the measuring staff and the laser interferometer sensor as the position sensor, whose repeatability accuracy is proved up to 10nm and the stable feature keeps well. With this method developed, the complex mirror with nanometric finish of 10.7nm in Ra and the form error within 1um are achieved.

  18. Intracranial aneurysms: evaluation in 200 patients with spiral CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.; Kingston, R.J.; Markson, G.; Dorsch, N.W.C.; McMahon, J.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the usefulness of spiral CT angiography (CTA) with three- dimensional reconstructions in defining intracranial aneurysms, particularly around the Circle of Willis. Two hundred consecutive patients with angiographic and/or surgical correlation were studied between 1993 and 1998, with CTA performed on a GE HiSpeed unit and Windows workstation. The following clinical situations were evaluated: conventional CT suspicion of an aneurysm; follow-up of treated aneurysm remnants or of untreated aneurysms; subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and negative angiography; family or past aneurysm history; and for improved definition of aneurysm anatomy. Spiral CTA detected 140 of 144 aneurysms, and an overall sensitivity of 97%, including 30 of 32 aneurysms 3 mm or less in size. In 38 patients with SAH and negative angiography, CTA found six of the seven aneurysms finally diagnosed. There was no significant artefact in 17 of 23 patients (74%) with clips. The specificity of CTA was 86% with 8 false-positive cases. Spiral CTA is very useful in demonstrating intracranial aneurysms. (orig.)

  19. Three-dimensional spiral CT for neurosurgical planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, H.M.; Bertalanffy, H.; Mayfrank, L.; Thron, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Gilsbach, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out 22 examinations to determine the value of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric CT (spiral CT) for planning neurosurgical procedures. All examinations were carried out on a of the first generation spiral CT. A tube model was used to investigate the influence of different parameter settings. Bolus injection of nonionic contrast medium was used when vessels or strongly enhancing tumours were to be delineated. 3D reconstructions were carried out using the integrated 3D software of the scanner. We found a table feed of 3 mm/s with a slice thickness of 2 mm and an increment of 1 mm to be suitable for most purposes. For larger regions of interest a table feed of 5 mm was the maximum which could be used without blurring of the 3D images. Particular advantages of 3D reconstructed spiral scanning were seen in the planning of approaches to the lower clivus, acquired or congenital bony abnormalities and when the relationship between vessels, tumour and bone was important. (orig.)

  20. TURBULENCE AND STAR FORMATION IN A SAMPLE OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Erin; Chien, Li-Hsin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University 527 S Beaver Street, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Hunter, Deidre A., E-mail: erin-maier@uiowa.edu, E-mail: Lisa.Chien@nau.edu, E-mail: dah@lowell.edu [Lowell Observatory 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. on the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, as indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the neutral hydrogen (H i) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We apply the statistical moments in three different methods—the galaxy as a whole, divided into a function of radii and then into grids. We create individual grid maps of kurtosis for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with their far-ultraviolet images taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite.We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies, in which the variation does not appear to trace any star-forming regions. This may, however, be due to the spatial resolution of our analysis, which could potentially limit the scale of turbulent motions that we are sensitive to greater than ∼700 pc. From comparison between the moments themselves, we find that the gas motions in our sampled galaxies are largely supersonic. This analysis also shows that the Burkhart et al. methods may be applied not just to dwarf galaxies but also to normal spiral galaxies.

  1. Magnetostrictive hypersound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychkov, Igor V. [Chelyabinsk State University, 129 Br. Kashirinykh Str., Chelyabinsk 454001 (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), 76 Lenin Prospekt, Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, Dmitry A., E-mail: kuzminda@csu.ru [Chelyabinsk State University, 129 Br. Kashirinykh Str., Chelyabinsk 454001 (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), 76 Lenin Prospekt, Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation); Kamantsev, Alexander P.; Koledov, Victor V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of RAS, Mokhovaya Street 11-7, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    In present work we have investigated magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition from spiral to collinear state. We found that such magnets may generate transverse sound waves with the wavelength equal to the spiral period. We have examined two types of spiral magnetic structures: with inhomogeneous exchange and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions. Frequency of the waves from exchange-caused spiral magnetic structure may reach some THz, while in case of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction-caused spiral it may reach some GHz. These waves will be emitted like a sound pulses. Amplitude of the waves is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. Some aspects of microwaves to hypersound transformation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of phase transition have been investigated as well. Results of the work may be interesting for investigation of phase transition kinetics as well, as for various hypersound applications. - Highlights: • Magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets at phase transition (PT) is studied. • Spiral magnets during PT may generate transverse sound with wavelength equal to spiral period. • Amplitude of the sound is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. • Microwave-to-sound transformation in the vicinity of PT is investigated as well.

  2. Spatial regulation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in postnatal articular and growth plate cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Presley; Yue, Shanna; Hanson, Jeffrey; Baron, Jeffrey; Lui, Julian C.

    2017-01-01

    Articular and growth plate cartilage both arise from condensations of mesenchymal cells, but ultimately develop important histological and functional differences. Each is composed of three layers—the superficial, mid and deep zones of articular cartilage and the resting, proliferative and hypertrophic zones of growth plate cartilage. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) system plays an important role in cartilage development. A gradient in expression of BMP-related genes has been observed across growth plate cartilage, likely playing a role in zonal differentiation. To investigate the presence of a similar expression gradient in articular cartilage, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) to separate murine growth plate and articular cartilage from the proximal tibia into their six constituent zones, and used a solution hybridization assay with color-coded probes (nCounter) to quantify mRNAs for 30 different BMP-related genes in each zone. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were then used to confirm spatial expression patterns. Expression gradients for Bmp2 and 6 were observed across growth plate cartilage with highest expression in hypertrophic zone. However, intracellular BMP signaling, assessed by phospho-Smad1/5/8 immunohistochemical staining, appeared to be higher in the proliferative zone and prehypertrophic area than in hypertrophic zone, possibly due to high expression of Smad7, an inhibitory Smad, in the hypertrophic zone. We also found BMP expression gradients across the articular cartilage with BMP agonists primarily expressed in the superficial zone and BMP functional antagonists primarily expressed in the deep zone. Phospho-Smad1/5/8 immunohistochemical staining showed a similar gradient. In combination with previous evidence that BMPs regulate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, the current findings suggest that BMP signaling gradients exist across both growth plate and articular cartilage and that these gradients may

  3. Mathematical modeling of melting during laser heating of metal plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purin Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modeling of heat transfer processes proceeding together under the conditions of intense phase transformations (melting and metal evaporation under laser action on a metal plate has been carried out. The analysis of the results has showed that increasing of the laser radiation (ql power leads to acceleration of the melting process. However, it has been found that the change in the melting dynamics with variation of ql is characteristic only for the plates made of iron and copper. At the same time, it has been found that an increase in ql does not affect significantly the melting rate of the aluminum plates. It has been established that when the laser is exposed to a plate, zones with large temperature gradients are formed which can cause thermal stresses.

  4. Modeling of Bullet Penetration in Explosively Welded Composite Armor Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Carney, Theodore C.

    2006-07-01

    Normal impact of high-speed armor piercing bullet on titanium-steel composite has been investigated using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The objective is to understand the effects of impact during the ballistic testing of explosively welded armor plates. These plates have significant microstructural differences within the weld region, heat-affected zone and the base metal. The variances result in substantial ductility, hardness and strength differences, important criteria in determining the failure mode, specifically whether it occurs at the joint or within the virgin base metal. Several configurations of composite plates with different material combinations were modeled. The results were used to modify the heat treatment process of explosively welded plates, making them more likely to survive impact.

  5. Modeling of Bullet Penetration in Explosively Welded Composite Armor Plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Carney, Theodore C.

    2006-01-01

    Normal impact of high-speed armor piercing bullet on titanium-steel composite has been investigated using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The objective is to understand the effects of impact during the ballistic testing of explosively welded armor plates. These plates have significant microstructural differences within the weld region, heat-affected zone and the base metal. The variances result in substantial ductility, hardness and strength differences, important criteria in determining the failure mode, specifically whether it occurs at the joint or within the virgin base metal. Several configurations of composite plates with different material combinations were modeled. The results were used to modify the heat treatment process of explosively welded plates, making them more likely to survive impact

  6. Experimental and numerical characterization of the water flow in spacer-filled channels of spiral-wound membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2015-09-25

    Micro-scale flow distribution in spacer-filled flow channels of spiral-wound membrane modules was determined with a particle image velocimetry system (PIV), aiming to elucidate the flow behaviour in spacer-filled flow channels. Two-dimensional water velocity fields were measured in a flow cell (representing the feed spacer-filled flow channel of a spiral wound reverse osmosis membrane module without permeate production) at several planes throughout the channel height. At linear flow velocities (volumetric flow rate per cross-section of the flow channel considering the channel porosity, also described as crossflow velocities) used in practice (0.074 and 0.163 m∙s-1) the recorded flow was laminar with only slight unsteadiness in the upper velocity limit. At higher linear flow velocity (0.3 m∙s-1) the flow was observed to be unsteady and with recirculation zones. Measurements made at different locations in the flow cell exhibited very similar flow patterns within all feed spacer mesh elements, thus revealing the same hydrodynamic conditions along the length of the flow channel. Three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed using the same geometries and flow parameters as the experiments, based on steady laminar flow assumption. The numerical results were in good agreement (0.85-0.95 Bray-Curtis similarity) with the measured flow fields at linear velocities of 0.074 and 0.163 m∙s-1, thus supporting the use of model-based studies in the optimization of feed spacer geometries and operational conditions of spiral wound membrane systems.

  7. Experimental and numerical characterization of the water flow in spacer-filled channels of spiral-wound membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucs, Szilard S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Marston, Jeremy O; Radu, Andrea I; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2015-12-15

    Micro-scale flow distribution in spacer-filled flow channels of spiral-wound membrane modules was determined with a particle image velocimetry system (PIV), aiming to elucidate the flow behaviour in spacer-filled flow channels. Two-dimensional water velocity fields were measured in a flow cell (representing the feed spacer-filled flow channel of a spiral wound reverse osmosis membrane module without permeate production) at several planes throughout the channel height. At linear flow velocities (volumetric flow rate per cross-section of the flow channel considering the channel porosity, also described as crossflow velocities) used in practice (0.074 and 0.163 m·s(-1)) the recorded flow was laminar with only slight unsteadiness in the upper velocity limit. At higher linear flow velocity (0.3 m·s(-1)) the flow was observed to be unsteady and with recirculation zones. Measurements made at different locations in the flow cell exhibited very similar flow patterns within all feed spacer mesh elements, thus revealing the same hydrodynamic conditions along the length of the flow channel. Three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed using the same geometries and flow parameters as the experiments, based on steady laminar flow assumption. The numerical results were in good agreement (0.85-0.95 Bray-Curtis similarity) with the measured flow fields at linear velocities of 0.074 and 0.163 m·s(-1), thus supporting the use of model-based studies in the optimization of feed spacer geometries and operational conditions of spiral wound membrane systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with spiral and electron-beam CT; Diagnostik der Lungenembolie mit Spiral- und Elektronenstrahl-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, U.J.; Bruening, R.D.; Becker, C.R.; Konschitzky, H.; Muehling, O.; Staebler, A.; Helmberger, T.; Holzknecht, N.; Reiser, M.F. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Knez, A.; Haberl, R. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 1

    1998-12-01

    Purpose: To compare spiral (SCT) and electron-beam CT (EBT) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: From June 1997 to June 1998 188 patients with suspected acute or chronic thrombembolism of the pulmonary arteries were examined. A total of 108 patients were scanned using SCT and 80 patients using EBT. On each scanner two different scan protocols were evaluated. Conclusions: Advanced CT scanning techniques allow the highly accurate diagnosis of central and peripheral PE. Other potentially life-threatening underlying diseases are also readily recognized. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Fragestellung: Spiral-CT (SCT) und Elektronenstrahlcomputertomographie (EBT) sollten hinsichtlich ihrer Eignung fuer die Diagnostik der Lungenembolie (LE) verglichen werden. Methode: Von Juni 1997 bis Juni 1998 wurden 188 Patienten mit Verdacht auf akute oder chronische thrombembolische Veraenderungen der Lungenarterien untersucht. Die CT-Diagnostik erfolgte dabei bei 108 Patienten mit Spiral-CT und bei 80 Patienten mit EBT. Schlussfolgerungen: Moderne CT-Scan-Verfahren erlauben mit hoher Genauigkeit die Diagnose der zentralen und peripheren Lungenembolie. Die EBT bietet Vorteile in der Darstellung herznaher peripherer Lungenarterien. Andere lebendsbedrohliche Ursachen fuer die Beschwerden des Patienten werden mit der CT sicher erkannt. (orig./AJ)

  9. Tracing the Farallon plate through seismic imaging with USArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, Robert William

    The Farallon plate system has been subducting off the western United States since at least the middle Mesozoic. This plate has undergone virtually every subduction process during this time including a long episode of flat-slab subduction, generation of microplates, and formation of oceanic plateaus. The shallow remains of this plate are two small microplates, the Gorda and Juan de Fuca, in the Pacific Northwest. The anomalous nature of these two small plates and the missing deeper evidence of subduction has motivated this study. The USArray seismic experiment has provided unprecedented spatial sampling of the seismic wavefield in the continuous United States. Utilizing this dataset, new imaging methods have been implemented and older imaging methods have been revitalized. This study first uses ambient seismic noise in the Pacific Northwest to extract short period Rayleigh waves which are sensitive to lithospheric scale structure. Phase velocities from this model are then combined with teleseismic delay times of body waves and surface waves to image the structure of the continuous United States from the surface through the mantle transition zone. The resolving power of this model allows tracing of the Farallon plate from the trench to the lower mantle. The seismic velocity structure of the continuous United States is broadly composed of a slow western half and fast eastern half separated by the Rocky Mountain Front. The low velocity of the western U.S. contains several high velocity anomalies. While previous work has focused on individual anomalies and suggested they represent lithospheric instabilities, a larger regional view indicates that these are the western remnants of the Farallon plate. Below the thick cratonic lithosphere of the eastern U.S., the Farallon plate contains significant topography due to a subducted heterogeneity of the oceanic plate and a viscosity contrast through the mantle transition zone. The velocity models presented herein provide a

  10. Effect of plate shapes in orifice plate type flowmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    The study of unusual plate shapes in orifice plate type flowmeters is presented, with a view to providing data for the substitution of the plate with one centered circular orifice in those applications where its use is not possible. For this purpose, six pairs of plates with different forms, with and without chamfered edges, were made and tested in a closed water loop. Results show that, generally, the use of chamfers improves the results and, in the case of perforated and slotlike orificed plates, the narrow-ness of the fluid passage tends to make unnecessary its use. (Author) [pt

  11. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2007, Caribbean Plate and Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Harley M.; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Furlong, Kevin P.; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Extensive diversity of tectonic regimes characterizes the perimeter of the Caribbean plate, involving no fewer than four major adjacent plates (North America, South America, Nazca, and Cocos). Inclined zones of deep earthquakes (Wadati-Benioff zones), deep ocean trenches, and arcs of volcanoes clearly indicate subduction of oceanic lithosphere along the Central American and Atlantic Ocean margins of the Caribbean plate, while shallow seismicity and focal mechanisms of major shocks in Guatemala, northern Venezuela, and the Cayman Ridge and Cayman Trench indicate transform fault and pull-apart basin tectonics.

  12. Naming polyhedra by general face-spirals - theory and applications to fullerenes and other polyhedral molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Lukas; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Avery, James Emil

    2018-01-01

    We present a general face-spiral algorithm for cubic polyhedral graphs (including fullerenes and fulleroids), and extend it to the full class of all polyhedral graphs by way of the leapfrog transform. This yields compact canonical representations of polyhedra with a simple and intuitive geometrical...... be found together with the canonical general spiral at negligible cost. The algorithm is fully compatible with the classical spiral algorithm developed by Manolopoulos for fullerenes, i. e., classical spirals are accepted as input, and spiralable graphs lead to identical output. We prove that the algorithm...... is correct and complete. The worst case runtime complexity is for general N-vertex polyhedral graphs, with J the sum of all jump lengths. When the number of faces of any particular size is bounded by a constant, such as the case for fullerenes, this reduces to . We have calculated canonical general spirals...

  13. What drives microplate motion and deformation in the northeastern Caribbean plate boundary region?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.

    2014-01-01

    The north Caribbean plate boundary zone is a broad deformation zone with several fault systems and tectonic blocks that move with different velocities. The indentation by the Bahamas Platform (the “Bahamas Collision”) is generally invoked as a cause of this fragmentation. We propose that a second

  14. Seismic Velocity and Elastic Properties of Plate Boundary Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppson, Tamara N.

    The elastic properties of fault zone rock at depth play a key role in rupture nucleation, propagation, and the magnitude of fault slip. Materials that lie within major plate boundary fault zones often have very different material properties than standard crustal rock values. In order to understand the mechanics of faulting at plate boundaries, we need to both measure these properties and understand how they govern the behavior of different types of faults. Mature fault zones tend to be identified in large-scale geophysical field studies as zones with low seismic velocity and/or electrical resistivity. These anomalous properties are related to two important mechanisms: (1) mechanical or diagenetic alteration of the rock materials and/or (2) pore fluid pressure and stress effects. However, in remotely-sensed and large-length-scale data it is difficult to determine which of these mechanisms are affecting the measured properties. The objective of this dissertation research is to characterize the seismic velocity and elastic properties of fault zone rocks at a range of scales, with a focus on understanding why the fault zone properties are different from those of the surrounding rock and the potential effects on earthquake rupture and fault slip. To do this I performed ultrasonic velocity experiments under elevated pressure conditions on drill core and outcrops samples from three plate boundary fault zones: the San Andreas Fault, California, USA; the Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand; and the Japan Trench megathrust, Japan. Additionally, I compared laboratory measurements to sonic log and large-scale seismic data to examine the scale-dependence of the measured properties. The results of this study provide the most comprehensive characterization of the seismic velocities and elastic properties of fault zone rocks currently available. My work shows that fault zone rocks at mature plate boundary faults tend to be significantly more compliant than surrounding crustal

  15. The Arabia-India plate boundary unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N. R.; Rodriguez, M.; Petit, C.; Huchon, P.; Beslier, M.; Hazard, B.

    2009-12-01

    Since the advent of Plate Tectonics, tectonic plate boundaries were explored on land as at sea for search of active faults where the destructive energy of earthquakes is released. Yet, some plate boundaries, less active or considered as less dangerous to humankind, escaped general attention and remained unknown to a large extent. Among them, the boundary between two major tectonic plates: Arabia and India. The Arabia-India motion is currently accommodated along the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the NW Indian Ocean, which connects the spreading centers of the Sheba and Carlsberg ridge system to the Makran subduction zone. We recently surveyed this fracture zone onboard the R/V Beautemps-Beaupré (Owen Cruise, March 2009) using a high-resolution deep-water multibeam echo-sounder. Bathymetric data reveal a spectacular submarine fault system running over a distance of 800 km between the Arabia-India-Somalia triple junction to the south and the Dalrymple Trough to the north. The morphology of the active faults is well preserved on the seafloor where fault scarps can be followed over hundreds of kilometres. The surficial trace of the faults is not obscured by the sediments of the aggrading deep-sea fan of the Indus River. The fault system is segmented in five main segments connected by pull apart basins. The length of the individual, apparently uninterrupted, segments is between 100 km and 220 km. The largest pull-apart basin at the latitude 20°N (20°N-Basin) corresponds to a right step-over of about 12 km between two fault segments. The 20°N-Basin is bounded by a normal fault scarp with a throw of 450-500 m. Numerous minor normal faults cutting the floor of the basin attest to recent activity. The 20°N-Basin is directly supplied in turbidity-current deposits by an active channel of the Indus fan. The preservation of tectonic features indicates that the dip-slip motion has exceeded the rate of burial by sediments. Some compressional structures are also deduced from

  16. Drift and breakup of spiral waves in reaction–diffusion–mechanics systems

    OpenAIRE

    Panfilov, A. V.; Keldermann, R. H.; Nash, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize excitation in various biological, physical, and chemical systems. They underpin a variety of important phenomena, such as cardiac arrhythmias, morphogenesis processes, and spatial patterns in chemical reactions. Important insights into spiral wave dynamics have been obtained from theoretical studies of the reaction–diffusion (RD) partial differential equations. However, most of these studies have ignored the fact that spiral wave rotation is often accompanied by...

  17. Fuel cell end plate structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1991-04-23

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  18. Seismic attenuation structure associated with episodic tremors and slip zones, southwestern Japan, in the Nankai subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, S.; Matsubara, M.

    2016-12-01

    We imaged the seismic attenuation structure (frequency- independent Qp) beneath southwestern Japan using t* estimated by the S coda wave spectral ratio method to the waveform data from the Kiban nationwide seismic network. The seismic attenuation (Qp-1) structure was clearly imaged for the region beneath Shikoku, the Kii peninsula, and eastern Kyushu at depths down to 50 km. At depths of 5 to 35 km, the seismic attenuation structure changes at the Median Tectonic Line and other geological boundaries beneath Shikoku and the southwestern Kii peninsula. High-Qp zones within the lower crust of the overlying plate were found just above the slip regions at the centers and deeper parts of the long-term slow-slip events (SSEs) beneath the Bungo and Kii channels and central Shikoku. Beneath central Shikoku, within the overlying plate, a high-Qp zone bounded by low-Qp zones was located from the top of the overlying plate to the plate interface of the subducting plate. The high-Qp zone and low-Qp zones correspond to high-Vp and low-Vp zones of previous study by Matsubara et al. [2009], respectively. The boundaries of the high-Qp zone and the low-Qp zones were located at the segment boundaries of tremors. The heterogeneity of the seismic attenuation and velocity structures also appeared to correspond to the characteristics of geography (uplifting map by Ohmori [1990]) beneath Shikoku. The results indicated that the locations of the long- and short-term SSEs could be limited by the inhomogeneous distribution of the materials and/or condition of the overlying plate, which is considered to be formed due to geological and geographical process. The heterogeneity of materials and/or condition within the forearc crust possibly made an effect on inhomogeneous rheological strength distribution on the interface.

  19. Pulmonary embolism: spiral CT evaluation; Embolie pulmonaire: apport de la tomodensitometrie helicoidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senac, J.P.; Vernhet, H.; Bousquet, C.; Giron, J.; Pieuchot, P.; Durand, G.; Benezet, O.; Aubas, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1995-06-01

    Purpose: Spiral computed tomography was compared retrospectively with digital substraction pulmonary angiography (PA) in 45 patients suspected of having acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. Materials and method : 45 patients in whom the presence of acute or chronic pulmonary embolism was suspected underwent examination by spiral CT and PA. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was based on the direct visualization of intraluminal clots. The study of the agreement between the two methods was based on the Kappa test. In 35 cases, pulmonary emboli were proved. Acute pulmonary emboli were present in 28 cases and chronic in 7 cases. Results: Spiral computed tomography represents an excellent way to detect acute pulmonary embolism. In the chronic form, spiral CT is better than PA to detect intraluminal clots. However, Spiral CT can fail to detect small emboli in the peripheral arterial bed. In the 10 patients without pulmonary embolism, the spiral CT proved diagnosis pulmonary oedema (n=3), lymphangi-carcinoma (n=4), pleural effusion (n=3). Conclusion: This study suggest that the spiral CT examination is accurate for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism specifically in case of suspected important embolism. The advantages of spiral CT are multiple (non invasive, wide diagnosis spectrum). However, may be a limitation to is use is insufficient distal thrombi detection. This eventuality (5 to 10% in the Pioped study) justify the practice of pulmonary angiography. Spiral CT improvements should reduce this insufficiency in the next future. (Authors). 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Magnetic field sensor based on fiber Bragg grating with a spiral microgroove ablated by femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yutang; Yang, Minghong; Xu, Gang; Yuan, Yinquan

    2013-07-15

    A novel magnetic field sensor based on Terfenol-D coated fiber Bragg grating with spiral microstructure was proposed and demonstrated. Through a specially-designed holder, the spiral microstructure was ablated into the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) cladding by femtosecond laser. Due to the spiral microstructure, the sensitivity of FBG coated with magnetostrictive film was enhanced greatly. When the spiral pitch is 50 μm and microgroove depth is 13.5 μm, the sensitivity of the magnetic field sensor is roughly 5 times higher than that of non-microstructured standard FBG. The response to magnetic field is reversible, and could be applicable for magnetic field detection.

  1. Geometric Offsets Across Spiral Arms in M51: Nature of Gas and Star Formation Tracers

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, M.; Koda, J.; Egusa, F.

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of geometric offsets between gas spiral arms and associated star forming regions in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51. These offsets are a suggested measure of the star formation timescale after the compression of gas at spiral arm entry. A surprising discrepancy, by an order of magnitude, has been reported in recent offset measurements in nearby spiral galaxies. Measurements using CO and H-alpha emission find large and ordered offsets in M51. On the contrary, small or...

  2. A novel measuring method for arbitrary optical vortex by three spiral spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Bo [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo, Lana [School of Electronics and Information, Guangdong Polytechnic Normal University, Guangzhou 510665 (China); Yue, Chengfeng [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhilie, E-mail: tangzhl@scnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2017-02-26

    In this letter, the topological charge of non-integer vortices determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Based on the conclusion, a novel method to measure non-integer vortices is presented. This method is applicable not only to arbitrary non-integer vortex but also to arbitrary integer vortex. - Highlights: • Different non-integer vortices cannot have three spiral spectra is demonstrated. • Relationship between the non-integer topological charge and the spiral spectra is presented. • Topological charge of non-integer vortices can be determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra.

  3. CFD simulation of flow through single and multi vane spiral pump for low pressure application using moving node unsteady computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, I.; Mahendra, A.K.; Chandresh, B.G.; Srikanthan, M.R.; Bera, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    A spiral pump uses two interleaved spirals (it can be involutes of a circle, involutes of a square, hybrid wraps, Archimedean spiral, logarithmic spirals and so on). Interleaved spiral orbits eccentrically without rotation around a fixed scroll, thereby trapping and compressing pockets of fluids between the spirals. Another method of providing the compression motion is by virtue of co-rotating the spirals synchronously with an offset in centers of rotation thereby providing relative motion similar to orbiting. Recently spiral pumps for low-pressure application have become popular. Since spiral pumps contain gas volumes, whose shapes and size change continuously, the flow fields inside the pumps is time dependent. The unsteadiness controls the mechanisms responsible for the behavior of the spiral pump components. To improve the spiral pump design for better performance as per our process requirement and reliability, information is required to understand the detailed physics of the unsteady flows inside the spiral pumps. The unsteady flows in a pump are studied numerically. The system simulated includes one side gap between fixed and moving spirals as the other side lies just in the reverse symmetry of the one side. Heavy molecular weight, condensable gas is used as the moving fluid. The mesh free Least Square Kinetic Upwind Method (LSKUM) for moving node is applied for numerical analysis of wobbling spiral. Nodes and boundaries change their positions, for every real time step hence at every iteration nodes take new coordinates. Our work consists of identifying various spiral dimensions and geometry, geometric modeling of suction process, identifying the eccentric orbiting motion of the moving spiral, formation of variable velocity moving nodes. Flow analysis of the spiral pump is done with a view to design and develop new pump as per our requirement. Experimental data from an existing spiral pump is used to carryout validation of the code. (author)

  4. Effect of vibratory stress relief during welding of thick stainless steel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, S.; David, S. A.; Wang, X. L.; Hubbard, C. R.; Holden, T. M.; Root, J. H.

    1993-12-01

    Residual strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction technique. The filler metal employed to weld these plates was type 308 stainless steel. One of the two welds was prepared without any vibratory stress relief treatment and the other was vibrated at a frequency below the resonant condition which gives a fraction the resonant amplitude during welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component found in the heat affected zone and in the base metal is along the fusion joint (longitudinal) and is found at the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 300 +/- 50 MPa in tension. The associated normal stress was close to zero and the transverse stress was 80 +/- 50 MPa. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between the vibratory-stress-relief treated and the untreated plates fall within the error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  5. Plate Full of Color

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Plate Full of Color teaches the value of eating a variety of colorful and healthy foods.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  6. Virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT in gastric lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Soo; Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Yoon, Man Won; Song, Sang Gook; Jeong, Gwang Woo

    1998-01-01

    To compare virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT with conventional endoscopy for the detection and evaluation of gastric lesions. During a previous six-month period, 30 patients with pathologically-proven gastric lesions underwent conventional endoscopy and virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT. There were 18 cases of advanced gastric carcinoma, eight benign ulcers, and four submucosal tumors(two leiomyomas, two lymphomas). Source images of virtual gastroscopy were three-dim-ensionally reconstructed within an Advantage Windows Workstation and virtual gastroscopic images were obtained using Navigator Software. On analysis, images were graded according to their quality(excellent, good, poor). Virtual gastroscopic images were interpreted by two radiologists blinded to conventional endoscopic findings, and were subsequently compared with endoscopic findings in terms of detectability and findings. In the cases of advanced gastric carcinoma, lesions were classified according to Borrmann's system. For virtual gastroscopy, overall image quality was excellent in 21 cases(70%), good in five(17%), and poor in four(13%). Lesions were detected in 25 cases(83%). Among the 18 advanced gastric carcinomas, virtual gastroscopy image quality was excellent in 14 cases(78%), good in two(11%), and poor in two(11%). Lesions were detected in 16 cases(89%). Two Borrmann type IV cases were not detected. Among the eight benign ulcers, virtual gastroscopy image quality was excellent in three cases(38%), good in three(38%), and poor in two(25%). The detection of lesion was possible in five cases(63%). In all submucosal tumors, virtual gastroscopy image quality was excellent. Lesions were detected in all cases. Virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT is safe and noninvasive, and for the evaluation of gastric lesions may be complementary to axial CT. It successfully detects gastric lesions, and in depicting the pattern of gastric folds its image quality is excellent.=20

  7. Galactic masers: Kinematics, spiral structure and the disk dynamic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorguev, A. S.; Utkin, N. D.; Zabolotskikh, M. V.; Dambis, A. K.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    We applied the currently most comprehensive version of the statistical-parallax technique to derive kinematical parameters of the maser sample with 136 sources. Our kinematic model comprises the overall rotation of the Galactic disk and the spiral density-wave effects. We take into account the variation of radial velocity dispersion with Galactocentric distance. The best description of the velocity field is provided by the model with constant radial and vertical velocity dispersions, $(\\sigma U0, \\sigma W0) \\approx (9.4 \\pm 0.9~, 5.9 \\pm 0.8)~ km/s$. We compute flat Galactic rotation curve over the Galactocentric distance interval from 3 to 15 kpc and find the local circular rotation velocity to be $ V_0 \\approx (235-238)$~ km/s $\\pm 7$~ km/s. We also determine the parameters of the four-armed spiral pattern (pitch angle $i \\approx (-10.4 \\pm 0.3)^\\circ$ and the phase of the Sun $\\chi_0 \\approx (125 \\pm 10) ^\\circ$). The radial and tangential spiral perturbations are about $f_R \\approx (-6.9 \\pm 1.4)$~km/s, $f_\\Theta \\approx (+2.8 \\pm 1.0$) ~km/s. The kinematic data yield a solar Galactocentric distance of $R_0 \\approx (8.24 \\pm 0.12)~kpc$. Based on rotation curve parameters and the asymmetric drift we Infer the exponential disk scale $H_D \\approx (2.7 \\pm 0.2)$ ~kpc under assumption of marginal stability of the intermediate-age disk, and finally we estimate the minimum local surface disk density, $\\Sigma (R_0) > (26 \\pm 3) ~ M_\\odot pc^{-2}$.

  8. A spiral model of musical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBangert

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a model of how musicians make decisions about performing notated music. The model builds on psychological theories of decision-making and was developed from empirical studies of Western art music performance that aimed to identify intuitive and deliberate processes of decision-making, a distinction consistent with dual-process theories of cognition. The model proposes that the proportion of intuitive (Type 1 and deliberate (Type 2 decision-making processes changes with increasing expertise and conceptualises this change as movement along a continually narrowing upward spiral where the primary axis signifies principal decision-making type and the vertical axis marks level of expertise. The model is intended to have implications for the development of expertise as described in two main phases. The first is movement from a primarily intuitive approach in the early stages of learning towards greater deliberation as analytical techniques are applied during practice. The second phase occurs as deliberate decisions gradually become automatic (procedural, increasing the role of intuitive processes. As a performer examines more issues or reconsiders decisions, the spiral motion towards the deliberate side and back to the intuitive is repeated indefinitely. With increasing expertise, the spiral tightens to signify greater control over decision type selection. The model draws on existing theories, particularly Evans’ (2011 Intervention Model of dual-process theories, Cognitive Continuum Theory (Hammond et al., 1987; Hammond, 2007, and Baylor’s (2001 U-shaped model for the development of intuition by level of expertise. By theorising how musical decision-making operates over time and with increasing expertise, this model could be used as a framework for future research in music performance studies and performance science more generally.

  9. Spiral Structure and Global Star Formation Processes in M 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruendl, Robert A.

    1994-12-01

    The nearby grand design spiral galaxy, M 51, is an obvious proving ground for studies of spiral structure and large scale star formation processes. New near--infrared observations of M 51 made with COB (Cryogenic Optical Bench) on the Kitt Peak 1.3m allow us to examine the stellar distribution and the young star formation regions as well as probe regions of high extinction such as dust lanes. We also present an analysis of the kinematics of the ionized gas observed with the Maryland--Caltech Imaging Fabry Perot. The color information we derive from the near--infrared bands provides a more accurate tracer of extinction than optical observations. We find that the dust extinction and CO emission in the arms are well correlated. Our kinematic data show unambiguously that these dense gas concentrations are associated with kinematic perturbations. In the inner disk, these perturbations are seen to be consistent with the streaming motions predicted by classical density wave theory. The dust lanes, and presumably the molecular arms, form a narrow ridge that matches these velocity perturbations wherever the viewing angle is appropriate. This interpretation requires that the corotation radius be inward of the outer tidal arms. The outer tidal arms however show streaming velocities of the sign that would be expected interior to the corotation point. This can be reconciled if the outer arms are part of a second spiral pattern, most likely due to the interaction with the companion NGC 5195. The near--infrared observations also show emission from the massive star forming regions. These observations are less affected by extinction than optical observations of H II regions and show clearly that the sites of massive star formation are correlated with but downstream from the concentrations of dense molecular material. This provides clear evidence that the ISM has been organized by the streaming motions which have in turn triggered massive star formation.

  10. Superconstructs in the treatment of charcot foot deformity: plantar plating, locked plating, and axial screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, V James

    2009-09-01

    Management of Charcot's deformity of the foot and ankle continues to challenge physicians. Medical co-morbidity, peripheral neuropathy, vascular disease, and immune impairment cause severe problems for these patients and, when combined with neuroarthropathy, can lead to amputation. Progressive bony deformity and bone resorption, which may accompany neuroarthropathy, only increase the challenge of surgical treatment. These challenges have led physicians to develop "superconstruct" techniques to improve fixation, whereby fusion is extended beyond the zone of injury to include joints that are not affected, bone resection is performed to shorten the extremity to allow for adequate reduction of deformity without undue tension on the soft tissue envelope, the strongest device is used that can be tolerated by the soft tissue envelope; and the devices are applied in a novel position that maximizes mechanical function. This article reviews three techniques designed to achieve lasting deformity correction and successful arthrodesis: plantar plating, locked plating, and axial screw fixation.

  11. Kinematics of molecular clouds: evidence for agglomeration in spiral arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new survey of CO in the first Galactic quadrant has been analysed to yield a catalog of 320 molecular clouds near the tangent velocity. These clouds have known distances, so that cloud sizes and heights above the Galactic plane can be determined. The largest clouds (Msub(C) > 10sup(5.5) solar masses) have a reduced scale height relative to smaller clouds by an amount which is consistent with equipartition of energy. This can be interpreted as evidence for small clouds combining to form giant clouds in spiral arms. (Auth.)

  12. Motivational Spiral Models (MSM): common and distinct motivations in context

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Laurel J

    2013-01-01

    Motivational Spiral Models (MSM) show links over time among self concepts, feelings, strategies, skills and participation in everyday activities. In theory, MSM have many common features, with distinct features in particular contexts. This project examined children?s motivation to participate in literacy (MSM-L), social (MSM-S) and physical activities (MSM-P). The participants in Study 1 (N?=?32) were 9 to 11 years old, and in Study 2 (N?=?73) were 4 to 12 year old children. Locations were cl...

  13. RFID Tag Design Using Spiral Resonators and Defected Ground Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Veysi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple generalized approach to design a compact chipless radio frequency identification tag. The proposed chipless tag encodes data into the spectral signature using a set of spiral resonators on both sides of substrate. Transmission amplitude component of the tag is used for data encoding. For miniaturization purpose, defected ground structure is used to reduce the circuit size by half compared to the conventional cascading technique. The proposed chipless tag operates between 4-6 GHz and produces 256 different binary strings through eight encoded bits. Measurement and simulation results verify the authenticity of this design.

  14. Vacuum sealing with a spiral grooved gas dynamic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tadashi

    1979-01-01

    Gas dynamic seals with rectangular spiral grooves are studied theoretically taking the effects of sidewalls of the grooves and the effects of gas compressibility into account, and slip boundary conditions are employed. The results are compared with the existing experimental data and the validity of the theory is confirmed over a wide pressure range except for the extremely low pressures. Suggestions are made regarding the choice of the geometrical dimensions, i.e., aspect ratio, helix angle, clearance parameter and groove width ratio. (author)

  15. Spiral orbits and oscillations in historical evolution of empires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Taksu; Poghosyan, Sergey S.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce the concept of metaasabiya, the second non-material resource, to the asabiya theory of historical dynamics. We find that the resulting three variable dynamical system has peculiar features such as repelling or attracting axes and spiraling orbits in the phase space. Depending on the initial state, the system can go through series of oscillatory rises and falls, mimicking the geopolitical evolution of real-world polities. These distinctive features, absent in conventional Lotka-Volterra type biological systems, reveal the hidden richness inherent in the asabiya theory.

  16. CMS Resistive plate Champers

    CERN Document Server

    Zainab, Karam

    2013-01-01

    There are many types of gas detectors which are used in CERN in LHC project, There is a main parts for the gas detectors which must be in all gas detectors types like Multiwire proportional chambers, such as the micromesh gaseous structure chamber (the MicroMegas), Gas-electron multiplier (GEM) detector, Resistive Plate Champers... Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment detecting muons which are powerful tool for recognizing signatures of interesting physics processes. The CMS detector uses: drift tube (DT), cathode strip chamber (CSC) and resistive plate chamber (RPC). Building RPC’s was my project in summer student program (hardware). RPC’s have advantages which are triggering detector and Excellent time resolution which reinforce the measurement of the correct beam crossing time. RPC’s Organized in stations :  RPC barrel (RB) there are 4 stations, namely RB1, RB2, RB3, and RB4  While in the RPC endcap (RE) the 3 stations are RE1, RE2, and RE3. In the endcaps a new starion will be added and this...

  17. Is plate tectonics needed to evolve technological species on exoplanets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Stern

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As we continue searching for exoplanets, we wonder if life and technological species capable of communicating with us exists on any of them. As geoscientists, we can also wonder how important is the presence or absence of plate tectonics for the evolution of technological species. This essay considers this question, focusing on tectonically active rocky (silicate planets, like Earth, Venus, and Mars. The development of technological species on Earth provides key insights for understanding evolution on exoplanets, including the likely role that plate tectonics may play. An Earth-sized silicate planet is likely to experience several tectonic styles over its lifetime, as it cools and its lithosphere thickens, strengthens, and becomes denser. These include magma ocean, various styles of stagnant lid, and perhaps plate tectonics. Abundant liquid water favors both life and plate tectonics. Ocean is required for early evolution of diverse single-celled organisms, then colonies of cells which specialized further to form guts, appendages, and sensory organisms up to the complexity of fish (central nervous system, appendages, eyes. Large expanses of dry land also begin in the ocean, today produced above subduction zones in juvenile arcs and by their coalescence to form continents, although it is not clear that plate tectonics was required to create continental crust on Earth. Dry land of continents is required for further evolution of technological species, where modification of appendages for grasping and manipulating, and improvement of eyes and central nervous system could be perfected. These bioassets allowed intelligent creatures to examine the night sky and wonder, the beginning of abstract thinking, including religion and science. Technology arises from the exigencies of daily living such as tool-making, agriculture, clothing, and weapons, but the pace of innovation accelerates once it is allied with science. Finally, the importance of plate

  18. Stress Orientations in a Locked Subduction Zone at the Southern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanzia, Dominic; Wilson, Thomas; Savage, Martha K.; Lamb, Simon; Hirschberg, Hamish

    2017-10-01

    We analyze the orientation of the stress field in the southern Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand, using focal mechanism inversions, S wave splitting fast directions, and gravitational stresses. Here the oceanic Pacific plate is being obliquely subducted beneath the continental Australian plate in the New Zealand plate boundary zone. The study makes use of 399 earthquakes for focal mechanism inversion and 425 earthquakes for shear wave splitting analysis, located with a network of seismic stations spanning southern North Island. We distinguish between stresses in the Pacific plate (from focal mechanism inversion) and Australian plate (from S wave fast directions) and gravitational stresses, in three regions: Western, Central Basin, and Eastern. In the Western region, the principal axis of horizontal compression (SHmax) is oriented NE-SW, parallel to the margin, in the upper Australian and lower Pacific plate. In the Central Basin, SHmax in the Australian plate is oriented NW-SE, perpendicular to the margin; in the lower subducting Pacific plate SHmax is oriented NE-SW. In the Eastern region, SHmax is oriented NE-SW in the upper plate, while in the lower plate there is a change in orientation to NNW-SSE. We interpret the stress orientations of the lower plate in the Western and Central Basin regions as a consequence of bending of the subducting plate. Sources of upper Australian plate stresses are likely to be bending stresses, gravitational stresses, and tectonic loading, with differing relative magnitudes across the study area.

  19. Seismotectonic zoning of Azerbaijan territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangarli, Talat; Aliyev, Ali; Aliyev, Fuad; Rahimov, Fuad

    2017-04-01

    Studying of the space-time correlation and consequences effect between tectonic events and other geological processes that have created modern earth structure still remains as one of the most important problems in geology. This problem is especially important for the East Caucasus-South Caspian geodynamic zone. Being situated at the eastern part of the Caucasian strait, this zone refers to a center of Alpine-Himalayan active folded belt, and is known as a complex tectonic unit with jointing heterogeneous structural-substantial complexes arising from different branches of the belt (Doburja-Caucasus-Kopetdag from the north and Pyrenean-Alborz from the south with Kura and South Caspian zone). According to GPS and precise leveling data, activity of regional geodynamic processes shows intensive horizontal and vertical movements of the Earth's crust as conditioned by collision of the Arabian and Eurasian continental plates continuing since the end of Miocene. So far studies related to the regional of geology-geophysical data, periodically used for the geological and tectonic modeling of the environment mainly based on the fixing ideology. There still remains a number of uncertainties in solution of issues related to regional geology, tectonics and magmatism, structure and interrelation of different structural zones, space-time interrelations between onshore and offshore complexes, etc. At the same time large dataset produced by surface geological surveys, deep geological mapping of on- and offshore areas with the use of seismic and electrical reconnaissance and geophysical field zoning methods, deep well drilling and remote sensing activities. Conducted new studies produced results including differentiation of formerly unknown nappe complexes of the different ages and scales within the structure of mountain-fold zones, identification of new zones containing ophiolites in their section, outlining of currently active faulting areas, geophysical interpretation of the deep

  20. Plate tectonics on the Earth triggered by plume-induced subduction initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T V; Stern, R J; Baes, M; Sobolev, S V; Whattam, S A

    2015-11-12

    Scientific theories of how subduction and plate tectonics began on Earth--and what the tectonic structure of Earth was before this--remain enigmatic and contentious. Understanding viable scenarios for the onset of subduction and plate tectonics is hampered by the fact that subduction initiation processes must have been markedly different before the onset of global plate tectonics because most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are both consequences of plate tectonics. However, plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without the help of plate tectonics. Here, we test this mechanism using high-resolution three-dimensional numerical thermomechanical modelling. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained subduction: (1) a strong, negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) focused magmatic weakening and thinning of lithosphere above the plume; and (3) lubrication of the slab interface by hydrated crust. We also show that plume-induced subduction could only have been feasible in the hotter early Earth for old oceanic plates. In contrast, younger plates favoured episodic lithospheric drips rather than self-sustained subduction and global plate tectonics.