WorldWideScience

Sample records for spiral arm pattern

  1. Spiral arm amplitude variations and pattern speeds in the grand design galaxies M51, M81, and M100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmegreen, B.G.; Seiden, P.E.; Elmegreen, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    In the modal theory of galactic spiral structure, the amplitude of a prominent two-arm spiral pattern should oscillate slightly with galactocentric distance because of an interference between the outward and inward propagating waves. In the stellar dynamical theory, the spiral arm amplitudes should oscillate because of differential crowding near and between wave-orbit resonances. Two and three cycles of such oscillations have been found in computer-enhanced images at B and I passbands of the grand design galaxies M81 and M100, respectively, and what is probably one cycle of such an amplitude variation in M51. These three galaxies are the most symmetric and global of the two-arm spirals in the near-IR survey of Elmegreen (1981), so the occurrence of such spiral amplitude oscillations could be common among galaxies of this type. The positions of the features discussed are used to suggest possible arm pattern speeds. 23 refs

  2. Magnetic spiral arms in galaxy haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, R. N.

    2017-08-01

    We seek the conditions for a steady mean field galactic dynamo. The parameter set is reduced to those appearing in the α2 and α/ω dynamo, namely velocity amplitudes, and the ratio of sub-scale helicity to diffusivity. The parameters can be allowed to vary on conical spirals. We analyse the mean field dynamo equations in terms of scale invariant logarithmic spiral modes and special exact solutions. Compatible scale invariant gravitational spiral arms are introduced and illustrated in an appendix, but the detailed dynamical interaction with the magnetic field is left for another work. As a result of planar magnetic spirals `lifting' into the halo, multiple sign changes in average rotation measures forming a regular pattern on each side of the galactic minor axis, are predicted. Such changes have recently been detected in the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies-an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) survey.

  3. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  4. Star distribution in the Orion spiral arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basharina, T.S.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.; Filippova, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the Orion spiral arm is studied by numerical experiments, assuming that in each direction considered the star distribution along the line of sight is a combination of two Gaussian laws. The corresponding parameters are evaluated for four Milky Way fields; the bimodal laws now fit the observations by the chi 2 criterion. In the Orion arm the line-of-sight star densities follow asymmetric curves, steeper at the outer edge of the arm

  5. Spiral arms in thermally stratified protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Attila; Rosotti, Giovanni P.

    2018-02-01

    Spiral arms have been observed in nearly a dozen protoplanetary discs in near-infrared scattered light and recently also in the submillimetre continuum. While one of the most compelling explanations is that they are driven by planetary or stellar companions, in all but one cases such companions have not yet been detected and there is even ambiguity on whether the planet should be located inside or outside the spirals. Here, we use 3D hydrodynamic simulations to study the morphology of spiral density waves launched by embedded planets taking into account the vertical temperature gradient, a natural consequence of stellar irradiation. Our simulations show that the pitch angle of the spirals in thermally stratified discs is the lowest in the disc mid-plane and increases towards the disc surface. We combine the hydrodynamic simulations with 3D radiative transfer calculations to predict that the pitch angle of planetary spirals observed in the near-infrared is higher than in the submillimetre. We also find that in both cases the spirals converge towards the planet. This provides a new powerful observational method to determine if the perturbing planet is inside or outside the spirals, as well as map the thermal stratification of the disc.

  6. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L) J , as a function of (g – i) versus (i – J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  7. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A., E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx, E-mail: martinez@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089 (Mexico)

    2013-03-10

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L){sub J}, as a function of (g - i) versus (i - J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  8. Spiral-arm instability: giant clump formation via fragmentation of a galactic spiral arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2018-03-01

    Fragmentation of a spiral arm is thought to drive the formation of giant clumps in galaxies. Using linear perturbation analysis for self-gravitating spiral arms, we derive an instability parameter and define the conditions for clump formation. We extend our analysis to multicomponent systems that consist of gas and stars in an external potential. We then perform numerical simulations of isolated disc galaxies with isothermal gas, and compare the results with the prediction of our analytic model. Our model describes accurately the evolution of the spiral arms in our simulations, even when spiral arms dynamically interact with one another. We show that most of the giant clumps formed in the simulated disc galaxies satisfy the instability condition. The clump masses predicted by our model are in agreement with the simulation results, but the growth time-scale of unstable perturbations is overestimated by a factor of a few. We also apply our instability analysis to derive scaling relations of clump properties. The expected scaling relation between the clump size, velocity dispersion, and circular velocity is slightly different from that given by the Toomre instability analyses, but neither is inconsistent with currently available observations. We argue that the spiral-arm instability is a viable formation mechanism of giant clumps in gas-rich disc galaxies.

  9. Evolution of Gas Across Spiral Arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Melissa Nicole

    To investigate the dynamic evolution of gas across spiral arms, we conducted a detailed study of the gas and star formation along the spiral arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy, M51. This nearby, face-on spiral galaxy provides a unique laboratory to study the relationship between gas dynamics and star formation. The textbook picture of interstellar medium (ISM) evolution is rapidly changing. Molecular gas was once believed to form along spiral arms from the diffuse atomic gas in the inter-arm regions. Star formation occurs within giant molecular clouds during spiral arm passage. Lastly, the molecular gas is photo-dissociated back into atomic gas by massive stars on the downstream side of the spiral arm. Recent evidence, however, is revealing a new picture of the interstellar medium and the process of star formation. We seek development of a new picture by studying the development and evolution of molecular gas and the role of large scale galactic dynamics in organizing the interstellar medium. This thesis begins by presenting work measuring the geometrical offsets between interstellar gas and recent star formation. Interstellar gas is traced by atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO). Star formation is traced by ionized hydrogen recombination lines and infrared emission from dust warmed by young bright stars. Measuring these offsets can help determine the underlying large scale galactic dynamics. Along the spiral arms in M51, offsets between CO and the star formation tracers suggest that gas is flowing through the spiral arms, but the offsets do not show the expected signature of a single pattern speed and imply a more complicated pattern. This thesis also examines the intermediate stages of gas evolution, by studying a denser component of the ISM closer to which stars will form. Only a small percent of the bulk molecular gas will become dense enough to form stars. HCN and HCO+ probe densities ˜104 cm-3, where as the bulk gas is 500 cm-3. This thesis looks at HCN and

  10. CHARACTERIZING SPIRAL ARM AND INTERARM STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreckel, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Meidt, S. [Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanc, G. A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Groves, B. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Adamo, A. [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Hughes, A., E-mail: kreckel@mpia.de [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2016-08-20

    Interarm star formation contributes significantly to a galaxy’s star formation budget and provides an opportunity to study stellar birthplaces unperturbed by spiral arm dynamics. Using optical integral field spectroscopy of the nearby galaxy NGC 628 with VLT/MUSE, we construct H α maps including detailed corrections for dust extinction and stellar absorption to identify 391 H ii regions at 35 pc resolution over 12 kpc{sup 2}. Using tracers sensitive to the underlying gravitational potential, we associate H ii regions with either arm (271) or interarm (120) environments. Using our full spectral coverage of each region, we find that most physical properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) of H ii regions are independent of environment. We calculate the fraction of H α luminosity due to the background of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contaminating each H ii region, and find the DIG surface brightness to be higher within H ii regions than in the surroundings, and slightly higher within arm H ii regions. Use of the temperature-sensitive [S ii]/H α line ratio instead of the H α surface brightness to identify the boundaries of H ii regions does not change this result. Using the dust attenuation as a tracer of the gas, we find depletion times consistent with previous work (2 × 10{sup 9} yr) with no differences between the arm and interarm, but this is very sensitive to the DIG correction. Unlike molecular clouds, which can be dynamically affected by the galactic environment, we see fairly consistent properties of H ii regions in both arm and interarm environments. This suggests either a difference in star formation and feedback in arms or a decoupling of dense star-forming clumps from the more extended surrounding molecular gas.

  11. The Spiral Pattern During Development*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-07

    Aug 7, 1971 ... which are destined to become the limb areas bud out laterally. Fig. 8. The early cells, which are destined to develop into the upper and the lower limbs, after lateral budding has occurred. Fig. 11 demonstrates the human embryo of about 5 mm. CR length and age of about 32 days. The spiral pattern is.

  12. On galaxy spiral arms' nature as revealed by rotation frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roca-Fabrega, Santi; Valenzuela, Octavio; Figueras, Francesca; Romero-Gomez, Merce; Velazquez, Hector; Antoja Castelltort, Teresa; Pichardo, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution N-body simulations using different codes and initial condition techniques reveal two different behaviours for the rotation frequency of transient spiral arms like structures. Whereas unbarred discs present spiral arms nearly corotating with disc particles, strong barred models

  13. A Method to Automate Identification of Spiral Arms in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Christina K.; Mercer, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present our preliminary results in identifying the spiral arms of NGC 6946 using a nearest-neighbors analysis. NGC 6946 is grand design spiral galaxy with well-defined arms. The spiral arms were previously identified in an Hα image and traced out by Matonick, D. et al., ApJS, 113, 333, (1997) by visual inspection. We want to develop a computer algorithm that will identify the spiral arms automatically. Once the spiral arms have been found digitally, we can use this information to compare the spiral arms with the locations of compact objects such as supernova remnants and perform statistical tests, for example, to determine if the supernova remnants are associated with the spiral arms. We are using the publicly available program PyFITS, a development project of the Science Software Branch at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) that is available for software download from STScI, to perform a computer-based image analysis. We have written python macros that interact with the already written image manipulation and display features of PyFITS to perform the image analysis and implement a nearest-neighbors algorithm to identify and link the centers of the high emission regions from the spiral arm regions. Our code currently identifies the centers of the high emission regions, but more work is needed to link up these sites and draw out the spiral arms. Future work includes improving the code to better identify spiral arms and converting the code to work on the Astropy, a community-developed core Python package for Astronomy (Robitaille, T. P., et al. A&A 558, A33, 2013).

  14. Testing the Link Between Terrestrial Climate Change and Galactic Spiral Arm Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Andrew C.; Melott, Adrian L.; Pohl, Martin

    2009-11-01

    We re-examine past suggestions of a close link between terrestrial climate change and the Sun's transit of spiral arms in its path through the Milky Way galaxy. These links produced concrete fits, deriving the unknown spiral pattern speed from terrestrial climate correlations. We test these fits against new data on spiral structure based on CO data that do not make simplifying assumptions about symmetry and circular rotation. If we compare the times of these transits with changes in the climate of Earth, the claimed correlations not only disappear, but we also find that they cannot be resurrected for any reasonable pattern speed.

  15. THE CONTRIBUTION OF SPIRAL ARMS TO THE THICK DISK ALONG THE HUBBLE SEQUENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico); Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Pérez-Villegas, A., E-mail: lmedina@fis.cinvestav.mx, E-mail: barbara@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: mperez@astro.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    The first mechanism invoked to explain the existence of the thick disk in the Milky Way Galaxy was the spiral arms. Up-to-date work summons several other possibilities that together seem to better explain this component of our Galaxy. All these processes must affect distinct types of galaxies differently, but the contribution of each one has not been straightforward to quantify. In this work, we present the first comprehensive study of the effect of the spiral arms on the formation of thick disks, looking at early- to late-type disk galaxies in an attempt to characterize and quantify this specific mechanism in galactic potentials. To this purpose, we perform test particle numerical simulations in a three-dimensional spiral galactic potential (for early- to late-types spiral galaxies). By varying the parameters of the spiral arms we found that the vertical heating of the stellar disk becomes very important in some cases and strongly depends on the galactic morphology, pitch angle, arm mass, and the arm pattern speed. The later the galaxy type, the larger is the effect on the disk heating. This study shows that the physical mechanism causing the vertical heating is different from simple resonant excitation. The spiral pattern induces chaotic behavior not linked necessarily to resonances but to direct scattering of disk stars, which leads to an increase of the velocity dispersion. We applied this study to the specific example of the Milky Way Galaxy, for which we have also added an experiment that includes the Galactic bar. From this study we deduce that the effect of spiral arms of a Milky-Way-like potential on the dynamical vertical heating of the disk is negligible, unlike later galactic potentials for disks.

  16. Geometric Offsets across Spiral Arms in M51: Nature of Gas and Star Formation Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Melissa; Koda, Jin; Egusa, Fumi

    2013-02-01

    We report measurements of geometric offsets between gas spiral arms and associated star-forming regions in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51. These offsets are a suggested measure of the star formation timescale after the compression of gas at spiral arm entry. A surprising discrepancy, by an order of magnitude, has been reported in recent offset measurements in nearby spiral galaxies. Measurements using CO and Hα emission find large and ordered offsets in M51. On the contrary, small or non-ordered offsets have been found using the H I 21 cm and 24 μm emissions, possible evidence against gas flow through spiral arms, and thus against the conventional density-wave theory with a stationary spiral pattern. The goal of this paper is to understand the cause of this discrepancy. We investigate potential causes by repeating those previous measurements using equivalent data, methods, and parameters. We find offsets consistent with the previous measurements and conclude that the difference of gas tracers, i.e., H I versus CO, is the primary cause. The H I emission is contaminated significantly by the gas photodissociated by recently formed stars and does not necessarily trace the compressed gas, the precursor of star formation. The H I gas and star-forming regions coincide spatially and tend to show small offsets. We find mostly positive offsets with substantial scatter between CO and Hα, suggesting that gas flow through spiral arms (i.e., density wave) though the spiral pattern may not necessarily be stationary.

  17. The Norma spiral arm: large-scale pitch angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2017-09-01

    In the inner Galaxy, we statistically find the mean pitch angle of the recently mapped Norma arm in two galactic quadrants (observed tangentially at galactic longitudes near l=328° and near l=20°), using the twin-tangent method, and obtain -13.7°± 1.4°. We compared with other measurements in the literature. Also, using the latest published data on pitch angle and the latest published data on the radial starting point of the four arms (R_{Gal} = 2.2 kpc) in each galactic quadrant, a revised velocity plot of the Norma spiral arm is made, along with other spiral arms in the Milky Way, in each Galactic quadrant.

  18. Arm structure in normal spiral galaxies, 1: Multivariate data for 492 galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Multivariate data have been collected as part of an effort to develop a new classification system for spiral galaxies, one which is not necessarily based on subjective morphological properties. A sample of 492 moderately bright northern Sa and Sc spirals was chosen for future statistical analysis. New observations were made at 20 and 21 cm; the latter data are described in detail here. Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) fluxes were obtained from archival data. Finally, new estimates of arm pattern radomness and of local environmental harshness were compiled for most sample objects.

  19. Embedded spiral patterns in the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1835

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, S.; Kitayama, T.; Dotani, T.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the central region of the massive galaxy cluster, Abell 1835, obtained with the data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find distinctive spiral patterns in the cool core in the residual image of the X-ray surface brightness after its nominal profile is subtracted. The spiral patterns consist of two arms. One of them appears as positive, and the other appears as negative excesses in the residual image. Their sizes are ˜ 70 kpc and their morphologies are consistent with each other. We find that the spiral patterns extend from the cool core out to the hotter surrounding ICM. We analyze the X-ray spectra extracted from both regions. We obtain that the ICM properties are similar to those expected by gas sloshing. We also find that the ICM in the two regions of spiral patterns is near or is in pressure equilibrium. Abell 1835 may now be experiencing gas sloshing induced by an off-axis minor merger. These results have been already published (Ueda, Kitayama, & Dotani 2017, ApJ, 837, 34).

  20. Kinematics of molecular clouds: evidence for agglomeration in spiral arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new survey of CO in the first Galactic quadrant has been analysed to yield a catalog of 320 molecular clouds near the tangent velocity. These clouds have known distances, so that cloud sizes and heights above the Galactic plane can be determined. The largest clouds (Msub(C) > 10sup(5.5) solar masses) have a reduced scale height relative to smaller clouds by an amount which is consistent with equipartition of energy. This can be interpreted as evidence for small clouds combining to form giant clouds in spiral arms. (Auth.)

  1. Study on the Orion spiral arm structure by the statistical modelling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basharina, T.S.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.; Filippova, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of investigation of the spiral structure based on the statistical modelling methods is suggested. This method is used for the study of the Orion spiral arm. The maxima of density and the widths of the Orion arm in the direction of the areas considered for the longitude interval 55 deg - 187 deg are defined under the assumption of normal distribution of stars across the arm. The Sun is shown to be at the inner edge of the arm [ru

  2. Grand-design Spiral Arms in a Young Forming Circumstellar Disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomida, Kengo; Lin, Chia Hui [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Machida, Masahiro N. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hosokawa, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Sakurai, Yuya, E-mail: tomida@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-01-20

    We study formation and long-term evolution of a circumstellar disk in a collapsing molecular cloud core using a resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation. While the formed circumstellar disk is initially small, it grows as accretion continues, and its radius becomes as large as 200 au toward the end of the Class-I phase. A pair of grand-design spiral arms form due to gravitational instability in the disk, and they transfer angular momentum in the highly resistive disk. Although the spiral arms disappear in a few rotations as expected in a classical theory, new spiral arms form recurrently as the disk, soon becoming unstable again by gas accretion. Such recurrent spiral arms persist throughout the Class-0 and I phases. We then perform synthetic observations and compare our model with a recent high-resolution observation of a young stellar object Elias 2–27, whose circumstellar disk has grand-design spiral arms. We find good agreement between our theoretical model and the observation. Our model suggests that the grand-design spiral arms around Elias 2–27 are consistent with material arms formed by gravitational instability. If such spiral arms commonly exist in young circumstellar disks, it implies that young circumstellar disks are considerably massive and gravitational instability is the key process of angular momentum transport.

  3. Geometric Aspects and Testing of the Galactic Center Distance Determination from Spiral Arm Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, I. I.; Veselova, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    We consider the problem of determining the geometric parameters of a Galactic spiral arm from its segment by including the distance to the spiral pole, i.e., the distance to the Galactic center ( R 0). The question about the number of points belonging to one turn of a logarithmic spiral and defining this spiral as a geometric figure has been investigated numerically and analytically by assuming the direction to the spiral pole (to the Galactic center) to be known. Based on the results obtained, in an effort to test the new approach, we have constructed a simplified method of solving the problem that consists in finding the median of the values for each parameter from all possible triplets of objects in the spiral arm segment satisfying the condition for the angular distance between objects. Applying the method to the data on the spatial distribution of masers in the Perseus and Scutum arms (the catalogue by Reid et al. (2014)) has led to an estimate of R 0 = 8.8 ± 0.5 kpc. The parameters of five spiral arm segments have been determined from masers of the same catalogue. We have confirmed the difference between the spiral arms in pitch angle. The pitch angles of the arms revealed by masers are shown to generally correlate with R 0 in the sense that an increase in R 0 leads to a growth in the absolute values of the pitch angles.

  4. Geometric Offsets Across Spiral Arms in M51: Nature of Gas and Star Formation Tracers

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, M.; Koda, J.; Egusa, F.

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of geometric offsets between gas spiral arms and associated star forming regions in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51. These offsets are a suggested measure of the star formation timescale after the compression of gas at spiral arm entry. A surprising discrepancy, by an order of magnitude, has been reported in recent offset measurements in nearby spiral galaxies. Measurements using CO and H-alpha emission find large and ordered offsets in M51. On the contrary, small or...

  5. Spiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hargittai, Istvan

    1992-01-01

    From the tiny twisted biological molecules to the gargantuan curling arms of many galaxies, the physical world contains a startling repetition of spiral patterns. Today, researchers have a keen interest in identifying, measuring, and defining these patterns in scientific terms. Spirals play an important role in the growth processes of many biological forms and organisms. Also, through time, humans have imitated spiral motifs in their art forms, and invented new and unusual spirals which have no counterparts in the natural world. Therefore, one goal of this multiauthored book is to stress the c

  6. A Comparison of Galaxy Spiral Arm Pitch Angle Measurements Using Manual and Automated Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ian; Treuthardt, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Disk galaxy evolution is dominated by secular processes in the nearby universe. Revealing the morphological characteristics and underlying dynamics of these galaxies is key to understanding their evolution. The arm structure of disk galaxies can generally be described with logarithmic spirals, thereby giving measurements of pitch angle. These measurements are valuable for probing the dynamics and less apparent characteristics of these galaxies (i.e. supermassive black hole mass). Pitch angle measurements are powerful because they can be derived from a single, uncalibrated, broadband image with sufficient contrast, as opposed to more intensive observations. Accurate determination of these measurements can be challenging, however, since pitch angle can vary with radius.There are currently several semi-automated and manual techniques used to determine pitch angle. These are, or will be, used in at least two Zooniverse citizen science projects. The goal of this work is to determine if different, specific techniques return similar pitch angles for the same set of galaxies. We compare the results from a machine vision technique using SPARCFIRE, a non-Euclidean based hand selection of pitch angle, and two methods using 2D Fourier decomposition (i.e. selecting stable regions from the results of direct application to broadband images and application to traced versions of the observed spiral pattern). Each technique is applied to our sample of galaxies and the resulting pitch angles are compared to generated logarithmic spirals to evaluate the match quality.

  7. How do spiral arm contrasts relate to bars, disc breaks and other fundamental galaxy properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Adrian; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, Evangelie; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Bosma, Albert; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos

    2017-10-01

    We investigate how the properties of spiral arms relate to other fundamental galaxy properties, including bars and disc breaks. We use previously published measurements of those properties, and our own measurements of arm and bar contrasts for a large sample of galaxies, using 3.6 μm images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Flocculent galaxies are clearly distinguished from other spiral arm classes, especially by their lower stellar mass and surface density. Multi-armed and grand-design galaxies are similar in most of their fundamental parameters, excluding some bar properties and the bulge-to-total ratio. Based on these results, we revisit the sequence of spiral arm classes, and discuss classical bulges as a necessary condition for standing spiral wave modes in grand-design galaxies. We find a strong correlation between bulge-to-total ratio and bar contrast, and a weaker correlation between arm and bar contrasts. Barred and unbarred galaxies exhibit similar arm contrasts, but the highest arm contrasts are found exclusively in barred galaxies. Interestingly, the bar contrast, and its increase from flocculent to grand-design galaxies, is systematically more significant than that of the arm contrast. We corroborate previous findings concerning a connection between bars and disc breaks. In particular, in grand-design galaxies, the bar contrast correlates with the normalized disc break radius. This does not hold for other spiral arm classes or the arm contrast. Our measurements of arm and bar contrast and radial contrast profiles are publicly available.

  8. Updating the (supermassive black hole mass)-(spiral arm pitch angle) relation: a strong correlation for galaxies with pseudobulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Graham, Alister W.; Seigar, Marc S.

    2017-10-01

    We have conducted an image analysis of the (current) full sample of 44 spiral galaxies with directly measured supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, MBH, to determine each galaxy's logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle, ϕ. For predicting black hole masses, we have derived the relation: log (MBH/M⊙) = (7.01 ± 0.07) - (0.171 ± 0.017)[|ϕ| - 15°]. The total root mean square scatter associated with this relation is 0.43 dex in the log MBH direction, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.30 ± 0.08 dex. The MBH-ϕ relation is therefore at least as accurate at predicting SMBH masses in spiral galaxies as the other known relations. By definition, the existence of an MBH-ϕ relation demands that the SMBH mass must correlate with the galaxy discs in some manner. Moreover, with the majority of our sample (37 of 44) classified in the literature as having a pseudobulge morphology, we additionally reveal that the SMBH mass correlates with the large-scale spiral pattern and thus the discs of galaxies hosting pseudobulges. Furthermore, given that the MBH-ϕ relation is capable of estimating black hole masses in bulge-less spiral galaxies, it therefore has great promise for predicting which galaxies may harbour intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs, MBH < 105 M⊙). Extrapolating from the current relation, we predict that galaxies with |ϕ| ≥ 26.7° should possess IMBHs.

  9. Constraining the pitch angle of the galactic spiral arms in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2017-11-01

    We carry out analyses of some parameters of the galactic spiral arms, in the currently available samples. We present a catalog of the observed pitch angle for each spiral arm in the Milky Way disk. For each long spiral arm in the Milky Way, we investigate for each individual arm its pitch angle, as measured through different methods (parallaxes, twin-tangent arm, kinematical, etc), and assess their answers. Second, we catalog recent advances in the cartography of the Galaxy (global mean arm pitch, arm number, arm shape, interarm distance at the Sun). We statistically compare the results over a long time frame, from 1980 to 2017. Histograms of about 90 individual results published in recent years (since mid-2015) are compared to 66 earlier results (from 1980 to 2005), showing the ratio of primary to secondary peaks to have increased by almost a factor of 3. Similarly, many earlier discrepancies (expressed in r.m.s.) have been reduced by almost a factor 3.

  10. Tracing the Milky Way spiral arms. Now and in the Gaia era : Now and in the Gaia era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monguio, M.; Grosbo, P.; Figueras, F.; Antoja Castelltort, Teresa; Torra, J.; Zapatero Osorio, M.R.; Gorgas, J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Pardo, J.R.; Gil de Paz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas it is well established that spiral arms are important agents driving the evolution of the galactic disks, the observational evidences of the outer spiral arms in our Milky Way are frustratingly inconclusive. In order to shed some light on the still remaining open questions, we are developing

  11. Revealing the spiral arms through radial migration and the shape of the metallicity distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.; Peimbert, A.

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations show that the Milky Way's metallicity distribution function (MDF) changes its shape as a function of radius. This new evidence of radial migration within the stellar disc sets additional constraints on Galactic models. By performing controlled test particle simulations in a very detailed, observationally motivated model of the Milky Way, we demonstrate that, in the inner region of the disc, the MDF is shaped by the joint action of the bar and spiral arms, while at outer radii the MDF is mainly shaped by the spiral arms. We show that the spiral arms are able to imprint their signature in the radial migration, shaping the MDF in the outskirts of the Galactic disc with a minimal participation of the bar. Conversely, this work has the potential to characterize some structural and dynamical parameters of the spiral arms based on radial migration and the shape of the MDF. Finally, the resemblance obtained with this approximation to the MDF curves of the Galaxy as seen by APOGEE, show that a fundamental factor influencing their shape is the Galactic potential.

  12. SpArcFiRe: morphological selection effects due to reduced visibility of tightly winding arms in distant spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tianrui Rae; Edward English, John; Silva, Pedro; Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B.

    2018-03-01

    The Galaxy Zoo project has provided a plethora of valuable morphological data on a large number of galaxies from various surveys, and their team have identified and/or corrected for many biases. Here we study a new bias related to spiral arm pitch angles, which first requires selecting a sample of spiral galaxies that show observable structure. One obvious way is to select galaxies using a threshold in spirality, which we define as the fraction of Galaxy Zoo humans who have reported seeing spiral structure. Using such a threshold, we use the automated tool SpArcFiRe (SPiral ARC FInder and REporter) to measure spiral arm pitch angles. We observe that the mean pitch angle of spiral arms increases linearly with redshift for 0.05 learning algorithm trained on Galaxy Zoo data to provide a spirality for each artificially degraded image. We find that SpARcFiRe's ability to accurately measure pitch angles decreases as the image degrades, but that spirality decreases more quickly in galaxies with tightly wound arms, leading to the selection effect. This new bias means one must be careful in selecting a sample on which to measure spiral structure. Finally, we also include a sensitivity analysis of SpArcFiRe's internal parameters.

  13. Spiral intensity patterns in the internally pumped optical parametric oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter; Bache, Morten; Saffman, Mark

    2001-01-01

    We describe a nonlinear optical system that supports spiral pattern solutions in the field intensity. This new spatial structure is found to bifurcate above a secondary instability in the internally pumped optical parametric oscillator. The analytical predictions of threshold and spatial scale...

  14. THE BEHAVIOR OF THE PITCH ANGLE OF SPIRAL ARMS DEPENDING ON OPTICAL WAVELENGTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; Puerari, Ivânio; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Luna, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); González-Lópezlira, Rosa A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacán, México, C.P. 58089 (Mexico); Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura, E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U. P. Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, 07730 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-09-20

    Based on integral field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey, we investigate the possible dependence of spiral arm pitch angle with optical wavelength. For three of the five studied objects, the pitch angle gradually increases at longer wavelengths. This is not the case for two objects where the pitch angle remains constant. This result is confirmed by the analysis of SDSS data. We discuss the possible physical mechanisms to explain this phenomenon, as well as the implications of the results.

  15. Carbon Monoxide Observations Toward Star Forming Regions in the Outer Scutum-CentaurusSpiral Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Nicholas; Wenger, Trey V.; Khan, Asad; Balser, Dana; Armentrout, William Paul; Anderson, Loren Dean; Bania, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The Outer Scutum-Centaurus arm (OSC) is the most distant molecular spiral arm known in the Milky Way. The Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm is posited to start at the end of the Galactic bar and to extend beyond the Solar orbit into the outer Galaxy. Carbon monoxide (CO) emission from molecular clouds is a bright star formation tracer that was recently discovered in the OSC in the first Galactic quadrant and may extend into the second quadrant. The population of star formation tracers in the OSC remains largely uncharacterized in part because the arm is distant enough from the Galactic Center to be affected by the Galactic warp. The OSC rises above the Galactic plane by nearly 4 degrees in the first quadrant, meaning most in-plane surveys of molecular gas or star formation tracers have missed the arm previously. Here we use the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12m telescope to observe 12CO J = 1-0 and 13CO J = 1-0 transitions toward 158 HII region candidates in the first and second Galactic quadrants chosen from the WISE Catalog of Galactic HII Regions. These targets are spatially coincident with the Galactic longitude-latitude (l, b) OSC locus as defined by HI emission. We detect CO toward most of our targets, many of which have at least one emission line originating beyond the Solar orbit. We compare the physical properties of molecular clouds in the OSC to the physical properties of molecular clouds located elsewhere in the Galaxy.

  16. Mechanically Reconfigurable Single-Arm Spiral Antenna Array for Generation of Broadband Circularly Polarized Orbital Angular Momentum Vortex Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Zhou, Xiaoxiao

    2018-03-23

    In this paper, a mechanically reconfigurable circular array with single-arm spiral antennas (SASAs) is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated to generate broadband circularly polarized orbital angular momentum (OAM) vortex waves in radio frequency domain. With the symmetrical and broadband properties of single-arm spiral antennas, the vortex waves with different OAM modes can be mechanically reconfigurable generated in a wide band from 3.4 GHz to 4.7 GHz. The prototype of the circular array is proposed, conducted, and fabricated to validate the theoretical analysis. The simulated and experimental results verify that different OAM modes can be effectively generated by rotating the spiral arms of single-arm spiral antennas with corresponding degrees, which greatly simplify the feeding network. The proposed method paves a reconfigurable way to generate multiple OAM vortex waves with spin angular momentum (SAM) in radio and microwave satellite communication applications.

  17. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, N.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil fungi fill many essential ecological and biogeochemical roles, e.g. decomposing litter, redistributing nutrients, and promoting biodiversity. Fairy ring fungi offer a rare glimpse into the otherwise opaque spatiotemporal dynamics of soil fungal growth, because subsurface mycelial patterns can be inferred from observations at the soil's surface. These observations can be made directly when the fungi send up fruiting bodies (e.g., mushrooms and toadstools), or indirectly via the effect the fungi have on neighboring organisms. Grasses in particular often temporarily thrive on the nutrients liberated by the fungus, creating bands of rich, dark green turf at the edge of the fungal mat. To date, only annular (the "ring" in fairy ring) and arc patterns have been described in the literature. We report observations of novel spiral and rotor pattern formation in fairy ring fungi, as seen in publically available high-resolution aerial imagery of 22 sites across the continental United States. To explain these new behaviors, we first demonstrate that a well-known model describing fairy ring formation is equivalent to the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model, which is known to support a wide range of dynamical behaviors, including annular traveling waves, rotors, spirals, and stable spatial patterns including spots and stripes. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation are then used to define the region of parameter space that supports spiral and rotor formation. We find that this region is adjacent to one within which typical fairy rings develop. Model results suggest simple experimental procedures that could potentially induce traditional ring structures to exhibit rotor or spiral dynamics. Intriguingly, the Gray-Scott model predicts that these same procedures could be used to solicit even richer patterns, including spots and stripes, which have not yet been identified in the field.

  18. The Spiral Arm Segments of the Galaxy within 3 kpc from the Sun: A Statistical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griv, Evgeny [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Jiang, Ing-Guey [Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Kuang-Fu Road 101, Hsin-Chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hou, Li-Gang, E-mail: griv@bgu.ac.il [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jia-20, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-08-01

    As can be reasonably expected, upcoming large-scale APOGEE, GAIA, GALAH, LAMOST, and WEAVE stellar spectroscopic surveys will yield rather noisy Galactic distributions of stars. In view of the possibility of employing these surveys, our aim is to present a statistical method to extract information about the spiral structure of the Galaxy from currently available data, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. The model differs from previous works studying how objects are distributed in space in its calculation of the statistical significance of the hypothesis that some of the objects are actually concentrated in a spiral. A statistical analysis of the distribution of cold dust clumps within molecular clouds, H ii regions, Cepheid stars, and open clusters in the nearby Galactic disk within 3 kpc from the Sun is carried out. As an application of the method, we obtain distances between the Sun and the centers of the neighboring Sagittarius arm segment, the Orion arm segment in which the Sun is located, and the Perseus arm segment. Pitch angles of the logarithmic spiral segments and their widths are also estimated. The hypothesis that the collected objects accidentally form spirals is refuted with almost 100% statistical confidence. We show that these four independent distributions of young objects lead to essentially the same results. We also demonstrate that our newly deduced values of the mean distances and pitch angles for the segments are not too far from those found recently by Reid et al. using VLBI-based trigonometric parallaxes of massive star-forming regions.

  19. The Spiral Arm Segments of the Galaxy within 3 kpc from the Sun: A Statistical Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Hou, Li-Gang

    2017-01-01

    As can be reasonably expected, upcoming large-scale APOGEE, GAIA, GALAH, LAMOST, and WEAVE stellar spectroscopic surveys will yield rather noisy Galactic distributions of stars. In view of the possibility of employing these surveys, our aim is to present a statistical method to extract information about the spiral structure of the Galaxy from currently available data, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. The model differs from previous works studying how objects are distributed in space in its calculation of the statistical significance of the hypothesis that some of the objects are actually concentrated in a spiral. A statistical analysis of the distribution of cold dust clumps within molecular clouds, H ii regions, Cepheid stars, and open clusters in the nearby Galactic disk within 3 kpc from the Sun is carried out. As an application of the method, we obtain distances between the Sun and the centers of the neighboring Sagittarius arm segment, the Orion arm segment in which the Sun is located, and the Perseus arm segment. Pitch angles of the logarithmic spiral segments and their widths are also estimated. The hypothesis that the collected objects accidentally form spirals is refuted with almost 100% statistical confidence. We show that these four independent distributions of young objects lead to essentially the same results. We also demonstrate that our newly deduced values of the mean distances and pitch angles for the segments are not too far from those found recently by Reid et al. using VLBI-based trigonometric parallaxes of massive star-forming regions.

  20. A New Dataset of Automatically Extracted Structure of Arms and Bars in Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, D.

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm capable of automatically extracting quantitative structure (bars and arms) from images of spiral galaxies. We have run the algorithm on 30,000 galaxies and compared the results to human classifications generously provided pre-publication by the Galaxy Zoo 2 team. In all available measures, our algorithm agrees with the humans about as well as they agree with each other. In addition we provide objective, quantitative measures not available in human classifications. We provide a preliminary analysis of this dataset to see how the properties of arms and bars vary as a function of basic variables such as environment, redshift, absolute magnitude, and color. We also show how structure can vary across wavebands as well as along and across individual arms and bars. Finally, we present preliminary results of a measurement of the total angular momentum present in our observed set of galaxies with an eye towards determining if there is a preferred "handedness" in the universe.

  1. A possible explanation for the origin of the magnetic fields in the galactic spiral arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagge, E.

    1975-04-01

    A theory for the movement of the interstellar gas under the influence of the gravitational field in the neighbourhood of the galactic arms is developped. If this gas bears electric charges of one sign (ωsub(e) approximately 3,000 electrons/gramm) a system of electric currents is produced by the relative velocity of the galactic gas and the spiral arms for which the streamlines are concentrated a little more to the galactic plane than above and below of it. By this way a large spaced magnetic field along the galactic arms is generated with opposite directions of the magnetic field vectors on the two sides of the galactic plane. (orig.) [de

  2. Changing patterns of arms transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, H.

    1998-01-01

    Three factors in the international system have been of importance for the trade of arms: the role of the main actors on the supply side and since 1970 on the demand side, the permanently increasing importance of economics, and the balance trade, industrial capacity and jobs in supplier countries and purchasing power of potential importers. Two political events in 1991 had lasting effect on the development of the trade in arms: the dissolution of Soviet Union and the Gulf War

  3. Searching gravitational microlensing events in the galaxy spiral arms by EROS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derue, Frederic

    1999-01-01

    The EROS II experiment is searching for microlensing events due to compact massive objects passing through the line-of-sight of luminous stars. These objects are candidates to explain the baryonic component of Dark Matter in our Galaxy. EROS II was dedicated to different lines-of-sight: Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, Galactic Centre and 4 directions towards the Spiral Arms of the Galaxy. This thesis presents the first search for microlensing towards these last lines-of-sight (about 9 million stars). Simple criteria based on the search for significant fluctuations allowed one to discover a low noise sample of 7 candidates to the microlensing effect, with an average timescale of 50 days. A detailed analysis of the light curve of one candidate allows us to give a confidence interval on its mass 2.7 x 10 -3 0 0 = 50 ± 3 days. To improve the knowledge of the distance of the target stars, we have combined observations of EROS II with bibliographic sources on associations of stars linked with the spiral arm features, and we have developed a program to find variable stars. Ten cepheids have thus been found. Distances obtained with different methods are in rough agreement with each other. The average optical depth measured towards the four directions is τ-bar = 0.45 0.11 +0.23 x 10 -6 . It is compatible with expectations from simple galactic models. The long duration of most events favours interpretation of lensing by objects belonging to the disk instead of the halo. It also seems that some events due to bulge lenses have influenced measurements towards the line-of-sight which is closest to the Galactic Centre. Observation continue towards spiral arms. More accurate measurements should be obtained with increase of statistics, allowing one to estimate the disk contribution to the optical depth towards the bulge and the Magellanic Clouds. (author)

  4. Discovery of a point-like source and a third spiral arm in the transition disk around the Herbig Ae star MWC 758

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiani, M.; Christiaens, V.; Absil, O.; Mawet, D.; Huby, E.; Choquet, E.; Gomez Gonzalez, C. A.; Ruane, G.; Femenia, B.; Serabyn, E.; Matthews, K.; Barraza, M.; Carlomagno, B.; Defrère, D.; Delacroix, C.; Habraken, S.; Jolivet, A.; Karlsson, M.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Piron, P.; Surdej, J.; Vargas Catalan, E.; Wertz, O.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Transition disks offer the extraordinary opportunity to look for newly born planets and to investigate the early stages of planet formation. Aim. In this context we observed the Herbig A5 star MWC 758 with the L'-band vector vortex coronagraph installed in the near-infrared camera and spectrograph NIRC2 at the Keck II telescope, with the aim of unveiling the nature of the spiral structure by constraining the presence of planetary companions in the system. Methods: Our high-contrast imaging observations show a bright (ΔL' = 7.0 ± 0.3 mag) point-like emission south of MWC 758 at a deprojected separation of 20 au (r = 0.''111 ± 0.''004) from the central star. We also recover the two spiral arms (southeast and northwest), already imaged by previous studies in polarized light, and discover a third arm to the southwest of the star. No additional companions were detected in the system down to 5 Jupiter masses beyond 0.''6 from the star. Results: We propose that the bright L'-band emission could be caused by the presence of an embedded and accreting protoplanet, although the possibility of it being an asymmetric disk feature cannot be excluded. The spiral structure is probably not related to the protoplanet candidate, unless on an inclined and eccentric orbit, and it could be due to one (or more) yet undetected planetary companions at the edge of or outside the spiral pattern. Future observations and additional simulations will be needed to shed light on the true nature of the point-like source and its link with the spiral arms. The reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A74

  5. Modelling the Galactic disc: perturbed distribution functions in the presence of spiral arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, Giacomo; Famaey, Benoit; Siebert, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    Starting from an axisymmetric equilibrium distribution function (DF) in action space, representing a Milky Way thin disc stellar population, we use the linearized Boltzmann equation to explicitly compute the response to a three-dimensional spiral potential in terms of the perturbed DF. This DF, valid away from the main resonances, allows us to investigate a snapshot of the velocity distribution at any given point in three-dimensional configuration space. Moreover, the first-order moments of the DF give rise to non-zero radial and vertical bulk flows - namely breathing modes - qualitatively similar to those recently observed in the extended solar neighbourhood. We show that these analytically predicted mean stellar motions are in agreement with the outcome of test-particle simulations. Moreover, we estimate for the first time the reduction factor for the vertical bulk motions of a stellar population compared to the case of a cold fluid. Such an explicit expression for the full perturbed DF of a thin disc stellar population in the presence of spiral arms will be helpful in order to dynamically interpret the detailed information on the Milky Way disc stellar kinematics that will be provided by upcoming large astrometric and spectroscopic surveys of the Galaxy.

  6. Temperature field simulation and phantom validation of a Two-armed Spiral Antenna for microwave thermotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Lingze; Sang, Lulu; Wu, Daocheng

    2016-04-29

    In this paper, an Archimedean planar spiral antenna for the application of thermotherapy was designed. This type of antenna was chosen for its compact structure, flexible application and wide heating area. The temperature field generated by the use of this Two-armed Spiral Antenna in a muscle-equivalent phantom was simulated and subsequently validated by experimentation. First, the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the field was calculated using the Finite Element Method (FEM) by Ansoft's High Frequency Structure Simulation (HFSS). Then, the temperature elevation in the phantom was simulated by an explicit finite difference approximation of the bioheat equation (BHE). The temperature distribution was then validated by a phantom heating experiment. The results showed that this antenna had a good heating ability and a wide heating area. A comparison between the calculation and the measurement showed a fair agreement in the temperature elevation. The validated model could be applied for the analysis of electromagnetic-temperature distribution in phantoms during the process of antenna design or thermotherapy experimentation.

  7. SPIRAL ARMS IN THE ASYMMETRICALLY ILLUMINATED DISK OF MWC 758 AND CONSTRAINTS ON GIANT PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, C. A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland CA 96002 (United States); Muto, T. [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 163-8677 (Japan); Hashimoto, J.; Kwon, J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fukagawa, M.; Sai, S. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Currie, T. [ExoPlanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Biller, B.; Thalmann, C. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sitko, M. L. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut St., Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Russell, R. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States); Wisniewski, J. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Dong, R. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Hornbeck, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Schneider, G. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Hines, D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Martin, A. Moro [Departamento de Astrofisica, CAB (INTA-CSIC), Instituto Nacional de Tcnica Aeroespacial, Torrejn de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Feldt, M.; Henning, Th.; Pott, J.-U., E-mail: carol.a.grady@nasa.gov [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the first near-IR scattered light detection of the transitional disk associated with the Herbig Ae star MWC 758 using data obtained as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru, and 1.1 {mu}m Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS data. While submillimeter studies suggested there is a dust-depleted cavity with r = 0.''35, we find scattered light as close as 0.''1 (20-28 AU) from the star, with no visible cavity at H, K', or K{sub s} . We find two small-scaled spiral structures that asymmetrically shadow the outer disk. We model one of the spirals using spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h {approx} 0.18, indicating a dynamically warm disk. If the spiral pattern is excited by a perturber, we estimate its mass to be 5{sup +3} {sub -4} M{sub J} , in the range where planet filtration models predict accretion continuing onto the star. Using a combination of non-redundant aperture masking data at L' and angular differential imaging with Locally Optimized Combination of Images at K' and K{sub s} , we exclude stellar or massive brown dwarf companions within 300 mas of the Herbig Ae star, and all but planetary mass companions exterior to 0.''5. We reach 5{sigma} contrasts limiting companions to planetary masses, 3-4 M{sub J} at 1.''0 and 2 M{sub J} at 1.''55, using the COND models. Collectively, these data strengthen the case for MWC 758 already being a young planetary system.

  8. Carbon Monoxide Observations toward Star-forming Regions in the Outer Scutum–Centaurus Spiral Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Trey V.; Khan, Asad A.; Ferraro, Nicholas G.; Balser, Dana S.; Armentrout, W. P.; Anderson, L. D.; Bania, T. M.

    2018-01-01

    The Outer Scutum–Centaurus arm (OSC) is the most distant molecular spiral arm known in the Milky Way. The OSC may be the very distant end of the well-known Scutum–Centaurus arm, which stretches from the end of the Galactic bar to the outer Galaxy. At this distance the OSC is seen in the first Galactic quadrant. The population of star formation tracers in the OSC remains largely uncharacterized. Extragalactic studies show a strong correlation between molecular gas and star formation, and carbon monoxide (CO) emission was recently discovered in the OSC. Here we use the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12 {{m}} telescope to observe the 12CO J = 1–0 and 13CO J = 1–0 transitions toward 78 H II region candidates chosen from the WISE Catalog of Galactic H II Regions. These targets are spatially coincident with the Galactic longitude–latitude ({\\ell },b) OSC locus as defined by H I emission. We detect CO emission in ∼80% of our targets. In total, we detect 117 12CO and 40 13CO emission lines. About two-thirds of our targets have at least one emission line originating beyond the solar orbit. Most of the detections beyond the solar orbit are associated with the outer arm, but there are 17 12CO emission lines and 8 13CO emission lines with LSR velocities that are consistent with the velocities of the OSC. There is no apparent difference between the physical properties (e.g., molecular column density) of these OSC molecular clouds and non-OSC molecular clouds within our sample.

  9. UNCOVERING THE ORIGINS OF SPIRAL STRUCTURE BY MEASURING RADIAL VARIATION IN PATTERN SPEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meidt, Sharon E.; Rand, Richard J.; Merrifield, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Current theories of spiral and bar structure predict a variety of pattern speed behaviors, calling for detailed, direct measurement of the radial variation of pattern speeds. Our recently developed Radial Tremaine-Weinberg (TWR) method allows this goal to be achieved for the first time. Here, we present TWR spiral pattern speed estimates for M101, IC 342, NGC 3938, and NGC 3344 in order to investigate whether spiral structure is steady or winding, whether spirals are described by multiple pattern speeds, and the relation between bar and spiral speeds. Where possible, we interpret our pattern speeds estimates according to the resonance radii associated with each (established with the disk angular rotation), and compare these to previous determinations. By analyzing the high-quality H I and CO data cubes available for these galaxies, we show that it is possible to determine directly multiple pattern speeds within these systems, and hence identify the characteristic signatures of the processes that drive the spiral structure. Even this small sample of galaxies reveals a surprisingly complex taxonomy, with the first direct evidence for the presence of resonant coupling of multiple patterns found in some systems, and the measurement of a simple single-pattern speed in others. Overall, this study demonstrates that we are now in a position to uncover more of the apparently complex physics that lies behind spiral structure.

  10. DISCOVERY OF A TWO-ARMED SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN THE GAPPED DISK AROUND HERBIG Ae STAR HD 100453

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Kevin; Apai, Daniel [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kasper, Markus [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Robberto, Massimo, E-mail: kwagner@as.arizona.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We present Very Large Telescope (VLT)/SPHERE adaptive optics imaging in the Y-, J-, H-, and K-bands of the HD 100453 system and the discovery of a two-armed spiral structure in a disk extending to 0.″37 (∼42 AU) from the star, with highly symmetric arms to the northeast and southwest. Inside of the spiral arms, we resolve a ring of emission from 0.″18 to 0.″25 (∼21–29 AU). By assuming that the ring is intrinsically circular we estimate an inclination of ∼34° from face on. We detect dark crescents on opposite sides (NW and SE) that begin at 0.″18 and continue to radii smaller than our inner working angle of 0.″15, which we interpret as the signature of a gap at ≲21 AU that has likely been cleared by forming planets. We also detect the ∼120 AU companion HD 100453 B, and by comparing our data to 2003 Hubble Space Telescope and VLT/NACO images we estimate an orbital period of ∼850 year. We discuss what implications the discovery of the spiral arms and finer structures of the disk may have on our understanding of the possible planetary system in HD 100453 and how the morphology of this disk compares to other related objects.

  11. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of a strange elliptical bubble in the northern arm of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946

    OpenAIRE

    Efremov, Yuri N.; Moiseev, Alexei V.

    2016-01-01

    NGC 6946, known as the Fireworks galaxy because of its high supernova rate and high star formation, is embedded in a very extended HI halo. Its northern spiral arm is well detached from the galactic main body. We found that this arm contains a large (~300 pc in size) Red Ellipse, named according to a strong contamination of the H-alpha emission line on its optical images. The ellipse is accompanied by a short parallel arc and a few others still smaller and less regular; a bright star cluster ...

  12. Right arm injection of contrast medium reduces venous artifacts in head and neck multislice spiral computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H; Song, Y-L; Li, X-S; Bi, Y-M; Wang, P; Fan, H-X; Meng, L M; Hu, H-X

    2015-12-01

    We tested whether injection of contrast medium via right or left arm would affect venous artifacts on head and neck multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) angiography. 326 patients were enrolled. Each patient was injected with 10 ml of contrast medium at 5 ml/sec. Time of peak contrast value plus an additional 1 sec was defined as delay time. Another 40 ml of contrast medium were injected with the same injection speed. The scanning area ranged from the aortic arch to the top of the head. Left and right forearms were used for intravenous injections of contrast medium in, respectively, 151 and 175 patients. Comparative analyses of image quality included determining contrast medium residues remaining in the superior vena cava, brachiocephalic vein, or subclavian vein, and comparisons of quality of three-dimensional CT angiography. In 75% of head and neck angiographies, the delay time of the common carotid artery ranged from 16 to 22 sec. In 60% of the images, the quality was graded as excellent, with the left arm injection resulting in delay time of > 23 sec and the right arm delay time of > 18 sec. The CT imaging quality after contrast injections via left or right arms was statistically significant (p arm injection was better than after left arm injection. Intravenous injection of contrast medium via right arm reduces artifacts from contrast medium residues and improves the image quality of head and neck CT angiography.

  13. Classifying and modelling spiral structures in hydrodynamic simulations of astrophysical discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, D. H.; Ramón-Fox, F. G.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate numerical techniques for automatic identification of individual spiral arms in hydrodynamic simulations of astrophysical discs. Building on our earlier work, which used tensor classification to identify regions that were `spiral-like', we can now obtain fits to spirals for individual arm elements. We show this process can even detect spirals in relatively flocculent spiral patterns, but the resulting fits to logarithmic `grand-design' spirals are less robust. Our methods not only permit the estimation of pitch angles, but also direct measurements of the spiral arm width and pattern speed. In principle, our techniques will allow the tracking of material as it passes through an arm. Our demonstration uses smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, but we stress that the method is suitable for any finite-element hydrodynamics system. We anticipate our techniques will be essential to studies of star formation in disc galaxies, and attempts to find the origin of recently observed spiral structure in protostellar discs.

  14. Dynamic expression pattern of Sonic hedgehog in developing cochlear spiral ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Owen, Thomas; Zhang, Lingli; Zuo, Jian

    2010-06-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays important roles in the formation of the auditory epithelium. However, little is known about the detailed expression pattern of Shh and the cell sources from which Shh is secreted. By analyzing Shh(CreEGFP/+) mice, we found that Shh was first expressed in all cochlear spiral ganglion neurons by embryonic day 13.5, after which its expression gradually decreased from base to apex. By postnatal day 0, it was not detected in any spiral ganglion neurons. Genetic cell fate mapping results also confirmed that Shh was exclusively expressed in all spiral ganglion neurons and not in surrounding glia cells. The basal-to-apical wave of Shh decline strongly resembles that of hair cell differentiation, supporting the idea that Shh signaling inhibits hair cell differentiation. Furthermore, this Shh(CreEGFP/+) mouse is a useful Cre line in which to delete floxed genes specifically in spiral ganglion neurons of the developing cochlea.

  15. Enhancement pattern of small hepatic hemangioma: findings on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung In; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae

    1999-01-01

    To compare the enhancement characteristics of small hemangiomas seen on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. Thirteen patients with 20 hepatic hemangiomas less than 25mm in diameter underwent both multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. All lesions were assigned to one of three classified into 3 categories according to the enhancement pattern seen on multiphase spiral CT : typical delayed pooling, atypical early enhancement, or continuous low attenuation. The enhancement patterns seen on spiral CT and on dynamic MRI were correlated. On CT scans, ten lesions (50%) showed delayed pooling. Six (30%) showed early arterial enhancement and four (20%) showed continuous low attenuation. On delayed-phase MRI, all lesions showed delayed high signal intensity compared to adjacent liver parenchyma. Four of six lesions with early enhancement on CT showed peripheral globular enhancement on early arterial-phase MRI. On multiphase spiral CT scans, small hemangiomas can show variable atypical enhancement features. In this situation, contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI is helpful for the diagnosis of hemangiomas

  16. On Density Waves in Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbol, P.; Patsis, P. A.

    The spiral structure of five ordinary spiral galaxies was studied using deep BVIK' surface photometry maps obtained at the 2.2m ESO/MPI telescope. The detailed shape of the arms was analyzed in terms of the spiral density wave theory. Grand design spirals were found on the K' maps in all five galaxies although at least two would be classified as flocculent on the blue images. In several of the galaxies, bulges with weak oval distortion (~10%) were observed. Dust spirals also continue, in some cases, inside the ILR where the stellar arms terminate. This emphasizes the strong bias of morphological classifications of spiral galaxies based on blue image due to dust and young stars. The 2--armed spirals were systematically found to be wound tighter on I than on K' maps suggesting the existence of a density wave. Locations of the ILR and the 4/1 resonance were estimated based on the arm morphology and the amplitude ratio between the m = 2,4 Fourier components. The wavenumber of the stellar 2--armed pattern is increasing towards the ILR which could suggest that the density wave is associated to the long waved branch of the dispersion relation. A possible scenario is discussed.

  17. FOUR HIGHLY LUMINOUS MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE NORMA SPIRAL ARM. II. DEEP NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ChavarrIa, L.; Mardones, D.; Garay, G.; Escala, A.; Bronfman, L.; Lizano, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present sensitive near-infrared (J, H, and K) imaging observations toward four luminous massive star-forming regions in the Norma Spiral Arm: G324.201+0.119, G328.307+0.432, G329.337+0.147, and G330.949-0.174. We identify three clusters of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on surface density diagnostics. We also find that sources detected only in the H and K bands and with colors corresponding to spectral types earlier than B2, are likely YSOs. We analyze the spatial distribution of stars of different masses and find signatures in two clusters of primordial mass segregation that cannot be explained as due to incompleteness effects. We show that dynamic interactions of cluster members with the dense gas from the parent core can explain the observed mass segregation, indicating that the gas plays an important role in the dynamics of young clusters.

  18. Insights into the properties of the Orion spiral arm. NGC 2302: first result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, E.; Carraro, G.; Moitinho, A.; Radiszc, M.; Méndez, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    We summarize the first results from a program aimed at determining the properties of the Local (Orion) arm - LOA, based on a large and homogeneous set of kinematic and photometric data. We have made a comprehensive study of the young LOA cluster NGC 2302, which includes a UBVRI photometric analysis and determination of its kinematic properties -proper motion (PM) and radial velocity (RV) - and of its orbital parameters.

  19. Heterogeneity of spiral wear patterns produced by local heating on amorphous polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Reginald H.; Gnecco, Enrico; King, William P.; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We report on spiral wear patterns produced at constant angular velocity by hot tip atomic force microscopy (HT-AFM) on surfaces of two common amorphous polymers: polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Topography of these patterns is obtained with regular AFM cantilevers. Topography cross-sections taken from a center of each spiral at a given azimuthal angle Θ relate changes of surface corrugation h corr with tangential velocity v of a thermal cantilever. Polymer wear is characterized by a power law h corr (v) = α(v/v max ) −β , which yields a pre-factor α and an exponent β. Below the glass transition temperature T g , α is polymer specific and β varies weakly between similar conditions and samples. Variations of β are hypothesized to reflect polymer relaxation processes, which are expected to vary only weakly between amorphous polymers. At and above T g , α approaches initial thermal tip indentation depth within a polymer, β plummets, and a power law relation of h corr with v diverges. These results are explained by heterogeneous wear around T g due to a local nature of glass transition. At all studied temperatures, additional wear heterogeneities are found as due to position on the polymer and Θ. Variations of α and β with position on the polymer are found to be only marginally larger then uncertainties of the thermal tip–polymer interface temperature. Variations of α and β with Θ are found to be largely influenced by buckling of thermal cantilevers traveling in a spiral pattern. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Novel method to characterize temperature dependant wear on polymers is reported. • Hot-tip AFM methods and spiral scanning are used. • Heterogeneity of polymer wear in vicinity of glass transition is discussed. • Amorphous polymers are studied only

  20. Spiral Arms, Infall, and Misalignment of the Circumbinary Disk from the Circumstellar Disks in the Protostellar Binary System L1551 NE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Saigo, Kazuya [ALMA Project Office, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomoaki [Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8160 (Japan); Saito, Masao [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1805 (Japan); Lim, Jeremy [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Hanawa, Tomoyuki [Center for Frontier Science, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ho, Paul T. P., E-mail: takakuwa@sci.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-01

    We report the ALMA Cycle 2 observations of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE in the 0.9 mm continuum, C{sup 18}O (3–2), {sup 13}CO (3–2), SO (7{sub 8}–6{sub 7}), and CS (7–6) emission. At 0.″18 (=25 au) resolution, ∼4 times higher than that of our Cycle 0 observations, the circumbinary disk (CBD) as seen in the 0.9 mm emission is shown to be composed of a northern and a southern spiral arm, with the southern arm connecting to the circumstellar disk (CSD) around Source B. The western parts of the spiral arms are brighter than the eastern parts, suggesting the presence of an m = 1 spiral mode. In the C{sup 18}O emission, the infall gas motions in the interarm regions and the outward gas motions in the arms are identified. These observed features are well reproduced with our numerical simulations, where gravitational torques from the binary system impart angular momenta to the spiral-arm regions and extract angular momenta from the interarm regions. Chemical differentiation of the CBD is seen in the four molecular species. Our Cycle 2 observations have also resolved the CSDs around the individual protostars, and the beam-deconvolved sizes are 0.″29 × 0.″19 (=40 × 26 au) (P.A. = 144°) and 0.″26 × 0.″20 (=36 × 27 au) (P.A. = 147°) for Sources A and B, respectively. The position and inclination angles of these CSDs are misaligned with those of the CBD. The C{sup 18}O emission traces the Keplerian rotation of the misaligned disk around Source A.

  1. Adaptive enhancement of optical fringe patterns by selective reconstruction using FABEMD algorithm and Hilbert spiral transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusiak, Maciej; Patorski, Krzysztof; Wielgus, Maciej

    2012-10-08

    Presented method for fringe pattern enhancement has been designed for processing and analyzing low quality fringe patterns. It uses a modified fast and adaptive bidimensional empirical mode decomposition (FABEMD) for the extraction of bidimensional intrinsic mode functions (BIMFs) from an interferogram. Fringe pattern is then selectively reconstructed (SR) taking the regions of selected BIMFs with high modulation values only. Amplitude demodulation and normalization of the reconstructed image is conducted using the spiral phase Hilbert transform (HS). It has been tested using computer generated interferograms and real data. The performance of the presented SR-FABEMD-HS method is compared with other normalization techniques. Its superiority, potential and robustness to high fringe density variations and the presence of noise, modulation and background illumination defects in analyzed fringe patterns has been corroborated.

  2. Spatial and mass distributions of molecular clouds and spiral structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, J.; Valdes, F.; National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ)

    1987-01-01

    The growth of molecular clouds resulting from cloud-cloud collisions and coalescence in the Galactic ring between 4 and 8 kpc are modeled, taking into account the presence of a spiral potential and the mutual cloud-cloud gravitational attraction. The mean lifetime of molecular clouds is determined to be about 200 million years. The clouds are present in both spiral arm and interarm regions, but a spiral pattern in their spatial distribution is clearly discernible, with the more massive clouds showing a stronger correlation with the spiral arms. As viewed from within the Galactic disk, however, it is very difficult to ascertain that the molecular cloud distribution in longitude-velocity space has a spiral pattern. 19 references

  3. The effects of additional arm weights on arm-swing magnitude and gait patterns in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jiyeon; Park, Jinse; Park, Kunbo; Jo, Geunyeol; Kim, Haeyu; Jang, Wooyoung; Kim, Ji Sun; Youn, Jinyoung; Oh, Eung Seok; Kim, Hee-Tae; Youm, Chang Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, arm facilitation has been interested in gait rehabilitation. However, there have been few studies concerning arm facilitation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of increasing arm weights on gait pattern in patients with PD. Twenty-seven patients with PD were enrolled, and they underwent gait analysis using a three-dimensional motion capture system. Sandbags were applied to the distal forearms in all participants. We compared gait parameters including arm swing, pelvic motion, spatiotemporal data, and relative rotational angle between the weighted and unweighted gaits. The total arm-swing amplitude and pelvic rotation were significantly higher when walking with additional arm weights than without arm weights. Cadence, walking speed, stride length, and swing phase were significantly higher, whereas stride time, double-support time, and stance phase were significantly lower, when walking with additional arm weights than without arm weights. We conclude that adding weights to the arm during walking may facilitate arm and pelvic movements, which results in changes to gait patterns. The therapeutic use of additional arm weights could be considered for gait rehabilitation in PD to improve gait impairment. Arm-swing facilitation using weight load improved gait in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnitudes of gluteus medius muscle activation during standing hip joint movements in spiral-diagonal patterns using elastic tubing resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdas, James W; Adams, Kady E; Bertucci, John E; Brooks, Koel J; Steiner, Meghan M; Hollman, John H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simultaneously quantify electromyographic (EMG) activation levels (% maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]) within the gluteus medius muscles on both moving and stance limbs across the performance of four proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) spiral-diagonal patterns in standing using resistance provided by elastic tubing. Differential EMG activity was recorded from the gluteus medius muscle of 26 healthy participants. EMG signals were collected with surface electrodes at a sampling frequency of 1000 Hz during three consecutive repetitions of each spiral-diagonal movement pattern. Significant differences existed among the four-spiral-diagonal movement patterns (F3,75 = 19.8; p gluteus medius muscle recruitment (50 SD 29.3% MVIC) than any of the other three patterns and the diagonal one extension [D1E] (39 SD 37% MVIC) and diagonal two extension [D2E] (35 SD 29% MVIC) patterns generated more gluteus medius muscle recruitment than diagonal one flexion [D1F] (22 SD 21% MVIC). From a clinical efficiency standpoint, a fitness professional using the spiral-diagonal movement pattern of D2F and elastic tubing with an average peak tension of about 9% body mass may be able to concurrently strengthen the gluteus medius muscle on both stance and moving lower limbs.

  5. The Use of Poetry in a Spiral-Patterned Methodology for Research about Love in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Research about love in early childhood education and care is rare. Love is difficult topic to research and write about in scholarly contexts. In order to properly explore love in professional contexts, practitioner narratives on the topic were sought through individual, unstructured interviews. A spiral-patterned methodological approach was…

  6. Acacia (wattle and Cananga (ylang-ylang: from spiral to whorled and irregular (chaotic phyllotactic patterns – a pictorial report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Rutishauser

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Phyllotaxis, i.e., the arrangement of leaves around the stem and leaf-like organs inside flowers is regular in most vascular plants. Thus, developmental models usually explain regular phyllotactic patterns such as Fibonacci spirals and decussate/whorled patterns that obey Hofmeister’s rule: primordia form as far away as possible from previously initiated primordia. However, flowering plants showing at first Fibonacci spirals or whorled phyllotaxes may switch to other patterns that lack an obvious order and thus may be called irregular or even chaotic. Vegetative shoot tips of various Australian wattles (Acacia spp., Leguminosae in eudicots and flower buds of ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata and other Annonaceae (basal angiosperms provide examples of irregular patterning. This pictorial report provides food for thought for scientists interested in phyllotaxis patterns beyond the usual spiral and whorled patterns. Emphasis is given on irregular phyllotaxes that occur in wild-type plants, mainly correlated with geometrical parameters such as leaf and stamen primordia that are very small as compared to the size of their apical meristems. They call for additional explanatory models, combining auxin-driven development with geometrical constraints and biophysical processes.

  7. Circumbinary, not transitional: On the spiral arms, cavity, shadows, fast radial flows, streamers and horseshoe in the HD142527 disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel J.; Cuello, Nicolás; Pinte, Christophe; Mentiplay, Daniel; Casassus, Simon; Christiaens, Valentin; Kennedy, Grant M.; Cuadra, Jorge; Perez, Sebastian; Marino, Sebastian; Armitage, Philip J.; Zurlo, Alice; Juhasz, Attila; Ragusa, Enrico; Laibe, Guillaume; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    We present 3D hydrodynamical models of the HD142527 protoplanetary disc, a bright and well studied disc that shows spirals and shadows in scattered light around a 100 au gas cavity, a large horseshoe dust structure in mm continuum emission, together with mysterious fast radial flows and streamers seen in gas kinematics. By considering several possible orbits consistent with the observed arc, we show that all of the main observational features can be explained by one mechanism — the interaction between the disc and the observed binary companion. We find that the spirals, shadows and horseshoe are only produced in the correct position angles by a companion on an inclined and eccentric orbit approaching periastron — the `red' family from Lacour et al. (2016). Dust-gas simulations show radial and azimuthal concentration of dust around the cavity, consistent with the observed horseshoe. The success of this model in the HD142527 disc suggests other mm-bright transition discs showing cavities, spirals and dust asymmetries may also be explained by the interaction with central companions.

  8. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  9. Spiral tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Asadiyan, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Spiral Tectonics (ST) is a new window to global tectonics introduced as alternative model for Plate Tectonics (PT). ST based upon Dahw(rolling) and Tahw(spreading) dynamics. Analogues to electric and magnetic components in the electromagnetic theory we could consider Dahw and Tahw as components of geodynamics, when one component increases the other decreases and vice versa. They are changed to each other during geological history. D-component represents continental crust and T-component represents oceanic crust. D and T are two arm of spiral-cell. T-arm 180 degree lags behind D-arm so named Retard-arm with respect to D or Forward-arm. It seems primary cell injected several billions years ago from Earth's center therefore the Earth's core was built up first then mantel and finally the crust was build up. Crust building initiate from Arabia (Mecca). As the universe extended gravitation wave swirled the earth fractaly along cycloid path from big to small scale. In global scale (order-0) ST collect continents in one side and abandoned Pacific Ocean in the other side. Recent researches also show two mantels upwelling in opposite side of the Earth: one under Africa (tectonic pose) and the other under Pacific Ocean (tectonic tail). In higher order (order-1) ST build up Africa in one side and S.America in the other side therefore left Atlantic Ocean meandered in between. In order-n e.g. Khoor Musa and Bandar-Deylam bay are seen meandered easterly in the Iranian part but Khoor Abdullah and Kuwait bay meandered westerly in the Arabian part, they are distributed symmetrically with respect to axis of Persian Gulf(PG), these two are fractal components of easterly Caspian-wing and westerly Black Sea-wing which split up from Anatoly. Caspian Sea and Black Sea make two legs of Y-like structure, this shape completely fitted with GPS-velocity map which start from PG and split up in the Catastrophic Point(Anatoly). We could consider PG as remnants of Ancient Ocean which spent up

  10. Predicting the distribution of spiral waves from cell properties in a developmental-path model of Dictyostelium pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geberth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers. This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this concept leads to an inhomogeneous and systematic spatial distribution of spiral waves, which can be predicted from the distribution of cells on the developmental path. We propose specific experiments for checking whether such systematics are also found in data and thus, indirectly, provide evidence of a developmental path.

  11. Numerical integration of gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects and its application to gravitational study of grand design spiral arm structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    We present a method to integrate the gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects. By adopting the spherical polar coordinates centred at the evaluation point as the integration variables, we numerically compute the volume integral representation of the gravitational potential and of the acceleration vector. The variable transformation completely removes the algebraic singularities of the original integrals. The comparison with exact solutions reveals around 15 digits accuracy of the new method. Meanwhile, the six digit accuracy of the integrated gravitational field is realized by around 106 evaluations of the integrand per evaluation point, which costs at most a few seconds at a PC with Intel Core i7-4600U CPU running at 2.10 GHz clock. By using the new method, we show the gravitational field of a grand design spiral arm structure as an example. The computed gravitational field shows not only spiral shaped details but also a global feature composed of a thick oblate spheroid and a thin disc. The developed method is directly applicable to the electromagnetic field computation by means of Coulomb's law, the Biot-Savart law, and their retarded extensions. Sample FORTRAN 90 programs and test results are electronically available.

  12. Large-scale Bubble Structure of the Intersteller Medium (ISM) and Properties of the Local Spiral Arm (LSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, N. G.

    1984-01-01

    Bubbles which are very common structure units in the Galaxy and galaxies were examined. Collection of radio, optical, infrared and X-ray observations of the Cyg superbubble (CSB) region of the sky show that the CSB is not a single bubble object. Between 50 to 75 percent of its X-ray emission is ascribed to discrete sources. The other 25 to 50% X-ray emission, probably originates from bubbles around 8 OB associations of the region. All bubbles located within the spiral structure of Galaxy, M31 and M33 have diameter 300 pc. The large distance of stellar association from the galactic plane (GP) combined with picture of the gas distribution within the LSA shows that a Reyleigh-Taylor instability in the LSA can develop and give use to the formation of compact stellar clusters, such as the Cyg OB2 association. Development stages of the Reyleigh-Taylor instability, some peculiarities of the dust distribution and departures of the local structure from the galactic grand design suggest the absence of a spiral shockwave in the LSA.

  13. Tracking Target and Spiral Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming G.; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2002-01-01

    A new algorithm for analyzing the evolution of patterns of spiral and target waves in large aspect ratio chemical systems is introduced. The algorithm does not depend on finding the spiral tip but locates the center of the pattern by a new concept, called the spiral focus, which is defined by the...

  14. Differentiation between sarcoidosis and Hodgkin’s lymphoma based on mediastinal lymph node involvement pattern: Evaluation using spiral CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrian, Payam; Ebrahimzadeh, Seyed Amir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the specific and detailed anatomic sites and morphologic characteristics of mediastinal lymph nodes on spiral computed tomography for the purpose of differentiation between sarcoidosis and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Anatomical distribution of mediastinal lymph nodes on spiral CT was reviewed in 39 patients with sarcoidosis and 37 patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma using the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) lymph node map. Other morphologic features such as lymph node calcification or coalescence of adjacent lymph nodes were also compared. Zone 10 was involved more often in sarcoidosis than in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. On the other hand, there was a higher tendency for presence of zone 1 and 3 as well as retrocrural and internal mammary lymphadenopathy in Hodgkin’s lymphoma than in sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis presented with intranodal calcifications more often than Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Coalescence, pressure effect on adjacent structures and central cavitations were significantly more common in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Findings of the present study indicate that specific anatomical distribution and morphological patterns of mediastinal lymph nodes, as demonstrated on spiral CT, can be useful in differentiating sarcoidosis from Hodgkin’s lymphoma

  15. Prediction of Spiral Patterns on the Surface of Asteroid 101955 Bennu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Asteroid 101955 Bennu, the target of OSIRIS-REx space mission, is known to have a "walnut" shape: close to an axially symmetric oblate shape with a sharp equatorial ridge (Nolan M. C., et al., 2013, Icarus 226, 629-640, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.05.028). Such a shape is usual among quickly spinning small asteroids; it is thought to be formed due to surficial transport of asteroid material toward equator under a combination of the gravitational and centrifugal forces, in other words, downhill with respect to the geopotential (e.g., Scheeres, D. J., et al., 2006, Science 314, 1280-1283, doi:10.1126/science.1133599). This is likely to occur, when a rubble-pile asteroid is spun up by the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. The Rossby number Ro associated with the frictionless downslope movement is scaled as (T/2π)(g sinθ/L)1/2, where T the spin period, g is a characteristic value of the effective gravity (the geopotential gradient), θ is the characteristic surface slope with respect to the geopotential, and L is the characteristic scale length of the slope. Typical values for Bennu, g 6×10-5 m s-2, θ 30° (Scheeres, D.J., et al., 2016, Icarus 276, 116-140, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.04.013), and L 100 m, a part of Bennu radius, yields Ro 1.3, which means that the Coriolis force play a significant role in the downslope movement dynamics. On this basis, it is reasonable to predict that the traces left by material sliding toward equator on Bennu would form spiral patterns. Hopefully, OSIRIS-REx mission will check the prediction soon. I modeled trajectories of rolling boulders, bouncing boulders, and sliding masses assuming different friction models. For these calculations I used an idealized axially symmetric Bennu shape and semianalytical calculation of gravitational potential. I also repeated the calculation for a set of higher spin rates that may be relevant to the geologically recent past. Although the trajectory form itself is insufficient to

  16. SAR and thermal response effects of a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil in a magnetic induction sensor on a human head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyi; Liu, Peiguo; Zhou, Dongming; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the radiation safety of a newly designed magnetic induction sensor. This novel magnetic induction sensor uses a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil (TAASC) as the exciter. A human head model with a real anatomical structure was used to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature change. Computer Simulation Technology (CST) was used to determine the values of the peak 10-g SAR under different operating parameters (current, frequency, horizontal distance between the excitation coil and the receiver coil, vertical distance between the top of the head model and the XOY plane, position of excitation coil, and volume of hemorrhage). Then, the highest response for the SAR and temperature rise was determined. The results showed that this new magnetic induction sensor is safe in the initial state; for safety reasons, the TAASC current should not exceed 4 A. The scalp tissue absorbed most of the electromagnetic energy. The TAASC's SAR/thermal performance was close to that of the circular coil.

  17. Spiral cleavage and early embryology of a loxosomatid entoproct and the usefulness of spiralian apical cross patterns for phylogenetic inferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkel Julia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the four major bilaterian clades, Deuterostomia, Acoelomorpha, Ecdysozoa, and Lophotrochozoa, the latter shows an astonishing diversity of bodyplans. While the largest lophotrochozoan assemblage, the Spiralia, which at least comprises Annelida, Mollusca, Entoprocta, Platyhelminthes, and Nemertea, show a spiral cleavage pattern, Ectoprocta, Brachiopoda and Phoronida (the Lophophorata cleave radially. Despite a vast amount of recent molecular phylogenetic analyses, the interrelationships of lophotrochozoan phyla remain largely unresolved. Thereby, Entoprocta play a key role, because they have frequently been assigned to the Ectoprocta, despite their differently cleaving embryos. However, developmental data on entoprocts employing modern methods are virtually non-existent and the data available rely exclusively on sketch drawings, thus calling for thorough re-investigation. Results By applying fluorescence staining in combination with confocal microscopy and 3D-imaging techniques, we analyzed early embryonic development of a basal loxosomatid entoproct. We found that cleavage is asynchronous, equal, and spiral. An apical rosette, typical for most spiralian embryos, is formed. We also identified two cross-like cellular arrangements that bear similarities to both, a "molluscan-like" as well as an "annelid-like" cross, respectively. Conclusions A broad comparison of cleavage types and apical cross patterns across Lophotrochozoa shows high plasticity of these character sets and we therefore argue that these developmental traits should be treated and interpreted carefully when used for phylogenetic inferences.

  18. Logarithmic Spiral

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    anti-clockwise direction and we get a right-handed spiral. (Figure 2). We know that the derivative of eX is also eX. Various properties of logarithmic spiral depend on this property of eX. Properties of Logarithmic Spiral. 1. The most important property of a logarithmic spiral is that r (i.e. the distance from the origin) increases.

  19. Forced Flow Patterns in a Miniature Planar Spiral Transformer with Ferrofluid Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. DUMITRU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvesting devices (EHD utilize small-scale components with low power losses. Key parts, the electric power transformers (EPTs are to convert the voltage/current electromagnetic parameters from the primary, energy harvesting stage, to the secondary, storage and delivery power levels. Magnetic colloidal nanofluids seem to be a sound solution for building the magnetic circuit of such EPTs, enabling miniaturized constructions, whose implementation may benefit of LIGA fabrication technology. Because the magnetic cores of EPTs are, at least in part, fluid, the occurring magnetization body forces may result in complex flows that need to be known. Along this line, this paper presents mathematical models and numerical simulation results for a miniature, planar, spiral EPT with hybrid, ferrite-magnetic nanofluid core. Several electric powering schemes are envisaged and the pending flows investigated.

  20. Patterns and cellular mechanisms of arm regeneration in adult starfish Asterias rollestoni bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingjun; Fan, Xianyuan; Du, Yutang; Sun, Wenjie; Zhang, Shaofeng; Li, Jiaxin

    2011-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms of starfish regeneration, the arms of adult starfish Asterias rollestoni Bell were amputated and their regeneration patterns and cellular mechanisms were studied. It was found that cells in the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum near the end of the stump began to dedifferentiate 4 d after amputation. The dedifferentiated cells in the outer epidermis proliferated, migrated to the wound site and formed a thickened pre-epidermis which would then re-differentiate gradually into mature epidermis. The new parietal peritoneum formed on the coelomic side of wound might be from the curvely elongated parietal peritoneum, resulting from the dedifferentiated and proliferated cells by extension. Afterwards, the proliferated cells made the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum invaginate into the interior dermis and formed blastema-like structures together with induced dedifferentiated dermal cells. Most interestingly, the arm regeneration in A. rollestoni was achieved synchronously by de novo arm-bud formation and growth, and arm-stump elongation. The crucial aspects of arm-bud formation included cell dedifferentiation, proliferation and migration, while those of arm-stump elongation included cell dedifferentiation, proliferation, invagination, and arm-wall-across blastema-like structure formation. The unique pattern and cellular mechanisms of amputated arm regeneration make it easier to understand the rapid regeneration process of adult starfish. This study may lay solid foundations for the research into molecular mechanisms of echinoderm regeneration.

  1. SPATIO-TEMPORAL PATTERN MINING ON TRAJECTORY DATA USING ARM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khoshahval

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary mobile was considered to be a device to make human connections easier. But today the consumption of this device has been evolved to a platform for gaming, web surfing and GPS-enabled application capabilities. Embedding GPS in handheld devices, altered them to significant trajectory data gathering facilities. Raw GPS trajectory data is a series of points which contains hidden information. For revealing hidden information in traces, trajectory data analysis is needed. One of the most beneficial concealed information in trajectory data is user activity patterns. In each pattern, there are multiple stops and moves which identifies users visited places and tasks. This paper proposes an approach to discover user daily activity patterns from GPS trajectories using association rules. Finding user patterns needs extraction of user’s visited places from stops and moves of GPS trajectories. In order to locate stops and moves, we have implemented a place recognition algorithm. After extraction of visited points an advanced association rule mining algorithm, called Apriori was used to extract user activity patterns. This study outlined that there are useful patterns in each trajectory that can be emerged from raw GPS data using association rule mining techniques in order to find out about multiple users’ behaviour in a system and can be utilized in various location-based applications.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Pattern Mining on Trajectory Data Using Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshahval, S.; Farnaghi, M.; Taleai, M.

    2017-09-01

    Preliminary mobile was considered to be a device to make human connections easier. But today the consumption of this device has been evolved to a platform for gaming, web surfing and GPS-enabled application capabilities. Embedding GPS in handheld devices, altered them to significant trajectory data gathering facilities. Raw GPS trajectory data is a series of points which contains hidden information. For revealing hidden information in traces, trajectory data analysis is needed. One of the most beneficial concealed information in trajectory data is user activity patterns. In each pattern, there are multiple stops and moves which identifies users visited places and tasks. This paper proposes an approach to discover user daily activity patterns from GPS trajectories using association rules. Finding user patterns needs extraction of user's visited places from stops and moves of GPS trajectories. In order to locate stops and moves, we have implemented a place recognition algorithm. After extraction of visited points an advanced association rule mining algorithm, called Apriori was used to extract user activity patterns. This study outlined that there are useful patterns in each trajectory that can be emerged from raw GPS data using association rule mining techniques in order to find out about multiple users' behaviour in a system and can be utilized in various location-based applications.

  3. On wave dark matter in spiral and barred galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F., México. (Mexico); Bray, Hubert L., E-mail: lmedina@fis.cinvestav.mx, E-mail: bray@math.duke.edu, E-mail: tmatos@fis.cinvestav.mx [Mathematics Department, Duke University, Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We recover spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxy simulations with a Wave Dark Matter (WDM) background (also known as Scalar Field Dark Matter (SFDM), Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) dark matter, and Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter). Here we show how the interaction between a baryonic disk and its Dark Matter Halo triggers the formation of spiral structures when the halo is allowed to have a triaxial shape and angular momentum. This is a more realistic picture within the WDM model since a non-spherical rotating halo seems to be more natural. By performing hydrodynamic simulations, along with earlier test particles simulations, we demonstrate another important way in which wave dark matter is consistent with observations. The common existence of bars in these simulations is particularly noteworthy. This may have consequences when trying to obtain information about the dark matter distribution in a galaxy, the mere presence of spiral arms or a bar usually indicates that baryonic matter dominates the central region and therefore observations, like rotation curves, may not tell us what the DM distribution is at the halo center. But here we show that spiral arms and bars can develop in DM dominated galaxies with a central density core without supposing its origin on mechanisms intrinsic to the baryonic matter.

  4. On wave dark matter in spiral and barred galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Matos, Tonatiuh; Bray, Hubert L.

    2015-01-01

    We recover spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxy simulations with a Wave Dark Matter (WDM) background (also known as Scalar Field Dark Matter (SFDM), Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) dark matter, and Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter). Here we show how the interaction between a baryonic disk and its Dark Matter Halo triggers the formation of spiral structures when the halo is allowed to have a triaxial shape and angular momentum. This is a more realistic picture within the WDM model since a non-spherical rotating halo seems to be more natural. By performing hydrodynamic simulations, along with earlier test particles simulations, we demonstrate another important way in which wave dark matter is consistent with observations. The common existence of bars in these simulations is particularly noteworthy. This may have consequences when trying to obtain information about the dark matter distribution in a galaxy, the mere presence of spiral arms or a bar usually indicates that baryonic matter dominates the central region and therefore observations, like rotation curves, may not tell us what the DM distribution is at the halo center. But here we show that spiral arms and bars can develop in DM dominated galaxies with a central density core without supposing its origin on mechanisms intrinsic to the baryonic matter

  5. Arm position influences the activation patterns of trunk muscles during trunk range-of-motion movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Aaron; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Drake, Janessa Dm

    2016-10-01

    To understand the activation patterns of the trunk musculature, it is also important to consider the implications of adjacent structures such as the upper limbs, and the muscles that act to move the arms. This study investigated the effects of arm positions on the activation patterns and co-activation of the trunk musculature and muscles that move the arm during trunk range-of-motion movements (maximum trunk axial twist, flexion, and lateral bend). Fifteen males and fifteen females, asymptomatic for low back pain, performed maximum trunk range-of-motion movements, with three arm positions for axial twist (loose, crossed, abducted) and two positions for flexion and lateral bend (loose, crossed). Electromyographical data were collected for eight muscles bilaterally, and activation signals were cross-correlated between trunk muscles and the muscles that move the arms (upper trapezius, latissimus dorsi). Results revealed consistently greater muscle co-activation (higher cross-correlation coefficients) between the trunk muscles and upper trapezius for the abducted arm position during maximum trunk axial twist, while results for the latissimus dorsi-trunk pairings were more dependent on the specific trunk muscles (either abdominal or back) and latissimus dorsi muscle (either right or left side), as well as the range-of-motion movement. The findings of this study contribute to the understanding of interactions between the upper limbs and trunk, and highlight the influence of arm positions on the trunk musculature. In addition, the comparison of the present results to those of individuals with back or shoulder conditions may ultimately aid in elucidating underlying mechanisms or contributing factors to those conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Searching gravitational microlensing events in the galaxy spiral arms by EROS II; Recherche d'evenements de microlentille gravitationnelle dans les bras spiraux de la galaxie avec EROS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derue, Frederic [Paris-11 Univ., 91 Orsay (France)

    1999-04-15

    The EROS II experiment is searching for microlensing events due to compact massive objects passing through the line-of-sight of luminous stars. These objects are candidates to explain the baryonic component of Dark Matter in our Galaxy. EROS II was dedicated to different lines-of-sight: Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, Galactic Centre and 4 directions towards the Spiral Arms of the Galaxy. This thesis presents the first search for microlensing towards these last lines-of-sight (about 9 million stars). Simple criteria based on the search for significant fluctuations allowed one to discover a low noise sample of 7 candidates to the microlensing effect, with an average timescale of 50 days. A detailed analysis of the light curve of one candidate allows us to give a confidence interval on its mass 2.7 x 10{sup -3} < M/M{sub 0} < 0.84 at 95% CL. The amplification curve of another candidate shows a modulation which can be interpreted as a microlensing effect acting on a binary source, with an orbital period of P{sub 0} = 50 {+-} 3 days. To improve the knowledge of the distance of the target stars, we have combined observations of EROS II with bibliographic sources on associations of stars linked with the spiral arm features, and we have developed a program to find variable stars. Ten cepheids have thus been found. Distances obtained with different methods are in rough agreement with each other. The average optical depth measured towards the four directions is {tau}-bar = 0.45{sub 0.11}{sup +0.23} x 10{sup -6}. It is compatible with expectations from simple galactic models. The long duration of most events favours interpretation of lensing by objects belonging to the disk instead of the halo. It also seems that some events due to bulge lenses have influenced measurements towards the line-of-sight which is closest to the Galactic Centre. Observation continue towards spiral arms. More accurate measurements should be obtained with increase of statistics, allowing one to

  7. Blood flow patterns of solitary pulmonary nodules with enhancement: clinical value of multi-slice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shenjiang; Xiao Xiangsheng; Liu Shiyuan; Liu Huimin; Li Yuli; Li Huimin; Li Chengzhou; Zhang Chenshi; Tao Zhiwei; Yang Chunshan; Jiang Qingjun; Ouyang Lin; Yu Hong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of dynamic multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) for providing quantitative information about blood flow patterns of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) and the correlation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-positive tumor angiogenesis and the quantifiable parameters of blood flow pattern in solitary bronchogenic adenocarcinoma. Methods Seventy-eight patients with SPNs (with strong enhancement) (diameter ≤4 cm; 68 malignant; 10 active inflammatory) underwent multi-location dynamic contrast enhanced (nonionic contrast material was administrated via the antecubital vein at a rate of 4 ml/s by using an autoinjector) serial CT. Precontrast and postcontrast attenuation on every scan was recorded. Perfusion, peak height, and ratio of peak height of the SPN to that of the aorta were calculated. Perfusion was calculated from the maximum gradient of the time-attenuation curve and the peak height of the aorta. The quantifiable parameters (perfusion, peak height, ratio of peak height of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma to that of the aorta and mean transit time) of blood flow pattern in 30 VEGF-positive solitary bronchogenic adenocarcinoma were compared with microvessel densities (MVD) and VEGF expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: No statistically significant difference in the peak height was found between malignant (35.79 ± 10.76) HU and active inflammatory (39.76 ± 4.59) HU nodules (t=1.148, P=0.255). SPN-to-aorta ratio (14.27 ± 4.37)% and perfusion value (3.02 ± 0.96)ml -1 ·min -1 ·kg -1 in malignant SPNs were significantly lower than those of active inflammatory nodules(18.51 ± 2.71)%, (6.34 ± 4.39)ml -1 ·min -1 ·kg -1 (t=2.978, P=0.004, t=5.590, P -1 ·min -1 ·kg -1 , mean transit time (14.86 ± 5.84) s, and MVD (70.15 ± 20.03). Each of peak height, ratio of peak height of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma to that of the aorta, and perfusion correlated positively with MVD (r=0.781, P<0.0001; r=0

  8. Rhythmic arm swing enhances patterned locomotor-like muscle activity in passively moved lower extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tetsuya; Sato, Takahiko; Ogata, Toru; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    The use of driven gait orthosis (DGO) has drawn attention in gait rehabilitation for patients after central nervous system (CNS) lesions. By imposing a passive locomotor-like kinematic pattern, the neural mechanisms responsible for locomotion can be activated as in a normal gait. To further enhance this activity, discussions on possible intervention are necessary. Given the possible functional linkages between the upper and lower limbs, we investigated in healthy subjects the degree of modification in the lower limb muscles during DGO-induced passive gait by the addition of swing movement in the upper extremity. The results clearly showed that muscle activity in the ankle dorsiflexor TA muscle was significantly enhanced when the passive locomotor-like movement was accompanied by arm swing movement. The modifications in the TA activity were not a general increase through the stride cycles, but were observed under particular phases as in normal gaits. Voluntary effort to swing the arms may have certain effects on the modification of the muscle activity. The results provide clinical implications regarding the usefulness of voluntary arm swing movement as a possible intervention in passive gait training using DGO, since ordinary gait training using DGO does not induce spontaneous arm swing movement despite its known influence on the lower limb movement. PMID:25742956

  9. Adaptive patterns of movement during arm elevation test in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiu-jenq; Hsieh, Shih-Chang; Cheng, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Wei Chun; Lai, Yuta

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a distinctive characteristic exists in the pattern of movement (scapular elevation and upward rotation to reduce impingement) and associated muscular activities during arm elevation in subjects with shoulder impingement (SI) that is associated with the severity of the disease. Fourteen subjects (7 amateur athletes and 7 student athletes) with SI and 7 controls performed arm elevation in the scapular plane. Scapular kinematics (upward rotation, elevation, tipping, and scapulohumeral rhythm) and muscular activity [upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and deltoid] were measured by an electromagnetic motion tracking system and surface electromyography, respectively. Subjects with SI had greater elevation of the scapula (11.9 mm, p impingement during arm elevation in subjects with SI. Assessing scapular elevation during arm elevation may be a useful functional marker for evaluating impingement status and associated muscle function. Additionally, SA and LT muscle strengthening may improve SI. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  10. Spiral Structure and Global Star Formation Processes in M 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruendl, Robert A.

    1994-12-01

    The nearby grand design spiral galaxy, M 51, is an obvious proving ground for studies of spiral structure and large scale star formation processes. New near--infrared observations of M 51 made with COB (Cryogenic Optical Bench) on the Kitt Peak 1.3m allow us to examine the stellar distribution and the young star formation regions as well as probe regions of high extinction such as dust lanes. We also present an analysis of the kinematics of the ionized gas observed with the Maryland--Caltech Imaging Fabry Perot. The color information we derive from the near--infrared bands provides a more accurate tracer of extinction than optical observations. We find that the dust extinction and CO emission in the arms are well correlated. Our kinematic data show unambiguously that these dense gas concentrations are associated with kinematic perturbations. In the inner disk, these perturbations are seen to be consistent with the streaming motions predicted by classical density wave theory. The dust lanes, and presumably the molecular arms, form a narrow ridge that matches these velocity perturbations wherever the viewing angle is appropriate. This interpretation requires that the corotation radius be inward of the outer tidal arms. The outer tidal arms however show streaming velocities of the sign that would be expected interior to the corotation point. This can be reconciled if the outer arms are part of a second spiral pattern, most likely due to the interaction with the companion NGC 5195. The near--infrared observations also show emission from the massive star forming regions. These observations are less affected by extinction than optical observations of H II regions and show clearly that the sites of massive star formation are correlated with but downstream from the concentrations of dense molecular material. This provides clear evidence that the ISM has been organized by the streaming motions which have in turn triggered massive star formation.

  11. An open and configurable embedded system for EMG pattern recognition implementation for artificial arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Liu; Fan Zhang; Huang, He Helen

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition (PR) based on electromyographic (EMG) signals has been developed for multifunctional artificial arms for decades. However, assessment of EMG PR control for daily prosthesis use is still limited. One of the major barriers is the lack of a portable and configurable embedded system to implement the EMG PR control. This paper aimed to design an open and configurable embedded system for EMG PR implementation so that researchers can easily modify and optimize the control algorithms upon our designed platform and test the EMG PR control outside of the lab environments. The open platform was built on an open source embedded Linux Operating System running a high-performance Gumstix board. Both the hardware and software system framework were openly designed. The system was highly flexible in terms of number of inputs/outputs and calibration interfaces used. Such flexibility enabled easy integration of our embedded system with different types of commercialized or prototypic artificial arms. Thus far, our system was portable for take-home use. Additionally, compared with previously reported embedded systems for EMG PR implementation, our system demonstrated improved processing efficiency and high system precision. Our long-term goals are (1) to develop a wearable and practical EMG PR-based control for multifunctional artificial arms, and (2) to quantify the benefits of EMG PR-based control over conventional myoelectric prosthesis control in a home setting.

  12. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Electromyography (EMG) pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. Methods With five unilateral transradial (TR) amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG) signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. Results With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9%) as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for amputated arms. Using a

  13. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yanjuan; Zhou, Ping; Li, Guanglin

    2012-10-05

    Electromyography (EMG) pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. With five unilateral transradial (TR) amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG) signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9%) as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for amputated arms. Using a two-stage cascade classifier

  14. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Yanjuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electromyography (EMG pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. Methods With five unilateral transradial (TR amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. Results With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9% as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for

  15. The spiral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bibace, Roger; Kharlamov, Nikita

    2013-01-01

    ’s work with Bernard Kaplan on symbol formation is a primer on this idea. This paper examines the idea of spirality and develops the notion of dynamic coexistence that can clarify the issue of directionality of development; that is, what is the general trajectory or ground plan that development assumes....... Directionality is discussed in terms of the organism-in-environment unfolding over time as the unit of developmental analysis. Thinking on this issue has proceeded from the nature–nurture debates, to recognition of the interaction of external and internal processes, to transactions between the organism...

  16. Successive motor nerve blocks to identify the muscles causing a spasticity pattern: example of the arm flexion pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, F; Schnitzler, A; Droz-Bartholet, F; Salga, M; Tatu, L; Debaud, C; Denormandie, P; Parratte, B

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin A has been the main treatment for spasticity since the beginning of the 1990s. Surprisingly, there is still no consensus regarding injection parameters or, importantly, how to determine which muscles to target to improve specific functions. The aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach to determine this, using the example of the arm flexion pattern. We first determined anatomical landmarks for selective motor block of the brachialis nerve, using 20 forearms from 10 fresh cadavers in Ecole Européenne de Chirurgie and a university-based dissection centre, Paris, France. We then carried out selective blocks of the motor nerves to the brachialis, brachioradialis and biceps brachii in patients with stroke with an arm flexion pattern, in a University Rehabilitation Hospital, Garches, France. We measured: the resting angle of the elbow angle in standing (manual goniometer), active and passive range of extension, and spasticity using the Held and Tardieu and the Modified Ashworth scales. Range of passive elbow extension was also measured with the shoulder in 90° of flexion. The resting angle of the elbow in standing decreased by 35.0° (from 87.6 ± 23.7 to 52.6 ± 24.2°) with inhibition of brachialis, by a further 3.9° (from 52.6 ± 24.2 to 48.7 ± 23.7°) with inhibition of brachioradialis and a further 14.5° (from 48.7 ± 23.7to 34.2 ± 20.7°) with inhibition of biceps brachii. These results were consistent with the clinical evaluation of passive elbow range of motion with the shoulder at 90°. Sequential blocking of the nerves to the three main elbow flexors revealed that the muscle that limited elbow extension the most, was brachialis. This muscle should be the main target to improve the arm flexion pattern. These results show that it is important not simply to inject the most superficial or powerful muscles to treat a spastic deformity. A comprehensive assessment is required. The strategy proposed in this paper should

  17. Etiology and pattern of maxillofacial injuries in the armed forces of pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.U.; Khan, M.; Khan, A.A.; Maqsood, A.; Ibrahim, W.; Wasim, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the etiology and pattern of maxillofacial injuries in the Armed Forces of Pakistan in terms of anatomical distribution of injuries. Three hundred consecutive patients of Armed Forces of Pakistan with maxillofacial injuries reporting to AFID and admitted to the hospital or treated as out-patients in the oral surgery clinic, were included in this study. Isolated nasal bone and frontal sinus fractures were excluded from the study. Anatomical distribution, frequency and etiology of fractures, rank at job and occupational as well as personal hobbies were recorded. Descriptive analyses were used to determine mean, standard deviation, percentage and range values. The most frequent bone fractured was the mandible, which accounted for 159 cases (53%). The zygomatic complex was fractured in 51 cases (17%), the maxilla in 12 cases (4 %), and the alveolar process in 21 cases (7%). The most common cause was road traffic accident (168 cases; 56%), followed by accidental fall (69 cases; 23%), gunshot injuries (27 cases; 9%), sports related injuries (15 cases; 5%), and injury associated with a fight (12 cases; 4%); there were only 9 cases of animals related injuries (3%). In this series, mandible was the most commonly fractured facial bone, while road traffic accident was the most common etiological factor. Results could be influenced by the personal and working environment. (author)

  18. Pattern of skin diseases among civil population and armed forces personnel at Pune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of skin disorders among 11393 civil and 8123 defence service personnel who attended out-patient department (OPD from January 1989 to December 1994 is presented. Infective dermatoses were more common in civil population (41.2% as compared to defence service personnel (36.3%. Fungal infection was common in both groups (15.1% and 17.2% whereas parasitic infestations and pyoderma were more common in civil population (12.8% and 6.1% as compared to service personnel (7.8% and 3.6%. Among non-infective dermatoses eczemas were more common in civil population (17.3% as compared to Armed Forces personnel (11.7%, whereas papulosquamous disorders, pigmentary disorders, acne and alopecia were more common in Armed Forces personnel (13.5%, 13.4% 8.7% and 6.2% as compared to civil population (10.8%, 10.1%, 6.4% and 4.1%. The incidence of other skin disorders did not differ much between the two groups.

  19. QS Spiral: Visualizing Periodic Quantified Self Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Cuttone, Andrea; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose an interactive visualization technique QS Spiral that aims to capture the periodic properties of quantified self data and let the user explore those recurring patterns. The approach is based on time-series data visualized as a spiral structure. The interactivity includes ...

  20. Shadows and spirals in the protoplanetary disk HD 100453

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benisty, M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; de Boer, J.; Lesur, G.; Dominik, C.; Dullemond, C. P.; Langlois, M.; Min, M.; Wagner, K.; Henning, T.; Juhasz, A.; Pinilla, P.; Facchini, S.; Apai, D.; van Boekel, R.; Garufi, A.; Ginski, C.; Ménard, F.; Pinte, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Zurlo, A.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Beuzit, J. L.; Chauvin, G.; Cudel, M.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Fontanive, C.; Gratton, R.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; LeCoroller, H.; Mouillet, D.; Mesa, D.; Sissa, E.; Vigan, A.; Antichi, J.; Buey, T.; Fusco, T.; Gisler, D.; Llored, M.; Magnard, Y.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Pragt, J.; Roelfsema, R.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Wildi, F.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Understanding the diversity of planets requires studying the morphology and physical conditions in the protoplanetary disks in which they form. Aims: We aim to study the structure of the 10 Myr old protoplanetary disk HD 100453, to detect features that can trace disk evolution and to understand the mechanisms that drive these features. Methods: We observed HD 100453 in polarized scattered light with VLT/SPHERE at optical (0.6 μm, 0.8 μm) and near-infrared (1.2 μm) wavelengths, reaching an angular resolution of 0.02'', and an inner working angle of 0.09''. Results: We spatially resolve the disk around HD 100453, and detect polarized scattered light up to 0.42'' ( 48 au). We detect a cavity, a rim with azimuthal brightness variations at an inclination of 38° with respect to our line of sight, two shadows and two symmetric spiral arms. The spiral arms originate near the location of the shadows, close to the semi major axis. We detect a faint feature in the SW that can be interpreted as the scattering surface of the bottom side of the disk, if the disk is tidally truncated by the M-dwarf companion currently seen at a projected distance of 119 au. We construct a radiative transfer model that accounts for the main characteristics of the features with an inner and outer disk misaligned by 72°. The azimuthal brightness variations along the rim are well reproduced with the scattering phase function of the model. While spirals can be triggered by the tidal interaction with the companion, the close proximity of the spirals to the shadows suggests that the shadows could also play a role. The change in stellar illumination along the rim induces an azimuthal variation of the scale height that can contribute to the brightness variations. Conclusions: Dark regions in polarized images of transition disks are now detected in a handful of disks and often interpreted as shadows due to a misaligned inner disk. However, the origin of such a misalignment in HD 100453, and

  1. Improving the Robustness of Real-Time Myoelectric Pattern Recognition against Arm Position Changes in Transradial Amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjuan Geng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have showed that arm position variations would significantly degrade the classification performance of myoelectric pattern-recognition-based prosthetic control, and the cascade classifier (CC and multiposition classifier (MPC have been proposed to minimize such degradation in offline scenarios. However, it remains unknown whether these proposed approaches could also perform well in the clinical use of a multifunctional prosthesis control. In this study, the online effect of arm position variation on motion identification was evaluated by using a motion-test environment (MTE developed to mimic the real-time control of myoelectric prostheses. The performance of different classifier configurations in reducing the impact of arm position variation was investigated using four real-time metrics based on dataset obtained from transradial amputees. The results of this study showed that, compared to the commonly used motion classification method, the CC and MPC configurations improved the real-time performance across seven classes of movements in five different arm positions (8.7% and 12.7% increments of motion completion rate, resp.. The results also indicated that high offline classification accuracy might not ensure good real-time performance under variable arm positions, which necessitated the investigation of the real-time control performance to gain proper insight on the clinical implementation of EMG-pattern-recognition-based controllers for limb amputees.

  2. Planet Formation in AB Aurigae: Imaging of the Inner Gaseous Spirals Observed inside the Dust Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ya-Wen; Gu, Pin-Gao; Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Guilloteau, Stephane; Dutrey, Anne; Chapillon, Edwige; Folco, Emmanuel di [Laboratoire d’astrophysique de Bordeaux, Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, B18N, alle Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, F-33615 Pessac (France); Muto, Takayuki [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Shen, Bo-Ting [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Momose, Munetake [College of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Pietu, Vincent [IRAM, 300 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, F-38406 Saint-Martin-d’Hères (France); Fukagawa, Misato [Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); Corder, Stuartt [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ohashi, Nagayoshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hashimoto, Jun, E-mail: ywtang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Astrobiology Center of NINS 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2017-05-01

    We report the results of ALMA observations of a protoplanetary disk surrounding the Herbig Ae star AB Aurigae. We obtained high-resolution (0.″1; 14 au) images in {sup 12}CO J = 2 − 1 emission and in the dust continuum at the wavelength of 1.3 mm. The continuum emission is detected at the center and at the ring with a radius ( r ) of ∼120 au. The CO emission is dominated by two prominent spirals within the dust ring. These spirals are trailing and appear to be about 4 times brighter than their surrounding medium. Their kinematics is consistent with Keplerian rotation at an inclination of 23°. The apparent two-arm-spiral pattern is best explained by tidal disturbances created by an unseen companion located at r of 60–80 au, with dust confined in the pressure bumps created outside this companion orbit. An additional companion at r of 30 au, coinciding with the peak CO brightness and a large pitch angle of the spiral, would help to explain the overall emptiness of the cavity. Alternative mechanisms to excite the spirals are discussed. The origin of the large pitch angle detected here remains puzzling.

  3. The Spiral of Euroscepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galpin, Charlotte; Trenz, Hans-Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Media scholars have increasingly examined the effects of a negativity bias that applies to political news. In the ‘spiral of cynicism’, journalist preferences for negative news correspond to public demands for sensational news. We argue that this spiral of cynicism in EU news results in a ‘spiral...

  4. Six Decades of Spiral Density Wave Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Frank H.

    2016-09-01

    The theory of spiral density waves had its origin approximately six decades ago in an attempt to reconcile the winding dilemma of material spiral arms in flattened disk galaxies. We begin with the earliest calculations of linear and nonlinear spiral density waves in disk galaxies, in which the hypothesis of quasi-stationary spiral structure (QSSS) plays a central role. The earliest success was the prediction of the nonlinear compression of the interstellar medium and its embedded magnetic field; the earliest failure, seemingly, was not detecting color gradients associated with the migration of OB stars whose formation is triggered downstream from the spiral shock front. We give the reasons for this apparent failure with an update on the current status of the problem of OB star formation, including its relationship to the feathering substructure of galactic spiral arms. Infrared images can show two-armed, grand design spirals, even when the optical and UV images show flocculent structures. We suggest how the nonlinear response of the interstellar gas, coupled with overlapping subharmonic resonances, might introduce chaotic behavior in the dynamics of the interstellar medium and Population I objects, even though the underlying forces to which they are subject are regular. We then move to a discussion of resonantly forced spiral density waves in a planetary ring and their relationship to the ideas of disk truncation, and the shepherding of narrow rings by satellites orbiting nearby. The back reaction of the rings on the satellites led to the prediction of planet migration in protoplanetary disks, which has had widespread application in the exploding data sets concerning hot Jupiters and extrasolar planetary systems. We then return to the issue of global normal modes in the stellar disk of spiral galaxies and its relationship to the QSSS hypothesis, where the central theoretical concepts involve waves with negative and positive surface densities of energy and angular

  5. Global enhancement and structure formation of the magnetic field in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Khrapov, Sergey S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we study numerically large-scale magnetic field evolution and its enhancement in gaseous disks of spiral galaxies. We consider a set of models with the various spiral pattern parameters and the initial magnetic field strength with taking into account gas self-gravity and cooling and heating processes. In agreement with previous studies we find out that galactic magnetic field is mostly aligned with gaseous structures, however small-scale gaseous structures (spurs and clumps) are more chaotic than the magnetic field structure. In spiral arms magnetic field often coexists with the gas distribution, in the inter-arm region we see filamentary magnetic field structure. These filaments connect several isolated gaseous clumps. Simulations reveal the presence of the small-scale irregularities of the magnetic field as well as the reversal of magnetic field at the outer edge of the large-scale spurs. We provide evidences that the magnetic field in the spiral arms has a stronger mean-field component, and there is a clear inverse correlation between gas density and plasma-beta parameter, compared to the rest of the disk with a more turbulent component of the field and an absence of correlation between gas density and plasma-beta. We show the mean field growth up to >3-10 μG in the cold gas during several rotation periods (>500-800 Myr), whereas ratio between azimuthal and radial field is equal to >4/1. We find an enhancement of random and ordered components of the magnetic field. Mean field strength increases by a factor of >1.5-2.5 for models with various spiral pattern parameters. Random magnetic field component can reach up to 25% from the total strength. By making an analysis of the time-dependent evolution of the radial Poynting flux, we point out that the magnetic field strength is enhanced more strongly at the galactic outskirts which is due to the radial transfer of magnetic energy by the spiral arms pushing the magnetic field outward. Our results also

  6. Some statistical properties of spiral galaxies along the Hubble sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Jun-liang; Zhang, Fei-peng; Peng, Qiu-he

    A statistical study has been made for the variations along the Hubble sequence, os such parameters as the degree of tightness of winding of spiral arm λ, the pitch angle μ, the flatness of the disk H/ D25 and the thickness H along the Hubble sequence for 365 spiral galaxies published in A&Ap Supplement Series. The mean values of these quantities for the various Hubble types have been obtained for the first time. The results of the statistics show clearly 1) that the Hubble classification of spiral galaxies is one which has only a qualitative and statistical significance, and 2) that the dispersion relation in the density wave theory is valid for most spiral galaxies, i.e., the arms of most spiral galaxies satisfy the requirements of being tightly wound.

  7. Mechanical response of spiral interconnect arrays for highly stretchable electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Qaiser, Nadeem

    2017-11-21

    A spiral interconnect array is a commonly used architecture for stretchable electronics, which accommodates large deformations during stretching. Here, we show the effect of different geometrical morphologies on the deformation behavior of the spiral island network. We use numerical modeling to calculate the stresses and strains in the spiral interconnects under the prescribed displacement of 1000 μm. Our result shows that spiral arm elongation depends on the angular position of that particular spiral in the array. We also introduce the concept of a unit-cell, which fairly replicates the deformation mechanism for full complex hexagon, diamond, and square shaped arrays. The spiral interconnects which are axially connected between displaced and fixed islands attain higher stretchability and thus experience the maximum deformations. We perform tensile testing of 3D printed replica and find that experimental observations corroborate with theoretical study.

  8. Variation of gunshot injury patterns in mortality associated with human rights abuses and armed conflict: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraybar, Jose Pablo

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of the distribution of gunshot injuries in a sample of 777 sets of human remains of proven human rights abuse from Somaliland, the Balkans and Peru is compared to frequencies of injuries sustained by combatants in contemporary conflicts reported in the literature. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) reduced the data to three components accounting for 82.94% of the variance. The first component with 38.31% of variance shows segments Arms and thorax/abdomen to be positively correlated (0.887 and 0.662, respectively); the segment head/neck is strongly correlated (0.951) to the second component while the segment thorax/abdomen shows a low, negative correlation (-0.388). Finally in the third component only the legs are strongly correlated (0.991). Data was further subjected to a K-means cluster analysis to determine the likely groupings combining the four types of injuries. Each of the three clusters reproduced similar patterns observed in the PCA: Cluster 1 shows the prevalence of injuries to the thorax/abdomen and extremities in addition to injuries to the head/neck; Cluster 2 shows injuries to the head/neck and Cluster 3 injuries to the thorax/abdomen and a lower representation of the arms and legs. Most of the cases (70.5%), irrespective of geography and type of site (attack or detention), were grouped into Cluster 2. Such comparison shows that in human rights abuse, irrespective of their geography, gunshot injuries tend to follow a pattern favouring the head/neck and thorax/abdomen areas over the extremities, the reverse pattern observed in contemporary combat operations. In those settings gunshot wound trauma is the second cause of mortality/morbidity (after fragmenting ammunition) and its distribution concentrates on the extremities, thorax/abdomen and head; following the pattern of protective armour when it is used. Considering that human rights abuses are often presented as encounters between two armed groups in the context of counter

  9. Triangular spiral tilings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushida, Takamichi; Hizume, Akio; Yamagishi, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    The topology of spiral tilings is intimately related to phyllotaxis theory and continued fractions. A quadrilateral spiral tiling is determined by a suitable chosen triple (ζ, m, n), where ζ element of D/R, and m and n are relatively prime integers. We give a simple characterization when (ζ, m, n) produce a triangular spiral tiling. When m and n are fixed, the admissible generators ζ form a curve in the unit disk. The family of triangular spiral tilings with opposed parastichy pairs (m, n) is parameterized by the divergence angle arg (ζ), while triangular spiral tilings with non-opposed parastichy pairs are parameterized by the plastochrone ratio 1/|ζ|. The generators for triangular spiral tilings with opposed parastichy pairs are not dense in the complex parameter space, while those with non-opposed parastichy pairs are dense. The proofs will be given in a general setting of spiral multiple tilings. We present paper-folding (origami) sheets that build spiral towers whose top-down views are triangular tilings. (paper)

  10. Importance of packing in spiral defect chaos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We develop two measures to characterize the geometry of patterns exhibited by the state of spiral defect chaos, a weakly turbulent regime of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. These describe the packing of contiguous stripes within the pattern by quantifying their length and nearest-neighbor distributions. The distributions ...

  11. The epidemiology of lethal violence in Darfur: using micro-data to explore complex patterns of ongoing armed conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Alex; Hazlett, Chad; Davenport, Christian; Kennedy, Joshua

    2014-11-01

    This article describes and analyzes patterns of lethal violence in Darfur, Sudan, during 2008-09, drawing upon a uniquely detailed dataset generated by the United Nations-African Union hybrid operation in Darfur (UNAMID), combined with data generated through aggregation of reports from open-source venues. These data enable detailed analysis of patterns of perpetrator/victim and belligerent groups over time, and show how violence changed over the four years following the height of armed conflict in 2003-05. During the reference period, violent incidents were sporadic and diverse and included: battles between the major combatants; battles among subgroups of combatant coalitions that were ostensibly allied; inter-tribal conflict; incidents of one-sided violence against civilians by different parties; and incidents of banditry. The conflict as a whole defies easy categorization. The exercise illustrates the limits of existing frameworks for categorizing armed violence and underlines the importance of rigorous microlevel data collection and improved models for understanding the dynamics of collective violence. By analogy with the use of the epidemiological data for infectious diseases to help design emergency health interventions, we argue for improved use of data on lethal violence in the design and implementation of peacekeeping, humanitarian and conflict resolution interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hello to Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This image highlights the hidden spiral arms (blue) that were discovered around the nearby galaxy NGC 4625 by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image is composed of ultraviolet and visible-light data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red. As the image demonstrates, the lengthy spiral arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light while bright in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light. The youthful arms are also very long, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far. Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own. The armless companion galaxy seen below NGC 4625 is called NGC 4618. Astronomers do not know why it lacks arms but speculate that it may have triggered the development of arms in NGC 4625.

  13. Spiral Countercurrent Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoichiro; Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    For many years, high-speed countercurrent chromatography conducted in open tubing coils has been widely used for the separation of natural and synthetic compounds. In this method, the retention of the stationary phase is solely provided by the Archimedean screw effect by rotating the coiled column in the centrifugal force field. However, the system fails to retain enough of the stationary phase for polar solvent systems such as the aqueous–aqueous polymer phase systems. To address this problem, the geometry of the coiled channel was modified to a spiral configuration so that the system could utilize the radially acting centrifugal force. This successfully improved the retention of the stationary phase. Two different types of spiral columns were fabricated: the spiral disk assembly, made by stacking multiple plastic disks with single or four interwoven spiral channels connected in series, and the spiral tube assembly, made by inserting the tetrafluoroethylene tubing into a spiral frame (spiral tube support). The capabilities of these column assemblies were successfully demonstrated by separations of peptides and proteins with polar two-phase solvent systems whose stationary phases had not been well retained in the earlier multilayer coil separation column for high-speed countercurrent chromatography. PMID:23833207

  14. Spiral finned crucible pot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soemowidagdo, Arianto Leman; Tiwan, Widarto, Ardian, Aan

    2018-02-01

    Innovation on a crucible furnace to increase its efficiency in aluminum melting has been done. The innovation was a spiral finned crucible pot. The inclination of the spiral finned was vary of 5, 10, 15, and 20 degrees. The spiral finned effects was determined from the performance test result. A crucible pot without fin was also tested as a control. The crucible pot was examined at the same process condition. The crucible pot with the inclined fin of 10 degrees gives an optimum performance. It gives effective heating rate so that more efficient in LPG consumption. Therefore it saves energy in the aluminum melting process.

  15. Galactic masers: Kinematics, spiral structure and the disk dynamic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorguev, A. S.; Utkin, N. D.; Zabolotskikh, M. V.; Dambis, A. K.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    We applied the currently most comprehensive version of the statistical-parallax technique to derive kinematical parameters of the maser sample with 136 sources. Our kinematic model comprises the overall rotation of the Galactic disk and the spiral density-wave effects. We take into account the variation of radial velocity dispersion with Galactocentric distance. The best description of the velocity field is provided by the model with constant radial and vertical velocity dispersions, $(\\sigma U0, \\sigma W0) \\approx (9.4 \\pm 0.9~, 5.9 \\pm 0.8)~ km/s$. We compute flat Galactic rotation curve over the Galactocentric distance interval from 3 to 15 kpc and find the local circular rotation velocity to be $ V_0 \\approx (235-238)$~ km/s $\\pm 7$~ km/s. We also determine the parameters of the four-armed spiral pattern (pitch angle $i \\approx (-10.4 \\pm 0.3)^\\circ$ and the phase of the Sun $\\chi_0 \\approx (125 \\pm 10) ^\\circ$). The radial and tangential spiral perturbations are about $f_R \\approx (-6.9 \\pm 1.4)$~km/s, $f_\\Theta \\approx (+2.8 \\pm 1.0$) ~km/s. The kinematic data yield a solar Galactocentric distance of $R_0 \\approx (8.24 \\pm 0.12)~kpc$. Based on rotation curve parameters and the asymmetric drift we Infer the exponential disk scale $H_D \\approx (2.7 \\pm 0.2)$ ~kpc under assumption of marginal stability of the intermediate-age disk, and finally we estimate the minimum local surface disk density, $\\Sigma (R_0) > (26 \\pm 3) ~ M_\\odot pc^{-2}$.

  16. Low surface brightness spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanishin, W.

    1980-01-01

    This dissertation presents an observational overview of a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) spiral galaxies. The sample galaxies were chosen to have low surface brightness disks and indications of spiral structure visible on the Palomar Sky Survey. They are of sufficient angular size (diameter > 2.5 arcmin), to allow detailed surface photometry using Mayall 4-m prime focus plates. The major findings of this dissertation are: (1) The average disk central surface brightness of the LSB galaxies is 22.88 magnitude/arcsec 2 in the B passband. (2) From broadband color measurements of the old stellar population, we infer a low average stellar metallicity, on the order of 1/5 solar. (3) The spectra and optical colors of the HII regions in the LSB galaxies indicate a lack of hot ionizing stars compared to HII regions in other late-type galaxies. (4) The average surface mass density, measured within the radius containing half the total mass, is less than half that of a sample of normal late-type spirals. (5) The average LSB galaxy neutral hydrogen mass to blue luminosity ratio is about 0.6, significantly higher than in a sample of normal late-type galaxies. (6) We find no conclusive evidence of an abnormal mass-to-light ratio in the LSB galaxies. (7) Some of the LSB galaxies exhibit well-developed density wave patterns. (8) A very crude calculation shows the lower metallicity of the LSB galaxies compared with normal late-type spirals might be explained simply by the deficiency of massive stars in the LSB galaxies

  17. Self-regulated model of galactic spiral structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartin, Daniel; Khanna, Gaurav

    2002-01-01

    The presence of spiral structure in isolated galaxies is a problem that has only been partially explained by theoretical models. Because the rate and pattern of star formation in the disk must depend only on mechanisms internal to the disk, we may think of the spiral galaxy as a self-regulated system far from equilibrium. This paper uses this idea to look at a reaction-diffusion model for the formation of spiral structures in certain types of galaxies. In numerical runs of the model, spiral structure forms and persists over several revolutions of the disk, but eventually dies out.

  18. [Effect of freezing and cooking on the texture and electrophoretic pattern of the proteins of octopus arms (Octopus vulgaris)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Genara; Nirchio, Mauro; Bello, Rafael; Borderías, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Texture is the most valuable feature in cephalopods. Factors that mainly affect the texture of octopus are: freezing, scalding and cooking. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of freezing, scalding and length of cooking time on the texture and electrophoretic pattern of proteins of octopus arms. Octopuses were trapped near Margarita Island and carried with ice to the laboratory where they were packed and subjected to: a) freezing at -27 degrees C or at -20 degrees C b) scalding c) cooking for 25 min, 35 min or 45 min. Shear force was determined by Kramer cell on strips of octopus arms. SDS-PAGE was done according to the Laemmli method with 12% polyacrilamide gels. A sensory evaluation of the preference of texture was carried out using a hedonic scale of 7-points and a non-trained panel. Octopus texture was not affected by freezing temperature or scalding. Frozen octopus was softer after cooking than fresh. The longer the cooking time was, the softer the octopus was. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not significantly affected by scalding or cooking; however large aggregates heavier than MHC, new bands and loss of resolution of the bands appeared. Myosin and paramyosin bands were more affected by freezing prior to cooking.

  19. Star formation and the surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    The (blue) surface brightness of spiral galaxies is significantly correlated with their Hα linewidth. This can be most plausibly interpreted as a correlation of surface brightness with star formation rate. There is also a significant difference in surface brightness between galaxies forming stars in a grand design spiral pattern and those with floc star formation regions. (author)

  20. Spiral 2 Week

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of this meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the Spiral-2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. Different issues have been tackled particularly the equipment around Spiral-2 like injectors, cryo-modules or beam diagnostics, a workshop was devoted to other facilities dedicated to radioactive ion beam production. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  1. Spiral 2 Week

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The main goal of this meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the Spiral-2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. Different issues have been tackled particularly the equipment around Spiral-2 like injectors, cryo-modules or beam diagnostics, a workshop was devoted to other facilities dedicated to radioactive ion beam production. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  2. A short report on the mid-upper arm circumference (muac) pattern in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUAC) pattern in children aged 2-5 years in Jos. Study Population and Methods: Data was collected in May 2002 and permission was granted for this study to be carried out. Children were selected from both groups of sexes (males and females).

  3. Plasma Generator Using Spiral Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowski, George N. (Inventor); Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Ticatch, Larry A. (Inventor); Smith, Laura J. (Inventor); Koppen, Sandra V. (Inventor); Nguyen, Truong X. (Inventor); Ely, Jay J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A plasma generator includes a pair of identical spiraled electrical conductors separated by dielectric material. Both spiraled conductors have inductance and capacitance wherein, in the presence of a time-varying electromagnetic field, the spiraled conductors resonate to generate a harmonic electromagnetic field response. The spiraled conductors lie in parallel planes and partially overlap one another in a direction perpendicular to the parallel planes. The geometric centers of the spiraled conductors define endpoints of a line that is non-perpendicular with respect to the parallel planes. A voltage source coupled across the spiraled conductors applies a voltage sufficient to generate a plasma in at least a portion of the dielectric material.

  4. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  5. Interacting noise sources shape patterns of arm movement variability in three-dimensional space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apker, Gregory A; Darling, Timothy K; Buneo, Christopher A

    2010-11-01

    Reaching movements are subject to noise in both the planning and execution phases of movement production. The interaction of these noise sources during natural movements is not well understood, despite its importance for understanding movement variability in neurologically intact and impaired individuals. Here we examined the interaction of planning and execution related noise during the production of unconstrained reaching movements. Subjects performed sequences of two movements to targets arranged in three vertical planes separated in depth. The starting position for each sequence was also varied in depth with the target plane; thus required movement sequences were largely contained within the vertical plane of the targets. Each final target in a sequence was approached from two different directions, and these movements were made with or without visual feedback of the moving hand. These combined aspects of the design allowed us to probe the interaction of execution and planning related noise with respect to reach endpoint variability. In agreement with previous studies, we found that reach endpoint distributions were highly anisotropic. The principal axes of movement variability were largely aligned with the depth axis, i.e., the axis along which visual planning related noise would be expected to dominate, and were not generally well aligned with the direction of the movement vector. Our results suggest that visual planning-related noise plays a dominant role in determining anisotropic patterns of endpoint variability in three-dimensional space, with execution noise adding to this variability in a movement direction-dependent manner.

  6. PROBING SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS THROUGH SPIRALS AND ARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyosun; Taam, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations of strikingly well-defined spirals in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars point to the existence of binary companions in these objects. In the case of planet- or brown-dwarf-mass companions, we investigate the observational properties of the spiral-onion shell wakes due to the gravitational interaction of these companions with the outflowing circumstellar matter. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations at high resolution show that the substellar mass objects produce detectable signatures, corresponding to density contrasts (10%-200%) and arm separations (10-400 AU) at 100 AU distance from the central star, for the wake induced by a Jupiter to brown-dwarf-mass object orbiting a solar mass AGB star. In particular, the arm pattern propagates in the radial direction with a speed depending on the local wind speed and sound speed, implying possible variations of the arm separation in the wind acceleration region and/or in a slow wind with significant temperature variation. The pattern propagation speeds of the inner and outer boundaries differ by twice the sound speed, leading to the overlap of high-density boundaries in slow winds and producing a subpattern of the spiral arm feature. Vertically, the wake forms concentric arcs with angular sizes anticorrelated to the wind Mach number. We provide an empirical formula for the peak density enhancement as a function of the mass, orbital distance, and velocity of the object as well as the wind and local sound speed. In typical conditions of AGB envelopes, the arm-interarm density contrast can be greater than 30% of the background density within a distance of ∼10 (M p /M J ) AU for the object mass M p in units of Jupiter mass M J . These results suggest that such features may probe unseen substellar mass objects embedded in the winds of AGB stars and may be useful in planning future high-sensitivity/resolution observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter

  7. The spinning ball spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupeux, Guillaume; Le Goff, Anne; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the trajectory of a fast revolving solid ball moving in a fluid of comparable density. As the ball slows down owing to drag, its trajectory follows an exponential spiral as long as the rotation speed remains constant: at the characteristic distance L where the ball speed is significantly affected by the drag, the bending of the trajectory increases, surprisingly. Later, the rotation speed decreases, which makes the ball follow a second kind of spiral, also described in the paper. Finally, the use of these highly curved trajectories is shown to be relevant to sports.

  8. Quarkyonic Chiral Spirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toru, Kojo; Hidaka, Y.; Pisarski, R.; McLerran, L.

    2010-01-01

    We argue the properties of confining dense quark matter, 'quarkyonic' matter, from the viewpoint of both bulk properties and excitation modes. After a brief review of confining aspects, the chiral breaking/restoration will be discussed. We argue that the strong infrared correlations induce the chiral spiral, i.e., the spatial modulation of the chiral condensate which breaks the chiral symmetry locally but restore it globally. The effective dimensional reduction takes place, allowing us to analyzing the system as 2D model in which several exact results can be explicitly derived. We also discuss the excitation spectra, both mesonic and baryonic ones, on the chiral spiral. (author)

  9. Are spiral galaxies heavy smokers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.; Disney, M.; Phillipps, S

    1990-01-01

    The dustiness of spiral galaxies is discussed. Starburst galaxies and the shortage of truly bright spiral galaxies is cited as evidence that spiral galaxies are far dustier than has been thought. The possibility is considered that the dust may be hiding missing mass

  10. Origin choice and petal loss in the flower garden of spiral wave tip trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard A; Wikswo, John P; Otani, Niels F

    2009-09-01

    Rotating spiral waves have been observed in numerous biological and physical systems. These spiral waves can be stationary, meander, or even degenerate into multiple unstable rotating waves. The spatiotemporal behavior of spiral waves has been extensively quantified by tracking spiral wave tip trajectories. However, the precise methodology of identifying the spiral wave tip and its influence on the specific patterns of behavior remains a largely unexplored topic of research. Here we use a two-state variable FitzHugh-Nagumo model to simulate stationary and meandering spiral waves and examine the spatiotemporal representation of the system's state variables in both the real (i.e., physical) and state spaces. We show that mapping between these two spaces provides a method to demarcate the spiral wave tip as the center of rotation of the solution to the underlying nonlinear partial differential equations. This approach leads to the simplest tip trajectories by eliminating portions resulting from the rotational component of the spiral wave.

  11. Mechanics and spiral formation in the rat cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Nejad, T; Iannaccone, S; Rutherford, W; Iannaccone, P M; Foster, C D

    2015-01-01

    During the maturation of some mammals such as mice and rats, corneal epithelial cells tend to develop into patterns such as spirals over time. A better understanding of these patterns can help to understand how the organ develops and may give insight into some of the diseases affecting corneal development. In this paper, a framework for explaining the development of the epithelial cells forming spiral patterns due to the effect of tensile and shear strains is proposed. Using chimeric animals, made by combining embryonic cells from genetically distinguishable strains, we can observe the development of patterns in the cornea. Aggregates of cell progeny from one strain or the other called patches form as organs and tissue develop. The boundaries of these patches are fitted with logarithmic spirals on confocal images of adult rat corneas. To compare with observed patterns, we develop a three-dimensional large strain finite element model for the rat cornea under intraocular pressure to examine the strain distribution on the cornea surface. The model includes the effects of oriented and dispersed fibrils families throughout the cornea and a nearly incompressible matrix. Tracing the directions of critical strain vectors on the cornea surface leads to spiral-like curves that are compared to the observed logarithmic spirals. Good agreement between the observed and numerical curves supports the proposed assumption that shear and tensile strains facilitate sliding of epithelial cells to develop spiral patterns.

  12. Spiraling into Transformative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranton, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how technical and vocational learning may spiral into transformative learning. Transformative learning theory is reviewed and the learning tasks of critical theory are used to integrate various approaches to transformative learning. With this as a foundation, the article explores how transformative learning can be fostered in…

  13. Archimedean Voronoi spiral tilings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi

    2018-01-01

    We study the transition of the number of spirals (called parastichy in the theory of phyllotaxis) within a Voronoi tiling for Archimedean spiral lattices. The transition of local parastichy numbers within a tiling is regarded as a transition at the base site point in a continuous family of tilings. This gives a natural description of the quasiperiodic structure of the grain boundaries. It is proved that the number of tiles in the grain boundaries are denominators of rational approximations of the argument (called the divergence angle) of the generator. The local parastichy numbers are non-decreasing functions of the plastochron parameter. The bifurcation diagram of local parastichy numbers has a Farey tree structure. We also prove Richards’ formula of spiral phyllotaxis in the case of Archimedean Voronoi spiral tilings, and show that, if the divergence angle is a quadratic irrational number, then the shapes of tiles in the grain boundaries are close to rectangles. If the divergence angle is linearly equivalent to the golden section, then the shape of tiles in the grain boundaries is close to square.

  14. Properties of spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuser, J.

    1989-10-01

    The present thesis deals with the calculation and the study of the application possibilities of single and double spiral resonators. The main aim was the development and the construction of reliable and effective high-power spiral resonators for the UNILAC of the GSI in Darmstadt and the H - -injector for the storage ring HERA of DESY in Hamburg. After the presentation of the construction and the properties of spiral resonators and their description by oscillating-circuit models the theoretical foundations of the bunching are presented and some examples of a rebuncher and debuncher and their influence on the longitudinal particle dynamics are shown. After the description of the characteristic accelerator quantities by means of an oscillating-circuit model and the theory of an inhomogeneous λ/4 line it is shown, how the resonance frequency and the efficiency of single and double spiral resonators can be calculated from the geometrical quantities of the structure. In the following the dependence of the maximal reachable resonator voltage in dependence on the gap width and the surface of the drift tubes is studied. Furthermore the high-power resonators are presented, which were built for the different applications for the GSI in Darmstadt, DESY in Hamburg, and for the FOM Institute in Amsterdam. (orig./HSI) [de

  15. Theory of spiral structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The density wave theory of galactic spirals has now developed into a form suitable for consideration by experts in Applied Mechanics. On the one hand, comparison of theoretical deductions with observational data has convinced astrophysicists of the validity of the basic physical picture and the calculated results. On the other hand, the dynamical problems of a stellar system, such as those concerning the origin of spiral structure in galaxies, have not been completely solved. This paper reviews the current status of such developments, including a brief summary of comparison with observations. A particularly important mechanism, currently called the mechanism of energy exchange, is described in some detail. The mathematical problems and the physical processes involved are similar to those occurring in certain instability mechanisms in the 'magnetic bottle' designed for plasma containment. Speculations are given on the future developments of the theory and on observational programs. (Auth.)

  16. Spiral 2 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop.

  17. Rediscovering the Giant Low Surface Brightness Spiral Galaxy Malin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaz, Gaspar

    2018-01-01

    I summarize the latest discoveries regarding this ramarkable diffuse and giant galaxy, the largest single spiral in the universe so far. I describe how the latest discoveries could have been done easily 20 years ago, but an incredible summation of facts and some astronomical sociology, keeped many of them undisclosed. I present the most conspicuous features of the giant spiral arms of Malin 1, including stellar density, colors, stellar populations and some modeling describing their past evolution to the current state. I conclude with pending issues regarding stellar formation in Malin 1, and the efforts to detect its elusive molecular gas.

  18. The color gradient in spiral galaxies: application to M 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segalovitz, A.

    1975-01-01

    The calculated development of the color of a star cluster is used to predict the expected color evolution, as a function of radius, in a spiral galaxy. It is assumed that the fraction of gas which is converted into stars during a spiral arm passage is a function of radius only. Applying this model to M 81, it is shown that the observed color and mass distributions can be explained by an initial disk-like gas distribution proportional to the inverse square of the radius and a consumption fraction which is an increasing function of radius. (orig.) [de

  19. Evaluation of patterns of liver toxicity in patients on antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs: a prospective four arm observational study in ethiopian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the incidence, type, severity and predictors of antiretroviral and/or anti-tuberculosis drugs induced liver injury (DILI. METHODS: A total of 1,060 treatment naive patients were prospectively enrolled into four treatment groups: HIV patients receiving efavirenz based HAART alone (Arm-1; TB-HIV co-infected patients with CD4≤200 cells/μL, receiving concomitant rifampicin based anti-TB and efavirenz based HAART (Arm-2; TB-HIV co-infected patients with CD4>200 cells/μL, receiving anti-TB alone (Arm-3; TB patients taking rifampicin based anti-TB alone (Arm-4. Liver enzyme levels were monitored at baseline, 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th and 24th weeks during treatment. CD4 and HIV viral load was measured at baseline, 24th and 48th weeks. Data were analyzed using multivariate Cox Proportional Hazards Model. RESULTS: A total of 159 patients (15% developed DILI with severity grades 1, 2, 3 and 4 of 53.5%, 32.7%, 11.3% and 2.5% respectively. The incidence of cholestatic, hepatocellular or mixed pattern was 61%, 15% and 24%, respectively. Incidence of DILI was highest in Arm-2 (24.2%>Arm-3 (10.8%>Arm-1 (8.8%>Arm-4 (2.9%. Concomitant anti-TB-HIV therapy increased the risk of DILI by 10-fold than anti-TB alone (p<0.0001. HIV co-infection increased the risk of anti-TB DILI by 4-fold (p = 0.004. HAART associated DILI was 3-fold higher than anti-TB alone, (p = 0.02. HAART was associated with cholestatic and grade 1 DILI whereas anti-TB therapy was associated with hepatocellular and grade ≥ 2. Treatment type, lower CD4, platelet, hemoglobin, higher serum AST and direct bilirubin levels at baseline were significant DILI predictors. There was no effect of DILI on immunologic recovery or virologic suppression rate of HAART. CONCLUSION: HAART associated DILI is mainly cholestatic and mild whereas hepatocellular or mixed pattern with high severity grade is more common in anti-tuberculosis DILI. TB-HIV co-infection, disease severity

  20. Decametre scale, spiral-shaped landforms in Elysium Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balme, M. R.; Gallagher, C.

    2012-04-01

    We present the discovery of a new type of landform that is apparently confined to one or two locations in western Elysium Planitia, Mars. In planview, these landforms consist of spirals, a few tens of metres across, defined by low furrows and ridges. They appear singly or in loose groups or chains and are generally double-armed with a visual similarity to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability forms. About 100 examples have been found, over 90% of which occur in a single image. Almost all the examples seen have "anti-clockwise" rotation (from the edge to the centre); less than a fifth spiral the other way. The spirals are found only in the polygonised elements of a terrain type known as Platy-Ridged-Polygonised (PRP) terrain. This distinctive surface displays a tripartite morphology comprising: 1) well-defined, kilometre-scale plates of rubbly material (clast-sizes up to a few meters in diameters), 2) complex patterns of sinuous to sub-linear rubbly ridges that are often many kilometres long, less than a few tens of metres across and less than a few metres in height, and 3) clast-free zones between the plates that display decametre scale polygonally patterned ground defined by networks of furrows and grooves. PRP terrain appears to represent the "frozen" remnants of a once liquid medium: it is extremely flat with margins defining an equipotential surface; infills craters and drapes low relief terrain; can be traced up through the 300 km long Athabasca Vallis outflow channel to a source region consisting of a pair of large (km-wide) fractures called the Cerberus Fossae. The origin of the PRP material is debated: some authors favour extremely fluid, voluminous and turbulently emplaced lavas (e.g. Keszthelyi et al., Geochem. Geophys. Geosys., 2003), others argue that this material represents a debris-covered relict frozen sea or ocean (e.g. Murray et al., Nature, 2005). The spirals, which are visible only in HiRISE images with sub-metre spatial resolution, have been observed in

  1. Fast spiral-scan atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, I A; Reza Moheimani, S O

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new scanning technique for fast atomic force microscopy. In this method, the sample is scanned in a spiral pattern instead of the well established raster pattern. A spiral scan can be produced by applying single frequency cosine and sine signals with slowly varying amplitudes to the x-axis and y-axis of an atomic force microscope (AFM) scanner respectively. The use of the single tone input signals allows the scanner to move at high speeds without exciting the mechanical resonance of the device and with relatively small control efforts. Experimental results obtained by implementing this technique on a commercial AFM indicate that high-quality images can be generated at scan frequencies well beyond the raster scans.

  2. A numerical investigation of flow around octopus-like arms: near-wake vortex patterns and force development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakidi, A; Vavourakis, V; Tsakiris, D P; Ekaterinaris, J A

    2015-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of cephalopods has so far received little attention in the literature, due to their complexity in structure and locomotion. The flow around octopuses, in particular, can be complicated due to their agile and dexterous arms, which frequently display some of the most diverse mechanisms of motion. The study of this flow amounts to a specific instance of the hydrodynamics problem for rough tapered cylinder geometries. The outstanding manipulative and locomotor skills of octopuses could inspire the development of advanced robotic arms, able to operate in fluid environments. Our primary aim was to study the hydrodynamic characteristics of such bio-inspired robotic models and to derive the hydrodynamic force coefficients as a concise description of the vortical flow effects. Utilizing computational fluid dynamic methods, the coefficients were computed on realistic morphologies of octopus-like arm models undergoing prescribed solid-body movements; such motions occur in nature for short durations in time, e.g. during reaching movements and exploratory behaviors. Numerical simulations were performed on translating, impulsively rotating, and maneuvering arms, around which the flow field structures were investigated. The results reveal in detail the generation of complex vortical flow structures around the moving arms. Hydrodynamic forces acting on a translating arm depend on the angle of incidence; forces generated during impulsive rotations of the arms are independent of their exact morphology and the angle of rotation; periodic motions based on a slow recovery and a fast power stroke are able to produce considerable propulsive thrust while harmonic motions are not. Parts of these results have been employed in bio-inspired models of underwater robotic mechanisms. This investigation may further assist elucidating the hydrodynamics underlying aspects of octopus locomotion and exploratory behaviors.

  3. KINEMATIC ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR SPIRALS: FEEDING THE BLACK HOLE IN NGC 1097

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Ven, Glenn; Fathi, Kambiz

    2010-01-01

    We present a harmonic expansion of the observed line-of-sight velocity field as a method to recover and investigate spiral structures in the nuclear regions of galaxies. We apply it to the emission-line velocity field within the circumnuclear star-forming ring of NGC 1097, obtained with the GMOS-IFU spectrograph. The radial variation of the third harmonic terms is well described by a logarithmic spiral, from which we interpret that the gravitational potential is weakly perturbed by a two-arm spiral density wave with an inferred pitch angle of 52 0 ± 4 0 . This interpretation predicts a two-arm spiral distortion in the surface brightness, as hinted by the dust structures in central images of NGC 1097, and predicts a combined one-arm and three-arm spiral structure in the velocity field, as revealed in the non-circular motions of the ionized gas. Next, we use a simple spiral perturbation model to constrain the fraction of the measured non-circular motions that is due to radial inflow. We combine the resulting inflow velocity with the gas density in the spiral arms, inferred from emission-line ratios, to estimate the mass inflow rate as a function of radius, which reaches about 0.011 M sun yr -1 at a distance of 70 pc from the center. This value corresponds to a fraction of about 4.2 x 10 -3 of the Eddington mass accretion rate onto the central black hole in this LINER/Seyfert1 galaxy. We conclude that the line-of-sight velocity can not only provide a cleaner view of nuclear spirals than the associated dust, but that the presented method also allows the quantitative study of these possibly important links in fueling the centers of galaxies, including providing a constraint on the mass inflow rate as a function of radius.

  4. Three phase spiral liver Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanyanja, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to perform rapid back-to-back spiral acquisitions is an important recent technical advantage of spiral CT. this allows imaging of the upper abdomen (liver) during peak arterial enhancement (arterial phase) and during peak hepatic parenchymal enhancement (portal venous phase). Breatheld spiral CT has completely replaced dynamic incremental CT for evaluation of the liver. in selected patients with hyper vascular metastasis (hepatoma, neuroendocrine tumors, renal cell carcinoma, etc.) a biphasic examination is performed with one spiral acquisition obtained during the hepatic arterial phase and a second acquisition during the portal venous phase

  5. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma : usefulness of two and three phase spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of each phases in two and three phase spiral CT in the detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Two phase spiral CT images of 18 patients and three phase spiral CT images of 12 patients with pathologically-proven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were retrospectively compared. Using a single spiral scan, images of early and delayed phases were obtained at 43 seconds and 2{approx}3minutes respectively initiating the after administration of 100-120cc of contrast material (2{approx}3cc/sec), Images of arterial, portal and delayed phases were also obtained at 25 and 60 seconds, and 3{approx}4minutes, respectively, by the use of a double spiral scan. CT scans were performed with 10mm collimation at 1:1 pitch table speed. Contrast between the tumor and adjacent pancreatic parenchyma were compared and graded and enhancement pattern of the tumor were analysed together. In 12 patients (66.7%), images of the early phase were superior to those of the delayed phase. images of the portal phase were superior to those of the arterial phase. Enhancement of tumor was seen in four patients;all tumors were less than 3cm in size. The early phase of two phase spiral CT is superior to the delayed phase and the portal phase of three phase spiral CT is superior to the arterial phase. Both arterial and portal phases are superior to the delayed phase.

  6. The subtropical nutrient spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, William J.; Doney, Scott C.

    2003-12-01

    We present an extended series of observations and more comprehensive analysis of a tracer-based measure of new production in the Sargasso Sea near Bermuda using the 3He flux gauge technique. The estimated annually averaged nitrate flux of 0.84 ± 0.26 mol m-2 yr-1 constitutes only that nitrate physically transported to the euphotic zone, not nitrogen from biological sources (e.g., nitrogen fixation or zooplankton migration). We show that the flux estimate is quantitatively consistent with other observations, including decade timescale evolution of the 3H + 3He inventory in the main thermocline and export production estimates. However, we argue that the flux cannot be supplied in the long term by local diapycnal or isopycnal processes. These considerations lead us to propose a three-dimensional pathway whereby nutrients remineralized within the main thermocline are returned to the seasonally accessible layers within the subtropical gyre. We describe this mechanism, which we call "the nutrient spiral," as a sequence of steps where (1) nutrient-rich thermocline waters are entrained into the Gulf Stream, (2) enhanced diapycnal mixing moves nutrients upward onto lighter densities, (3) detrainment and enhanced isopycnal mixing injects these waters into the seasonally accessible layer of the gyre recirculation region, and (4) the nutrients become available to biota via eddy heaving and wintertime convection. The spiral is closed when nutrients are utilized, exported, and then remineralized within the thermocline. We present evidence regarding the characteristics of the spiral and discuss some implications of its operation within the biogeochemical cycle of the subtropical ocean.

  7. Influence of Gravity Compensation on Muscle Activation Patterns During Different Temporal Phases of Arm Movements of Stroke Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prange, Grada Berendina; Jannink, M.J.A.; Stienen, Arno; van der Kooij, Herman; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Arm support to help compensate for the effects of gravity may improve functional use of the shoulder and elbow during therapy after stroke, but gravity compensation may alter motor control. Objective. To obtain quantitative information on how gravity compensation influences muscle

  8. Long-term patterns of chronic complaints of the arms, neck, and shoulders and their determinants - The Doetinchem Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hulst, Rens; Van Oostrom, Sandra H.; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Verschuren, W. M Monique; Picavet, H. Susan

    2016-01-01

    Complaints of the arms, neck, and shoulders (CANS) represent a major public health problem but the long-term course is largely unknown. Our objective was to explore the 15-year course of chronic CANS and its determinants in a population-based cohort. During 1993 to 2012, 3050 men and women aged 26

  9. Spiral optical designs for nonimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Pablo; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.; Vilaplana, Juan; Buljan, Marina

    2011-10-01

    Manufacturing technologies as injection molding or embossing specify their production limits for minimum radii of the vertices or draft angle for demolding, for instance. In some demanding nonimaging applications, these restrictions may limit the system optical efficiency or affect the generation of undesired artifacts on the illumination pattern. A novel manufacturing concept is presented here, in which the optical surfaces are not obtained from the usual revolution symmetry with respect to a central axis (z axis), but they are calculated as free-form surfaces describing a spiral trajectory around z axis. The main advantage of this new concept lies in the manufacturing process: a molded piece can be easily separated from its mold just by applying a combination of rotational movement around axis z and linear movement along axis z, even for negative draft angles. Some of these spiral symmetry examples will be shown here, as well as their simulated results.

  10. The perfect shape spiral stories

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    This book uses the spiral shape as a key to a multitude of strange and seemingly disparate stories about art, nature, science, mathematics, and the human endeavour. In a way, the book is itself organized as a spiral, with almost disconnected chapters circling around and closing in on the common theme. A particular strength of the book is its extremely cross-disciplinary nature - everything is fun, and everything is connected! At the same time, the author puts great emphasis on mathematical and scientific correctness, in contrast, perhaps, with some earlier books on spirals. Subjects include the mathematical properties of spirals, sea shells, sun flowers, Greek architecture, air ships, the history of mathematics, spiral galaxies, the anatomy of the human hand, the art of prehistoric Europe, Alfred Hitchcock, and spider webs, to name a few.

  11. Drift and breakup of spiral waves in reaction–diffusion–mechanics systems

    OpenAIRE

    Panfilov, A. V.; Keldermann, R. H.; Nash, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize excitation in various biological, physical, and chemical systems. They underpin a variety of important phenomena, such as cardiac arrhythmias, morphogenesis processes, and spatial patterns in chemical reactions. Important insights into spiral wave dynamics have been obtained from theoretical studies of the reaction–diffusion (RD) partial differential equations. However, most of these studies have ignored the fact that spiral wave rotation is often accompanied by...

  12. Hurricane Spiral Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Thomas A.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    1993-10-01

    The spiral bands that occur in tropical cyclones can be conveniently divided into two classes-outer bands and inner bands. Evidence is presented here that the outer bands form as the result of nonlinear effects during the breakdown of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) through barotropic instability. In this process a zonal strip of high potential vorticity (the ITCZ shear zone or monsoon trough) begins to distort in a varicose fashion, with the potential vorticity (PV) becoming pooled in local regions that are connected by filaments of high PV. As the pooled regions become more axisymmetric, the filaments become thinner and begin to wrap around the PV centers.It is argued that inner bands form in a different manner. As a tropical cyclone intensifies due to latent heat release, the PV field becomes nearly circular with the highest values of PV in the cyclone center. The radial gradient of PV provides a state on which PV waves (the generalization of Rossby waves) can propagate. The nonlinear breaking of PV waves then leads to an irreversible distortion of the PV contours and a downgradient flux of PV. The continuation of this proem tends to erode the high PV core of the tropical cyclone, to produce a surrounding surf zone, and hence to spread the PV horizontally. In a similar fashion, inner bands can also form by the merger of a vortex with a patch of relatively high PV air. As the merger proem occurs the patch of PV is quickly elongated and wrapped around the vortex. The resulting vortex is generally larger in horizontal extent and exhibits a spiral band of PV.When the formation of outer and inner bands is interpreted in the context of a normal-mode spectral model, they emerge as slow manifold phenomena; that is, they have both rotational and (balanced or slaved) gravitational mode aspects. In this sense, regarding them as simply gravity waves leads to an incomplete dynamical picture.

  13. Measuring with the spiral reader

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The spiral reader shown here was at the time, together with the Shivamatic scanning system, the basic equipment used for measuring bubble chamber pictures. Anne Anton sits at the table. (See Photo Archive 7408343.)

  14. Spiral-shaped disinfection reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2015-08-20

    This disclosure includes disinfection reactors and processes for the disinfection of water. Some disinfection reactors include a body that defines an inlet, an outlet, and a spiral flow path between the inlet and the outlet, in which the body is configured to receive water and a disinfectant at the inlet such that the water is exposed to the disinfectant as the water flows through the spiral flow path. Also disclosed are processes for disinfecting water in such disinfection reactors.

  15. Spiral inlets for steam turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škach, Radek; Uher, Jan

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the design process of special nozzle blades for spiral inlets. Spiral inlets are used for the first stages of high pressure and intermediate pressure steam turbines with both reaction and impulse blades when throttling or sliding pressure control is applied. They improve the steam flow uniformity from the inlet pipe and thus decrease the aerodynamic losses. The proposed evaluation of the inlet angle is based on the free vortex law.

  16. Patterns of groundwater flow, pH, and electrical conductance in the Nordic west arm tailings, Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackport, R.

    1980-01-01

    The prime objective of the field investigation reported was to install a groundwater monitoring network in and below the west arm Nordic tailings in order to determine the general directions of groundwater flow within the tailings, provide a basis for calculation of the groundwater flux into and out of the tailings, and provide a groundwater sampling network. Areas of upward, downward, and horizontal flow were found. In some areas seepage from the tailings enters the sand aquifer beneath the tailings, and in other areas the seepage enters the permeable bedrock. The chemical composition of pore water in the tailings is variable, in some places highly acidic. The general trends in hydraulic head and gradient were delineated, but it was not possible to define groundwater flow paths within and beneath the tailings, or to carry out mass balance studies

  17. Recovery of post stroke proximal arm function, driven by complex neuroplastic bilateral brain activation patterns and predicted by baseline motor dysfunction severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana ePundik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Neuroplastic changes that drive recovery of shoulder/elbow function after stoke have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between neuroplastic brain changes related to shoulder/elbow movement control in response to treatment and recovery of arm motor function in chronic stroke survivors. Methods: Twenty-three chronic stroke survivors were treated with 12 weeks of arm rehabilitation. Outcome measures included functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI for the shoulder/elbow components of reach and a skilled motor function test (Arm Motor Abilities Test (AMAT, collected before and after treatment.Results: We observed two patterns of neuroplastic changes that were associated with gains in motor function: decreased or increased task-related brain activation. Those with significantly better motor function at baseline exhibited a decrease in brain activation in response to treatment, evident in the ipsilesional primary motor and contralesional supplementary motor regions; in contrast, those with greater baseline motor impairment, exhibited increased brain activation in response to treatment. There was an linear relationship between greater functional gain (AMAT and increased activation in bilateral primary motor, contralesional primary and secondary sensory regions, and contralesional lateral premotor area, after adjusting for baseline AMAT, age, and time since stroke. Conclusions: Recovery of functional reach involves recruitment of several contralesional and bilateral primary motor regions. In response to intensive therapy, the direction of functional brain change (i.e. increase or decrease in task-related brain recruitment for shoulder/elbow reach components depends on baseline level of motor function and may represent either different phases or different strategies of neuroplasticity that drive functional recovery.

  18. Multivessel myocardial bridging in a patient with spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Timothy; Abdallah, Wissam; McNamara, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, usually confined to the left anterior descending (LAD), and correlates to the hypertrophic septum. We present a patient with unique spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and compression of all three coronary arteries corresponding to this hypertrophy pattern.

  19. Comparison of muscle activation levels during arm abduction in the plane of the scapula vs. proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation upper extremity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdas, James W; Arend, David B; Exstrom, Jada M; Helmus, Taylor J; Rozeboom, Jessica D; Hollman, John H

    2012-04-01

    This study quantified activation of 8 muscles of the shoulder, trunk, and back during standing performance of (a) arm abduction in the plane of the scapula (scaption), (b) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) diagonal 1 flexion (D1F), and (c) PNF diagonal 2 flexion (D2F) while lifting a dumbbell with the dominant hand. Twelve men (26.1 ± 4.4 years) and 13 women (24.5 ± 1.9 years) volunteered to participate. Electromyographic signals were collected with DE-3.1 double-differential surface electrodes at a sampling frequency of 1,000 Hz. Electromyographic signals were normalized to peak activity in the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trial and expressed as a percentage. One-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni corrections (α = 0.05) examined muscle activation patterns across the 3 conditions. For the middle trapezius, average activation was greater (p 60% MVIC) with the exception of the lower trapezius (55% MVIC). In contrast, erector spinae and external oblique muscles exhibited moderate activation (21-40% MVIC) during arm elevation. The 6 muscles of the shoulder complex displayed high to very high muscle activation at a level appropriate for strength training during all 3 exercise conditions.

  20. Robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  1. Robotic arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwech, H.

    1989-01-01

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube is disclosed. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel. 23 figs

  2. DAMPING OF THE MILKY WAY BAR BY MANIFOLD-DRIVEN SPIRALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łokas, Ewa L. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-10-10

    We describe a new phenomenon of “bar damping” that may have played an important role in shaping the Milky Way bar and bulge as well as its spiral structure. We use a collisionless N -body simulation of a Milky Way–like galaxy initially composed of a dark matter halo and an exponential disk with a Toomre parameter slightly above unity. In this configuration, dominated by the disk in the center, a bar forms relatively quickly, after 1 Gyr of evolution. This is immediately followed by the formation of two manifold-driven spiral arms and the outflow of stars that modifies the potential in the vicinity of the bar, apparently shifting the position of the L {sub 1}/ L {sub 2} Lagrange points. This modification leads to the shortening of the bar and the creation of a next generation of manifold-driven spiral arms at a smaller radius. The process repeats itself a few times over the next 0.5 Gyr resulting in further substantial weakening and shortening of the bar. The time when the damping comes to an end coincides with the first buckling episode in the bar that rebuilds the orbital structure so that no more new spiral arms are formed. The morphology of the bar and the spiral structure at this time show remarkable similarity to the present properties of the Milky Way. Later on, the bar starts to grow rather steadily again, weakened only by subsequent buckling episodes occurring at more distant parts of the disk.

  3. Spiral Inflector For Compact Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Karamysheva, G A

    2004-01-01

    Compact cyclotron for explosives detection by nuclear resonance absorption of γ-rays in nitrogen is under development [1] Cyclotron will be equipped with the external ion source. The injection system consists of a double-drift beam bunching system, a spiral inflector, beam diagnostics, focusing and adjustment elements [2]. The spiral inflector for ion bending from axial to median plane is used. Computer model of spiral inflector for the Customs cyclotron is developed. 3D electrostatic field calculations of the designed inflector are performed. Calculated electric field map and magnetic field map of the cyclotron [3] are used for beam dynamic simulations. Numeric simulations are carried out for 500 particles using code for calculation of particle dynamics by integration of differential equations in Cartesian coordinate system written in MATLAB. Direct Coulomb particle-to-particle method is used to take into account space-charge effects.

  4. Unveiling the sources of disk heating in spiral galaxies with the CALIFA survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinna, F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martig, M.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Leaman, R.

    The stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) quantifies the amount of velocity dispersion in the vertical, radial and azimuthal directions. Since different disk heating mechanisms (e.g. spiral arms, giant molecular clouds, mergers, etc) affect these components differently, the SVE can constrain the sources

  5. GANIL-SPIRAL1-SPIRAL2: Highlights and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.

    2010-06-01

    GANIL presently offers unique opportunities in nuclear physics and many other fields that arise from not only the provision of low-energy stable beams, fragmentation beams and re-accelerated radioactive species, but also from the availability of a wide range of state-of-the-art spectrometers and instrumentation. A few examples of recent highlights are presented. With the construction of SPIRAL2 over the next few years, GANIL is in a good position to retain its world-leading capability. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, will surpass by two order of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100*A to 1 mA), heavier ions (Ar up to Xe) at maximum energy of 14 MeV/n. Under the 7FP program of European Union called*Preparatory phase*, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4 M€ to build up an international consortium around this new venture. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and associated physics instruments in collaboration with EU and International partners will be presented.

  6. Quasicrystallography on the spiral of Archimedes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of a spiral lattice is discussed. Some examples of known mineral structures, namely clino asbestos, halloysite and cylindrite, are then interpreted in terms of this structural principle. An example of a synthetic sulphide catalyst spiral structure having atomic dimensions is also described. All of these inorganic spiral structures are based on the sprial of Archimedes. The principles for a new type of crystallography, based on the Archimedian spiral, are then presented. 45 refs., 8 figs

  7. Pattern of Injuries and Treatment Given to Victims of Rana Plaza Tragedy in a Level II Armed Forces Medical Facility in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shafiul; Alam, Rabiul; Islam, Manirul; Salek, Amin

    2017-02-01

    Rana Plaza building collapse is the worst industrial disaster of Bangladesh so far. The 9-storied structure collapsed suddenly on April 24, 2013, with more than 4000 people inside. Bangladesh Armed Forces played a key role in the massive rescue operations. We conducted a cross-sectional study with 423 victims who were treated at a Combined Military Hospital to review the pattern of injuries and management provided. Middle-aged (35±12.75 years) females (68.32%) were the majority of the victims. Among the injured, 42.35% had soft tissue injury, 22.55% had abrasions, 18.79% had fractures, 3.75% had facial injuries, and 2.5% each had head and abdominal injuries. We treated the injured with various surgical approaches, such as soft tissue debridement (38.84%), fasciotomy (18.79%), amputation (3.75%), and other procedures. We had to refer 8.27% of the patients to different advanced centers. The mortality rate was 5.91%, including 1 volunteer rescuer. Pattern of injuries and modalities of management needed in an industrial disaster is a valuable experience which can be utilized in preparing to face disasters in the future and beyond. Death of a voluntary rescuer once again warrants the necessity of using a helmet and safety gear during any rescue operation. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:21-24).

  8. Inspired Spirals. Teaching Art with Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirals in nature, man-made objects, and art. Focuses on art that incorporates the spiral, including works by M. C. Escher and Frank Lloyd Wright, an African headdress, and a burial urn. Describes activities to help students make spirals of their own, such as constructing a coil clay pot. (CMK)

  9. A study of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wevers, B.M.H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Attempts have been made to look for possible correlations between integral properties of spiral galaxies as a function of morphological type. To investigate this problem, one needs the detailed distribution of both the gaseous and the stellar components for a well-defined sample of spiral galaxies. A sample of about 20 spiral galaxies was therefore defined; these galaxies were observed in the 21 cm neutral hydrogen line with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and in three broad-band optical colours with the 48-inch Palomar Smidt Telescope. First, an atlas of the combined radio and optical observations of 16 nearby northern-hemisphere spiral galaxies is presented. Luminosity profiles are discussed and the scale lengths of the exponential disks and extrapolated central surface brightnesses are derived, as well as radial color distributions; azimuthal surface brightness distributions and rotation curves. Possible correlations with optical features are investigated. It is found that 20 to 50 per cent of the total mass is in the disk. (Auth.)

  10. Three-armed rifts or masked radial pattern of eruptive fissures? The intriguing case of El Hierro volcano (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, L.; Galindo, I.; Martí, J.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-04-01

    Using new surface structural data as well as subsurface structural data obtained from seventeen water galleries, we provide a comprehensive model of the volcano-tectonic evolution of El Hierro (Canary Islands). We have identified, measured and analysed more than 1700 volcano-structural elements including vents, eruptive fissures, dykes and faults. The new data provide important information on the main structural patterns of the island and on its stress and strain fields, all of which are crucial for reliable hazard assessments. We conducted temporal and spatial analyses of the main structural elements, focusing on their relative age and association with the three main cycles in the construction of the island: the Tiñor Edifice, the El Golfo-Las Playas Edifice, and the Rift Volcanism. A radial strike distribution, which can be related to constructive episodes, is observed in the on-land structures. A similar strike distribution is seen in the submarine eruptive fissures, which are radial with respect to the centre of the island. However, the volcano-structural elements identified onshore and reflecting the entire volcano-tectonic evolution of the island also show a predominant NE-SW strike, which coincides with the main regional trend of the Canary archipelago as a whole. Two other dominant directions of structural elements, N-S and WNW-ESE, are evident from the establishment of the El Golfo-Las Playas edifice, during the second constructive cycle. We suggest that the radial-striking structures reflect comparatively uniform stress fields during the constructive episodes, mainly conditioned by the combination of overburden pressure, gravitational spreading, and magma-induced stresses in each of the volcanic edifices. By contrast, in the shallower parts of the edifice the NE-SW, N-S and WNW-ESE-striking structures reflect local stress fields related to the formation of mega-landslides and masking the general and regional radial patterns.

  11. Gaia DR1 Evidence of Disrupting the Perseus Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Junichi; Kawata, Daisuke; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Grand, Robert J. J.; Hunt, Jason A. S.

    2018-02-01

    We have discovered a clear sign of the disruption phase of the Perseus arm in the Milky Way using Cepheid variables, taking advantage of the accurately measured distances of Cepheids and the proper motions from Gaia Data Release 1. Both the Galactocentric radial and rotation velocities of 77 Cepheids within 1.5 kpc of the Perseus arm are correlated with their distances from the locus of the Perseus arm, as the trailing side is rotating faster and moving inward compared to the leading side. We also found a negative vertex deviation for the Cepheids on the trailing side, ‑27.°6 ± 2.°4, in contrast to the positive vertex deviation in the solar neighborhood. This is, to our knowledge, the first direct evidence that the vertex deviation around the Perseus arm is affected by the spiral arm. We compared these observational trends with our N-body/hydrodynamics simulations based on a static density-wave spiral scenario and with those based on a transient dynamic spiral scenario. Although our comparisons are limited to qualitative trends, they strongly favor the conclusion that the Perseus arm is in the disruption phase of a transient arm.

  12. Infrared emission and tidal interactions of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations of tidal interactions of spiral galaxies are used to attempt to understand recent discoveries about infrared (IR) emitting galaxies. It is found that the stronger tidal perturbation by a companion the more disk gas clouds are thrown into nucleus crossing orbits and the greater the velocity jumps crossing spiral arms. Both these tidally created characteristics would create more IR emission by high speed cloud collisions and more IR via effects of recently formed stars. This expectation at greater tidal perturbation matches the observation of greater IR emission for spiral galaxies with closer and/or more massive companions. The greater collision velocities found at stronger perturbations on the models will also result in higher dust temperature in the colliding clouds. In the IR pairs examined, most have only one member, the larger, detected and when both are detected, the larger is always the more luminous. In simulations and in a simple analytic description of the strong distance dependence of the tidal force, it is found that the big galaxy of a pair is more strongly affected than the small

  13. Variability in spatio-temporal pattern of trapezius activity and coordination of hand-arm muscles during a sustained repetitive dynamic task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Afshin; Srinivasan, Divya; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Madeleine, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of muscle activity has been suggested to be a determinant of fatigue development. Pursuing this hypothesis, we investigated the pattern of muscular activity in the shoulder and arm during a repetitive dynamic task performed until participants' rating of perceived exertion reached 8 on Borg's CR-10 scale. We collected high-density surface electromyogram (HD-EMG) over the upper trapezius, as well as bipolar EMG from biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoideus anterior, serratus anterior, upper and lower trapezius from 21 healthy women. Root-mean-square (RMS) and mean power frequency (MNF) were calculated for all EMG signals. The barycenter of RMS values over the HD-EMG grid was also determined, as well as normalized mutual information (NMI) for each pair of muscles. Cycle-to-cycle variability of these metrics was also assessed. With time, EMG RMS increased for most of the muscles, and MNF decreased. Trapezius activity became higher on the lateral side than on the medial side of the HD-EMG grid and the barycenter moved in a lateral direction. NMI between muscle pairs increased with time while its variability decreased. The variability of the metrics during the initial 10 % of task performance was not associated with the time to task termination. Our results suggest that the considerable variability in force and posture contained in the dynamic task per se masks any possible effects of differences between subjects in initial motor variability on the rate of fatigue development.

  14. Multiple mechanisms quench passive spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin; Dolley, Tim; Bonne, Nicolas J.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the properties of a sample of 35 nearby passive spiral galaxies in order to determine their dominant quenching mechanism(s). All five low-mass (M⋆ environments. We postulate that cluster-scale gas stripping and heating mechanisms operating only in rich clusters are required to quench low-mass passive spirals, and ram-pressure stripping and strangulation are obvious candidates. For higher mass passive spirals, while trends are present, the story is less clear. The passive spiral bar fraction is high: 74 ± 15 per cent, compared with 36 ± 5 per cent for a mass, redshift and T-type matched comparison sample of star-forming spiral galaxies. The high mass passive spirals occur mostly, but not exclusively, in groups, and can be central or satellite galaxies. The passive spiral group fraction of 74 ± 15 per cent is similar to that of the comparison sample of star-forming galaxies at 61 ± 7 per cent. We find evidence for both quenching via internal structure and environment in our passive spiral sample, though some galaxies have evidence of neither. From this, we conclude no one mechanism is responsible for quenching star formation in passive spiral galaxies - rather, a mixture of mechanisms is required to produce the passive spiral distribution we see today.

  15. Multiferroic Magnetic Spirals Induced by Random Magnetic Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramucci, Andrea; Shinaoka, Hiroshi; Mostovoy, Maxim V.; Müller, Markus; Mudry, Christopher; Troyer, Matthias; Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2018-01-01

    Multiferroism can originate from the breaking of inversion symmetry caused by magnetic-spiral order. The usual mechanism for stabilizing a magnetic spiral is competition between magnetic exchange interactions differing by their range and sign, such as nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions. In insulating compounds, it is unusual for these interactions to be both comparable in magnitude and of a strength that can induce magnetic ordering at room temperature. Therefore, the onset temperatures for multiferroism through this mechanism are typically low. By considering a realistic model for multiferroic YBaCuFeO5 , we propose an alternative mechanism for magnetic-spiral order, and hence for multiferroism, that occurs at much higher temperatures. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations and electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory, that the Heisenberg model on a geometrically nonfrustrated lattice with only nearest-neighbor interactions can have a spiral phase up to high temperature when frustrating bonds are introduced randomly along a single crystallographic direction as caused, e.g., by a particular type of chemical disorder. This long-range correlated pattern of frustration avoids ferroelectrically inactive spin-glass order. Finally, we provide an intuitive explanation for this mechanism and discuss its generalization to other materials.

  16. Spiral model of procedural cycle of educational process management

    OpenAIRE

    Bezrukov Valery I.; Lukashina Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    The article analyzes the nature and characteristics of the spiral model Procedure educational systems management cycle. The authors identify patterns between the development of information and communication technologies and the transformation of the education management process, give the characteristics of the concept of “information literacy” and “Media Education”. Consider the design function, determine its potential in changing the traditional educational paradigm to the new - information....

  17. Spontaneous spiral formation in two-dimensional oscillatory media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Petteri; Amemiya, Takashi; Ohmori, Takao; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    1999-08-01

    Computational studies of pattern formation in a modified Oregonator model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction is described. Initially inactive two-dimensional reaction media with an immobilized catalyst is connected to a reservoir of fresh reactants through a set of discrete points distributed randomly over the interphase surface. It is shown that the diffusion of reactants combined with oscillatory reaction kinetics can give rise to spontaneous spiral formation and phase waves.

  18. Arm Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2013. http://accessmedicine. com. Accessed Jan. 16, 2016. Jan. 11, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/arm-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050870 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  19. Broken Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common cause of a broken arm. Sports injuries. Direct blows and injuries on the field or court ... during a car accident, bike accident or other direct trauma. Child abuse. In children, a ... sports Any sport that involves physical contact or increases ...

  20. Spiral 2 the scientific objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    The French ministry of research took the decision to build Spiral-2 in May 2005. Its construction costs are estimated to 130 million euros while its operating costs will near 8.5 million euros per year. The construction works will last 5 years. The Spiral-2 facility is based on a high power, superconducting driver Linac, which will deliver a high intensity, 40 MeV deuteron beam as well as a variety of heavy-ion beams with mass over charge ratio equal to 3 and energy up to 14.5 MeV/nucleon. Using a carbon converter, fast neutrons from the breakup of the 5 mA of deuterons impinging on a uranium carbide target will induce a rate of up to 10 14 fissions/s. The radioactive ion beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to 140 will be of the order of 10 6 to 10 11 particles/s surpassing by one or two orders-of-magnitude any existing facility in the world. A direct irradiation of the UC 2 target with 3,4 He, 6,7 Li or 12 C may also be used. Different production targets will be used to produce high-intensity beams of light radioactive species with the Isol technique. The extracted radioactive ion beam will be accelerated to energies up to 20 MeV/nucleons by the existing Cime cyclotron. One of the most important features of the future Ganil accelerator complex will be the capability of delivering up to 5 stable or radioactive beams simultaneously in the energy range from the keV to several tens of MeV/nucleons. The document details also the future contribution of Spiral-2 concerning the structure of exotic nuclei, the thermodynamical aspects of nuclear matter, nucleosynthesis, the fundamental basic interactions, and the use of neutrons. (A.C.)

  1. Spiral 2 the scientific objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    The French ministry of research took the decision to build Spiral-2 in May 2005. Its construction costs are estimated to 130 million euros while its operating costs will near 8.5 million euros per year. The construction works will last 5 years. The Spiral-2 facility is based on a high power, superconducting driver Linac, which will deliver a high intensity, 40 MeV deuteron beam as well as a variety of heavy-ion beams with mass over charge ratio equal to 3 and energy up to 14.5 MeV/nucleon. Using a carbon converter, fast neutrons from the breakup of the 5 mA of deuterons impinging on a uranium carbide target will induce a rate of up to 10{sup 14} fissions/s. The radioactive ion beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to 140 will be of the order of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 11} particles/s surpassing by one or two orders-of-magnitude any existing facility in the world. A direct irradiation of the UC{sub 2} target with {sup 3,4}He, {sup 6,7}Li or {sup 12}C may also be used. Different production targets will be used to produce high-intensity beams of light radioactive species with the Isol technique. The extracted radioactive ion beam will be accelerated to energies up to 20 MeV/nucleons by the existing Cime cyclotron. One of the most important features of the future Ganil accelerator complex will be the capability of delivering up to 5 stable or radioactive beams simultaneously in the energy range from the keV to several tens of MeV/nucleons. The document details also the future contribution of Spiral-2 concerning the structure of exotic nuclei, the thermodynamical aspects of nuclear matter, nucleosynthesis, the fundamental basic interactions, and the use of neutrons. (A.C.)

  2. The rotation of spiral galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, V C

    1983-06-24

    There is accumulating evidence that as much as 90 percent of the mass of the universe is nonluminous and is clumped, halo-like, around individual galaxies. The gravitational force of this dark matter is presumed to be responsible for the high rotational velocities of stars and gas in the disks of spiral galaxie. At present, the form of the dark matter is unknown. Possible candidates span a range in mass of 10(70), from non-zero-mass neutrinos to massive black holes.

  3. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: the role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.W. Jr.; Stewart, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes

  4. Morphology and grain-size characteristics of a log-spiral beach at Nagwa (Diu), west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerayya, M.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Murty, C.S.

    Sediment samples collected along 6 beach profiles of a log-spiral shaped beach and nearby dunes have been studied for particle size distribution in relation to wave refraction patterns. The results reveal that the foreshore sediments...

  5. A Self-Complementary 1.2 to 40 GHz Spiral Antenna with Impedance Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazanek

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a design of the Self- Complementary Spiral Antenna (SCSA which consists of a spiral antenna and a wideband impedance transformer. The spiral antenna and the transformer are designed separately due to computing demands. New knowledge about current distribution on the spiral antenna and influence of higher numbers of wavelength in circumference is presented. The novel transition between feeding and radiating antenna structure are optimized in the frequency range 1.2 to 40 GHz. The meaning of the transition in the paper includes the impedance as well as the geometry transforming of the structure. The antenna is suitable for wideband illuminating of a parabolic reflector due to relatively constant phase center and radiation pattern with frequency.

  6. Dependence of spiral galaxy distribution on viewing angle in RC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Song, Guoxuan; Cheng, Shugang

    The normalized inclination distributions are presented for the spiral galaxies in RC3. The results show that, except for the bin of 81° - 90°, in which the apparent minor isophotal diameters that are used to obtain the inclinations are affected by the central bulges, the distributions for Sa, Sab, Scd and Sd are well consistent with the Monte-Carlo simulation of random inclinations within 3-σ, and Sb and Sbc almost, but Sc is different. One reason for the difference between the real distribution and the Monte-Carlo simulation of Sc may be that some quite inclined spirals, the arms of which are inherently loosely wound on the galactic plane and should be classified to Sc galaxies, have been incorrectly classified to the earlier ones, because the tightness of spiral arms which is one of the criteria of the Hubble classification in RC3 is different between on the galactic plane and on the tangent plane of the celestial sphere. The authors' result also implies that there might exist biases in the luminosity functions of individual Hubble types if spiral galaxies are only classified visually.

  7. The DESIR Facility at SPIRAL2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Beams from the low-energy branch of the separator spectrometer S3 and from SPIRAL1 will allow complementary studies of refrac- tory elements produced by means of fusion reactions as well as of light and intense exotic beams, respectively. Keywords. SPIRAL2; low-energy facility; nuclear physics; weak interaction; astro-.

  8. ANGULAR-MOMENTUM IN BINARY SPIRAL GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTERLOO, T

    In order to investigate the relative orientations of spiral galaxies in pairs, the distribution of the angle between the spin-vectors for a new sample of 40 binary spiral galaxies is determined. From this distribution it is found, contrary to an earlier result obtained by Helou (1984), that there is

  9. Scaling effects in spiral capsule robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Hu, Rong; Chen, Bai; Tang, Yong; Xu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Spiral capsule robots can be applied to human gastrointestinal tracts and blood vessels. Because of significant variations in the sizes of the inner diameters of the intestines as well as blood vessels, this research has been unable to meet the requirements for medical applications. By applying the fluid dynamic equations, using the computational fluid dynamics method, to a robot axial length ranging from 10 -5 to 10 -2  m, the operational performance indicators (axial driving force, load torque, and maximum fluid pressure on the pipe wall) of the spiral capsule robot and the fluid turbulent intensity around the robot spiral surfaces was numerically calculated in a straight rigid pipe filled with fluid. The reasonableness and validity of the calculation method adopted in this study were verified by the consistency of the calculated values by the computational fluid dynamics method and the experimental values from a relevant literature. The results show that the greater the fluid turbulent intensity, the greater the impact of the fluid turbulence on the driving performance of the spiral capsule robot and the higher the energy consumption of the robot. For the same level of size of the robot, the axial driving force, the load torque, and the maximum fluid pressure on the pipe wall of the outer spiral robot were larger than those of the inner spiral robot. For different requirements of the operating environment, we can choose a certain kind of spiral capsule robot. This study provides a theoretical foundation for spiral capsule robots.

  10. Arm Lift (Brachioplasty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arm lift Overview An arm lift — also known as brachioplasty — is a cosmetic surgical procedure to improve the appearance of the under portion of your upper arms. During an arm lift, excess skin and fat ...

  11. Radial and spiral stream formation in Proteus mirabilis colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xue

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis, which is a pathogen that forms biofilms in vivo, can swarm over hard surfaces and form a variety of spatial patterns in colonies. Colony formation involves two distinct cell types: swarmer cells that dominate near the surface and the leading edge, and swimmer cells that prefer a less viscous medium, but the mechanisms underlying pattern formation are not understood. New experimental investigations reported here show that swimmer cells in the center of the colony stream inward toward the inoculation site and in the process form many complex patterns, including radial and spiral streams, in addition to previously-reported concentric rings. These new observations suggest that swimmers are motile and that indirect interactions between them are essential in the pattern formation. To explain these observations we develop a hybrid model comprising cell-based and continuum components that incorporates a chemotactic response of swimmers to a chemical they produce. The model predicts that formation of radial streams can be explained as the modulation of the local attractant concentration by the cells, and that the chirality of the spiral streams results from a swimming bias of the cells near the surface of the substrate. The spatial patterns generated from the model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Analisa Kekuatan Spiral Bevel Gear Dengan Variasi Sudut Spiral Menggunakan Metode Elemen Hingga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deta Rachmat Andika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Seiring perkembangan zaman,  teknologi roda gigi dituntut untuk mampu mentransmisikan daya yang besar dengan efisiensi yang besar pula. Pada jenis intersecting shaft gear, tipe roda gigi payung spiral (spiral bevel gear  merupakan perkembangan dari roda gigi payung bergigi lurus (straight bevel gear. Kelebihan dari spiral bevel gear antara  lain adalah kemampuan transmisi daya dan efisiensi yang lebih besar pada geometri yang sama serta tidak terlalu berisik. Akan tetapi spiral bevel gear juga mempunyai kelemahan jika dibandingkan dengan straight bevel gear. Selain proses manufaktur yang lebih rumit, profil lengkung gigi spiral ini membuat distribusi tegangan yang terjadi menjadi lebih rumit untuk dimodelkan dengan persamaan matematika. Salah satu pendekatan yang dapat dilakukan adalah dengan menggunakan metode elemen hingga. Penelitian diawali dengan membuat model dari straight bevel gear dan juga spiral bevel gear yang sudut spiralnya divariasikan 20, 35, dan 45 derajat. Model dibuat dengan dimensi yang sama baik diameter maupun jumlah gigi gear. Langkah selanjutnya yaitu perhitungan analitis pada straight bevel gear dimana hasilnya akan dibandingkan dengan hasil simulasi statis. Setelah eror yang terjadi dibawah 15% maka dilakukan simulasi dinamis pada semua model yang telah dibuat yaitu straight bevel dan juga spira bevel gear. Hasil yang didapatkan dari penelitian ini adalah secara keseluruhan spiral bevel gear lebih kuat daripada straight bevel gear pada dimensi dan beban yang sama jika dilihat dari lebih kecilnya tegangan bending dan tegangan kontak maksimum yang terjadi. Tegangan terbesar terjadi pada jenis straight bevel gear baik pada tegangan bending maupun tegangan kontak sedangkan spiral bevel gear dengan variasi sudut Seiring spiral 35 mempunyai nilai tegangan terkecil. Prosntase selisih tegangan bending maksimum yang terjadi antara straight bevel gear dan spiral bevel gear dengan variasi sudut spiral 35 derajat  sebesar 44

  13. Planetary-like spirals caused by moving shadows in transition discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, Matías; Cuello, Nicolás

    2018-03-01

    Shadows and spirals seem to be common features of transition discs. Among the spiral-triggering mechanisms proposed, only one establishes a causal link between shadows and spirals so far. In fact, provided the presence of shadows in the disc, the combined effect of temperature gradient and differential disc rotation creates strong azimuthal pressure gradients. After several thousand years, grand-design spirals develop in the gas phase. Previous works have only considered static shadows caused by an inclined inner disc. However, in some cases, the inner regions of circumbinary discs can break and precess. Thus, it is more realistic to consider moving shadow patterns in the disc. In this configuration, the intersection between the inner and the outer discs defines the line of nodes at which the shadows are cast. Here, we consider moving shadows and study the resulting circumbinary disc structure. We find that only static and prograde shadows trigger spirals, in contrast to retrograde ones. Interestingly, if a region of the disc corotates with the shadow, a planet-like signature develops at the co-rotation position. The resulting spirals resemble those caused by a planet embedded in the disc, with similar pitch angles.

  14. Spiral versus J-shaped coils for neurovascular embolisation - an in-vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiu, K.; Tokunaga, K.; Mandai, S.; Martin, J.B.; Jean, B.; Ruefenacht, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare the characteristics of J-shaped detachable platinum coils with those of spiral coils in in-vitro vascular models. J-shaped coils consist of distal semicircular and proximal straight segments, the latter extending for most of the length of the coil. Spiral coils have a helical shape memory and are thus limited in expansion. In in-vitro silicone vascular models simulating intracranial aneurysms and dural arteriovenous fistulae, we compared J-shaped and spiral coils with regard to ease of delivery, anchoring and folding patterns, and stability in various types of vascular lumen. Delivery and retrieval were comparable. In large and irregular aneurysms and venous sinuses, J-shaped coils could form a more complex basket which conformed to the shape of the vascular cavity. The J-shaped coil was always in contact with the vessel wall. In wide-necked aneurysms, coil protrusion was more frequent with J-shaped coils, while spiral coils tended to stay compact and circular. Arteries were occluded in a shorter segment with spiral coils. J-shaped coils were safe and superior for large and irregular aneurysms or sinuses. Spiral coils were preferable for spherical aneurysms and segmental occlusion of arteries. (orig.)

  15. Clear New View of a Classic Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    ESO is releasing a beautiful image of the nearby galaxy Messier 83 taken by the HAWK-I instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The picture shows the galaxy in infrared light and demonstrates the impressive power of the camera to create one of the sharpest and most detailed pictures of Messier 83 ever taken from the ground. The galaxy Messier 83 (eso0825) is located about 15 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra (the Sea Serpent). It spans over 40 000 light-years, only 40 percent the size of the Milky Way, but in many ways is quite similar to our home galaxy, both in its spiral shape and the presence of a bar of stars across its centre. Messier 83 is famous among astronomers for its many supernovae: vast explosions that end the lives of some stars. Over the last century, six supernovae have been observed in Messier 83 - a record number that is matched by only one other galaxy. Even without supernovae, Messier 83 is one of the brightest nearby galaxies, visible using just binoculars. Messier 83 has been observed in the infrared part of the spectrum using HAWK-I [1], a powerful camera on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). When viewed in infrared light most of the obscuring dust that hides much of Messier 83 becomes transparent. The brightly lit gas around hot young stars in the spiral arms is also less prominent in infrared pictures. As a result much more of the structure of the galaxy and the vast hordes of its constituent stars can be seen. This clear view is important for astronomers looking for clusters of young stars, especially those hidden in dusty regions of the galaxy. Studying such star clusters was one of the main scientific goals of these observations [2]. When compared to earlier images, the acute vision of HAWK-I reveals far more stars within the galaxy. The combination of the huge mirror of the VLT, the large field of view and great sensitivity of the camera, and the superb observing conditions

  16. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  17. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe : [Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  18. Cylindrical spirals in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, S; Karpati, G; Robitaille, Y; Melmed, C

    1979-01-01

    Muscle biopsies from two patients revealed that numerous type 2 fibers contained large abnormal areas filled with cylindrical spirals. The cytochemical profile of these cylindrical spirals was sufficiently characteristic that they could be distinguished from tubular aggregates. Their electron microscopic appearance was unmistakable. Their origin and significance are uncertain. The diverse nature of the patients' conditions (cramps and malignancy, and an unusual form of spinocerebellar degeneration) indicate that these abnormal structures are not disease specific.

  19. Wavelet Scattering on the Pitch Spiral

    OpenAIRE

    Lostanlen, Vincent; Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We present a new representation of harmonic sounds that linearizes the dynamics of pitch and spectral envelope, while remaining stable to deformations in the time-frequency plane. It is an instance of the scattering transform, a generic operator which cascades wavelet convolutions and modulus nonlinearities. It is derived from the pitch spiral, in that convolutions are successively performed in time, log-frequency, and octave index. We give a closed-form approximation of spiral scattering coe...

  20. Dark matter in spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albada, T.S. van; Sancisi, R.

    1986-01-01

    Mass models of spiral galaxies based on the observed light distribution, assuming constant M/L for bulge and disc, are able to reproduce the observed rotation curves in the inner regions, but fail to do so increasingly towards and beyond the edge of the visible material. The discrepancy in the outer region can be accounted for by invoking dark matter; some galaxies require at least four times as much dark matter as luminous matter. There is no evidence for a dependence on galaxy luminosity or morphological type. Various arguments support the idea that a distribution of visible matter with constant M/L is responsible for the circular velocity in the inner region, i.e. inside approximately 2.5 disc scalelengths. Luminous matter and dark matter seem to 'conspire' to produce the flat observed rotation curves in the outer region. It seems unlikely that this coupling between disc and halo results from the large-scale gravitational interaction between the two components. Attempts to determine the shape of dark halos have not yet produced convincing results. (author)

  1. Chiralities of spiral waves and their transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jun-ting; Cai, Mei-chun; Li, Bing-wei; Zhang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    The chiralities of spiral waves usually refer to their rotation directions (the turning orientations of the spiral temporal movements as time elapses) and their curl directions (the winding orientations of the spiral spatial geometrical structures themselves). Traditionally, they are the same as each other. Namely, they are both clockwise or both counterclockwise. Moreover, the chiralities are determined by the topological charges of spiral waves, and thus they are conserved quantities. After the inwardly propagating spirals were experimentally observed, the relationship between the chiralities and the one between the chiralities and the topological charges are no longer preserved. The chiralities thus become more complex than ever before. As a result, there is now a desire to further study them. In this paper, the chiralities and their transition properties for all kinds of spiral waves are systemically studied in the framework of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and the general relationships both between the chiralities and between the chiralities and the topological charges are obtained. The investigation of some other models, such as the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, the nonuniform Oregonator model, the modified standard model, etc., is also discussed for comparison.

  2. Bars and spirals in tidal interactions with an ensemble of galaxy mass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, Alex R.; Wadsley, J. W.

    2018-03-01

    We present simulations of the gaseous and stellar material in several different galaxy mass models under the influence of different tidal fly-bys to assess the changes in their bar and spiral morphology. Five different mass models are chosen to represent the variety of rotation curves seen in nature. We find a multitude of different spiral and bar structures can be created, with their properties dependent on the strength of the interaction. We calculate pattern speeds, spiral wind-up rates, bar lengths, and angular momentum exchange to quantify the changes in disc morphology in each scenario. The wind-up rates of the tidal spirals follow the 2:1 resonance very closely for the flat and dark matter-dominated rotation curves, whereas the more baryon-dominated curves tend to wind-up faster, influenced by their inner bars. Clear spurs are seen in most of the tidal spirals, most noticeable in the flat rotation curve models. Bars formed both in isolation and interactions agree well with those seen in real galaxies, with a mixture of `fast' and `slow' rotators. We find no strong correlation between bar length or pattern speed and the interaction strength. Bar formation is, however, accelerated/induced in four out of five of our models. We close by briefly comparing the morphology of our models to real galaxies, easily finding analogues for nearly all simulations presenter here, showing passages of small companions can easily reproduce an ensemble of observed morphologies.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells with high telomerase expression do not actively restore their chromosome arm specific telomere length pattern after exposure to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graakjaer, Jesper; Christensen, Rikke; Kølvrå, Steen

    2007-01-01

    were measured using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (Q-FISH). RESULTS: A telomere length pattern was found to exist in primary hMSC's as well as in hMSC-telo1. This pattern is similar to what was previously found in lymphocytes and fibroblasts. The cells were then exposed to a high dose of ionizing...... radiation. Irradiation caused profound changes in chromosome specific telomere lengths, effectively destroying the telomere length pattern. Following long term culturing after irradiation, a telomere length pattern was found to re-emerge. However, the new telomere length pattern did not resemble...

  4. Some INDRA experiments on SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cussol, D.; Orr, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    A panel joining members of INDRA collaboration and physicists off collaboration was gathered to debate the question whether the INDRA detector, designed to study multifragmentation with beams of stable nuclei, could be used also in experiments with beams of exotic nuclei. Four experiments were discussed as well as the implied detector modifications. In the frame of experiments with SISSI the study of the multifragmentation as a function of N/Z of the system should answer questions related to the system stability as a function of N/Z and origin of the particles emitted during the collision. Among the experiments with SPIRAL to study de-excitation of hot nuclei the following topics were examined: nuclear stability as a function of N/Z, α-n competition, emission of neutron-rich particles as a function of N/Z, evolution of emission modes near the shell closure. The de-excitation of the resonant excited states through 2p decay will be studied in the following three channels: 1p-1p sequential decay, un-correlated simultaneous 2p emission and correlated simultaneous 2p emission ( 2 He emission). Such experiments were carried out on 6 Be, 12 O and 14 O. The only first two channels were observed so far. The 16 Ne could be a good candidate to observe the third channel. Finally sub-barrier Coulomb fusion experiments were also discussed. Concerning the modifications to be undertaken on INDRA detector two were obvious: a modification at the level of electronics to make possible time-of-flight measurements with silicon detectors and transformations of ionization chambers in Bragg chambers. Simulation studies are under way to test the pertinence and validity of the solution

  5. Tensor GSVD of Patient- and Platform-Matched Tumor and Normal DNA Copy-Number Profiles Uncovers Chromosome Arm-Wide Patterns of Tumor-Exclusive Platform-Consistent Alterations Encoding for Cell Transformation and Predicting Ovarian Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E.; Aiello, Katherine A.; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient’s prognosis, is independent of the tumor’s stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell’s immortality, and a patient’s shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq

  6. Characterisation and optimisation of a coplanar waveguide fed logarithmic spiral antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    pattern, due to the absorbing material. Only half of the input power is transformed into radiated power due to the presence of the absorber. The simulated performance of the spiral antenna is very promising. The simulations indicated that the antenna has a radiation efficiency of more than 70...

  7. Hierarchical star formation across the grand-design spiral NGC 1566

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Calzetti, Daniela; Cignoni, Michele; Gallagher, John S., III; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Sabbi, Elena; Thilker, David; Ubeda, Leonardo; Aloisi, Alessandra; Adamo, Angela; Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel; Grasha, Kathryn; Grebel, Eva K.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Sacchi, Elena; Shabani, Fayezeh; Smith, Linda J.; Wofford, Aida

    2017-06-01

    We investigate how star formation is spatially organized in the grand-design spiral NGC 1566 from deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey. Our contour-based clustering analysis reveals 890 distinct stellar conglomerations at various levels of significance. These star-forming complexes are organized in a hierarchical fashion with the larger congregations consisting of smaller structures, which themselves fragment into even smaller and more compact stellar groupings. Their size distribution, covering a wide range in length-scales, shows a power law as expected from scale-free processes. We explain this shape with a simple 'fragmentation and enrichment' model. The hierarchical morphology of the complexes is confirmed by their mass-size relation that can be represented by a power law with a fractional exponent, analogous to that determined for fractal molecular clouds. The surface stellar density distribution of the complexes shows a lognormal shape similar to that for supersonic non-gravitating turbulent gas. Between 50 and 65 per cent of the recently formed stars, as well as about 90 per cent of the young star clusters, are found inside the stellar complexes, located along the spiral arms. We find an age difference between young stars inside the complexes and those in their direct vicinity in the arms of at least 10 Myr. This time-scale may relate to the minimum time for stellar evaporation, although we cannot exclude the in situ formation of stars. As expected, star formation preferentially occurs in spiral arms. Our findings reveal turbulent-driven hierarchical star formation along the arms of a grand-design galaxy.

  8. Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Keel, William C.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4mag for the ugri passbands (estimating 0.3mag of extinction in z band). We split the sample into `bulgy' (early-type) and `discy' (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or fDeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of `bulgy' spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of `discy' spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disc ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with discy spirals at Mr ~ -21.5mag having the most reddening - more than twice as much as both the lowest luminosity and most massive, bulge-dominated spirals. An increase in dust content is well known for more luminous galaxies, but the decrease of the trend for the most luminous has not been observed before and may be related to their lower levels of recent star formation. We compare our results with the latest dust attenuation models of Tuffs et al. We find that the model reproduces the observed trends reasonably well but overpredicts the amount of u-band attenuation in edge-on galaxies. This could be an inadequacy in the Milky Way extinction law (when applied to external galaxies), but more likely indicates the need for a wider range of dust-star geometries. We end by discussing the effects of dust on large galaxy surveys and emphasize that these effects will become important as we push to higher precision measurements of galaxy properties and their clustering. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than

  9. The Spiral-in Method for Designing and Connecting Learning Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a method that provides adaptive support to those engaged in learning activities. It proposes a way for acquiring content knowledge in a specific domain by using Learning Objects (LOs) and suggests a pattern for designing and connecting these LOs for the creation of a course...... given, LOs are created and connected in a linear structure, like a spiral. The LOs are grouped together into lessons attempting to satisfy short-term learning outcomes. The spiral has to be fully wrapped for the possession of the subject matter....

  10. Body-Worn Spiral Monopole Antenna for On-Body Communications (Invited Paper)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel body-worn spiral monopole antenna is presented. The antenna consists of a ground plane and a spiral monopole. The antenna was designed for Ear-to-Ear (E2E) communication between In-the-Ear (ITE) hearing instruments at 2.45 GHz and has been simulated, prototyped, and measured. The antenna ...... yielded a measured and simulated E2E path gain at 2.45 GHz of –82.1 dB and –85.9 dB, respectively. The radiation pattern of the antenna when mounted in the ear is presented and discussed....

  11. HOW SPIRALS AND GAPS DRIVEN BY COMPANIONS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS APPEAR IN SCATTERED LIGHT AT ARBITRARY VIEWING ANGLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Ruobing [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: rdong2013@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Direct imaging observations of protoplanetary disks at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths have revealed structures of potentially planetary origin. Investigations of observational signatures from planet-induced features have so far focused on disks viewed face-on. Combining 3D hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simulations, we study how the appearance of the spiral arms and the gap produced in a disk by a companion varies with inclination and position angle in NIR scattered light. We compare the cases of a 3 M {sub J} and a 0.1 M {sub ⊙} companion, and make predictions suitable for testing with Gemini/GPI, Very Large Telescope/NACO/SPHERE, and Subaru/HiCIAO/SCExAO. We find that the two trailing arms produced by an external perturber can have a variety of morphologies in inclined systems—they may appear as one trailing arm; two trailing arms on the same side of the disk; or two arms winding in opposite directions. The disk ring outside a planetary gap may also mimic spiral arms when viewed at high inclinations. We suggest potential explanations for the features observed in HH 30, HD 141569 A, AK Sco, HD 100546, and AB Aur. We emphasize that inclined views of companion-induced features cannot be converted into face-on views using simple and commonly practiced image deprojections.

  12. Hysteresis and drift of spiral waves near heterogeneities: From chemical experiments to cardiac simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Totz, Jan Frederik; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver; Engel, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative patterns in excitable reaction-diffusion systems can be strongly affected by spatial heterogeneities. Using the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, we show a hysteresis effect in the transition between free and pinned spiral rotation. The latter state involves the rotation around a disk-shaped obstacle with an impermeable and inert boundary. The transition is controlled by changes in light intensity. For permeable heterogeneities of higher excitability, we observe spiral drift along both linear and circular boundaries. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions and, in the case of spiral drift, are further reproduced by numerical simulations with a modified Oregonator model. Additional simulations with a cardiac model show that orbital motion can also exist in anisotropic and three-dimensional systems.

  13. Spiral CT manifestations of spherical pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohong; Yang Hongwei; Xu Chunmin; Qin Xiu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the Spiral CT manifestations and differential diagnosis of spherical pneumonia. Methods: 18 cases of spherical pneumonia and 20 cases of peripheral pulmonary carcinoma were selected, both of them were confirmed by clinic and/or pathology. The SCT findings of both groups were compared retrospectively. Results: Main spiral CT findings of spherical pneumonia were showed as followings: square or triangular lesions adjacent to pleura; with irregular shape, blurry, slightly lobulated margin, sometimes with halo sign. Small inflammatory patches and intensified vascular markings around the lesions were seen. Lesions became smaller or vanished after short-term anti-inflammatory treatment. Conclusion: Spherical pneumonia showed some characteristics on Spiral CT scan, which are helpful in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this disease. (authors)

  14. Graphite target for the spiral project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Bertrand, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Loiselet, M. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author). 5 refs.

  15. Photometry and mass modeling of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent estimates of the relative contributions of dark and luminous matter to the mass of spiral galaxies are reviewed. In these studies, the galactic mass distribution is modeled on the basis of photometric and kinematic observational data. The accuracy of current photometry is discussed; the three-dimensional structure of spiral galaxies and the techniques used in bulge-disk decomposition are examined; and mass models incorporating rotation curves are presented. The disk mass/luminosity ratios in the red band (corrected for internal extinction) are found to range from 1.6 to 3.2, with no particular radius at which dark matter dominates. 20 references

  16. Virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT in gastric lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Soo; Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Yoon, Man Won; Song, Sang Gook; Jeong, Gwang Woo

    1998-01-01

    To compare virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT with conventional endoscopy for the detection and evaluation of gastric lesions. During a previous six-month period, 30 patients with pathologically-proven gastric lesions underwent conventional endoscopy and virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT. There were 18 cases of advanced gastric carcinoma, eight benign ulcers, and four submucosal tumors(two leiomyomas, two lymphomas). Source images of virtual gastroscopy were three-dim-ensionally reconstructed within an Advantage Windows Workstation and virtual gastroscopic images were obtained using Navigator Software. On analysis, images were graded according to their quality(excellent, good, poor). Virtual gastroscopic images were interpreted by two radiologists blinded to conventional endoscopic findings, and were subsequently compared with endoscopic findings in terms of detectability and findings. In the cases of advanced gastric carcinoma, lesions were classified according to Borrmann's system. For virtual gastroscopy, overall image quality was excellent in 21 cases(70%), good in five(17%), and poor in four(13%). Lesions were detected in 25 cases(83%). Among the 18 advanced gastric carcinomas, virtual gastroscopy image quality was excellent in 14 cases(78%), good in two(11%), and poor in two(11%). Lesions were detected in 16 cases(89%). Two Borrmann type IV cases were not detected. Among the eight benign ulcers, virtual gastroscopy image quality was excellent in three cases(38%), good in three(38%), and poor in two(25%). The detection of lesion was possible in five cases(63%). In all submucosal tumors, virtual gastroscopy image quality was excellent. Lesions were detected in all cases. Virtual gastroscopy using spiral CT is safe and noninvasive, and for the evaluation of gastric lesions may be complementary to axial CT. It successfully detects gastric lesions, and in depicting the pattern of gastric folds its image quality is excellent.=20

  17. Dust-penetrated arm classes: insights from rising and falling rotation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigar, M. S.; Block, D. L.; Puerari, I.; Chorney, N. E.; James, P. A.

    2005-05-01

    In the last decade, near-infrared imaging has highlighted the decoupling of gaseous and old stellar discs: the morphologies of optical (Population I) tracers compared to the old stellar disc morphology, can be radically different. Galaxies which appear multi-armed and even flocculent in the optical may show significant grand-design spirals in the near-infrared. Furthermore, the optically determined Hubble classification scheme does not provide a sound way of classifying dust-penetrated stellar discs: spiral arm pitch angles (when measured in the near-infrared) do not correlate with Hubble type. The dust-penetrated classification scheme of Block & Puerari provides an alternative classification based on near-infrared morphology, which is thus more closely linked to the dominant stellar mass component. Here we present near-infrared K-band images of 14 galaxies, on which we have performed a Fourier analysis of the spiral structure in order to determine their near-infrared pitch angles and dust-penetrated arm classes. We have also used the rotation curve data of Mathewson et al. to calculate the rates of shear in the stellar discs of these galaxies. We find a correlation between near-infrared pitch angle and rate of shear: galaxies with wide open arms (the γ class) are found to have rising rotation curves, while those with falling rotation curves belong to the tightly wound α bin. The major determinant of near-infrared spiral arm pitch angle is the distribution of matter within the galaxy concerned. The correlation reported in this study provides the physical basis underpinning spiral arm classes in the dust-penetrated regime and underscores earlier spectroscopic findings by Burstein and Rubin that Hubble type and mass distributions are unrelated.

  18. Adaptation of the control system in view of SPIRAL integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecorche, E.

    1998-01-01

    As soon as the collaboration between the SPIRAL project and the Control Group has been defined, the first implementation of the SPIRAL control system started following various directions. Both the global hardware and software architectures has been specified and some practical works have been undertaken such as the Ethernet network installation or the first SPIRAL oriented software design and coding. (authors)

  19. The dynamics of the spiral galaxy M81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, H.C.D.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed comparison of the observations of the spiral galaxy M81 with the density-wave theory for tightly-wound spirals is presented. In particular, hydrogen-line observations are compared with the nonlinear density-wave theory for the gas with the aim of constructing a density-wave model for the spiral galaxy M81

  20. Geometric studies on variable radius spiral cone-beam scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Yangbo; Zhu Jiehua; Wang Ge

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to perform geometric studies on cone-beam CT scanning along a three-dimensional (3D) spiral of variable radius. First, the background for variable radius spiral cone-beam scanning is given in the context of electron-beam CT/micro-CT. Then, necessary and sufficient conditions are proved for existence and uniqueness of PI lines inside the variable radius 3D spiral. These results are necessary steps toward exact cone-beam reconstruction from a 3D spiral scan of variable radius, adapting Katsevich's formula for the standard helical cone-beam scanning. It is shown in the paper that when the longitudinally projected planar spiral is not always convex toward the origin, the PI line may not be unique in the envelope defined by the tangents of the spiral. This situation can be avoided by using planar spirals whose curvatures are always positive. Using such a spiral, a longitudinally homogeneous region inside the corresponding 3D spiral is constructed in which any point is passed by one and only one PI line, provided the angle ω between planar spiral's tangent and radius is bounded by vertical bar ω-90 deg. vertical bar ≤ε for some positive ε≤32.48 deg. If the radius varies monotonically, this region is larger and one may allow ε≤51.85 deg. Examples for 3D spirals based on logarithmic and Archimedean spirals are given. The corresponding generalized Tam-Danielsson detection windows are also formulated

  1. A nutrient’s downstream spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indicators of a stream’s ability to remove nutrients provide insights on watershed integrity and stream habitat characteristics that are needed to help managers to restore stream ecosystem services. We used the Tracer Additon Spiraling Characterization Curve (TASCC) to mea...

  2. The Distribution of Mass in Spiral Galaxies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaters, Rob; Andersen, David; Bershady, Matthew; Verheijen, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about the content and distribution of dark matter in spiral galaxies. Mass modeling of any rotation curve can yield an alarming range of results - from entirely halo-dominated, centrally- concentrated dark distributions, to disk-dominated inner potentials with shallow, low density

  3. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1983-01-01

    Correlations between optical surface brightness and the radio properties of spiral galaxies are investigated. It is found that galaxies with high surface brightness are more likely to be strong continuum radio sources and that galaxies with low surface brightness have high 21-cm line emission. (author)

  4. Logarithmic spiral trajectories generated by Solar sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetto, Marco; Niccolai, Lorenzo; Quarta, Alessandro A.; Mengali, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    Analytic solutions to continuous thrust-propelled trajectories are available in a few cases only. An interesting case is offered by the logarithmic spiral, that is, a trajectory characterized by a constant flight path angle and a fixed thrust vector direction in an orbital reference frame. The logarithmic spiral is important from a practical point of view, because it may be passively maintained by a Solar sail-based spacecraft. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic study concerning the possibility of inserting a Solar sail-based spacecraft into a heliocentric logarithmic spiral trajectory without using any impulsive maneuver. The required conditions to be met by the sail in terms of attitude angle, propulsive performance, parking orbit characteristics, and initial position are thoroughly investigated. The closed-form variations of the osculating orbital parameters are analyzed, and the obtained analytical results are used for investigating the phasing maneuver of a Solar sail along an elliptic heliocentric orbit. In this mission scenario, the phasing orbit is composed of two symmetric logarithmic spiral trajectories connected with a coasting arc.

  5. High-displacement spiral piezoelectric actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, F.; Kholkin, A. L.; Jadidian, B.; Safari, A.

    1999-10-01

    A high-displacement piezoelectric actuator, employing spiral geometry of a curved piezoelectric strip is described. The monolithic actuators are fabricated using a layered manufacturing technique, fused deposition of ceramics, which is capable of prototyping electroceramic components with complex shapes. The spiral actuators (2-3 cm in diameter) consisted of 4-5 turns of a lead zirconate titanate ceramic strip with an effective length up to 28 cm. The width was varied from 0.9 to 1.75 mm with a height of 3 mm. When driven by the electric field applied across the width of the spiral wall, the tip of the actuator was found to displace in both radial and tangential directions. The tangential displacement of the tip was about 210 μm under the field of 5 kV/cm. Both the displacement and resonant frequency of the spirals could be tailored by changing the effective length and wall width. The blocking force of the actuator in tangential direction was about 1 N under the field of 5 kV/cm. These properties are advantageous for high-displacement low-force applications where bimorph or monomorph actuators are currently employed.

  6. The Spiral Curriculum. Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The Spiral Curriculum is predicated on cognitive theory advanced by Jerome Bruner (1960), who wrote, "We begin with the hypothesis that any subject can be taught in some intellectually honest form to any child at any stage of development." In other words, even the most complex material, if properly structured and presented, can be understood by…

  7. Nobeyama CO Atlas of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, N.; Nakai, N.; Sorai, K.; Sato, N..; Yamauchi, A.; Tosaki, T.; Shioya, Y.; Vila-Vilaró, B.; Nishiyama, K.; Ishihara, Y.; Cepa, J.

    BEARS is a 25-beam focal plane array receiver mounted on the Nobeyama 45-m telescope. The combination of the large dish size of the telescope with the excellent performance of this receiver makes it an ideal tool for mapping observations of extended regions of the sky. We present here one of its current applications in a CO mapping survey of nearby spiral galaxies.

  8. A section of a spiral coal chute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtin, V.N.; Gorodilov, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    A section of a spiral coal chute includes a housing with support brackets. It differs in that to decrease the amount of work necessary for assembly, each support bracket is made with a guide slot and equipped with a pull-out cantilever in the shape of a fork which covers the slot from the lateral sides.

  9. Biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouwenvelder, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems High quality drinking water can be produced with membrane filtration processes like reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Because the global demand for fresh clean water is increasing, these membrane technologies will increase in importance in the

  10. SPIRAL2 at GANIL: Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.

    2008-05-01

    To pursue the investigation of a new territory of nuclei with extreme N/Z called ``terra incognita'' several projects, all aiming at the increase by several orders of magnitude of the RIB intensities are now under discussions worldwide. In Europe, two major new projects have been approved recently FAIRatGSI using the so-called ``in-flight'' method and SPIRAL2atGANIL, based on the ISOL method. Both projects were selected in the European Strategic Roadmap For research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The main goal of SPIRAL2 is clearly to extend our knowledge of the limit of existence and the structure of nuclei deeply in the medium and heavy mass region (A = 60 to 140) which is to day an almost unexplored continent. SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting driver LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities for exotic species in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, of the order of 106 to 1010 pps will surpass by two order of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100 μA to 1 mA), heavier ions up to Ar at 14 MeV/n producing also proton rich exotic nuclei. In applied areas SPIRAL2 is considered as a powerful variable energy neutron source, a must to study the impact of nuclear fission and fusion on materials. The intensities of these unstable species are excellent opportunities for new tracers and diagnostics either for solid state, material or for radiobiological science and medicine. The ``Go'' decision has been taken in May 2005. The investments and personnel costs amount to 190 M€, for the construction period 2006-2012. Construction of the SPIRAL2 facility is shared by ten French laboratories and a network of international partners. Under the 7FP program of European Union

  11. Three-dimensional dental imaging by spiral CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Conover, Gary; Knapp, Robert H.; Yokoyama-Crothers, Naoko; Wang, Ge

    1995-05-01

    Three-dimensional image acquisition, display, and analysis of dental structures was performed and validated using spiral computed tomography (SCT) with metal artifact suppression. Isolated extracted teeth, a dry mandible, cadaver mandible, and cadaver head were scanned and reconstructed using a spiral CT scanner (Siemens Somatom PLUS-S) with 1 mm detector collimation, 1-mm table feed, and 0.1 - 1 mm reconstruction interval using specially developed software. Algorithms for metal artifact reduction including extended attenuation range and interpolation of missing projections were applied. Volumetric rendering of voxel sum images was performed to synthesize images comparable to conventional intraoral dental radiographs. Direct comparison of voxel-based synthetic and digitized film images was made. Several isolated, extracted teeth were sectioned with a diamond saw and submitted for histomorphometric analysis to aid in direct comparison with CT slice images obtained by multiplanar reconstruction. Metal artifact reduction was successful in markedly reducing the streaks and star patterns that usually accompany metallic restorations and intraoral appliances. Individual teeth were comparable to CT slice images. Voxel sum images were comparable to dental radiographs; however, for the SCT images, the spatial resolution was higher within the plane of section than it was orthogonal to the plane of section. Serial examinations were obtained by SCT, registered by surface matching, and interval change measured by 3D subtraction. Simulated lesions and restorations were introduced and quantitatively evaluated pre- and post-interventionally to assess imaging method performance.

  12. Acute cholecystitis: two-phase spiral CT finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Eung Young; Yoon, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dal Mo; Chun Seok; Bae, Jun Gi; Kim, Hak Soo; Kim, Hyung Sik [Chungang Ghil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    To describe the two-phase spiral CT findings of acute cholecystitis. Materials and Methods : CT scans of nine patients with surgically-proven acute cholecystitis were retrospectively reviewed for wall thickening, enhancement pattern of the wall, attenuation of the liver adjacent to the gallbladder, gallstones,gallbladder distension, gas collection within the gallbladder, pericholecystic fluid and infiltration of pericholecystic fat. Results : In all cases, wall thickening of the gallbladder was seen, though this was more distinct on delayed images, Using high-low-high attenuation, one layer was seen in five cases, nd three layers in four. On arterial images, eight cases showed transient focal increased attenuation of the liver adjacent to the gall bladder;four of these showed curvilinear attenuation and four showed subsegmental attenuation. One case showed curvilinear decreased attenuation between increased attenuation of the liver and the gallbladder, and during surgery, severe adhesion between the liver and gallbladder was confirmed. Additional CT findings were infiltration of pericholecystic fat (n=9), gallstones (n=7), gallbladder distension (n=6), pericholecystic fluid(n=3), and gas collection within the gallbladder (n=2). Conclusion : In patients with acute cholecystitis,two-phase spiral CT revealed wall thickening in one or three layers ; on delayed images this was more distinct. In many cases, arterial images showed transient focal increased attenuation of the liver adjacent to the gallbladder.

  13. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  14. The NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Norma Arm Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornasini, Francesca M.; Tomsick, John A.; Hong, JaeSub

    2017-01-01

    We present a catalog of hard X-ray sources in a square-degree region surveyed by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in the direction of the Norma spiral arm. This survey has a total exposure time of 1.7 Ms, and the typical and maximum exposure depths are 50 ks and 1 Ms, respectively...

  15. Nutrient spiraling in streams and river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Doyle, Martin W.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past 3 decades, nutrient spiraling has become a unifying paradigm for stream biogeochemical research. This paper presents (1) a quantitative synthesis of the nutrient spiraling literature and (2) application of these data to elucidate trends in nutrient spiraling within stream networks. Results are based on 404 individual experiments on ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) from 52 published studies. Sixty-nine percent of the experiments were performed in first- and second-order streams, and 31% were performed in third- to fifth-order streams. Uptake lengths, Sw, of NH4 (median = 86 m) and PO4 (median = 96 m) were significantly different (α = 0.05) than NO3 (median = 236 m). Areal uptake rates of NH4 (median = 28 μg m-2 min-1) were significantly different than NO3 and PO4 (median = 15 and 14 μg m-2 min-1, respectively). There were significant differences among NH4, NO3, and PO4 uptake velocity (median = 5, 1, and 2 mm min-1, respectively). Correlation analysis results were equivocal on the effect of transient storage on nutrient spiraling. Application of these data to a stream network model showed that recycling (defined here as stream length ÷ Sw) of NH4 and NO3 generally increased with stream order, while PO4 recycling remained constant along a first- to fifth-order stream gradient. Within this hypothetical stream network, cumulative NH4 uptake decreased slightly with stream order, while cumulative NO3 and PO4 uptake increased with stream order. These data suggest the importance of larger rivers to nutrient spiraling and the need to consider how stream networks affect nutrient flux between terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

  16. GANIL-SPIRAL2: A new era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, Sydney

    2011-05-01

    GANIL presently offers unique opportunities in nuclear physics and many other fields that arise from not only the provision of low-energy stable beams, fragmentation beams and re-accelerated radioactive species, but also from the availability of a wide range of state-of-the-art spectrometers and instrumentation. A few examples of recent highlights are discussed in the present paper. With the construction of SPIRAL2 over the next few years, GANIL is in a good position to retain its world-leading capability. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting LINAC, delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 KW) directed on a C converter+ Uranium target and producing therefore more than 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to A = 140, will surpass by two orders of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few KeV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100 μA to 1 mA), heavier ions (Ar up to Xe) at maximum energy of 14 MeV/n. Under the 7FP program of European Union called *Preparatory phase*, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4M€ to build up an international consortium around this new venture. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and associated physics instruments in collaboration with EU and International partners will be presented.

  17. Simulation of Octopus Arm Based on Coupled CPGs

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Tian; Qiang Lu

    2015-01-01

    The octopus arm has attracted many researchers’ interests and became a research hot spot because of its amazing features. Several dynamic models inspired by an octopus arm are presented to realize the structure with a large number of degrees of freedom. The octopus arm is made of a soft material introducing high-dimensionality, nonlinearity, and elasticity, which makes the octopus arm difficult to control. In this paper, three coupled central pattern generators (CPGs) are built and a 2-dimens...

  18. Improved orthopedic arm joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Joint permits smooth and easy movement of disabled arm and is smaller, lighter and less expensive than previous models. Device is interchangeable and may be used on either arm at the shoulder or at the elbow.

  19. Spiral analysis-improved clinical utility with center detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, Qiping; Kurtis, Mónica M; Floyd, Alicia G; Smith, Whitney A; Pullman, Seth L

    2008-06-30

    Spiral analysis is a computerized method that measures human motor performance from handwritten Archimedean spirals. It quantifies normal motor activity, and detects early disease as well as dysfunction in patients with movement disorders. The clinical utility of spiral analysis is based on kinematic and dynamic indices derived from the original spiral trace, which must be detected and transformed into mathematical expressions with great precision. Accurately determining the center of the spiral and reducing spurious low frequency noise caused by center selection error is important to the analysis. Handwritten spirals do not all start at the same point, even when marked on paper, and drawing artifacts are not easily filtered without distortion of the spiral data and corruption of the performance indices. In this report, we describe a method for detecting the optimal spiral center and reducing the unwanted drawing artifacts. To demonstrate overall improvement to spiral analysis, we study the impact of the optimal spiral center detection in different frequency domains separately and find that it notably improves the clinical spiral measurement accuracy in low frequency domains.

  20. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body, three of them are in your arm: the humerus, radius, and ulna. Your arms are also made up of muscles, joints, tendons, ... Injuries to any of these parts of the arm can occur during sports, a fall, or an ...

  1. Spiral Calcium Wave Propagation and Annihilation in Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleiter, James; Girard, Steven; Peralta, Ernest; Clapham, David

    1991-04-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger. Information is encoded in the magnitude, frequency, and spatial organization of changes in the concentration of cytosolic free Ca2+. Regenerative spiral waves of release of free Ca2+ were observed by confocal microscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. This pattern of Ca2+ activity is characteristic of an intracellular milieu that behaves as a regenerative excitable medium. The minimal critical radius for propagation of focal Ca2+ waves (10.4 micrometers) and the effective diffusion constant for the excitation signal (2.3 x 10-6 square centimeters per second) were estimated from measurements of velocity and curvature of circular wavefronts expanding from foci. By modeling Ca2+ release with cellular automata, the absolute refractory period for Ca2+ stores (4.7 seconds) was determined. Other phenomena expected of an excitable medium, such as wave propagation of undiminished amplitude and annihilation of colliding wavefronts, were observed.

  2. Novel freeform optical surface design with spiral symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Pablo; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.; Vilaplana, Juan

    2011-10-01

    Manufacturing technologies as injection molding or embossing specify their production limits for minimum radii of the vertices or draft angle for demolding, for instance. These restrictions may limit the system optical efficiency or affect the generation of undesired artifacts on the illumination pattern when dealing with optical design. A novel manufacturing concept is presented here, in which the optical surfaces are not obtained from the usual revolution symmetry with respect to a central axis (z axis), but they are calculated as free-form surfaces describing a spiral trajectory around z axis. The main advantage of this new concept lies in the manufacturing process: a molded piece can be easily separated from its mold just by applying a combination of rotational movement around axis z and linear movement along axis z, even for negative draft angles. The general designing procedure will be described in detail.

  3. Is the spiral morphology of the Elias 2-27 circumstellar disc due to gravitational instability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Cassandra; Rice, Ken; Dipierro, Giovanni; Forgan, Duncan; Harries, Tim; Alexander, Richard

    2018-02-01

    A recent ALMA observation of the Elias 2-27 system revealed a two-armed structure extending out to ˜300 au in radius. The protostellar disc surrounding the central star is unusually massive, raising the possibility that the system is gravitationally unstable. Recent work has shown that the observed morphology of the system can be explained by disc self-gravity, so we examine the physical properties of the disc necessary to detect self-gravitating spiral waves. Using three-dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, coupled with radiative transfer and synthetic ALMA imaging, we find that observable spiral structure can only be explained by self-gravity if the disc has a low opacity (and therefore efficient cooling), and is minimally supported by external irradiation. This corresponds to a very narrow region of parameter space, suggesting that, although it is possible for the spiral structure to be due to disc self-gravity, other explanations, such as an external perturbation, may be preferred.

  4. Powered manipulator control arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Mouee, Theodore; Vertut, Jean; Marchal, Paul; Germon, J.C.; Petit, Michel

    1975-01-01

    A remote operated control arm for powered manipulators is described. It includes an assembly allowing several movements with position sensors for each movement. The number of possible arm movements equals the number of possible manipulator movements. The control systems may be interrupted as required. One part of the arm is fitted with a system to lock it with respect to another part of the arm without affecting the other movements, so long as the positions of the manipulator and the arm have not been brought into complete coincidence. With this system the locking can be ended when complete concordance is achieved [fr

  5. Borrmann type IV adenocarcinoma versus gastric lymphoma : spiral CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Shin, Kue Hee; Hong, Suk Joo; Kim, Hong Weon; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Cho, Hyun Deuk

    1999-01-01

    To distinguish the spiral CT findings of Borrmann type IV adenocarcinoma from those of gastric lymphoma with diffuse gastric wall thickening. We retrospectively reviewed the spiral CT scans of 30 patients with Borrmann type IV adenocarcinoma and nine with gastric lymphoma with diffuse gastric wall thickening. In all patients the respective condition was pathologically confirmed by gastrectomy. CT scanning was performed after peroral administration of 500-700ml of water. A total of 120-140 ml bolus of nonionic contrast material was administered intravenously at a flow rate of 3 ml/sec and two-phase images were obtained at 35-45 sec(early phase) and 180 sec(delayed phase) after the start of bolus injection. Spiral CT was performed with 10mm collimation, 10mm/sec table feed and 10mm reconstruction. We evaluated the degree and homogeneity of enhancement of thickened entire gastric wall, and the enhancement pattern of gastric inner layer, as seen on early-phase CT scans. On early and delayed views, the thickness of gastric wall and the presence of perigastric fat infiltration were determined. The enhancement patterns of gastric inner layer were classified as either continuous or discontinuous thick enhancement, thin enhancement, or nonenhancement. The thickness of gastric wall was 1.2-3.5cm(mean 2.2cm) in cases of adenocarcinoma and 1.2-7.6cm(mean 4cm) in lymphoma. Perigastric fat infiltration was seen in 24 patients with adenocarcinoma(80%) and four with lymphoma(44%). In those with adenocarcinoma, the degree of enhancement of entire gastric wall was hyperdense in fifteen patients(50%) and isointense in eleven (37%). Seven patients with lymphoma(78%)showed hypodensity. In those with adenocarcinoma, continuous thick enhancement of gastric inner layer was seen in 18 patients(60%) and discontinuous thick enhancement in nine(30%). In lymphoma cases, no thick enhancement was observed. Thin enhancement of gastric inner layer was demonstrated in three patients with

  6. Spiral-driven accretion in protoplanetary discs . III. Tridimensional simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Lesur, Geoffroy; Fromang, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    Context. Understanding how accretion proceeds in proto-planetary discs, and more generally, understanding their dynamics, is a crucial questions that needs to be answered to explain the conditions in which planets form. Aims: The role that accretion of gas from the surrounding molecular cloud onto the disc may have on its structure needs to be quantified. Methods: We performed tridimensional simulations using the Cartesian AMR code RAMSES of an accretion disc that is subject to infalling material. Results: For the aspect ratio of H/R ≃ 0.15 and disc mass Md ≃ 10-2M⊙ used in our study, we find that for typical accretion rates of the order of a few 10-7M⊙ yr-1, values of the α parameter as high as a few 10-3 are inferred. The mass that is accreted in the inner part of the disc is typically at least 50% of the total mass that has been accreted onto the disc. Conclusions: Our results suggest that external accretion of gas at moderate values onto circumstellar discs may trigger prominent spiral arms that are reminiscent of recent observations made with various instruments, and may lead to significant transport through the disc. If confirmed from observational studies, such accretion may therefore influence disc evolution.

  7. New Portraits of Spiral Galaxies NGC 613, NGC 1792 and NGC 3627

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    of this photo retains the original pixels. Note the many arms and the pronounced dust bands. North is up and East is left. NGC 613 is a beautiful barred spiral galaxy in the southern constellation Sculptor. This galaxy is inclined by 32 degrees and, contrary to most barred spirals, has many arms that give it a tentacular appearance. Prominent dust lanes are visible along the large-scale bar. Extensive star-formation occurs in this area, at the ends of the bar, and also in the nuclear regions of the galaxy. The gas at the centre, as well as the radio properties are indicative of the presence of a massive black hole in the centre of NGC 613. NGC 1792 ESO PR Photo 33b/03 ESO PR Photo 33b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 473 x 400 pix - 26k] [Normal - JPEG: 946 x 800 pix - 376k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2716 x 2297 pix - 3.2M] PR Photo 33b/03 shows the starburst spiral galaxy NGC 1792 . Note the numerous background galaxies in this sky field. North is up and East is to the left. NGC 1792 is located in the southern constellation Columba (The Dove) - almost on the border with the constellation Caelum (The Graving Tool) - and is a so-called starburst spiral galaxy. Its optical appearance is quite chaotic, due to the patchy distribution of dust throughout the disc of this galaxy. It is very rich in neutral hydrogen gas - fuel for the formation of new stars - and is indeed rapidly forming such stars. The galaxy is characterized by unusually luminous far-infrared radiation; this is due to dust heated by young stars. M 66 (NGC 3627) ESO PR Photo 33c/03 ESO PR Photo 33c/03 [Preview - JPEG: 469 x 400 pix - 24k] [Normal - JPEG: 938 x 800 pix - 383k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2698 x 2300 pix - 3.0M] PR Photo 33c/03 of the spiral galaxy M 66 (or NGC 3627). North towards upper left, West towards upper right. The third galaxy is NGC 3627 , also known as Messier 66, i.e. it is the 66th object in the famous catalogue of nebulae by French astronomer Charles Messier (1730 - 1817). It is located in the constellation

  8. A WARP IN PROGRESS: H I AND RADIO CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPIRAL NGC 3145

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Michele [110 Westchester Rd, Newton, MA 02458 (United States); Brinks, Elias [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Struck, Curtis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Rd., Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, Debra M., E-mail: kaufmanrallis@icloud.com, E-mail: E.Brinks@herts.ac.uk, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com, E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, 124 Raymond Av., Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    VLA H i observations and λ6 cm radio continuum observations are presented of the barred-spiral galaxy NGC 3145. In optical images NGC 3145 has stellar arms that appear to cross, forming “X”-features. Our radio continuum observations rule out shock fronts at three of the four “X”-features, and our H i data provide evidence of gas motions perpendicular to the disk of NGC 3145. In large portions of NGC 3145, particularly in the middle-to-outer disk, the H i line profiles are skewed. Relative to the disk, the gas in the skewed wing of the line profiles has z-motions away from us on the approaching side of the galaxy and z-motions of about the same magnitude (∼40 km s{sup −1}) toward us on the receding side. These warping motions imply that there has been a perturbation with a sizeable component perpendicular to the disk over large spatial scales. Two features in NGC 3145 have velocities indicating that they are out-of-plane tidal arms. One is an apparent branch of a main spiral arm on the northeastern side of NGC 3145; the velocity of the branch is ∼150 km s{sup −1} greater than the spiral arm where they appear to intersect in projection. The other is the arm on the southwestern side that forms three of the “X”-features. It differs in velocity by ∼56 km s{sup −1} from that of the disk at the same projected location. H i observations are presented also of the two small companions NGC 3143 and PGC 029578. Based on its properties (enhanced SFR, H i emission 50% more extended on its northeastern side, etc.), NGC 3143 is the more likely of the two companions to have interacted with NGC 3145 recently. A simple analytic model demonstrates that an encounter between NGC 3143 and NGC 3145 is a plausible explanation for the observed warping motions in NGC 3145.

  9. A WARP IN PROGRESS: H I AND RADIO CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPIRAL NGC 3145

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, Michele; Brinks, Elias; Struck, Curtis; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.

    2015-01-01

    VLA H i observations and λ6 cm radio continuum observations are presented of the barred-spiral galaxy NGC 3145. In optical images NGC 3145 has stellar arms that appear to cross, forming “X”-features. Our radio continuum observations rule out shock fronts at three of the four “X”-features, and our H i data provide evidence of gas motions perpendicular to the disk of NGC 3145. In large portions of NGC 3145, particularly in the middle-to-outer disk, the H i line profiles are skewed. Relative to the disk, the gas in the skewed wing of the line profiles has z-motions away from us on the approaching side of the galaxy and z-motions of about the same magnitude (∼40 km s −1 ) toward us on the receding side. These warping motions imply that there has been a perturbation with a sizeable component perpendicular to the disk over large spatial scales. Two features in NGC 3145 have velocities indicating that they are out-of-plane tidal arms. One is an apparent branch of a main spiral arm on the northeastern side of NGC 3145; the velocity of the branch is ∼150 km s −1 greater than the spiral arm where they appear to intersect in projection. The other is the arm on the southwestern side that forms three of the “X”-features. It differs in velocity by ∼56 km s −1 from that of the disk at the same projected location. H i observations are presented also of the two small companions NGC 3143 and PGC 029578. Based on its properties (enhanced SFR, H i emission 50% more extended on its northeastern side, etc.), NGC 3143 is the more likely of the two companions to have interacted with NGC 3145 recently. A simple analytic model demonstrates that an encounter between NGC 3143 and NGC 3145 is a plausible explanation for the observed warping motions in NGC 3145

  10. Dark and visible matter in spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persic, M.; Salucci, P.; Durham Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Exploiting relevant information from the profiles of rotation curves, we calculate the dark-to-luminous mass ratio within the disc size for a sample of 43 spiral galaxies. The values we find, while proving the ubiquitous presence of dark matter, vary with luminosity. Faint and bright galaxies are found to be respectively halo- and disc-dominated in the disc regions. The luminosity sequence turns out to be a dark-to-luminous sequence. (author)

  11. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1983-01-01

    It is proposed that Freeman's discovery that the extrapolated central surface brightness of spiral galaxies is approximately constant can be simply explained if the galaxies contain a spheroidal component which dominates the light in their outer isophotes. Calculations of an effective central surface brightness indicate a wide spread of values. This requires either a wide spread in disc properties or significant spheroidal components or, most probably, both. (author)

  12. Incorporating hydrologic variability into nutrient spiraling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Martin W.

    2005-09-01

    Nutrient spiraling describes the path of a nutrient molecule within a stream ecosystem, combining the biochemical cycling processes with the downstream driving force of stream discharge. To date, nutrient spiraling approaches have been hampered by their inability to deal with fluctuating flows, as most studies have characterized nutrient retention within only a small range of discharges near base flow. Here hydrologic variability is incorporated into nutrient spiraling theory by drawing on the fluvial geomorphic concept of effective discharge. The effective discharge for nutrient retention is proposed to be that discharge which, over long periods of time, is responsible for the greatest portion of nutrient retention. A developed analytical model predicts that the effective discharge for nutrient retention will equal the modal discharge for small streams or those with little discharge variability. As modal discharge increases or discharge variability increases, the effective discharge becomes increasingly less than the modal discharge. In addition to the effective discharge, a new metric is proposed, the functionally equivalent discharge, which is the single discharge that will reproduce the magnitude of nutrient retention generated by the full hydrologic frequency distribution when all discharge takes place at that rate. The functionally equivalent discharge was found to be the same as the modal discharge at low hydrologic variability, but increasingly different from the modal discharge at large hydrologic variability. The functionally equivalent discharge provides a simple quantitative means of incorporating hydrologic variability into long-term nutrient budgets.

  13. Log-Spiral Keypoint: A Robust Approach toward Image Patch Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangho Paek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Matching of keypoints across image patches forms the basis of computer vision applications, such as object detection, recognition, and tracking in real-world images. Most of keypoint methods are mainly used to match the high-resolution images, which always utilize an image pyramid for multiscale keypoint detection. In this paper, we propose a novel keypoint method to improve the matching performance of image patches with the low-resolution and small size. The location, scale, and orientation of keypoints are directly estimated from an original image patch using a Log-Spiral sampling pattern for keypoint detection without consideration of image pyramid. A Log-Spiral sampling pattern for keypoint description and two bit-generated functions are designed for generating a binary descriptor. Extensive experiments show that the proposed method is more effective and robust than existing binary-based methods for image patch matching.

  14. The Sagittarius impact as an architect of spirality and outer rings in the Milky Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Chris W; Bullock, James S; Tollerud, Erik J; Rocha, Miguel; Chakrabarti, Sukanya

    2011-09-14

    Like many galaxies of its size, the Milky Way is a disk with prominent spiral arms rooted in a central bar, although our knowledge of its structure and origin is incomplete. Traditional attempts to understand our Galaxy's morphology assume that it has been unperturbed by major external forces. Here we report simulations of the response of the Milky Way to the infall of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr), which results in the formation of spiral arms, influences the central bar and produces a flared outer disk. Two ring-like wrappings emerge towards the Galactic anti-Centre in our model that are reminiscent of the low-latitude arcs observed in the same area of the Milky Way. Previous models have focused on Sgr itself to reproduce the dwarf's orbital history and place associated constraints on the shape of the Milky Way gravitational potential, treating the Sgr impact event as a trivial influence on the Galactic disk. Our results show that the Milky Way's morphology is not purely secular in origin and that low-mass minor mergers predicted to be common throughout the Universe probably have a similarly important role in shaping galactic structure.

  15. Clinical application of the three-dimensional reconstruction of spiral CT pneumocolon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shenping; Li Ziping; Xu Dasheng; Lin Erjian; Lin Peizhang; Xu Qiaolan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical role of the 3 types of reconstruction of the spiral CT pneumocolon in the diagnosis of colon lesions. Methods: Three types of reconstruction with spiral CT pneumocolon including air cast imaging (ACI), CT virtual endoscopy (CTVE), and multiple planner reconstruction (MPR) in 34 patients with colorectal cancer or polyps were correlated with surgical pathology respectively. Results: Among the 34 patients, 30 was colorectal cancer and 6 was polyps (2 of which in the proximal lumen of 2 colon cancer). (1) Comparison between the 3 types of the spiral CT pneumocolon reconstruction and pathology in colorectal cancer. 1) ACI: tumor patterns: coincide (n =22), anti-coincide (n = 8); tumor extension: coincide (n = 24), anti-coincide (n = 6); tumor size: coincide (n = 28), anti-coincide (n = 2). 2) CTVE: tumor patterns: coincide (n = 26), anti-coincide (n = 4); tumor extension: coincide (n = 25), anti-coincide ( n 5); tumor size: coincide (n = 23), anti-coincide (n = 7). 3) MPR: tumor patterns: coincide (n = 24), anti-coincide (n = 6); tumor extension: coincide (n = 30), anti-coincide (n = 0); tumor size: coincide (n = 26), anti-coincide (n = 4). (2) Comparison between the 3 types of the spiral CT pneumocolon reconstruction and pathology in colorectal polyps: the lesions were displayed in 4 (ACI) and in 6 (CTVE and MPR). Conclusion: (1) For the diagnosis of colorectal cancers: CTVE was the best means to display the tumor patterns, MPR most correct to judge the tumor extension, and ACI most suitable to measure the tumor size. (2) For the diagnosis of colorectal polyps, ACI can be used for oriented diagnosis, CTVE can well display the intra-luminal three-dimensional structure and can be used for characteristic diagnosis, MPR can be used for differential diagnosis

  16. Ablation acceleration of macroparticle in spiral magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1981-05-01

    The rocket motion of macroparticles heated by energetic pulses in a spiral magnetic field was studied. The purpose of the present work is to study the ablation acceleration of a macroparticle in a spiral magnetic field with the help of the law of conservation of angular momentum. The basic equation of motion of ablatively accelerated projectile in a spiral magnetic field was derived. Any rocket which is ejecting fully ionized plasma in an intense magnetic field with rotational transform is able to have spin by the law of conservation of momentum. The effect of spiral magnetic field on macroparticle acceleration is discussed. The necessary mass ratio increase exponentially with respect to the field parameter. The spiral field should be employed with care to have only to stabilize the position of macroparticles. As conclusion, it can be said that the ablation acceleration of the projectile in a spiral field can give the accelerated body spin quite easily. (Kato, T.)

  17. Wave-particle dualism of spiral waves dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktasheva, I V; Biktashev, V N

    2003-02-01

    We demonstrate and explain a wave-particle dualism of such classical macroscopic phenomena as spiral waves in active media. That means although spiral waves appear as nonlocal processes involving the whole medium, they respond to small perturbations as effectively localized entities. The dualism appears as an emergent property of a nonlinear field and is mathematically expressed in terms of the spiral waves response functions, which are essentially nonzero only in the vicinity of the spiral wave core. Knowledge of the response functions allows quantitatively accurate prediction of the spiral wave drift due to small perturbations of any nature, which makes them as fundamental characteristics for spiral waves as mass is for the condensed matter.

  18. The Ultraviolet Attenuation Law in Backlit Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, William C.; Manning, Anna M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    The effective extinction law (attenuation behavior) in galaxies in the emitted ultraviolet (UV) regime is well known only for actively star-forming objects and combines effects of the grain properties, fine structure in the dust distribution, and relative distributions of stars and dust. We use Galaxy Evolution Explorer, XMM Optical Monitor, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to explore the UV attenuation in the outer parts of spiral disks which are backlit by other UV-bright galaxies, starting with the candidate list of pairs provided by Galaxy Zoo participants. New optical images help to constrain the geometry and structure of the target galaxies. Our analysis incorporates galaxy symmetry, using non-overlapping regions of each galaxy to derive error estimates on the attenuation measurements. The entire sample has an attenuation law across the optical and UV that is close to the Calzetti et al. form; the UV slope for the overall sample is substantially shallower than found by Wild et al., which is a reasonable match to the more distant galaxies in our sample but not to the weighted combination including NGC 2207. The nearby, bright spiral NGC 2207 alone gives an accuracy almost equal to the rest of our sample, and its outer arms have a very low level of foreground starlight. Thus, this widespread, fairly "gray" law can be produced from the distribution of dust alone, without a necessary contribution from differential escape of stars from dense clouds. Our results indicate that the extrapolation needed to compare attenuation between backlit galaxies at moderate redshifts from HST data, and local systems from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and similar data, is mild enough to allow the use of galaxy overlaps to trace the cosmic history of dust in galaxies. For NGC 2207, HST data in the near-UV F336W band show that the covering factor of clouds with small optical attenuation becomes a dominant factor farther into the UV, which opens the possibility that widespread

  19. The ultraviolet attenuation law in backlit spiral galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Manning, Anna M. [Stennis Space Center, MS 39522 (United States); Holwerda, Benne W. [ESA-ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201-AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Lintott, Chris J. [Astrophysics, Oxford University, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Schawinski, Kevin, E-mail: wkeel@ua.edu, E-mail: ammanning@bama.ua.edu, E-mail: bholwerd@rssd.esa.int, E-mail: Twitter@BenneHolwerda, E-mail: cjl@astro.ox.ac.uk, E-mail: Twitter@chrislintott, E-mail: kevin.schawinski@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: Twitter@kevinschawinski [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-02-01

    The effective extinction law (attenuation behavior) in galaxies in the emitted ultraviolet (UV) regime is well known only for actively star-forming objects and combines effects of the grain properties, fine structure in the dust distribution, and relative distributions of stars and dust. We use Galaxy Evolution Explorer, XMM Optical Monitor, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to explore the UV attenuation in the outer parts of spiral disks which are backlit by other UV-bright galaxies, starting with the candidate list of pairs provided by Galaxy Zoo participants. New optical images help to constrain the geometry and structure of the target galaxies. Our analysis incorporates galaxy symmetry, using non-overlapping regions of each galaxy to derive error estimates on the attenuation measurements. The entire sample has an attenuation law across the optical and UV that is close to the Calzetti et al. form; the UV slope for the overall sample is substantially shallower than found by Wild et al., which is a reasonable match to the more distant galaxies in our sample but not to the weighted combination including NGC 2207. The nearby, bright spiral NGC 2207 alone gives an accuracy almost equal to the rest of our sample, and its outer arms have a very low level of foreground starlight. Thus, this widespread, fairly 'gray' law can be produced from the distribution of dust alone, without a necessary contribution from differential escape of stars from dense clouds. Our results indicate that the extrapolation needed to compare attenuation between backlit galaxies at moderate redshifts from HST data, and local systems from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and similar data, is mild enough to allow the use of galaxy overlaps to trace the cosmic history of dust in galaxies. For NGC 2207, HST data in the near-UV F336W band show that the covering factor of clouds with small optical attenuation becomes a dominant factor farther into the UV, which opens the possibility that

  20. The ultraviolet attenuation law in backlit spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, William C.; Manning, Anna M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The effective extinction law (attenuation behavior) in galaxies in the emitted ultraviolet (UV) regime is well known only for actively star-forming objects and combines effects of the grain properties, fine structure in the dust distribution, and relative distributions of stars and dust. We use Galaxy Evolution Explorer, XMM Optical Monitor, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to explore the UV attenuation in the outer parts of spiral disks which are backlit by other UV-bright galaxies, starting with the candidate list of pairs provided by Galaxy Zoo participants. New optical images help to constrain the geometry and structure of the target galaxies. Our analysis incorporates galaxy symmetry, using non-overlapping regions of each galaxy to derive error estimates on the attenuation measurements. The entire sample has an attenuation law across the optical and UV that is close to the Calzetti et al. form; the UV slope for the overall sample is substantially shallower than found by Wild et al., which is a reasonable match to the more distant galaxies in our sample but not to the weighted combination including NGC 2207. The nearby, bright spiral NGC 2207 alone gives an accuracy almost equal to the rest of our sample, and its outer arms have a very low level of foreground starlight. Thus, this widespread, fairly 'gray' law can be produced from the distribution of dust alone, without a necessary contribution from differential escape of stars from dense clouds. Our results indicate that the extrapolation needed to compare attenuation between backlit galaxies at moderate redshifts from HST data, and local systems from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and similar data, is mild enough to allow the use of galaxy overlaps to trace the cosmic history of dust in galaxies. For NGC 2207, HST data in the near-UV F336W band show that the covering factor of clouds with small optical attenuation becomes a dominant factor farther into the UV, which opens the possibility that

  1. Evolution of robotic arms

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of surgical robotics is in the development of the robotic arm. This is a thorough review of the literature on the nature and development of this device with emphasis on surgical applications. We have reviewed the published literature and classified robotic arms by their application: show, industrial application, medical application, etc. There is a definite trend in the manufacture of robotic arms toward more dextrous devices, more degrees-of-freedom, and capabilities beyond th...

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of breathers in the spiral structures of magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, V. V., E-mail: kiselev@imp.uran.ru; Raskovalov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The structure and properties of pulsating solitons (breathers) in the spiral structures of magnets are analyzed within the sine-Gordon model. The breather core pulsations are shown to be accompanied by local shifts and oscillations of the spiral structure with the formation of “precursors” and “tails” in the moving soliton. The possibilities for the observation and excitation of breathers in the spiral structures of magnets and multiferroics are discussed.

  3. Cochlea and other spiral forms in nature and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stanković, Predrag; Štrbac, Mile; Tomić, Irina; Ćetković, Mila

    2012-01-01

    The original appearance of the cochlea and the specific shape of a spiral are interesting for both the scientists and artists. Yet, a correlation between the cochlea and the spiral forms in nature and art has been very rarely mentioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible correlation between the cochlea and the other spiral objects in nature, as well as the artistic presentation of the spiral forms. We explored data related to many natural objects and examined 13,625 artworks created by 2049 artists. We also dissected 2 human cochleas and prepared histologic slices of a rat cochlea. The cochlea is a spiral, cone-shaped osseous structure that resembles certain other spiral forms in nature. It was noticed that parts of some plants are arranged in a spiral manner, often according to Fibonacci numbers. Certain animals, their parts, or their products also represent various types of spirals. Many of them, including the cochlea, belong to the logarithmic type. Nature created spiral forms in the living world to pack a larger number of structures in a limited space and also to improve their function. Because the cochlea and other spiral forms have a certain aesthetic value, many artists presented them in their works of art. There is a mathematical and geometric correlation between the cochlea and natural spiral objects, and the same functional reason for their formation. The artists' imagery added a new aspect to those domains. Obviously, the creativity of nature and Homo sapiens has no limits--like the infinite distal part of the spiral. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dust-trapping Vortices and a Potentially Planet-triggered Spiral Wake in the Pre-transitional Disk of V1247 Orionis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Stefan; Kreplin, Alexander; Young, Alison K.; Bate, Matthew R.; Harries, Tim T.; Willson, Matthew [University of Exeter, School of Physics, Astrophysics Group, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Fukugawa, Misato [Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Sitko, Michael L. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Grady, Carol [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96402 (United States); Monnier, John D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 311 West Hall, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wisniewski, John, E-mail: skraus@astro.ex.ac.uk [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73071 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    The radial drift problem constitutes one of the most fundamental problems in planet formation theory, as it predicts particles to drift into the star before they are able to grow to planetesimal size. Dust-trapping vortices have been proposed as a possible solution to this problem, as they might be able to trap particles over millions of years, allowing them to grow beyond the radial drift barrier. Here, we present ALMA 0.″04 resolution imaging of the pre-transitional disk of V1247 Orionis that reveals an asymmetric ring as well as a sharply confined crescent structure, resembling morphologies seen in theoretical models of vortex formation. The asymmetric ring (at 0.″17 = 54 au separation from the star) and the crescent (at 0.″38 = 120 au) seem smoothly connected through a one-armed spiral-arm structure that has been found previously in scattered light. We propose a physical scenario with a planet orbiting at ∼0.″3 ≈ 100 au, where the one-armed spiral arm detected in polarized light traces the accretion stream feeding the protoplanet. The dynamical influence of the planet clears the gap between the ring and the crescent and triggers two vortices that trap millimeter-sized particles, namely, the crescent and the bright asymmetry seen in the ring. We conducted dedicated hydrodynamics simulations of a disk with an embedded planet, which results in similar spiral-arm morphologies as seen in our scattered-light images. At the position of the spiral wake and the crescent we also observe {sup 12}CO(3-2) and H{sup 12}CO{sup +} (4-3) excess line emission, likely tracing the increased scale-height in these disk regions.

  5. SPIRAL2 Week 2012 - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staley, F.; Jacquemet, M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Bertrand, P.; Tuske, O.; Caruso, A.; Leyge, J.F.; Perrot, L.; Di Giacomo, M.; Ausset, P.; Moscatello, M.H.; Savalle, A.; Rannou, B.; Lambert, M.; Petit, E.; Hulin, X.; Barre-Boscher, N.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.; Tecchio, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the 5. edition of the SPIRAL2 Week is to present and discuss the current status of the SPIRAL2 project in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. The program of the meeting will include presentations on scientific and technical developments related to the baseline project, experiments and theory. The main topics to be discussed at the conference are: -) physics and detectors at SPIRAL2, -) driver accelerators, -) production of radioactive ion beams (RIB), -) safety, -) buildings and infrastructure, -) RIB facilities worldwide, and -) SPIRAL2 preparatory phase. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  6. Algorithms for computing efficient, electric-propulsion, spiralling trajectories

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop techniques for rapidly designing many-revolution, electric-propulsion, spiralling trajectories, including the effects of shadowing, gravity harmonics, and...

  7. Spread of the spiraling white fly Aleurodicus dispersus (Homoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spread of the spiraling white fly Aleurodicus dispersus (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and its parasitoids Encarcia species (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) on horticultural plants in Northwest and Central Nigeria.

  8. Topological Signatures in the Electronic Structure of Graphene Spirals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avdoshenko, Stas.M.; Koskinen, Pekka; Sevincli, Haldun

    2013-01-01

    and graphene systems. Here, we introduce topologically distinct graphene forms - graphene spirals - and employ density-functional theory to investigate their geometric and electronic properties. We found that the spiral topology gives rise to an intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit splitting. Through a Hamiltonian...... constrained by space curvature, graphene spirals have topologically protected states due to time-reversal symmetry. In addition, we argue that the synthesis of such graphene spirals is feasible and can be achieved through advanced bottom-up experimental routes that we indicate in this work....

  9. Virtual bronchoscopy based on spiral CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Haubner, Michael; Krapichler, Christian; Schuhmann, Dietrich; Seemann, Mark; Fuerst, H.; Reiser, Maximilian

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: To improve the diagnosis of pathologic modified airways, a visualization system has been developed and tested based on the techniques of digital image analysis, synthesis of spiral CT and the visualization by methods of virtual reality. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with pathologic modifications of the airways (tumors, obstructions) were examined with Spiral-CT. The three-dimensional shape of the airways and the lung tissue is defined by a semiautomatic volume growing method and a following geometric surface reconstruction. This is the basis of a multidimensional display system which visualizes volumes, surfaces and computation results simultaneously. To enable the intuitive and immersive inspection of the airways a virtual reality system, consisting of two graphic engines, a head mounted display system, data gloves and specialized software was integrated. Results: In 20 cases the extension of the pathologic modification of the airways could be visualized with the virtual bronchoscopy. The user interacts with and manipulates the 3D model of the airways in an intuitive and immersive way. In contrast to previously proposed virtual bronchoscopy systems the described method permits truly interactive navigation and detailed exploration of anatomic structures. The system enables a user oriented and fast inspection of the volumetric image data. Conclusion: To support radiological diagnosis with additional information in an easy to use and fast way a virtual bronchoscopy system was developed. It enables the immersive and intuitive interaction with 3D Spiral CTs by truly 3D navigation within the airway system. The complex anatomy of the central tracheobronchial system could be clearly visualized. Peripheral bronchi are displayed up to 5th degree.

  10. Production and post acceleration scheme for spiral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibet, D.

    2001-01-01

    SPIRAL, the R.I.B. facility of GANIL uses heavy ion beams to produce radioactive atoms inside a thick target. Atoms are ionised in a compact permanent magnet ECR ion source. The compact cyclotron CIME accelerates the radioactive ions in an energy range from 1.7 to 25 MeV/u. The cyclotron acts as a mass separator with resolving power of 2500. Plastic scintillator and silicon detectors are used to tune the machine at a very low intensity. An overview of the facility, stable beam tests results and the R and D program will be presented. (authors)

  11. Controls and automation in the SPIRAL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bothner, U.; Boulot, A.; Maherault, J.; Martial, L.

    1999-01-01

    The control and automation team of the R and D of Accelerator-Exotic Beam Department has had in the framework of SPIRAL collaboration the following tasks: 1. automation of the resonator high frequency equipment of the CIME cyclotron; 2. automation of the vacuum equipment, i.e. the low energy line (TBE), the CIME cyclotron, the low energy line (BE); 3. automation of load safety for power supply; 4. for each of these tasks a circuitry file based on the SCHEMA software has been worked out. The programs required in the automation of load safety for power supply (STEP5, PROTOOL, DESIGNER 4.1) were developed and implemented for PC

  12. Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies star

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Keel, William C.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24 276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4 mag for the ugri passbands (estimating 0.3 mag of extinction in z band). We split the sample into ‘bulgy’ (early-type) and ‘discy’ (late-typ...

  13. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  14. Security and arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, E.A.; Morgan, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book attempts to clarify and define selected current issues and problems related to security and arms control from an international perspective. The chapters are organized under the following headings. Conflict and the international system, Nuclear deterrence, Conventional warfare, Subconventional conflict, Arms control and crisis management

  15. Biomimetic spiral-cylindrical scaffold based on hybrid chitosan/cellulose/nano-hydroxyapatite membrane for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Zuo, Yi; Zou, Qin; Wang, Huanan; Du, Jingjing; Li, Yubao; Yang, Xiaochao

    2013-11-27

    Natural bone is a complex material with well-designed architecture. To achieve successful bone integration and regeneration, the constituent and structure of bone-repairing scaffolds need to be functionalized synergistically based on biomimetics. In this study, a hybrid membrane composed of chitosan (CS), sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), and nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) was curled in a concentric manner to generate an anisotropic spiral-cylindrical scaffold, with compositional and structural properties mimicking natural bone. After optimization in terms of morphology, hydrophilicity, swelling and degradation pattern, the osteoblast cells seeded on the membrane of 60 wt% n-HA exhibited the highest cell viability and osteocalcin expression. In vivo osteogenesis assessment revealed that the spiral-cylindrical architecture played a dominant role in bone regeneration and osseointegration. Newly formed bone tissue grew through the longitudinal direction of the cylinder-shaped scaffold bridging both ends of the defect, bone marrow penetrated the entire scaffold and formed a medullary cavity in the center of the spiral cylinder. This study for the first time demonstrates that the spiral-cylindrical scaffold can promote complete infiltration of bone tissues in vivo, leading to successful osteointegration and functional reconstruction of bone defects. It suggests that the biomimetic spiral-cylindrical scaffold could be a promising candidate for bone regeneration applications.

  16. 2D array based on fermat spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, O.; Martín, C. J.; Godoy, G.; Ullate, L. G.

    2010-01-01

    The main challenge faced by 3D ultrasonic imaging with 2D array transducer is the large number of elements required to achieve an acceptable level of quality in the images. Therefore, the optimization of the array layout to reduce the number of active elements in the aperture has been a research topic in the last years. Nowadays, CMUT array technology has made viable the production of 2D arrays with larger flexibility on elements size, shape and position. This is opening new options in 2D array design, allowing to revise as viable alternatives others layouts that had been studied in the past, like circular and Archimedes spiral layout. In this work the problem of designing an imaging system array with a diameter of 60 λ and a limited number of elements using the Fermat spiral layout has been studied. This study has been done for two different numbers of electronic channels (N = 128 and N = 256). As summary, a general discussion of the results and the most interesting cases are presented.

  17. Spiral-shaped reactor for water disinfection

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane

    2016-04-20

    Chlorine-based processes are still widely used for water disinfection. The disinfection process for municipal water consumption is usually carried out in large tanks, specifically designed to verify several hydraulic and disinfection criteria. The hydrodynamic behavior of contact tanks of different shapes, each with an approximate total volume of 50,000 m3, was analyzed by solving turbulent momentum transport equations with a computational fluid dynamics code, namely ANSYS fluent. Numerical experiments of a tracer pulse were performed for each design to generate flow through curves and investigate species residence time distribution for different inlet flow rates, ranging from 3 to 12 m3 s−1. A new nature-inspired Conch tank design whose shape follows an Archimedean spiral was then developed. The spiral design is shown to strongly outperform the other tanks’ designs for all the selected plug flow criteria with an enhancement in efficiency, less short circuiting, and an order of magnitude improvement in mixing and dispersion. Moreover, following the intensification philosophy, after 50% reduction in its size, the new design retains its properties and still gives far better results than the classical shapes.

  18. Cambrian spiral-plated echinoderms from Gondwana reveal the earliest pentaradial body plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew B.; Zamora, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Echinoderms are unique among animal phyla in having a pentaradial body plan, and their fossil record provides critical data on how this novel organization came about by revealing intermediate stages. Here, we report a spiral-plated animal from the early Cambrian of Morocco that is the most primitive pentaradial echinoderm yet discovered. It is intermediate between helicoplacoids (a bizarre group of spiral-bodied echinoderms) and crown-group pentaradiate echinoderms. By filling an important gap, this fossil reveals the common pattern that underpins the body plans of the two major echinoderm clades (pelmatozoans and eleutherozoans), showing that differential growth played an important role in their divergence. It also adds to the striking disparity of novel body plans appearing in the Cambrian explosion. PMID:23804624

  19. Fabrication and characterization on width of spiral interdigitated electrodes based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelyn, P. Y. P.; Hashim, U.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Ruslinda, A. R.; Voon, C. H.; Ayub, R. M.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Liu, Wei-Wen; Kahar, S. M.; Huda, A. R. N.; Lee, H. Cheun

    2017-03-01

    Simple and inexpensive mask layout design on a transparency film were demonstrated using the conventional complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technique to produce interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) for biomedical biosensors applications. Lift-off techniques were implemented during photolithography process in order to pattern an electrode widths of 200µm, 300µm, 400µm and 500µm, respectively with a standardized 400µm gap spacing spiral IDEs. Due to the effect of the transparent mask, a fabrication of these spiral IDEs resulted in shrinkage of electrode width and increment of the gap spacing. Among these electrode sizes, the conductance of 300µm, 400µm and 500µm electrode width were successfully examined as compared to 200µm.

  20. Cambrian spiral-plated echinoderms from Gondwana reveal the earliest pentaradial body plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew B; Zamora, Samuel

    2013-08-22

    Echinoderms are unique among animal phyla in having a pentaradial body plan, and their fossil record provides critical data on how this novel organization came about by revealing intermediate stages. Here, we report a spiral-plated animal from the early Cambrian of Morocco that is the most primitive pentaradial echinoderm yet discovered. It is intermediate between helicoplacoids (a bizarre group of spiral-bodied echinoderms) and crown-group pentaradiate echinoderms. By filling an important gap, this fossil reveals the common pattern that underpins the body plans of the two major echinoderm clades (pelmatozoans and eleutherozoans), showing that differential growth played an important role in their divergence. It also adds to the striking disparity of novel body plans appearing in the Cambrian explosion.

  1. Entrainment and resonance of spiral waves in active media with periodically modulated excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, M.; Schrader, A.; Engel, H.

    1994-05-01

    We study frequency locking and resonance of spiral waves in an active medium subjected to periodic forcing with adjustable frequency. The experiments are carried out with a modified Belousov-Zhabotinsky system whose excitability is light-sensitive. In the meander regime of compound rotation we find entrainment bands if the sum of the two basic frequencies determining the dynamics of the spiral tip is a rational multiple of the modulation frequency. We observe resonance if the ratio between the forcing period and the mean excitation period outside of the pattern is equal to one, two, etc. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with data of numerical simulations obtained using a two-variable Oregonator scheme. This model takes account of an additional flow of the inhibitor bromide produced photochemically.

  2. A phenomenological theory for polarization flop in spiral multiferroic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    driven polarization flop in TbMnO3. The Néel wall-like magnetic structure in spiral multiferroics induces a space-dependent internal magnetic field which exerts a torque on spins to rotate bc-spiral to abspiral. The external magnetic field is argued ...

  3. A phenomenological theory for polarization flop in spiral multiferroic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a space-dependent internal magnetic field which exerts a torque on spins to rotate bc-spiral to ab- spiral. The external ... Fv; 75.85.+t. Electric control of magnetization and magnetic control of polarization have been long ... divergence of magnetization, an internal field is induced which has important physical. Figure 1. ab ...

  4. Up the Down Spiral with English: Guidelines, Project Insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catholic Board of Education, Diocese of Cleveland, OH.

    This curriculum guide presents the philosophy, objectives, and processes which unify a student-centered English program based on Jerome Bruner's concept of the spiral curriculum. To illustrate the spiraling of the learning process (i.e., engagement, perception, interpretation, evaluation, and personal integration), the theme of "hero" is traced…

  5. The cold interstellar medium - An HI view of spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancisi, R; Bender, R; Davies, RL

    1996-01-01

    An HI view of spiral galaxies is presented. In the first part the standard picture of isolated, normal spiral galaxies is briefly reviewed. In the second part attention is drawn to all those phenomena, such as tidal interactions, accretion and mergers, that depend on the galaxy environment and seem

  6. Topographic Beta Spiral and Onshore Intrusion of the Kuroshio Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, De-Zhou; Huang, Rui Xin; Yin, Bao-shu; Feng, Xing-Ru; Chen, Hai-ying; Qi, Ji-Feng; Xu, Ling-jing; Shi, Yun-long; Cui, Xuan; Gao, Guan-Dong; Benthuysen, Jessica A.

    2018-01-01

    The Kuroshio intrusion plays a vitally important role in carrying nutrients to marginal seas. However, the key mechanism leading to the Kuroshio intrusion remains unclear. In this study we postulate a mechanism: when the Kuroshio runs onto steep topography northeast of Taiwan, the strong inertia gives rise to upwelling over topography, leading to a left-hand spiral in the stratified ocean. This is called the topographic beta spiral, which is a major player regulating the Kuroshio intrusion; this spiral can be inferred from hydrographic surveys. In the world oceans, the topographic beta spirals can be induced by upwelling generated by strong currents running onto steep topography. This is a vital mechanism regulating onshore intruding flow and the cross-shelf transport of energy and nutrients from the Kuroshio Current to the East China Sea. This topographic beta spiral reveals a long-term missing link between the oceanic general circulation theory and shelf dynamic theory.

  7. The Effects of Spiral Taping Treatment on Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jae-Ok

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate the effects of spiral taping treatment on low back pain. Methods : 420 low back pain patients were treated with spiral taping or spiral taping plus herbal medicine, and no other treatments such as acupuncture, herbal acupuncture, and chiropractic therapy were added. We evaluated the improvement by physical examination and pain. Results : 364 patients felt no pain or inconvenience of daily life and 43 patients showed improvement of pain or symptom after 1 month of treatment. 13 patients showed same pain with before treatment. Conclusions : These results suggest spiral taping treatments contribute to the improvement of low back pain. Further study is needed for the confirmation of this effect of spiral taping treatments on low back pain.

  8. Imaging of head and neck tumors -- methods: CT, spiral-CT, multislice-spiral-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Ulrich E-mail: baum@idr.med.uni-erlangen.de; Greess, Holger; Lell, Michael; Noemayr, Anton; Lenz, Martin

    2000-03-01

    Spiral-CT is standard for imaging neck tumors. In correspondence with other groups we routinely use spiral-CT with thin slices (3 mm), a pitch of 1.3-1.5 and an overlapping reconstruction increment (2-3 mm). In patients with dental fillings a short additional spiral parallel to the corpus of the mandible reduces artifacts behind the dental arches and improves the diagnostic value of CT. For the assessment of the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the palate and paranasal sinuses an additional examination in the coronal plane is helpful. Secondary coronal reconstructions of axial scans are helpful in the evaluation of the crossing of the midline by small tumors of the tongue base or palate. For an optimal vascular or tissue contrast a sufficient volume of contrast medium and a start delay greater than 70-80 s are necessary. In our opinion the best results can be achieved with a volume of 150 ml, a flow of 2.5 ml/s and a start delay of 80 s. Dynamic enhanced CT is only necessary in some special cases. There is clear indication for dynamic enhanced CT where a glomus tumor is suspected. Additional functional CT imaging during i-phonation and/or Valsalva's maneuver are of great importance to prove vocal cords mobility. Therefore, imaging during i-phonation is an elemental part of every thorough examination of the hypopharynx and larynx region. Multislice-spiral-CT allows almost isotropic imaging of the head and neck region and improves the assessment of tumor spread and lymph node metastases in arbitrary oblique planes. Thin structures (the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the hard palate) as well as the floor of the mouth can be evaluated sufficiently with multiplanar reformations. Usually, additional coronal scanning is not necessary with multislice-spiral-CT. Multislice-spiral-CT is especially advantageous in defining the critical relationships of tumor and lymph node metastases and for functional imaging of the hypopharynx and larynx not only in the

  9. Imaging of head and neck tumors -- methods: CT, spiral-CT, multislice-spiral-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Ulrich; Greess, Holger; Lell, Michael; Noemayr, Anton; Lenz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Spiral-CT is standard for imaging neck tumors. In correspondence with other groups we routinely use spiral-CT with thin slices (3 mm), a pitch of 1.3-1.5 and an overlapping reconstruction increment (2-3 mm). In patients with dental fillings a short additional spiral parallel to the corpus of the mandible reduces artifacts behind the dental arches and improves the diagnostic value of CT. For the assessment of the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the palate and paranasal sinuses an additional examination in the coronal plane is helpful. Secondary coronal reconstructions of axial scans are helpful in the evaluation of the crossing of the midline by small tumors of the tongue base or palate. For an optimal vascular or tissue contrast a sufficient volume of contrast medium and a start delay greater than 70-80 s are necessary. In our opinion the best results can be achieved with a volume of 150 ml, a flow of 2.5 ml/s and a start delay of 80 s. Dynamic enhanced CT is only necessary in some special cases. There is clear indication for dynamic enhanced CT where a glomus tumor is suspected. Additional functional CT imaging during i-phonation and/or Valsalva's maneuver are of great importance to prove vocal cords mobility. Therefore, imaging during i-phonation is an elemental part of every thorough examination of the hypopharynx and larynx region. Multislice-spiral-CT allows almost isotropic imaging of the head and neck region and improves the assessment of tumor spread and lymph node metastases in arbitrary oblique planes. Thin structures (the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the hard palate) as well as the floor of the mouth can be evaluated sufficiently with multiplanar reformations. Usually, additional coronal scanning is not necessary with multislice-spiral-CT. Multislice-spiral-CT is especially advantageous in defining the critical relationships of tumor and lymph node metastases and for functional imaging of the hypopharynx and larynx not only in the

  10. MVACS Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, R.; Slostad, J.; Bon, B.; Braun, D.; Brill, R.; Buck, C.; Fleischner, R.; Haldeman, A.; Herman, J.; Hertzel, M.; hide

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) Robotic Arm is to support to the other MVACS science instruments by digging trenches in the Martian soil; acquiring and dumping soil samples into the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA); positioning the Soil Temperature Probe (STP) in the soil: positioning the Robotic Arm Air Temperature Sensor (RAATS) at various heights above the surface, and positioning the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) for taking images of the surface, trench, soil samples, magnetic targets and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace.

  11. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moradi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness.

  12. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moradi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness.

  13. Understanding EROS2 observations toward the spiral arms within a classical Galactic model framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniez, M.; Sajadian, S.; Karami, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ansari, R.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: EROS (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) has searched for microlensing toward four directions in the Galactic plane away from the Galactic center. The interpretation of the catalog optical depth is complicated by the spread of the source distance distribution. We compare the EROS microlensing observations with Galactic models (including the Besançon model), tuned to fit the EROS source catalogs, and take into account all observational data such as the microlensing optical depth, the Einstein crossing durations, and the color and magnitude distributions of the catalogued stars. Methods: We simulated EROS-like source catalogs using the HIgh-Precision PARallax COllecting Satellite (Hipparcos) database, the Galactic mass distribution, and an interstellar extinction table. Taking into account the EROS star detection efficiency, we were able to produce simulated color-magnitude diagrams that fit the observed diagrams. This allows us to estimate average microlensing optical depths and event durations that are directly comparable with the measured values. Results: Both the Besançon model and our Galactic model allow us to fully understand the EROS color-magnitude data. The average optical depths and mean event durations calculated from these models are in reasonable agreement with the observations. Varying the Galactic structure parameters through simulation, we were also able to deduce contraints on the kinematics of the disk, the disk stellar mass function (at a few kpc distance from the Sun), and the maximum contribution of a thick disk of compact objects in the Galactic plane (Mthickstatistics are needed to provide competitive constraints. Conclusions: Our simulation gives a better understanding of the lens and source spatial distributions in the microlensing events. The goodness of a global fit taking into account all the observables (from the color-magnitude diagrams and microlensing observations) shows the validity of the Galactic models. Our tests with the parameters excursions show the unique sensitivity of the microlensing data to the kinematical parameters and stellar initial mass function. http://www.lal.in2p3.fr/recherche/eros

  14. Lightweight Small Arms Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spiegel, Kori; Shipley, Paul

    2006-01-01

    .... The Lightweight Small Arms Technologies program was established to address this critical issue. The goals of the program prioritize weight reduction over any other characteristic, while balancing the requirements of lethality, reliability, and cost...

  15. Perspectives on Arms Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wheeler, Michael O; Smith, James M; Segell, Glen M

    2004-01-01

    ...). For the past three years INSS has organized, sponsored, and/or participated in panels addressing arms control and strategic security issues at annual meetings of the International Studies Association (ISA...

  16. Arms Trafficking and Colombia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cragin, Kim; Hoffman, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    ... to traditional definitions of a security threat. For this analysis, the term "small arms" refers to man-portable personal and military weapons, ranging from handguns to assault rifles to surface-to-air missiles (SAMs...

  17. Electromagnetic, flow and thermal study of a miniature planar spiral transformer with planar, spiral windings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. DUMITRU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mathematical modeling and numerical simulation results for a miniature, planar, spiral transformer (MPST fabricated in micro-electromechanical MEMS technology. When the MPST is magnetic nanofluid cored, magnetization body forces occur, entraining it into a complex flow. This particular MPST design is then compared with other competing solutions concerning the lumped (circuit parameters. Finally, the heat transfer problem is solved for different electromagnetic working conditions to assess the thermal loads inside the MPST.

  18. Spiral model pilot project information model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was an evaluation of the Spiral Model (SM) development approach to allow NASA Marshall to develop an experience base of that software management methodology. A discussion is presented of the Information Model (IM) that was used as part of the SM methodology. A key concept of the SM is the establishment of an IM to be used by management to track the progress of a project. The IM is the set of metrics that is to be measured and reported throughout the life of the project. These metrics measure both the product and the process to ensure the quality of the final delivery item and to ensure the project met programmatic guidelines. The beauty of the SM, along with the IM, is the ability to measure not only the correctness of the specification and implementation of the requirements but to also obtain a measure of customer satisfaction.

  19. Processing fine stainless-steel slag using spiral concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Eric R; Klima, Mark S

    2008-04-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of spiral concentration to process a fine (-1 mm) stainless-steel slag was evaluated. Specifically, testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a high metal content stainless steel product and a low metal content aggregate product. This involved investigating a key operating variable for both five-and seven-turn spiral concentrators. The raw slag and spiral products were characterized to determine their respective size and metal distributions. Separation testing was carried out using the two full-scale spiral concentrators to evaluate the effects of feed solids concentration on spiral performance at solids feed rates ranging from 15 to 30 kg/min. The results indicated that under certain conditions, a high-quality metal fraction could be produced. For example, using the five-turn spiral, a product containing 95% metal was obtained at a low metal recovery. Both spirals were ineffective at concentrating the aggregate fraction. Overall, the feed solids concentration did not significantly affect the quality or recoveries of the products, particularly for feed solids concentrations less than 35% by weight. In order to improve the metal recoveries and to produce a low-metal aggregate material, reprocessing of the product streams and/or additional liberation of the raw slag would be required.

  20. Spiral Antenna-Coupled Microbridge Structures for THz Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Jun; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Yadong

    2017-12-01

    Bolometer sensor is a good candidate for THz imaging due to its compact system, low cost, and wideband operation. Based on infrared microbolometer structures, two kinds of antenna-coupled microbridge structures are proposed with different spiral antennas: spiral antenna on support layer and spiral antenna with extended legs. Aiming at applications in detection and imaging, simulations are carried out mainly for optimized absorption at 2.52 THz, which is the radiation frequency of far-infrared CO 2 lasers. The effects of rotation angle, line width, and spacing of the spiral antenna on THz wave absorption of microbridge structures are discussed. Spiral antenna, with extended legs, is a good solution for high absorption rate at low absorption frequency and can be used as electrode lead simultaneously for simplified manufacturing process. A spiral antenna-coupled microbridge structure with an absorption rate of more than 75% at 2.52 THz is achieved by optimizing the structure parameters. This research demonstrates the use of different spiral antennas for enhanced and tunable THz absorption of microbridge structures and provides an effective way to fabricate THz microbolometer detectors with great potential in the application of real-time THz imaging.

  1. Compressed sensing reconstruction of cardiac cine MRI using golden angle spiral trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolouee, Azar; Alirezaie, Javad; Babyn, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In dynamic cardiac cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), the spatiotemporal resolution is limited by the low imaging speed. Compressed sensing (CS) theory has been applied to improve the imaging speed and thus the spatiotemporal resolution. The purpose of this paper is to improve CS reconstruction of under sampled data by exploiting spatiotemporal sparsity and efficient spiral trajectories. We extend k-t sparse algorithm to spiral trajectories to achieve high spatio temporal resolutions in cardiac cine imaging. We have exploited spatiotemporal sparsity of cardiac cine MRI by applying a 2D+time wavelet-Fourier transform. For efficient coverage of k-space, we have used a modified version of multi shot (interleaved) spirals trajectories. In order to reduce incoherent aliasing artifact, we use different random undersampling pattern for each temporal frame. Finally, we have used nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) algorithm to reconstruct the image from the non-uniformly acquired samples. The proposed approach was tested in simulated and cardiac cine MRI data. Results show that higher acceleration factors with improved image quality can be obtained with the proposed approach in comparison to the existing state-of-the-art method. The flexibility of the introduced method should allow it to be used not only for the challenging case of cardiac imaging, but also for other patient motion where the patient moves or breathes during acquisition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Establishment of an orthotopic lung cancer model in nude mice and its evaluation by spiral CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Liu, Jun; Guan, Yubao; Li, Huiling; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; He, Jianxing

    2012-04-01

    To establish a simple and highly efficient orthotopic animal model of lung cancer cell line A549 and evaluate the growth pattern of intrathoracic tumors by spiral CT. A549 cells (5×10(6) mL(-1)) were suspended and inoculated into the right lung of BALB/c nude mice via intrathoracic injection. Nude mice were scanned three times each week by spiral CT after inoculation of lung cancer cell line A549. The survival time and body weight of nude mice as well as tumor invasion and metastasis were examined. Tissue was collected for subsequent histological assay after autopsia of mice. The tumor-forming rate of the orthotopic lung cancer model was 90%. The median survival time was 30.7 (range, 20-41) days. The incidence of tumor metastasis was 100%. The mean tumor diameter and the average CT value gradually increased in a time-dependent manner. The method of establishing the orthotopic lung cancer model through transplanting A549 cells into the lung of nude mice is simple and highly successful. Spiral CT can be used to evaluate intrathoracic tumor growth in nude mice vividly and dynamically.

  3. Rossby vortices, spiral structures, solitons astrophysics and plasma physics in shallow water experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nezlin, Mikhail V

    1993-01-01

    This book can be looked upon in more ways than one. On the one hand, it describes strikingly interesting and lucid hydrodynamic experiments done in the style of the "good old days" when the physicist needed little more than a piece of string and some sealing wax. On the other hand, it demonstrates how a profound physical analogy can help to get a synoptic view on a broad range of nonlinear phenomena involving self-organization of vortical structures in planetary atmo­ spheres and oceans, in galaxies and in plasmas. In particular, this approach has elucidated the nature and the mechanism of such grand phenomena as the Great of galaxies. A number of our Red Spot vortex on Jupiter and the spiral arms predictions concerning the dynamics of spiral galaxies are now being confirmed by astronomical observations stimulated by our experiments. This book is based on the material most of which was accumulated during 1981-88 in close cooperation with our colleagues, experimenters from the Plasma Physics Department of the...

  4. Energy from Active Galactic Nuclei and the Effects on Host Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Amanda

    I have investigated the energy output of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in order to understand how these objects evolve and the impact they may have on host galaxies. First, I looked at a sample of 96 AGN at redshifts z 2, 3, and 4 which have imaging and thus luminosity measurements in the griz and JHK observed wavebands. For these galaxies, I have co-epochal data across those bands which accounted for variability in AGN luminosity. I used the luminosity measurements in the five bands to construct spectral energy distributions (SED) in the emitted optical-UV bands for each AGN. I compared the SED to assumptions previously made about quasars and looked for correlations between SED and other AGN and galaxy properties. Second, I used spectra of the broad line region (BLR) of Type 1 AGN to estimate the mass of the central supermassive black hole (MBH). I found a sample of Type 1 AGN that reside in spiral galaxies in order to explore the relationship between MBH and pitch angle (φ), a measurement of how tightly wound the spiral arms are. Type 1 AGN offer a method to estimate MBH at higher redshift than previous studies of the M BH-φ relation. I was able to look at the evolution in the MBH-φ relation which has implications for galaxy formation as well as AGN feedback.

  5. A Software Development Simulation Model of a Spiral Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Malone, Linda

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for simulation models of software development processes other than the waterfall because processes such as spiral development are becoming more and more popular. The use of a spiral process can make the inherently difficult job of cost and schedule estimation even more challenging due to its evolutionary nature, but this allows for a more flexible process that can better meet customers' needs. This paper will present a discrete event simulation model of spiral development that can be used to analyze cost and schedule effects of using such a process in comparison to a waterfall process.

  6. Fabrication techniques of X-ray spiral zone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Nan; Zhu Xiaoli; Li Hailiang; Xie Changqing

    2010-01-01

    The techniques to make X-ray spiral zone plates using electron beam and X-ray lithography were studied. A master mask was fabricated on polyimide membrane by E-beam lithography and micro-electroplating. Spiral zone plates were efficiently replicated by X-ray lithography and micro-electroplating. By combining the techniques, spiral zone plates at 1 keV were successfully fabricate. With an outermost zone width of the 200 nm, and the gold absorbers thickness of 700 nm, the high quality zone plates can be used for X-ray phase contrast microscopy.(authors)

  7. Comments on H. Arp 'The persistent problem of spiral galaxies'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1987-04-01

    In his paper 'The persistent problem of Spiral Galaxies' H. Arp criticises the standard theory of spiral galaxies and demonstrates that introduction of plasma theory is necessary in order to understand the structure of spiral galaxies. In the present paper arguments are given in support of Arp's theory and suggestions are made how Arp's ideas should be developed. An important result of Arp's new approach is that there is no convincing argument for the belief that there is a 'missing mass'. This is important from a cosmological point of view. (author)

  8. Harmonic oscillator in an elastic medium with a spiral dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, A. V. D. M.; Bakke, K.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the behaviour of a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator in an elastic medium that possesses a spiral dislocation (an edge dislocation). We show that the Schrödinger equation for harmonic oscillator in the presence of a spiral dislocation can be solved analytically. Further, we discuss the effects of this topological defect on the confinement to a hard-wall confining potential. In both cases, we analyse if the effects of the topology of the spiral dislocation gives rise to an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect for bound states.

  9. Frequency wavenumber design of spiral macro fiber composite directional transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Matteo; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    This work is focused on design and testing of a novel class of transducers for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), able to perform directional interrogation of plate-like structures. These transducers leverage guided waves (GWs), and in particular Lamb waves, that have emerged as a very prominent option for assessing the state of a structure during operation. GW-SHM approaches greatly benefit from the use of transducers with controllable directional characteristics, so that selective scanning of a surface can be performed to locate damage, impacts, or cracks. In the concepts that we propose, continuous beam steering and directional actuation are achieved through proper selection of the excitation frequency. The design procedure takes advantage of the wavenumber representation of the device, and formulates the problem using a Fourier-based approach. The active layer of the transducer is made of piezoelectric fibers embedded into an epoxy matrix, allowing the device to be flexible, and thus suitable for application on non{ at surfaces. Proper shaping of the electrodes pattern through a compensation function allows taking into account the anisotropy level introduced by the active layer. The resulting spiral frequency steerable acoustic actuator is a configuration that features (i) enhanced performance, (ii) reduced complexity, and (iii) reduced hardware requirements of such devices.

  10. Electromagnetic flat sheet forming by spiral type actuator coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, S.; Aleem, M. A.; Sarwar, M. N.; Zillohu, A. U.; Awan, M. S.; Haider, A.; Ahmad, Z.; Akhtar, S.; Farooque, M.

    2016-08-01

    Focus of present work is to develop a setup for high strain rate electromagnetic forming of thin aluminum sheets (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) and optimization of forming parameters. Flat spiral coil of 99.9% pure Cu strip (2.5x8.0 mm) with self-inductance 11 μH, 13 no. of turns and resultant outer diameter of 130mm has been fabricated and was coupled to a capacitor bank of energy, voltage and capacitance of 9 kJ, 900 V and 22.8 mF, respectively. To optimize the coil design, a commercially available software FEMM-4.2 was used to simulate the electromagnetic field profile generated by the coils of different pitch but same number of turns. Results of electromagnetic field intensity proposed by simulation agree in close proximity with those of theoretical as well as experimental data. The calculation of electromagnetic force and magnetic couplings between the coil and metal sheet are made. Forming parameters were optimized for different sheet thicknesses. Electromagnetic field intensity's profile plays a principal role in forming of typical shapes and patterns in sheets.

  11. Epic and ARM : user's guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Walters (Pum)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe give a brief introduction to Epic and to ARM (they are discussed in more detail elsewhere). We show how to use the Epic compiler and how to execute ARM code. Then we describe ARM's API (application programmer's interface) which allows ARM to be used as a plug-in library. We describe

  12. Software trends for both the GANIL and spiral control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.; Lecorche, E.

    1999-01-01

    The Ganil facility has been running with a new control system since 1993. Many improvements have been done since that time to bring new capabilities to the system. So, in February 1996, when the Spiral control system was designed, it was mainly considered as an extension of the Ganil control system. This paper briefly recalls the basic architecture of the whole control system and the main choices upon which it relies. Then it presents the new software trends, to show how the Spiral control system has been integrated alongside the existing one. The last part describe the new developments and the most significant functionalities it brings as seen from the operator point of view, with some emphasis about the application programs for beam tuning. Indeed, these new programs have to be provided both for the spiral tuning with exotic ions beams and for the coupling of the Spiral and older Ganil facilities. (authors)

  13. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  14. Effects of semiclassical spiral fluctuations on hole dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, I. J.; Manuel, L. O.; Trumper, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a single hole coupled to the spiral fluctuations related to the magnetic ground states of the antiferromagnetic J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model on a square lattice. Using exact diagonalization on finite size clusters and the self-consistent Born approximation in the thermodynamic limit, we find, as a general feature, a strong reduction of the quasiparticle weight along the spiral phases of the magnetic phase diagram. For an important region of the Brillouin zone the hole spectral functions are completely incoherent, whereas at low energies the spectral weight is redistributed on several irregular peaks. We find a characteristic value of the spiral pitch Q=(0.7,0.7)π, for which the available phase space for hole scattering is maximum. We argue that this behavior is due to the nontrivial interference of the magnon-assisted and the free-hopping mechanism for hole motion, characteristic of a hole coupled to semiclassical spiral fluctuations.

  15. Measurement and structure of spiral wave response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Hans; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2017-09-01

    The rotating spiral waves that emerge in diverse natural and man-made systems typically exhibit a particle-like behaviour since their adjoint critical eigenmodes (response functions) are often seen to be localised around the spiral core. We present a simple method to numerically compute response functions for circular-core and meandering spirals by recording their drift response to many elementary perturbations. Although our method is computationally more expensive than solving the adjoint system, our technique is fully parallellisable, does not suffer from memory limitations and can be applied to experiments. For a cardiac tissue model with the linear spiral core, we find that the response functions are localised near the turning points of the trajectory.

  16. Data Fusion Tool for Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Antolick, Lance J.; Branning, Jeremy S.; Thomas, Josiah

    2014-01-01

    Tests were performed on two spiral bevel gear sets in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig to simulate the fielded failures of spiral bevel gears installed in a helicopter. Gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed on two or more gear or pinion teeth. During testing, gear health monitoring data was collected with two different health monitoring systems. Operational parameters were measured with a third data acquisition system. Tooth damage progression was documented with photographs taken at inspection intervals throughout the test. A software tool was developed for fusing the operational data and the vibration based gear condition indicator (CI) data collected from the two health monitoring systems. Results of this study illustrate the benefits of combining the data from all three systems to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears. The tool also enabled evaluation of the effectiveness of each CI with respect to operational conditions and fault mode.

  17. Relative frequencies of supernovae versus properties of spiral hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Nazaryan, T. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Petrosian, A. R.; Aramyan, L. S.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; de Lapparent, V.; Bertin, E.; Gomes, J. M.; Turatto, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present an analysis of SNe number ratios in spiral galaxies with different morphological subtypes, luminosities, sSFR, and metallicities, to provide important information about the physical properties of the progenitor populations.

  18. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Pinion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ural, Ani

    2003-01-01

    .... To obtain a more detailed understanding of the contact between a cracked pinion tooth in mesh with an uncracked gear tooth, three-dimensional contact analyses were performed on a spiral bevel gear...

  19. Robotic Arm Unwrapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken shortly after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the surface of Mars, shows the spacecraft's robotic arm in its stowed configuration, with its biobarrier successfully unpeeled. The 'elbow' of the arm can be seen at the top center of the picture, and the biobarrier is the shiny film seen to the left of the arm. The biobarrier is an extra precautionary measure for protecting Mars from contamination with any bacteria from Earth. While the whole spacecraft was decontaminated through cleaning, filters and heat, the robotic arm was given additional protection because it is the only spacecraft part that will directly touch the ice below the surface of Mars. Before the arm was heated, it was sealed in the biobarrier, which is made of a trademarked film called Tedlar that holds up to baking like a turkey-basting bag. This ensures that any new bacterial spores that might have appeared during the final steps before launch and during the journey to Mars will not contact the robotic arm. After Phoenix landed, springs were used to pop back the barrier, giving it room to deploy. The base of the lander's Meteorological Station can be seen in this picture on the upper left. Because only the base of the station is showing, this image tells engineers that the instrument deployed successfully. The image was taken on landing day, May 25, 2008, by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. PHENIX Muon Arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akikawa, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Archuleta, J.B.; Archuleta, J.R.; Armendariz, R.; Armijo, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baldisseri, A.; Barker, A.B.; Barnes, P.D.; Bassalleck, B.; Batsouli, S.; Behrendt, J.; Bellaiche, F.G.; Bland, A.W.; Bobrek, M.; Boissevain, J.G.; Borel, H.; Brooks, M.L.; Brown, A.W.; Brown, D.S.; Bruner, N.; Cafferty, M.M.; Carey, T.A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chavez, L.L.; Chollet, S.; Choudhury, R.K.; Chung, M.S.; Cianciolo, V.; Clark, D.J.; Cobigo, Y.; Dabrowski, C.M.; Debraine, A.; DeMoss, J.; Dinesh, B.V.; Drachenberg, J.L.; Drapier, O.; Echave, M.A.; Efremenko, Y.V.; En'yo, H.; Fields, D.E.; Fleuret, F.; Fried, J.; Fujisawa, E.; Funahashi, H.; Gadrat, S.; Gastaldi, F.; Gee, T.F.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Hance, R.H.; Hart, G.W.; Hayashi, N.; Held, S.; Hicks, J.S.; Hill, J.C.; Hoade, R.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hunter, C.T.; Hurst, D.E.; Ichihara, T.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, L.D.L. Davis; Isenhower, L.D.L. Donald; Ishihara, M.; Jang, W.Y.; Johnson, J.; Jouan, D.; Kamihara, N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kang, J.H.; Kapoor, S.S.; Kim, D.J.; Kim, D.-W.; Kim, G.-B.; Kinnison, W.W.; Klinksiek, S.; Kluberg, L.; Kobayashi, H.; Koehler, D.; Kotchenda, L.; Kuberg, C.H.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M.J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G.S.; LaBounty, J.J.; Lajoie, J.G.; Lee, D.M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M.J.; Li, Z.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Lockner, E.; Lopez, J.D.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, X.B.; McCain, M.C.; McGaughey, P.L.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R.E.; Mohanty, A.K.; Montoya, B.C.; Moss, J.M.; Murata, J.; Murray, M.M.; Nagle, J.L.; Nakada, Y.; Newby, J.; Obenshain, F.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S.F.; Plasil, F.; Pope, K.; Qualls, J.M.; Rao, G.; Read, K.F.; Robinson, S.H.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosnet, P.; Roth, R.; Saito, N.; Sakuma, T.; Sandhoff, W.F.; Sanfratello, L.; Sato, H.D.; Savino, R.; Sekimoto, M.; Shaw, M.R.; Shibata, T.-A.; Sim, K.S.; Skank, H.D.; Smith, D.E.; Smith, G.D.; Sondheim, W.E.; Sorensen, S.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P.W.; Steffens, S.; Stein, E.M.; Stepanov, M.; Stokes, W.; Sugioka, M.; Sun, Z.; Taketani, A.; Taniguchi, E.; Tepe, J.D.; Thornton, G.W.; Tian, W.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R.S.; Tradeski, J.; Vassent, M.; Velissaris, C.; Villatte, L.; Wan, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Watkins, L.C.; Whitus, B.R.; Williams, C.; Willis, P.S.; Wong-Swanson, B.G.; Yang, Y.; Yoneyama, S.; Young, G.R.; Zhou, S.

    2003-01-01

    The PHENIX Muon Arms detect muons at rapidities of |y|=(1.2-2.4) with full azimuthal acceptance. Each muon arm must track and identify muons and provide good rejection of pions and kaons (∼10 -3 ). In order to accomplish this we employ a radial field magnetic spectrometer with precision tracking (Muon Tracker) followed by a stack of absorber/low resolution tracking layers (Muon Identifier). The design, construction, testing and expected run parameters of both the muon tracker and the muon identifier are described

  1. Dosimetry in dental radiology. Dentascan spiral CT versus panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, N.; Stecco, A.; Zatelli, G.

    1999-01-01

    The study compares the doses absorbed by the dentomaxillary area in spiral CT and panoramic examinations. The dose measurements demonstrate that patients receive smaller doses with panoramic radiography than with spiral CT with Dentascan. After following for some variations from instrumental differences, they are in substantial agreement with literature data. Further investigations are needed considering the radiobiological risk related to the growing spread of Dentascan examinations [it

  2. Scintigraphic diagnosis of spiral fracture in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein-Foucher, C.; Venel, H.; Lecouffe, P.; Ythier, H.; Legghe, R.; Marchandise, X.

    1988-01-01

    8 cases of unsuspected bone fracture in children, identified at bone scan are reported. Common features were the children's young age (1 to 3 years), the absence of clinical suspicion, the initially normal X-rays, the fracture type (spiral fracture of the tibia undisplaced), and the uniform appearance of the bone scan. These data confim the value of bone scan in limping children and suggest that spiral fracture of the tibia is a frequent and underdiagnosed condition in children [fr

  3. Lung studies with spiral CT. pitch 1 versus pitch 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoni Galloni, S.; Miceli, M.; Lipparino, M.; Burzi, M.; Gigli, F.; Rossi, M.S.; Santoli, G.; Guidarelli, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Spiral CT, the pitch is the ratio of the distance to tabletop travels per 360 degrees rotation to nominal slice width, expressed in mm. Performing Spiral CT examination with pitch 2 allows to reduce examination time, exposure and contrast dose, and X-ray tube overload. The authors investigated the yield of pitch 2 in lung parenchyma studies, particular relative to diagnostic image quality [it

  4. The accelerated ISOL technique and the SPIRAL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    2001-01-01

    The accelerated ISOL technique is presented as an introduction to the present status of the SPIRAL facility. SPIRAL is based on the very high intensity light and heavy ion beams available at GANIL. The facility will deliver radioactive beams with energies in the range between 1.7 A and 25 A MeV. The presently target-ion source production system, as well the new developments undertaken by the target ion-source group at GANIL are presented. (authors)

  5. Spiralizations and tropisms in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, F; Piconese, S

    2001-12-01

    When Arabidopsis seedlings are grown on a hard-agar plate, their primary roots show characteristic spiralling movements, apparent as waves, coils and torsions, together with a slanting toward the right-hand side. All these movements are believed to be the result of three different processes acting on the roots: circumnutation, positive gravitropism and negative thigmotropism. The basic movement of the roots is described as that of a growing right-handed helix, which, because of the root tip hitting the agar plate, is continuously switched from the right-hand to the left-hand of the growth direction, and vice versa. This movement also produces a slanting root-growth direction toward the right-hand because of the incomplete waves made by the right-handed root to the left-hand. By contrast, the torsions seen in the coils and waves are interpreted as artefacts that form as an adaptation of the three-dimensional root helix to the flat two-dimensional agar surface.

  6. Noncontrast peripheral MRA with spiral echo train imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Samuel W; Mugler, John P; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Norton, Patrick T; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-03-01

    To develop a spin echo train sequence with spiral readout gradients with improved artery-vein contrast for noncontrast angiography. Venous T2 becomes shorter as the echo spacing is increased in echo train sequences, improving contrast. Spiral acquisitions, due to their data collection efficiency, facilitate long echo spacings without increasing scan times. Bloch equation simulations were performed to determine optimal sequence parameters, and the sequence was applied in five volunteers. In two volunteers, the sequence was performed with a range of echo times and echo spacings to compare with the theoretical contrast behavior. A Cartesian version of the sequence was used to compare contrast appearance with the spiral sequence. Additionally, spiral parallel imaging was optionally used to improve image resolution. In vivo, artery-vein contrast properties followed the general shape predicted by simulations, and good results were obtained in all stations. Compared with a Cartesian implementation, the spiral sequence had superior artery-vein contrast, better spatial resolution (1.2 mm(2) versus 1.5 mm(2) ), and was acquired in less time (1.4 min versus 7.5 min). The spiral spin echo train sequence can be used for flow-independent angiography to generate three-dimensional angiograms of the periphery quickly and without the use of contrast agents. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Improved MRI thermometry with multiple-echo spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Michael; Butts Pauly, Kim

    2016-09-01

    Low-bandwidth PRF shift thermometry is used to guide HIFU ablation treatments. Low sampling bandwidth is needed for high signal-to-noise ratio with short acquisition times, but can lead to off-resonance artifacts. In this work, improved multiple-echo thermometry is presented that allows for high bandwidth and reduced artifacts. It is also demonstrated with spiral sampling, to improve the trade-off between resolution, speed, and measurement precision. Four multiple-echo thermometry sequences were tested in vivo, one using two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) sampling and three using spirals. The spiral sequences were individually optimized for resolution, for speed, and for precision. Multifrequency reconstruction was used to correct for off-resonance spiral artifacts. Additionally, two different multiecho temperature reconstructions were compared. Weighted combination of per-echo phase differences gave significantly better precision than least squares off-resonance estimation. Multiple-echo 2DFT sequence obtained precision similar to single-echo 2DFT, while greatly increasing sampling bandwidth. The multiecho spiral acquisitions achieved 2× better resolution, 2.9× better uncertainty, or 3.4× faster acquisition time, without negatively impacting the other two design parameters as compared to single-echo 2DFT. Multiecho spiral thermometry greatly improves the capabilities of temperature monitoring, and could improve transcranial treatment monitoring capabilities. Magn Reson Med 76:747-756, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Spiral instabilities in media supporting complex oscillations under periodic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qingyu; Li, Jun; Zhang, Kailong; Epstein, Irving R.

    2009-09-01

    The periodically forced Brusselator model displays temporal mixed-mode and quasiperiodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. We explore the behavior of such media as reaction-diffusion systems for investigating spiral instabilities. Besides near-core breakup and far-field breakup resulting from unstable modes in the radial direction or Doppler-induced instability (destabilization of the core's location), the observed complex phenomena include backfiring, spiral regeneration, and amplitude modulation from line defects. Amplitude modulation of spirals can evolve to chambered spirals resembling those found in nature, such as pine cones and sunflowers. When the forcing amplitude is increased, the spiral-tip meander evolves from simple rotation to complex petals, corresponding to transformation of the local dynamics from simple oscillations to mixed-mode, period-2, and quasiperiodic oscillations. The number of petals is related to the complexity of the mixed-mode oscillations. Spiral turbulence, standing waves, and homogeneous synchronization permeate the entire system when the forcing amplitude is further increased.

  9. Differential diagnosis of gallbladder wall thickening by two phase spiral CT : gallbladder carcinoma versus cholicystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Mi Young; Woo, Je Hong; Shin, Seok Hwan; Lee, Kykung Hee; Suh, Chang Hae [Inha Univ. College of Medicine, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To determine whether an analysis of two-phase CT features provides a sound basis for differential diagnosis between gallbladder carcinoma and cholecystitis. We reviewed a total of 89 cases of gallbladder carcinoma (n=35) or cholecystitis (n=54) in patients who had undergone two-phase spiral CT. For this, a GE Highspeed Advantage scanner (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, U . S . A .) was used. A total of 120ml of contrast material was injected at a rate of 2-3 ml/sec. Arterial and venous phase scans were obtained 35 and 65 seconds, respectively, after the initiation of contrast infusion. All cases of gallbladder carcinoma and 468 of cholecystitis (of a total of 482) were confirmed by histopathology. We reviewed the two phase spiral CT features, analyzing and assessing thickness of the lesion, the enhancement pattern seen during the arterial and the venous phase, invasion of liver, pericholecystic fat infiltration, dilatation of intrahepatic ducts, and other associated findings. Mean wall thickness was 12.6 mm in the gallbladder carcinoma group, and 7.2 mm in the cholecystitis group. The common enhancement patterns seen in gallbladder carcinoma were 1) a highly enhanced thick inner wall layer during the arterial phase which became iso attenuated with adjacent liver parenchyma during the venous phase (16/35; 45.7%) and 2) highly enhanced thick inner wall layer during both the arterial and venous phase (8/35; 22.9%). The most common enhancement pattern in cholecystitis cases was an iso attenuated thin inner wall layer during both the arterial and the venous phase (44/54; 81.5%). Findings of intrahepatic mass formation by direct invasion (9/35), lymph node enlargement (12/35), and metastasis to other organs (7/35) occurred only in cases of gallbladder carcinoma (18/35, 51.4%) than of cholecystitis (10/54, 18.5%). The incidence of pericholecystic fat infiltration and fluid collection was not significantly different between the gallbladder cancer and cholecystitis groups

  10. High-Tc Superconducting Thick-Film Spiral Magnet: Development and Characterization of a Single Spiral Module

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinnis, W

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project was to make characterized and numerically model prototype modules of a new type of superconducting electromagnet based on stacked spirals of superconducting thick films...

  11. Robotic Arm End Effector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Image illustrates the tools on the end of the arm that are used to acquire samples, image the contents of the scoop, and perform science experiments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Arms Trafficking and Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    chronology of the intensification of violence in the area, see Noche Y Niebla: Panorama De Derechos Humanos Y Violencia Politica En Colombia, Bogotá...Arms, London, UK: Zed Books, 2000, pp. 155–178. Noche Y Niebla: Panorama De Derechos Humanos Y Violencia Politica En Colombia, Bogotá: Cinep & Justicia

  13. Worldwide Report Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-04

    totally eliminate medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe, as if they want to incarcerate it forever in a medieval fortress. Third, if given a... astronomical military expenditure, which is once again being increased by 3 percent, is to be devoted to the buildup both of nuclear and conventional arms

  14. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-23

    nunciature in Panama City, have kidnapped the Cuban ambassador twice, and now they have even assaulted and searched the residence of the Nicaraguan...orators out there who have only seen the armed forces in cinema news- reels. The issue is not one of politics but politicking. For example, we hear

  15. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-13

    suppress it wherever the arm of the Pentagon and the CIA has reached, as in Grenada . They have elevated various "contras" and dushmans to the rank of...and others on certain U.S. population groups, primarily those on the margins of society —,drug addicts, homosexuals , the homeless..." -, Zapevalov

  16. SPIRAL COUNTER-CURRENT CHROMATOGRAPHY OF SMALL MOLECULES, PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS USING THE SPIRAL TUBING SUPPORT ROTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.; Zehmer, John; Clayton, Adam; Pilon, Aprile

    2011-01-01

    An important advance in countercurrent chromatography (CCC) carried out in open flow-tubing coils, rotated in planetary centrifuges, is the new design to spread out the tubing in spirals. More spacing between the tubing was found to significantly increase the stationary phase retention, such that now all types of two-phase solvent systems can be used for liquid-liquid partition chromatography in the J-type planetary centrifuges. A spiral tubing support (STS) frame with circular channels was c...

  17. Coordination of multiple robot arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. K.; Soloway, D.

    1987-01-01

    Kinematic resolved-rate control from one robot arm is extended to the coordinated control of multiple robot arms in the movement of an object. The structure supports the general movement of one axis system (moving reference frame) with respect to another axis system (control reference frame) by one or more robot arms. The grippers of the robot arms do not have to be parallel or at any pre-disposed positions on the object. For multiarm control, the operator chooses the same moving and control reference frames for each of the robot arms. Consequently, each arm then moves as though it were carrying out the commanded motions by itself.

  18. The peculiar spiral galaxy NGC 4258

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albada, G.D. van.

    1978-01-01

    Observations have been obtained of the 21 cm line and continuum emission, both with the WSRT and the 100m telescope of the Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie in Bonn. The reduction of these observations is described, maps of the distribution of the neutral hydrogen and the continuum are presented and an analysis is given. The normal aspects and the anomalous arms are discussed. Methods for the reduction and analysis of H I observations are reviewed and how the ejected matter in NGC 4258 may have behaved is discussed. Some suggestions are made for further, mainly observational research. (C.F.)

  19. A computer solution for the dynamic load, lubricant film thickness and surface temperatures in spiral bevel gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, H. C.; Cheng, H. S.

    1987-01-01

    A complete analysis of spiral bevel gear sets is presented. The gear profile is described by the movements of the cutting tools. The contact patterns of the rigid body gears are investigated. The tooth dynamic force is studied by combining the effects of variable teeth meshing stiffness, speed, damping, and bearing stiffness. The lubrication performance is also accomplished by including the effects of the lubricant viscosity, ambient temperature, and gear speed. A set of numerical results is also presented.

  20. Asymmetric metallicity patterns in the stellar velocity space with RAVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoja, T.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Monari, G.; Famaey, B.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Grebel, E. K.; Steinmetz, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gibson, B. K.; Bienaymé, O.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Zwitter, T.

    Context. The chemical abundances of stars encode information on their place and time of origin. Stars formed together in e.g. a cluster, should present chemical homogeneity. Also disk stars influenced by the effects of the bar and the spiral arms might have distinct chemical signatures depending on

  1. Spacer geometry and particle deposition in spiral wound membrane feed channels

    KAUST Repository

    Radu, A.I.

    2014-11-01

    Deposition of microspheres mimicking bacterial cells was studied experimentally and with a numerical model in feed spacer membrane channels, as used in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems. In-situ microscopic observations in membrane fouling simulators revealed formation of specific particle deposition patterns for different diamond and ladder feed spacer orientations. A three-dimensional numerical model combining fluid flow with a Lagrangian approach for particle trajectory calculations could describe very well the in-situ observations on particle deposition in flow cells. Feed spacer geometry, positioning and cross-flow velocity sensitively influenced the particle transport and deposition patterns. The deposition patterns were not influenced by permeate production. This combined experimental-modeling approach could be used for feed spacer geometry optimization studies for reduced (bio)fouling. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Octopus-inspired multi-arm robotic swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfakiotakis, M; Kazakidi, A; Tsakiris, D P

    2015-05-13

    The outstanding locomotor and manipulation characteristics of the octopus have recently inspired the development, by our group, of multi-functional robotic swimmers, featuring both manipulation and locomotion capabilities, which could be of significant engineering interest in underwater applications. During its little-studied arm-swimming behavior, as opposed to the better known jetting via the siphon, the animal appears to generate considerable propulsive thrust and rapid acceleration, predominantly employing movements of its arms. In this work, we capture the fundamental characteristics of the corresponding complex pattern of arm motion by a sculling profile, involving a fast power stroke and a slow recovery stroke. We investigate the propulsive capabilities of a multi-arm robotic system under various swimming gaits, namely patterns of arm coordination, which achieve the generation of forward, as well as backward, propulsion and turning. A lumped-element model of the robotic swimmer, which considers arm compliance and the interaction with the aquatic environment, was used to study the characteristics of these gaits, the effect of various kinematic parameters on propulsion, and the generation of complex trajectories. This investigation focuses on relatively high-stiffness arms. Experiments employing a compliant-body robotic prototype swimmer with eight compliant arms, all made of polyurethane, inside a water tank, successfully demonstrated this novel mode of underwater propulsion. Speeds of up to 0.26 body lengths per second (approximately 100 mm s(-1)), and propulsive forces of up to 3.5 N were achieved, with a non-dimensional cost of transport of 1.42 with all eight arms and of 0.9 with only two active arms. The experiments confirmed the computational results and verified the multi-arm maneuverability and simultaneous object grasping capability of such systems.

  3. The Globular Cluster System of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 7814

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    2003-11-01

    We present the results of a wide-field photometric study of the globular cluster (GC) system of the edge-on Sab spiral NGC 7814. This is the first spiral to be fully analyzed from our survey of the GC systems of a large sample of galaxies beyond the Local Group. NGC 7814 is of particular interest because a previous study estimated that it has 500-1000 GCs, giving it the largest specific frequency (SN) known for a spiral. Understanding this galaxy's GC system is important in terms of our understanding of the GC populations of spirals in general and has implications for the formation of massive galaxies. We observed the galaxy in BVR filters with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope and used image classification and three-color photometry to select GC candidates. We also analyzed archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of NGC 7814, both to help quantify the contamination level of the WIYN GC candidate list and to detect GCs in the inner part of the galaxy halo. Combining HST data with high-quality ground-based images allows us to trace the entire radial extent of this galaxy's GC system and determine the total number of GCs directly through observation. We find that rather than being an especially high-SN spiral, NGC 7814 has <~200 GCs and SN~1, making it comparable to the two most well-studied spiral galaxies, the Milky Way and M31. We explore the implications of these results for models of the formation of galaxies and their GC systems. The initial results from our survey suggest that the GC systems of typical elliptical galaxies can be accounted for by the merger of two or more spirals, but that for highly luminous elliptical galaxies, additional physical processes may be needed.

  4. COMPARING PUMA ROBOT ARM WITH THE HUMAN ARM MOVEMENTS; AN ALTERNATIVE ROBOTIC ARM SHOULDER DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa BOZDEMİR

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Using the robotic arms instead of human power becomes increasingly widespread nowadays. Widening of the robotic arms usage field is parallel to improvement of movement capability of it. In this study PUMA Robotic Arm System that is a developed system of the robotic arms was compared with a human arm due to movement. A new joint was added to PUMA Robotic Arm System to have the movements similar to the human shoulder joint. Thus, a shoulder was designed that can make movements through the sides in addition to fore and back movement.

  5. COMPARING PUMA ROBOT ARM WITH THE HUMAN ARM MOVEMENTS; AN ALTERNATIVE ROBOTIC ARM SHOULDER DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    BOZDEMİR, Mustafa; ADIGÜZEL, Esat

    1999-01-01

    Using the robotic arms instead of human power becomes increasingly widespread nowadays. Widening of the robotic arms usage field is parallel to improvement of movement capability of it. In this study PUMA Robotic Arm System that is a developed system of the robotic arms was compared with a human arm due to movement. A new joint was added to PUMA Robotic Arm System to have the movements similar to the human shoulder joint. Thus, a shoulder was designed that can make movements through the sides...

  6. Bionic robot arm with compliant actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehl, Bernhard

    2000-10-01

    Traditional robotics uses non-compliant materials for all components involved in the production of movement. Elasticity is avoided as far as possible, because it leads to hazardous oscillations and makes control of precise movements very difficult. Due to this deliberate stiffness, robots are typically heavy and clumsy structures in comparison to their living counterparts (i.e. man and animals). Yet, moving systems in nature cope not only with the difficulties introduced by compliant materials, they also take advantage of the elasticity in muscles and tendons to produce smooth and even rapid movements. It is understood, that elasticity in a multi-jointed moving system requires sophisticated control mechanisms- as provided by a nervous system or a suitably programmed computer. In this contribution I shall describe a two-jointed robot with purpose-built elasticity in its actuators. This is accomplished by spiral springs places in series with a conventional electric motor and a tendon to the arm. It is shown that, with sufficiently soft elasticity, oscillations can be avoided by active oscillation damping. (Such active oscillation damping presumably also governs movement control in man and animals.) Furthermore, once the major problem has been overcome, elasticity is found to offer a wide spectrum of valuable advantages, as far as the most serious problems in traditional robotics are concerned. They are summarized by terms such as less dangerous, position tolerant, lightweight construction, controlled forces, and ballistic movements. These will be explained in detail and presented for discussion.

  7. Modernization of African Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa.......Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa....

  8. Research on performance of upstream pumping mechanical seal with different deep spiral groove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q; Chen, H L; Liu, T; Liu, Y H; Liu, Z B; Liu, D H

    2012-01-01

    As one new type of mechanical seal, Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal has been widely used in fluid machinery. In this paper, structure of spiral groove is innovatively optimized to improve performance of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with Spiral Groove: keeping the dam zone and the weir zone not changed, changing the bottom shape of spiral groove only, substituting different deep spiral groove for equal deep spiral groove. The simulation on Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with different deep spiral grooves is done using FVM method. According to calculation, the performances of opening force and pressure distribution on seals face are obtained. Five types of spiral grooves are analyzed, namely equal deep spiral groove, circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, circumferential divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, radial convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove and radial divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove. This paper works on twenty-five working conditions. The results indicate the performances of circumferential divergent 2-ladder different deep spiral groove are better than the others, with more opening force and better stabilization, while with the same leakage. The outcome provides theoretical support for application of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove.

  9. Research on performance of upstream pumping mechanical seal with different deep spiral groove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Chen, H. L.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y. H.; Liu, Z. B.; Liu, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    As one new type of mechanical seal, Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal has been widely used in fluid machinery. In this paper, structure of spiral groove is innovatively optimized to improve performance of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with Spiral Groove: keeping the dam zone and the weir zone not changed, changing the bottom shape of spiral groove only, substituting different deep spiral groove for equal deep spiral groove. The simulation on Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with different deep spiral grooves is done using FVM method. According to calculation, the performances of opening force and pressure distribution on seals face are obtained. Five types of spiral grooves are analyzed, namely equal deep spiral groove, circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, circumferential divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove, radial convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove and radial divergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove. This paper works on twenty-five working conditions. The results indicate the performances of circumferential divergent 2-ladder different deep spiral groove are better than the others, with more opening force and better stabilization, while with the same leakage. The outcome provides theoretical support for application of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal with circumferential convergent ladder-like different deep spiral groove.

  10. Understanding the conventional arms trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    The global conventional arms trade is worth tens of billions of dollars every year and is engaged in by every country in the world. Yet, it is often difficult to control the legal trade in conventional arms and there is a thriving illicit market, willing to arm unscrupulous regimes and nefarious non-state actors. This chapter examines the international conventional arms trade, the range of tools that have been used to control it, and challenges to these international regimes.

  11. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  12. Robotic Arm of Rover 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    JPL engineers examine the robotic arm of Mars Exploration Rover 1. The arm is modeled after a human arm, complete with joints, and holds four devices on its end, the Rock Abrasion Tool which can grind into Martian rocks, a microscopic imager, and two spectrometers for elemental and iron-mineral identification.

  13. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-30

    to provide housing for over 3,000 homeless families , the document notes. The ban on nuclear tests would end the dangerous rivalry in developing...TASS 14 Jan] 22 ’Nuclear Angle’of Soviet Union’s Breakup Considered [Ye. Shashkov; PRAVDA 21 Jan] 23 UN Experts Discuss Conventional Arms...Soviet soldiers are stationed in Poland currently, together with JPRS-TAC-91-003 30 January 1991 EAST EUROPE back-up personnel and family members this

  14. Liposuction of arm lymphoedema.

    OpenAIRE

    Brorson, Håkan

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common disease in women, and up to 38% develop lymphedema of the arm following mastectomy, standard axillary node dissection and postoperative irradiation. Limb reductions have been reported utilising various conservative therapies such as manual lymph and pressure therapy. Some patients with long-standing pronounced lymphedema do not respond to these conservative treatments because slow or absent lymph flow causes the formation of excess subcutaneous adipose tissue....

  15. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-03

    produce prosaic kneaders, electric abattoirs , and canning lines that no one was in a hurry to acquire at prices several times higher that those of the...armed struggle between two equal enemies. [Khokhlov] Fine, but what do you have to say about the environmental contamination that would result... contamination then was dozens of times less than what we had at Chernobyl and almost all of it went up into the stratosphere. I believe that our half

  16. Strategic arms limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen Greb, G.; Johnson, Gerald W.

    1983-10-01

    Following World War II, American scientists and politicians proposed in the Baruch plan a radical solution to the problem of nuclear weapons: to eliminate them forever under the auspices of an international nuclear development authority. The Soviets, who as yet did not possess the bomb, rejected this plan. Another approach suggested by Secretary of War Henry Stimson to negotiate directly with the Soviet Union was not accepted by the American leadership. These initial arms limitation failures both reflected and exacerbated the hostile political relationship of the superpowers in the 1950s and 1960s. Since 1969, the more modest focus of the Soviet-American arms control process has been on limiting the numbers and sizes of both defensive and offensive strategic systems. The format for this effort has been the Strategic Arms Limitatins Talks (Salt) and more recently the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START). Both sides came to these negotiations convinced that nuclear arsenals had grown so large that some for of mutual restraint was needed. Although the SALT/START process has been slow and ponderous, it has produced several concrete the agreements and collateral benefits. The 1972 ABM Treaty restricts the deployment of ballistic missile defense systems, the 1972 Interim Agreement places a quantitative freeze on each side's land based and sea based strategic launchers, and the as yet unratified 1979 SALT II Treaty sets numerical limits on all offensive strategic systems and sublimits on MIRVed systems. Collateral benefits include improved verification procedures, working definitions and counting rules, and permanent bureaucratic apparatus which enhance stability and increase the chances for achieving additional agreements.

  17. Kiikuv maja / Anu Arm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arm, Anu

    2006-01-01

    Eesti Kunstiakadeemia esimese kursuse arhitektuuriüliõpilaste II semestri töö. Juhendaja arhitekt Andres Alver, ehitamise Pedaspeale organiseeris suvepraktika juhendaja arhitekt Jaan Tiidemann. Autor Anu Arm, kaasa töötasid ja valmis ehitasid: Ott Alver, Maarja Elm, Mari Hunt, Alvin Järving, Marten Kaevats, Riho Kerge, Reedik Poopuu, Anu Põime, Helen Rebane, Kaisa Saarva, Martin Tago, Reet Volt. Valmis: 19. VIII 2006

  18. Phoenix Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A vital instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is the robotic arm, which will dig into the icy soil and bring samples back to the science deck of the spacecraft for analysis. In September 2006 at a Lockheed Martin Space Systems clean room facility near Denver, spacecraft technician Billy Jones inspects the arm during the assembly phase of the mission. Using the robotic arm -- built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena -- the Phoenix mission will study the history of water and search for complex organic molecules in the ice-rich soil. The Phoenix mission is led by Principal Investigator Peter H. Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson, with project management at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and development partnership with Lockheed Martin Space Systems. International contributions for Phoenix are provided by the Canadian Space Agency, the University of Neuchatel (Switzerland), the University of Copenhagen, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Dynamic study of the larynx with spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Yeon; Choi, Chang Ho; Yoon, Chi Soon; Kim, Yoon Gyoo; Nam, Sang Hwa; Kim, Kun Il; Kim, Byung Soo; Wang, Soo Guen

    1994-01-01

    It is essential to know the functional and morphologic changes of the larynx in the evaluation of laryngeal lesions. Conventional CT which has relatively long examination time is not suitable for this aim. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the capability of spiral CT in the dynamic study of the larynx and to know whether this new technique can replace conventional laryngography or not. Five healthy volunteers and 20 patients with laryngeal lesions underwent spiral dynamic CT scans with 3-dimensional reconstruction of the mucosal surface. A series of spiral CT scans were done while the volunteers performed various laryngeal positions to obtain the functional and morphologic information. The maneuvers used were: quite breathing, 'E' phonation, Valsalva maneuver, modified Valsalva maneuver, and a new method of our own, 'modified breath holding' technique. The patients were scanned when in quite breathing. Additional scans were obtained by using the 'modified breath holding' technique. The dynamic study with spiral CT could provide high resolutional images which nicely depicted the mobility of vocal cords and the mucosal changes of the laryngeal cavity in both healthy volunteer and patient groups. In patient group, the new 'modified breath holding' technique was easier and more reproducible than other maneuvers. Spiral CT allows a dynamic study of the larynx and can be a new alternative of laryngography

  20. Spiral scan long object reconstruction through PI line reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, K C; Hu, J; Sourbelle, K

    2004-01-01

    The response of a point object in a cone beam (CB) spiral scan is analysed. Based on the result, a reconstruction algorithm for long object imaging in spiral scan cone beam CT is developed. A region-of-interest (ROI) of the long object is scanned with a detector smaller than the ROI, and a portion of it can be reconstructed without contamination from overlaying materials. The top and bottom surfaces of the ROI are defined by two sets of PI lines near the two ends of the spiral path. With this novel definition of the top and bottom ROI surfaces and through the use of projective geometry, it is straightforward to partition the cone beam image into regions corresponding to projections of the ROI, the overlaying objects or both. This also simplifies computation at source positions near the spiral ends, and makes it possible to reduce radiation exposure near the spiral ends substantially through simple hardware collimation. Simulation results to validate the algorithm are presented

  1. Continuing research on the classical spiraling photon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongrui

    2014-11-01

    Based no the classical spiraling photon model proposed by Hongrui Li, the laws of reflection, refraction of a single photon can be derived. Moreover, the polarization, total reflection, evanescent wave and Goos-Hanchen shift of a single photon can be elucidated. However, this photon model is still unfinished. Especially, the spiraling diameter of a photon is not definite. In this paper, the continuous research works on this new theory are reported. According to the facts that the diffraction limit of light and the smallest diameter of the focal spot of lenses are all equal to the wavelength λ of the light, we can get that the spiraling diameter of a photon equals to the wavelength λ, so we gain that the angle between the linear velocity of the spiraling photon υ and the component of the linear velocity in the forward direction υb is 45°, and the energy of a classical spiraling photon E = (1/2)mυ2 = (1/2)m2c2 = mc2. This coincides with Einstein's mass-energy relation. While it is obtained that the velocity of the evanescent wave in the vacuum is slower than the velocity of light in glass in straight line. In such a way, the optical fiber can slow the light down. In addition, the force analysis of a single photon in optical tweezers system is discussed. And the reason that the laser beam can capture the particle slightly downstream from the focal point can be explained.

  2. Molecular clouds in the Carina arm - the largest objects, associated regions of star formation, and the Carina arm in the Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabelsky, D.A.; Cohen, R.S.; Bronfman, L.; Thaddeus, P.

    1988-01-01

    The Columbia CO survey of the southern Galactic plane is used to identify giant molecular clouds and cloud complexes in the Vela-Carina-Centaurus section of the Galaxy. Twenty-seven giant molecular clouds between l = 270 and 300 deg are catalogued and their heliocentric distances given. In addition, 16 clouds at l greater than 300 deg beyond the solar circle extend the catalog to include the very distant portion of the Carina arm. The most massive clouds in the catalog trace the Carina arm over 23 kpc in the plane of the Galaxy. The average mass of these objects is 1.4 x 10 to the 6th solar, and their average spacing along the arm is 700 pc. The composite distribution projected onto the Galactic plane of the largest molecular clouds in the Carina arm and of similarly massive clouds in the first and second quadrants strongly suggests that the Carina and Sagittarius arms form a single spiral arm about 40 kpc in length wrapping two-thirds of the way around the Galaxy. Descriptions of each cloud, including identification of associated star-forming regions, are presented in an appendix. 76 references

  3. Constraints on radial migration in spiral galaxies - II. Angular momentum distribution and preferential migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Kathryne J.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2018-05-01

    The orbital angular momentum of individual stars in galactic discs can be permanently changed through torques from transient spiral patterns. Interactions at the corotation resonance dominate these changes and have the further property of conserving orbital circularity. We derived in an earlier paper an analytic criterion that an unperturbed stellar orbit must satisfy in order for such an interaction to occur, i.e. for it to be in a trapped orbit around corotation. We here use this criterion in an investigation of how the efficiency of induced radial migration for a population of disc stars varies with the angular momentum distribution of that population. We frame our results in terms of the velocity dispersion of the population, this being an easier observable than is the angular momentum distribution. Specifically, we investigate how the fraction of stars in trapped orbits at corotation varies with the velocity dispersion of the population, for a system with an assumed flat rotation curve. Our analytic results agree with the finding from simulations that radial migration is less effective in populations with `hotter' kinematics. We further quantify the dependence of this trapped fraction on the strength of the spiral pattern, finding a higher trapped fraction for higher amplitude perturbations.

  4. Holographic gunsights for small arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Anthony M.; Sieczka, Eric J.; Radler, Richard; Upatnieks, Juris

    1996-05-01

    Holographic gunsights were first demonstrated in the mid 1970s by researchers at the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) under contracts with the Air Force and the Army. The sights utilized He-Ne gas lasers and were designed for use with large weapons systems. With the advent of low cost visible laser diode, ERIM formed a new company, EOTech, to develop, manufacture and market a holographic gun sight for small arms. A hologram is used to reconstruct the image of a reticle pattern that appears at the target plane. Unlike red-dot sights, virtually any reticle pattern, 2D or 3D, can be formed. The design challenges include an opto-mechanical package that is compact, light weight and low cost which can withstand recoils up to 4,000 Gs and provide fine elevation/windage pointing adjustments, and optics that are aberration-free and stable over a wide temperature range. Manufacturing challenges include the mass production of high quality holographic optics at low cost and the precision alignment of the very low f/number optics.

  5. [The morphometric study of endometrial spiral arterioles before and after insertion of gamma CuI and TCu 220C intrauterine devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Chen, Q; Ni, X

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the morphologic changes of endometrial spiral arterioles and its relationship with bleeding pattern after insertion of gamma-shape copper indomethacin-medicated (gamma CuI) and T-shape copper (TCu 220C) intrauterine devices (IUD). Endometrium specimens of late secretory phase were obtained from fertile age women: 10 from preinsertion, 10 obtained after insertion of TCu 220C IUD, and 9 obtained after insertion of gamma CuI IUD. Samples were sectioned serially and morphometric analysis of endometrial spiral arterioles was performed under light microscope. The average cross section area (Area), maximum diameter (Dmax) and minimum diameter (Dmin) of spiral arterioles in both spongeous and dense layers of endometrium increased significantly after insertion of TCu 220C IUD. After insertion of gamma CuI IUD, the Area and Dmax increased in dense layer only, though less obviously than that occurred in TCu 220C group. However, the Dmin increased more obviously in both spongeous and dense layers than after insertion of TCu 220C IUD, implying that the shape of spiral arterioles was more regular in gamma CuI group. gamma CuI IUD has less effects on the morphological changes of endometrial spiral arterioles, and this may relate to its indomethacin-contained which causes less bleeding.

  6. Extending the GANIL control system for the SPIRAL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecorche, E.

    1997-01-01

    The SPIRAL project under construction at GANIL aims to deliver radioactive ion beams to the physicists by the end of 1998. In 1996, it has been proposed to achieve most of the SPIRAL control system as an extension of the system currently in use at GANIL. Therefore the main features of the GANIL control system design are first recalled. Then the paper shows how the GANIL control system should have been upgraded and extended to integrate the SPIRAL project. This evolution had to cope with the specific needs brought by the new machine and to consider the size of the project which is around one third of the GANIL control system volume. Lastly current status of the system is given. (author)

  7. Spiral waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, James P.; Tyson, John J.

    1986-09-01

    The beautiful spiral waves of oxidation in the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction are the source of many interesting and important questions about periods structures in excitable media. It has long been known that these spirals are similar to involutes of circles, at least some distance from the center, but until now, no way has been known to determine the correct wavelength and frequency. In this paper, we show that the parameters of a spiral wave can be viwed s eigenvalues of a problem with unique solution. The critical ingredients of the theory are the effects of curvature on the propagation of wavefronts in two-dimensional media, and the dispersion of plane waves Our analytical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data for the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reagent.

  8. A Twin Spiral Planar Antenna for UWB Medical Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe A. Zito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A planar-spiral antenna to be used in an ultrawideband (UWB radar system for heart activity monitoring is presented. The antenna, named “twin,” is constituted by two spiral dipoles in a compact structure. The reflection coefficient at the feed point of the dipoles is lower than −8 dB over the 3–12 GHz band, while the two-dipoles coupling is about −20 dB. The radiated beam is perpendicular to the plane of the spiral, so the antenna is wearable and it may be an optimal radiator for a medical UWB radar for heart rate detection. The designed antenna has been also used to check some hypotheses about the UWB radar heart activity detection mechanism. The radiation impedance variation, caused by the thorax vibrations associated with heart activity, seems to be the most likely explanation of the UWB radar operation.

  9. The scientific objectives of the SPIRAL 2 Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, D.; Adoui, L.; Angelis, G. de

    2006-06-01

    The construction of SPIRAL 2 at GANIL will open completely new possibilities for parallel beam operation of the whole facility. The whole GANIL/SPIRAL/SPIRAL2 accelerator complex will allow for the simultaneous use of up to 5 different radioactive and stable beams. Several combinations of different beams delivered in parallel for experiments at low (keV/u), medium (few MeV/u) and high (up to 100 MeV/u) energies will be possible. Presently the GANIL/SPIRAL facility delivers about 60 weeks per year of stable and radioactive beams (up to 3 simultaneous beams). Thanks to SPIRAL 2 and the construction of a new beam line connecting the CIME cyclotron and the G1 and G2 experimental rooms the available beam time for experiments may be extended up to about 120 (up to 5 simultaneous beams) weeks per year. The chapters which follow a general introduction deal with the detailed questions to be addressed by experiments with the beams from SPIRAL2. In chapter 2 the many unanswered questions related to the structure of exotic nuclei are posed and the role of SPIRAL2 in answering them outlined. Chapter 3 deals with the dynamics and thermodynamics of asymmetric nuclear systems. Chapter 4 is concerned with questions of nuclear astrophysics which are intimately related to the properties of exotic nuclei. Chapter 5 indicates how the atomic nucleus can act as a laboratory for tests of the Standard model of Particle Physics and Chapter 6 shows how the production of intense fluxes of neutrons at SPIRAL2 make it an excellent tool to address both questions related to damage in materials of importance in nuclear installations and to the s- and r-processes of nucleosynthesis. In chapter 7 we turn to the application, of the radioactive beams from SPIRAL2 and the radionuclides produced by it, to study condensed matter and radiobiology. Finally in the eight and last chapter the reader can find an account of the historical development of the SPIRAL2 facility and this is followed by an outline of

  10. The scientific objectives of the SPIRAL 2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, D.; Adoui, L.; Angelis, G. de [GANIL, Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, BP 55027, 14076 Caen cedex 5 (France)] (and others)

    2006-06-15

    The construction of SPIRAL 2 at GANIL will open completely new possibilities for parallel beam operation of the whole facility. The whole GANIL/SPIRAL/SPIRAL2 accelerator complex will allow for the simultaneous use of up to 5 different radioactive and stable beams. Several combinations of different beams delivered in parallel for experiments at low (keV/u), medium (few MeV/u) and high (up to 100 MeV/u) energies will be possible. Presently the GANIL/SPIRAL facility delivers about 60 weeks per year of stable and radioactive beams (up to 3 simultaneous beams). Thanks to SPIRAL 2 and the construction of a new beam line connecting the CIME cyclotron and the G1 and G2 experimental rooms the available beam time for experiments may be extended up to about 120 (up to 5 simultaneous beams) weeks per year. The chapters which follow a general introduction deal with the detailed questions to be addressed by experiments with the beams from SPIRAL2. In chapter 2 the many unanswered questions related to the structure of exotic nuclei are posed and the role of SPIRAL2 in answering them outlined. Chapter 3 deals with the dynamics and thermodynamics of asymmetric nuclear systems. Chapter 4 is concerned with questions of nuclear astrophysics which are intimately related to the properties of exotic nuclei. Chapter 5 indicates how the atomic nucleus can act as a laboratory for tests of the Standard model of Particle Physics and Chapter 6 shows how the production of intense fluxes of neutrons at SPIRAL2 make it an excellent tool to address both questions related to damage in materials of importance in nuclear installations and to the s- and r-processes of nucleosynthesis. In chapter 7 we turn to the application, of the radioactive beams from SPIRAL2 and the radionuclides produced by it, to study condensed matter and radiobiology. Finally in the eight and last chapter the reader can find an account of the historical development of the SPIRAL2 facility and this is followed by an outline of

  11. Study on a new water purification equipment with spiral lamellas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X. R.

    2017-08-01

    A new water purification equipment was introduced, especially the section of spiral lamellas. Utilization of spiral lamellas made the sedimentation space reach to 100%, not only improving sedimentation efficiency and reducing the cover space, but also saving investment. Production test results showed that the new water purification equipment with spiral lamellas had characteristics of excellent treatment efficiency and high shock resistant capacity. As the treatment water volume was 240 m3/d, when the turbidity, CODMn and UV254 were 203 NTU, 1.90 mg/L and 0.030 cm-1 in raw water, they were 0.32 NTU, 0.72mg/L and 0.011 cm-1 respectively in effluent water, which could fully meet the drinking water hygiene requirement.

  12. A Spiral And Discipline-Oriented Curriculum In Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Hanson, Lars G.; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge

    2011-01-01

    This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging and Radi......This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging...... and Radiation Physics containing three disciplines: Imaging modalities, Radiation therapy and Image processing. The two imaging courses in the bachelor’s program and the first imaging course in the master’s program follow a spiral curriculum in which most disciplines are encountered in all courses...

  13. Auditory Mechanics of the Tectorial Membrane and the Cochlear Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review is timely and relevant since new experimental and theoretical findings suggest that cochlear mechanics from the nanoscale to the macroscale are affected by mechanical properties of the tectorial membrane and the spiral shape. Recent findings Main tectorial membrane themes covered are i) composition and morphology, ii) nanoscale mechanical interactions with the outer hair cell bundle, iii) macroscale longitudinal coupling, iv) fluid interaction with inner hair cell bundles, v) macroscale dynamics and waves. Main cochlear spiral themes are macroscale low-frequency energy focusing and microscale organ of Corti shear gain. Implications Findings from new experimental and theoretical models reveal exquisite sensitivity of cochlear mechanical performance to tectorial membrane structural organization, mechanics, and its positioning with respect to hair bundles. The cochlear spiral geometry is a major determinant of low frequency hearing. Suggestions are made for future research directions. PMID:21785353

  14. Spiral CT for cervical lymph node enlargement. Early clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkamp, H.J.; Keske, U.; Schedel, J.; Hosten, N.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    Spiral CT was performed before treatment in 35 patients with suspected cervical lymph node enlargement. By coronary and sagittal reconstruction it is possible to utilise the M/Q quotient which has become accepted as the result of sonographic and MRI examinations. It is now possible to obtain high diagnostic accuracy (97%) for distinguishing between reactive change from metastatic infiltration of lymph nodes (>8 mm) by using CT. Using spiral CT with 5 mm table movement, three patients diagnosed as stage N1 by axial CT were shown to be N2b. This represents a highly sensitive and highly specific method of lymph node diagnosis. Further diagnostic improvement derives from the ability to relate the lymph nodes to surrounding tissues. Spiral CT is also suitable for defining other space occupying lesions, e.g., the exact extent of retropharyngeal abscesses, abnormalities of the salivary glands or laryngocoeles. (orig.)

  15. Hematocrit, anemia, and arm preference for blood sample collection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is a common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Regular review of hematocrit (HCT) and anemia patterns in pregnancy is necessary in our environment. Aim: The aim was to determine the average HCT, prevalence, and pattern of anemia, as well the arm ...

  16. Initial clinical experience with spiral CT angiography in the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaa, J.; Stehling, M.K.; Costello, P.

    1993-01-01

    The latest developments in modern CT instruments, offering scanning times of a second, opened up new possibilities in CT imaging in combination with the spiral technique. The data set normally taken with single-breath-hold technique is free of respiratory artefacts and thus is a good basis for accurate 3D image reconstruction. Spiral CTA allows a non-invasive 3D imaging of various blood vessels. Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms of aorto-iliac bypass can be examined as outpatients within 15 minutes. (orig.) [de

  17. Spiral CT angiography of the abdominal aorta and its branches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Gaa, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Spiral CT angiography (CTA) was performed on 19 patients for the pre-operative assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms and in 3 post-operative renal artery bypass patients. Spiral CTA performed during intravenous contrast infusion provided a volume of data that was reconstructed at thin increments. Images were edited and reformatted either as surface rendered three-dimensional or maximum intensity projection (MIP) displays. Final images were viewed in a cine-loop presentation of quality comparable to conventional angiograms. The entire aorta can be examined from the coeliac axis to mid-pelvis with only 107 ml of 60% contrast. (orig.)

  18. SPIRAL2 Week 2011 - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.; Jacquemet, M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Petit, E.; Biarrote, J.L.; Uriot, D.; Thuillier, T.; Peaucelle, C.; Barue, C.; Van Hille, C.; Bernaudin, P.E.; Galdemard, P.; Ausset, P.; Dolegieviez, P.; Levallois, R.; Marchetto, M.; Pasini, M.; Quiclet, M.; Danna, O.; Lunney, D.; Di Giacomo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the SPIRAL2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. The program of the meeting will include presentations on scientific and technical developments related to the baseline project, experiments and theory. The main topics to be discussed at the conference have been: -) Driver Accelerators, -) Production of radioactive ion beams (RIB), -) Safety, -) RIB Facilities Worldwide (FAIR, Riken Nishina Center, SPES project, FRIB project) -) FP7 SPIRAL2 Preparatory Phase, -) Experiments with RIB and Theory. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  19. Necessity for High Accuracy Rotation Curves in Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Blais-Ouellette, Sebastien; Carignan, Claude; Amram, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    In the last 20 years, rotation curves derived from H I kinematics obtained on radio synthesis instruments were used to probe the dark matter distribution in spiral and dwarf irregular galaxies. It is shown, with the aid of the Sd galaxy NGC 5585, that high resolution 2--D H II kinematics is necessary to determine accurately the mass distribution of spirals. New CFHT Fabry--Perot Hff observations are combined with low resolution Westerbork H I data to study its mass distribution. Using the com...

  20. A Spiral And Discipline-Oriented Curriculum In Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Hanson, Lars G.; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge

    2011-01-01

    This contribution describes and evaluates an experimental combination of a spiral and discipline-oriented curriculum implemented in the bachelor’s and master’s program in Medicine and Technology. The implementation in the master’s program is in the form of a study line in Medical Imaging...... and Radiation Physics containing three disciplines: Imaging modalities, Radiation therapy and Image processing. The two imaging courses in the bachelor’s program and the first imaging course in the master’s program follow a spiral curriculum in which most disciplines are encountered in all courses...

  1. Resonant fields created by spiral electric currents in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Caldas, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of the resonant magnetic perturbations, created by electric currents in spirals, on the plasma confinement in a tokamak with circular section and large aspect ratio is investigated. These perturbations create magnetic islands around the rational magnetic surface which has the helicity of the helicoidal currents. The intensities of these currents are calculated in order to the magnetic islands reach the limiter or others rational surfaces, what could provoke the plasma disrupture. The electric current intensities are estimated, in two spiral sets with different helicities, which create a predominantly stocastic region among the rational magnetic surfaces with these helicities. (L.C.) [pt

  2. AES i ARM procesori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela D. Protić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Potreba za zaštitom informacija dovodi do velikih problema u izradi prenosivih uređaja kojima su limitirani snaga, memorija i energija. Ukoliko se takvim uređajima dodaju koprocesori, koji treba da obavljaju funkcije kriptozaštite, njihove se dimenzije povećavaju, pojavljuje se nefleksibilnost pa cena uređaja raste i do nekoliko puta. Na drugoj strani, algoritmi za zaštitu podataka su često memorijski zahtevni, a zbog velikog broja operacija koje je potrebno izvršavati u procesima šifrovanja i dešifrovanja, koprocesori često uspore rad osnovnog procesora. Za jedan od standarda za kriptozaštitu, AES, NIST je prihvatio Rijndaelov blokovski algoritam sa dužinom ulaznog i izlaznog bloka od 128 b, i dužinama šifarskog ključa od 128 b, 192 b i 256 b. Zbog karakteristika male potrošnje, 32-bitske arhitekture i brzog izvršavanja instrukcija, ARM procesori mogu da realizuju kriptozaštitu podataka, između ostalog i AES-om, a da ne opterete glavne procese u sistemima u kojima se koriste. Tehnologija ARM-a zaštićena je kao intelektualna svojina, pa je veliki broj proizvođača koristi za razvoj sopstvenih proizvoda, što je rezultovalo činjenicom da je u svetu proizvedeno preko 2 milijarde čipova koji su bazirani na ovoj tehnologiji. U radu su prikazane mogućnosti za poboljšanja u izvršenju algoritma AES primenom najnovijih verzija ARM procesora.

  3. Design of UWB Planar Monopole Antennas with Etched Spiral Slot on the Patch for Multiple Band-Notched Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three types of Ultrawideband (UWB antennas with single, double, and triple notched bands are proposed and investigated for UWB communication applications. The proposed antennas consist of CPW fed monopole with spiral slot etched on the patch. In this paper single, double, and also triple band notches with central frequency of 3.57, 5.12, and 8.21 GHz have been generated by varying the length of a single spiral slot. The proposed antenna is low-profile and of compact size. A stable gain is obtained throughout the operation band except the three notched frequencies. The antennas have omnidirectional and stable radiation patterns across all the relevant bands. Moreover, relatively consistent group delays across the UWB frequencies are noticed for the triple notched band antenna. A prototype of the UWB antenna with triple notched bands is fabricated and the measured results of the antenna are compared with the simulated results.

  4. Testing predator-driven evolution with Paleozoic crinoid arm regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumiller, Tomasz K; Gahn, Forest J

    2004-09-03

    Regenerating arms of crinoids represent direct evidence of nonlethal attacks by predators and provide an opportunity for exploring the importance of predation through geologic time. Analysis of 11 Paleozoic crinoid Lagerstätten revealed a significant increase in arm regeneration during the Siluro-Devonian. During this interval, referred to as the Middle Paleozoic Marine Revolution, the diversity of shell-crushing predators increased, and antipredatory morphologies among invertebrate prey, such as crinoids, became more common. Crinoid arm regeneration data suggest an increase in nonlethal attacks at this time and represent a causal link between those patterns, which implies an important role for predator-driven evolution.

  5. The spiral aftereffect technique (SAT) can differentiate between depressive and somatoform disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Lars

    2014-04-01

    This study examined how differences in visuo-perceptual patterns are related to psychopathology. Fifty-six patients (37 women, 19 men; M age = 43.8 yr., SD = 13.4) with a main diagnosis of unipolar depression and 42 patients (22 women, 20 men; M age = 42.0 yr., SD = 11.1) with a main diagnosis of somatoform disorder were compared. The duration and trend of a visual motion aftereffect were measured with the Spiral Aftereffect Technique (SAT). The results indicated that successively increasing aftereffect durations characterized the depressive patients, whereas patterns of very short or short final aftereffect preceded by successively decreasing aftereffect durations characterized the patients with a somatoform disorder. The SAT is thus a valuable tool for linking objectively measured perceptual-personality characteristics with some mental disorders.

  6. Reduction waves in the BZ reaction: Circles, spirals and effects of electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaštánek, P.; Kpsek, J.; Šnita, D.; Schreiber, I.; Marek, M.

    Spatiotemporal patterns in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction medium in a Petri dish at low concentrations of malonic acid are studied experimentally and theoretically. Depending on the concentration of malonic acid, the interaction of reduction and oxidation front waves may lead to: (i) a disappearing reduction pulse wave, (ii) complex target structures, (iii) a stably propagating reduction pulse wave. A mechanical perturbation can lead either to reduction spirals or to healing effects causing heart-shaped structures. Imposed electric field causes a symmetry breaking of target patterns and can stabilize or destabilize the waves. A formal reaction-diffusion model reproduces qualitatively most of the experimentally observed phenomena in the absence of electric field. A modified Oregonator model that involves ionic migration describes well some experiments including those in the presence of electric field.

  7. Phoenix Robotic Arm Rasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This photograph shows the rasp protruding from the back of the scoop on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm engineering model in the Payload Interoperability Testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson. This is the position the rasp will assume when it drills into the Martian soil to acquire an icy soil sample for analysis. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Disarmament and arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzen, B.

    1979-01-01

    This report discusses how far science and technology can provide methods of making arms control and disarmament agreements more controlable in an objective way. Two case studies have been considered, the test ban treaty and the verification of the number of strategic nuclear weapons. These lead to the conclusion that both science and politics are closely interwoven and that within what appear to be scientific arguments, political positions are being defended. Consequently scientists and technologists and the contexts in which they work, play a prominent role. (C.F.)

  9. Controller arm for a remotely related slave arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, J. K., Jr. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A segmented controller arm configured and dimensioned to form a miniature kinematic replica of a remotely related slave arm is disclosed. The arm includes: (1) a plurality of joints for affording segments of the arm simultaneous angular displacement about a plurality of pairs of intersecting axes, (2) a plurality of position sensing devices for providing electrical signals indicative of angular displacement imparted to corresponding segments of the controller shaft about the axes, and (3) a control signal circuit for generating control signals to be transmitted to the slave arm. The arm is characterized by a plurality of yokes, each being supported for angular displacement about a pair of orthogonally related axes and counterbalanced against gravitation by a cantilevered mass.

  10. Rotating shallow water modeling of planetary,astrophysical and plasma vortical structures (plasma transport across a magnetic field,model of the jupiter's GRS, prediction of existence of giant vortices in spiral galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nezlin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three kinds of results have been described in this paper. Firstly, an experimental study of the Rossby vortex meridional drift on the rotating shallow water has been carried out. Owing to the stringent physical analogy between the Rossby vortices and drift vortices in the magnetized plasma, the results obtained have allowed one to make a conclusion that the transport rate of the plasma, trapped by the drift vortices, across the magnetic field is equivalent to the “gyro-Bohm” diffusion coefficient. Secondly, a model of big vortices of the type of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, dominating in the atmospheres of the outer planets, has been produced. Thirdly, the rotating shallow water modeling has been carried out of the hydrodynamical generation mechanism of spiral structures in galaxies. Trailing spiral waves of various azimuthal modes, generated by a shear flow between fast rotating “nucleus” and slow rotating periphery, were produced. The spirals are similar to those existing in the real galaxies. The hydrodynamical concept of the spiral structure formation in galaxies has been substantiated. Strong anticyclonic vortices between the spiral arms of the structures under study have been discovered for the first time. The existence of analogous vortices in real galaxies has been predicted. (This prediction has been reliably confirmed recently in special astronomical observations, carried out on the basis of the mentioned laboratory modeling and the prediction made – see the paper by A. Fridman et al. (Astrophysics and Space Science, 1997, 252, 115.

  11. An Implanted Neuroprosthesis for Restoring Arm and Hand Function in People with High Level Tetraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memberg, William D.; Polasek, Katherine H.; Hart, Ronald L.; Bryden, Anne M.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; Nemunaitis, Gregory A.; Hoyen, Harry A.; Keith, Michael W.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop and apply an implanted neuroprosthesis to restore arm and hand function to individuals with high level tetraplegia Design Case study. Setting Clinical research laboratory. Participants Two individuals with spinal cord injuries at or above the C4 motor level. Interventions The individuals were each implanted with two stimulators (24 stimulation channels and 4 myoelectric recording channels total). Stimulating electrodes were placed in the shoulder and arm, including the first chronic application of spiral nerve cuff electrodes to activate a human limb. Myoelectric recording electrodes were placed in the head and neck areas. Main Outcome Measures The successful installation and operation of the neuroprosthesis, along with the electrode performance, range of motion, grasp strength, joint moments, and performance in activities of daily living. Results The neuroprosthesis system was successfully implanted in both individuals. Spiral nerve cuff electrodes were placed around upper extremity nerves and activated the intended muscles. In both individuals, the neuroprosthesis has functioned properly for at least 2.5 years post-implant. Hand, wrist, forearm, elbow and shoulder movements were achieved. A mobile arm support was needed to support the mass of the arm during functional activities. One individual was able to perform several activities of daily living with some limitations due to spasticity. The second individual was able to partially complete two activities of daily living. Conclusions Functional electrical stimulation is a feasible intervention for restoring arm and hand functions to individuals with high tetraplegia. Forces and movements were generated at the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder that allowed the performance of activities of daily living, with some limitations requiring the use of a mobile arm support to assist the stimulated shoulder forces. PMID:24561055

  12. Implanted neuroprosthesis for restoring arm and hand function in people with high level tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memberg, William D; Polasek, Katharine H; Hart, Ronald L; Bryden, Anne M; Kilgore, Kevin L; Nemunaitis, Gregory A; Hoyen, Harry A; Keith, Michael W; Kirsch, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    To develop and apply an implanted neuroprosthesis to restore arm and hand function to individuals with high level tetraplegia. Case study. Clinical research laboratory. Individuals with spinal cord injuries (N=2) at or above the C4 motor level. The individuals were each implanted with 2 stimulators (24 stimulation channels and 4 myoelectric recording channels total). Stimulating electrodes were placed in the shoulder and arm, being, to our knowledge, the first long-term application of spiral nerve cuff electrodes to activate a human limb. Myoelectric recording electrodes were placed in the head and neck areas. Successful installation and operation of the neuroprosthesis and electrode performance, range of motion, grasp strength, joint moments, and performance in activities of daily living. The neuroprosthesis system was successfully implanted in both individuals. Spiral nerve cuff electrodes were placed around upper extremity nerves and activated the intended muscles. In both individuals, the neuroprosthesis has functioned properly for at least 2.5 years postimplant. Hand, wrist, forearm, elbow, and shoulder movements were achieved. A mobile arm support was needed to support the mass of the arm during functional activities. One individual was able to perform several activities of daily living with some limitations as a result of spasticity. The second individual was able to partially complete 2 activities of daily living. Functional electrical stimulation is a feasible intervention for restoring arm and hand functions to individuals with high tetraplegia. Forces and movements were generated at the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder that allowed the performance of activities of daily living, with some limitations requiring the use of a mobile arm support to assist the stimulated shoulder forces. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Importance of packing in spiral defect chaos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tifying their length and nearest-neighbor distributions. The distributions evolve towards a unique distribution with increasing Rayleigh number that suggests power-law scaling for the dynamics in the limit of infinite system size. The techniques are generally applicable to patterns that are reducible to a binary representation.

  14. Discontinuous Spirals of Stable Periodic Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sack, Achim; Freire, Joana G.; Lindberg, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We report the experimental discovery of a remarkable organization of the set of self-generated periodic oscillations in the parameter space of a nonlinear electronic circuit. When control parameters are suitably tuned, the wave pattern complexity of the periodic oscillations is found to increase...

  15. Orientation of spiral galaxies in the local supercluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaaniste, J.A.; Saar, E.M.

    1977-01-01

    Two alternative models for the spatial orientation of galaxies - parallelism and perpendicularity of the planes of galaxies with respect to the supergalactic plane - are compared with the observed orientations of spiral galaxies within the volume of the radius of 50 Mpc. The first model does not agree with experimental data whereas the second one-perpendicularity of the planes - describes the above data well

  16. EM-wave absorption properties of hollow spiral iron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-01-01

    Hollow iron spiral particles were fabricated successfully by thermal decomposition method, and they were heat-treated at different temperatures in N 2 atmosphere. The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of hollow iron spiral particles were investigated ranging between 1 GHz and 18 GHz. The results indicated that the phase structures of the particles changed from amorphous to nanocrystal with the treating temperature rising, also causing the significant change in electromagnetic parameters and the reflection loss. The reflection loss could reach −33 dB at 16.2 GHz, indicating that the hollow iron spiral particles had the potential to be used in prepare the a high property EM-wave absorber. - Highlights: • Hollow iron spiral particles were fabricated by thermal decomposition method. • The particles changed from amorphous to nanocrystals with heat-treatment. • Particles’ EM-parameters have a great change after high temperature heat-treatment. • RL results show the particles have potential to be high property EM-wave absorber

  17. The thickness of the HI gas layer in spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicking, Floris Jan

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, in two inclined spiral galaxies, NGC 3198 and NGC 2403, the HI random velocity dispersion and layer thickness will be measured simultaneously. This will be done from the HI velocity dispersion field (the distribution on the sky of the observed HI line of sight velocity

  18. Teaching about Energy Through a Spiral Curriculum: Guiding Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    Conventional science instruction often fails to address or change students' misconceptions about physical phenomena. Students stubbornly cling to anthropocentric, causal, and product conceptions about energy. This article explores scientific and pedagogical arguments favoring development of a spiral curriculum for teaching energy in (Israeli)…

  19. Ultra wideband coplanar waveguide fed spiral antenna for humanitarian demining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    to 1 bandwidth with a return loss better than 10 dB from 0.4 to 3.8 GHz is presented. A wideband balun covering the frequency range of the antenna was developed. The constructed spiral antenna is very useful in a stepped frequency ground penetrating radar for humanitarian demining due to the very...

  20. Abundance analysis of giant H II regions in nearby spirals

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Angeles I.; Terlevich, E.; Pagel, B.E.J.; Vílchez, J.M; Edmunds, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica. Díaz, Angeles I. et al. Abundance analysis of giant H II regions in nearby spirals. Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica 21 (1990): 223-227

  1. A Spiral And Discipline-Oriented Curriculum In Medical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Hanson, Lars G.; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge

    2011-01-01

    . However, in the master’s program, such a tight schedule is impractical since students are likely to seek specialization. From a pedagogical point of view, the spiral curriculum is advantageous to use in the initial semesters where the teaching can be conducted so that the students can build...

  2. A combined optical, SEM and STM study of growth spirals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some novel results of a combined sequential study of growth spirals on the basal surface of the richly polytypic CdI2 crystals by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are presented and discussed. In confirmation of the known structural data, the STM pictures ...

  3. Learning in 3D Virtual Environments: Collaboration and Knowledge Spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Brian G.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine if learning occurred within a 3D virtual learning environment by determining if elements of collaboration and Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) knowledge spiral were present. A key portion of this research was the creation of a Virtual Learning Environment. This 3D VLE utilized the Torque Game Engine…

  4. Long term complications of the intraprostatic spiral. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J

    1992-01-01

    A 76-year-old man had an intraprostatic spiral inserted to relieve bladder outlet obstruction that was caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy. After 30 months numerous complications had arisen including severe encrustations, urethral stricture, and sclerosis of the bladder neck. Regular replaceme...

  5. Advanced Manufacture of Spiral Bevel and Hypoid Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmos Simon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an advanced method for the manufacture of spiral bevel and hypoid gears on CNC hypoid generators is proposed. The optmal head-cutter geometry and machine tool settings are determined to introduce the optimal tooth surface modifications into the teeth of spiral bevel and hypoid gears. The aim of these tooth surface modifications is to simultaneously reduce the tooth contact pressure and the transmission errors, to maximize the EHD load carrying capacity of the oil film, and to minimize power losses in the oil film. The proposed advanced method for the manufacture of spiral bevel and hypoid gears is based on machine tool setting variation on the cradle-type generator conducted by optimal polynomial functions and on the use of a CNC hypoid generator. An algorithm is developed for the execution of motions on the CNC hypoid generator using the optimal relations on the cradle-type machine. Effectiveness of the method was demonstrated by using spiral bevel and hypoid gear examples. Significant improvements in the operating characteristics of the gear pairs are achieved.

  6. Long term complications of the intraprostatic spiral. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J

    1992-01-01

    A 76-year-old man had an intraprostatic spiral inserted to relieve bladder outlet obstruction that was caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy. After 30 months numerous complications had arisen including severe encrustations, urethral stricture, and sclerosis of the bladder neck. Regular replacement...

  7. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ledoux, X.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Bém, Pavel; Fischer, U.; Majerle, Mitja; Mrázek, Jaromír; Negoita, F.; Novák, Jan; Simakov, S. P.; Šimečková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, MAY (2014), s. 353-356 ISSN 0090-3752 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : SPIRAL-2 * Neutron For Science * time-of-flight Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.571, year: 2014

  8. The dynamics of the spiral structure in galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contopoulos, G.

    1979-01-01

    The basic ideas and current problems of the linear and non-linear theory of spiral structure are reviewed. Some recent work on the response density and possible self-consistent solutions of bars with an Inner Lindblad Resonance are described. (Auth.)

  9. Opaque spiral disks - Some empirical facts and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.

    1990-01-01

    Results for the Sb and Sc galaxies, as obtained from the analysis of the optical ESO-LV data, are reviewed, and the implied constraints for the properties of the absorbing components in spiral disks are discussed. An alternative interpretation of flat rotation curves and a revised extinction model

  10. SPIRAL (Sandia's Program for Information Retrieval and Listing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Leslie E.

    The general scope of SPIRAL is storage of free-flowing text information into a machine-readable library and recall of any portions of this stored information that are relevant to an inquiry. The major objectives in the design of the system were (1) to make it easy to use by persons unfamiliar with computer systems; and (2) to make it efficient, in…

  11. Ekman Spiral in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    thermocline (in temperature) and pycnocline (in density) (e.g., Kraus and Turner 1967; Garwood 1977; Chu and Garwood 1991; Steger et al. 1998; Chu et...spiral as a good statistical fit to low-frequency currents in a coastal strait. Science, 233, 470-472. Steger , J., Collins, C.A., and Chu, P.C. (1998

  12. THE MASS-DISTRIBUTION OF THE DWARF SPIRAL NGC-1560

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROEILS, AH

    H I synthesis observations with the WSRT and optical surface photometry of the dwarf spiral galaxy NGC 1560 are presented. This galaxy has an absolute luminosity of M(B) = -15.87. The observations show that the galaxy is gas rich, with an M(HI)/L(B) of 2.4. We obtained a very detailed rotation curve

  13. Evaluation of spiral CT in the diagnosis of ureteral diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiansheng; Li Kangyin; Chen Huyi; Qiang Haixia; Shen Guoqiang; Li Jing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the diagnostic value of spiral CT in ureteral diseases. Methods: Spiral CT urography (SCTU) was performed in 27 cases with ureteral diseases, including 9 cases of ureteral calculus, 5 carcinomas, 9 stenosis, 1 malformation, 1 inflammation and 2 fistula. Of the 27 cases,15 also underwent non-enhanced spiral CT scan and 10 received intravenous urography(IVU). Results: (1) Eight cases of radiolucent ureteral calculus were clearly showed by non-enhanced spiral CT. (2) On SCTU, the location and diameter of 9 ureteral calculus (8 radiolucent, 1 radiopaque) and enlargement of renal pelvis and ureter were displayed. Irregular ureteral wall, local rarefaction or obstruction of contrast medium in ureter were detected in 5 case of tumor. Ureteral lumen was narrowed gradually in 7 cases of simple ureteral stenosis without thickening of the wall. Two cases with ectopic vessel compression were clarified at the boundary of ureter and pelvis. 1 malformation with double renal pelvis and ureter was demonstrated. The location and direction of ureteral fistula were notified. Conclusion: SCTU is superior to IVU and conventional CT in improving diagnostic accuracy of ureteral disease

  14. Intervention of malignant biliary obstruction with Hanaro spiral stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sung Wook; Choo, Sung Wook; Pyeun, Yong Seon and others

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term patency of the Hanaro spiral stent (Solco Intermed, Seoul, Korea) when used as a palliative in patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Between April 1996 and July 1998, 39 patients with malignant biliary obstruction underwent percutaneous placement of 48 Hanaro spiral stents. The causes of obstruction were bile duct carcinoma (n=18), pancreatic carcinoma (n=8), metastatic lymphadenopathy (n=5), gallbladder carcinoma (n=5), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1) and other tumors (n=2). Using the kaplan-Meier method, patient survival and stet patency rates were estimated with regard to level of obstruction. As regards stent insertion, there was no technical failure. Overall 25- and 50-week survival rates for the entire patient group were 50 % and 11 %, respectively, while overall stent patency rates at 25 and 50 weeks were 42 % and 11 %, respectively. Twenty-five-week stent patency rates in patients with common bile duct (CBD) and hilar obstruction were 51 % and 18 %, respectively. The stent patency rates in the CBD obstruction group was significantly higher than that in the hilar obstruction group (p<0.05). In patients with CBD obstruction, the clinical efficacy of Hanaro spiral stent was superior to that in patients with hilar obstruction. However, Hanaro spiral stents showed a lower patency rate with regard to patient survival, and further investigation is required

  15. Flux flow and cleaning enhancement in a spiral membrane element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of backpulsing, into the permeate space of a 2.5 inch spiral wrap membrane, on the prevention of fouling (flux enhancement) was investigated experimentally. These experiments were performed using a 500 mg∙ℓ-1 dextrin solution and a 100 000 MCWO polypropylene membrane, with a feed pressure of 100 kPa ...

  16. Dark matter and rotation curves of spiral galaxies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Křížek, Filip; Somer, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, April (2016), s. 64-77 ISSN 1313-2709 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15052 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : red dwarf * dark matter * spiral galaxy Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.astro.bas.bg/AIJ/issues/n25/MKrizek.pdf

  17. Exact cone beam CT with a spiral scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, K.C.; Samarasekera, S.; Sauer, F.

    1998-01-01

    A method is developed which makes it possible to scan and reconstruct an object with cone beam x-rays in a spiral scan path with area detectors much shorter than the length of the object. The method is mathematically exact. If only a region of interest of the object is to be imaged, a top circle scan at the top level of the region of interest and a bottom circle scan at the bottom level of the region of interest are added. The height of the detector is required to cover only the distance between adjacent turns in the spiral projected at the detector. To reconstruct the object, the Radon transform for each plane intersecting the object is computed from the totality of the cone beam data. This is achieved by suitably combining the cone beam data taken at different source positions on the scan path; the angular range of the cone beam data required at each source position can be determined easily with a mask which is the spiral scan path projected on the detector from the current source position. The spiral scan algorithm has been successfully validated with simulated cone beam data. (author)

  18. Targeted muscle reinnervation and advanced prosthetic arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E; Smith, Lauren H; Kuiken, Todd A; Dumanian, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to improve the control of upper limb prostheses. Residual nerves from the amputated limb are transferred to reinnervate new muscle targets that have otherwise lost their function. These reinnervated muscles then serve as biological amplifiers of the amputated nerve motor signals, allowing for more intuitive control of advanced prosthetic arms. Here the authors provide a review of surgical techniques for TMR in patients with either transhumeral or shoulder disarticulation amputations. They also discuss how TMR may act synergistically with recent advances in prosthetic arm technologies to improve prosthesis controllability. Discussion of TMR and prosthesis control is presented in the context of a 41-year-old man with a left-side shoulder disarticulation and a right-side transhumeral amputation. This patient underwent bilateral TMR surgery and was fit with advanced pattern-recognition myoelectric prostheses.

  19. Model for Simulating a Spiral Software-Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Curley, Charles; Nayak, Umanath

    2010-01-01

    A discrete-event simulation model, and a computer program that implements the model, have been developed as means of analyzing a spiral software-development process. This model can be tailored to specific development environments for use by software project managers in making quantitative cases for deciding among different software-development processes, courses of action, and cost estimates. A spiral process can be contrasted with a waterfall process, which is a traditional process that consists of a sequence of activities that include analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, and support. A spiral process is an iterative process that can be regarded as a repeating modified waterfall process. Each iteration includes assessment of risk, analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, delivery, and evaluation. A key difference between a spiral and a waterfall process is that a spiral process can accommodate changes in requirements at each iteration, whereas in a waterfall process, requirements are considered to be fixed from the beginning and, therefore, a waterfall process is not flexible enough for some projects, especially those in which requirements are not known at the beginning or may change during development. For a given project, a spiral process may cost more and take more time than does a waterfall process, but may better satisfy a customer's expectations and needs. Models for simulating various waterfall processes have been developed previously, but until now, there have been no models for simulating spiral processes. The present spiral-process-simulating model and the software that implements it were developed by extending a discrete-event simulation process model of the IEEE 12207 Software Development Process, which was built using commercially available software known as the Process Analysis Tradeoff Tool (PATT). Typical inputs to PATT models include industry-average values of product size (expressed as number of lines of code

  20. CFD investigation of flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in isoflux spirally fluted tubes

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the problem of flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in spirally fluted tubes is investigated numerically using the CFD code Fluent. The tube investigated in this work is characterized by the existence of helical ridging which is usually obtained by embossing a smooth tube. A tube of diameter of 15 mm, 1.5 mm groove depth and a single helix with pitch of 64 mm is chosen for simulation. This geometry has been chosen for simulation because it has been investigated experimentally for pure fluids and would, therefore, provide a verification framework with our CFD model. The result of our CFD investigation compares very well with the experimental work conducted on this tube geometry. Interesting patterns are highlighted and investigated including the existence of flow swirl as a result of the existence of the spirally enhanced ridges. This swirl flow enhances heat transfer characteristics of this system as reported in the literatures. This study also shows that further enhancement is achieved if small amount of nanoparticles are introduced to the fluid. These nanoparticles (metallic-based nanoparticles) when introduced to the fluid enhances its heat transfer characteristics.

  1. Computerized spiral analysis using the iPad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Jonathan A; Christophe, Brandon; Seville, Audrey Rakovich; Garton, Andrew L A; Gupta, Vivek P; Bandin, Alexander J; Yu, Qiping; Pullman, Seth L

    2017-01-01

    Digital analysis of writing and drawing has become a valuable research and clinical tool for the study of upper limb motor dysfunction in patients with essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and related disorders. We developed a validated method of computerized spiral analysis of hand-drawn Archimedean spirals that provides insight into movement dynamics beyond subjective visual assessment using a Wacom graphics tablet. While the Wacom tablet method provides robust data, more widely available mobile technology platforms exist. We introduce a novel adaptation of the Wacom-based method for the collection of hand-drawn kinematic data using an Apple iPad. This iPad-based system is stand-alone, easy-to-use, can capture drawing data with either a finger or capacitive stylus, is precise, and potentially ubiquitous. The iPad-based system acquires position and time data that is fully compatible with our original spiral analysis program. All of the important indices including degree of severity, speed, presence of tremor, tremor amplitude, tremor frequency, variability of pressure, and tightness are calculated from the digital spiral data, which the application is able to transmit. While the iPad method is limited by current touch screen technology, it does collect data with acceptable congruence compared to the current Wacom-based method while providing the advantages of accessibility and ease of use. The iPad is capable of capturing precise digital spiral data for analysis of motor dysfunction while also providing a convenient, easy-to-use modality in clinics and potentially at home. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Robotic Arm Biobarrier Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on the 14th Martian day of the mission (June 7, 2008), shows the cable that held the Robotic Arm's biobarrier in place during flight has snapped. The cable's springs retracted to release the biobarrier right after landing. To the lower right of the image a spring is visible. Extending from that spring is a length of cable that snapped during the biobarrier's release. A second spring separated from the cable when it snapped and has been photographed on the ground under the lander near one of the legs. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Have Third-World Arms Industries Reduced Arms Imports?

    OpenAIRE

    Looney, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Current Research on Peace and Violence, no. 1, 1989. Refereed Journal Article In 1945 only Argentina, Brazil, India and South Africa in the Third World possessed domestic arms industries which produced weapons systems other than small arms and ammunition (SIPRI, 1987, 76).

  4. Planar Task Space Control of a Biarticular Manipulator Driven by Spiral Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaki bin Hj Shukor

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates upon a musculoskeletal-inspired robot manipulator using a prototype of the spiral motor developed in our laboratory. The spiral motors represent the antagonistic muscles due to the high forward/backward drivability without any gears or mechanisms. Modelling of the biarticular structure with spiral motor dynamics was presented and simulations were carried out to compare two control methods, Inverse Kinematics (IK and direct-Cartesian control, between monoarticular only structures and biarticular structures using the spiral motor. The results show the feasibility of the control, especially in maintaining air gaps within the spiral motor.

  5. MR appearance of cartilage defects of the knee: preliminary results of a spiral CT arthrography-guided analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine signal intensity patterns of cartilage defects at MR imaging. The MR imaging (3-mm-thick fat-suppressed intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo images) was obtained in 31 knees (21 male and 10 female patients; mean age 45.5 years) blindly selected from a series of 252 consecutive knees investigated by dual-detector spiral CT arthrography. Two radiologists determined in consensus the MR signal intensity of the cartilage areas where cartilage defects had been demonstrated on the corresponding reformatted CT arthrographic images. There were 83 cartilage defects at spiral CT arthrography. In 52 (63%) lesion areas, the MR signal intensity was higher than that of adjacent normal cartilage with signal intensity equivalent to (n=31) or lower than (n=21) that of articular fluid. The MR signal intensity was equivalent to that of adjacent normal cartilage in 17 (20%) lesion areas and lower than that of adjacent cartilage in 8 (10%) lesion areas. In 6 (7%) lesion areas, mixed low and high signal intensity was observed. The MR signal intensity of cartilage defects demonstrated on spiral CT arthrographic images varies from low to high on fat-suppressed intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo MR images obtained with our equipment and MR parameters. (orig.)

  6. The effect of boundaries on the asymptotic wavenumber of spiral wave solutions of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation

    KAUST Repository

    Aguareles, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we consider an oscillatory medium whose dynamics are modeled by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. In particular, we focus on n-armed spiral wave solutions of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in a disk of radius d with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. It is well-known that such solutions exist for small enough values of the twist parameter q and large enough values of d. We investigate the effect of boundaries on the rotational frequency of the spirals, which is an unknown of the problem uniquely determined by the parameters d and q. We show that there is a threshold in the parameter space where the effect of the boundary on the rotational frequency switches from being algebraic to exponentially weak. We use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to obtain explicit expressions for the asymptotic wavenumber as a function of the twist parameter and the domain size for small values of q. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Arm coordination in octopus crawling involves unique motor control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Guy; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2015-05-04

    To cope with the exceptional computational complexity that is involved in the control of its hyper-redundant arms [1], the octopus has adopted unique motor control strategies in which the central brain activates rather autonomous motor programs in the elaborated peripheral nervous system of the arms [2, 3]. How octopuses coordinate their eight long and flexible arms in locomotion is still unknown. Here, we present the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling. The results are surprising in several respects: (1) despite its bilaterally symmetrical body, the octopus can crawl in any direction relative to its body orientation; (2) body and crawling orientation are monotonically and independently controlled; and (3) contrasting known animal locomotion, octopus crawling lacks any apparent rhythmical patterns in limb coordination, suggesting a unique non-rhythmical output of the octopus central controller. We show that this uncommon maneuverability is derived from the radial symmetry of the arms around the body and the simple pushing-by-elongation mechanism by which the arms create the crawling thrust. These two together enable a mechanism whereby the central controller chooses in a moment-to-moment fashion which arms to recruit for pushing the body in an instantaneous direction. Our findings suggest that the soft molluscan body has affected in an embodied way [4, 5] the emergence of the adaptive motor behavior of the octopus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. LISA Long-Arm Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James I.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of LISA Long-Arm Interferometry is presented. The contents include: 1) LISA Interferometry; 2) Constellation Design; 3) Telescope Design; 4) Constellation Acquisition; 5) Mechanisms; 6) Optical Bench Design; 7) Phase Measurement Subsystem; 8) Phasemeter Demonstration; 9) Time Delay Interferometry; 10) TDI Limitations; 11) Active Frequency Stabilization; 12) Spacecraft Level Stabilization; 13) Arm-Locking; and 14) Embarassment of Riches.

  9. Teaching about the Arms Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, Dietrich

    1983-01-01

    Focusing on long-term arms-race education, discusses what physicists can do to help provide students and the public with technical information needed to understand issues involved in the nuclear cold war. Suggestions provided focus on public programs, media, publications, education of physicists, arms-race courses, "enrichment in physics courses,"…

  10. Arménie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Verdier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available L’Arménie est une petite république du Caucase, à la limite sud–est de l’Europe, qui a gagné son autonomie en 1990 après l’ouverture du bloc soviétique. Le nouveau Ministère du Patrimoine a sollicité la coopération de la France pour mettre en place une nouvelle politique culturelle. Tout d’abord, une évaluation sur place de la situation dans les domaines des monuments historiques, de l’archéologie et de l’Inventaire a permis d’envisager les réponses à proposer. Pour la demande d’informatisation des dossiers d’inventaire déjà réalisés sous l’autorité de l’Académie de Saint–Petersbourg, nous avons proposé de former des chercheurs arméniens aux méthodes et techniques de l’Inventaire général. L’accueil d’une stagiaire pendant trois mois au service régional de l’Inventaire de Haute–Normandie a été suivi par la mise en place d’un équipement informatique à Yérévan, puis par l’accueil et la formation de techniciens informaticiens et photographes arméniens. De retour dans leur pays ils ont commencé à remettre en place un service d’inventaire dont le programme comprend la création d’une base de données patrimoniales, le recensement de la ville de Yérévan, la numérisation d’images pour la publication d’un indicateur du patrimoine et la préparation de dossiers de protection au titre du patrimoine mondial.The Armenian heritage comprises both archaeological remains of towns destroyed by never–ending wars and a number of old churches from the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, was founded three thousand years ago and is one of Europe’s oldest capitals. From 1925 it has developed according to an ambitious urban planning project. After the major political upheavals of 1991, a special ministry was created to look after the architectural and movable heritage of the country and to promote the Armenian national identity. A mission in Yerevan was

  11. STAR FORMATION IN PARTIALLY GAS-DEPLETED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, James A.; Miner, Jesse; Levy, Lorenza; Robertson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Broadband B and R and Hα images have been obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon, Chile, for 29 spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster and for 18 spirals in non-cluster environments. Pegasus I is a spiral-rich cluster with a low-density intracluster medium and a low galaxy velocity dispersion. When combined with neutral hydrogen (H I) data obtained with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope, acquired by Levy et al. (2007) and by Springob et al. (2005b), we study the star formation rates in disk galaxies as a function of their H I deficiency. To quantify H I deficiency, we use the usual logarithmic deficiency parameter, DEF. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) is quantified by the logarithmic flux ratio of Hα flux to R-band flux, and thus roughly characterizes the logarithmic SFR per unit stellar mass. We find a clear correlation between the global SFR per unit stellar mass and DEF, such that the SFR is lower in more H I-deficient galaxies. This correlation appears to extend from the most gas-rich to the most gas-poor galaxies. We also find a correlation between the central SFR per unit mass relative to the global values, in the sense that the more H I-deficient galaxies have a higher central SFR per unit mass relative to their global SFR values than do gas-rich galaxies. In fact, approximately half of the H I-depleted galaxies have highly elevated SSFRs in their central regions, indicative of a transient evolutionary state. In addition, we find a correlation between gas depletion and the size of the Hα disk (relative to the R-band disk); H I-poor galaxies have truncated disks. Moreover, aside from the elevated central SSFR in many gas-poor spirals, the SSFR is otherwise lower in the Hα disks of gas-poor galaxies than in gas-rich spirals. Thus, both disk truncation and lowered SSFR levels within the star-forming part of the disks (aside from the enhanced nuclear SSFR) correlate with H I deficiency, and both phenomena are found to

  12. Broadband and stable acoustic vortex emitter with multi-arm coiling slits

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Xue

    2016-05-16

    We present the analytical design and experimental realization of a scheme based on multi-arm coiling slits to generate the stable acoustic vortices in a broadband. The proposed structure is able to spiral the acoustic wave spatially and generate the twisted acoustic vortices with invariant topological charge for a long propagation distance. Compared with conventional methods which require the electronic control of a bulky loudspeaker, this scheme provides an effective and compact solution to generate acoustic vortices with controllable topological charge in the broadband, which offers more initiatives in the demanding applications.

  13. Spatial coherence resonance and spatial pattern transition induced by the decrease of inhibitory effect in a neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Gu, Huaguang; Ding, Xueli

    2017-10-01

    Spiral waves were observed in the biological experiment on rat brain cortex with the application of carbachol and bicuculline which can block inhibitory coupling from interneurons to pyramidal neurons. To simulate the experimental spiral waves, a two-dimensional neuronal network composed of pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons was built. By decreasing the percentage of active inhibitory interneurons, the random-like spatial patterns change to spiral waves and to random-like spatial patterns or nearly synchronous behaviors. The spiral waves appear at a low percentage of inhibitory interneurons, which matches the experimental condition that inhibitory couplings of the interneurons were blocked. The spiral waves exhibit a higher order or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) characterized by spatial structure function than both random-like spatial patterns and nearly synchronous behaviors, which shows that changes of the percentage of active inhibitory interneurons can induce spatial coherence resonance-like behaviors. In addition, the relationship between the coherence degree and the spatial structures of the spiral waves is identified. The results not only present a possible and reasonable interpretation to the spiral waves observed in the biological experiment on the brain cortex with disinhibition, but also reveal that the spiral waves exhibit more ordered degree in spatial patterns.

  14. Split-arm swinging: the effect of arm swinging manipulation on interlimb coordination during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Moshe; Zeilig, Gabi; Bloch, Ayala; Fasano, Alfonso; Plotnik, Meir

    2017-08-01

    Human locomotion is defined by bilateral coordination of gait (BCG) and shared features with the fore-hindlimb coordination of quadrupeds. The objective of the present study is to explore the influence of arm swinging (AS) on BCG. Sixteen young, healthy individuals (eight women; eight right motor-dominant, eight left-motor dominant) participated. Participants performed 10 walking trials (2 min). In each of the trials AS was unilaterally manipulated (e.g., arm restriction, weight on the wrist), bilaterally manipulated, or not manipulated. The order of trials was random. Walking trials were performed on a treadmill. Gait kinematics were recorded by a motion capture system. Using feedback-controlled belt speed allowed the participants to walk at a self-determined gait speed. Effects of the manipulations were assessed by AS amplitudes and the phase coordination index (PCI), which quantifies the left-right anti-phased stepping pattern. Most of the AS manipulations caused an increase in PCI values (i.e., reduced lower limb coordination). Unilateral AS manipulation had a reciprocal effect on the AS amplitude of the other arm such that, for example, over-swinging of the right arm led to a decrease in the AS amplitude of the left arm. Side of motor dominance was not found to have a significant impact on PCI and AS amplitude. The present findings suggest that lower limb BCG is markedly influenced by the rhythmic AS during walking. It may thus be important for gait rehabilitation programs targeting BCG to take AS into account. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Control mechanisms for four-limb coordination in human locomotion are not fully known. To study the influence of arm swinging (AS) on bilateral coordination of the lower limbs during walking, we introduced a split-AS paradigm in young, healthy adults. AS manipulations caused deterioration in the anti-phased stepping pattern and impacted the AS amplitudes for the contralateral arm, suggesting that lower limb coordination is markedly

  15. STAR Formation Histories Across the Interacting Galaxy NGC 6872, the Largest-Known Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, RIchard G.; deMello, Duilia F.; Gadotti, DImitri A.; Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; deOliveira, CLaudia Mendes; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    NGC6872, hereafter the Condor, is a large spiral galaxy that is interacting with its closest companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970. The extent of the Condor provides an opportunity for detailed investigation of the impact of the interaction on the current star formation rate and its history across the galaxy, on the age and spatial distribution of its stellar population, and on the mechanism that drives the star formation activity. To address these issues we analyzed the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (near-IR) spectral energy distribution of seventeen 10 kpc diameter regions across the galaxy, and derived their star formation history, current star formation rate, and stellar population and mass. We find that most of the star formation takes place in the extended arms, with very little star formation in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy, in contrast to what was predicted from previous numerical simulations. There is a trend of increasing star formation activity with distance from the nucleus of the galaxy, and no evidence for a recent increase in the current star formation rate due to the interaction. The nucleus itself shows no significant current star formation activity. The extent of the Condor also provides an opportunity to test the applicability of a single standard prescription for conversion of the FUV + IR (22 micrometer) intensities to a star formation rate for all regions. We find that the conversion factor differs from region to region, arising from regional differences in the stellar populations.

  16. Star formation histories across the interacting galaxy NGC 6872, the largest-known spiral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; De Mello, Duilia F. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Benford, Dominic J. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Santiago (Chile); Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; De Oliveira, Claudia Mendes, E-mail: rafael.t.eufrasio@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomia, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas da USP, Rua do Matão 1226, Cidade Universitária, 05508-090 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    NGC 6872, hereafter the Condor, is a large spiral galaxy that is interacting with its closest companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970. The extent of the Condor provides an opportunity for detailed investigation of the impact of the interaction on the current star formation rate and its history across the galaxy, on the age and spatial distribution of its stellar population, and on the mechanism that drives the star formation activity. To address these issues we analyzed the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (near-IR) spectral energy distribution of seventeen 10 kpc diameter regions across the galaxy, and derived their star formation history, current star formation rate, and stellar population and mass. We find that most of the star formation takes place in the extended arms, with very little star formation in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy, in contrast to what was predicted from previous numerical simulations. There is a trend of increasing star formation activity with distance from the nucleus of the galaxy, and no evidence for a recent increase in the current star formation rate due to the interaction. The nucleus itself shows no significant current star formation activity. The extent of the Condor also provides an opportunity to test the applicability of a single standard prescription for conversion of the FUV + IR (22 μm) intensities to a star formation rate for all regions. We find that the conversion factor differs from region to region, arising from regional differences in the stellar populations.

  17. Arm motion coupling during locomotion-like actions: An experimental study and a dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapkova, E.Yu; Terekhov, A.V.; Latash, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the coordination of arm movements in standing persons who performed an out-of-phase arm-swinging task while stepping in place or while standing. The subjects were instructed to stop one of the arms in response to an auditory signal while trying to keep the rest of the movement pattern unchanged. A significant increase was observed in the amplitude of the arm that continued swinging under both the stepping and standing conditions. This increase was similar between the right and left arms. A dynamic model was developed including two coupled non-linear van der Pol oscillators. We assumed that stopping an arm did not eliminate the coupling but introduced a new constraint. Within the model, superposition of two factors, a command to stop the ongoing movement of one arm and the coupling between the two oscillators, has been able to account for the observed effects. The model makes predictions for future experiments. PMID:21628725

  18. Sometimes two arms are enough--an unusual life-stage in brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Sabine; Alme, Øydis

    2015-08-03

    Off West Africa (Angola-Morocco), benthos samples were collected in the years 2005-2012. These contained 124 specimens of brittle stars with two long arms and three extremely short or absent arms and an elongated, narrow disc. These unusual brittle stars, as well as 33 specimens with five fully developed arms, were identified as Amphiura ungulata. The specimens with unequal arms were juvenile stages, whereas adults had five equal arms. The large number of specimens with unequal arms suggests that this condition is not the result of damage and regeneration, but a normal growth pattern in this species. This study documents the morphology by SEM, amends the species description, and discusses possible explanations for the evolution of this condition. Although brittle star species with unequal arm growth have been reported, this is an extreme case that was unknown before this study.

  19. Arm and leg substrate utilization and muscle adaptation after prolonged low-intensity training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2010-01-01

    This review will focus on current data where substrate metabolism in arm and leg muscle is investigated and discuss the presence of higher carbohydrate oxidation and lactate release observed during arm compared with leg exercise. Furthermore, a basis for a possible difference in substrate...... partitioning between endogenous and exogenous substrate during arm and leg exercise will be debated. Moreover the review will probe if differences between arm and leg muscle are merely a result of different training status rather than a qualitative difference in limb substrate regulation. Along this line...... the review will address the available studies on low-intensity training performed separately with arm or legs or as whole-body training to evaluate if this leads to different adaptations in arm and leg muscle resulting in different substrate utilization patterns during separate arm or leg exercise...

  20. Curvature-driven bubbles or droplets on the spiral surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanpeng; Liu, Jianlin; Hou, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Directional motion of droplets or bubbles can often be observed in nature and our daily life, and this phenomenon holds great potential in many engineering areas. The study shows that droplets or bubbles can be driven to migrate perpetually on some special substrates, such as the Archimedean spiral, the logarithmic spiral and a cantilever sheet in large deflection. It is found that a bubble approaches or deviates from the position with highest curvature of the substrate, when it is on the concave or convex side. This fact is helpful to explain the repelling water capability of Nepenthes alata. Based on the force and energy analysis, the mechanism of the bubble migration is well addressed. These findings pave a new way to accurately manipulate droplet or bubble movement, which bring inspirations to the design of microfluidic and water harvesting devices, as well as oil displacement and ore filtration.

  1. Synchronized control of spiral CT scan for security inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jue; Jiang Zenghui; Wang Fuquan

    2008-01-01

    In security inspection system of spiral CT, the synchronization between removing and rotating, and the scan synchronization between rotating and sampling influence quality of image reconstruction, so it is difficulty and important that how to realize synchronized scan. According to the controlling demand of multi-slice Spiral CT, the method to realize synchronized scan is given. a synchronized control system is designed, in which we use a industrial PC as the control computer, use magnetic grids as position detectors, use alternating current servo motor and roller motor as drivers respectively drive moving axis and rotating axis. This method can solve the problem of synchronized scan, and has a feasibility and value of use. (authors)

  2. Status of the SPIRAL 2 LINAC cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghribi, A.; Bernaudin, P.-E.; Vassal, A.; Bonne, F.

    2017-07-01

    SPIRAL 2 is a state of the art superconducting linear accelerator expected to deliver some of the highest intensity rare isotope beams on earth. The project has been in development/design, fabrication and installation for over 10 years and is now reaching its final critical stages before commissioning. One of its most critical parts is a cryoplant and a cryodistribution system that feed the heart of the accelerator with the necessary refrigeration power and allow the required pressure and thermal regulation to be achieved and maintained in a reliable way. This paper summarises the latest updates of the cryogenic system before the first cool down trials. It also plots the strategies and R&D efforts undertaken to tackle some of the challenges that SPIRAL 2 is expected to face.

  3. Distributed temperature sensing using a SPIRAL configuration ultrasonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    Distributed temperature sensing has important applications in the long term monitoring of critical enclosures such as containment vessels, flue gas stacks, furnaces, underground storage tanks and buildings for fire risk. This paper presents novel techniques for such measurements, using wire in a spiral configuration and having special embodiments such a notch for obtaining wave reflections from desired locations. Transduction is performed using commercially available Piezo-electric crystal that is bonded to one end of the waveguide. Lower order axisymmetric guided ultrasonic modes were employed. Time of fight (TOF) differences between predefined reflectors located on the waveguides are used to infer temperature profile in a chamber with different temperatures. The L(0,1) wave mode (pulse echo approach) was generated/received in a spiral waveguide at different temperatures for this work. The ultrasonic measurements were compared with commercially available thermocouples.

  4. Spiral actin-polymerization waves can generate amoeboidal cell crawling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Kruse, K.

    2014-05-01

    Amoeboidal cell crawling on solid substrates is characterized by protrusions that seemingly appear randomly along the cell periphery and drive the cell forward. For many cell types, it is known that the protrusions result from polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, little is known about how the formation of protrusions is triggered and whether the appearance of subsequent protrusions is coordinated. Recently, the spontaneous formation of actin-polymerization waves was observed. These waves have been proposed to orchestrate the cytoskeletal dynamics during cell crawling. Here, we study the impact of cytoskeletal polymerization waves on cell migration using a phase-field approach. In addition to directionally moving cells, we find states reminiscent of amoeboidal cell crawling. In this framework, new protrusions are seen to emerge from a nucleation process, generating spiral actin waves in the cell interior. Nucleation of new spirals does not require noise, but occurs in a state that is apparently displaying spatio-temporal chaos.

  5. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a spiral startup staged sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Miller, David Scott [Katy, TX

    2009-12-15

    Methods for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include treating a first zone of the formation. Treatment of a plurality of zones of the formation may be begun at selected times after the treatment of the first zone begins. The treatment of at least two successively treated zones may begin at a selected time after treatment of the previous zone begins. At least two of the successively treated zones may be adjacent to the zone treated previously. The successive treatment of the zones proceeds in an outward, substantially spiral sequence from the first zone so that the treatment of the zones may move substantially spirally outwards towards a boundary of the treatment area.

  6. Chiral spiral induced by a strong magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuki Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modification of the chiral phase structure of QCD due to an external magnetic field. We first demonstrate how the effect of magnetic field can systematically be incorporated into a generalized Ginzburg-Landau framework. We then analyze the phase structure in the vicinity of the chiral critical point. In the chiral limit, the effect is found to be so drastic that it brings a “continent” of chiral spiral in the phase diagram, by which the chiral tricritical point is totally washed out. This is the case no matter how small the intensity of magnetic field is. On the other hand, the current quark mass protects the chiral critical point from a weak magnetic field. However, the critical point will eventually be covered by the chiral spiral phase as the magnetic field grows.

  7. Heat transfer studies on spiral plate heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajavel Rangasamy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the heat transfer coefficients in a spiral plate heat exchanger are investigated. The test section consists of a plate of width 0.3150 m, thickness 0.001 m and mean hydraulic diameter of 0.01 m. The mass flow rate of hot water (hot fluid is varying from 0.5 to 0.8 kg/s and the mass flow rate of cold water (cold fluid varies from 0.4 to 0.7 kg/s. Experiments have been conducted by varying the mass flow rate, temperature, and pressure of cold fluid, keeping the mass flow rate of hot fluid constant. The effects of relevant parameters on spiral plate heat exchanger are investigated. The data obtained from the experimental study are compared with the theoretical data. Besides, a new correlation for the Nusselt number which can be used for practical applications is proposed.

  8. Scintigraphic diagnosis of spiral fracture in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein-Foucher, C.; Venel, H.; Legouffe, P.; Ythier, H.; Legghe, R.; Marchandise, X.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report 8 cases of unsuspected bone fracture in children, identified at bone scan. Common features were the children's young age (1 to 3 years), the absence of clinical suspicion, the initially normal X-rays, the fracture type (sprial fracture of the tibia undisplaced), and the uniform of appearance the bone scan. These data confirm the value of the bone scan in limping children and suggest that spiral fracture of the tibia is a frequent and underdiagnosed condition in children [fr

  9. Ultra-precision turning of complex spiral optical delay line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Po; Fang, Fengzhou; Wang, Qichang

    2011-11-01

    Optical delay line (ODL) implements the vertical or depth scanning of optical coherence tomography, which is the most important factor affecting the scanning resolution and speed. The spinning spiral mirror is found as an excellent optical delay device because of the high-speed and high-repetition-rate. However, it is one difficult task to machine the mirror due to the special shape and precision requirement. In this paper, the spiral mirror with titled parabolic generatrix is proposed, and the ultra-precision turning method is studied for its machining using the spiral mathematic model. Another type of ODL with the segmental shape is also introduced and machined to make rotation balance for the mass equalization when scanning. The efficiency improvement is considered in details, including the rough cutting with the 5- axis milling machine, the machining coordinates unification, and the selection of layer direction in turning. The onmachine measuring method based on stylus gauge is designed to analyze the shape deviation. The air bearing is used as the measuring staff and the laser interferometer sensor as the position sensor, whose repeatability accuracy is proved up to 10nm and the stable feature keeps well. With this method developed, the complex mirror with nanometric finish of 10.7nm in Ra and the form error within 1um are achieved.

  10. Intracranial aneurysms: evaluation in 200 patients with spiral CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.; Kingston, R.J.; Markson, G.; Dorsch, N.W.C.; McMahon, J.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the usefulness of spiral CT angiography (CTA) with three- dimensional reconstructions in defining intracranial aneurysms, particularly around the Circle of Willis. Two hundred consecutive patients with angiographic and/or surgical correlation were studied between 1993 and 1998, with CTA performed on a GE HiSpeed unit and Windows workstation. The following clinical situations were evaluated: conventional CT suspicion of an aneurysm; follow-up of treated aneurysm remnants or of untreated aneurysms; subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and negative angiography; family or past aneurysm history; and for improved definition of aneurysm anatomy. Spiral CTA detected 140 of 144 aneurysms, and an overall sensitivity of 97%, including 30 of 32 aneurysms 3 mm or less in size. In 38 patients with SAH and negative angiography, CTA found six of the seven aneurysms finally diagnosed. There was no significant artefact in 17 of 23 patients (74%) with clips. The specificity of CTA was 86% with 8 false-positive cases. Spiral CTA is very useful in demonstrating intracranial aneurysms. (orig.)

  11. Three-dimensional spiral CT for neurosurgical planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, H.M.; Bertalanffy, H.; Mayfrank, L.; Thron, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Gilsbach, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out 22 examinations to determine the value of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric CT (spiral CT) for planning neurosurgical procedures. All examinations were carried out on a of the first generation spiral CT. A tube model was used to investigate the influence of different parameter settings. Bolus injection of nonionic contrast medium was used when vessels or strongly enhancing tumours were to be delineated. 3D reconstructions were carried out using the integrated 3D software of the scanner. We found a table feed of 3 mm/s with a slice thickness of 2 mm and an increment of 1 mm to be suitable for most purposes. For larger regions of interest a table feed of 5 mm was the maximum which could be used without blurring of the 3D images. Particular advantages of 3D reconstructed spiral scanning were seen in the planning of approaches to the lower clivus, acquired or congenital bony abnormalities and when the relationship between vessels, tumour and bone was important. (orig.)

  12. TURBULENCE AND STAR FORMATION IN A SAMPLE OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Erin; Chien, Li-Hsin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University 527 S Beaver Street, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Hunter, Deidre A., E-mail: erin-maier@uiowa.edu, E-mail: Lisa.Chien@nau.edu, E-mail: dah@lowell.edu [Lowell Observatory 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. on the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, as indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the neutral hydrogen (H i) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We apply the statistical moments in three different methods—the galaxy as a whole, divided into a function of radii and then into grids. We create individual grid maps of kurtosis for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with their far-ultraviolet images taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite.We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies, in which the variation does not appear to trace any star-forming regions. This may, however, be due to the spatial resolution of our analysis, which could potentially limit the scale of turbulent motions that we are sensitive to greater than ∼700 pc. From comparison between the moments themselves, we find that the gas motions in our sampled galaxies are largely supersonic. This analysis also shows that the Burkhart et al. methods may be applied not just to dwarf galaxies but also to normal spiral galaxies.

  13. International security and arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekeus, R.

    2000-01-01

    The end of the cold war also ended the focus on the bilateral approach to arms control and disarmament. Key concepts of security needed to be revisited, along with their implications for the disarmament and arms control agenda. Though there is currently a unipolar global security environment, there remain important tasks on the multilateral arms control agenda. The major task is that of reducing and eliminating weapons of mass destruction, especially nuclear weapons. The author contends that maintaining reliance on the nuclear-weapons option makes little sense in a time when the major Powers are strengthening their partnerships in economics, trade, peacemaking and building. (author)

  14. ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, DL

    2013-03-13

    The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as Instrument Mentors. Instrument Mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets.

  15. Magnetostrictive hypersound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychkov, Igor V. [Chelyabinsk State University, 129 Br. Kashirinykh Str., Chelyabinsk 454001 (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), 76 Lenin Prospekt, Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, Dmitry A., E-mail: kuzminda@csu.ru [Chelyabinsk State University, 129 Br. Kashirinykh Str., Chelyabinsk 454001 (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), 76 Lenin Prospekt, Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation); Kamantsev, Alexander P.; Koledov, Victor V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of RAS, Mokhovaya Street 11-7, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    In present work we have investigated magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition from spiral to collinear state. We found that such magnets may generate transverse sound waves with the wavelength equal to the spiral period. We have examined two types of spiral magnetic structures: with inhomogeneous exchange and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions. Frequency of the waves from exchange-caused spiral magnetic structure may reach some THz, while in case of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction-caused spiral it may reach some GHz. These waves will be emitted like a sound pulses. Amplitude of the waves is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. Some aspects of microwaves to hypersound transformation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of phase transition have been investigated as well. Results of the work may be interesting for investigation of phase transition kinetics as well, as for various hypersound applications. - Highlights: • Magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets at phase transition (PT) is studied. • Spiral magnets during PT may generate transverse sound with wavelength equal to spiral period. • Amplitude of the sound is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. • Microwave-to-sound transformation in the vicinity of PT is investigated as well.

  16. Filtering sensory information with XCSF: improving learning robustness and robot arm control performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneissler, Jan; Stalph, Patrick O; Drugowitsch, Jan; Butz, Martin V

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown previously that the control of a robot arm can be efficiently learned using the XCSF learning classifier system, which is a nonlinear regression system based on evolutionary computation. So far, however, the predictive knowledge about how actual motor activity changes the state of the arm system has not been exploited. In this paper, we utilize the forward velocity kinematics knowledge of XCSF to alleviate the negative effect of noisy sensors for successful learning and control. We incorporate Kalman filtering for estimating successive arm positions, iteratively combining sensory readings with XCSF-based predictions of hand position changes over time. The filtered arm position is used to improve both trajectory planning and further learning of the forward velocity kinematics. We test the approach on a simulated kinematic robot arm model. The results show that the combination can improve learning and control performance significantly. However, it also shows that variance estimates of XCSF prediction may be underestimated, in which case self-delusional spiraling effects can hinder effective learning. Thus, we introduce a heuristic parameter, which can be motivated by theory, and which limits the influence of XCSF's predictions on its own further learning input. As a result, we obtain drastic improvements in noise tolerance, allowing the system to cope with more than 10 times higher noise levels.

  17. Asymmetric metallicity patterns in the stellar velocity space with RAVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoja, T.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Monari, G.; Famaey, B.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Grebel, E. K.; Steinmetz, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gibson, B. K.; Bienaymé, O.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Zwitter, T.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The chemical abundances of stars encode information on their place and time of origin. Stars formed together in e.g. a cluster, should present chemical homogeneity. Also disk stars influenced by the effects of the bar and the spiral arms might have distinct chemical signatures depending on the type of orbit that they follow, e.g. from the inner versus outer regions of the Milky Way. Aims: We explore the correlations between velocity and metallicity and the possible distinct chemical signatures of the velocity over-densities of the local Galactic neighbourhood. Methods: We use the large spectroscopic survey RAVE and the Geneva Copenhagen Survey. We compare the metallicity distribution of regions in the velocity plane (vR,vφ) with that of their symmetric counterparts (-vR,vφ). We expect similar metallicity distributions if there are no tracers of a sub-population (e.g. a dispersed cluster, accreted stars), if the disk of the Galaxy is axisymmetric, and if the orbital effects of the bar and the spiral arms are weak. Results: We find that the metallicity-velocity space of the solar neighbourhood is highly patterned. A large fraction of the velocity plane shows differences in the metallicity distribution when comparing symmetric vR regions. The typical differences in the median metallicity are of 0.05 dex with statistical significant of at least 95% confidence, and with values up to 0.6 dex. For stars with low azimuthal velocity vφ, the ones moving outwards. These include stars in the Hercules and Hyades moving groups and other velocity branch-like structures. For higher vφ, the stars moving inwards have higher metallicity than those moving outwards. We have also discovered a positive gradient in vφ with respect to metallicity at high metallicities, apart from the two known positive and negative gradients for the thick and thin disks. Conclusions: The most likely interpretation of the metallicity asymmetry is that it is mainly due to the orbital effects of

  18. Borehole tool outrigger arm displacement control mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    As the outrigger arms of a borehole logging tool are flexed inwardly and outwardly according to the diameter of the borehole opening through which they pass, the corresponding axial displacements of the ends of the arms are controlled to determine the axial positions of the arms relative to the tool. Specifically, as the arm ends move, they are caused to rotate by a cam mechanism. The stiffness of the arms causes the arm ends to rotate in unison, and the exact positions of the arms on the tool are then controlled by the differential movements of the arm ends in the cams

  19. Hematocrit, Anemia, and Arm Preference for Blood Sample ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and pattern of anemia, as well the arm preferences for blood sample collection among pregnant women in Enugu, South East Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: HCT was determined using venous blood of 200 antenatal women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH). Enugu, Nigeria. Questionnaires were used ...

  20. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with spiral and electron-beam CT; Diagnostik der Lungenembolie mit Spiral- und Elektronenstrahl-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, U.J.; Bruening, R.D.; Becker, C.R.; Konschitzky, H.; Muehling, O.; Staebler, A.; Helmberger, T.; Holzknecht, N.; Reiser, M.F. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Knez, A.; Haberl, R. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 1

    1998-12-01

    Purpose: To compare spiral (SCT) and electron-beam CT (EBT) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: From June 1997 to June 1998 188 patients with suspected acute or chronic thrombembolism of the pulmonary arteries were examined. A total of 108 patients were scanned using SCT and 80 patients using EBT. On each scanner two different scan protocols were evaluated. Conclusions: Advanced CT scanning techniques allow the highly accurate diagnosis of central and peripheral PE. Other potentially life-threatening underlying diseases are also readily recognized. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Fragestellung: Spiral-CT (SCT) und Elektronenstrahlcomputertomographie (EBT) sollten hinsichtlich ihrer Eignung fuer die Diagnostik der Lungenembolie (LE) verglichen werden. Methode: Von Juni 1997 bis Juni 1998 wurden 188 Patienten mit Verdacht auf akute oder chronische thrombembolische Veraenderungen der Lungenarterien untersucht. Die CT-Diagnostik erfolgte dabei bei 108 Patienten mit Spiral-CT und bei 80 Patienten mit EBT. Schlussfolgerungen: Moderne CT-Scan-Verfahren erlauben mit hoher Genauigkeit die Diagnose der zentralen und peripheren Lungenembolie. Die EBT bietet Vorteile in der Darstellung herznaher peripherer Lungenarterien. Andere lebendsbedrohliche Ursachen fuer die Beschwerden des Patienten werden mit der CT sicher erkannt. (orig./AJ)

  1. Phyllotactic pattern and stem cell fate are determined by the Arabidopsis homeobox gene BELLRINGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Byrne; Andrew T. Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Robert A. Martienssen

    2003-01-01

    Lateral organs in plants arise from the meristem in a stereotypical pattern known as phyllotaxy. Spiral patterns result from initiation of successive organs at a fixed angle of divergence but variable patterns of physical contact. Such patterns ultimately give rise to individual leaves and flowers at positions related to each other by consecutive terms in the...

  2. Unequal-Arms Michelson Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Michelson interferometers allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the phase stability of the laser light injected into their two almost equal-length arms. If, however, the two arms are unequal, the laser fluctuations can not be removed by simply recombining the two beams. This is because the laser jitters experience different time delays in the two arms, and therefore can not cancel at the photo detector. We present here a method for achieving exact laser noise cancellation, even in an unequal-arm interferometer. The method presented in this paper requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam. By linearly combining the two data sets with themselves, after they have been properly time shifted, we show that it is possible to construct a new data set that is free of laser fluctuations. An application of this technique to future planned space-based laser interferometer detector3 of gravitational radiation is discussed.

  3. Nudging Armed Groups: How Civilians Transmit Norms of Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kaplan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available What are the varying roles that norms play to either enable or constrain violence in armed conflict settings? The article examines this question by drawing on experiences from communities and armed groups in Colombia and Syria. It begins by presenting an explanation of how norms of violence and nonviolence may arise within communities and influence the behavior of civilian residents, reducing the chances of them becoming involved with armed groups. It then considers how civilian communities can transmit those same norms, shared understandings, and patterns of interaction to the ranks of illegal armed groups and subsequently shape their decisions about the use of violence against civilians. The author argues that civilians may be better positioned to promote the principles codified in International Humanitarian Law than international humanitarian organizations because they have closer contact with irregular armed actors and are viewed with greater legitimacy. The analysis illustrates that to better understand civilian protection mechanisms it is essential to study the interactions between communities and armed actors.

  4. Naming polyhedra by general face-spirals - theory and applications to fullerenes and other polyhedral molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Lukas; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Avery, James Emil

    2018-01-01

    We present a general face-spiral algorithm for cubic polyhedral graphs (including fullerenes and fulleroids), and extend it to the full class of all polyhedral graphs by way of the leapfrog transform. This yields compact canonical representations of polyhedra with a simple and intuitive geometrical...... be found together with the canonical general spiral at negligible cost. The algorithm is fully compatible with the classical spiral algorithm developed by Manolopoulos for fullerenes, i. e., classical spirals are accepted as input, and spiralable graphs lead to identical output. We prove that the algorithm...... is correct and complete. The worst case runtime complexity is for general N-vertex polyhedral graphs, with J the sum of all jump lengths. When the number of faces of any particular size is bounded by a constant, such as the case for fullerenes, this reduces to . We have calculated canonical general spirals...

  5. Displacement and resonance behaviors of a piezoelectric diaphragm driven by a double-sided spiral electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Zhiyuan

    2012-04-03

    This paper presents the design of a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) diaphragm actuated by double-sided patterned electrodes. Au/Cr electrodes were deposited on bulk PZT wafers by sputtering while patterned by a lift-off process. SU-8 thick film was used to form the structural layer. Double-spiral electrode induced in-plane poling and piezoelectric elongation are converted to an out-of-plane displacement due to the confined boundary condition. The influence of different drive configurations and electrode parameters on deflection has been calculated by finite element methods (FEM) using a uniform field model. Impedance and quasi-static displacement spectra of the diaphragm were measured after poling. Adouble-sided patterned electrode diaphragm can be actuated by more drive configurations than a single-sided one. Compared with a single-sided electrode drive, a double-sided out-of-phase drive configuration increases the coupling coefficient of the fundamental resonance from 7.6% to 11.8%. The displacement response of the diaphragm increases from 2.6 to 8.6nmV 1. Configurations including the electric field component perpendicular to the poling direction can stimulate shear modes of the diaphragm. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Pulmonary embolism: spiral CT evaluation; Embolie pulmonaire: apport de la tomodensitometrie helicoidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senac, J.P.; Vernhet, H.; Bousquet, C.; Giron, J.; Pieuchot, P.; Durand, G.; Benezet, O.; Aubas, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1995-06-01

    Purpose: Spiral computed tomography was compared retrospectively with digital substraction pulmonary angiography (PA) in 45 patients suspected of having acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. Materials and method : 45 patients in whom the presence of acute or chronic pulmonary embolism was suspected underwent examination by spiral CT and PA. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was based on the direct visualization of intraluminal clots. The study of the agreement between the two methods was based on the Kappa test. In 35 cases, pulmonary emboli were proved. Acute pulmonary emboli were present in 28 cases and chronic in 7 cases. Results: Spiral computed tomography represents an excellent way to detect acute pulmonary embolism. In the chronic form, spiral CT is better than PA to detect intraluminal clots. However, Spiral CT can fail to detect small emboli in the peripheral arterial bed. In the 10 patients without pulmonary embolism, the spiral CT proved diagnosis pulmonary oedema (n=3), lymphangi-carcinoma (n=4), pleural effusion (n=3). Conclusion: This study suggest that the spiral CT examination is accurate for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism specifically in case of suspected important embolism. The advantages of spiral CT are multiple (non invasive, wide diagnosis spectrum). However, may be a limitation to is use is insufficient distal thrombi detection. This eventuality (5 to 10% in the Pioped study) justify the practice of pulmonary angiography. Spiral CT improvements should reduce this insufficiency in the next future. (Authors). 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Magnetic field sensor based on fiber Bragg grating with a spiral microgroove ablated by femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yutang; Yang, Minghong; Xu, Gang; Yuan, Yinquan

    2013-07-15

    A novel magnetic field sensor based on Terfenol-D coated fiber Bragg grating with spiral microstructure was proposed and demonstrated. Through a specially-designed holder, the spiral microstructure was ablated into the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) cladding by femtosecond laser. Due to the spiral microstructure, the sensitivity of FBG coated with magnetostrictive film was enhanced greatly. When the spiral pitch is 50 μm and microgroove depth is 13.5 μm, the sensitivity of the magnetic field sensor is roughly 5 times higher than that of non-microstructured standard FBG. The response to magnetic field is reversible, and could be applicable for magnetic field detection.

  8. A novel measuring method for arbitrary optical vortex by three spiral spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Bo [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo, Lana [School of Electronics and Information, Guangdong Polytechnic Normal University, Guangzhou 510665 (China); Yue, Chengfeng [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhilie, E-mail: tangzhl@scnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2017-02-26

    In this letter, the topological charge of non-integer vortices determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Based on the conclusion, a novel method to measure non-integer vortices is presented. This method is applicable not only to arbitrary non-integer vortex but also to arbitrary integer vortex. - Highlights: • Different non-integer vortices cannot have three spiral spectra is demonstrated. • Relationship between the non-integer topological charge and the spiral spectra is presented. • Topological charge of non-integer vortices can be determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra.

  9. Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F. [Fish and Wildlife Science and Allocation, Ministry of Environment, Province of British Columbia

    2009-07-01

    This report summarizes results from the fifteenth year (2006) of nutrient additions to the North Arm of Kootenay Lake and three years of nutrient additions to the South Arm. Experimental fertilization of the lake has been conducted using an adaptive management approach in an effort to restore lake productivity lost as a result of nutrient uptake in upstream reservoirs. The primary objective of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are the main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to the North Arm in 2006 was 44.7 tonnes of P and 248.4 tonnes of N. The total fertilizer load added to the South Arm was 257 tonnes of nitrogen; no P was added. Kootenay Lake has an area of 395 km{sup 2}, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. Kootenay Lake is a monomictic lake, generally mixing from late fall to early spring and stratifying during the summer. Surface water temperatures generally exceed 20 C for only a few weeks in July. Results of oxygen profiles were similar to previous years with the lake being well oxygenated from the surface to the bottom depths at all stations. Similar to past years, Secchi disc measurements at all stations in 2006 indicate a typical seasonal pattern of decreasing depths associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, followed by increasing depths as the bloom gradually decreases by the late summer and fall. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L and tended to decrease as summer advanced. Over the sampling season dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations decreased, with the decline corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being utilized by phytoplankton during summer stratification. Owing to the importance of epilimnetic nitrate

  10. CFD simulation of flow through single and multi vane spiral pump for low pressure application using moving node unsteady computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, I.; Mahendra, A.K.; Chandresh, B.G.; Srikanthan, M.R.; Bera, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    A spiral pump uses two interleaved spirals (it can be involutes of a circle, involutes of a square, hybrid wraps, Archimedean spiral, logarithmic spirals and so on). Interleaved spiral orbits eccentrically without rotation around a fixed scroll, thereby trapping and compressing pockets of fluids between the spirals. Another method of providing the compression motion is by virtue of co-rotating the spirals synchronously with an offset in centers of rotation thereby providing relative motion similar to orbiting. Recently spiral pumps for low-pressure application have become popular. Since spiral pumps contain gas volumes, whose shapes and size change continuously, the flow fields inside the pumps is time dependent. The unsteadiness controls the mechanisms responsible for the behavior of the spiral pump components. To improve the spiral pump design for better performance as per our process requirement and reliability, information is required to understand the detailed physics of the unsteady flows inside the spiral pumps. The unsteady flows in a pump are studied numerically. The system simulated includes one side gap between fixed and moving spirals as the other side lies just in the reverse symmetry of the one side. Heavy molecular weight, condensable gas is used as the moving fluid. The mesh free Least Square Kinetic Upwind Method (LSKUM) for moving node is applied for numerical analysis of wobbling spiral. Nodes and boundaries change their positions, for every real time step hence at every iteration nodes take new coordinates. Our work consists of identifying various spiral dimensions and geometry, geometric modeling of suction process, identifying the eccentric orbiting motion of the moving spiral, formation of variable velocity moving nodes. Flow analysis of the spiral pump is done with a view to design and develop new pump as per our requirement. Experimental data from an existing spiral pump is used to carryout validation of the code. (author)

  11. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when in the downward position, shall extend across... clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm shall start its downward motion not less than...

  12. 21 CFR 890.3640 - Arm sling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arm sling. 890.3640 Section 890.3640 Food and... PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3640 Arm sling. (a) Identification. An arm sling is a device intended for medical purposes to immobilize the arm, by means of a fabric band...

  13. Algorithms for Unequal-Arm Michelson Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Giacomo; Hellings, Ronald W.; Tinto, Massimo; Bender, Peter L.; Faller, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A method of data acquisition and data analysis is described in which the performance of Michelson-type interferometers with unequal arms can be made nearly the same as interferometers with equal arms. The method requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam.

  14. A spiral model of musical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBangert

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a model of how musicians make decisions about performing notated music. The model builds on psychological theories of decision-making and was developed from empirical studies of Western art music performance that aimed to identify intuitive and deliberate processes of decision-making, a distinction consistent with dual-process theories of cognition. The model proposes that the proportion of intuitive (Type 1 and deliberate (Type 2 decision-making processes changes with increasing expertise and conceptualises this change as movement along a continually narrowing upward spiral where the primary axis signifies principal decision-making type and the vertical axis marks level of expertise. The model is intended to have implications for the development of expertise as described in two main phases. The first is movement from a primarily intuitive approach in the early stages of learning towards greater deliberation as analytical techniques are applied during practice. The second phase occurs as deliberate decisions gradually become automatic (procedural, increasing the role of intuitive processes. As a performer examines more issues or reconsiders decisions, the spiral motion towards the deliberate side and back to the intuitive is repeated indefinitely. With increasing expertise, the spiral tightens to signify greater control over decision type selection. The model draws on existing theories, particularly Evans’ (2011 Intervention Model of dual-process theories, Cognitive Continuum Theory (Hammond et al., 1987; Hammond, 2007, and Baylor’s (2001 U-shaped model for the development of intuition by level of expertise. By theorising how musical decision-making operates over time and with increasing expertise, this model could be used as a framework for future research in music performance studies and performance science more generally.

  15. 26Al kinematics: superbubbles following the spiral arms?. Constraints from the statistics of star clusters and HI supershells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, Martin G. H.; Diehl, Roland; Bagetakos, Yiannis; Brinks, Elias; Burkert, Andreas; Gerhard, Ortwin; Greiner, Jochen; Kretschmer, Karsten; Siegert, Thomas

    Context. High-energy resolution spectroscopy of the 1.8 MeV radioactive decay line of 26Al with the SPI instrument onboard the INTEGRAL satellite has recently revealed that diffuse 26Al has higher velocities than other components of the interstellar medium in the Milky Way. 26Al shows Galactic

  16. Motivational Spiral Models (MSM): common and distinct motivations in context

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Laurel J

    2013-01-01

    Motivational Spiral Models (MSM) show links over time among self concepts, feelings, strategies, skills and participation in everyday activities. In theory, MSM have many common features, with distinct features in particular contexts. This project examined children?s motivation to participate in literacy (MSM-L), social (MSM-S) and physical activities (MSM-P). The participants in Study 1 (N?=?32) were 9 to 11 years old, and in Study 2 (N?=?73) were 4 to 12 year old children. Locations were cl...

  17. RFID Tag Design Using Spiral Resonators and Defected Ground Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Veysi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple generalized approach to design a compact chipless radio frequency identification tag. The proposed chipless tag encodes data into the spectral signature using a set of spiral resonators on both sides of substrate. Transmission amplitude component of the tag is used for data encoding. For miniaturization purpose, defected ground structure is used to reduce the circuit size by half compared to the conventional cascading technique. The proposed chipless tag operates between 4-6 GHz and produces 256 different binary strings through eight encoded bits. Measurement and simulation results verify the authenticity of this design.

  18. Vacuum sealing with a spiral grooved gas dynamic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tadashi

    1979-01-01

    Gas dynamic seals with rectangular spiral grooves are studied theoretically taking the effects of sidewalls of the grooves and the effects of gas compressibility into account, and slip boundary conditions are employed. The results are compared with the existing experimental data and the validity of the theory is confirmed over a wide pressure range except for the extremely low pressures. Suggestions are made regarding the choice of the geometrical dimensions, i.e., aspect ratio, helix angle, clearance parameter and groove width ratio. (author)

  19. Spiral orbits and oscillations in historical evolution of empires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Taksu; Poghosyan, Sergey S.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce the concept of metaasabiya, the second non-material resource, to the asabiya theory of historical dynamics. We find that the resulting three variable dynamical system has peculiar features such as repelling or attracting axes and spiraling orbits in the phase space. Depending on the initial state, the system can go through series of oscillatory rises and falls, mimicking the geopolitical evolution of real-world polities. These distinctive features, absent in conventional Lotka-Volterra type biological systems, reveal the hidden richness inherent in the asabiya theory.

  20. NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Paul; Mazanek, Dan; Reeves, David; Naasz, Bo; Cichy, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a robotic mission to visit a large near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface, and redirect it into a stable orbit around the Moon. Once returned to cislunar space in the mid-2020s, astronauts will explore the boulder and return to Earth with samples. This Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) is part of NASA’s plan to advance the technologies, capabilities, and spaceflight experience needed for a human mission to the Martian system in the 2030s. Subsequent human and robotic missions to the asteroidal material would also be facilitated by its return to cislunar space. Although ARM is primarily a capability demonstration mission (i.e., technologies and associated operations), there exist significant opportunities to advance our knowledge of small bodies in the synergistic areas of science, planetary defense, asteroidal resources and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and capability and technology demonstrations. In order to maximize the knowledge return from the mission, NASA is organizing an ARM Investigation Team, which is being preceded by the Formulation Assessment and Support Team. These teams will be comprised of scientists, technologists, and other qualified and interested individuals to help plan the implementation and execution of ARM. An overview of robotic and crewed segments of ARM, including the mission requirements, NEA targets, and mission operations, will be provided along with a discussion of the potential opportunities associated with the mission.

  1. Pattern Speeds of BIMA SONG Galaxies with Molecule-dominated Interstellar Mediums Using the Tremaine-Weinberg Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Richard J.; Wallin, John F.

    2004-10-01

    We apply the Tremaine-Weinberg method of pattern speed determination to data cubes of CO emission in six spiral galaxies from the BIMA Survey of Nearby Galaxies, each with an interstellar medium dominated by molecular gas. We compare derived pattern speeds with estimates based on other methods, usually involving the identification of a predicted behavior at one or more resonances of the pattern(s). In two cases (NGC 1068 and NGC 4736), we find evidence for a central bar pattern speed that is greater than that of the surrounding spiral and roughly consistent with previous estimates. However, the spiral pattern speed in both cases is much larger than previous determinations. For the barred spirals NGC 3627 and NGC 4321, the method is insensitive to the bar pattern speed (the bar in each is nearly parallel to the major axis; in this case the method will not work), but for the former galaxy the spiral pattern speed found agrees with previous estimates of the bar pattern speed, suggesting that these two structures are part of a single pattern. For the latter, the spiral pattern speed found is in agreement with several previous determinations. For the flocculent spiral NGC 4414 and the ``Evil Eye'' galaxy NGC 4826, the method does not support the presence of a large-scale coherent pattern. We also apply the method to a simulated barred galaxy in order to demonstrate its validity and to understand its sensitivity to various observational parameters. In addition, we study the results of applying the method to a simulated, clumpy axisymmetric disk with no wave present. The Tremaine & Weinberg method in this case may falsely indicate a well-defined pattern.

  2. Taxation, stateness and armed groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kasper; Vlassenroot, Koen; Marchais, Gauthier

    2016-01-01

    This contribution analyses the role of taxation in the constitution of authority in the conflict-ridden eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, where a multitude of authorities alternately compete and collude over the right to extract resources. Taxation ranges from simple plunder, to protection...... rackets, to the material reciprocation of the recognition of rights. Focusing on the taxation practices of armed groups, the article argues that taxation is at the core of armed groups’ production of public authority and citizenship, and that their modes of taxation are based on long-standing registers...

  3. Semiclassical dynamics, Berry curvature, and spiral holonomy in optical quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Stephen; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2018-04-01

    We describe the theory of the dynamics of atoms in two-dimensional quasicrystalline optical lattices. We focus on a regime of shallow lattice depths under which the applied force can cause Landau-Zener tunneling past a dense hierarchy of gaps in the quasiperiodic energy spectrum. We derive conditions on the external force that allow for a "semiadiabatic" regime in which semiclassical equations of motion can apply, leading to Bloch oscillations between the edges of a pseudo-Brillouin-zone. We verify this semiclassical theory by comparing to the results of an exact numerical solution. Interesting features appear in the semiclassical dynamics for the quasicrystal for a particle driven in a cyclic trajectory around the corner of the pseudo-Brillouin-zone: The particle fails to return to its initial state, providing a realization of a "spiral holonomy" in the dynamics. We show that there can appear anomalous velocity contributions, associated with nonzero Berry curvature. We relate these to the Berry phase associated with the spiral holonomy, and show how the Berry curvature can be accessed from the semiclassical dynamics. Finally, by identifying the pseudo-Brillouin-zone as a higher genus surface, we show that the Chern number classification for periodic systems can be extended to a quasicrystal, thereby determining a topological index for the system.

  4. Radioactive ion beam production by the ISOL method for SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landre-Pellemoine, Frederique

    2001-01-01

    This work is directly related to the SPIRAL project (Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Acceleres en Lignes) of which the start up will begin in September 2001 at GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) in Caen. This thesis primarily concerns the development of radioactive ion production systems (target/ion source) by the thorough study of each production stage of the ISOL (Isotopic Separation On Line) method: target and/or projectile fragmentation production, diffusion out of target material, effusion into the ion source and finally the ionization of the radioactive atoms. A bibliographical research and thermal simulations allowed us to optimize materials and the shape of the production and diffusion targets. A first target was optimized and made reliable for the radioactive noble gases production (argon, neon...). A second target dedicated to the radioactive helium production was entirely designed and realised (from the specifications to the 'off line' and 'on line' tests). Finally, a third target source system was defined for singly-charged radioactive alkaline production. The intensities of secondary beams planned for SPIRAL are presented here. A detailed study of the diffusion effusion efficiency for these various targets showed that the use of a fine microstructure carbon (grain size of 1 μm) improved the diffusion and showed the importance of thickness of the lamella for the short lived isotope effusion. (author) [fr

  5. Distributed predictive control of spiral wave in cardiac excitable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng-Ning, Gan; Xin-Ming, Cheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the distributed predictive control strategies of spiral wave in cardiac excitable media. The modified FitzHugh–Nagumo model was used to express the cardiac excitable media approximately. Based on the control-Lyapunov theory, we obtained the distributed control equation, which consists of a positive control-Lyapunov function and a positive cost function. Using the equation, we investigate two kinds of robust control strategies: the time-dependent distributed control strategy and the space-time dependent distributed control strategy. The feasibility of the strategies was demonstrated via an illustrative example, in which the spiral wave was prevented to occur, and the possibility for inducing ventricular fibrillation was eliminated. The strategies are helpful in designing various cardiac devices. Since the second strategy is more efficient and robust than the first one, and the response time in the second strategy is far less than that in the first one, the former is suitable for the quick-response control systems. In addition, our spatiotemporal control strategies, especially the second strategy, can be applied to other cardiac models, even to other reaction-diffusion systems. (general)

  6. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A SAMPLE OF NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eck, C. L. [Department of Astrophysics, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brown, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 (Canada); Shukurov, A.; Fletcher, A., E-mail: c.vaneck@astro.ru.nl, E-mail: jocat@ucalgary.ca, E-mail: anvar.shukurov@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: andrew.fletcher@ncl.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-20

    Both observations and modeling of magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar gas of spiral galaxies are well developed, but the theory has been confronted with observations for only a handful of individual galaxies. There is now sufficient data to consider the statistical properties of galactic magnetic fields. We have collected data from the literature on the magnetic fields and interstellar media of 20 spiral galaxies, and tested for various physically motivated correlations between magnetic field and interstellar medium parameters. Clear correlations emerge between the total magnetic field strength and molecular gas density as well as the star formation rate. The magnetic pitch angle exhibits correlations with the total gas density, the star formation rate, and the strength of the axisymmetric component of the mean magnetic field. The total and mean magnetic field strengths exhibit a noticeable degree of correlation, suggesting a universal behavior of the degree of order in galactic magnetic fields. We also compare the predictions of galactic dynamo theory to observed magnetic field parameters and identify directions in which theory and observations might be usefully developed.

  7. Spiral Dynamics of Consciousness. Possibilities of Use by Collective Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doronin Andrii V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is showing a possibility of solution of the problem of reduction of human efficiency in the information society by means of growth of psychological load. Methodological grounds of the study are ideas of the American psychologist Clare William Graves, who, while developing the Abraham Maslow theory, created a system theory of evolution development of human consciousness, which determines human behaviour. Based of systemisation of conclusions of C. Graves and his followers the article formulates a hypothesis about expediency of use of spiral dynamics ideas for identifying reserves of strengthening of influence of the collective manager upon labour behaviour of subordinates. Test of hypothesis shows that, apart from diagnostics of the sources of activation of individual labour behaviour, the theory of spiral dynamics allows identification of reserves of formation of collective consciousness and solidary labour force of a creative collective. Their use creates a basis of intensification of processes of intellectualisation of the organisation capital. In order to ensure these changes it is necessary to find mechanisms of changing external environment, which sets principally new tasks and requires principally new strategies of their solution.

  8. Optical image encryption in Fresnel domain using spiral phase transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Bhaduri, Basanta

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we propose a new nonlinear optical image encryption technique using spiral phase transform (SPT). First, the primary image is phase encoded and multiplied with a random amplitude mask (RAM), and using power function, the product is then powered to m. This powered output is Fresnel propagated with distance z 1 and then modulated with a random phase mask (RPM). The modulated image is further Fresnel propagated with distance z 2. Similarly, a security image is also modulated with another RAM and then Fresnel propagated with distance z 3. Next, the two modulated images after Fresnel propagations, are interfered and further Fresnel propagated with distance z 4 to get a complex image. Finally, this complex image is SPT with particular spiral phase function (SPF), to get the final encrypted image for transmission. In the proposed technique, the security keys are Fresnel propagation distances, the security image, RPM, RAMs, power order, m, and order of SPF, q. Numerical simulation results confirm the validity and effectiveness of the proposed technique. The proposed technique is robust against noise and brutal force attacks.

  9. A planar microfluidic mixer based on logarithmic spirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherr, Thomas; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy; Quitadamo, Christian; Tesvich, Preston; Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Hayes, Daniel; Monroe, W Todd; Tiersch, Terrence; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A passive, planar micromixer design based on logarithmic spirals is presented. The device was fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane soft photolithography techniques, and mixing performance was characterized via numerical simulation and fluorescent microscopy. Mixing efficiency initially declined as the Reynolds number increased, and this trend continued until a Reynolds number of 15 where a minimum was reached at 53%. Mixing efficiency then began to increase reaching a maximum mixing efficiency of 86% at Re = 67. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of fluid mixing in this design were compared to other planar geometries such as the Archimedes spiral and Meandering-S mixers. The implementation of logarithmic curvature offers several unique advantages that enhance mixing, namely a variable cross-sectional area and a logarithmically varying radius of curvature that creates 3D Dean vortices. These flow phenomena were observed in simulations with multilayered fluid folding and validated with confocal microscopy. This design provides improved mixing performance over a broader range of Reynolds numbers than other reported planar mixers, all while avoiding external force fields, more complicated fabrication processes and the introduction of flow obstructions or cavities that may unintentionally affect sensitive or particulate-containing samples. Due to the planar design requiring only single-step lithographic features, this compact geometry could be easily implemented into existing micro-total analysis systems requiring effective rapid mixing. (paper)

  10. A Rectangular Planar Spiral Antenna for GIS Partial Discharge Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rectangular planar spiral antenna sensor was designed for detecting the partial discharge in gas insulation substations (GIS. It can expediently receive electromagnetic waves leaked from basin-type insulators and can effectively suppress low frequency electromagnetic interference from the surrounding environment. Certain effective techniques such as rectangular spiral structure, bow-tie loading, and back cavity structure optimization during the antenna design process can miniaturize antenna size and optimize voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR characteristics. Model calculation and experimental data measured in the laboratory show that the antenna possesses a good radiating performance and a multiband property when working in the ultrahigh frequency (UHF band. A comparative study between characteristics of the designed antenna and the existing quasi-TEM horn antenna was made. Based on the GIS defect simulation equipment in the laboratory, partial discharge signals were detected by the designed antenna, the available quasi-TEM horn antenna, and the microstrip patch antenna, and the measurement results were compared.

  11. Novel nanofibrous spiral scaffolds for neural tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Junping; Yu, Xiaojun

    2008-12-01

    Due to several drawbacks associated with autografts and allografts, tissue-engineering approaches have been widely used to repair peripheral nerve injuries. Most of the traditional tissue-engineered scaffolds in use are either tubular (single or multi-lumen) or hydrogel-based cylindrical grafts, which provide limited surface area for cell attachment and regeneration. Here, we show a novel poly(lactide-co-glycotide) (PLGA) microsphere-based spiral scaffold design with a nanofibrous surface that has enhanced surface areas and possesses sufficient mechanical properties and porosities to support the nerve regeneration process. These scaffolds have an open architecture that goes evenly throughout the scaffolds hence leaving enough volume for media influx and deeper cell penetration into the scaffolds. The in vitro tests conducted using Schwann cells show that the nanofibrous spiral scaffolds promote higher cell attachment and proliferation when compared to contemporary tubular scaffolds or nanofiber-based tubular scaffolds. Also, the nanofiber coating on the surfaces enhances the surface area, mimics the extracellular matrix and provides unidirectional alignment of cells along its direction. Hence, we propose that these scaffolds could alleviate some drawbacks in current nerve grafts and could potentially be used in nerve regeneration.

  12. Influence of baryonic physics in simulations of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halle, A.

    2013-01-01

    The modelling of baryonic physics in numerical simulations of disc galaxies allows us to study the evolution of the different components, the physical state of the gas and the star formation. The present work aims at investigating in particular the role of the cold and dense molecular phase, which could play a role of gas reservoir in the outer galaxy discs, with low star formation efficiency. After a presentation of galaxies with a focus on spiral galaxies, their interstellar medium and dynamical evolution, we review the current state of hydrodynamical numerical simulations and the implementation of baryonic physics. We then present the simulations we performed. These include the cooling to low temperatures, and a molecular hydrogen component. The cooling functions we use include cooling by metals, for temperatures as low as 100 K, and cooling by H 2 due to collisions with H, He and other H 2 molecules. We use a TreeSPH type code that considers the stellar and gaseous components and black matter as particles. We especially test the impact of the presence of molecular hydrogen in simulations with several feedback efficiencies, and find that the molecular hydrogen allows in all cases some slow stellar formation to occur in the outer disc, with an effect on the vertical structure of the disc that is sensitive to the feedback efficiency. Molecular hydrogen is therefore able to play the role of gas reservoir in external parts of spiral galaxies, which accrete gas from cosmic filaments all along their lives

  13. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, X.; Aïche, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Audouin, L.; Balanzat, E.; Ban-détat, B.; Ban, G.; Barreau, G.; Bauge, E.; Bélier, G.; Bem, P.; Blideanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Bouffard, S.; Caillaud, T.; Chatillon, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dessagne, P.; Doré, D.; Fallot, M.; Farget, F.; Fischer, U.; Giot, L.; Granier, T.; Guillous, S.; Gunsing, F.; Gustavsson, C.; Jacquot, B.; Jansson, K.; Jurado, B.; Kerveno, M.; Klix, A.; Landoas, O.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Majerle, M.; Marie, N.; Materna, T.; Mrazek, J.; Negoita, F.; Novak, J.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Panebianco, S.; Perrot, L.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pomp, S.; Ramillon, J. M.; Ridikas, D.; Rossé, B.; Rudolf, G.; Serot, O.; Simakov, S. P.; Simeckova, E.; Smith, A. G.; Sublet, J. C.; Taieb, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tarrio, D.; Takibayev, A.; Thfoin, I.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Varignon, C.

    2014-05-01

    The Neutrons For Science (NFS) facility is a component of SPIRAL-2 laboratory under construction at Caen (France). SPIRAL-2 is dedicated to the production of high intensity Radioactive Ions Beams (RIB). It is based on a high-power linear accelerator (LINAG) to accelerate deuterons beams in order to produce neutrons by breakup reactions on a C converter. These neutrons will induce fission in 238U for production of radioactive isotopes. Additionally to the RIB production, the proton and deuteron beams delivered by the accelerator will be used in the NFS facility. NFS is composed of a pulsed neutron beam and irradiation stations for cross-section measurements and material studies. The beams delivered by the LINAG will allow producing intense neutron beams in the 100 keV-40 MeV energy range with either a continuous or quasi-mono-energetic spectrum. At NFS available average fluxes will be up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of other existing time-of-flight facilities in the 1 MeV - 40 MeV range. NFS will be a very powerful tool for fundamental physics and application related research in support of the transmutation of nuclear waste, design of future fission and fusion reactors, nuclear medicine or test and development of new detectors. The facility and its characteristics are described, and several examples of the first potential experiments are presented.

  14. A Reconfigurable Spiral Antenna for Adaptive MIMO Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetiner Bedri A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a reconfigurable spiral antenna for use in adaptive MIMO systems. The antenna is capable of changing the sense of polarization of the radiated field. It is fabricated by using an RF-MEMS technology compatible with microwave laminate substrates developed within the author's group. The proposed antenna structure is built on a number of rectangular-shaped bent metallic strips interconnected to each other with RF-MEMS actuators. Two senses of polarization, RHCP and LHCP, are achieved by configuring the physical structure of the antenna, that is , by changing the winding sense of the spiral, through judicious activation of MEM actuators. The fabrication process for the monolithic integration of MEM actuators with bent microstrip pixels on RO4003-FR4 microwave laminate substrate is described. The measured and calculated radiation and impedance characteristics of the antenna are given. The operating frequency of the presented antenna design can easily be adjusted to be compatible with popular IEEE networking standards such as 802.11a.

  15. A Reconfigurable Spiral Antenna for Adaptive MIMO Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian JY

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a reconfigurable spiral antenna for use in adaptive MIMO systems. The antenna is capable of changing the sense of polarization of the radiated field. It is fabricated by using an RF-MEMS technology compatible with microwave laminate substrates developed within the author's group. The proposed antenna structure is built on a number of rectangular-shaped bent metallic strips interconnected to each other with RF-MEMS actuators. Two senses of polarization, RHCP and LHCP, are achieved by configuring the physical structure of the antenna, that is, by changing the winding sense of the spiral, through judicious activation of MEM actuators. The fabrication process for the monolithic integration of MEM actuators with bent microstrip pixels on RO4003-FR4 microwave laminate substrate is described. The measured and calculated radiation and impedance characteristics of the antenna are given. The operating frequency of the presented antenna design can easily be adjusted to be compatible with popular IEEE networking standards such as 802.11a.

  16. Optical and electrical properties of a spiral LED filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zou, Jun; Yang, Bobo; Li, Wenbo; Li, Yang; Shi, Mingming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Canyun; Wang, Fengchao; Lin, Yujie

    2018-02-01

    This paper introduces a new type of spiral white light-emitting diodes (WLED) filament with high luminous efficiency and uniform optical performance. The optical and thermal properties of the flexible filament were investigated at different stretching heights, namely 0, 1, 2, and 3 cm. The results indicated that the filament showed the best optical characteristics at the stretching height of 2 cm, because of good heat dissipation. In addition, the radiation temperature of the filament was inversely proportional to the output luminous flux. The reliability of the filament at a stretching height of 2 cm was also evaluated after 1000 h of use. The result demonstrated that the luminous flux decay of the bulb was only 0.85%. The flexible spiral WLED filament exhibiting high luminous flux and good reliability could be adapted to promote industrial development in the near future. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 51302171), the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (CN) (No. 14500503300), the Shanghai Municipal Alliance Program (No. Lm201547), the Shanghai Cooperative Project (No. ShanghaiCXY-2013-61), and the Jiashan County Technology Program (No. 20141316).

  17. Spiraling Edge: Fast Surface Reconstruction from Partially Organized Sample Points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Edward; Crossno, Patricia

    1999-07-12

    Many applications produce three-dimensional points that must be further processed to generate a surface. Surface reconstruction algorithms that start with a set of unorganized points are extremely time-consuming. Sometimes, however, points are generated such that there is additional information available to the reconstruction algorithm. We present Spiraling Edge, a specialized algorithm for surface reconstruction that is three orders of magnitude faster than algorithms for the general case. In addition to sample point locations, our algorithm starts with normal information and knowledge of each point's neighbors. Our algorithm produces a localized approximation to the surface by creating a star-shaped triangulation between a point and a subset of its nearest neighbors. This surface patch is extended by locally triangulating each of the points along the edge of the patch. As each edge point is triangulated, it is removed from the edge and new edge points along the patch's edge are inserted in its place. The updated edge spirals out over the surface until the edge encounters a surface boundary and stops growing in that direction, or until the edge reduces to a small hole that is filled by the final triangle.

  18. Multislice spiral computed tomography imaging in congenital inner ear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui; Han, Ping; Liang, Bo; Tian, Zhi-liang; Lei, Zi-qiao; Kong, Wei-jia; Feng, Gan-sheng

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of congenital inner ear malformations. Forty-four patients with sensorineural hearing loss were examined on a Somatom Sensation 16 (Siemens) CT scanner. The 3-dimensional reconstructions and multiplanar reformation (MPR) were performed using the volume-rendering technique (VRT) on the workstation. Of the 44 patients examined for this study, 25 patients were found to be normal and 19 patients (36 ears) were diagnosed with congenital inner ear malformations. Of the malformations, the axial, MPR, and VRT images can all display the site and degree in 33 of the ears. Volume-rendering technique images were superior to the axial images in displaying the malformations in 3 ears with small lateral semicircular canal malformations. The common malformations were Michel deformity (1 ear), common cavity deformity (3 ears), incomplete partition I (3 ears), incomplete partition II (Mondini deformity) (5 ears), vestibular and semicircular canal malformations (14 ears), enlarged vestibular aqueduct (16 ears, 6 of which had other malformations), and internal auditory canal malformation (8 ears, all accompanied by other malformations). Multislice spiral CT allows a comprehensively assessment of various congenital inner ear malformations through high-quality MPR and VRT reconstructions. Volume-rendering technique images can display the site and degree of the malformation 3-dimensionally and intuitionisticly. This is very useful to the cochlear implantation.

  19. A disassembly-free method for evaluation of spiral bevel gear assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedliński, Łukasz; Jonak, Józef

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a novel method for evaluation of assembly of spiral bevel gears. The examination of the approaches to the problem of gear control diagnostics without disassembly has revealed that residual processes in the form of vibrations (or noise) are currently the most suitable to this end. According to the literature, contact pattern is a complex parameter for describing gear position. Therefore, the task is to determine the correlation between contact pattern and gear vibrations. Although the vibration signal contains a great deal of information, it also has a complex spectral structure and contains interferences. For this reason, the proposed method has three variants which determine the effect of preliminary processing of the signal on the results. In Variant 2, stage 1, the vibration signal is subjected to multichannel denoising using a wavelet transform (WT), and in Variant 3 - to a combination of WT and principal component analysis (PCA). This denoising procedure does not occur in Variant 1. Next, we determine the features of the vibration signal in order to focus on information which is crucial regarding the objective of the study. Given the lack of unequivocal premises enabling selection of optimum features, we calculate twenty features, rank them and finally select the appropriate ones using an algorithm. Diagnostic rules were created using artificial neural networks. We investigated the suitability of three network types: multilayer perceptron (MLP), radial basis function (RBF) and support vector machine (SVM).

  20. Selected isomiR expression profiles via arm switching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Sheng; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A mature miRNA may be generated from 5p or 3p arm of a hairpin precursor. The selection may be flexible via "arm switching". However, accumulating evidences suggest that both arms of many pre-miRNAs can yield mature functional miRNAs. Herein, we attempted to compare the isomiR expression profiles between the two arms through analyzing in-house and published small RNA deep sequencing datasets. Although many miR-#-5p and miR-#-3p have been reported as functional miRNAs, fewer miRNA pairs (11 and 6 pairs are collected in tumor and normal cells, respectively) are simultaneously identified as abundant miRNA species. According to isomiR types and dominant isomiR species, miR-#-5p and miR-#-3p show various isomiR expression profiles as well as diverse enrichment levels. IsomiR profiles of non-dominant arm are not well-conserved in 5' ends as well as isomiR profiles of dominant arm. If both the miR-#-5p and miR-#-3p are abundantly expressed, their isomiR expression profiles are always stable across different samples. Similar to diverse enrichment levels of miR-#-5p and miR-#-3p, the isomiR expression patterns may also be influenced by the phenomenon of "arm switching". The diverged isomiR expression profiles further enrich the complexity of multiple isomiRs, and complicate the coding-non-coding RNA regulatory network. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.