WorldWideScience

Sample records for spinocerebellar ataxias huntington

  1. Trial in Adult Subjects With Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-22

    Spinocerebellar Ataxias; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 8; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10

  2. Spinocerebellar ataxias Ataxias espinocerebelares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia in association with some or all of the following conditions: ophthalmoplegia, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To carry out a clinical and genetic review of the main types of SCA. METHOD: The review was based on a search of the PUBMED and OMIM databases. RESULTS: Thirty types of SCAs are currently known, and 16 genes associated with the disease have been identified. The most common types are SCA type 3, or Machado-Joseph disease, SCA type 10 and SCA types 7, 2, 1 and 6. SCAs are genotypically and phenotypically very heterogeneous. A clinical algorithm can be used to distinguish between the different types of SCAs. CONCLUSIONS: Detailed clinical neurological examination of SCA patients can be of great help when assessing them, and the information thus gained can be used in an algorithm to screen patients before molecular tests to investigate the correct etiology of the disease are requested.As ataxias espinocerebelares (AECs compreendem um grupo heterogeneo de enfermidades neurodegenerativas, que se caracterizam pela presença de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, associada de forma variada com oftalmoplegia, sinais piramidais, distúrbios do movimento, retinopatia pigmentar, neuropatia periférica, disfunção cognitiva e demência. OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão clínico-genética dos principais tipos de AECs. MÉTODO: A revisão foi realizada através da pesquisa pelo sistema do PUBMED e do OMIM. RESULTADOS: Na atualidade existem cerca de 30 tipos de AECs, com a descoberta de 16 genes. Os tipos mais comuns são a AEC tipo 3, ou doença de Machado-Joseph, a AEC tipo 10, e as AECs tipo 7, 2 1, e 6. As AECs apresentam grande heterogeneidade genotípica e fenotípica. Pode-se utilizar um algoritmo clínico para a

  3. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium channels . These channels transport positively charged calcium atoms (calcium ions) across cell membranes. The movement of ... Dysphagia Disease InfoSearch: Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: What is Ataxia? ...

  4. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported...

  5. Epilepsy and Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A large consanguinous family from Saudi Arabia with 4 affected children presenting with an autosomal recessive ataxia, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation is reported from the Institut de Genetique, Universite Louis Pasteur, Illkirch, France; Division of Pediatric Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and other centers.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epub 2009 Dec 2. Citation on PubMed Lastres-Becker I, Rüb U, Auburger G. Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 ( ... spinocerebellar ataxias in Cuba: insights into SCA2 founder effect in Holguin. Neurosci Lett. 2009 Apr 24;454( ...

  7. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Tawani

    Full Text Available In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein to expanded r(CAG repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG motif.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R, Giunti P. Clinical, genetic, molecular, and pathophysiological insights into spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Cerebellum. 2008;7( ... editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is ...

  9. Axonal inclusions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Schultz, Christian; Paulson, Henry; Frank, Stefanie; de Vos, Rob A.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas; Kampinga, Harm H.; Rueb, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders including polyglutamine diseases. Aggregation of the mutated form of the disease protein ataxin-3 into neuronal nuclear inclusions is well described in the polyglutamine disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

  10. Inherited polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the frequency and distribution of polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) from referrals over a 24-year period to the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) in South Africa (SA). Methods. Paper-based clinical reports in the University of. Cape Town laboratory and the NHLS electronic patient record

  11. Genetic testing for clinically suspected spinocerebellar ataxias ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sowmya Devatha Venkatesh

    2018-03-13

    Mar 13, 2018 ... 5 Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. 6 Department of ... Abstract. Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative syndromes, characterized by a wide range of muscular .... The age of FRDA mutation has been calculated to be ...

  12. Clinical neurogenetics: autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Fogel, Brent L

    2013-11-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are a diverse and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of the cerebellum and its associated pathways. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation can be challenging because of phenotypic overlap among causes, and a stratified and systematic approach is essential. Recent advances include the identification of additional genes causing dominant genetic ataxia, a better understanding of cellular pathogenesis in several disorders, the generation of new disease models that may stimulate development of new therapies, and the use of new DNA sequencing technologies, including whole-exome sequencing, to improve diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spinocerebellar ataxia-10 with paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavesh Trikamji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spino-cerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, seizures and nystagmus with a fragmented pursuit. Schizophrenia has been reported with SCAs 1 and 2 yet in SCA 10, psychiatric manifestations are uncommon. We report a Hispanic family involving a father and his four children with SCA10 genetic mutation. Two of his children, a 20-year-old female and a 23-year-old male, presented with gradually progressive spino-cerebellar ataxia and paranoid schizophrenia. Neurological examination revealed ocular dysmetria, dysdiadokinesia, impaired finger-to-nose exam, gait ataxia and hyperreflexia in both the cases. Additionally, they had a history of psychosis with destructive behavior, depression and paranoid delusions with auditory hallucinations. Serology and CSF studies were unremarkable and MRI brain revealed cerebellar volume loss. Ultimately, a test for ATAXIN-10 mutation was positive thus confirming the diagnosis of SCA10 in father and his four children. We now endeavor to investigate the association between schizophrenia and SCA10.

  14. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  15. Phenotype variability and early onset ataxia symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: comparison and correlation with other spinocerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Cristino de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA are a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentation. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion and includes cerebellar signs associated with visual loss and ophthalmoplegia. Marked anticipation and dynamic mutation is observed in SCA7. Moreover, phenotype variability and very early onset of symptoms may occur. In this article, a large series of Brazilian patients with different SCA subtypes was evaluated, and we compared the age of onset of SCA7 with other SCA. From the 26 patients with SCA7, 4 manifested their symptoms before 10-year-old. Also, occasionally the parents may have the onset of symptoms after their children. In conclusion, our study highlights the genetic anticipation phenomenon that occurs in SCA7 families. Patients with very early onset ataxia in the context of a remarkable family history, must be considered and tested for SCA7.

  16. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23: a genetic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Dineke S

    2009-06-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 locus was identified in 2004 based on linkage analysis in a large, two-generation Dutch family. The age of onset ranged 43-56 years and the phenotype was characterized by a slowly progressive, isolated ataxia. Neuropathological examination revealed neuronal loss in the Purkinje cell layer, dentate nuclei, and inferior olives. Ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions were found in nigral neurons, but were considered to be Marinesco bodies. The disease locus on chromosome 20p13-12.3 was found to span a region of approximately 6 Mb of genomic DNA, containing 97 known or predicted genes. To date, no other families have been described that also map to this SCA locus. Direct sequencing of the coding regions of 21 prioritized candidate genes did not reveal any disease-causing mutation. Apparently, the SCA23 gene is a disease gene with a different function than the genes that have been associated with other known SCA types. Work to elucidate the chromosomal organization of the SCA23 locus will eventually discover the responsible disease gene.

  17. New insights into the pathoanatomy of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent neuropathological findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and discusses their relevance for clinical neurology. Recent findings The extent of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 related central nervous neurodegenerative changes has been recently

  18. ELOVL5 Mutations Cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A.; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases. PMID:25065913

  19. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 1, 2, 3 and 6 : the Clinical Spectrum of Ataxia and Morphometric Brainstem and Cerebellar Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Heike; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Giunti, Paola; Globas, Christoph; Bauer, Peter; Schmitz-Huebsch, Tanja; Baliko, Laszlo; Filla, Alessandro; Mariotti, Caterina; Rakowicz, Maria; Charles, Perine; Ribai, Pascale; Szymanski, Sandra; Infante, Jon; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Duerr, Alexandra; Timmann, Dagmar; Boesch, Sylvia; Fancellu, Roberto; Rola, Rafal; Depondt, Chantal; Schoels, Ludger; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Kang, Jun-Suk; Ratzka, Susanne; Kremer, Berry; Stephenson, Dennis A.; Melegh, Bela; Pandolfo, Massimo; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Borkert, Johannes; Schulz, Joerg B.; Klockgether, Thomas

    To assess the clinical spectrum of ataxia and cerebellar oculomotor deficits in the most common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), we analysed the baseline data of the EUROSCA natural history study, a multicentric cohort study of 526 patients with either spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3 or 6. To

  20. 'Costa da Morte' ataxia is spinocerebellar ataxia 36: clinical and genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Murias, María; Quintáns, Beatriz; Arias, Manuel; Seixas, Ana I; Cacheiro, Pilar; Tarrío, Rosa; Pardo, Julio; Millán, María J; Arias-Rivas, Susana; Blanco-Arias, Patricia; Dapena, Dolores; Moreira, Ramón; Rodríguez-Trelles, Francisco; Sequeiros, Jorge; Carracedo, Angel; Silveira, Isabel; Sobrido, María J

    2012-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 36 has been recently described in Japanese families as a new type of spinocerebellar ataxia with motor neuron signs. It is caused by a GGCCTG repeat expansion in intron 1 of NOP56. Family interview and document research allowed us to reconstruct two extensive, multigenerational kindreds stemming from the same village (Costa da Morte in Galicia, Spain), in the 17th century. We found the presence of the spinocerebellar ataxia 36 mutation co-segregating with disease in these families in whom we had previously identified an ~0.8 Mb linkage region to chromosome 20 p. Subsequent screening revealed the NOP56 expansion in eight additional Galician ataxia kindreds. While normal alleles contain 5-14 hexanucleotide repeats, expanded alleles range from ~650 to 2500 repeats, within a shared haplotype. Further expansion of repeat size was frequent, especially upon paternal transmission, while instances of allele contraction were observed in maternal transmissions. We found a total of 63 individuals carrying the mutation, 44 of whom were confirmed to be clinically affected; over 400 people are at risk. We describe here the detailed clinical picture, consisting of a late-onset, slowly progressive cerebellar syndrome with variable eye movement abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. There were signs of denervation in the tongue, as well as mild pyramidal signs, but otherwise no signs of classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were consistent with the clinical course, showing atrophy of the cerebellar vermis in initial stages, later evolving to a pattern of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. We estimated the origin of the founder mutation in Galicia to have occurred ~1275 years ago. Out of 160 Galician families with spinocerebellar ataxia, 10 (6.3%) were found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 36, while 15 (9.4%) showed other of the routinely tested dominant spinocerebellar ataxia types. Spinocerebellar ataxia 36 is

  1. ‘Costa da Morte’ ataxia is spinocerebellar ataxia 36: clinical and genetic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Murias, María; Quintáns, Beatriz; Arias, Manuel; Seixas, Ana I.; Cacheiro, Pilar; Tarrío, Rosa; Pardo, Julio; Millán, María J.; Arias-Rivas, Susana; Blanco-Arias, Patricia; Dapena, Dolores; Moreira, Ramón; Rodríguez-Trelles, Francisco; Sequeiros, Jorge; Carracedo, Ángel; Silveira, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 36 has been recently described in Japanese families as a new type of spinocerebellar ataxia with motor neuron signs. It is caused by a GGCCTG repeat expansion in intron 1 of NOP56. Family interview and document research allowed us to reconstruct two extensive, multigenerational kindreds stemming from the same village (Costa da Morte in Galicia, Spain), in the 17th century. We found the presence of the spinocerebellar ataxia 36 mutation co-segregating with disease in these families in whom we had previously identified an ∼0.8 Mb linkage region to chromosome 20 p. Subsequent screening revealed the NOP56 expansion in eight additional Galician ataxia kindreds. While normal alleles contain 5–14 hexanucleotide repeats, expanded alleles range from ∼650 to 2500 repeats, within a shared haplotype. Further expansion of repeat size was frequent, especially upon paternal transmission, while instances of allele contraction were observed in maternal transmissions. We found a total of 63 individuals carrying the mutation, 44 of whom were confirmed to be clinically affected; over 400 people are at risk. We describe here the detailed clinical picture, consisting of a late-onset, slowly progressive cerebellar syndrome with variable eye movement abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. There were signs of denervation in the tongue, as well as mild pyramidal signs, but otherwise no signs of classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were consistent with the clinical course, showing atrophy of the cerebellar vermis in initial stages, later evolving to a pattern of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. We estimated the origin of the founder mutation in Galicia to have occurred ∼1275 years ago. Out of 160 Galician families with spinocerebellar ataxia, 10 (6.3%) were found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 36, while 15 (9.4%) showed other of the routinely tested dominant spinocerebellar ataxia types. Spinocerebellar ataxia

  2. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, J.I.; Tokumoto, H.; Yukitake, M.; Matsui, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Matsuyama, Z.; Kawakami, H.; Nakamura, S.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the α 1A voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca 2+ channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.)

  3. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment ... a failure of muscle control in their arms and legs, resulting in a lack of balance and coordination or a disturbance of gait. While the term ataxia is primarily used to ...

  4. Genetic testing for clinically suspected spinocerebellar ataxias ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahesh

    Key words: SCA, Genotyping, CAG repeats, India. Introduction. The ataxia .... 2014), we also identified one SCA 12 positive case from southern India (Table 2). Out of the patients that tested positive for FRDA, 75% (N=15) were from southern India and 25% (N=5) from northern and eastern India. FRDA has been reported to ...

  5. Rehabilitative Trial With Cerebello-Spinal tDCS in Neurodegenerative Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Ataxia, Cerebellar; Cerebellar Ataxia; Spinocerebellar Ataxias; Ataxia, Spinocerebellar; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2; Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3; Spinocerebellar Degenerations; Friedreich Ataxia; Ataxia With Oculomotor Apraxia; Multiple System Atrophy

  6. Why do so many genetic insults lead to Purkinje Cell degeneration and spinocerebellar ataxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Miaozhen; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2018-02-05

    The genetically heterozygous spinocerebellar ataxias are all characterized by cerebellar atrophy and pervasive Purkinje Cell degeneration. Up to date, more than 35 functionally diverse spinocerebellar ataxia genes have been identified. The main question that remains yet unsolved is why do some many genetic insults lead to Purkinje Cell degeneration and spinocerebellar ataxia? To address this question it is important to identify intrinsic pathways important for Purkinje Cell function and survival. In this review, we discuss the current consensus on shared mechanisms underlying the pervasive Purkinje Cell loss in spinocerebellar ataxia. Additionally, using recently published cell type specific expression data, we identified several Purkinje Cell-specific genes and discuss how the corresponding pathways might underlie the vulnerability of Purkinje Cells in response to the diverse genetic insults causing spinocerebellar ataxia. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Studies on Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Line Vildbrad

    The polyglutamine (polyQ) disorders comprise nine diseases characterized by an expanded polyQ tract within the respective proteins. These disorders are rare but include the well-known Huntington’s disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). The diseases usually strike midlife and progress....... Even though a range of mechanisms contributing to polyQ diseases have been uncovered, there is still no treatment available. One of the more common polyQ diseases is SCA3, which is caused by a polyQ expansion in the ataxin-3 protein that normally functions as a deubiquitinating enzyme involved...

  8. Vascular Risk Factors and Clinical Progression in Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Y. Lo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The contributions of vascular risk factors to spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA are not known.Methods: We studied 319 participants with SCA 1, 2, 3, and 6 and repeatedly measured clinical severity using the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA for 2 years. Vascular risk factors were summarized by CHA2DS2-VASc scores as the vascular risk factor index. We employed regression models to study the effects of vascular risk factors on ataxia onset and progression after adjusting for age, sex, and pathological CAG repeats. Our secondary analyses took hyperlipidemia into account.Results: Nearly 60% of SCA participants were at low vascular risks with CHA2DS2-VASc = 0, and 31% scored 2 or greater. Higher CHA2DS2-VASc scores were not associated with either earlier onset or faster progression of ataxia. These findings were not altered after accounting for hyperlipidemia. Discussion: Vascular risks are not common in SCAs and are not associated with earlier onset or faster ataxia progression.

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: Report of an Indian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusidheshwar M Wali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is a form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia which is associated with pigmentary retinal degeneration. It is known for its world-wide rarity except in the Scandinavian countries. It is very rarely reported from India and the neighbouring Asian countries . The present report describes the neurogenetic findings of a family of SCA7, from the northern part of Karnataka in South India. It documents the wide intrafamilial phenotypic variability, which could be correlated with the CAG repeat counts and phenomenon of anticipation. Genotype phenotype correlation highlighted certain disparities in comparison with the previous studies. The report highlights the need for multiethnic population studies and the role of genetic counseling and prenatal testing in SCA7 patients.

  10. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective...

  11. Progression of Dysphagia in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Chiharu; Hirano, Makito; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Ueno, Shuichi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakamura, Yusaku

    2017-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant triplet repeat disease, predominantly affects the cerebellum with a late onset and generally good prognosis. Dysphagia is commonly associated with the outcomes of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCA6. Although the characteristics of dysphagia have been rarely reported in SCA6, our previous study indicated that dysphagia is generally milder in SCA6 than in SCA3, another inherited ataxia with multisystem involvement. However, abnormalities in the pharyngeal phase in SCA6 were indistinguishable from those in SCA3, with no explainable reason. To determine the reason, we repeatedly performed videofluoroscopic examinations (VF) in 14 patients with SCA6. The results showed that the gross progression of dysphagia was apparently slow, but four patients had progressive dysphagia at an early disease stage; dysphagia began within 10 years from the onset of ataxia and rapidly progressed. A common clinical feature of the four patients was a significantly older age at the onset of ataxia (74.0 vs. 60.3 years), associated with significantly shorter triplet repeats. This finding surprisingly indicated that patients who had shorter repeats and thereby later onset and potentially better prognoses were at risk for dysphagia-associated problems. Ischemic changes, homozygous mutation, and diabetes mellitus as well as aging might have contributed to the observed progressive dysphagia. We found that conventionally monitored somatosensory evoked potentials at least partly reflected progressive dysphagia. Despite the small study group, our findings suggest that clinicians should carefully monitor dysphagia in patients with SCA6 who are older at disease onset (>60 years).

  12. Missense mutations in ITPR1 cause autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lijia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia is characterized by early gross motor delay, hypotonia, gait ataxia, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. The clinical presentation remains fairly stable and may be associated with cerebellar atrophy. To date, only a few families with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia have been reported. Linkage to 3pter was demonstrated in one large Australian family and this locus was designated spinocerebellar ataxia type 29. The objective of this study is to describe an unreported Canadian family with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia and to identify the underlying genetic causes in this family and the original Australian family. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was performed for the Australian family, resulting in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in the ITPR1 gene. For the Canadian family, genotyping with microsatellite markers and Sanger sequencing of ITPR1 gene were performed; a heterozygous missense mutation in ITPR1 was identified. Conclusions ITPR1 encodes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletions of ITPR1 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, a distinct and very slowly progressive form of cerebellar ataxia with onset in adulthood. Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, alteration of ITPR1 function can cause a distinct congenital nonprogressive ataxia; highlighting important clinical heterogeneity associated with the ITPR1 gene and a significant role of the ITPR1-related pathway in the development and maintenance of the normal functions of the cerebellum.

  13. Exome sequencing and network analysis identifies shared mechanisms underlying spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibbeling, Esther A R; Duarri, Anna; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien C; Fokkens, Michiel R; Karjalainen, Juha M; Smeets, Cleo J L M; de Boer-Bergsma, Jelkje J; van der Vries, Gerben; Dooijes, Dennis; Bampi, Giovana B; van Diemen, Cleo; Brunt, Ewout; Ippel, Elly; Kremer, Berry; Vlak, Monique; Adir, Noam; Wijmenga, Cisca; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Franke, Lude; Sinke, Richard J; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2017-11-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias, referred to as spinocerebellar ataxias in genetic nomenclature, are a rare group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by loss of balance and coordination. Despite the identification of numerous disease genes, a substantial number of cases still remain without a genetic diagnosis. Here, we report five novel spinocerebellar ataxia genes, FAT2, PLD3, KIF26B, EP300, and FAT1, identified through a combination of exome sequencing in genetically undiagnosed families and targeted resequencing of exome candidates in a cohort of singletons. We validated almost all genes genetically, assessed damaging effects of the gene variants in cell models and further consolidated a role for several of these genes in the aetiology of spinocerebellar ataxia through network analysis. Our work links spinocerebellar ataxia to alterations in synaptic transmission and transcription regulation, and identifies these as the main shared mechanisms underlying the genetically diverse spinocerebellar ataxia types. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa - 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti - 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu - 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case.

  15. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice for 30 days-, Śirobasti(sudation of head with the help of a cap on head with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balaādi ksiāra basti (enema with medicated milk with Aśvagandhā taila anuvaāsana(enema with oil for 30 days in Karma basti krama(30 days regime of purification and oleation enema along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvaātacintaāmanirasa – 125 mg, Vasantaāmaltiā rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṃa(powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL- 3g, Amrtaā cūrṃa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti – 500 mg, Yogaraāja Guggulu – 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA. Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case.

  16. Bergmann glia are reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwaku, Hiroki; Yagishita, Saburo; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2013-08-07

    Non-cell-autonomous pathology involving glial cells has been implicated in Purkinje cell degeneration. We reported previously that mutant ataxin-1, a causative gene product of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), prevents Bergmann glia proliferation in mutant ataxin-1 knockin mice and that suppressed Bergmann glia function leads to Purkinje cell degeneration. However, because reactive astrocytes are produced in response to brain injuries and diseases, Bergmann glia are also suspected to proliferate and increase in response to Purkinje cell degeneration, including during SCA1 pathogenesis. However, little is known about reactive Bergmann glia (Bergmann gliosis) and its beneficial or detrimental role. Given the lack of quantitative studies of Bergmann glia using specific molecular markers, we quantified Bergmann glia in human SCA1 brains with Bergmann glia-specific Sox2 staining and conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining. Our results showed reduced numbers of Bergmann glia in SCA1 patient brains and support the hypothesis that Bergmann glia loss contributes toward Purkinje cell degeneration in human SCA1.

  17. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 in eastern India: Some new observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs are hereditary, autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorders showing clinical and genetic heterogeneity. They are usually manifested clinically in the third to fifth decade of life although there is a wide variability in the age of onset. More than 36 different types of SCAs have been reported so far and about half of them are caused by pathological expansion of the trinucleotide, Cytosine Alanine Guanine (CAG repeat. The global prevalence of SCA is 0.3-2 per 100,000 population, SCA3 being the commonest variety worldwide, accounting for 20-50 per cent of all cases, though SCA 2 is generally considered as the commonest one in India. However, SCA6 has not been addressed adequately from India though it is common in the eastern Asian countries like, Japan, Korea and Thailand. Objective: The present study was undertaken to identify the prevalence of SCA6 in the city of Kolkata and the eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: 83 consecutive patients were recruited for the study of possible SCAs and their clinical features and genotype were investigated. Results: 6 of the 83 subjects turned out positive for SCA6, constituting therefore, 13.33% of the patient pool. Discussion: SCA6 is prevalent in the eastern part of India, though not as frequent as the other common varieties. Conclusions: Further community based studies are required in order to understand the magnitude of SCA6 in the eastern part, as well as in other regions of India.

  18. Partial Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training in Spinocerebellar Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Laura Alice Santos; Martins, Camilla Polonini; Horsczaruk, Carlos Henrique Ramos; da Silva, Débora Cristina Lima; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Meira Mainenti, Míriam Raquel; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho

    2018-01-01

    The motor impairments related to gait and balance have a huge impact on the life of individuals with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Here, the aim was to assess the possibility of retraining gait, improving cardiopulmonary capacity, and challenging balance during gait in SCA using a partial body weight support (BWS) and a treadmill. Also, the effects of this training over functionality and quality of life were investigated. Eight SCA patients were engaged in the first stage of the study that focused on gait training and cardiovascular conditioning. From those, five took part in a second stage of the study centered on dynamic balance training during gait. The first and second stages lasted 8 and 10 weeks, respectively, both comprising sessions of 50 min (2 times per week). The results showed that gait training using partial BWS significantly increased gait performance, treadmill inclination, duration of exercise, and cardiopulmonary capacity in individuals with SCA. After the second stage, balance improvements were also found. Combining gait training and challenging tasks to the postural control system in SCA individuals is viable, well tolerated by patients with SCA, and resulted in changes in capacity for walking and balance.

  19. Ethical considerations in presymptomatic diagnosis of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, M H; Cervantes-Aragón, I; García-Cruz, D

    2017-09-01

    Information on achieving presymptomatic diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is limited. The advent of molecular diagnosis makes it possible to identify the carriers of different diseases and has also introduced the prospect of detecting diseases even before their onset. This has drawn attention to the ethical implications that must be considered in these subjects with a view to preserving their physical and psychological well-being. SCA is composed of a group of neurodegenerative disorders with autosomal dominant inheritance. Only a few publications have described the genetic counselling processes and guidelines to be followed during the process of presymptomatic diagnosis (PSD). The size of the multidisciplinary teams, their areas of expertise, and the number of counselling sessions are different for each of the studies analysed here. However, the basis of presymptomatic diagnosis originates in common guidelines to which members of our team have contributed recently. Presymptomatic diagnosis should be performed according to guidelines that safeguard the subjects' welfare. The diagnostic process is only recommended for patients over 18 years old with symptoms suggesting SCA, and a minimum risk of 50%. Genetic counselling programmes must be available in all centres that offer presymptomatic diagnosis of SCA. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular genetics of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-dan WU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the genotype of the members of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA. Methods The peripheral blood samples of 6 patients and 40 asymptomatic people belonged to the family were collected. Referring to the clinical manifestations of the proband and second-generation sequencing results, the CAG trinucleotide repeats of the pathogenic gene ATXN2 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The repeated times of the trinucleotide in normally and abnormally amplified alleles were defined by agarose gel electrophoresis and PCR products sequencing. Results Autosomal dominant heredity was the cause of the SCA in this family. Six out of 46 in the fourth-generation were SCA2 patients, 7 were the carriers of pathogenic allele. The repeated times of CAG trinucleotide were within the normal range in one of the two alleles of ATXN2, but they were in abnormal range in the another one. The repeated times of CAG trinucleotide were 40-46 in abnormal alleles of patients. Conclusion Autosomal dominant heredity SCA2 has been diagnosed in this family caused by the dynamic nutation of CAG trinucleotide repeats, and 7 pathogenic allele carriers in this family were confirmed by genetic diagnosis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.07

  1. Mini-review: spinocerebellar ataxias: an update of SCA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Alexis; Houenou, Lucien J

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a complex group of debilitating and neurodegenerative diseases that affect the cerebellum and its main connections and characterized by a generalized incoordination of gait, speech, and limb movements. In general, the onset of SCAs occurs during adult life and shows great clinical heterogeneity. Currently, the mutations responsible for different types of SCAs have been localized in different regions of the genome, and most of them were already mapped and cloned. Several pieces of evidence suggest that all these diseases share the same molecular mechanism and physiopathological processes. CAG trinucleotide expansion is a common mutational basis of several of these disorders. An expanded polyglutamine tract may become a toxic product when located within the coding region of the gene. The SCA genes, recent patents and the molecular aspects of these disorders are presented in this review. Our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of SCAs is rapidly expanding, and the development of important studies is bringing hope for effective therapies.

  2. Elevated mutant dynorphin A causes Purkinje cell loss and motor dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Cleo J L M; Jezierska, Justyna; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Duarri, Anna; Fokkens, Michiel R; Meijer, Michel; Zhou, Qin; Yakovleva, Tania; Boddeke, Erik; den Dunnen, Wilfred; van Deursen, Jan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2015-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, α-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot for spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutations, and in vitro data suggested that dynorphin A mutations lead to persistently elevated mutant peptide levels that are cytotoxic and may thus play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23. To further test this and study spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 in more detail, we generated a mouse carrying the spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutation R212W in PDYN. Analysis of peptide levels using a radioimmunoassay shows that these PDYN(R212W) mice display markedly elevated levels of mutant dynorphin A, which are associated with climber fibre retraction and Purkinje cell loss, visualized with immunohistochemical stainings. The PDYN(R212W) mice reproduced many of the clinical features of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23, with gait deficits starting at 3 months of age revealed by footprint pattern analysis, and progressive loss of motor coordination and balance at the age of 12 months demonstrated by declining performances on the accelerating Rotarod. The pathologically elevated mutant dynorphin A levels in the cerebellum coincided with transcriptionally dysregulated ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters, and altered neuronal excitability. In conclusion, the PDYN(R212W) mouse is the first animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 and our work indicates that the elevated mutant dynorphin A peptide levels are likely responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease, affecting glutamatergic signalling, neuronal excitability, and motor performance. Our novel mouse model defines a critical role for opioid

  3. Cytokines in Machado Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Carvalho, Gerson; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Camey, Suzi; Portela, Luis Valmor; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the serum concentrations of a broad spectrum of cytokines in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) CAG expansions. Molecularly confirmed carriers and controls were studied. Age at onset, disease duration, and clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxias (NESSCA), SCA Functional Index (SCAFI), and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were obtained from the symptomatic carriers. Serum was obtained from all individuals and a cytokine panel "consisted of" eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-a, MIP-b, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed. In a subgroup of symptomatic carriers, the cytokine panel was repeated after 360 days. Cytokine distribution among groups was studied by discriminant analysis; changes in serum levels after 360 days were studied by generalized estimation equation. Sixty-six symptomatic carriers, 13 asymptomatic carriers, and 43 controls were studied. No differences in cytokine patterns were found between controls and carriers of the CAG expansions or between controls and symptomatic carriers only. In contrast, eotaxin concentrations were significantly higher in asymptomatic than in symptomatic carriers or in controls (p = 0.001, ANCOVA). Eotaxin did not correlate with age, disease duration, CAG expansion, NESSCA score, and SARA score. Among symptomatic carriers, eotaxin dropped after 360 days (p = 0.039, GEE). SCA3/MJD patients presented a benign pattern of

  4. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H196

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell...

  5. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H266

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell...

  6. Early symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3, and 6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Globas, C.; Montcel, S.T. du; Baliko, L.; Boesch, S.; Depondt, C.; DiDonato, S.; Durr, A.; Filla, A.; Klockgether, T.; Mariotti, C.; Melegh, B.; Rakowicz, M.; Ribai, P.; Rola, R.; Schmitz-Hubsch, T.; Szymanski, S.; Timmann, D.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Bauer, P.; Schols, L.

    2008-01-01

    Onset of genetically determined neurodegenerative diseases is difficult to specify because of their insidious and slowly progressive nature. This is especially true for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) because of varying affection of many parts of the nervous system and huge variability of symptoms. We

  7. The p62 antibody reveals various cytoplasmic protein aggregates in spinocerebellar ataxia Type 6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, K.; Brunt, E. R. P.; de Vos, R. A. I.; Dijk, F.; van der Want, H. J. L.; Kampinga, H. H.; Rueb, U.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal protein aggregates are considered as pathological hallmarks of various human neurodegenerative diseases, including the so-called CAG-repeat disorders, such as spinocerebellar ataxia Type 6 (SCA6). Since the immunocytochemical findings of an initial post-mortem study using a specific

  8. Degeneration of ingestion-related brainstem nuclei in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, 3, 6 and 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Brunt, E. R.; Petrasch-Parwez, E.; Schoels, L.; Theegarten, D.; Auburger, G.; Seidel, K.; Schultz, C.; Gierga, K.; Paulson, H.; van Broeckhoven, C.; Deller, T.; de Vos, R. A. I.

    2006-01-01

    Dysphagia, which can lead to nutritional deficiencies, weight loss and dehydration, represents a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia. Although clinical studies have reported the occurrence of dysphagia in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), type 3 (SCA3), type 6 (SCA6) and type 7

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease) : severe destruction of the lateral reticular nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rub, U; de Vos, RAI; Schultz, C; Brunt, ER; Paulson, H; Braak, H

    The lateral reticular nucleus (LRT) of the medulla oblongata is a precerebellar nucleus involved in proprioception and somatomotor automatisms. We investigated this nucleus in five individuals with clinically diagnosed and genetically confirmed spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, Machado-Joseph

  10. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Protein Aggregates Cause Deficits in Motor Learning and Cerebellar Plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, Melanie D; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that

  11. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H271

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Schmid, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate the generation of an induced pluripotent stem ce...

  12. HLA-linked spinocerebellar ataxia: a clinical and genetic study of large Italian kindreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, M; Giunti, P; Lulli, P; Frontali, M; Jodice, C; Cappellacci, S; Morellini, M; Persichetti, F; Trabace, S; Anastasi, R

    1992-04-01

    Five families with late onset autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, were studied. Linkage between the disease and HLA loci on the short arm of chromosome 6 was shown in the two largest pedigrees. Clinical study of 26 patients and neuropathological study in one are reported. The disease was characterized by cerebellar and pyramidal involvement variably associated with cranial nerve and peripheral nervous system disorders. A remarkable concordance of the main clinical features was observed in patients with similar disease duration. Comparison with previous reports of HLA-linked spinocerebellar ataxia kindreds showed differences in clinical phenotypes. Although these might be due to genetic variation, the hypothesis is suggested that the phenotype might appear more homogeneous if disease duration is taken into account.

  13. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  14. Quantitative analysis of upper-limb ataxia in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Naohisa; Hakii, Yasuhito; Koyano, Shigeru; Higashiyama, Yuichi; Joki, Hideto; Baba, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yume; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2014-07-01

    Spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which cerebellar ataxia causes motor disability. There are no widely applicable methods for objective evaluation of ataxia in SCD. An objective system to evaluate ataxia is necessary for use in clinical trials of newly developed medication and rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method to quantify the degree of upper-limb ataxia. Forty-nine patients with SCD participated in this study. Patients were instructed to trace an Archimedean spiral template, and the gap between the template spiral and the drawn spiral (gap area; GA) was measured using Image J software. Ataxia was rated using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and cerebellar volume was evaluated in 37 patients using an axial cross-section of magnetic resonance images that were obtained within 6 months of clinical evaluation. Regression analysis was performed to assess the relation between GA and patient age, disease duration, SARA score, and cerebellar volume. GA was significantly related to total SARA score (r = 0.660, p ataxia, especially upper-limb ataxia, and can be widely adopted in various settings, including clinical trials.

  15. Operation of a P300-based brain-computer interface by patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Okahara

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated the efficacy of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA, which is often accompanied by cerebellar impairment. Methods: Eight patients with SCA and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls were instructed to input Japanese hiragana characters using the P300-based BCI with green/blue flicker. All patients depended on some assistance in their daily lives (modified Rankin scale: mean 3.5. The chief symptom was cerebellar ataxia; no cognitive deterioration was present. A region-based, two-step P300-based BCI was used. During the P300 task, eight-channel EEG data were recorded, and a linear discriminant analysis distinguished the target from other nontarget regions of the matrix. Results: The mean online accuracy in BCI operation was 82.9% for patients with SCA and 83.2% for controls; no significant difference was detected. Conclusion: The P300-based BCI was operated successfully not only by healthy controls but also by individuals with SCA. Significance: These results suggest that the P300-based BCI may be applicable for patients with SCA. Keywords: BCI, BMI, P300, Visual stimuli, Spinocerebellar ataxia

  16. Machado-Joseph disease in Brazil: from the first descriptions to the emergence as the most common spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of Azorean ancestry firstly described in 1972. Since then, several Brazilian researchers have studied clinical and genetic issues related to the disease. Nowadays, Machado-Joseph disease is considered the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide. Machado-Joseph disease still has no specific therapy to arrest progression, but the unclear pathophysiological mechanism, features related to genetic characteristics, phenotype variability, apparently global involvement of the nervous system in the disease and the therapeutic challenges continue to attract investigators in the field of spinocerebellar ataxias. Brazilian researchers have distinguished themselves in the ongoing investigation seeking new knowledge about Machado-Joseph disease.

  17. Machado-Joseph disease in Brazil: from the first descriptions to the emergence as the most common spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Radvany, João; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2012-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of Azorean ancestry firstly described in 1972. Since then, several Brazilian researchers have studied clinical and genetic issues related to the disease. Nowadays, Machado-Joseph disease is considered the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide. Machado-Joseph disease still has no specific therapy to arrest progression, but the unclear pathophysiological mechanism, features related to genetic characteristics, phenotype variability, apparently global involvement of the nervous system in the disease and the therapeutic challenges continue to attract investigators in the field of spinocerebellar ataxias. Brazilian researchers have distinguished themselves in the ongoing investigation seeking new knowledge about Machado-Joseph disease.

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cell - derived neurons for the study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Stummann, Tina C.; Madsen, Helena Borland

    2016-01-01

    The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines were established from two SCA3 patients. Dermal fibroblasts were reprogrammed using an integration-free method...... displaying synchronized spontaneous calcium oscillations within 28 days of maturation, and expressed the mature neuronal markers NeuN and Synapsin 1 implying a relatively advanced state of maturity, although not comparable to that of the adult human brain. Interestingly, we were not able to recapitulate...

  19. [Spinocerebellar ataxia type 8: the case of a Spanish family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Cabrero, D; Sánchez-Migallón, M; Cantarero, S; García-Ruiz Espiga, P J; Giménez-Pardo, A; Trujillo-Tiebas, M; Ayuso-García, C

    Dominant autosomic ataxias include a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the abnormal expansion of triplets. Male aged 33, with expansion of the SCA 8 gene (100 repetitions), who presented a clinical picture compatible with a pancerebellar syndrome. The patient had been diagnosed 11 years earlier as suffering from previously of histiocytosis X. A clinico genetic study was conducted on the patient and several members of his family (parents and two sisters). Both sisters and the father were found to be carriers of the expansion (110 and 150 repetitions, respectively), and are currently asymptomatic. There is no relation between the number of repetitions and the age of onset of the disease. The normal interval in our population oscillates between 16 37 repetitions, and the pathological interval has not been well determined. There may be a relation between the SCA 8 form and histiocytosis X.

  20. Tremor in neurodegenerative ataxias, Huntington disease and tic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzińska, M; Krawczyk, M; Wójcik-Pędziwiatr, M; Szczudlik, A; Tomaszewski, T

    2013-01-01

    Tremor is the most prevalent movement disorder, defined as rhythmic oscillations of a body part, caused by alternating or synchronic contractions of agonistic or antagonistic muscles. The aim of the study was to assess prevalence and to characterize parameters of tremor accompanying de-generative ataxias, Huntington disease (HD) and tic disorders in comparison with a control group. Forty-three patients with degenerative ataxias, 28 with HD and 26 with tic disorders together with 51 healthy controls were included in the study. For each participant, clinical and instrumental assessment (accelerometer, electromyography [EMG], graphic tablet) of hand tremor was performed. Frequency and severity of tremor were assessed in three positions: at rest (rest tremor), with hands extended (postural tremor), during the 'finger-to-nose' test and during Archimedes spiral drawing (kinetic tremor). Based on the mass load test, the type of tremor was determined as essential tremor type or enhanced physiological tremor type. The incidence of tremor in the accelerometry in patients with degenerative ataxia (50%) significantly differs from controls (10%) (p = 0.001). The dominant tremor was postural, low-intense, with 7-Hz frequency, essential tremor (23%) or other tremor type (23%), while enhanced physiological tremor was the least frequent (2%). Tremor in patients with HD and tic disorders was found in 10% and 20% of patients, respectively, similarly to the control group. Tremor was mild, postural and of essential tremor type, less frequently of enhanced physiological tremor type. No correlation between severity of tremor and severity of disease was found. The prevalence of tremor is considerably higher among patients with degenerative ataxias compared with HD, tic disorder and the control group. The most common type of tremor accompanying ataxias, HD and tic disorders is essential tremor type.

  1. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  2. Non-opioid nociceptive activity of human dynorphin mutants that cause neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 23

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Verbeek, Dineke S.; Kuzmin, Alexander; Nyberg, Fred; Krishtal, Oleg; Sakurada, Shinobu; Bakalkin, Georgy

    We previously identified four missense mutations in the prodynorphin gene that cause human neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 (SCA23). Three mutations substitute Leu(5), Arg(6), and Arg(9) to Ser (L5S), Trp (R6W) and Cys (R9C) in dynorphin A(1-17) (Dyn A), a peptide with both

  3. Inflammatory genes are upregulated in expanded ataxin-3-expressing cell lines and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evert, BO; Vogt, IR; Kindermann, C; Ozimek, L; de Vos, RAI; Brunt, ERP; Schmitt, [No Value; Klockgether, T; Wullner, U

    2001-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a polyglutamine disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of a gene encoding ataxin-3. To study putative alterations of gene expression induced by expanded ataxin-3, we performed PCR-based cDNA subtractive hybridization in a cell culture

  4. Spinocerebellar ataxias in Venezuela: genetic epidemiology and their most likely ethnic descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Irene; Ikonomu, Vassiliki; Arias, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Dominantly inherited ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias, SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of neurologic diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar and spinal tract degeneration with ataxia and other signs, common to all known subtypes. Several types are relatively frequent worldwide, but in several countries, one specific SCA may show a higher prevalence owing to founder phenomena. In Venezuela, genetic epidemiological features of SCAs have been assessed during the last 30 years; mutations in ATXN1 (SCA1), ATXN2 (SCA2), ATXN3 (SCA3), CACNA1A (SCA6), ATXN7 (SCA7), ATXN8 (SCA8), ATXN10 (SCA10), TBP (SCA17) and ATN1 (dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy, DRPLA) loci were searched among 115 independent families. SCA7 was the most frequent subtype (26.6%), followed by SCA3 (25.0%), SCA2 (21.9%), SCA1 (17.2%), SCA10 (4.7%) and DRPLA (3.1%); in 43% of the families, the subtype remained unidentified. SCA7 mutations displayed strong geographic aggregation in two independent founder foci, and SCA1 showed a very remote founder effect for a subset of families. SCA10 families were scattered across the country, but all had an identical in-phase haplotype carried also by Mexican, Brazilian and Sioux patients, supporting a very old common Amerindian origin. Prevalence for dominant SCAs in Venezuela was estimated as 1:25 000 nuclear families, provenances of which are either Caucasoid, African or Amerindian.

  5. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Mascalchi

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM and cortical gray matter (GM in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  6. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalchi, Mario; Diciotti, Stefano; Giannelli, Marco; Ginestroni, Andrea; Soricelli, Andrea; Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Tessa, Carlo; Galli, Lucia; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Piacentini, Silvia; Salvatore, Elena; Toschi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM) and cortical gray matter (GM) in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  7. Pontine atrophy precedes cerebellar degeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia 7: MRI-based volumetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, O; Lee, P; Kim, S; Kim, H; Huh, K

    2004-01-01

    Background and objective: Spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7) is characterised by cerebellar ataxia and visual loss. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings characteristic of patients with SCA7. Methods: Twenty patients with SCA (eight SCA3, three SCA6, and nine SCA7) and 20 control subjects underwent an MRI-based volumetric analysis. Results: The pontine volume in patients with SCA7 was decreased by a greater amount than in patients with other types of SCA (p0.05). Pontine atrophy was a consistent finding in all patients with SCA7 regardless of the degree of cerebellar atrophy or the severity or duration of illness. In contrast, cerebellar atrophy was not found in those with a short duration of illness or mild ataxia, but became prominent as the severity and duration of illness progressed. Conclusions: Our study suggests that neurodegeneration is ongoing during the life of individuals with SCA7, and that the primary pathology in these individuals involves the brainstem rather than the cerebellum. In addition, pontine atrophy is a prominent, consistent finding in SCA7, and may help in establishing the clinical diagnosis of SCA7. PMID:15377695

  8. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 due to mutations in ITPR1: a case series and review of this emerging congenital ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambonin, Jessica L; Bellomo, Allison; Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Everman, David B; Frazer, Lee M; Geraghty, Michael T; Harper, Amy D; Jones, Julie R; Kamien, Benjamin; Kernohan, Kristin; Koenig, Mary Kay; Lines, Matthew; Palmer, Elizabeth Emma; Richardson, Randal; Segel, Reeval; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Vanstone, Jason R; Gibbons, Melissa; Collins, Abigail; Fogel, Brent L; Dudding-Byth, Tracy; Boycott, Kym M

    2017-06-28

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 (SCA29) is an autosomal dominant, non-progressive cerebellar ataxia characterized by infantile-onset hypotonia, gross motor delay and cognitive impairment. Affected individuals exhibit cerebellar dysfunction and often have cerebellar atrophy on neuroimaging. Recently, missense mutations in ITPR1 were determined to be responsible. Clinical information on 21 individuals from 15 unrelated families with ITPR1 mutations was retrospectively collected using standardized questionnaires, including 11 previously unreported singletons and 2 new patients from a previously reported family. We describe the genetic, clinical and neuroimaging features of these patients to further characterize the clinical features of this rare condition and assess for any genotype-phenotype correlation for this disorder. Our cohort consisted of 9 males and 12 females, with ages ranging from 28 months to 49 years. Disease course was non-progressive with infantile-onset hypotonia and delays in motor and speech development. Gait ataxia was present in all individuals and 10 (48%) were not ambulating independently between the ages of 3-12 years of age. Mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment was present in 17 individuals (85%). Cerebellar atrophy developed after initial symptom presentation in 13 individuals (72%) and was not associated with disease progression or worsening functional impairment. We identified 12 different mutations including 6 novel mutations; 10 mutations were missense (with 4 present in >1 individual), 1 a splice site mutation leading to an in-frame insertion and 1 an in-frame deletion. No specific genotype-phenotype correlations were observed within our cohort. Our findings document significant clinical heterogeneity between individuals with SCA29 in a large cohort of molecularly confirmed cases. Based on the retrospective observed clinical features and disease course, we provide recommendations for management. Further research into the natural

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia: miRNAs expose biological pathways underlying pervasive Purkinje cell degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Stijl, Rogier; Withoff, Sebo; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2017-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the importance of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of various brain disorders including the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). This review focuses on the role of miRNAs in the shared pathogenesis of the different SCA types. We examine the novel findings of a recent cell-type-specific RNA-sequencing study in mouse brain and discuss how the identification of Purkinje-cell-enriched miRNAs highlights biological pathways that expose the mechanisms behind pervasive Purkinje cell degeneration in SCA. These key pathways are likely to contain targets for therapeutic development and represent potential candidate genes for genetically unsolved SCAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA interference-based therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavitra S Ramachandran

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor coordination and retinal degeneration with no current therapies in the clinic. The causative mutation is an expanded CAG repeat in the ataxin-7 gene whose mutant protein product causes cerebellar and brainstem degeneration and retinal cone-rod dystrophy. Here, we reduced the expression of both mutant and wildtype ataxin-7 in the SCA7 mouse retina by RNA interference and evaluated retinal function 23 weeks post injection. We observed a preservation of normal retinal function and no adverse toxicity with ≥50% reduction of mutant and wildtype ataxin-7 alleles. These studies address an important safety concern regarding non-allele specific silencing of ataxin-7 for SCA7 retinal therapy.

  11. Major Depressive Disorder Complicated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia: Report of 2 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagahisa Okamoto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is known that patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA tend to exhibit depressive symptoms. But the pathology of depressive symptoms complicated with SCA, including the reaction to the stress resulting from decreased motor function and central dysfunction due to neurodegeneration, is controversial and remains to be elucidated. To our knowledge, there have been hardly any reports on treatment methods of major depressive disorder (MDD complicated with SCA. Case Reports: We report 2 cases in which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs were effective against MDD complicated with SCA. Interestingly, one of the patients developed the symptoms of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD during the course of the MDD, and the other patient developed the symptoms of MDD during the course of SCA, but complete remission of the MDD occurred in both cases. In our cases, the depressive symptoms may have been caused mainly by an abnormality of reversible neural transmission including serotonin transmission due to central dysfunction, and there is the unlikely possibility that the depressive symptoms are reactive to the stress due to decreased motor function, because the depressive symptoms decreased with SSRIs. Conclusion: Although cerebellar degeneration is irreversible in SCA patients, our cases suggest that MDD complicated with SCA may be reversible and treatable using antidepressants such as SSRIs with few adverse events. Therefore, it is important for neurologists to detect MDD complicated with SCA early and consult a psychiatrist in order to improve quality of life of SCA patients.

  12. Repeat interruptions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 expansions are strongly associated with epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen N.; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Zeng, Desmond; Raskin, Salmo; Moscovich, Mariana; Gatto, Emilia M.; Ochoa, Adriana; Teive, Hélio A. G.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs, termed “ATCCT interruptions,” experience large contractions during germline transmission, particularly in paternal lineages. At the same time, these alleles confer an earlier age at onset which contradicts traditional rules of genetic anticipation in repeat expansions. Previously, ATCCT interruptions have been associated with a higher prevalence of epileptic seizures in one Mexican-American SCA10 family. In a large cohort of SCA10 families, we analyzed whether ATCCT interruptions confers a greater risk for developing seizures in these families. Notably, we find that the presence of repeat interruptions within the SCA10 expansion confers a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of an SCA10 patient developing epilepsy (6.2-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only) and a 13.7-fold increase in having a positive family history of epilepsy (10.5-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only). We conclude that the presence of repeat interruptions in SCA10 repeat expansion indicates a significant risk for the epilepsy phenotype and should be considered during genetic counseling. PMID:24318420

  13. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: Clinicogenetic Aspects, Mechanistic Insights, and Management Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. Velázquez-Pérez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia that occurs as a consequence of abnormal CAG expansions in the ATXN2 gene. Progressive clinical features result from the neurodegeneration of cerebellum and extra-cerebellar structures including the pons, the basal ganglia, and the cerebral cortex. Clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging approaches have been used to characterize the natural history of the disease, allowing its classification into four distinct stages, with special emphasis on the prodromal stage, which is characterized by a plethora of motor and non-motor features. Neuropathological investigations of brain tissue from SCA2 patients reveal a widespread involvement of multiple brain systems, mainly cerebellar and brainstem systems. Recent findings linking ataxin-2 intermediate expansions to other neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have provided insights into the ataxin-2-related toxicity mechanism in neurodegenerative diseases and have raised new ethical challenges to molecular predictive diagnosis of SCA2. No effective neuroprotective therapies are currently available for SCA2 patients, but some therapeutic options such as neurorehabilitation and some emerging neuroprotective drugs have shown palliative benefits.

  14. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: Clinicogenetic Aspects, Mechanistic Insights, and Management Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis C.; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia that occurs as a consequence of abnormal CAG expansions in the ATXN2 gene. Progressive clinical features result from the neurodegeneration of cerebellum and extra-cerebellar structures including the pons, the basal ganglia, and the cerebral cortex. Clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging approaches have been used to characterize the natural history of the disease, allowing its classification into four distinct stages, with special emphasis on the prodromal stage, which is characterized by a plethora of motor and non-motor features. Neuropathological investigations of brain tissue from SCA2 patients reveal a widespread involvement of multiple brain systems, mainly cerebellar and brainstem systems. Recent findings linking ataxin-2 intermediate expansions to other neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have provided insights into the ataxin-2-related toxicity mechanism in neurodegenerative diseases and have raised new ethical challenges to molecular predictive diagnosis of SCA2. No effective neuroprotective therapies are currently available for SCA2 patients, but some therapeutic options such as neurorehabilitation and some emerging neuroprotective drugs have shown palliative benefits. PMID:28955296

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease starting before adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donis, Karina Carvalho; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Krum-Santos, Ana Carolina; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Mattos, Eduardo Preusser; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-04-01

    Onset of Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) before adolescence has been rarely reported. This study aims to describe a cohort of SCA3/MJD with onset before 12 years of age, comparing their disease progression with the progression observed in patients with usual disease onset. We identified all cases from our cohort whose onset was before adolescence. After consent, patients were examined with clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxia (NESSCA). Gender, age, age at onset, disease duration, CAG expanded repeats, transmitting parent, and anticipation of cases with infantile and adult onset were studied. Progression of NESSCA and SARA scores was estimated through a mixed model, and was compared with a historical group with onset after adolescence. Between 2000 and 2014, 461 symptomatic individuals from our region were diagnosed as SCA3/MJD. Onset of eight cases (2.2%), all heterozygotes, was before adolescence: seven were females (p = 0.054). CAG expanded repeats--75 ± 3 versus 84 ± 4--and anticipations--7 ± 9.7 versus 14.4 ± 7.2 years--were different between early childhood and adult onset groups (p < 0.03). The median survival of early childhood onset group was 23 years of age. The annual progression of SARA--2.3 and 0.6 points/year (p = 0.001)--and NESSCA--2.04 and 0.88 points/year (p = 0.043)--was faster in childhood than in adult onset group. Onset of SCA3/MJD before adolescence was related to larger expanded CAG repeats in heterozygosis; females seemed to be at higher risk. Disease progression was faster than in SCA3/MJD starting after 12 years.

  16. Multimodal evoked potentials in spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, and 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Chandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by ataxia and an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The aim of our study was to describe the findings of evoked potentials (EPs among genetically proven SCA types 1, 2, and 3 and to additionally evaluate if EPs can be used to differentiate between them. Materials and Methods: Forty-three cases of genetically proven SCA (SCA1 = 19, SCA2 = 13, and SCA3 = 11 were evaluated with median somatosensory-EP (mSSEP, visual-EP (VEP, and brainstem auditory-evoked response (BAER by standard procedures and compared with normative laboratory data. An EP was considered abnormal if latency was prolonged (>mean + 3 standard deviation (SD of laboratory control data or the waveform was absent or poorly defined. The waves studied were as follows: mSSEP - N20, VEP - P100 and BAER - interpeak latency 1-3 and 3-5. Results: EPs were abnormal in at least one modality in 90.9% of patients. The most common abnormality was of BAER (86.1% followed by VEP (34.9% and mSSEP (30.2%. The degree of abnormality in VEP, mSSEP, and BAER among patients with SCA1 was 42.1, 41.2, and 73.3%, respectively; among patients with SCA2 was 38.5, 27.3, and 100%, respectively; and among patients with SCA3 was 18.2, 37.5, and 88.9%, respectively. The differences between the subgroups of SCAs were not statistically significant. Conclusions: BAER was the most frequent abnormality in SCA types 1, 2, and 3; abnormalities of mSSEP were comparable in the three SCAs; whereas, abnormality of VEP was less often noted in SCA3.

  17. CAG repeats determine brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia 17: a VBM study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reetz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal repeat length has been associated with an earlier age of onset and more severe disease progression in the rare neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17.To determine whether specific structural brain degeneration and rate of disease progression in SCA17 might be associated with the CAG repeat size, observer-independent voxel-based morphometry was applied to high-resolution magnetic resonance images of 16 patients with SCA17 and 16 age-matched healthy controls. The main finding contrasting SCA17 patients with healthy controls demonstrated atrophy in the cerebellum bilaterally. Multiple regression analyses with available genetic data and also post-hoc correlations revealed an inverse relationship again with cerebellar atrophy. Moreover, we found an inverse relationship between the CAG repeat length and rate of disease progression.Our results highlight the fundamental role of the cerebellum in this neurodegenerative disease and support the genotype-phenotype relationship in SCA17 patients. Genetic factors may determine individual susceptibility to neurodegeneration and rate of disease progression.

  18. Massive CAG repeat expansion and somatic instability in maternally transmitted infantile spinocerebellar ataxia type 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Heather; Stanley, Sabrina Y; Thorner, Paul; Faghfoury, Hannaneh; Schulze, Andreas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Pearson, Christopher E; Yoon, Grace

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case to date of maternally transmitted infantile spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), in which a tract of (CAG)45 expands to lengths as large as (CAG)92-250. A 38-year-old woman with classic SCA7 (and a son, who died at age 3 years) had pronounced cerebellar atrophy and a renal biopsy specimen that showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with abnormal podocytes containing cytoplasmic inclusions. Polymerase chain reaction amplification across the SCA7 repeat tract assessed expansion levels in tissues of the affected son. High levels of somatic CAG instability were observed in blood, kidney, and skeletal muscle. This transmitted expansion is considerably larger than previously reported maternal transmission expansions of 5 to 10 gained repeats. We document the first intertissue CAG instability reported to date in patients with SCA7, similar to SCA7 mouse models. Infantile SCA7, which is often paternally transmitted, can rarely arise by maternal transmission, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling among families of patients with SCA7.

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cell - derived neurons for the study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne K. Hansen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 is caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines were established from two SCA3 patients. Dermal fibroblasts were reprogrammed using an integration-free method and the resulting SCA3 iPSCs were differentiated into neurons. These neuronal lines harbored the disease causing mutation, expressed comparable levels of several neuronal markers and responded to the neurotransmitters, glutamate/glycine, GABA and acetylcholine. Additionally, all neuronal cultures formed networks displaying synchronized spontaneous calcium oscillations within 28 days of maturation, and expressed the mature neuronal markers NeuN and Synapsin 1 implying a relatively advanced state of maturity, although not comparable to that of the adult human brain. Interestingly, we were not able to recapitulate the glutamate-induced ataxin-3 aggregation shown in a previously published iPSC-derived SCA3 model. In conclusion, we have generated a panel of SCA3 patient iPSCs and a robust protocol to derive neurons of relatively advanced maturity, which could potentially be valuable for the study of SCA3 disease mechanisms.

  20. Visual Suppression is Impaired in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 but Preserved in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Kishi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Positional vertigo is a common neurologic emergency and mostly the etiology is peripheral. However, central diseases may mimic peripheral positional vertigo at their initial presentation. We here describe the results of a visual suppression test in six patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6, a central positional vertigo, and nine patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the major peripheral positional vertigo. As a result, the visual suppression value of both diseases differed significantly; e.g., 22.5% in SCA6 and 64.3% in BPPV (p < 0.001. There was a positive correlation between the visual suppression value and disease duration, cerebellar atrophy, and CAG repeat length of SCA6 but they were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the present study showed for the first time that visual suppression is impaired in SCA6, a central positional vertigo, but preserved in BPPV, the major peripheral positional vertigo, by directly comparing both groups. The abnormality in the SCA6 group presumably reflects dysfunction in the central visual fixation pathway at the cerebellar flocculus and nodulus. This simple test might aid differential diagnosis of peripheral and central positional vertigo at the earlier stage of disease.disease.

  1. Misclassification of Patients with Spinocerebellar Ataxia as having Psychogenic Postural Instability based on Computerized Dynamic Posturography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Herdman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific criteria have been developed based on computerized dynamic posturography (CDP to assist clinicians in identifying patients with psychogenic balance problems1-4. Patients with known Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA meet several of the criteria for psychogenic balance problem and risk being misclassified as having imbalance of psychogenic origin. However, our research shows that patients with SCA may be distinguished from patients with psychogenic balance problems in several ways. We compared test performance on CDP and the observation of specific behaviors that are associated with psychogenic balance problems in patients with SCA (n = 43 and patients with known psychogenic balance problems (n = 40. Chi square analysis was used to determine if there were significant differences between the groups for the frequency of each criterion for psychogenic CDP and Observed Behaviors. Level of significance was Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratios were calculated for each criterion. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to examine whether the two patient groups demonstrated similar groupings of criteria. Comparison of the results of these analyses identified two criteria that were significantly more frequent in the Psychogenic group than in the SCA group: Regular Periodicity of sway and Circular Sway. Sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratios identified two additional criteria, Inconsistent Motor Responses and Large lateral Sway that also seem to suggest a psychogenic component to a person’s imbalance. Prospective studies are needed to validate the usefulness of these findings.

  2. Health-related quality of life in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, C R; Perestelo-Pérez, L; Escobar, A; López-Bastida, J; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2017-04-01

    The progressive deterioration of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) has a major impact on their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study evaluates HRQOL in a sample of patients diagnosed with SCA and aims to estimate the predictive ability of a set of sociodemographic variables for the different dimensions of the General Health Questionnaire. A total of 80 patients diagnosed with SCA were assessed using a sociodemographic questionnaire and the SF-36 General Health Questionnaire. The sociodemographic variables studied were sex, age, presence of a carer, employment status, and time elapsed from diagnosis of the disease. The 8 subscales of the SF-36 show positive and significant correlations to one another. Mean scores obtained on each SF-36 subscale differ between women and men, although this difference is significant only on the general health subscale, with men scoring higher than women. We found significant age differences on the vitality and social function subscales, with higher scores among younger patients (< 34 years). The variable 'presence of a carer' accounts for most of the total variance of the questionnaire. The SF-36 is a valid and useful instrument for evaluating HRQOL in patients diagnosed with SCA. Presence of a carer seems to be a determinant of self-perceived quality of life in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of gene patents on diagnostic testing: a new patent landscaping method applied to spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthels, Nele; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2011-11-01

    Recent reports in Europe and the United States raise concern about the potential negative impact of gene patents on the freedom to operate of diagnosticians and on the access of patients to genetic diagnostic services. Patents, historically seen as legal instruments to trigger innovation, could cause undesired side effects in the public health domain. Clear empirical evidence on the alleged hindering effect of gene patents is still scarce. We therefore developed a patent categorization method to determine which gene patents could indeed be problematic. The method is applied to patents relevant for genetic testing of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The SCA test is probably the most widely used DNA test in (adult) neurology, as well as one of the most challenging due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Typically tested as a gene panel covering the five common SCA subtypes, we show that the patenting of SCA genes and testing methods and the associated licensing conditions could have far-reaching consequences on legitimate access to this gene panel. Moreover, with genetic testing being increasingly standardized, simply ignoring patents is unlikely to hold out indefinitely. This paper aims to differentiate among so-called 'gene patents' by lifting out the truly problematic ones. In doing so, awareness is raised among all stakeholders in the genetic diagnostics field who are not necessarily familiar with the ins and outs of patenting and licensing.

  4. The spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus is located within a 3-cm interval on chromosome 12q23-24.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Cemal, C. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a predominantly cerebellar syndrome of onset with gait ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, and dysdiadochokinesia. Pathologically, the disorders are characterized by premature neuronal loss in the cerebellar cortex and the inferior olivary and pontine nuclei, with degeneration of the spinal cord. We have previously assigned the spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1, within a 31-cM interval flanked by the loci D12S58 and PLA2. Linkage to SCA2 has been demonstrated in pedigrees from Europe, Japan, and North America, the latter serving to refine the candidate region to a 16-cM interval. We report here genetic analysis undertaken between SCA2 and nine microsatellite loci known to span 8 cM within this interval. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 8 larger triplet expansion alters histone modification and induces RNA foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yih-Ru

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 8 (SCA8 involves the expression of an expanded CTG/CAG combined repeats (CR from opposite strands producing CUG expansion transcripts (ataxin 8 opposite strand, ATXN8OS and a polyglutamine expansion protein (ataxin 8, ATXN8. The pathogenesis of SCA8 is complex and the spectrum of clinical presentations is broad. Results Using stably induced cell models expressing 0, 23, 88 and 157 CR, we study the role of ATXN8OS transcripts in SCA8 pathogenesis. In the absence of doxycycline, the stable ATXN8OS CR cell lines exhibit low levels of ATXN8OS expression and a repeat length-related increase in staurosporine sensitivity and in the number of annexin positive cells. A repeat length-dependent repression of ATXN8OS expression was also notable. Addition of doxycycline leads to 25~50 times more ATXN8OS RNA expression with a repeat length-dependent increase in fold of ATXN8OS RNA induction. ChIP-PCR assay using anti-dimethyl-histone H3-K9 and anti-acetyl-histone H3-K14 antibodies revealed increased H3-K9 dimethylation and reduced H3-K14 acetylation around the ATXN8OS cDNA gene in 157 CR line. The repeat length-dependent increase in induction fold is probably due to the increased RNA stability as demonstrated by monitoring ATXN8OS RNA decay in cells treated with the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. In cells stably expressing ATXN8OS, RNA FISH experiments further revealed ribonuclear foci formation in cells carrying expanded 88 and 157 CR. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that the expanded CUG-repeat tracts are toxic to human cells and may affect ATXN8OS RNA expression and stability through epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates motor function deterioration of spinocerebellar ataxia by rescuing cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wei-Hsien

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA refers to a disease entity in which polyglutamine aggregates are over-produced in Purkinje cells (PCs of the cerebellum as well as other neurons in the central nervous system, and the formation of intracellular polyglutamine aggregates result in the loss of neurons as well as deterioration of motor functions. So far there is no effective neuroprotective treatment for this debilitating disease although numerous efforts have been made. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess multi-lineage differentiation potentials as well as immuno-modulatory properties, and are theoretically good candidates for SCA treatment. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether transplantation of human MSCs (hMSCs can rescue cerebellar PCs and ameliorate motor function deterioration in SCA in a pre-clinical animal model. Method Transgenic mice bearing poly-glutamine mutation in ataxin-2 gene (C57BL/6J SCA2 transgenic mice were serially transplanted with hMSCs intravenously or intracranially before and after the onset of motor function loss. Motor function of mice was evaluated by an accelerating protocol of rotarod test every 8 weeks. Immunohistochemical stain of whole brain sections was adopted to demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of hMSC transplantation on cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs into mice brain. Results Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs effectively improved rotarod performance of SCA2 transgenic mice and delayed the onset of motor function deterioration; while intracranial transplantation failed to achieve such neuroprotective effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed that intravenous transplantation was more effective in the preservation of the survival of cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs than intracranial injection, which was compatible to rotarod performance of transplanted mice. Conclusion Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs can indeed delay the onset as well as improve the motor

  7. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to

  8. Social and cultural elements associated with neurocognitive dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Emmanuele Mercadillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2 is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain related alterations. Here we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the

  9. A strategy for multimodal data integration: application to biomarkers identification in spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garali, Imene; Adanyeguh, Isaac M; Ichou, Farid; Perlbarg, Vincent; Seyer, Alexandre; Colsch, Benoit; Moszer, Ivan; Guillemot, Vincent; Durr, Alexandra; Mochel, Fanny; Tenenhaus, Arthur

    2017-07-03

    The growing number of modalities (e.g. multi-omics, imaging and clinical data) characterizing a given disease provides physicians and statisticians with complementary facets reflecting the disease process but emphasizes the need for novel statistical methods of data analysis able to unify these views. Such data sets are indeed intrinsically structured in blocks, where each block represents a set of variables observed on a group of individuals. Therefore, classical statistical tools cannot be applied without altering their organization, with the risk of information loss. Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) and its sparse generalized canonical correlation analysis (SGCCA) counterpart are component-based methods for exploratory analyses of data sets structured in blocks of variables. Rather than operating sequentially on parts of the measurements, the RGCCA/SGCCA-based integrative analysis method aims at summarizing the relevant information between and within the blocks. It processes a priori information defining which blocks are supposed to be linked to one another, thus reflecting hypotheses about the biology underlying the data blocks. It also requires the setting of extra parameters that need to be carefully adjusted.Here, we provide practical guidelines for the use of RGCCA/SGCCA. We also illustrate the flexibility and usefulness of RGCCA/SGCCA on a unique cohort of patients with four genetic subtypes of spinocerebellar ataxia, in which we obtained multiple data sets from brain volumetry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and metabolomic and lipidomic analyses. As a first step toward the extraction of multimodal biomarkers, and through the reduction to a few meaningful components and the visualization of relevant variables, we identified possible markers of disease progression. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang improves the aversive memory in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Maurmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: The spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA-2 is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder without specific therapy identified, and it is related to the loss of function in the cerebellum, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neurotoxic processes. Scientific evidence indicates that Mangifera indica L. aqueous extract (MiE and its major constituent (mangiferin display antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. Aims: To investigate the MiE and mangiferin effects on behavioral outcomes of neurological function in SCA-2 transgenic mice. Methods: The SCA-2 transgenic mice were daily and orally administered during 12 months with MiE (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, mangiferin (10 mg/kg or vehicle. It was evaluated locomotion (open-field, aversive memory (inhibitory avoidance and declarative memory (object recognition. To explore possible cellular mechanisms underlying the in vivo effects was also evaluated their effects on nerve grow factor (NGF and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α levels in the human glioblastoma cell line U138-MG supernatant. Results: MiE administration did not affect the object recognition memory, but mangiferin did. The natural extract improved selectively the aversive memory in SCA-2 mice, indicating that MiE can affect behavioral parameters regarding fear-related memory. MiE also induced a significant increase in supernatant levels of NGF and TNF-α in vitro in human U138-MG glioblastoma cells. Conclusions: The results suggest that MiE enhances the aversive memory through a mechanism that might involve an increase in neurotrophin and cytokine levels. These findings constitute the basis for the use of the natural extract in the prevention/treatment of memory deficits in SCA-2.

  11. Automated home cage assessment shows behavioral changes in a transgenic mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Esteban; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2013-08-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 17 (SCA17) is an autosomal dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disease characterized by ataxia, involuntary movements, and dementia. A novel SCA17 mouse model having a 71 polyglutamine repeat expansion in the TATA-binding protein (TBP) has shown age related motor deficit using a classic motor test, yet concomitant weight increase might be a confounding factor for this measurement. In this study we used an automated home cage system to test several motor readouts for this same model to confirm pathological behavior results and evaluate benefits of automated home cage in behavior phenotyping. Our results confirm motor deficits in the Tbp/Q71 mice and present previously unrecognized behavioral characteristics obtained from the automated home cage, indicating its use for high-throughput screening and testing, e.g. of therapeutic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a comparative study with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rosa, Anna; De Leva, Maria Fulvia; Maddaluno, Gennaro; Filla, Alessandro; De Michele, Giuseppe; Pappata, Sabina; Pellegrino, Teresa; Fiumara, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Raffaella; Cuocolo, Alberto; Petretta, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and peripheral neuropathy. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is often present. This study evaluated the cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2 using 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in comparison with patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and control subjects. Nine patients with SCA2, nine patients with PD, and nine control subjects underwent 123 I-MIBG imaging studies from which early and late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios and myocardial washout rates were calculated. Early (F = 12.3, p 123 I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy demonstrated an impairment of cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2, which was less marked than in PD patients. These results suggest that 123 I-MIBG cardiac imaging could become a useful tool for analysing the pathophysiology of SCA2. (orig.)

  13. Consistent affection of the central somatosensory system in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and type 3 and its significance for clinical symptoms and rehabilitative therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; Seidel, Kay; Ozerden, Inci; Gierga, Kristin; Brunt, Ewout R.; Schoels, Ludger; de Vos, Rob A. I.; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Schultz, Christian; Auburger, Georg; Deller, Thomas

    The spinocerebellar ataxias type 2 (SCA2) and type 3 (SCA3) are progressive, currently untreatable and ultimately fatal ataxic disorders, which belong to the group of neurological disorders known as CAG-repeat or polyglutamine diseases. Since knowledge regarding the involvement of the central

  14. Involvement of the auditory brainstem system in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), type 3 (SCA3) and type 7 (SCA7)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoche, F.; Seidel, K.; Brunt, E. R.; Auburger, G.; Schoels, L.; Buerk, K.; de Vos, R. A.; den Dunnen, W.; Bechmann, I.; Egensperger, R.; Van Broeckhoven, C.; Gierga, K.; Deller, T.; Rueb, U.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: The spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), type 3 (SCA3) and type 7 (SCA7) are clinically characterized by progressive and severe ataxic symptoms, dysarthria, dysphagia, oculomotor impairments, pyramidal and extrapyramidal manifestations and sensory deficits. Although recent clinical studies

  15. Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing in detection of dynamic mutations of spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan CHEN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To estimate the accuracy and stability of capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing in detecting dynamic mutations of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA. Methods Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing were used in detecting trinucleotide repeated sequence of 14 SCA patients (3 cases of SCA2, 2 cases of SCA7, 7 cases of SCA8 and 2 cases of SCA17. Results Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis of 3 SCA2 cases showed the expanded cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeats were 31, 30 and 32, and the copy numbers of 3 clone sequencing for 3 colonies in each case were 37/40/40, 37/38/39 and 38/39/40 respectively. Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis of 2 SCA7 cases showed the expanded CAG repeats were 57 and 34, and the copy numbers of repeats were 69, 74, 75 in 3 colonies of one case, and was 45 in the other case. For the 7 SCA8 cases with the expanded cytosine-thymine-adenine (CTA/cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG repeats of 99, 111, 104, 92, 89, 104 and 75, the results of clone sequencing were 97, 116, 104, 90, 90, 102 and 76 respectively. For 2 SCA17 cases with the short/expanded CAG repeats of 37/50 and 36/45, the results of clone sequencing were 51/50/52 and 45/44 for 3 and 2 colonies. Conclusions Although the higher mobility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR products containing dynamic mutation in the capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis might cause the deviation for analysis of copy numbers, the deviation was predictable and the results were repeatable. The clone sequencing results showed obvious instability, especially for SCA2 and SCA7 genes, which might owing to their simple CAG repeats. Consequently, clone sequencing is not suited for detection of dynamic mutation, not to mention the quantitative criteria of dynamic mutation sequencing. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2018.03.008

  16. Mechanistic Insights into the Binding of Class IIa HDAC Inhibitors toward Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type-2: A 3D-QSAR and Pharmacophore Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Siddharth; Goyal, Sukriti; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-2) type-2 is a rare neurological disorder among the nine polyglutamine disorders, mainly caused by polyQ (CAG) trinucleotide repeats expansion within gene coding ataxin-2 protein. The expanded trinucleotide repeats within the ataxin-2 protein sequesters transcriptional cofactors i.e., CREB-binding protein (CBP), Ataxin-2 binding protein 1 (A2BP1) leading to a state of hypo-acetylation and transcriptional repression. Histone de-acetylases inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported to restore transcriptional balance through inhibition of class IIa HDAC's, that leads to an increased acetylation and transcription as demonstrated through in-vivo studies on mouse models of Huntington's. In this study, 61 di-aryl cyclo-propanehydroxamic acid derivatives were used for developing three dimensional (3D) QSAR and pharmacophore models. These models were then employed for screening and selection of anti-ataxia compounds. The chosen QSAR model was observed to be statistically robust with correlation coefficient ( r 2 ) value of 0.6774, cross-validated correlation coefficient ( q 2 ) of 0.6157 and co-relation coefficient for external test set ( pred _ r 2 ) of 0.7570. A high F -test value of 77.7093 signified the robustness of the model. Two potential drug leads ZINC 00608101 (SEI) and ZINC 00329110 (ACI) were selected after a coalesce procedure of pharmacophore based screening using the pharmacophore model ADDRR.20 and structural analysis using molecular docking and dynamics simulations. The pharmacophore and the 3D-QSAR model generated were further validated for their screening and prediction ability using the enrichment factor (EF), goodness of hit (GH), and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The compounds SEI and ACI exhibited a docking score of -10.097 and -9.182 kcal/mol, respectively. An evaluation of binding conformation of ligand-bound protein complexes was performed with MD simulations for a time period of 30 ns along with

  17. Clinical application of next generation sequencing in hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia: increasing the diagnostic yield and broadening the ataxia-spasticity spectrum. A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatolo, Daniele; Tessa, Alessandra; Filla, Alessandro; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2018-01-01

    One of the hardest challenges in medical genetics is to reach a molecular diagnosis in the presence of rare brain disorders. Hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia (HA), characterized by high clinical and genetic heterogeneity, is among the diseases that present this challenge. HA can have features overlapping with those of other neurological diseases, especially hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), as routine clinical application of next generation sequencing (NGS) has confirmed. This article reviews different NGS methods applied in heterogeneous cohorts of patients with suspected HA and suggests that exome sequencing should be considered the first-tier genetic approach in this setting. Its application lends support to the hypothesis of HA and HSP as two extremes of a continuous spectrum.

  18. Clinical features, neurogenetics and neuropathology of the polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias type 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, Udo; Schöls, Ludger; Paulson, Henry; Auburger, Georg; Kermer, Pawel; Jen, Joanna C; Seidel, Kay; Korf, Horst-Werner; Deller, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias type 1 (SCA1), 2 (SCA2), 3 (SCA3), 6 (SCA6) and 7 (SCA7) are genetically defined autosomal dominantly inherited progressive cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs). They belong to the group of CAG-repeat or polyglutamine diseases and share pathologically expanded and meiotically unstable glutamine-encoding CAG-repeats at distinct gene loci encoding elongated polyglutamine stretches in the disease proteins. In recent years, progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these currently incurable diseases: Identification of underlying genetic mechanisms made it possible to classify the different ADCAs and to define their clinical and pathological features. Furthermore, advances in molecular biology yielded new insights into the physiological and pathophysiological role of the gene products of SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7 (i.e. ataxin-1, ataxin-2, ataxin-3, α-1A subunit of the P/Q type voltage-dependent calcium channel, ataxin-7). In the present review we summarize our current knowledge about the polyglutamine ataxias SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7 and compare their clinical and electrophysiological features, genetic and molecular biological background, as well as their brain pathologies. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the structure, interactions and functions of the different disease proteins. On the basis of these comprehensive data, similarities, differences and possible disease mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Depression as the Primary Cause of Insomnia and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in a Family with Multiple Cases of Spinocerebellar Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Yen-Lin; Pei, Dee; Yu, Shu-Man; Liu, I-Chao

    2016-07-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is a hereditary disease characterized by central nervous system-related motor dysfunctions. Sleep disorders and frequent non-motor manifestations are commonly comorbid with SCA. To elucidate this relationship, we present three cases in a family that included multiple SCA type 2 patients with various sleep disorders. Complete physical examination, and genetic and imaging studies were performed. Anti-parkinsonism medications were prescribed after neurological examination. Clonazepam and/or quetiapine were administered for sleep disorders but failed to resolve insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Based on DSM-5 criteria, all cases were diagnosed with depression. After treatment with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, symptoms of insomnia and EDS, which are strongly associated with depression in SCA type 2 patients, improved significantly. It is crucial to recognize insomnia and EDS in neurodegenerative diseases, not only for earlier diagnosis, but also to improve quality of life. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  20. The history of spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 in Brazil: travels of a gene A história da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 no Brasil: as viagens de um gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the history of spinocerebellar ataxia 10 (SCA10, since its first report in a large Portuguese-ancestry Family with autosomal dominant pure cerebellar ataxia, till the final identification of further families without Mexican ancestry. These families present a quite different phenotype from those SCA10 families described in Mexico.Os autores apresentam a história da descoberta da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 (AEC10 no Brasil, desde o primeiro relato em uma família com ancestrais portugueses com ataxia cerebelar pura, autossômica dominante, até a identificação de famílias sem ancestrais mexicanos. Essas famílias apresentam um fenótipo de AEC10, com ataxia cerebelar "pura", distinta daquele descrito nas famílias no México.

  1. Genetic fitness and selection intensity in a population affected with high-incidence spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonov, Fedor A; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Tikhonov, Dmitriy G; Neustroyeva, Tatyana S; Sivtseva, Tatyana M; Yakovleva, Natalya V; Nikolaev, Valerian P; Sidorova, Oksana G; Kononova, Sardana K; Goldfarb, Lev G; Renwick, Neil M

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is the major and likely the only type of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia in the Sakha (Yakut) people of Eastern Siberia. The prevalence rate of SCA1 has doubled over the past 21 years peaking at 46 cases per 100,000 rural population. The age at death correlates closely with the number of CAG triplet repeats in the mutant ATXN1 gene (r = -0.81); most patients with low-medium (39-55) repeat numbers survived until the end of reproductive age. The number of CAG repeats expands in meiosis, particularly in paternal transmissions; the average total increase in intergenerational transmissions in our cohort was estimated at 1.6 CAG repeats. The fertility rates of heterozygous carriers of 39-55 CAG repeats in women were no different from those of the general Sakha population. Overall, the survival of mutation carriers through reproductive age, unaltered fertility rates, low childhood mortality in SCA1-affected families, and intergenerational transmission of increasing numbers of CAG repeats in the ATXN1 gene indicate that SCA1 in the Sakha population will be maintained at high prevalence levels. The low (0.19) Crow's index of total selection intensity in our SCA1 cohort implies that this mutation is unlikely to be eliminated through natural selection alone.

  2. Expansion of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 repeat in a patient with Sioux Native American ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf Bushara

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10, an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, is caused by the expansion of the non-coding ATTCT pentanucleotide repeat in the ATAXIN 10 gene. To date, all cases of SCA10 are restricted to patients with ancestral ties to Latin American countries. Here, we report on a SCA10 patient with Sioux Native American ancestry and no reported Hispanic or Latino heritage. Neurological exam findings revealed impaired gait with mild, age-consistent cerebellar atrophy and no evidence of epileptic seizures. The age at onset for this patient, at 83 years of age, is the latest documented for SCA10 patients and is suggestive of a reduced penetrance allele in his family. Southern blot analysis showed an SCA10 expanded allele of 1400 repeats. Established SNPs surrounding the SCA10 locus showed a disease haplotype consistent with the previously described "SCA10 haplotype". This case suggests that the SCA10 expansion represents an early mutation event that possibly occurred during the initial peopling of the Americas.

  3. Huntington's disease-like and ataxia syndromes: identification of a family with a de novo SCA17/TBP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Sara; Petersen, Thor; Nørremølle, Anne

    2010-01-01

    with a Huntington's disease-like phenotype without the HD-gene mutation and 178 patients with genetically unclassified cerebellar ataxia for the mutation in TBP. A 33-year old woman presenting with an HD like phenotype with a de novo 54 CAG/CAA repeat expansion was identified. Her normal allele included 38 repeats......-like phenotypes and ataxia syndromes, also in isolated cases....

  4. Double-blind crossover trial of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, T; Mattern, R; Berger, K; Szymanski, S; Klotz, P; Kraus, P H; Przuntek, H; Schöls, L

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of a combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD). Placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial in 22 patients with genetically confirmed SCA3/MJD. Study phases of 6 months were separated by a washout period of 4 weeks. Dosages were a combination of trimethoprim, 160 mg, and sulfamethoxazole, 800 mg, twice daily for 2 weeks, followed by a combination of trimethoprim, 80 mg, and sulfamethoxazole, 400 mg, twice daily for 5.5 months. Outpatient department of the Neurological Clinic, Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany. Ataxia ranking scale, self-assessment score, static posturography, and results of motor performance testing. Effects on the visual system were studied using the achromatic Vision Contrast Test System and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test for color discrimination. Physical and mental health were documented using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Subgroup analyses assessed the influence of age, sex, age at onset, duration of the disease, phenotype, and CAG repeat length on test performance. Twenty of 22 patients completed the study. Dropouts were due to a rash (placebo phase) and an attempted suicide in a family conflict. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy had no significant effect in SCA3/MJD patients in the short-term analysis (2 weeks) or in the long-term interval (6 months). In contrast to previous reports that studied smaller groups of patients, treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole did not improve the diverse and complex movement disorders caused by SCA3/MJD. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole had no effect on the visual system and cannot be recommended as a continuous treatment for SCA3/MJD patients.

  5. Experience and outcome of 3 years of a European EQA scheme for genetic testing of the spinocerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneca, Sara; Morris, Michael A; Patton, Simon; Elles, Rob; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2008-08-01

    The European Molecular Genetics Quality Network (EMQN) has been organizing an external quality assessment (EQA) scheme for molecular genetic testing of trinucleotide repeat mutations in the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) since 2004. DNA samples were validated by at least two independent labs and two different methods. Together with mock clinical case descriptions and requests for specific SCA gene analyses, these were sent to registered participants each year. Laboratories were asked to use their routine procedures and protocols. A panel of assessors reviewed the final returns, including genotype results and reports, to assess the quality of (1) genotyping and (2) interpretation and reporting. A description of methods and raw data were also requested and were very useful for the final analysis. Altogether, during 3 years, 239 reports were received from the laboratories. Overall genotype error rate ranged 1.1-5.2%, a significant cause of concern. Scores for interpretation and reporting also showed that there is still much room for progress, although performance has improved over this period of assessment. The consequences of suboptimal laboratory practices, genotyping errors and misdiagnosis and of incorrect or incomplete interpretation and reporting have wide implications for patient lives, as well as for health management and counselling of relatives. EQA schemes are an important part of quality assurance in molecular genetic laboratories, and their use should become a routine part of laboratory diagnostic practice. Current evidence shows also that it is important that laboratories participate on a yearly basis and that this becomes mandatory for reference laboratories.

  6. Incidentalome in Neurogenetics: Pathogenic Variant of NSD1 in a Patient With Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Harvy; Ramírez-Montaño, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Background: Genetic studies of late-onset sporadic ataxias (>40 years of age) are not routinely indicated. For unresolved cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS) tools, such as whole-exome sequencing (WES), are available for a definitive diagnosis. Case presentation: Our patient is a woman with a usual facial phenotype and anthropometry, who developed ataxia at 45 years of age, with no relevant family history and an initial clinical approach that ruled out common aetiologies. WES was performed when the patient was 54 years old. The results identified the heterozygous pathogenic variant c.248delA (p.N83MfsX4) in the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 1 ( NSD1 ; MIM 606681) gene (related to Sotos syndrome), which was not associated with ataxia and is not related to the patient's phenotype. Sanger sequencing of NSD1 in two different laboratories confirmed the variant. Conclusions: NGS findings generally offer valuable information that can be used for clinical decision-making. However, an incidental finding that leads to defining new clinical and bioethical actions is also possible. Consequently, the biological importance of this type of genetic "incidentalome" must be determined.

  7. Incidentalome in Neurogenetics: Pathogenic Variant of NSD1 in a Patient With Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvy Velasco

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genetic studies of late-onset sporadic ataxias (>40 years of age are not routinely indicated. For unresolved cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS tools, such as whole-exome sequencing (WES, are available for a definitive diagnosis.Case presentation: Our patient is a woman with a usual facial phenotype and anthropometry, who developed ataxia at 45 years of age, with no relevant family history and an initial clinical approach that ruled out common aetiologies. WES was performed when the patient was 54 years old. The results identified the heterozygous pathogenic variant c.248delA (p.N83MfsX4 in the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 1 (NSD1; MIM 606681 gene (related to Sotos syndrome, which was not associated with ataxia and is not related to the patient's phenotype. Sanger sequencing of NSD1 in two different laboratories confirmed the variant.Conclusions: NGS findings generally offer valuable information that can be used for clinical decision-making. However, an incidental finding that leads to defining new clinical and bioethical actions is also possible. Consequently, the biological importance of this type of genetic “incidentalome” must be determined.

  8. Polyglutamine aggregation in Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 : similar mechanisms in aggregate formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, K.; Siswanto, S.; Fredrich, M.; Bouzrou, M.; Brunt, E. R.; van Leeuwen, F. W.; Kampinga, H. H.; Korf, H. -W.; Rueb, U.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.

    AimsPolyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are characterized by the expansion of a polymorphic glutamine sequence in disease-specific proteins and exhibit aggregation of these proteins. This is combated by the cellular protein quality control (PQC) system, consisting of chaperone-mediated refolding as well

  9. Understanding the Pathophysiology of Spinocerebellar Ataxias through genetics, neurophysiology, structural and functional neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Pal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years a large cohort of 656 index patients with clinically suspected degenerative ataxias were clinically evaluated under various research projects. Of these, 625 index patients underwent genetic tests for the clinically suspected most probable diagnosis. A diagnosis could be achieved in 218 patients (34.9%. Among these 218 index patients, 82 each were SCA1 and SCA2, 32 were SCA3, 4 were SCA12, and 18 were Friedreich's Ataxia. Thus among the Autosomal Dominant Ataxias (SCAs there was equal prevalence of SCA1 and SCA2 (41% each followed by SCA3 (16% and SCA12 (2%. This high prevalence of SCA1 is in contrast to the available National and International literature. The rate of clinical disease progression, especially in SCA2, was dependent on the CAG repeat size, and may commence linearly from birth.Apart from cerebellar involvement, a comprehensive evaluation of the neuroaxis in various subsets of this genetically proved cohort showedsubclinicalinvolvement of the cerebral cortex, central motor and sensory pathways, peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system. Important findings include: (aAmixedsensorimotor and pure sensory neuropathy was seen in all the three subtypes of SCAs, while pure motor neuropathy was uncommon; (b There was reduced cortical excitability and prolonged central motor conduction time, most evident in SCA1 and least in SCA2; (c Cardiac autonomic dysfunction, predominantly parasympathetic, was seen in SCA, and the severity correlated with the duration of illness in SCA1; (d In SCA1 there was a global impairment of balance, with greater instability in anterior–posterior than medio–lateral directions; (e In all the three SCAs there was a significant loss of gray matter in both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Vermian atrophy was more pronounced in SCA3, while SCA1 and SCA2 had significant white matter atrophy. Pontine white matter atrophy was more pronounced in SCA2; (f Cerebellar activity was

  10. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease: segregation patterns and factors influencing instability of expanded CAG transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, G N; Kersting, N; Krum-Santos, A C; Santos, A S P; Furtado, G V; Pacheco, D; Gonçalves, T A; Saute, J A; Schuler-Faccini, L; Mattos, E P; Saraiva-Pereira, M L; Jardim, L B

    2016-08-01

    Controversies about Mendelian segregation and CAG expansion (CAGexp) instabilities during meiosis in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) need clarification. Additional evidence about these issues was obtained from the cohort of all SCA3/MJD individuals living in South Brazil. A survey was carried out to update information registered since 2001. Deaths were checked with the Public Information System, and data was made anonymous. Anticipation and delta-CAGexp from parent-offspring pairs, and delta-CAGexp between siblings were obtained. One hundred and fifty-nine families (94% of the entire registry) were retrieved, comprising 3725 living individuals as of 2015, 625 of these being symptomatic. Minimal prevalence was 6:100,000. Carriers of a CAGexp represented 65.6% of sibs in the genotyped offspring (p < 0.001). Median instability was larger among paternal than maternal transmissions, and instabilities correlated with anticipation (r = 0.38; p = 0.001). Age of the parent correlated to delta-CAGexp among 115 direct parent-offspring CAGexp transmissions (ρ = 0.23, p = 0.014). In 98 additional kindreds, the delta-CAGexp between 269 siblings correlated with their delta-of-age (ρ = 0.27, p < 0.0001). SCA3/MJD was associated with a segregation distortion favoring the expanded allele in our cohort. Instability of expansion during meiosis was weakly influenced by the age of the transmitting parent at the time of conception. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Polyglutamine length-dependent toxicity from α1ACT in Drosophila models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ling Tsou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6 is a neurodegenerative disease that results from abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ repeat. SCA6 is caused by CAG triplet repeat expansion in the gene CACNA1A, resulting in a polyQ tract of 19-33 in patients. CACNA1A, a bicistronic gene, encodes the α1A calcium channel subunit and the transcription factor, α1ACT. PolyQ expansion in α1ACT causes degeneration in mice. We recently described the first Drosophila models of SCA6 that express α1ACT with a normal (11Q or hyper-expanded (70Q polyQ. Here, we report additional α1ACT transgenic flies, which express full-length α1ACT with a 33Q repeat. We show that α1ACT33Q is toxic in Drosophila, but less so than the 70Q version. When expressed everywhere, α1ACT33Q-expressing adults die earlier than flies expressing the normal allele. α1ACT33Q causes retinal degeneration and leads to aggregated species in an age-dependent manner, but at a slower pace than the 70Q counterpart. According to western blots, α1ACT33Q localizes less readily in the nucleus than α1ACT70Q, providing clues into the importance of polyQ tract length on α1ACT localization and its site of toxicity. We expect that these new lines will be highly valuable for future work on SCA6.

  12. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and tetracycline differently affect ataxin-3 fibrillogenesis and reduce toxicity in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanomi, Marcella; Natalello, Antonino; Visentin, Cristina; Pastori, Valentina; Penco, Amanda; Cornelli, Giuseppina; Colombo, Giorgio; Malabarba, Maria G; Doglia, Silvia M; Relini, Annalisa; Regonesi, Maria E; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-12-15

    The polyglutamine (polyQ)-containing protein ataxin-3 (AT3) triggers the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) when its polyQ tract is expanded beyond a critical length. This results in protein aggregation and generation of toxic oligomers and fibrils. Currently, no effective treatment is available for such and other polyQ diseases. Therefore, plenty of investigations are being carried on to assess the mechanism of action and the therapeutic potential of anti-amyloid agents. The polyphenol compound epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and tetracycline have been shown to exert some effect in preventing fibrillogenesis of amyloidogenic proteins. Here, we have incubated an expanded AT3 variant with either compound to assess their effects on the aggregation pattern. The process was monitored by atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Whereas in the absence of any treatment, AT3 gives rise to amyloid β-rich fibrils, whose hallmark is the typical glutamine side-chain hydrogen bonding, when incubated in the presence of EGCG it generated soluble, SDS-resistant aggregates, much poorer in β-sheets and devoid of any ordered side-chain hydrogen bonding. These are off-pathway species that persist until the latest incubation time and are virtually absent in the control sample. In contrast, tetracycline did not produce major alterations in the structural features of the aggregated species compared with the control, but substantially increased their solubility. Both compounds significantly reduced toxicity, as shown by the MTT assay in COS-7 cell line and in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain expressing in the nervous system an AT3 expanded variant in fusion with GFP. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Fatigue and Its Associated Factors in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3/Machado-Joseph Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Nunes, Marcelo B; Faber, Ingrid; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; Lopes-Cendes, Íscia; França, Marcondes C

    2017-02-01

    Fatigue has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases, reducing quality of life. A systematic evaluation of this clinical feature is lacking in SCA3/MJD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and the factors associated with fatigue in SCA3/MJD. Patients with SCA3/MJD and matched healthy controls answered the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Beck Inventory Depression (BDI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA) was used to determine ataxia severity. We used Mann-Whitney and Fisher exact tests to compare mean scores and proportions between groups. Linear regression analyses were employed to investigate factors associated with fatigue in SCA3/MJD. Seventy-four patients were included with a mean age and disease duration of 47.2 ± 12.8 and 9.5 ± 6.37 years, respectively. There were 38 men and 36 women. Mean (CAG)n was 72.2 ± 3.8. Mean MFIS score was higher in patients with SCA3/MJD (41.4 ± 16.2 vs 18.4 ± 12.9, p < 0.001). According to BDI scores, relevant depressive symptoms were found in 69.4 % of patients but only in 10.4 % of controls (p < 0.001). The proportion of patients with ESS scores indicating excessive daytime somnolence was also higher than controls (37.5 vs 22.3 %, p = 0.05). In the multiple regression analysis, both BDI and ESS scores were associated with fatigue (r = 0.67, p < 0.001 and p = 0.01). Fatigue is frequent and strongly associated with depression and excessive daytime somnolence in SCA3/MJD.

  14. Novel selective positive modulator of calcium-activated potassium channels exerts beneficial effects in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumu, AW; Hougaard, C; Rode, F; Jacobsen, TA; Sabatier, JM; Eriksen, BL; Strøbæk, D; Liang, X; Egorova, P; Vorontsova, D; Christophersen, P; Rønn, LCB; Bezprozvanny, I

    2012-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion within the Ataxin-2 (Atxn2) protein. Purkinje cells (PC) of the cerebellum fire irregularly and eventually die in SCA2. We show here that the type 2 small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK2) play a key role in control of normal PC activity. Using cerebellar slices from transgenic SCA2 mice we demonstrate that SK channel modulators restore regular pacemaker activity of SCA2 PCs. Furthermore, we also show that oral delivery of a novel selective positive modulator of SK2/3 channels (NS13001) alleviates behavioural and neuropathological phenotypes of aging SCA2 transgenic mice. We conclude that SK2 channels constitute a novel target for SCA2 treatment and that the developed selective SK2/3 modulator NS13001 holds promise as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of SCA2 and possibly other cerebellar ataxias. PMID:23102227

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 neurodegeneration differentially affects error-based and strategic-based visuomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Díaz, Rosalinda; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Medrano-Montero, Jacqeline; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimé; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2013-12-01

    There are different types of visuomotor learning. Among the most studied is motor error-based learning where the sign and magnitude of the error are used to update motor commands. However, there are other instances where individuals show visuomotor learning even if the sign or magnitude of the error is precluded. Studies with patients suggest that the former learning is impaired after cerebellar lesions, while basal ganglia lesions disrupt the latter. Nevertheless, the cerebellar role is not restricted only to error-based learning, but it also contributes to several cognitive processes. Therefore, here, we tested if cerebellar ataxia patients are affected in two tasks, one that depends on error-based learning and the other that prevents the use of error-based learning. Our results showed that cerebellar patients have deficits in both visuomotor tasks; however, while error-based learning tasks deficits correlated with the motor impairments, the motor error-dependent task did not correlate with any motor measure.

  16. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) : widespread brain damage in an adult-onset patient with progressive visual impairments in comparison with an adult-onset patient without visual impairments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Brunt, E. R.; Seidel, K.; Gierga, K.; Mooy, C. M.; Kettner, M.; Van Broeckhoven, C.; Bechmann, I.; La Spada, A. R.; Schoels, L.; den Dunnen, W.; de Vos, R. A. I.; Deller, T.

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) represents a rare and severe autosomal dominantly inherited ataxic disorder and is among the known CAG-repeat, or polyglutamine, diseases. In contrast to other currently known autosomal dominantly inherited ataxic disorders, SCA7 may manifest itself with

  17. Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Xia, Guangbin

    2016-08-01

    This article introduces the background and common etiologies of ataxia and provides a general approach to assessing and managing the patient with ataxia. Ataxia is a manifestation of a variety of disease processes, and an underlying etiology needs to be investigated. Pure ataxia is rare in acquired ataxia disorders, and associated symptoms and signs almost always exist to suggest an underlying cause. While the spectrum of hereditary degenerative ataxias is expanding, special attention should be addressed to those treatable and reversible etiologies, especially potentially life-threatening causes. This article summarizes the diseases that can present with ataxia, with special attention given to diagnostically useful features. While emerging genetic tests are becoming increasingly available for hereditary ataxia, they cannot replace conventional diagnostic procedures in most patients with ataxia. Special consideration should be focused on clinical features when selecting a cost-effective diagnostic test. Clinicians who evaluate patients with ataxia should be familiar with the disease spectrum that can present with ataxia. Following a detailed history and neurologic examination, proper diagnostic tests can be designed to confirm the clinical working diagnosis.

  18. Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid signaling system in the cerebellum and brainstem in a transgenic mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cueto, Carmen; Hernández-Gálvez, Mariluz; Hillard, Cecilia J; Maciel, Patricia; García-García, Luis; Valdeolivas, Sara; Pozo, Miguel A; Ramos, José A; Gómez-Ruiz, María; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2016-12-17

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA-3) is a rare disease but it is the most frequent type within the autosomal dominant inherited ataxias. The disease lacks an effective treatment to alleviate major symptoms and to modify disease progression. Our recent findings that endocannabinoid receptors and enzymes are significantly altered in the post-mortem cerebellum of patients affected by autosomal-dominant hereditary ataxias suggest that targeting the endocannabinoid signaling system may be a promising therapeutic option. Our goal was to investigate the status of the endocannabinoid signaling system in a transgenic mouse model of SCA-3, in the two CNS structures most affected in this disease - cerebellum and brainstem. These animals exhibited progressive motor incoordination, imbalance, abnormal gait, muscle weakness, and dystonia, in parallel to reduced in vivo brain glucose metabolism, deterioration of specific neuron subsets located in the dentate nucleus and pontine nuclei, small changes in microglial morphology, and reduction in glial glutamate transporters. Concerning the endocannabinoid signaling, our data indicated no changes in CB 2 receptors. By contrast, CB 1 receptors increased in the Purkinje cell layer, in particular in terminals of basket cells, but they were reduced in the dentate nucleus. We also measured the levels of endocannabinoid lipids and found reductions in anandamide and oleoylethanolamide in the brainstem. These changes correlated with an increase in the FAAH enzyme in the brainstem, which also occurred in some cerebellar areas, whereas other endocannabinoid-related enzymes were not altered. Collectively, our results in SCA-3 mutant mice confirm a possible dysregulation in the endocannabinoid system in the most important brain structures affected in this type of ataxia, suggesting that a pharmacological manipulation addressed to correct these changes could be a promising option in SCA-3. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Most mutations that cause spinocerebellar ataxia autosomal recessive type 16 (SCAR16) destabilize the protein quality-control E3 ligase CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanack, Adam J; Newsom, Oliver J; Scaglione, Kenneth Matthew

    2018-02-23

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins promotes protein aggregation and neuronal death in many neurodegenerative diseases. To counteract misfolded protein accumulation, neurons have pathways that recognize and refold or degrade aggregation-prone proteins. One U-box-containing E3 ligase, C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), plays a key role in this process, targeting misfolded proteins for proteasomal degradation. CHIP plays a protective role in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, and in humans, mutations in CHIP cause spinocerebellar ataxia autosomal recessive type 16 (SCAR16), a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by truncal and limb ataxia that results in gait instability. Here, we systematically analyzed CHIP mutations that cause SCAR16 and found that most SCAR16 mutations destabilize CHIP. This destabilization caused mutation-specific defects in CHIP activity, including increased formation of soluble oligomers, decreased interactions with chaperones, diminished substrate ubiquitination, and reduced steady-state levels in cells. Consistent with decreased CHIP stability promoting its dysfunction in SCAR16, most mutant proteins recovered activity when the assays were performed below the mutants' melting temperature. Together, our results have uncovered the molecular basis of genetic defects in CHIP function that cause SCAR16. Our insights suggest that compounds that improve the thermostability of genetic CHIP variants may be beneficial for treating patients with SCAR16. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Clinical analysis of the treatment of spinocerebellar ataxia and multiple system atrophy-cerebellar type with umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongmei, Han; Jing, Liu; Mei, Xue; Ling, Zhu; Hongmin, Yan; Zhidong, Wang; Li, Ding; Zikuan, Guo; Hengxiang, Wang

    2011-09-01

    The aims of this study were to observe the safety and effectiveness of umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSC) in the treatment of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) and multiple system atrophy-cerebellar type (MSA-C). From October 2009 to September 2010, 14 cases of SCA and 10 cases of MSA-C were given UC-MSC by weekly intrathecal injection, at a dose of 1 × 10(6)/kg four times as one course. All the patients received one course of treatment, except three patients who received two courses. The movement ability and quality of daily life were evaluated with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and Activity of Daily Living Scale (ADL) and the scores compared with those before cell therapy. A follow-up of 6-15 months was carried out for all of the patients. The results showed that the ICARS and ADL scores were significantly decreased 1 month after treatment (P pain (two cases) and headache (one case), which disappeared within 1-3 days. During the follow-up, 10 cases remained stable for half a year or longer, while 14 cases had regressed to the status prior to the treatment within 1-14 months (an average of 3 months). Intrathecal injection of UC-MSC is safe and can delay the progression of neurologic deficits for SCA and MSA-C patients.

  1. Challenges in sleep stage R scoring in patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1, SCA2 and SCA3) and oculomotor abnormalities: a whole night polysomnographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshagiri, Doniparthi Venkata; Sasidharan, Arun; Kumar, Gulshan; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Kutty, Bindu M; Yadav, Ravi

    2018-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive cerebellar features with additional neuro-axis involvement. Oculomotor abnormality is one of the most frequent manifestations. This study was done to assess the polysomnographic abnormalities in patients with Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2 and SCA3) and also to evaluate whether oculomotor abnormalities interfere with sleep stage R scoring. The study was carried out using 36 genetically positive SCA patients. All patients underwent neurological examination with special focus on oculomotor function (optokinetic nystagmus-OKN and extraocular movement restriction-EOM). The sleep quality was measured with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Disease severity was assessed with International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). All the patients underwent over-night video-polysomnography (VPSG). Out of 36 patients studied, the data of 34 patients [SCA1 (n = 12), SCA2 (n = 13), SCA3 (n = 9)] were used for final analysis. Patients from SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3 category did not show significant differences in age and diseases severity (ICARS). All patients had vertical OKN impairment. Oculomotor impairment was higher in SCA2 patients. Sleep macro-architecture analysis showed absent stage R sleep, predominantly in SCA2 (69%) followed by SCA3 (44%) and SCA1 (8%). Patients showed a strong negative correlation of stage R sleep percentage with disease severity and oculomotor dysfunction. Voluntary saccadic eye movement velocity and rapid eye movements (REMs) in sleep are strongly correlated. The more severe the saccadic velocity impairment, the less likely was it to generate REMs (rapid eye movements) during stage R. Accordingly 69% of SCA2 patients with severe occulomotor impairments showed absent stage R as per the AASM sleep scoring. We presume that the impaired REMs generation in sleep could be due to oculomotor abnormality and has

  2. Clinical validity of MR based program for analysis of fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguslawska, R.; Lechowicz, W.

    2008-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) and type 2 (SCA2) belong to the group of neurodegenerative disorders of autosomal dominant inheritance, genetically and clinically heterogeneous, caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion, which leads to productions of protein carrying the abnormal polyglutamine chain (polyQ). Molecular abnormalities cause degenerative changes - atrophy of posterior cranial fossa structures. The clinical symptoms typical of this disorder include progressive gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, occulomotor disturbances, pyramidal tract and peripheral nerves involvement. The aim of the study is to evaluate the usefulness of a computer program prepared in our department for volumetric measurements of posterior cranial fossa structures (the pons, vermis and cerebellar hemispheres) in a group of SCA patients. MR examinations of 22 patients suffering from SCA were used to calculate the value of fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures and compared with the results of group of 10 healthy volunteers. The degree of atrophy of posterior cranial fossa structures can be objectively evaluated by special volumetric measurements. We found fluid/brain index (FBI) of posterior cranial fossa structures in group of SCA patients to vary from 0.1411 to 0.3929 (mean 0.2456 SD±0.601). 1. MR-based calculation of fluid/brain index of posterior fossa structures is a valuable tool for morphological assessment of SCA-related changes in brain structures. 2. The presented software enables objective evaluation of the course and stage of posterior fossa structures atrophy. 3. Our self-made computer program to calculate the fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures is easy to use on a personal computer- it is a good tool in everyday radiological practice. (author)

  3. A novel nuclear DnaJ protein, DNAJC8, can suppress the formation of spinocerebellar ataxia 3 polyglutamine aggregation in a J-domain independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Norie [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Department of Neurology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Kamiguchi, Kenjiro; Nakanishi, Katsuya; Sokolovskya, Alice; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yasuaki; Murai, Aiko; Yamamoto, Eri; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Kochin, Vitaly [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Chiba, Susumu [Department of Neurology, Clinical Brain Research Laboratory, Toyokura Memorial Hall, Sapporo Yamano-ue Hospital (Japan); Shimohama, Shun [Department of Neurology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Sato, Noriyuki [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Torigoe, Toshihiko, E-mail: torigoe@sapmed.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)

    2016-06-10

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases comprise neurodegenerative disorders caused by expression of expanded polyQ-containing proteins. The cytotoxicity of the expanded polyQ-containing proteins is closely associated with aggregate formation. In this study, we report that a novel J-protein, DNAJ (HSP40) Homolog, Subfamily C, Member 8 (DNAJC8), suppresses the aggregation of polyQ-containing protein in a cellular model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), which is also known as Machado-Joseph disease. Overexpression of DNAJC8 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells significantly reduced the polyQ aggregation and apoptosis, and DNAJC8 was co-localized with the polyQ aggregation in the cell nucleus. Deletion mutants of DNAJC8 revealed that the C-terminal domain of DNAJC8 was essential for the suppression of polyQ aggregation, whereas the J-domain was dispensable. Furthermore, 22-mer oligopeptide derived from C-termilal domain could suppress the polyQ aggregation. These results indicate that DNAJC8 can suppress the polyQ aggregation via a distinct mechanism independent of HSP70-based chaperone machinery and have a unique protective role against the aggregation of expanded polyQ-containing proteins such as pathogenic ataxin-3 proteins.

  4. Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1) in two large Italian kindreds: evidence in favour of a locus position distal to GLO1 and the HLA cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, M; Iodice, C; Lulli, P; Spadaro, M; Cappellacci, S; Giunti, P; Malaspina, P; Morellini, M; Morocutti, C; Novelletto, A

    1991-01-01

    Two large Italian pedigrees with HLA-linked spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1) were typed for HLA-A, -B and -DR as well as for markers either distal (F13A, D6S8) or proximal (D6S29, GLO1) to HLA. Pairwise linkage analyses of SCA1 vs. HLA-A, -B, and -DR showed peak lodscores of 5.3, 5.6 and 3.3 respectively at 7% recombination. Negative lodscores significantly excluded linkage with F13A at less than 5% and with GLO1 at less than 10%. The lodscores with D6S8 and D6S29 had only low peaks. Recombination events in the two pedigrees and the estimated genetic distances of SCA1 from GLO1 and HLA favour the hypothesis of a SCA1 location distal to both of them. An order cen-GLO1-HLA-SCA1-tel appears therefore most likely with present data. These results are discussed in relation to previous reports placing SCA1 distal to HLA in two families and

  5. The SCA1 (Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and MJD (Machado-Joseph disease CAG repeats in normal individuals: segregation analysis and allele frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiezel Cláudia Emília Vieira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3 are autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by expansions of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the SCA1 and MJD genes. These expanded sequences are unstable upon transmission, leading to an intergeneration increase in the number of repeats (dynamic mutation. The transmission of the CAG repeat was studied in normal mother-father-child trios, referred for paternity testing (SCA1, n = 367; MJD, n = 879. No segregation distortion was detected. The CAG allele frequencies were determined in 330 unrelated individuals (fathers from couples tested for paternity. The allele frequency distributions did not differ from those previously reported for European populations. The estimated values for the statistic parameters indicating diversity at the SCA1 locus did not differ much from those reported previously for other STRs in the Brazilian population, while those for the MJD locus were close to or higher than the maximum values of previous reports. This shows that SCA1 and MJD are highly informative loci for applications in genetic and population studies and for forensic analysis.

  6. Reduced cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a comparative study with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Rosa, Anna; De Leva, Maria Fulvia; Maddaluno, Gennaro; Filla, Alessandro; De Michele, Giuseppe [University Federico II, Department of Neurosciences and Reproductive and Odontostomatologic Sciences, Naples (Italy); Pappata, Sabina; Pellegrino, Teresa [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Fiumara, Giovanni [Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Carotenuto, Raffaella; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and peripheral neuropathy. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is often present. This study evaluated the cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2 using {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in comparison with patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and control subjects. Nine patients with SCA2, nine patients with PD, and nine control subjects underwent {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging studies from which early and late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios and myocardial washout rates were calculated. Early (F = 12.3, p < 0.0001) and late (F = 16.8, p < 0.0001) H/M ratios were significantly different among groups. In controls, early and late H/M ratios (2.2 {+-} 0.12 and 2.1 {+-} 0.20) were significantly higher than in patients with SCA2 (1.9 {+-} 0.23 and 1.8 {+-} 0.20, both p < 0.05) and with patients with PD (1.7 {+-} 0.29 and 1.4 {+-} 0.35, both p < 0.001). There was also a significant difference in washout rates among groups (F = 11.7, p < 0.0001). In controls the washout rate (19.9 {+-} 9.6 %) was significantly lower (p < 0.005) than in patients with PD (51.0 {+-} 23.7 %), but not different from that in SCA2 patients (19.5 {+-} 9.4 %). In SCA2 patients, in a multivariable linear regression analysis only the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score was independently associated with early H/M ratio ({beta} = -0.12, p < 0.05). {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy demonstrated an impairment of cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2, which was less marked than in PD patients. These results suggest that {sup 123}I-MIBG cardiac imaging could become a useful tool for analysing the pathophysiology of SCA2. (orig.)

  7. Home-cage anxiety levels in a transgenic rat model for Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 measured by an approach-avoidance task: The light spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, Elisavet I; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Homberg, Judith R; Van der Harst, Johanneke E

    2017-08-18

    Measuring anxiety in a reliable manner is essential for behavioural phenotyping of rodent models such as the rat model for Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) where anxiety is reported in patients. An automated tool for assessing anxiety within the home cage can minimize human intervention, stress of handling, transportation and novelty. We applied the anxiety test "light spot" (LS) (white led directed at the food-hopper) to our transgenic SCA17 rat model in the PhenoTyper 4500 ® to extend the knowledge of this automated tool for behavioural phenotyping and to verify an anxiety-like phenotype at three different disease stages for use in future therapeutic studies. Locomotor activity was increased in SCA17 rats at 6 and 9 months during the first 15min of the LS, potentially reflecting increased risk assessment. Both genotypes responded to the test with lower duration in the LS zone and higher time spent inside the shelter compared to baseline. We present the first data of a rat model subjected to the LS. The LS can be considered more biologically relevant than a traditional test as it measures anxiety in a familiar situation. The LS successfully evoked avoidance and shelter-seeking in rats. SCA17 rats showed a stronger approach-avoidance conflict reflected by increased activity in the area outside the LS. This home cage test, continuously monitoring pre- and post-effects, provides the opportunity for in-depth analysis, making it a potentially useful tool for detecting subtle or complex anxiety-related traits in rodents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro characterization of six STUB1 variants in spinocerebellar ataxia 16 reveals altered structural properties for the encoded CHIP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdaman, Yasaman; Sanchez-Guixé, Monica; Kleppe, Rune; Erdal, Sigrid; Bustad, Helene J; Bjørkhaug, Lise; Haugarvoll, Kristoffer; Tzoulis, Charalampos; Heimdal, Ketil; Knappskog, Per M; Johansson, Stefan; Aukrust, Ingvild

    2017-04-30

    Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 16 (SCAR16) is caused by biallelic mutations in the STIP1 homology and U-box containing protein 1 ( STUB1 ) gene encoding the ubiquitin E3 ligase and dimeric co-chaperone C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP). It has been proposed that the disease mechanism is related to CHIP's impaired E3 ubiquitin ligase properties and/or interaction with its chaperones. However, there is limited knowledge on how these mutations affect the stability, folding, and protein structure of CHIP itself. To gain further insight, six previously reported pathogenic STUB1 variants (E28K, N65S, K145Q, M211I, S236T, and T246M) were expressed as recombinant proteins and studied using limited proteolysis, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), and circular dichroism (CD). Our results reveal that N65S shows increased CHIP dimerization, higher levels of α-helical content, and decreased degradation rate compared with wild-type (WT) CHIP. By contrast, T246M demonstrates a strong tendency for aggregation, a more flexible protein structure, decreased levels of α-helical structures, and increased degradation rate compared with WT CHIP. E28K, K145Q, M211I, and S236T also show defects on structural properties compared with WT CHIP, although less profound than what observed for N65S and T246M. In conclusion, our results illustrate that some STUB1 mutations known to cause recessive SCAR16 have a profound impact on the protein structure, stability, and ability of CHIP to dimerize in vitro. These results add to the growing understanding on the mechanisms behind the disorder. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Expanding the clinical phenotype associated with ELOVL4 mutation: study of a large French-Canadian family with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia and erythrokeratodermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Turcotte-Gauthier, Maude; Noreau, Anne; Martin, Caroline; Meloche, Caroline; Gravel, Micheline; Drouin, Christian Allen; Rouleau, Guy A; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a complex group of neurodegenerative disorders with significant genetic heterogeneity. Despite the identification of 20 SCA genes, the cause of the disorder in a significant proportion of families with SCA remains unexplained. In 1972, a French-Canadian family segregating a combination of SCA and erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV) in an autosomal dominant fashion was described. To map and identify the causative gene in this large family with SCA and EKV using a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. A total of 32 individuals from the family have undergone complete neurologic and dermatologic examinations. Mutations in ELOVL4 have been reported in families with macular degeneration. Recently, homozygous mutations were found in patients with ichthyosis, spastic paraplegia, and severe neurodevelopmental defects. In the present study, we report on a heterozygote mutation in ELOVL4 in affected individuals from the family with SCA and EKV. The mutation segregates with a milder phenotype consisting of early-onset patches of erythema and hyperkeratosis, as well as SCA manifesting in the fourth or fifth decade of life. We describe the mapping and the identification of a c.504G>C transversion in ELOVL4 resulting in the p.L168F substitution. We also provide clinical characterization of the phenotypes in 19 mutation carriers. We report, to our knowledge, the first mutation in ELOVL4 that is associated with SCA and EKV. This gene encodes a member of the elongase family, which is responsible for the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (at least 26 carbons). These fatty acids participate in a wide variety of physiological functions, including skin barrier formation and peroxisome β-oxidation. Overall, these results provide additional insight into the pathogenesis of these complex neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as

  11. Clinical and molecular characteristics of a Brazilian family with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 Características clínicas e moleculares de uma família Brasileira com ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iscia Lopes-Cendes

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of late onset neurodegenerative disorders. To date, seven different genes causing autosomal dominant SCA have been mapped: SCA1, SCA2, Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3, SCA4, SCA5, SCA7 and dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA. Expansions of an unstable trinucleotide CAG repeat cause three of these disorders: SCA1, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA. We studied one Brazilian family segregating an autosomal dominant type of SCA. A total of ten individuals were examined and tested for the presence of the SCA1, MJD and DRPLA mutations. Three individuals, one male and two females, were considered affected based on neurological examination; ages at onset were: 32, 36 and 41 years. The first complaint in all three patients was gait ataxia which progressed slowly over the years. Six individuals showed one allele containing an expanded CAG repeat in the SCA1 gene. The mean size of the expanded allele was 48.2 CAG units. Instability of the expanded CAG tract was seen in the two transmissions that were observed in this family. In both occasions there was a contraction of the CAG tract. Our study demonstrates that SCA1 occurs in the Brazilian population. In addition, our results stress the importance of molecular studies in the confirmation of diagnosis and for pre-symptomatic testing in SCAs.As ataxias espinocerebelares (AECs fazem parte de um grupo de doenças neurodegenerativas que apresentam grande heterogeneidade clínica e genética. Existem até o momento sete genes mapeados responsáveis pelas AECs de transmissão autossômica dominante: SCA1, SCA2, doença de Machado-Joseph (DA/7 ou SCA3, SCA4, SCA5, SCA7 e atrofia dentatorubropalidoluisiana (ADRPL. Uma expansão de um trínucletídeo CAG foi identificada como a mutação responsável na SCA], DMJ e ADRPL. Estudamos uma família brasileira com uma forma autossômica dominante de AEC. Dez indivíduos foram examinados e

  12. Transcranial sonography findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease): a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Felício, Andre Carvalho; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani

    2011-10-24

    Few studies on transcranial brain sonography have been performed in hereditary and non-hereditary ataxias. The objective of the present study was to report transcranial brain sonography findings in a sample of clinically and molecularly proven Machado-Joseph disease patients and to compare these data against those of an age- and gender-matched control group. A cross-sectional study on transcranial brain sonography was conducted in 30 Machado-Joseph disease patients. Transcranial brain sonography was performed by an experienced sonographer blinded to the clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging data. The results were compared with those of a control group of 44 healthy subjects matched for age and gender. The sonographic findings were also correlated with clinical features and genetic data in Machado-Joseph disease group. A significantly higher frequency of substantia nigra and lenticular nucleus hyperechogenicity was found in the Machado-Joseph disease group compared to an age- and gender-matched healthy control group (pMachado-Joseph disease patients than in the control subjects. No significant correlations were found between transcranial brain sonography findings and Machado-Joseph disease demographic/clinical data. Transcranial brain sonography findings in Machado-Joseph disease patients differed significantly to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity occurred frequently in Machado-Joseph disease patients and was found to be the best predictor for differentiating cases from controls. Additionally, this data describes the occurrence of brain atrophy in Machado-Joseph disease group. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Deregulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in response to phorbol ester by the mutant protein kinase C gamma that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Seki, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hikaru; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. γPKC is a neuron-specific member of the classical PKCs and is activated and translocated to subcellular regions as a result of various stimuli, including diacylglycerol synthesis, increased intracellular Ca(2+) and phorbol esters. We investigated whether SCA14 mutations affect the γPKC-related functions by stimulating HeLa cells with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylpholbol 13-acetate), a type of phorbol ester. Wild-type (WT) γPKC-GFP was translocated to the plasma membrane within 10 min of TPA stimulation, followed by its perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage, in a PKC kinase activity- and microtubule-dependent manner. On the other hand, although SCA14 mutant γPKC-GFP exhibited a similar translocation to the plasma membrane, the subsequent perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage were significantly impaired in response to TPA. Translocated WT γPKC colocalized with F-actin and formed large vesicular structures in the perinuclear region. The uptake of FITC-dextran, a marker of macropinocytosis, was promoted by TPA stimulation in cells expressing WT γPKC, and FITC-dextran was surrounded by γPKC-positive vesicles. Moreover, TPA induced the phosphorylation of MARCKS, which is a membrane-substrate of PKC, resulting in the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS to the perinuclear region, suggesting that TPA induces macropinocytosis via γPKC activation. However, TPA failed to activate macropinocytosis and trigger the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS in cells expressing the SCA14 mutant γPKC. These findings suggest that γPKC is involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in HeLa cells, while SCA14 mutant γPKC fails to regulate these processes due to its reduced kinase activity at the plasma membrane. This property might be involved in pathogenesis

  14. Deregulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in response to phorbol ester by the mutant protein kinase C gamma that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro eYamamoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. γPKC is a neuron-specific member of the classical PKCs and is activated and translocated to subcellular regions as a result of various stimuli, including diacylglycerol synthesis, increased intracellular Ca2+ and phorbol esters. We investigated whether SCA14 mutations affect the γPKC-related functions by stimulating HeLa cells with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylpholbol 13-acetate, a type of phorbol ester. Wild-type (WT γPKC-GFP was translocated to the plasma membrane within 10 min of TPA stimulation, followed by its perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage, in a PKC kinase activity- and microtubule-dependent manner. On the other hand, although SCA14 mutant γPKC-GFP exhibited a similar translocation to the plasma membrane, the subsequent perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage were significantly impaired in response to TPA. Translocated WT γPKC colocalized with F-actin and formed large vesicular structures in the perinuclear region. The uptake of FITC-dextran, a marker of macropinocytosis, was promoted by TPA stimulation in cells expressing WT γPKC, and FITC-dextran was surrounded by γPKC-positive vesicles. Moreover, TPA induced the phosphorylation of MARCKS, which is a membrane-substrate of PKC, resulting in the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS to the perinuclear region, suggesting that TPA induces macropinocytosis via γPKC activation. However, TPA failed to activate macropinocytosis and trigger the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS in cells expressing the SCA14 mutant γPKC. These findings suggest that γPKC is involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in HeLa cells, while SCA14 mutant γPKC fails to regulate these processes due to its reduced kinase activity at the plasma membrane. This property might be involved in

  15. Synergistic Toxicity of Polyglutamine-Expanded TATA-Binding Protein in Glia and Neuronal Cells: Therapeutic Implications for Spinocerebellar Ataxia 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Su; Guo, Jifeng; Cui, Yiting; Tang, Beisha; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2017-09-20

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17) is caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansion in the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and is among a family of neurodegenerative diseases in which polyQ expansion leads to preferential neuronal loss in the brain. Although previous studies have demonstrated that expression of polyQ-expanded proteins in glial cells can cause neuronal injury via noncell-autonomous mechanisms, these studies investigated animal models that overexpress transgenic mutant proteins. Since glial cells are particularly reactive to overexpressed mutant proteins, it is important to investigate the in vivo role of glial dysfunction in neurodegeneration when mutant polyQ proteins are endogenously expressed. In the current study, we generated two conditional TBP-105Q knock-in mouse models that specifically express mutant TBP at the endogenous level in neurons or in astrocytes. We found that mutant TBP expression in neuronal cells or astrocytes alone only caused mild neurodegeneration, whereas severe neuronal toxicity requires the expression of mutant TBP in both neuronal and glial cells. Coculture of neurons and astrocytes further validated that mutant TBP in astrocytes promoted neuronal injury. We identified activated inflammatory signaling pathways in mutant TBP-expressing astrocytes, and blocking nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling in astrocytes ameliorated neurodegeneration. Our results indicate that the synergistic toxicity of mutant TBP in neuronal and glial cells plays a critical role in SCA17 pathogenesis and that targeting glial inflammation could be a potential therapeutic approach for SCA17 treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mutant TBP with polyglutamine expansion preferentially affects neuronal viability in SCA17 patients. Whether glia, the cells that support and protect neurons, contribute to neurodegeneration in SCA17 remains mostly unexplored. In this study, we provide both in vivo and in vitro evidence arguing that endogenous expression of mutant

  16. Autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Abeysekera, Gayan S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Tallaksen, Chantal ME; Dissanayake, Vajira HW

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Prevalence of SCA subtypes differ worldwide. Autosomal dominant ataxias are the commonest types of inherited ataxias seen in Sri Lanka. The aim of the study is to determine the genetic etiology of patients with autosomal dominant ataxia in Sri Lanka and to describe the clinical features of each genetic subtype. Methods ...

  17. Congo red, an amyloid-inhibiting compound, alleviates various types of cellular dysfunction triggered by mutant protein kinase cγ that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14) by inhibiting oligomerization and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kota; Onji, Tomoya; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We previously demonstrated that the mutant γPKC found in SCA14 is susceptible to aggregation that induces apoptotic cell death. Congo red is widely used as a histological dye for amyloid detection. Recent evidence has revealed that Congo red has the property to inhibit amyloid oligomers and fibril formation of misfolded proteins. In the present study, we examine whether Congo red inhibits aggregate formation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC. Congo red likely inhibits aggregate formation of mutant γPKC – green fluorescent protein (GFP) without affecting its expression level in SH-SY5Y cells. Congo red counteracts the insolubilization of recombinant mutant γPKC, suggesting that the dye inhibits aggregation of mutant γPKC by a direct mechanism. Congo red also inhibits aggregation and oligomerization of mutant γPKC-GFP in primary cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells. Moreover, the dye reverses the improper development of dendrites and inhibits apoptotic cell death in Purkinje cells that express mutant γPKC-GFP. These results indicate that amyloid-inhibiting compounds like Congo red may be novel therapeutics for SCA14.

  18. Frequency of the different mutations causing spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA in a large group of Brazilian patients Freqüência das mutações que causam ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 e DRPLA em um grupo numeroso de pacientes Brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iscia Lopes-Cendesi

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1, spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 and Machado-Joseph disease or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (MJD/SCA3 are three distinctive forms of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA caused by expansions of an unstable CAG repeat localized in the coding region of the causative genes. Another related disease, dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA is also caused by an unstable triplet repeat and can present as SCA in late onset patients. We investigated the frequency of the SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA mutations in 328 Brazilian patients with SCA, belonging to 90 unrelated families with various patterns of inheritance and originating in different geographic regions of Brazil. We found mutations in 35 families (39%, 32 of them with a clear autosomal dominant inheritance. The frequency of the SCA1 mutation was 3% of all patients; and 6 % in the dominantly inherited SCAs. We identified the SCA2 mutation in 6% of all families and in 9% of the families with autosomal dominant inheritance. The MJD/SCA3 mutation was detected in 30 % of all patients; and in the 44% of the dominantly inherited cases. We found no DRPLA mutation. In addition, we observed variability in the frequency of the different mutations according to geographic origin of the patients, which is probably related to the distinct colonization of different parts of Brazil. These results suggest that SCA may be occasionally caused by the SCA1 and SCA2 mutations in the Brazilian population, and that the MJD/SCA3 mutation is the most common cause of dominantly inherited SCA in Brazil.Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 1 (SCA1, ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 2 (SCA2 e doença de Machado-Joseph ou ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 3 (MJD/SCA3 são três formas de ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA que apresentam herança genética autossômica dominante. Nessas três doenças foi encontrada uma expansão instável de trinucleotídeo CAG localizada na região codificadora dos

  19. Ataxia espinocerebelosa 7: Investigación clínica y genética en una familia argentina Spinocerebellar ataxia 7: Clinical and genetic investigation in an Argentine family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I. Rojas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias espino cerebelosas (AEC, constituyen un grupo de trastornos hereditarios neurodegenerativos de herencia autosómica dominante. Se caracterizan principalmente por la presencia clínica de ataxia cerebelosa asociada a oftalmoplejía, disartria, signos piramidales o extrapiramidales y pérdida de la sensibilidad profunda. La AEC 7 pertenece al grupo de las ataxias espinocerebelosas en la cual el trastorno es consecuencia de la expansión del triplete CAG localizado en el cromosoma 3 p12-p21. La característica clínica de dicha ataxia es la pérdida de la agudeza visual y posterior ceguera. Presentamos tres individuos de una familia con ataxia cerebelosa, pérdida de la agudeza visual y otros signos neurológicos. El diagnóstico fue confirmado por medio del análisis genético en el cual se observó la anormalidad característica de la AEC 7. Este es el primer caso de AEC 7 en Argentina confirmado por estudio genético. En la revisión de la literatura (hasta enero 2006 se hallaron sólo dos familias notificadas en América Latina. El objetivo del trabajo es el de enfocar la atención en el diagnóstico de esta enfermedad degenerativa en pacientes que se presentan con ataxia cerebelosa progresiva asociada con disminución de la agudeza visual e historia familiar positiva.Spino cerebellar ataxia (SCA are a complex group of hereditary neurodegenerative disturbances of autosomal dominant pattern. They are largely characterized by the clinical presence of cerebellar ataxia related to ophtalmoplegia, dysarthria, pyramidal and extra-pyramidal signs and loss of deep sensitivity. SCA 7 belongs to the SCA group in which the disturbance is a result of the expansion of CAG triplet repetition located in the 3p12-p21 chromosome. The characteristic clinical feature of SCA7 is the loss of visual acuity and blindness. We present here three cases of ataxia, from the same family, with loss of visual acuity and other neurological disorders. The diagnosis

  20. Milestones in ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockgether, Thomas; Paulson, Henry

    2010-01-01

    The past 25 years have seen enormous progress in the deciphering of the genetic and molecular basis of ataxias resulting in an improved understanding of their pathogenesis. The most significant milestones during this period were the cloning of the genes associated with the common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). To date, the causative mutations of more than 30 SCAs and 20 recessive ataxias have been identified. In addition, there are numerous acquired ataxias with defined molecular causes so that the entire number of distinct ataxia disorders exceeds 50 and possibly approaches 100. Despite this enormous heterogeneity, a few recurrent pathopyhsiological themes stand out. These include protein aggregation, failure of protein homoestasis, perturbations in ion channel function, defects in DNA repair and mitochondrial dysfunction. The clinical phenotypes of the most common ataxia disorders have been firmly established, and their natural history is being studied in ongoing large observational trials. Effective therapies for ataxias are still lacking. However, novel drug targets are under investigation, and it is expected that there will be an increasing number of therapeutic trials in ataxia. PMID:21626557

  1. 2 SISTERS WITH MENTAL-RETARDATION, CATARACT, ATAXIA, PROGRESSIVE HEARING-LOSS, AND POLYNEUROPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEGEER, JH; SCHOLTE, FA; VANESSEN, AJ

    1991-01-01

    Two sisters are described with a disorder characterised by mental retardation, congenital cataract, progressive spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and signs of peripheral neuropathy. Progressive hearing loss, ataxia, and polyneuropathy became evident in the third decade. The

  2. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  3. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  4. Genetic testing for clinically suspected spinocerebellar ataxias ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahesh

    Cuba and south Asia) population could have important implications in studying the population flow, and prevalence of inherited late-onset disorders. Evidence for a founder effect at the SCA12 loci has been suggested specifically from northern ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time, individuals with SCA3 may develop loss of sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy), muscle cramps, muscle twitches (fasciculations), and swallowing difficulties. Individuals with SCA3 may have problems with memory, planning, and problem solving. Signs and symptoms of ...

  6. Gly118Asp is a SCA14 founder mutation in the Dutch ataxia population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, DS; van de Warrenburg, BPC; Hennekam, FAM; Dooijes, D; Ippel, PF; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, CC; Kremer, HPH; Sinke, RJ

    Missense mutations in the PRKCG gene have recently been identified in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 (SCA14) patients; these include the Gly118Asp mutation that we found in a large Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family. We subsequently screened the current Dutch ataxia cohort

  7. Delayed-onset Friedreich's ataxia revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Claire; Charles, Perrine; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Meissner, Wassilios; Rai, Myriam; N'Guyen, Karine; Péréon, Yann; Fabre, Nelly; Robin, Elsa; Courtois, Sylvie; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Zagnoli, Fabien; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Renaud, Mathilde; Sévin-Allouet, Mathieu; Lesne, Fabien; Alaerts, Nick; Goizet, Cyril; Calvas, Patrick; Eusebio, Alexandre; Guissart, Claire; Derkinderen, Pascal; Tison, Francois; Brice, Alexis; Koenig, Michel; Pandolfo, Massimo; Tranchant, Christine; Dürr, Alexandra; Anheim, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia usually occurs before the age of 25. Rare variants have been described, such as late-onset Friedreich's ataxia and very-late-onset Friedreich's ataxia, occurring after 25 and 40 years, respectively. We describe the clinical, functional, and molecular findings from a large series of late-onset Friedreich's ataxia and very-late-onset Friedreich's ataxia and compare them with typical-onset Friedreich's ataxia. Phenotypic and genotypic comparison of 44 late-onset Friedreich's ataxia, 30 very late-onset Friedreich's ataxia, and 180 typical Friedreich's ataxia was undertaken. Delayed-onset Friedreich's ataxia (late-onset Friedreich's ataxia and very-late-onset Friedreich's ataxia) had less frequently dysarthria, abolished tendon reflexes, extensor plantar reflexes, weakness, amyotrophy, ganglionopathy, cerebellar atrophy, scoliosis, and cardiomyopathy than typical-onset Friedreich's ataxia, along with less severe functional disability and shorter GAA expansion on the smaller allele (P < 0.001). Delayed-onset Friedreich's ataxia had lower scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia and spinocerebellar degeneration functional scores and longer disease duration before wheelchair confinement (P < 0.001). Both GAA expansions were negatively correlated to age at disease onset (P < 0.001), but the smaller GAA expansion accounted for 62.9% of age at onset variation and the larger GAA expansion for 15.6%. In this comparative study of late-onset Friedreich's ataxia and very-late-onset Friedreich's ataxia, no differences between these phenotypes were demonstrated. Typical- and delayed-onset Friedreich's ataxia are different and Friedreich's ataxia is heterogeneous. Late-onset Friedreich's ataxia and very-late-onset Friedreich's ataxia appear to belong to the same clinical and molecular continuum and should be considered together as "delayed-onset Friedreich's ataxia." As the most frequently inherited ataxia, Friedreich's ataxia should be considered

  8. Clinical and genetic analysis of 29 Brazilian patients with Huntington's disease-like phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Riccioppo Rodrigues

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chorea, behavioral disturbances and dementia, caused by a pathological expansion of the CAG trinucleotide in the HTT gene. Several patients have been recognized with the typical HD phenotype without the expected mutation. The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of diseases such as Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA7, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA and chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc among 29 Brazilian patients with a HD-like phenotype. In the group analyzed, we found 3 patients with HDL2 and 2 patients with ChAc. The diagnosis was not reached in 79.3% of the patients. HDL2 was the main cause of the HD-like phenotype in the group analyzed, and is attributable to the African ancestry of this population. However, the etiology of the disease remains undetermined in the majority of the HD negative patients with HD-like phenotype.

  9. Huntington's disease (HD): the neuropathology of a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, U; Seidel, K; Heinsen, H; Vonsattel, J P; den Dunnen, W F; Korf, H W

    2016-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited, and currently untreatable, neuropsychiatric disorder. This progressive and ultimately fatal disease is named after the American physician George Huntington and according to the underlying molecular biological mechanisms is assigned to the human polyglutamine or CAG-repeat diseases. In the present article we give an overview of the currently known neurodegenerative hallmarks of the brains of HD patients. Subsequent to recent pathoanatomical studies the prevailing reductionistic concept of HD as a human neurodegenerative disease, which is primarily and more or less exclusively confined to the striatum (ie, caudate nucleus and putamen) has been abandoned. Many recent studies have improved our neuropathological knowledge of HD; many of the early groundbreaking findings of neuropathological HD research have been rediscovered and confirmed. The results of this investigation have led to the stepwise revision of the simplified pathoanatomical and pathophysiological HD concept and culminated in the implementation of the current concept of HD as a multisystem degenerative disease of the human brain. The multisystem character of the neuropathology of HD is emphasized by a brain distribution pattern of neurodegeneration (i) which apart from the striatum includes the cerebral neo-and allocortex, thalamus, pallidum, brainstem and cerebellum, and which (ii) therefore, shares more similarities with polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias than previously thought. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  10. Predictive gene testing for Huntington disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedderburn, S; Panegyres, P K; Andrew, S; Goldblatt, J; Liebeck, T; McGrath, F; Wiltshire, M; Pestell, C; Lee, J; Beilby, J

    2013-12-01

    Controversies exist around predictive testing (PT) programmes in neurodegenerative disorders. This study sets out to answer the following questions relating to Huntington disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative disorders: differences between these patients in their PT journeys, why and when individuals withdraw from PT, and decision-making processes regarding reproductive genetic testing. A case series analysis of patients having PT from the multidisciplinary Western Australian centre for PT over the past 20 years was performed using internationally recognised guidelines for predictive gene testing in neurodegenerative disorders. Of 740 at-risk patients, 518 applied for PT: 466 at risk of HD, 52 at risk of other neurodegenerative disorders - spinocerebellar ataxias, hereditary prion disease and familial Alzheimer disease. Thirteen percent withdrew from PT - 80.32% of withdrawals occurred during counselling stages. Major withdrawal reasons related to timing in the patients' lives or unknown as the patient did not disclose the reason. Thirty-eight HD individuals had reproductive genetic testing: 34 initiated prenatal testing (of which eight withdrew from the process) and four initiated pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. There was no recorded or other evidence of major psychological reactions or suicides during PT. People withdrew from PT in relation to life stages and reasons that are unknown. Our findings emphasise the importance of: (i) adherence to internationally recommended guidelines for PT; (ii) the role of the multidisciplinary team in risk minimisation; and (iii) patient selection. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, inherited disease. It affects the nervous system, immune system, and ... young children, usually before age 5. They include Ataxia - trouble coordinating movements Poor balance Slurred speech Tiny, ...

  12. Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that damages your nervous system. The damage affects your spinal cord and the ... of 5 and 15. The main symptom is ataxia, which means trouble coordinating movements. Specific symptoms include ...

  13. Speech Characteristics Associated with Three Genotypes of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods: Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA…

  14. Dantrolene is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the Huntingtin protein which results in the selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. Our group has previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca2+ signaling is abnormal in MSNs from the yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128. Moreover, we demonstrated that deranged intracellular Ca2+ signaling sensitizes YAC128 MSNs to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity when compared to wild type (WT MSNs. In previous studies we also observed abnormal neuronal Ca2+ signaling in neurons from spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2 and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3 mouse models and demonstrated that treatment with dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and clinically relevant Ca2+ signaling stabilizer, was neuroprotective in experiments with these mouse models. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential beneficial effects of dantrolene in experiments with YAC128 HD mouse model. Results The application of caffeine and glutamate resulted in increased Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in YAC128 MSN cultures when compared to WT MSN cultures. Pre-treatment with dantrolene protected YAC128 MSNs from glutamate excitotoxicty, with an effective concentration of 100 nM and above. Feeding dantrolene (5 mg/kg twice a week to YAC128 mice between 2 months and 11.5 months of age resulted in significantly improved performance in the beam-walking and gait-walking assays. Neuropathological analysis revealed that long-term dantrolene feeding to YAC128 mice significantly reduced the loss of NeuN-positive striatal neurons and reduced formation of Httexp nuclear aggregates. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that deranged Ca2+ signaling plays an important role in HD pathology. Our data also implicate the RyanRs as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HD and demonstrate that Ryan

  15. Huntington disease and Huntington disease-like in a case series from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilhos, R M; Souza, A F D; Furtado, G V; Gheno, T C; Silva, A L; Vargas, F R; Lima, M-A F D; Barsottini, O; Pedroso, J L; Godeiro, C; Salarini, D; Pereira, E T; Lin, K; Toralles, M-B; Saute, J A M; Rieder, C R; Quintas, M; Sequeiros, J; Alonso, I; Saraiva-Pereira, M L; Jardim, L B

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relative frequency of Huntington's disease (HD) and HD-like (HDL) disorders HDL1, HDL2, spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), SCA17, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian degeneration (DRPLA), benign hereditary chorea, neuroferritinopathy and chorea-acanthocytosis (CHAC), in a series of Brazilian families. Patients were recruited in seven centers if they or their relatives presented at least chorea, besides other findings. Molecular studies of HTT, ATXN2, TBP, ATN1, JPH3, FTL, NKX2-1/TITF1 and VPS13A genes were performed. A total of 104 families were ascertained from 2001 to 2012: 71 families from South, 25 from Southeast and 8 from Northeast Brazil. There were 93 HD, 4 HDL2 and 1 SCA2 families. Eleven of 104 index cases did not have a family history: 10 with HD. Clinical characteristics were similar between HD and non-HD cases. In HD, the median expanded (CAG)n (range) was 44 (40-81) units; R(2) between expanded HTT and age-at-onset (AO) was 0.55 (p=0.0001, Pearson). HDL2 was found in Rio de Janeiro (2 of 9 families) and Rio Grande do Sul states (2 of 68 families). We detected HD in 89.4%, HDL2 in 3.8% and SCA2 in 1% of 104 Brazilian families. There were no cases of HDL1, SCA17, DRPLA, neuroferritinopathy, benign hereditary chorea or CHAC. Only six families (5.8%) remained without diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko; Yamada, Kazuhiko.

    1989-01-01

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author)

  17. Ataxia - telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or absent physical and sexual development Growth failure Mask-like face Multiple skin coloring and texture changes ... Foundation (NAF): www.ataxia.org Outlook (Prognosis) Early death is common, but life expectancy varies. Because people ...

  18. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A-T usually have normal or above normal intelligence. × Definition Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare, childhood neurological ... A-T usually have normal or above normal intelligence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure ...

  19. Visuomotor ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Genjiro; Kawada, Junya; Oda, Rokuhei; Kitagawa, Yoshinobu; Kosoegawa, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with visuomotor ataxia, a disorder of hand movement to grasp objects located in the periphery of the visual field, were studied clinically and neuroradiologically with conventional and reformatted CT scans. Visuomotor ataxia was noted in the hemifield contralateral to the parieto-occipital lesion with both hands regardless the side of the lesion in this study. No dominant hemisphere for visuomotor ataxia was noted. The responsible lesions for this disorder were overlapped at Broadmann's area 7, 18, 19 and their surrounded white matter including the connecting fibers to the contralateral hemisphere via the splenium of corpus callosum. No direct lesion was found in the angular gyrus (Broadmann area 39). Visuomotor ataxia was seen with both hands in our series and it can be explained by the disconnection of either or both of the direct and crossed long association fibers between visual association areas and motor association areas at the parieto-occipital junction. (author)

  20. Impact of presymptomatic genetic testing for hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corrine O; Lipe, Hillary P; Bird, Thomas D

    2004-06-01

    With the exception of Huntington disease, the psychological and psychosocial impact of DNA testing for neurogenetic disorders has not been well studied. To evaluate the psychosocial impact of genetic testing for autosomal dominant forms of hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders. Patients Fifty subjects at risk for autosomal dominant forms of spinocerebellar ataxia (n = 11), muscular dystrophy (n = 28), and hereditary neuropathy (n = 12). A prospective, descriptive, observational study in a university setting of individuals who underwent genetic counseling and DNA testing. Participants completed 3 questionnaires before testing and at regular intervals after testing. The questionnaire set included the Revised Impact of Event Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, demographic information, and an assessment of attitudes and feelings about genetic testing. Thirty-nine subjects (78%) completed 6 months to 5 years of posttest follow-up. Common reasons for pursuing genetic testing were to provide an explanation for symptoms, emotional relief, and information for future planning. Thirty-four (68%) had positive and 16 (32%) had negative genetic results. In those with a positive result, 26 (76%) had nonspecific signs or symptoms of the relevant disorder. Forty-two participants (84%) felt genetic testing was beneficial. Groups with positive and negative test results coped well with results. However, 13 subjects (10 with positive and 3 with negative results) reported elevated anxiety levels, and 3 (1 with positive and 2 with negative results) expressed feelings of depression during the follow-up period. The test result was not predictive of anxiety or depression. Most individuals find neurogenetic testing to be beneficial, regardless of the result. Anxiety or depression may persist in some persons with positive or negative test results. Testing can have a demonstrable impact on family planning and interpersonal relationships. Further studies are needed to

  1. Spinocerebellar variant of adrenoleukodystrophy with a novel ABCD1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie-Yuan; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Chi-Ren

    2010-03-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) shows a wide range of phenotypic expression, and clinical presentation as adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxia has been rarely reported. Here, we report a Taiwanese family with X-ALD. The proband, a 37-year-old man presented with dysarthria, cerebellar ataxia and mild spastic paraparesis, and had atrophy of cerebellum and upper cervical cord on MRI. One of his nephews, a 9-year-old boy had a classic childhood cerebral ALD phenotype. This family harbors a novel deletion of 1 base pair in exon 8 at nucleotide position 2245 (2245delA) in the ABCD1 gene. This is the first report of the 2245delA mutation presenting with a spinocerebellar variant of X-ALD.

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, particularly younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  3. Clinical presentation of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Heloísa H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation a group of patients with juvenile onset of Huntington disease. METHOD: All patients were interviewed following a structured clinical questioner. Patients were genotyped for the trinucleotide cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeat in the Huntington Disease gene. High resolution brain MRI was performed in all patients. RESULTS: We identified 4 patients with juvenile onset of disease among 50 patients with Huntington disease followed prospectively in our Neurogenetics clinic. Age at onset varied from 3 to 13 years, there were 2 boys, and 3 patients had a paternal inheritance of the disease. Expanded Huntington disease allele sizes varied from 41 to 69 trinucleotide repeats. The early onset patients presented with rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, dysarthria, seizures and ataxia. MRI showed severe volume loss of caudate and putamen nuclei (p=0.001 and reduced cerebral and cerebellum volumes (p=0.01. CONCLUSION: 8% of Huntington disease patients seen in our clinic had juvenile onset of the disease. They did not present with typical chorea as seen in adult onset Huntington disease. There was a predominance of rigidity and bradykinesia. Two other important clinical features were seizures and ataxia, which related with the imaging findings of early cortical atrophy and cerebellum volume loss.

  4. SCA13 causes dominantly inherited non-progressive myoclonus ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaut, Solveig; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Chanson, Jean-Baptiste; Ewenczyk, Claire; Renaud, Mathilde; Guissart, Claire; Muller, Jean; Legrand, André Pierre; Durr, Alexandra; Laugel, Vincent; Koenig, Michel; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2017-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 13 (SCA13) is a rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia. To our knowledge, its association to movement disorders has never been described. We aimed at reporting 8 new SCA13 cases with a focus on movement disorders especially myoclonus. We performed a detailed neurological examination and neurophysiological recording in 8 patients consecutively diagnosed with SCA13 between December 2013 and October 2015 and followed up in two French tertiary centers. We identified mild subcortical myoclonus in all patients, with a homogenous clinical and electrophysiological pattern. Myoclonus ataxia was very slowly progressive, like the other symptoms of the disease, whatever the age of onset. Patients with R423H mutation had an earlier age of onset than patients with R420H mutation. Myoclonus appears to be frequent in SCA13. SCA13 should be considered facing non-progressive autosomal dominant myoclonus ataxia, and polymyographic recording should be included in the diagnosis work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genotyping and prenatal diagnosis of a large spinocerebellar ataxia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... Electrocardiography and chest X-ray films showed no abnormalities in heart and lungs. Pedigree. The III11, III13, III17 and III18 had similar symptoms. The pedigree has five generations and 199 members. (figure 1). There were 30 individuals affected with SCA in this pedigree, and 13 of them are alive.

  6. Genotyping and prenatal diagnosis of a large spinocerebellar ataxia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... Amniotic fluid culture conditions and treatment. One of the fifth generation member, a 25-year-old female, was assessed during the early stages of pregnancy. She was identified as a presymptomatic carrier by previous work and this couple had received genetic counselling at our medi- cal centre, the No.

  7. Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genetics of Friedreich's ataxia are leading to breakthroughs in treatment. Research has moved forward to the point where clinical ... be involved in the disease process, and explore new therapeutic approaches for ... disorders or research programs funded by the National Institute of Neurological ...

  8. Speech changes after coordinative training in patients with cerebellar ataxia: a pilot study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykalová, T.; Pospíšilová, M.; Čmejla, R.; Jeřábek, J.; Mareš, Pavel; Rusz, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2016), s. 293-296 ISSN 1590-1874 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : spinocerebellar ataxia * rehabilitation * physiotherapy * ataxic dysarthria * postural alignment * acoustic analysis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.749, year: 2016

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7: family princeps’ history, genealogy and geographical distribution Ataxia espinocerebelar do tipo 7 (AEC7: história, genealogia e distribuição geográfica da família princeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomão da Cunha Linhares

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a 320 year retrospective survey of the history and genealogy of a large Brazilian family with SCA7. The ancestral couple was from the State of Ceará, Brazil, and the genealogical tree was composed of 577 individuals, including 217 males (37.6%, 255 females (44.1% and 105 individuals of unknown sex (18.1%. Based on collected information, the 118 individuals consistently affected were distributed in generations IV (n=2, V (n=28, VI (n=57, VII (n=25 and VIII (n=6 of the genealogical tree. Sixty affected members are alive, 37 of them (61.6% live in the Northeast region, 12 (20% in the Southeast, 9 (15% in the Center-West and 2 (3.3% in the North. This genealogical survey was based only on 4 of the 10 children of the ancestral couple since the destiny of the remaining 6 is unknown. We propose that other Brazilian families with SCA7 may have the same genetic origin.Avaliamos retrospectivamente 320 anos da história e da genealogia de uma família brasileira portadora de ataxia espinocerebelar do tipo 7 (AEC7. O casal ancestral é oriundo do Estado do Ceará e a árvore genealógica foi composta de 577 indivíduos, sendo 217 do sexo masculino (37,6%, 255 do sexo feminino (44,1% e 105 de sexo ignorado (18,1%. Até o presente momento, 118 indivíduos foram acometidos, distribuídos nas gerações IV (n=2, V (n=28, VI (n=57, VII (n=25 e VIII (n=6 da árvore genealógica. Entre os doentes atualmente vivos (n=60, 37 deles (61,6% encontram-se na região Nordeste, 12 (20% na região Sudeste, 9 (15% na região Centro-Oeste e 2 (3,3% na região Norte. Uma vez que a reconstituição da árvore genealógica foi baseada em apenas 4 dos 10 filhos do casal ancestral devido ao desconhecimento do destino dos outros 6, levantamos a hipótese de que outras famílias brasileiras com AEC7 possam ter a mesma origem genética.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor Associated with Underlying Ataxia Syndromes: A Case Series and Discussion of Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genko Oyama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS has been utilized to treat various symptoms in patients suffering from movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor. Though ataxia syndromes have not been formally or frequently addressed with DBS, there are patients with ataxia and associated medication refractory tremor or dystonia who may potentially benefit from therapy.Methods: A retrospective database review was performed, searching for cases of ataxia where tremor and/or dystonia were addressed by utilizing DBS at the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration between 2008 and 2011. Five patients were found who had DBS implantation to address either medication refractory tremor or dystonia. The patient's underlying diagnoses included spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2, fragile X associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, a case of idiopathic ataxia (ataxia not otherwise specified [NOS], spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17, and a senataxin mutation (SETX.Results: DBS improved medication refractory tremor in the SCA2 and the ataxia NOS patients. The outcome for the FXTAS patient was poor. DBS improved dystonia in the SCA17 and SETX patients, although dystonia did not improve in the lower extremities of the SCA17 patient. All patients reported a transient gait dysfunction postoperatively, and there were no reports of improvement in ataxia‐related symptoms.Discussion: DBS may be an option to treat tremor, inclusive of dystonic tremor in patients with underlying ataxia; however, gait and other symptoms may possibly be worsened.Erratum published on July 27, 2016

  11. On the neurolinguistic nature of language abnormalities in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallesch, C W; Fehrenbach, R A

    1988-03-01

    Spontaneous language of 18 patients suffering from Huntington's disease and 15 dysarthric controls suffering from Friedreich's ataxia were investigated. In addition, language functions in various modalities were assessed with the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT). The Huntington patients exhibited deficits in the syntactical complexity of spontaneous speech and in the Token Test, confrontation naming, and language comprehension subtests of the AAT, which are interpreted as resulting from their dementia. Errors affecting word access mechanisms and production of syntactical structures as such were not encountered.

  12. Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy Memorials What is Friedreich's Ataxia? About FARA Mission & Organization Financials Leadership & Staff Scientific ... Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy Memorials What is Friedreich's Ataxia? FARA News / Blogs Ride Ataxia 2017 AAI Grant ...

  13. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of getting it. A blood test can tell you if have the HD gene and will develop the disease. Genetic counseling can help you weigh the risks and ...

  14. Early-Onset Friedreich's Ataxia With Oculomotor Apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Hafizi, Sina; Hosseini, Firouzeh; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-02-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a rare autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia which in the majority of cases is associated with a GAA-trinucleotide repeat expansion in the first intron of Frataxin gene located on chromosome 9. The clinical features include progressive gait and limb ataxia, cerebellar dysarthria, neuropathy, optic atrophy, and loss of vibration and proprioception. Ataxia with ocular motor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is another autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia which is associated with oculomotor apraxia, hypoalbuminaemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Here we describe two siblings (13- and 10-year-old) display overlapping clinical features of both early-onset FRDA and AOA1. Almost all of laboratory test (including urinary analysis/culture, biochemistry, peripheral blood smear, C-reactive protein level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate-1h) results were within the normal range for both patients. Due to the normal laboratory test results; we concluded that the diagnosis was more likely to be FRDA than AOA1. Therefore, neurologists should bear in mind that clinical presentations of FRDA may vary widely from the classical phenotype of gait and limb ataxia to atypical manifestations such as oculomotor apraxia.

  15. [A sporadic case of episodic ataxia with nystagmus (EA-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekawa, M; Takiyama, Y; Ueno, N; Nishizawa, M

    1998-05-01

    A 39-year-old man with episodic ataxia with nystagmus (EA-2) was reported. He showed intermittent cerebellar dysfunction, i.e., ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria and vertigo, since he was 10 years old. Although this attack lasted for several hours, he was normal with exception of interictal nystagmus. His parents and sister showed no episodic ataxia. We ruled out the diseases, which may cause episodic ataxia, such as multiple sclerosis, vascular disorders, metabolic disorders and congenital anomalies. He was released from the attack by treatment with acetazolamide. EA-2 has been associated with mutations in the alpha 1A-voltage dependent calcium channel gene (CACNL1A4), which is also affected in familial hemiplegic migraine (FMH) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). In EA-2, frame-shift mutation leading to premature stop and splice-site mutation leading to truncated, non-functional channel protein have been reported. However, our patient did not have the mutations in the CACNL1A4 gene that were previously reported. In addition, our patient did not have an expanded CAG allele in the CACNL1A4 gene which is responsible for SCA6. Further examination is required to address whether a new mutation exists in the CACNL1A4 gene in our patient.

  16. Video game-based coordinative training improves ataxia in children with degenerative ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Winfried; Schatton, Cornelia; Schicks, Julia; Giese, Martin A; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis

    2012-11-13

    Degenerative ataxias in children present a rare condition where effective treatments are lacking. Intensive coordinative training based on physiotherapeutic exercises improves degenerative ataxia in adults, but such exercises have drawbacks for children, often including a lack of motivation for high-frequent physiotherapy. Recently developed whole-body controlled video game technology might present a novel treatment strategy for highly interactive and motivational coordinative training for children with degenerative ataxias. We examined the effectiveness of an 8-week coordinative training for 10 children with progressive spinocerebellar ataxia. Training was based on 3 Microsoft Xbox Kinect video games particularly suitable to exercise whole-body coordination and dynamic balance. Training was started with a laboratory-based 2-week training phase and followed by 6 weeks training in children's home environment. Rater-blinded assessments were performed 2 weeks before laboratory-based training, immediately prior to and after the laboratory-based training period, as well as after home training. These assessments allowed for an intraindividual control design, where performance changes with and without training were compared. Ataxia symptoms were significantly reduced (decrease in Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score, p = 0.0078) and balance capacities improved (dynamic gait index, p = 0.04) after intervention. Quantitative movement analysis revealed improvements in gait (lateral sway: p = 0.01; step length variability: p = 0.01) and in goal-directed leg placement (p = 0.03). Despite progressive cerebellar degeneration, children are able to improve motor performance by intensive coordination training. Directed training of whole-body controlled video games might present a highly motivational, cost-efficient, and home-based rehabilitation strategy to train dynamic balance and interaction with dynamic environments in a large variety of young-onset neurologic

  17. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...... choosing to continue treatment over the 18-month follow-up period). The treatment regimen was well tolerated. No significant differences on neuropsychological parameters before and after treatment were detected; but the patient who continued treatment did not deteriorate at 18 months' reevaluation, whereas...... the three patients who had stopped treatment after 3 to 4 months had minor progression in all cognitive domains on re-evaluation 12 months after the end of treatment....

  18. Psychopathology in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Erik van

    2010-01-01

    Dit proefschrift begint met een overzichtsartikel van oorspronkelijke onderzoek naar psychopathologie bij mutatiedragers voor de ziekte van Huntington. Aansluitend worden de resultaten van een cohortstudie naar de aanwezigheid en ernst van psychopathologie bij mensen met de ziekte van Huntington in

  19. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palau Francesc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000, ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000 and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000. Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder, ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1, and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning, electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia.

  20. Clinical neurogenetics: friedreich ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Abigail

    2013-11-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most common autosomal recessive ataxia. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, typically with onset before 20 years of age. Signs and symptoms include progressive ataxia, ascending weakness and ascending loss of vibration and joint position senses, pes cavus, scoliosis, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. There are no disease-modifying medications to either slow or halt the progression of the disease, but research investigating therapies to increase endogenous frataxin production and decrease the downstream consequences of disrupted iron homeostasis is ongoing. Clinical trials of promising medications are underway, and the treatment era of Friedreich ataxia is beginning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What Is Ataxia-Telangiectasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About A-T Research Fundraising About Us About Ataxia-telangiectasia About A-T » WHAT IS A- ... develop slurred or distorted speech, and swallowing problems. Ataxia... The onset of this ataxia marks the beginning ...

  2. A panel study on patients with dominant cerebellar ataxia highlights the frequency of channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelier, Marie; Coarelli, Giulia; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Konop, Juliette; Davoine, Claire-Sophie; Tesson, Christelle; Valter, Rémi; Anheim, Mathieu; Behin, Anthony; Castelnovo, Giovanni; Charles, Perrine; David, Albert; Ewenczyk, Claire; Fradin, Mélanie; Goizet, Cyril; Hannequin, Didier; Labauge, Pierre; Riant, Florence; Sarda, Pierre; Sznajer, Yves; Tison, François; Ullmann, Urielle; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Mochel, Fanny; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra

    2017-06-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have a marked heterogeneous genetic background, with mutations in 34 genes identified so far. This large amount of implicated genes accounts for heterogeneous clinical presentations, making genotype-phenotype correlations a major challenge in the field. While polyglutamine ataxias, linked to CAG repeat expansions in genes such as ATXN1, ATXN2, ATXN3, ATXN7, CACNA1A and TBP, have been extensively characterized in large cohorts, there is a need for comprehensive assessment of frequency and phenotype of more 'conventional' ataxias. After exclusion of CAG/polyglutamine expansions in spinocerebellar ataxia genes in 412 index cases with dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxias, we aimed to establish the relative frequencies of mutations in other genes, with an approach combining panel sequencing and TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction assay. We found relevant genetic variants in 59 patients (14.3%). The most frequently mutated were channel genes [CACNA1A (n = 16), KCND3 (n = 4), KCNC3 (n = 2) and KCNA1 (n = 2)]. Deletions in ITPR1 (n = 11) were followed by biallelic variants in SPG7 (n = 9). Variants in AFG3L2 (n = 7) came next in frequency, and variants were rarely found in STBN2 (n = 2), ELOVL5, FGF14, STUB1 and TTBK2 (n = 1 each). Interestingly, possible risk factor variants were detected in SPG7 and POLG. Clinical comparisons showed that ataxias due to channelopathies had a significantly earlier age at onset with an average of 24.6 years, versus 40.9 years for polyglutamine expansion spinocerebellar ataxias and 37.8 years for SPG7-related forms (P = 0.001). In contrast, disease duration was significantly longer in the former (20.5 years versus 9.3 and 13.7, P=0.001), though for similar functional stages, indicating slower progression of the disease. Of interest, intellectual deficiency was more frequent in channel spinocerebellar ataxias, while cognitive impairment in adulthood was similar among the three groups. Similar

  3. [Voluntary postural control learning with a use of visual bio-feedback in patients with spinocerebellar degenerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinova, K I; Ioffe, M E; Chernikova, L A; Kulikov, M A; Illarioshkin, S N; Markova, E D

    2004-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluation of possibility and features of voluntary postural control learning using biofeedback from a force platform in patients with spinocerebellar ataxias. Thirty-seven patients with different forms of spinocerebellar degenerations and 13 age-matched healthy subjects were trained to shift the center of pressure (CP) during several stabilographic computer games which tested an ability to learn 2 different types of voluntary postural control: general strategy and precise coordination of CP shifting. Despite the disturbances of static posture and ability for voluntary control of CP position, patients with spinocerebellar degenerations can learn to control a vertical posture using biofeedback on stabilogram. In contrast to healthy subjects, improvement of coordination in the training process does not exert a significant influence on the static posture characteristics, in particular on lateral CP oscillations. The results obtained suggest involvement of the cerebellum in both types of postural control that distinguishes them from pathology caused by motor cortex and nigro-striatal system involved only in one type of postural control.

  4. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancellu, Roberto; Corsini, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio; Buzzo, Paolo; Ferrari, Maria Luisa; Lamantea, Eleonora; Garaventa, Alberto; Truini, Mauro; Salvarani, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma. A 28-year-old woman developed progressive ataxia with hyporeflexia at the age of 19. Brain MRI showed progressive cerebellar atrophy. Neurophysiological studies, screening of immune-mediated ataxias, oncological markers, vitamin E and genetic tests for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1,2,3, Friedreich ataxia and POLG1 were negative. Anti-Hu antibodies were positive in Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (1:640). Total-body computed tomography revealed a mediastinum mass; the histological diagnosis was maturing ganglioneuroma. Immunohistochemistry showed a mild reaction between the tumor and the patient's serum, and no reaction between the tumor and control serum. After surgery, serum anti-Hu titer decreased, while ataxic symptoms initially worsened and then stabilized. Ganglioneuroma is a benign tumor, usually derived from the maturation of a neuroblastoma. The benign histology and the presence of anti-Hu antibodies could be related to the positive oncological prognosis and to the slow clinical course mimicking a degenerative ataxia.

  5. Huntington\\'s disease: Genetic heterogeneity in black African patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington\\'s disease: Genetic heterogeneity in black African patients. D S Magazi, A Krause, V Bonev, M Moagi, Z Iqbal, M Dludla, C H van der Meyden. Abstract. Objective. Huntington's disease (HD) has been reported to occur rarely in black patients. A new genetic variant– Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) – occurring ...

  6. Ataxias cerebelares hereditárias: do martelo ao gen Hereditary cerebellar ataxias from neurological hammer to genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available As heredoataxias constituem grupo complexo de doenças neurodegenerativas hereditárias, para o qual várias formas de classificação clínica e patológica foram propostas com sucesso variável. O desenvolvimento das técnicas de biologia molecular trouxe informações importantes que têm permitido caracterizar geneticamente as ataxias cerebelares hereditárias. O reconhecimento das doenças causadas por expansões de trinucleotídeos abre novo capítulo para a pesquisa sobre outros mecanismos de doenças, como na ataxia de Friedreich e nas várias formas de ataxia cerebelar autossômica dominante(SCAl a SCA7, das quais a doença de Machado-Joseph / SCA3 parece ser a mais comum no nosso meio. A deficiência familial de vitamina E (cromossomo 8q leva a quadro semelhante ao da ataxia de Friedreich (cromossomo 9p, mas responde à reposição oral de tocoferol. Formas familiais de ataxia periódica com (cromossomo 12p ou sem (cromossomo 19p mioquimia foram caracterizadas, a primeira resultado de mutações dos gens de canais de potássio. Os portadores do gen da ataxia-teleangiectasia (cromossomo 1 lq representam 1-3% da população e são suscetíveis aos efeitos oncogênicos da radiação iônica. Sem olvidar da importância da avaliação clínica neurológica, a avaliação genética laboratorial passa a ser valiosa ferramenta para o diagnóstico e aconselhamento genético, além do melhor entendimento da patogênese dessas doenças.The hereditary ataxias comprise a complex group of neurological disorders involving the cerebellum and its connections. Several classifications based on clinical and/or pathological data have been only partially successful. Recent progress in molecular genetics has identified the genic loci of hereditary ataxias and has allowed a more precise diagnosis of distinct genetic diseases. Trinucleotide repeat expansions has been recognized as a mechanism of disease in some autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (ADCA

  7. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 links) Consortium for Clinical Investigations of Neurological Channelopathies (CINCH) GeneReview: Episodic Ataxia Type 1 GeneReview: Episodic ... MG. Episodic ataxia type 1: a neuronal potassium channelopathy. Neurotherapeutics. 2007 Apr;4(2):258-66. Review. ...

  8. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  9. Learning about Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Huntington's Disease Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  10. Progressive dysarthria and ataxia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progressive dysarthria and ataxia. Lynsey McAlpinea, Fiona Cranb, Eluzai Hakimc a FY1 Stroke and Rehabilitation Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Isle of Wight. b GPVST Stroke and Rehabilitation Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Isle of Wight. c Consultant Physician Stroke and Rehabilitation Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Isle of ...

  11. VT Data - Zoning 20120709, Huntington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Zoning district data for the Town of Huntington, Vermont. For details regarding each zoning district refer to the current zoning regulations on town of Huntington's...

  12. [The Henry E. Huntington Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Terry

    The biographical sketch of Henry E. Huntington includes a description of the establishment of the Huntington Library and the purpose and scope of its collection. Although this is a free and public library, its use is restricted to qualified scholars having legitimate research needs. Photographic techniques were developed at the Huntington Library…

  13. Genetics of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Martha A

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the evolution of our understanding of the genetic aspects of HD, and the applications of our understanding in the management of Huntington's disease patients and families over the last 150 years. Important aspects of the clinical genetics and epidemiology of Huntington's disease are discussed, such as the definition of "normal" and "abnormal" numbers of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) repeats in the critical spot within the huntingtin gene, meiotic instability of CAG repeat numbers, common Huntington's disease genetic haplotypes, compound heterozygosity for an abnormal gene, and somatic mosaicism for CAG repeat expansions. We touch only briefly on the creation of multiple animal models for Huntington's disease that have profoundly impacted our understanding of the disease and permitted the development of potential disease-modifying treatments, and end with what is, at the time of writing, the dawn of a new era: the advent of gene-based therapies (gene silencing, gene editing) for Huntington's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1990-01-01

    São apresentados os casos de dois irmãos com ataxia-telangiectasia, estudados sob os pontos de vista clínico, eletrencefalográfico, liquórico e encefalográfico. O autor resume os achados de diversos autores e chama a atenção para a regressão parcial da síndrome cerebelar em ambos os pacientes, fato ainda não referido na literatura.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia-telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Ataxia-telangiectasia Ataxia-telangiectasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare inherited disorder that affects ...

  16. Evidence of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) patient fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Nanna; Wardman, Jonathan H; Hargreaves, Iain P

    2017-01-01

    morphology in SCA2 patient fibroblasts compared to controls, and we show that treatment with CoQ10 can partially reverse these changes. Together, our results suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may be contributory factors to the pathophysiology of SCA2 and that therapeutic strategies...

  17. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease starting before adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donis, Karina Carvalho; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Krum-Santos, Ana Carolina; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Mattos, Eduardo Preusser; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    Onset of Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) before adolescence has been rarely reported. This study aims to describe a cohort of SCA3/MJD with onset before 12 years of age, comparing their disease progression with the progression observed in patients with usual disease onset. We identified all cases

  18. Clinical Characteristics, Radiological Features and Gene Mutation in 10 Chinese Families with Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Wen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Collectively our study is a systematic research on SCAs in China, which may help for the clinical diagnosis and prenatal screening of this disease, and it may also aid toward better understanding of this disease.

  19. Degeneration of the external cuneate nucleus in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rub, U; de Vos, RAI; Brunt, ER; Schultz, C; Paulson, H; Del Tredici, K; Braak, H

    2002-01-01

    Owing to its anatomical connections, the external cuneate nucleus (ECU) plays a crucial role in processing proprioceptive input from the upper trunk and upper limbs. Here, we studied this dorsal column nucleus post-mortem in five individuals with clinically diagnosed and genetically confirmed

  20. Ocular-motor profile and effects of memantine in a familial form of adult cerebellar ataxia with slow saccades and square wave saccadic intrusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rosini

    Full Text Available Fixation instability due to saccadic intrusions is a feature of autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxias, and includes square wave intrusions (SWI and macrosaccadic oscillations (MSO. A recent report suggested that the non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors, memantine, could decrease MSO and improve fixation in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia with saccadic intrusions (SCASI. We similarly tested two sisters, respectively of 58 and 60 years, with an unrecognized form of recessive, adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and slow saccades, who showed prominent SWI and also complained with difficulty in reading. We tested horizontal visually guided saccades (10°-18° and three minutes of steady fixation in each patient and in thirty healthy controls. Both patients showed a significant reduction of peak and mean velocity compared with control subjects. Large SWI interrupting steady fixation were prominent during steady fixation and especially following visually guided saccades. Eye movements were recorded before and during the treatment with memantine, 20 mg/daily for 6 months. The treatment with memantine reduced both the magnitude and frequency of SWI (the former significantly, but did not modified neurological conditions or saccade parameters. Thus, our report suggests that memantine may have some general suppressive effect on saccadic intrusions, including both SWI and MSO, thereby restoring the capacity of reading and visual attention in these and in other recessive forms of ataxia, including Friedreich's, in which saccadic intrusions are prominent.

  1. Prevalence of ataxia in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, Cristina T.; Marasigan, Rhul; Jenkins, Mary E.; Konczak, Jürgen; Morton, Susanne M.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of childhood ataxia resulting from both genetic and acquired causes. Methods: A systematic review was conducted following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) statement. Five databases were searched for articles reporting a frequency measure (e.g., prevalence, incidence) of ataxia in children. Included articles were first grouped according to the World Health Organization (WHO) regions and subsequently classified according to etiology (genetic, acquired, or mixed). Each article was assessed for its risk of bias on the domains of sampling, measurement, and analysis. Incidence values were converted to prevalence estimates whenever possible. European prevalence estimates for different etiologies of ataxia were summed to gauge the overall prevalence of childhood ataxia. Results: One hundred fifteen articles were included in the review. More than 50% of the data originated from the Europe WHO region. Data from this region also showed the least susceptibility to bias. Little data were available for Africa and Southeast Asia. The prevalence of acquired ataxias was found to vary more greatly across regions than the genetic ataxias. Ataxic cerebral palsy was found to be a significant contributor to the overall prevalence of childhood ataxia across WHO regions. The prevalence of childhood ataxias in Europe was estimated to be ∼26/100,000 children and likely reflects a minimum prevalence worldwide. Conclusions: The findings show that ataxia is a common childhood motor disorder with a higher prevalence than previously assumed. More research concerning the epidemiology, assessment, and treatment of childhood ataxia is warranted. PMID:24285620

  2. CT scanning of the brain and lumber CSF monoamine metabolites in spinocerebellar degenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kuramoto, Kenmei

    1984-01-01

    Eight patients with parenchymatous cerebellar degeneration (PCD) group (3 with late cortical cerebellar atrophy and 5 with Holmes' hereditary ataxia), 14 with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) group (4 with Shy-Drager syndrome, 6 with OPCA without family history and 4 with Menzel type SCS), 15 with Parkinson's disease and 44 control with other neurological diseases were studied. In all the spinocerebellar degenerative disorder s (SCD) cases, CVI values corresponding to the cerebellar atrophy were definitely reduced. On the other hand, PVI values corresponding to the pontine atrophy were only significantly decreased in OPCA group. However, since there were several cases showing only questionable pontine atrpphy, it seems difficult to clearly differentiate individual OPCA cases from other SCD cases on CT films alone. Concerning monoamine metabolites in CSF, it was noted that a significant reduction of HVA and total MHPG was found in the OPCA group. Among them, the patients with overt autonomic failure showed the lowest HVA level and the cases of Menzel type of SCD showed a slight reduction of HVA but an unexpected elevation of free MHPG values. The cases of Parkinson's disease showed a definite reduction of HVA. On the other hand, the cases of PCD group showed no significant difference against controls. 5-HIAA levels were not significantly different among the SCD subgroups. (J.P.N.)

  3. Modelling studies on neurodegenerative disease-causing triplet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    degenerative diseases are caused by expansion of triplet repeats. To date, more than twelve human genetic diseases, including myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica,. DM), fragile X syndrome (FraX), Huntington disease. (HD), several spinocerebellar ataxias and Friedreich ataxia have been associated with the ...

  4. Non coding RNAs in protein clearance pathways :- Implications in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    Neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Spinocerebellar ataxia`s and Huntington's disease are characterized by set of proteins that misfold and aggregate in specific tissues and are thus categorized as "Proteinopathies"(Dantuma and Bott 2014). Cells protein quality control system is ...

  5. Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome: The Expanding Clinical Picture, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, and Update on Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Hall

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a progressive degenerative movement disorder characterized by kinetic tremor, cerebellar gait ataxia, parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. This disorder occurs in both males and females, frequently in families with children who have fragile X syndrome. The clinical features of this disorder, both classic and newly described, are summarized in this paper. In screening studies, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene premutation (55–200 CGG expansions are most frequently seen in men with ataxia who have tested negative for spinocerebellar ataxias. Since the original description, the classic FXTAS phenotype has now been reported in females and in carriers of smaller (45–54 CGG and larger (>200 CGG expansions in FMR1. Premutation carriers may present with a Parkinson disease phenotype or hypotension, rather than with tremor and/or ataxia. Parkinsonism and gait ataxia may also be seen in individuals with gray zone (41–54 CGG expansions. Studies regarding medication to treat the symptoms in FXTAS are few in number and suggest that medications targeted to specific symptoms, such as kinetic tremor or gait ataxia, may be most beneficial. Great progress has been made in regards to FXTAS research, likely given the readily available gene test and the screening of multiple family members, including parents and grandparents, of fragile X syndrome children. Expansion of genotypes and phenotypes in the disorder may suggest that a broader disease definition might be necessary in the future.

  6. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease–-Spinocerebellar Ataxia–-Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Oligonucleotide therapy called sequence specific siRNA mediated gene silencing has evolved with promising results. This approach emphasizes on suppressing the expression of the diseased gene at mRNA level. However, there is a limitation in delivery of siRNA to the target site. Several methods have been developed over the last decade to enhance the target specific delivery of DNA, siRNA, protein and small drug molecules for therapeutic purpose with less or no side effects. This review discusses the latest upcoming technologies in the field that focus on a number of nonviral nanocarriers for targeted delivery. In this review, we explore the promise and potential of novel therapeutics with interest on ataxia therapy.

  7. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments.

  8. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (9 links) Ataxia UK Brain Foundation (Australia) Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center European Federation ... Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, ...

  10. The Huntington's Disease Dysphagia Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Anne-Wil; Verbist, Berit M; Marinus, Johan; Heijnen, Bas; Sjögren, Elisabeth V; Roos, Raymund A C

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the swallowing disturbances of patients with Huntington's disease; therefore, we developed the Huntington's Disease Dysphagia Scale. The scale was developed in four stages: (1) item generation, (2) comprehension testing, (3) evaluation of reliability, (4) item reduction and validity testing. The questionnaire was presented twice to 50 Huntington's disease patients and their caregivers. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate whether the severity of swallowing difficulties increased with advancing disease. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to examine the construct validity with the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire. The final version contained 11 items with five response options and exhibited a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.728. The severity of swallowing difficulties was significantly higher in more advanced Huntington's disease. The correlation with the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire was 0.734. We developed a valid and reliable 11-item scale to measure the severity of dysphagia in Huntington's disease. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. Ataxia telangiectasia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Rothblum-Oviatt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T is an autosomal recessive disorder primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration, telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, cancer susceptibility and radiation sensitivity. A-T is often referred to as a genome instability or DNA damage response syndrome. Epidemiology The world-wide prevalence of A-T is estimated to be between 1 in 40,000 and 1 in 100,000 live births. Clinical description A-T is a complex disorder with substantial variability in the severity of features between affected individuals, and at different ages. Neurological symptoms most often first appear in early childhood when children begin to sit or walk. They have immunological abnormalities including immunoglobulin and antibody deficiencies and lymphopenia. People with A-T have an increased predisposition for cancers, particularly of lymphoid origin. Pulmonary disease and problems with feeding, swallowing and nutrition are common, and there also may be dermatological and endocrine manifestations. Etiology A-T is caused by mutations in the ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia, Mutated gene which encodes a protein of the same name. The primary role of the ATM protein is coordination of cellular signaling pathways in response to DNA double strand breaks, oxidative stress and other genotoxic stress. Diagnosis The diagnosis of A-T is usually suspected by the combination of neurologic clinical features (ataxia, abnormal control of eye movement, and postural instability with one or more of the following which may vary in their appearance: telangiectasia, frequent sinopulmonary infections and specific laboratory abnormalities (e.g. IgA deficiency, lymphopenia especially affecting T lymphocytes and increased alpha-fetoprotein levels. Because certain neurological features may arise later, a diagnosis of A-T should be carefully considered for any ataxic child with an otherwise elusive diagnosis. A diagnosis of A-T can be confirmed by the

  12. Cardiopatía dilatada en ataxia de Friedreich: el punto sin retorno Dilated cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia: point of no return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Las cardiopatías infiltrativas se caracterizan por el depósito de sustancias en el miocardio que causan un impacto negativo en la arquitectura de la pared ventricular. La ataxia espino-cerebelosa de Friedreich es una enfermedad degenerativa, heredada, con carácter autosómico recesivo. Clínicamente se caracteriza por ataxia de extremidades y tronco, hiporreflexia, neuropatía periférica, retinopatía y cardiopatía, entre otros. La afectación cardíaca es muy frecuente y se detectan alteraciones en estudios pos-mortem en 95% a 100% de los pacientes. La tasa de mortalidad es elevada y se considera una enfermedad incurable, a pesar de la existencia actual de múltiples medicamentos en estudio basados en los fundamentos fisiopatológicos de esta afección.Infiltrative heart diseases are characterized by deposit of substances in the myocardium that cause a negative impact on the architecture of the ventricular wall. Friedreich's spino-cerebellar ataxia is a degenerative disease, inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinically it is characterized by limb and trunk ataxia, hyporeflexia, peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and heart disease among others. Cardiac involvement is common and on post-mortem studies cardiac abnormalities are found in 95% to 100% of patients. The mortality rate is high and it is considered an incurable disease, despite the current existence of multiple medications being studied, based on the pathophysiological basis of this condition.

  13. Neurophysiological studies and non-motor symptoms prior to ataxia in a patient with machado-joseph disease: trying to understand the natural history of brain degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Bezerra, Márcio Luiz Escorcio; do Prado, Lucila B F; Batista, Ilza Rosa; Alessi, Helena; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola; do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2014-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 or Machado-Joseph disease is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia. In this neurological disease, anatomical, physiological, clinical, and functional neuroimaging demonstrate a degenerative process besides the cerebellum. We performed neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies-polysomnography, transcranial sonography, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1, and a formal neuropsychological evaluation in a patient with sleep complaints and positive testing for Machado-Joseph disease, without cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, or cognitive complaints. Polysomnography disclosed paradoxical high amplitude of submental muscle, characterizing REM sleep without atonia phenomenon. Transcranial sonography showed hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra. There was an absence of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials on both sides in the patient under study, in opposite to 20 healthy subjects. Brain imaging SPECT with (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 demonstrated a significant lower DAT density than the average observed in six healthy controls. Electroneuromyography was normal. Neuropsychological evaluation demonstrated visuospatial and memory deficits. Impairment of midbrain cholinergic and pontine noradrenergic systems, dysfunction of the pre-synaptic nigrostriatal system, changes in echogenicity of the substantia nigra, and damage to vestibulo-cervical pathways are supposed to occur previous to cerebellar involvement in Machado-Joseph disease.

  14. Adult onset sporadic ataxias: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Graziani Povoas Barsottini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with adult onset non-familial progressive ataxia are classified in sporadic ataxia group. There are several disease categories that may manifest with sporadic ataxia: toxic causes, immune-mediated ataxias, vitamin deficiency, infectious diseases, degenerative disorders and even genetic conditions. Considering heterogeneity in the clinical spectrum of sporadic ataxias, the correct diagnosis remains a clinical challenge. In this review, the different disease categories that lead to sporadic ataxia with adult onset are discussed with special emphasis on their clinical and neuroimaging features, and diagnostic criteria.

  15. Clinical neurogenetics: huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Yvette M

    2013-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of abnormal movements (typically chorea), cognitive impairment, and psychiatric problems. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the gene encoding the protein huntingtin on chromosome 4 and causes progressive atrophy of the striatum as well as cortical and other extrastriatal structures. Genetic testing has been available since 1993 to confirm diagnosis in affected adults and for presymptomatic testing in at-risk individuals. This review covers HD signs, symptoms, and pathophysiology; current genetic testing issues; and current and future treatment strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  17. Properties of bilateral spinocerebellar activation of cerebellar cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus eGeborek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore the cerebellar cortical inputs from two spinocerebellar pathways, the spinal border cell-component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (SBC-VSCT and the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT, respectively, in the sublobule C1 of the cerebellar posterior lobe. The two pathways were activated by electrical stimulation of the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF and the ipsilateral LF (iLF at lower thoracic levels. Most granule cells in sublobule C1 did not respond at all but part of the granule cell population displayed high-intensity responses to either coLF or iLF stimulation. As a rule, Golgi cells and Purkinje cell simple spikes responded to input from both LFs, although Golgi cells could be more selective. In addition, a small population of granule cells responded to input from both the coLF and the iLF. However, in these cases, similarities in the temporal topography and magnitude of the responses suggested that the same axons were stimulated from the two LFs, i.e. that the axons of individual spinocerebellar neurons could be present in both funiculi. This was also confirmed for a population of spinal neurons located within known locations of SBC-VSCT neurons and dorsal horn DSCT neurons. We conclude that bilateral spinocerebellar responses can occur in cerebellar granule cells, but the VSCT and DSCT systems that provide the input can also be organized bilaterally. The implications for the traditional functional separation of VSCT and DSCT systems and the issue whether granule cells primarily integrate functionally similar information or not are discussed.

  18. Friedreich Ataxia in Classical Galactosaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Siobhán; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; Sweeney, Bronagh; Lynch, Bryan; Hanrahan, Donncha; Knerr, Ina; Lynch, Sally Ann; Crushell, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders such as ataxia are a recognized complication of classical galactosaemia, even in diet-compliant patients. Here, we report the coexistence of classical galactosaemia and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) in nine children from seven Irish Traveller families. These two autosomal recessive disorders, the loci for which are located on either side of the centromere of chromosome 9, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium in this subgroup. Both conditions are known to occur with increased frequency amongst the Irish Traveller population.Each member of our cohort had been diagnosed with galactosaemia in the neonatal period, and all are homozygous for the common Q188R mutation in the GALT gene. Eight of the nine patients later presented with progressive ataxia, between the ages of 5-13 years. Another child presented in cardiac failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy at 7 years of age. He was not ataxic at presentation and, one year from diagnosis, his neurological examination remains normal. The diagnosis of FRDA was confirmed by detecting the common pathogenic GAA expansion in both alleles of the frataxin gene (FXN) in each patient.Neurological symptoms are easily attributed to an underlying diagnosis of galactosaemia. It is important to consider a diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia in a child from the Irish Traveller population with galactosaemia who presents with ataxia or cardiomyopathy.

  19. Increased sexual arousal in patients with movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Munhoz, Renato P

    2016-04-01

    Increased of sexual arousal (ISA) has been described in different neurological diseases. The purpose of this study was present a case series of ISA in patients with movement disorders. Fifteen patients with different forms of movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3), were evaluated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Federal University of Paraná. Among Parkinson's disease patients there were seven cases with different forms of ISA due to dopaminergic agonist use, levodopa abuse, and deep brain stimulation (DBS). In the group with hyperkinetic disorders, two patients with Huntington's disease, two with Tourette's syndrome, and four with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 presented with ISA. ISA in this group of patients had different etiologies, predominantly related to dopaminergic treatment or DBS in Parkinson's disease, part of the background clinical picture in Huntington's disease and Tourette's syndrome, and probably associated with cultural aspects in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

  20. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA. Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical

  1. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical examination, genetic molecular

  2. Huntington's disease presenting as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phukan, Julie

    2010-08-01

    We present the clinical, electrophysiological and molecular genetic findings of a 58-year-old male with genetically confirmed Huntington\\'s disease (HD) and concurrent clinically definite ALS by El Escorial criteria. The patient presented with asymmetric upper limb amyotrophy and weakness, and subsequently developed chorea and cognitive change. Genetic testing confirmed the presence of expanded trinucleotide repeats in huntingtin, consistent with a diagnosis of Huntington\\'s disease. This case confirms the rare coexistence of Huntington\\'s disease and motor neuron degeneration.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 381328-2.00015-8. Review. Citation on PubMed Kent A. Huntington's disease. Nurs Stand. 2004 Apr 21- ... Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, ...

  4. Natural history of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Darwin, Kristin; Nichols, Paige; Brocht, Alicia F D; Biglan, Kevin M; Shoulson, Ira

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the natural history of Huntington disease will inform patients and clinicians on the disease course and researchers on the design of clinical trials. To determine the longitudinal change in clinical features among individuals with Huntington disease compared with controls. Prospective, longitudinal cohort study at 44 research sites in Australia (n = 2), Canada (n =4), and the United States (n = 38). Three hundred thirty-four individuals with clinically manifest Huntington disease who had at least 3 years of annually accrued longitudinal data and 142 controls consisting of caregivers and spouses who had no genetic risk of Huntington disease. Change in movement, cognition, behavior, and function as measured by the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and vital signs. Total motor score worsened by 3.0 points (95% CI, 2.5-3.4) per year and chorea worsened by 0.3 point per year (95% CI, 0.1-0.5). Cognition declined by 0.7 point (95% CI, 0.6-0.8) per year on the Mini-Mental State Examination. Behavior, as measured by the product of frequency and severity score on the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale, worsened by 0.6 point per year (95% CI, 0.0-1.2). Total functional capacity declined by 0.6 point per year (95% CI, 0.5-0.7). Compared with controls, baseline body mass index was lower in those with Huntington disease (25.8 vs 28.8; P Huntington disease all declined in a monotonic manner. These data quantify the natural history of the disease and may inform the design of trials aimed at reducing its burden. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00313495.

  5. Falls and cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Damulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the main causes of falls. Whatever their cause is, falls may lead to severe maladjustment in everyday life. In nearly 1 out of 10 cases, they are accompanied by severe injuries, including fractures (most commonly those of the proximal femur and humerus, hands, pelvic bones, and vertebrae, subdural hematoma, and severe soft tissue and head injuries. This process is emphasized to be multifactorial. Particular emphasis is laid on the involvement of the cerebellum and its associations, which may be accompanied by falls. This is clinically manifested mainly by gait disorders. Walking is a result of an interaction of three related functions (locomotion, maintenance of balance and adaptive reactions. In addition to synergies related to locomotion and balance maintenance, standing at rest and walking are influenced bythe following factors: postural and environmental information (proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual, the capacity to interpret and integrate this information, the ability of the musculoskeletal system to make movements, and the capability to optimally modulate these movements in view of the specific situation and the ability to choose and adapt synergy in terms of external factors and the capacities and purposes of an individual. The clinical signs of damage to the cerebellum and its associations are considered in detail. These structures are emphasized to be involved not only in movements, but also in cognitive functions. The major symptoms that permit cerebellar dysfunction to be diagnosed are given. Symptoms in cerebellar injuries are generally most pronounced when suddenly changing the direction of movements or attempting to start walking immediately after a dramatic rise. The magnitude of ataxia also increases in a patient who tries to decrease the step size. Falling tendencies or bending to one side (in other symptoms characteristic of cerebellar diseases suggest injury of the corresponding

  6. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  7. Movement disorders in hereditary ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ruiz, Pedro J; Mayo, David; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Ayuso, Carmen

    2002-10-15

    Movement disorders are well known features of some dominant hereditary ataxias (HA), specially SCA3/Machado-Joseph disease and dentatorubropallidolusyan atrophy. However, little is known about the existence and classification of movement disorders in other dominant and recessive ataxias. We prospectively studied the presence of movement disorders in patients referred for HA over the last 3 years. Only those patients with a confirmed family history of ataxia were included. We studied 84 cases of HA, including 46 cases of recessive and 38 cases of dominant HA. Thirty out of 46 cases of recessive HA could be classified as: Friedreich ataxia (FA), 29 cases; vitamin E deficiency, 1 case. Twenty-three out of 38 cases of dominant HA could be classified as: SCA 2, 4 cases; SCA 3, 8 cases; SCA 6, 4 cases; SCA 7, 6 cases and SCA 8, 1 case. We observed movement disorders in 20/38 (52%) patients with dominant HA and 25/46 (54%) cases with recessive HA, including 16 patients (16/29) with FA. In general, postural tremor was the most frequent observed movement disorder (27 cases), followed by dystonia (22 cases). Five patients had akinetic rigid syndrome, and in 13 cases, several movement disorders coexisted. Movement disorders are frequent findings in HA, not only in dominant HA but also in recessive HA. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  9. Huntington's disease: a perplexing neurological disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington's disease has served as a model for the study of other more common neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Symptomatic treatment of Huntington's disease involves use of Dopamine antagonists, presynaptic dopamine depleters, Antidepressants, Tranquillizers ...

  10. Huntington Disease in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Xu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The lower epidemiology in Asians can be partly explained by the less cytosine-adenine-guanine repeats, different haplotypes, and CCG polymorphisms. For the physicians, atypical clinical profiles such as the initial symptom of ataxia, movement abnormalities of Parkinsonism, dystonia, or tics need to be paid more attention to and suggest gene testing if necessary. Moreover, some pathogenesis studies may help progress some new advanced treatments. The clinicians in Asian especially in China should promote the usage of genetic testing and put more effects in rehabilitation, palliative care, and offer comfort of patients and their families. The unified HD rating scale also needs to be popularized in Asia to assist in evaluating the progression of HD.

  11. Reliability and discriminant validity of ataxia rating scales in early onset ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, Tjitske F; Kuiper, Marieke J; Lunsing, Roelineke J; Burger, Huibert; Sival, Deborah A

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether ataxia rating scales are reliable disease biomarkers for early onset ataxia (EOA). In 40 patients clinically identified with EOA (28 males, 12 females; mean age 15y 3mo [range 5-34y]), we determined interobserver and intraobserver agreement (interclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) and discriminant validity of ataxia rating scales (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale [ICARS], Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia [SARA], and Brief Ataxia Rating Scale [BARS]). Three paediatric neurologists independently scored ICARS, SARA and BARS performances recorded on video, and also phenotyped the primary and secondary movement disorder features. When ataxia was the primary movement disorder feature, we assigned patients to the subgroup 'EOA with core ataxia' (n=26). When ataxia concurred with other prevailing movement disorders (such as dystonia, myoclonus, and chorea), we assigned patients to the subgroup 'EOA with comorbid ataxia' (n=12). ICC values were similar in both EOA subgroups of 'core' and 'comorbid' ataxia (0.92-0.99; ICARS, SARA, and BARS). Independent of the phenotype, the severity of the prevailing movement disorder predicted the ataxia rating scale scores (β=0.83-0.88; pataxia rating scales is high. However, the discriminative validity for 'ataxia' is low. For adequate interpretation of ataxia rating scale scores, application in uniform movement disorder phenotypes is essential. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  12. More Than Ataxia: Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders in Childhood Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The autosomal recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by complex neurological features in addition to progressive ataxia. Hyperkinetic movement disorders occur in a significant proportion of patients, and may sometimes be the presenting motor symptom. Presentations with involuntary movements rather than ataxia are diagnostically challenging, and are likely under-recognized. Methods A PubMed literature search was performed in October 2015 utilizing pairwise combinations of disease-related terms (autosomal recessive ataxia, ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), Friedreich ataxia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and symptom-related terms (movement disorder, dystonia, chorea, choreoathetosis, myoclonus). Results Involuntary movements occur in the majority of patients with ataxia–telangiectasia and AOA1, and less frequently in patients with AOA2, Friedreich ataxia, and ataxia with vitamin E deficiency. Clinical presentations with an isolated hyperkinetic movement disorder in the absence of ataxia include dystonia or dystonia with myoclonus with predominant upper limb and cervical involvement (ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and generalized chorea (ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1, ataxia-telangiectasia). Discussion An awareness of atypical presentations facilitates early and accurate diagnosis in these challenging cases. Recognition of involuntary movements is important not only for diagnosis, but also because of the potential for effective targeted symptomatic treatment. PMID:27536460

  13. Location of the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus to a 1 cM interval on chromsome 12q23-24.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Orozco, G. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia. We have previously assigned the disease locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a population from the Holguin province, Cuba, within a 31 cM interval flanked by the anonymous marker D12S53 and the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2). Clinical as much as genealogical and geographical evidence indicate that the Cuban pedigrees are homogeneous and descend from a common ancestor. We now report fine genetic mapping of the disease locus with fourteen microsatellite loci known to span this region, which positions SCA2 in a 1 cM interval defined by the loci D12S84-AFM291xe9. Observation of a common haplotype segregating with the disease supports the existence of a founder effect in the Holguin pedigrees.

  14. Epidemiology of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Chris; Hayden, Michael R; Leavitt, Blair R

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurologic disorder caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat mutation in patients with characteristic motor signs and specific brain pathology. A repeat of 36 CAG or more can lead to the disease, with increased penetrance and decreased age of onset at longer CAG repeats. The epidemiology of HD thus depends on ascertainment of individuals with the expanded CAG mutation, and on examination of clinical signs to accurately assess disease onset. A larger number of individuals have an expanded CAG repeat than actively manifest the disease due to adult onset in the majority of cases. Because of incomplete penetrance at the lower end of the pathogenic CAG repeat range, the frequency of the expanded CAG repeat in the general population may be higher than previously thought. Genetic differences and changing demographics may account for geographic and ethnic variation in the prevalence of HD between populations and over time. There are gross differences in the prevalence of HD by ancestry, with a much higher rate of the disease in populations of European descent. Molecular studies have elucidated genetic causes for these population-specific differences, possibly resulting from differences in the HD new mutation rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Acute benign ataxia in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, J; Arroyo, H A; Rocco, R D; Iraola, J

    1979-01-01

    The patogenesis and etiology of acute ataxia in childhood is not well known. It may occur without previous symptoms or may be the expression of specific infectious diseases. Forty patients hospitalized at the Hospital de Niños de Buenos Aires en 1972-1978, were studied. The neurological manifestations showed an acute onset, being ataxia the main sign, associate to tremor, nystagmus, dysartria, oculo-motor paresia, muscular weakness, and hyporeflexia. Most of the patients (82%) became cured within the first four weeks. It is advisable to establish a follow-up with periodic controls, mainly in those patients in whom an association with previous infectious diseases did not exist to be able to detect an association with degenerative or desmyelinizing diseases.

  16. PET Study in a Patient with Spinocerebellar Degeneration before and after Long-Term Administration of Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tanji

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the chronic effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH in a patient with spinocerebellar degeneration by measuring cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRG1c using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG and positron emission tomography (PET. A 56-year-old female, who had suffered from progressive ataxia for 2 years, was treated by intravenous administration of 2 mg TRH for 3 weeks, and CMRG1c of the brain was measured before and after treatment. CMRG1c was markedly decreased in the cerebellum and there was no significant difference before and after the treatment, i.e. mean CMRG1c values were 4.92 and 4.90 mg/100 g/min, and the ratios of the cerebellum versus the frontal cortex were 0.50 and 0.51, respectively. The degree of disequilibrium of her body examined with stabilography became better by the 19th day and further improved by the 26th day after the start of TRH treatment. Based on the present study we conclude that long-term administration of TRH did not improve CMRG1c in the cerebellum, but evidently improved the sway of gravity center by stabilography. We speculate that the chronic effect of TRH was not necessarily due to an improvement of cerebellar function, because TRH receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system.

  17. Huntington's disease and Huntington's disease-like syndromes: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gövert, Felix; Schneider, Susanne A

    2013-08-01

    The differential diagnosis of chorea syndromes may be complex and includes various genetic disorders such as Huntington's disease and mimicking disorders called Huntington's disease-like (HDL) phenotypes. To familiarize clinicians with these (in some cases very rare) conditions we will summarize the main characteristics. HDL disorders are rare and account for about 1% of cases presenting with a Huntington's disease phenotype. They share overlapping clinical features, so making the diagnosis purely on clinical grounds may be challenging, however presence of certain characteristics may be a clue (e.g. prominent orofacial involvement in neuroferritinopathy etc.), Information of ethnic descent will also guide genetic work-up [HDL2 in Black Africans; dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) in Japanese etc.], Huntington's disease, the classical HDL disorders (except HDL3) and DRPLA are repeat disorders with anticipation effect and age-dependent phenotype in some, but genetic underpinnings may be more complicated in the other chorea syndromes. With advances in genetics more and more rare diseases are disentangled, allowing molecular diagnoses in a growing number of choreic patients. Hopefully, with better understanding of their pathophysiology we are moving towards mechanistic therapies.

  18. Recurrent Ataxia in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Klassen, Samantha F; Johnston, Janine L

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent ataxia is encountered infrequently in clinical pediatric neurology practise and presents with diagnostic challenges. It is caused by several disorders. Our aims were to describe the epidemiology and clinical features in children with recurrent ataxia. A retrospective review was undertaken in 185 children with chronic ataxia, who presented during 1991 to 2008. Several databases were searched to ensure optimum ascertainment. Patients with brain tumors or isolated disorders of the peripheral nerves or vestibular system were excluded. Recurrent ataxia was reported in 21 patients. Their age range was between 6 and 32.75 years (males=12). The crude period prevalence rate for the 18-year study period was 7.44/100,000. Eight patients had episodic ataxia and seven had inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the rest the etiology was unknown. Many patients presented with ataxia, dizziness, and vertigo. The frequency and duration of the ataxic episodes varied from several per day to one every few months. Other clinical features included developmental delay and seizures. Neuroimaging in episodic ataxia was normal and abnormal in inflammatory or metabolic disorders. Acetazolamide provided symptomatic relief in patients with episodic ataxia, while steroids were beneficial in patients with an inflammatory etiology. One child with a metabolic disorder died. Recurrent ataxia is an uncommon presentation in children and mortality is rare. Genetic, metabolic, and inflammatory disorders should be considered in these patients. Neuroimaging is essential. Acetazolamide in selected patients provides good symptomatic relief.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  20. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome: phenotypic comparisons with other movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; McAsey, Andrew R; O'Keefe, Joan A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the typical cognitive and motor impairments seen in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), essential tremor (ET), Parkinson disease (PD), spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in order to enhance diagnosis of FXTAS patients. We compared the cognitive and motor phenotypes of FXTAS with each of these other movement disorders. Relevant neuropathological and neuroimaging findings are also reviewed. Finally, we describe the differences in age of onset, disease severity, progression rates, and average lifespan in FXTAS compared to ET, PD, SCAs, MSA, and PSP. We conclude with a flow chart algorithm to guide the clinician in the differential diagnosis of FXTAS. By comparing the cognitive and motor phenotypes of FXTAS with the phenotypes of ET, PD, SCAs, MSA, and PSP we have clarified potential symptom overlap while elucidating factors that make these disorders unique from one another. In summary, the clinician should consider a FXTAS diagnosis and testing for the Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene premutation if a patient over the age of 50 (1) presents with cerebellar ataxia and/or intention tremor with mild parkinsonism, (2) has the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) sign, global cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, and/or subcortical white matter lesions on MRI, or (3) has a family history of fragile X related disorders, intellectual disability, autism, premature ovarian failure and has neurological signs consistent with FXTAS. Peripheral neuropathy, executive function deficits, anxiety, or depression are supportive of the diagnosis. Distinct profiles in the cognitive and motor domains between these movement disorders may guide practitioners in the differential diagnosis process and ultimately lead to better medical management of FXTAS patients.

  1. Congenital ataxia and hemiplegic migraine with cerebral edema associated with a novel gain of function mutation in the calcium channel CACNA1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Segarra, Nuria; Gautschi, Ivan; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Kallay Zetchi, Christine; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Maeder, Philippe; Bonafé, Luisa; Schild, Laurent; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2014-07-15

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the α1 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type), have been associated with three neurological phenotypes: familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1, SHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). We report a child with congenital ataxia, abnormal eye movements and developmental delay who presented severe attacks of hemiplegic migraine triggered by minor head traumas and associated with hemispheric swelling and seizures. Progressive cerebellar atrophy was also observed. Remission of the attacks was obtained with acetazolamide. A de novo 3 bp deletion was found in heterozygosity causing loss of a phenylalanine residue at position 1502, in one of the critical transmembrane domains of the protein contributing to the inner part of the pore. We characterized the electrophysiology of this mutant in a Xenopus oocyte in vitro system and showed that it causes gain of function of the channel. The mutant Ca(V)2.1 activates at lower voltage threshold than the wild type. These findings provide further evidence of this molecular mechanism as causative of FHM1 and expand the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations with a child exhibiting severe SHM1 and non-episodic ataxia of congenital onset. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Music therapy in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen-Rufi, van C.H.M.

    2018-01-01

    The thesis reports about the effects of music therapy with patients in the late stage of Huntington's disease. A literature review, a focus group study, a randomized controlled trial, an evaluation for complex interventions and a case report study are integrated in the thesis. The beneficial

  3. What is HD - Huntington's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... END TO HD? WHERE TO FIND HELP PUBLICATIONS Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal genetic disorder that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve ... personal and there is no "right" answer. The Huntington's Disease Society of ... who are considering genetic testing do so at a genetic testing center ...

  4. Stages of Huntington's Disease (HD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... END TO HD? WHERE TO FIND HELP PUBLICATIONS Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal genetic disorder that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve ... personal and there is no "right" answer. The Huntington's Disease Society of ... who are considering genetic testing do so at a genetic testing center ...

  5. Bradykinesia in early Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Pernaute, R; Kunig, G; Alba, AD; de Yebenes, JG; Vontobel, P; Leenders, KL

    2000-01-01

    Background: Hunting-ton's disease (HD) is generally considered a hyperkinetic disorder, although hypokinetic features are part of the motor syndrome. Moreover, the striatum is considered to play a key role in initiating and executing motor programs and achieving optimal scheduling in response

  6. Is Huntington's disease a tauopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratuze, Maud; Cisbani, Giulia; Cicchetti, Francesca; Planel, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Tauopathies are a subclass of neurodegenerative diseases typified by the deposition of abnormal microtubule-associated tau protein within the cerebral tissue. Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and some fronto-temporal dementias are examples of the extended family of tauopathies. In the last decades, intermittent reports of cerebral tau pathology in individuals afflicted with Huntington's disease-an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that manifests by severe motor, cognitive and psychiatric problems in adulthood-have also begun to surface. These observations remained anecdotal until recently when a series of publications brought forward compelling evidence that this monogenic disorder may, too, be a tauopathy. Collectively, these studies reported that: (i) patients with Huntington's disease present aggregated tau inclusions within various structures of the brain; (ii) tau haplotype influences the cognitive function of Huntington's disease patients; and (iii) that the genetic product of the disease, the mutant huntingtin protein, could alter tau splicing, phosphorylation, oligomerization and subcellular localization. Here, we review the past and current evidence in favour of the postulate that Huntington's disease is a new member of the family of tauopathies. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. [The hypothalamus in Huntington's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellosta-Diago, E; Viloria-Alebesque, A; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Lopez Del Val, L J

    2017-11-01

    Disorders affecting sleep and the circadian rhythm, autonomic clinical signs and symptoms, and neuroendocrine alterations are frequent characteristics in Huntington's disease, some of which present in early stages of the disease. It is reasonable to think that some of these features could result from a hypothalamic dysfunction affecting the centre regulating sleep, metabolism and the autonomic nervous system. The study presents the evidence available to date that suggests the involvement of a hypothalamic disorder in Huntington's disease. Histopathological, hormonal and neuroimaging research relates this area of the brain to Huntington's disease. The experimental findings and those obtained with animal models or in studies conducted with patients are summarised. Likewise, the clinical repercussions (sleep and circadian rhythm disorders, psychiatric and cognitive pathologies, and the clinical signs and symptoms linked to autonomic dysfunction) secondary to possible involvement of the hypothalamus in this disease are also described. The hypothalamus acts as a centre that integrates the neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, and plays a significant role in cognitive and behavioural signs and symptoms. Disorders of this type have been highlighted in Huntington's disease. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role and scope of this region of the brain in this disease.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Huntington disease-like syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Huntington disease-like syndrome Huntington disease-like syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close ... collapse boxes. Description As its name suggests, a Huntington disease -like (HDL) syndrome is a condition that ...

  9. The Functional Role of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gautier, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a progressive cerebellar ataxia, severe immune deficiencies, gonadal atrophy, telangiectases, increased risk for cancer, particularly lymphomas...

  10. The Functional Role of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gautier, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a progressive cerebellar ataxia, severe immune deficiencies, gonadal atrophy, telangiectases, increased risk for cancer, particularly lymphomas...

  11. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  12. The scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia correlates with dysarthria assessment in Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigentler, Andreas; Rhomberg, Johanna; Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Ritzer, Irmgard; Poewe, Werner; Boesch, Sylvia

    2012-03-01

    Dysarthria is an acquired neurogenic sensorimotor speech symptom and an integral part within the clinical spectrum of ataxia syndromes. Ataxia measurements and disability scores generally focus on the assessment of motor functions. Since comprehensive investigations of dysarthria in ataxias are sparse, we assessed dysarthria in ataxia patients using the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment is a ten-item validated test in which eight items focus on the observation of oral structures and speech functions. Fifteen Friedreich's ataxia patients and 15 healthy control individuals were analyzed using clinical and logopedic methodology. All patients underwent neurological assessment applying the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia. In Friedreich's ataxia patients, the Frenchay sub-item voice showed to be most affected compared to healthy individuals followed by items such as reflexes, palate, tongue, and intelligibility. Scoring of lips, jaw, and respiration appeared to be mildly affected. Ataxia severity in Friedreich's ataxia patients revealed a significant correlation with the Frenchay dysarthria sum score. The introduction of a binary Adapted Dysarthria Score additionally allowed allocation to distinct dysarthria pattern in ataxias. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment proved to be a valid dysarthria measure in Friedreich's ataxia. Its availability in several languages provides a major advantage regarding the applicability in international clinical studies. Shortcomings of the Frenchay test are the multiplicity of items tested and its alphabetic coding. Numerical scoring and condensation of assessments in a modified version may, however, provide an excellent clinical tool for the measurement and scoring of dysarthria in ataxic speech disorders.

  13. Emerging therapies in Friedreich's ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranca, Tanya V; Jones, Tracy M; Shaw, Jessica D; Staffetti, Joseph S; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Fogel, Brent L; Wilmot, George R; Perlman, Susan L; Onyike, Chiadi U; Ying, Sarah H; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disease that typically affects teenagers and young adults. Therapeutic strategies and disease insight have expanded rapidly over recent years, leading to hope for the FRDA population. There is currently no US FDA-approved treatment for FRDA, but advances in research of its pathogenesis have led to clinical trials of potential treatments. This article reviews emerging therapies and discusses future perspectives, including the need for more precise measures for detecting changes in neurologic symptoms as well as a disease-modifying agent. PMID:26782317

  14. Ataxias agudas en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaline Betancourt Fursow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La ataxia cerebelosa aguda infantil (ACAI es la forma más frecuente de complicación neurológica por el virus de la varicela.Descritas dentro del grupo de las cerebelitis agudas. Los objetivos de este estudio fueron: evaluar la presentación clínica, manejo y seguimiento de niños hospitalizados con ACAI en un hospital pediátrico terciario donde la inmunización para varicela no está disponible (parte I y describir los diagnósticos diferenciales de la cerebelitis aguda (parte II. Estudiamos 95 pacientes. Los criterios diagnósticos de ataxia aguda se basaron en: pérdida aguda de la coordinación o dificultad para la marcha con o sin nistagmo asociado y duración menor de 48 horas, en un niño previamente sano. Estos criterios se cumplían en todos los casos valorados, excepto en las ataxias secundarias a ingesta de tóxicos, en los que la duración debía ser menor de 24 horas para su inclusión en el estudio. Se registraron los datos en una historia clínica pediátrica y neurológica. Entre los pacientes inmunosuprimidos la incidencia mayor fue la complicación por varicela. La mayoría de los pacientes fueron varones. El rango de edad fue la preescolar, 5 años . El intervalo entre la presentación del rash y el ingreso fue de 1 a 3 días. El estudio de LCR se practicó en 59.5% de los casos. La TAC y la resonancia magnética cerebral (RM presentaron edema en el 33.3%. El aciclovir endovenoso fue utilizado en 23 pacientes; pero no hubo diferencias significativas en las manifestaciones clínicas y seguimiento entre tratados y no tratados. La ataxia fue la primera manifestación clínica. La estadía hospitalaria fue de 4 días (rango: 2-11 días.

  15. Genes and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Sandford

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes.

  16. Epigenetics in Friedreich's Ataxia: Challenges and Opportunities for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeevi Sandi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by homozygous expansion of a GAA·TTC trinucleotide repeat within the first intron of the FXN gene, leading to reduced FXN transcription and decreased levels of frataxin protein. Recent advances in FRDA research have revealed the presence of several epigenetic modifications that are either directly or indirectly involved in this FXN gene silencing. Although epigenetic marks may be inherited from one generation to the next, modifications of DNA and histones can be reversed, indicating that they are suitable targets for epigenetic-based therapy. Unlike other trinucleotide repeat disorders, such as Huntington disease, the large expansions of GAA·TTC repeats in FRDA do not produce a change in the frataxin amino acid sequence, but they produce reduced levels of normal frataxin. Therefore, transcriptional reactivation of the FXN gene provides a good therapeutic option. The present paper will initially focus on the epigenetic changes seen in FRDA patients and their role in the silencing of FXN gene and will be concluded by considering the potential epigenetic therapies.

  17. Levels of DNAJB family members (HSP40) correlate with disease onset in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, M. P.; Rujano, M. A.; Van Waarde, M. A.; Vis, E.; Brunt, E. R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    In polyglutamine disorders, the length of the expanded CAG repeat shows a strong inverse correlation with the age at disease onset, yet up to 50% of the variation in age of onset is determined by other additional factors. Here, we investigated whether variations in the expression of heat shock

  18. A Novel TTBK2 De Novo Mutation in a Danish Family with Early-Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Suzanne Granhøj; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Dali, Christine I.

    2017-01-01

    examined. Exome sequencing was performed and a "movement disorders" gene panel consisting of approximately 200 genes was used for filtering, while Sanger sequencing was used for subsequent testing for the mutation in the family. Onset of symptoms in affected family members was in early childhood. A novel...

  19. Eye Position Feedback in a Model of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex for Spino-Cerebellar Ataxia 6

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, J

    2001-01-01

    ..., incoordination, ocular motor dysfunction, and dysarthria due to degeneration of cerebellar and brainstem neurons. Recent studies have established that there are more than 16 genetically distinct subtypes...

  20. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.A11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    , SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of genomically integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. This iPSC line...

  1. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.B11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    -MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. Potentially, this i......PSC line could be a useful tool for the investigation of SCA3 disease mechanisms....

  2. Huntington Disease: Molecular Diagnostics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastepe, Murat; Xin, Winnie

    2015-10-06

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the first exon of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Molecular testing of Huntington disease for diagnostic confirmation and disease prediction requires detection of the CAG repeat expansion. There are three main types of HD genetic testing: (1) diagnostic testing to confirm or rule out disease, (2) presymptomatic testing to determine whether an at-risk individual inherited the expanded allele, and (3) prenatal testing to determine whether the fetus has inherited the expanded allele. This unit includes protocols that describe the complementary use of polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization to accurately measure the CAG trinucleotide repeat size and interpret the test results. In addition, an indirect linkage analysis that does not reveal the unwanted parental HD status in a prenatal testing will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. JP-3 gene polymorphism in a healthy population of Serbia and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    pared to French population (9–18), exhibiting larger alleles that are not present in the French population. If larger alleles undergo expansions (like in Huntington disease and Spinocerebellar Ataxias), it could be concluded that the North African population is at higher risk of deve- loping HDL-2 then the French population.

  4. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    PolyQ disorders include Huntington disease (HD), six distinct forms of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-1, 2, 3, 6,. 7 and 17), dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) (reviewed in Bates. 2005; Gatchel and Zoghbi 2005). Barring SBMA, which is. X-linked, all other polyQ disorders ...

  5. Heat shock proteins as potential targets for protective strategies in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    Protein aggregates are hallmarks of nearly all age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and several polyglutamine diseases such as Huntington's disease and different forms of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA; SCA1-3, SCA6,

  6. Genetic testing for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaid, Kimberly A

    2017-01-01

    In 1983, Huntington disease (HD) became the first disease to be mapped to a previously unknown location on chromosome 4. This discovery meant that we could now identify whether some individuals at risk for HD would develop HD in the future using a method called linkage testing. Testing was first offered through research protocols designed to assess whether testing could be done safely in this population. Testing guidelines were soon developed by the Huntington's Disease Society of America and the International Huntington Association in collaboration with the World Federation of Neurology. The gene for HD was found in 1993, allowing for direct gene testing for the mutant HTT allele. This chapter will discuss the development of guidelines and recent revisions to the guidelines, prenatal testing, and testing in three complicated situations: (1) the testing of minors; (2) anonymous testing; and (3) testing individuals at 25% risk. Studies examining the outcomes of predictive testing will also be discussed. Outcome studies have shown that testing can be done safely in the context of testing protocols that include neurologic examinations, pretest counseling, psychiatric/psychologic assessment, results in person, and available follow-up support. It appears that anxiety and depression prior to testing are better predictors of psychologic status after testing than the test result itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuropsychiatric Burden in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Ricardo Augusto; Botturi, Andrea; Ciammola, Andrea; Silani, Vincenzo; Prunas, Cecilia; Lucchiari, Claudio; Zugno, Elisa; Caletti, Elisabetta

    2017-06-16

    Huntington's disease is a disorder that results in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric problems. The symptoms often take different forms and the presence of disturbances of the psychic sphere reduces patients' autonomy and quality of life, also impacting patients' social life. It is estimated that a prevalence between 33% and 76% of the main psychiatric syndromes may arise in different phases of the disease, often in atypical form, even 20 years before the onset of chorea and dementia. We present a narrative review of the literature describing the main psychopathological patterns that may be found in Huntington's disease, searching for a related article in the main database sources (Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and Medscape). Psychiatric conditions were classified into two main categories: affective and nonaffective disorders/symptoms; and anxiety and neuropsychiatric features such as apathy and irritability. Though the literature is extensive, it is not always convergent, probably due to the high heterogeneity of methods used. We summarize main papers for pathology and sample size, in order to present a synoptic vision of the argument. Since the association between Huntington's disease and psychiatric symptoms was demonstrated, we argue that the prevalent and more invalidating psychiatric components should be recognized as early as possible during the disease course in order to best address psychopharmacological therapy, improve quality of life, and also reduce burden on caregivers.

  8. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich’s Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bonello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich’s ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich’s ataxia but was later found to have AVED.

  9. Aspectos moleculares das ataxias espinocerebelares autossomicas recessivas

    OpenAIRE

    Flavia Chagas Costa

    2000-01-01

    Resumo: As ataxias espinocerebelares (ABC) formam um grupo heterogêneo de doenças degenerativas que envolvem o sistema nervoso central. Esse grupo se caracteriza clinicamente por apresentar disfunção cerebelar manifestada por ataxia de marcha, incoordenação e disartria. Nos casos familiares, o padrão de herança é variável, podendo ser compatível com herança autossômica dominante (HAD) ou herança autossômica recessiva (HAR). Para as ataxias espinocerebelares com HAR existem três lócus identifi...

  10. Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, R; Capone, F; Plantone, D; Batocchi, A P

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria are part of the spectrum of transient neurological disturbances that can be frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prompt recognition of these symptoms is important because they can be the only manifestation of a MS relapse and symptomatic therapy is often beneficial. We report a patient who developed paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria, documented by video imaging, while he was recovering from a MS relapse. Treatment with carbamazepine resulted in the complete reversal of the paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Huntington's disease: Genetic heterogeneity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-03-01

    Mar 1, 2008 ... George Huntington's description of Huntington's disease. (HD) in 1872 (at the age of 22 years) remains the basic pillar of diagnosis: 'A hereditary chorea, tendency to insanity and suicide and its manifesting itself as a grave disease in adulthood'.1 HD is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder ...

  12. Huntington's disease : Psychological aspects of predictive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timman, Reinier

    2005-01-01

    Predictive testing for Huntington's disease appears to have long lasting psychological effects. The predictive test for Huntington's disease (HD), a hereditary disease of the nervous system, was introduced in the Netherlands in the late eighties. As adverse consequences of the test were

  13. Respiration during sleep in Huntington's chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, E. L.; den Heijer, J. C.; Ponsioen, C.; Kramer, C.; van der Velde, E. A.; van Dijk, J. G.; Roos, R. A.; Kamphuisen, H. A.; Buruma, O. J.

    1988-01-01

    In view of recent reports on lower brainstem dysfunction in Huntington's chorea, we studied respiration during sleep in 12 patients with Huntington's chorea (HC) and in controls. There were no statistically significant differences between patients and controls with respect to apnea periods,

  14. Falls and gait disturbances in Huntington's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Knol, M.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Kremer, B.P.; Roos, R.A.C.; Munneke, M.

    2008-01-01

    Falls are common in patients with Huntington's disease, but the incidence, falling circumstances and contributing factors have never been examined. We recorded falls in 45 early to midstage Huntington's disease patients, both retrospectively (12 months) and prospectively (3 months). Fall rates were

  15. Apathy is not depression in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Paul; Janzing, Joost G E; Eling, Paul; van der Werf, Sieberen; Kremer, Berry

    2009-01-01

    Apathy and depression are common neuropsychiatric features of Huntington's disease. The authors studied a group of 34 Huntington's disease patients. In addition to the conventional classification according to DSM-IV criteria of depression, emphasis was put on a dimensional approach using scores on

  16. Drug-induced hyperthermia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek, D; Naarding, Paul; Stor, T; Kremer, H P H

    Until now, only three patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) have been reported in the literature. We describe four cases with advanced stage Huntington's disease who within a period of one year developed drug-induced hyperthermia, either the neuroleptic

  17. Plasma melatonin is reduced in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliolia, Eirini; Silajdžić, Edina; Nambron, Rajasree; Hill, Nathan R; Doshi, Anisha; Frost, Chris; Watt, Hilary; Hindmarsh, Peter; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T

    2014-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the production of melatonin, a hormone regulating sleep in relation to the light/dark cycle, is altered in Huntington's disease. We analyzed the circadian rhythm of melatonin in a 24-hour study of cohorts of control, premanifest, and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects. The mean and acrophase melatonin concentrations were significantly reduced in stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects compared with controls. We also observed a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean and acrophase melatonin in premanifest Huntington's disease subjects. Onset of melatonin rise was significantly more temporally spread in both premanifest and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects compared with controls. A nonsignificant trend also was seen for reduced pulsatile secretion of melatonin. Melatonin concentrations are reduced in Huntington's disease. Altered melatonin patterns may provide an explanation for disrupted sleep and circadian behavior in Huntington's disease, and represent a biomarker for disease state. Melatonin therapy may help the sleep disorders seen in Huntington's disease. © © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Origin, course, and laterality of spinocerebellar axons in the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terman, J R; Wang, X M; Martin, G F

    1998-08-01

    Spinocerebellar axons have been studied extensively in placental mammals, but there have been no full reports on their origin, laterality, or spinal course in any marsupial. We have used the North American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) to obtain such information and to ask whether any spinocerebellar neurons innervate both the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum through axonal collaterals. To identify spinal neurons that project to the cerebellum, we employed the retrograde transport of Fluoro-Gold (FG) from the anterior lobe, the main target of spinocerebellar axons. In some cases, cerebellar injections of FG were combined with hemisections of the rostral cervical or midthoracic spinal cord, so that laterality of spinocerebellar connections could be established. To determine whether single neurons project to both the anterior lobe and the posterior lobe, injections of Fast Blue (FB) into the anterior lobe were combined with injections of Diamidino yellow (DY) or rhodamine B dextran (RBD) into the posterior lobe, or vice versa. Following injections of FG into the anterior lobe, neurons were labeled throughout the length of the spinal cord, which differed in laminar distribution and laterality of their projections. Among other areas, neurons were labeled in the central cervical nucleus, the nucleus centrobasalis, Clarke's nucleus, the dorsal horn dorsal spinocerebellar tract area, the spinal border region, and Stilling's nucleus. When anterior lobe injections of FB were combined with injections of RBD or DY into the posterior lobe, or vice versa, some double-labeled neurons were present in all major spinocerebellar groups. Cerebellar injections of FG also retrogradely labeled spinocerebellar axons, allowing us to document their locations in the gray matter as well as within the periphery of the lateral and ventral funiculi at all spinal levels. A few spinocerebellar axons also were found in the dorsal funiculus (a dorsal column-spinocerebellar tract

  19. Pathogenesis of severe ataxia and tremor without the typical signs of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joshua J; Arancillo, Marife; King, Annesha; Lin, Tao; Miterko, Lauren N; Gebre, Samrawit A; Sillitoe, Roy V

    2016-02-01

    Neurological diseases are especially devastating when they involve neurodegeneration. Neuronal destruction is widespread in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's and regionally localized in motor disorders such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, and ataxia. But, surprisingly, the onset and progression of these diseases can occur without neurodegeneration. To understand the origins of diseases that do not have an obvious neuropathology, we tested how loss of CAR8, a regulator of IP3R1-mediated Ca(2+)-signaling, influences cerebellar circuit formation and neural function as movement deteriorates. We found that faulty molecular patterning, which shapes functional circuits called zones, leads to alterations in cerebellar wiring and Purkinje cell activity, but not to degeneration. Rescuing Purkinje cell function improved movement and reducing their Ca(2+) influx eliminated ectopic zones. Our findings in Car8(wdl) mutant mice unveil a pathophysiological mechanism that may operate broadly to impact motor and non-motor conditions that do not involve degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology

  1. [Ataxia telangiectasia: review of 13 new cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, O; Póo, P; Campistol, J; Vernet, A; Fernández-Alvarez, E; Sierra, I; Gean, E

    1996-01-01

    We report the review of 13 patients who were diagnosed of ataxia telangiectasia before 6 years of age. All of them manifested cerebelous ataxia, oculocutaneus telangiectasias (11), sinopulmonary infections (9), dystonia (9), oculomotor apraxia (9) and Burkitt linfoma (1). We analyse the most common presentation of the disease in early stages and the complementary studies performed. The prompt diagnosis allow us a better control of infections, malignant process and finally the possibility of genetic counseling.

  2. Clinical data and characterization of the liver conditional mouse model exclude neoplasia as a non-neurological manifestation associated with Friedreich’s ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Martelli

    2012-11-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is the most common hereditary ataxia in the caucasian population and is characterized by a mixed spinocerebellar and sensory ataxia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and increased incidence of diabetes. FRDA is caused by impaired expression of the FXN gene coding for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. During the past ten years, the development of mouse models of FRDA has allowed better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Among the mouse models of FRDA, the liver conditional mouse model pointed to a tumor suppressor activity of frataxin leading to the hypothesis that individuals with FRDA might be predisposed to cancer. In the present work, we investigated the presence and the incidence of neoplasia in the largest FRDA patient cohorts from the USA, Australia and Europe. As no predisposition to cancer could be observed in both cohorts, we revisited the phenotype of the liver conditional mouse model. Our results show that frataxin-deficient livers developed early mitochondriopathy, iron-sulfur cluster deficits and intramitochondrial dense deposits, classical hallmarks observed in frataxin-deficient tissues and cells. With age, a minority of mice developed structures similar to the ones previously associated with tumor formation. However, these peripheral structures contained dying, frataxin-deficient hepatocytes, whereas the inner liver structure was composed of a pool of frataxin-positive cells, due to inefficient Cre-mediated recombination of the Fxn gene, that contributed to regeneration of a functional liver. Together, our data demonstrate that frataxin deficiency and tumorigenesis are not associated.

  3. Functional Analysis Helps to Define KCNC3 Mutational Spectrum in Dutch Ataxia Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkens, Michiel R.; Meijer, Michel; Boerrigter, Melissa; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien C.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Dooijes, Dennis; Boddeke, Erik; Sinke, Richard J.; Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder of the cerebellum caused by mutations in the voltage gated potassium channel KCNC3. To identify novel pathogenic SCA13 mutations in KCNC3 and to gain insights into the disease prevalence in the Netherlands, we sequenced the entire coding region of KCNC3 in 848 Dutch cerebellar ataxia patients with familial or sporadic origin. We evaluated the pathogenicity of the identified variants by co-segregation analysis and in silico prediction followed by biochemical and electrophysiological studies. We identified 19 variants in KCNC3 including 2 non-coding, 11 missense and 6 synonymous variants. Two missense variants did not co-segregate with the disease and were excluded as potentially disease-causing mutations. We also identified the previously reported p.R420H and p.R423H mutations in our cohort. Of the remaining 7 missense variants, functional analysis revealed that 2 missense variants shifted Kv3.3 channel activation to more negative voltages. These variations were associated with early disease onset and mild intellectual disability. Additionally, one other missense variant shifted channel activation to more positive voltages and was associated with spastic ataxic gait. Whereas, the remaining missense variants did not change any of the channel characteristics. Of these three functional variants, only one variant was in silico predicted to be damaging and segregated with disease. The other two variants were in silico predicted to be benign and co-segregation analysis was not optimal or could only be partially confirmed. Therefore, we conclude that we have identified at least one novel pathogenic mutation in KCNC3 that cause SCA13 and two additionally potential SCA13 mutations. This leads to an estimate of SCA13 prevalence in the Netherlands to be between 0.6% and 1.3%. PMID:25756792

  4. Functional analysis helps to define KCNC3 mutational spectrum in Dutch ataxia cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Duarri

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13 is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder of the cerebellum caused by mutations in the voltage gated potassium channel KCNC3. To identify novel pathogenic SCA13 mutations in KCNC3 and to gain insights into the disease prevalence in the Netherlands, we sequenced the entire coding region of KCNC3 in 848 Dutch cerebellar ataxia patients with familial or sporadic origin. We evaluated the pathogenicity of the identified variants by co-segregation analysis and in silico prediction followed by biochemical and electrophysiological studies. We identified 19 variants in KCNC3 including 2 non-coding, 11 missense and 6 synonymous variants. Two missense variants did not co-segregate with the disease and were excluded as potentially disease-causing mutations. We also identified the previously reported p.R420H and p.R423H mutations in our cohort. Of the remaining 7 missense variants, functional analysis revealed that 2 missense variants shifted Kv3.3 channel activation to more negative voltages. These variations were associated with early disease onset and mild intellectual disability. Additionally, one other missense variant shifted channel activation to more positive voltages and was associated with spastic ataxic gait. Whereas, the remaining missense variants did not change any of the channel characteristics. Of these three functional variants, only one variant was in silico predicted to be damaging and segregated with disease. The other two variants were in silico predicted to be benign and co-segregation analysis was not optimal or could only be partially confirmed. Therefore, we conclude that we have identified at least one novel pathogenic mutation in KCNC3 that cause SCA13 and two additionally potential SCA13 mutations. This leads to an estimate of SCA13 prevalence in the Netherlands to be between 0.6% and 1.3%.

  5. Huntington disease: pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalu, Praveen; Albin, Roger L

    2015-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor, behavioral, and cognitive decline, culminating in death. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Even years before symptoms become overt, mutation carriers show subtle but progressive striatal and cerebral white matter atrophy by volumetric MRI. Although there is currently no direct treatment of HD, management options are available for several symptoms. A better understanding of HD pathogenesis, and more sophisticated clinical trials using newer biomarkers, may lead to meaningful treatments. This article reviews the current knowledge of HD pathogenesis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychiatric symptoms and CAG expansion in Huntington`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.W.; Schmid, W.; Spiegel, R. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-02-16

    The mutation responsible for Huntington`s disease (HD) is an elongated CAG repeat in the coding region of the IT15 gene. A PCR-based test with high sensitivity and accuracy is now available to identify asymptomatic gene carriers and patients. An inverse correlation between CAG copy number and age at disease onset has been found in a large number of affected individuals. The influence of the CAG repeat expansion on other phenotypic manifestations, especially specific psychiatric symptoms has not been studied intensively. In order to elucidate this situation we investigated the relation between CAG copy number and distinct psychiatric phenotypes found in 79 HD-patients. None of the four differentiated categories (personality change, psychosis, depression, and nonspecific alterations) showed significant differences in respect to size of the CAG expansion. In addition, no influence of individual sex on psychiatric presentation could be found. On the other hand in patients with personality changes maternal transmission was significantly more frequent compared with all other groups. Therefore we suggest that clinical severity of psychiatric features in HD is not directly dependent on the size of the dynamic mutation involved. The complex pathogenetic mechanisms leading to psychiatric alterations are still unknown and thus genotyping does not provide information about expected psychiatric symptoms in HD gene carriers. 40 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Reliability and discriminant validity of ataxia rating scales in early onset ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, R.; Lawerman, T. F.; Kuiper, M. J.; Geffen, van Joke; Lunsing, I. J.; Burger, H.; de Koning, T. J.; de Vries, J. J.; de Koning-Tijssen, M. A. J.; Sival, D. A.

    Objective: To determine observer-agreement and discriminantvalidity of ataxia rating scales.Background: In children and young adults, Early Onset Ataxia(EOA) is frequently concurrent with other Movement Disorders,resulting in moderate inter-observer agreement among MovementDisorder professionals. To

  8. Reliability and discriminant validity of ataxia rating scales in early onset ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, Tjitske F.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Burger, Huibert; Sival, Deborah A.

    AIM To determine whether ataxia rating scales are reliable disease biomarkers for early onset ataxia (EOA). METHOD In 40 patients clinically identified with EOA (28 males, 12 females; mean age 15y 3mo [range 5-34y]), we determined interobserver and intraobserver agreement (interclass correlation

  9. Current concepts in the treatment of hereditary ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Braga Neto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hereditary ataxias (HA represents an extensive group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by progressive ataxia combined with extra-cerebellar and multi-systemic involvements, including peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. There is no effective treatment for HA, and management remains supportive and symptomatic. In this review, we will focus on the symptomatic treatment of the main autosomal recessive ataxias, autosomal dominant ataxias, X-linked cerebellar ataxias and mitochondrial ataxias. We describe management for different clinical symptoms, mechanism-based approaches, rehabilitation therapy, disease modifying therapy, future clinical trials and perspectives, genetic counseling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  10. Gluten-related disorders: gluten ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Sanders, David D; Aeschlimann, Daniel P

    2015-01-01

    The term gluten-related disorders (GRD) refers to a spectrum of diverse clinical manifestations triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. They include both intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Gluten ataxia (GA) is one of the commonest neurological manifestations of GRD. It was originally defined as otherwise idiopathic sporadic ataxia in the presence of circulating antigliadin antibodies of IgA and/or IgG type. Newer more specific serological markers have been identified but are not as yet readily available. GA has a prevalence of 15% amongst all ataxias and 40% of all idiopathic sporadic ataxias. It usually presents with gait and lower limb ataxia. It is of insidious onset with a mean age at onset of 53 years. Up to 40% of patients have evidence of enteropathy on duodenal biopsy. Gastrointestinal symptoms are seldom prominent and are not a reliable indicator for the presence of enteropathy. Furthermore, the presence of enteropathy does not influence the response to a gluten-free diet. Most patients will stabilise or improve with strict adherence to gluten-free diet depending on the duration of the ataxia prior to the treatment. Up to 60% of patients with GA have evidence of cerebellar atrophy on MR imaging, but all patients have spectroscopic abnormalities primarily affecting the vermis. Recent evidence suggests that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease presenting to the gastroenterologists have abnormal MR spectroscopy at presentation associated with clinical evidence of subtle cerebellar dysfunction. The advantage of early diagnosis and treatment (mean age 42 years in patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms vs. 53 years in patients presenting with ataxia) may protect the first group from the development and/or progression of neurological dysfunction. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The Neuropsychology of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Julie S

    2017-11-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited, degenerative brain disease, characterized by involuntary movements, cognitive disorder and neuropsychiatric change. Men and women are affected equally. Symptoms emerge at around 40 years, although there is wide variation. A rare juvenile form has onset in childhood or adolescence. The evolution of disease is insidious and structural and functional brain changes may be present more than a decade before symptoms and signs become manifest. The earliest site of pathology is the striatum and neuroimaging measures of striatal change correlate with neurological and cognitive markers of disease. Chorea and other aspects of the movement disorder are the most visible aspect of the disease. However, non-motor features have greatest affect on functional independence and quality of life, so require recognition and management. The evidence-base for non-pharmacological treatments in Huntington's disease is currently limited, but recent intervention studies are encouraging. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Genetic modifiers of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-09-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that directly affects more than 1 in 10,000 persons in Western societies but, as a family disorder with a long, costly, debilitating course, it has an indirect impact on a far greater proportion of the population. Although some palliative treatments are used, no effective treatment exists for preventing clinical onset of the disorder or for delaying its inevitable progression toward premature death, approximately 15 years after diagnosis. Huntington's disease involves a movement disorder characterized by chorea, as well as a variety of psychiatric disturbances and intellectual decline, with a gradual loss of independence. A dire need exists for effective HD therapies to alleviate the suffering and costs to the individual, family, and health care system. In past decades, genetics, the study of DNA sequence variation and its consequences, provided the tools to map the HD gene to chromosome 4 and ultimately to identify its mutation as an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the coding sequence of a large protein, dubbed huntingtin. Now, advances in genetic technology offer an unbiased route to the identification of genetic factors that are disease-modifying agents in human patients. Such genetic modifiers are expected to highlight processes capable of altering the course of HD and therefore to provide new, human-validated targets for traditional drug development, with the goal of developing rational treatments to delay or prevent onset of HD clinical signs. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Personality Traits in Huntington's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ida Unmack; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Vinther-Jensen, Tua

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is associated with risk for developing psychiatric symptoms. Vulnerability or resilience to psychiatric symptoms may be associated with personality traits. This exploratory study, aimed to investigate personality traits in a large cohort of HD carriers and at risk gene-e...... symptoms. Our findings suggest that, there is no direct effect of the HD gene on personality traits, but that personality assessment may be relevant to use when identifying individuals from HD families who are vulnerable to develop psychiatric symptoms.......Huntington's disease (HD) is associated with risk for developing psychiatric symptoms. Vulnerability or resilience to psychiatric symptoms may be associated with personality traits. This exploratory study, aimed to investigate personality traits in a large cohort of HD carriers and at risk gene......-expansion negative individuals (HD non-carriers), exploring whether carrying the HD gene or growing up in an HD family influences personality traits. Forty-seven HD carriers, Thirty-nine HD non-carriers, and 121 healthy controls answered the Danish version of the revised NEO personality inventory. Comparisons...

  14. Tics as an initial manifestation of juvenile Huntington's disease: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shi-Shuang; Ren, Ru-Jing; Wang, Ying; Wang, Gang; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-08-08

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder, typically characterized by chorea due to a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the HTT gene, although the clinical manifestations of patients with juvenile HD (JHD) are atypical. A 17-year-old boy with initial presentation of tics attended our clinic and his DNA analysis demonstrated mutation in the HTT gene (49 CAG repeats). After treatment, his symptoms improved. Furthermore, we performed literature review through searching the databases and summarized clinical features in 33 JHD patients. The most prevalent symptoms are ataxia, and two cases reported that tics as initial and prominent manifestation in JHD. Among them, 88% patients carried CAG repeats beyond 60 and most of them have family history. This case here illustrates the variable range of clinical symptoms of JHD and the necessity of testing for the HD mutation in young patients with tics with symptoms unable to be explained by Tourette's syndrome (TS).

  15. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  16. Friedreich's ataxia cardiomyopathy: case based discussion and management issues.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-04-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and is a common cause of premature death. Evidence regarding treatment of congestive heart failure in patients with Friedreich\\'s Ataxia is lacking. The case of a 31-year-old male with advanced Friedreich\\'s Ataxia who presented with an acute diarrhoeal illness and features of acute heart failure is discussed. We then review the reported cardiac manifestations of Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and discuss management options.

  17. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej Elkamil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder which usually starts in childhood. The clinical presentation is very similar to Friedreich ataxia, most patients have progressive truncal and extremity ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski sign, dysarthria and sensory neuropathy. Methods We made an inquiry to our colleagues in Norway, we included information from a prevalence study published southern Norway and added data from our own known case. Results A newly published prevalence study of hereditary ataxias (total of 171 subjects found only one subject with AVED in Southeast Norway. We describe two more patients, one from the Central part and one from the Northern part of Norway. All 3 cases had age of onset in early childhood (age of 4–5 years and all experienced gait ataxia and dysarthria. The genetic testing confirmed that they had pathogenic mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA. All were carriers of the non-sense c.400C > T mutation, one was homozygous for that mutation and the others were compound heterozygous, either with c.358G > A or c.513_514insTT. The homozygous carrier was by far the most severely affected case. Conclusions We estimate the occurrence of AVED in Norway to be at least 0.6 per million inhabitants. We emphasize that all patients who develop ataxia in childhood should be routinely tested for AVED to make an early diagnosis for initiating treatment with high dose vitamin E to avoid severe neurological deficits.

  18. Functional imaging in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethammer, Martin; Eidelberg, David

    2017-01-01

    Functional imaging has been increasingly used in the study of neurodegenerative diseases as such techniques can elucidate neurochemical and functional changes that cannot be captured with structural imaging. Unlike other neurodegenerative diseases, in Huntington disease (HD) genetic testing allows for diagnostic certainty. Thus, the focus has been on understanding the pathophysiogic processes underlying the development of the disease, as well as the identification of potential biomarkers to monitor disease progression, particularly during the presymptomatic stage. These imaging methods have expanded our understanding of HD beyond dopaminergic deficits and striatal cell loss, and have described alteration in widespread networks relating to motor and cognitive symptoms. In this chapter, we review the current literature on radiotracer and functional magnetic resonance imaging relating to HD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Huntington disease - another chapter rewritten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nance, M.A. [Hennepin County Medical Center and Minneapolis Veterans Administration Medical Center, MN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    To those of us who began life when humans had 48 chromosomes and who began working in genetics when the (by then 46) chromosomes had no bands and chromosome 4 could not reliably be distinguished from chromosome 5, the mere ability to diagnose and correlate the clinical phenotypes of genetic disorders with their molecular genotypes is a source of continuing astonishment and pleasure. Indeed, molecular genetic analysis of neurogenetic disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) has provided a steady stream of challenges and surprises to all who believe the genetic principles that they were taught about these disorders. The paper by Rubinsztein et al. in this issue of the Journal highlights yet another surprise, which was adumbrated even in the initial paper announcing the discovery of the HD gene: incomplete penetrance of HD gene mutations. 59 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Huntington's disease: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Raymund AC

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington disease (HD is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD. The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which

  1. Neuroendocrine Disturbances in Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Nadine; Moutereau, Stéphane; Durr, Alexandra; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tranchant, Christine; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Morin, Françoise; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Maison, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is a severe inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized, in addition to neurological impairment, by weight loss suggesting endocrine disturbances. The aims of this study were to look for neuroendocrine disturbances in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and to determine the relationship with weight loss seen in HD Methods and Finding We compared plasma levels of hormones from the five pituitary axes in 219 patients with genetically documented HD and in 71 sex- and age-matched controls. Relationships between hormone levels and disease severity, including weight-loss severity, were evaluated. Growth hormone (GH) and standard deviation score of insulin-like growth factor 1 (SDS IGF-1) were significantly higher in patients than in controls (0.25 (0.01–5.89) vs. 0.15 (0.005–4.89) ng/ml, p = 0.013 and 0.16±1.02 vs. 0.06±0.91, p = 0.039; respectively). Cortisol was higher (p = 0.002) in patients (399.14±160.5 nmol/L vs. 279.8±130.1 nmol/L), whereas no differences were found for other hormone axes. In patients, elevations in GH and IGF-1 and decreases in thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine and testosterone (in men) were associated with severity of impairments (Independence scale, Functional score, Total Functional Capacity, Total Motor score, Behavioral score). Only GH was independently associated with body mass index (β = −0.26, p = 0.001). Conclusion Our data suggest that the thyrotropic and in men gonadotropic axes are altered in HD according to the severity of the disease. The somatotropic axis is overactive even in patients with early disease, and could be related to the weight loss seen in HD patients. PMID:19319184

  2. Progress and challenges in RNA interference therapy for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Scott Q

    2009-08-01

    Huntington disease is an incurable, dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by polyglutamine repeat expansion in the huntingtin protein. Reducing mutant huntingtin expression may offer a treatment for Huntington disease. RNA interference has emerged as a powerful method to silence dominant disease genes. As such, it is being developed as a prospective Huntington disease therapy. Here I discuss the current progress and important remaining challenges of RNA interference therapy for Huntington disease.

  3. Stem cells from wildtype and Friedreich's ataxia mice present similar neuroprotective properties in dorsal root ganglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Jones

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative disorders share a common susceptibility to oxidative stress, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson Disease, Huntington Disease and Friedreich's ataxia. In a previous work, we proved that stem cell-conditioned medium increased the survival of cells isolated from Friedreich's ataxia patients, when submitted to oxidative stress. The aim of the present work is to confirm this same effect in dorsal root ganglia cells isolated from YG8 mice, a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia. In this disorder, the neurons of the dorsal root ganglia are the first to degenerate. Also, in this work we cultured mesenchymal stem cells isolated from YG8 mice, in order to compare them with their wildtype counterpart. To this end, dorsal root ganglia primary cultures isolated from YG8 mice were exposed to oxidative stress and cultured with conditioned medium from either wildtype or YG8 stem cells. As a result, the conditioned medium increased the survival of the dorsal root ganglia cells. This coincided with an increase in oxidative stress-related markers and frataxin expression levels. BDNF, NT3 and NT4 trophic factors were detected in the conditioned medium of both wild-type and YG8 stem cells, all which bind to the various neuronal cell types present in the dorsal root ganglia. No differences were observed in the stem cells isolated from wildtype and YG8 mice. The results presented confirm the possibility that autologous stem cell transplantation may be a viable therapeutic approach in protecting dorsal root ganglia neurons of Friedreich's ataxia patients.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with oculomotor apraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a common form of ataxia in Portugal and Japan. Type 2 is estimated to occur in 1 ... Reviewed : April 2015 Published : March 6, 2018 The resources on this site should not be used as a ... Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  6. Friedreich ataxia: dysarthria profile and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Bettina; Ackermann, Hermann; Berg, Daniela; Lindig, Tobias; Schölderle, Theresa; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2013-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most frequent recessive ataxia in the Western world. Dysarthria is a cardinal feature of FRDA, often leading to severe impairments in daily functioning, but its exact characteristics are only poorly understood so far. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of dysarthria severity and the profile of speech motor deficits in 20 patients with a genetic diagnosis of FRDA based on a carefully selected battery of speaking tasks and two widely used paraspeech tasks, i.e., oral diadochokinesis and sustained vowel productions. Perceptual ratings of the speech samples identified respiration, voice quality, voice instability, articulation, and tempo as the most affected speech dimensions. Whereas vocal instability predicted ataxia severity, tempo turned out as a significant correlate of disease duration. Furthermore, articulation predicted the overall intelligibility score as determined by a systematic speech pathology assessment tool. In contrast, neurologists' ratings of intelligibility--a component of the "Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia"--were found to be related to perceived speech tempo. Obviously, clinicians are more sensitive to slowness of speech than to any other feature of spoken language during dysarthria evaluation. Our results suggest that different components of speech production and trunk/limb motor functions are differentially susceptible to FRDA pathology. Furthermore, evidence emerged that paraspeech tasks do not allow for an adequate scaling of speech deficits in FRDA.

  7. Unmasking adrenoleukodystrophy in a cohort of cerebellar ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hao Chen

    Full Text Available Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD is a rare and progressive neurogenetic disease that may manifest disparate symptoms. The present study aims at investigating the role of ataxic variant of ALD (AVALD in patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, as well as characterizing their clinical features that distinguish AVALD from other cerebellar ataxias. Mutations in the ATP binding cassette subfamily D member 1 gene (ABCD1 were ascertained in 516 unrelated patients with ataxia. The patients were categorized into three groups: molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia (n = 118, sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions (n = 296, and sporadic ataxia without autonomic dysfunctions (n = 102. Brain MRIs were scrutinized for white matter hyperintensity (WMH in the parieto-occipital lobes, frontal lobes, corticospinal tracts, pons, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres. Two ABCD1 mutations (p.S108L and p.P623fs previously linked to cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy but not AVALD were identified. ALD accounts for 0.85% (1/118 of the patients with molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia and 0.34% (1/296 of the patients with sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions. WMH in the corticospinal tracts and WMH in the cerebellar hemispheres were strongly associated with AVALD rather than other ataxias. To conclude, ALD accounts for approximately 0.39% (2/516 of adult-onset cerebellar ataxias. This study expands the mutational spectrum of AVALD and underscores the importance of considering ALD as a potential etiology of cerebellar ataxia.

  8. Unmasking adrenoleukodystrophy in a cohort of cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Hao; Lee, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Jin-An

    2017-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a rare and progressive neurogenetic disease that may manifest disparate symptoms. The present study aims at investigating the role of ataxic variant of ALD (AVALD) in patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, as well as characterizing their clinical features that distinguish AVALD from other cerebellar ataxias. Mutations in the ATP binding cassette subfamily D member 1 gene (ABCD1) were ascertained in 516 unrelated patients with ataxia. The patients were categorized into three groups: molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia (n = 118), sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions (n = 296), and sporadic ataxia without autonomic dysfunctions (n = 102). Brain MRIs were scrutinized for white matter hyperintensity (WMH) in the parieto-occipital lobes, frontal lobes, corticospinal tracts, pons, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres. Two ABCD1 mutations (p.S108L and p.P623fs) previously linked to cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy but not AVALD were identified. ALD accounts for 0.85% (1/118) of the patients with molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia and 0.34% (1/296) of the patients with sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions. WMH in the corticospinal tracts and WMH in the cerebellar hemispheres were strongly associated with AVALD rather than other ataxias. To conclude, ALD accounts for approximately 0.39% (2/516) of adult-onset cerebellar ataxias. This study expands the mutational spectrum of AVALD and underscores the importance of considering ALD as a potential etiology of cerebellar ataxia. PMID:28481932

  9. Unmasking adrenoleukodystrophy in a cohort of cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Hao; Lee, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Jin-An; Liao, Yi-Chu; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a rare and progressive neurogenetic disease that may manifest disparate symptoms. The present study aims at investigating the role of ataxic variant of ALD (AVALD) in patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, as well as characterizing their clinical features that distinguish AVALD from other cerebellar ataxias. Mutations in the ATP binding cassette subfamily D member 1 gene (ABCD1) were ascertained in 516 unrelated patients with ataxia. The patients were categorized into three groups: molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia (n = 118), sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions (n = 296), and sporadic ataxia without autonomic dysfunctions (n = 102). Brain MRIs were scrutinized for white matter hyperintensity (WMH) in the parieto-occipital lobes, frontal lobes, corticospinal tracts, pons, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar hemispheres. Two ABCD1 mutations (p.S108L and p.P623fs) previously linked to cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy but not AVALD were identified. ALD accounts for 0.85% (1/118) of the patients with molecularly unassigned hereditary ataxia and 0.34% (1/296) of the patients with sporadic ataxia with autonomic dysfunctions. WMH in the corticospinal tracts and WMH in the cerebellar hemispheres were strongly associated with AVALD rather than other ataxias. To conclude, ALD accounts for approximately 0.39% (2/516) of adult-onset cerebellar ataxias. This study expands the mutational spectrum of AVALD and underscores the importance of considering ALD as a potential etiology of cerebellar ataxia.

  10. Direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways: shared ideas but different functions in motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eJiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The impressive precision of mammalian limb movements relies on internal feedback pathways that convey information about ongoing motor output to cerebellar circuits. The spino-cerebellar tracts (SCT in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord have long been considered canonical neural substrates for the conveyance of internal feedback signals. Here we consider the distinct features of an indirect spino-cerebellar route, via the brainstem lateral reticular nucleus (LRN, and the implications of this pre-cerebellar ‘detour’ for the execution and evolution of limb motor control. Both direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways signal spinal interneuronal activity to the cerebellum during movements, but evidence suggests that direct SCT neurons are mainly modulated by rhythmic activity, whereas the LRN also receives information from systems active during postural adjustment, reaching and grasping. Thus, while direct and indirect spino-cerebellar circuits can both be regarded as internal copy pathways, it seems likely that the direct system is principally dedicated to rhythmic motor acts like locomotion, while the indirect system also provides a means of pre-cerebellar integration relevant to the execution and coordination of de

  11. Rhythmic activity of feline dorsal and ventral spinocerebellar tract neurons during fictive motor actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedirchuk, Brent; Stecina, Katinka; Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl

    2013-01-01

    nerves. Spinocerebellar tract cells with cell bodies located in the lumbar segments were identified by electrophysiological techniques and examined by extra- and intracellular microelectrode recordings. During fictive locomotion, 57/81 DSCT and 30/30 VSCT neurons showed phasic, cycle-related activity...

  12. Epigenetic modifications as novel therapeutic targets for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengli; Fischhaber, Paula L; Guo, Caixia; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2014-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a late-onset, autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptomatology. The earliest stage of Huntington's disease is marked by alterations in gene expression, which partially results from dysregulated epigenetic modifications. In past decades, altered epigenetic markers including histone modifications (acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation and phosphorylation) and DNA modifications (cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation) have been reported as important epigenetic features in patients and multiple animal models of Huntington's disease. Drugs aimed to correct some of those alterations have shown promise in treating Huntington's disease. This article discusses the field of epigenetics for potential Huntington's disease interventions and presents the most recent findings in this area.

  13. Modeling Huntington disease in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    Yeast have been extensively used to model aspects of protein folding diseases, yielding novel mechanistic insights and identifying promising candidate therapeutic targets. In particular, the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington disease (HD), which is caused by the abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (htt) protein, has been widely studied in yeast. This work has led to the identification of several promising therapeutic targets and compounds that have been validated in mammalian cells, Drosophila and rodent models of HD. Here we discuss the development of yeast models of mutant htt toxicity and misfolding, as well as the mechanistic insights gleaned from this simple model. The role of yeast prions in the toxicity/misfolding of mutant htt is also highlighted. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the application of HD yeast models in both genetic and chemical screens, and the fruitful results obtained from these approaches. Finally, we discuss the future of yeast in neurodegenerative research, in the context of HD and other diseases. PMID:22052350

  14. Aberrant palmitoylation in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shaun S; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. HD is characterized by striatal atrophy and is associated with motor, cognitive and psychiatric deficits. In the presence of the HD mutation, the interactions between huntingtin (HTT) and huntingtin interacting protein 14 (HIP14 or DHHC17) and HIP14-like (DHHC13, a HIP14 orthologue), palmitoyl acyltransferases for HTT, are disturbed, resulting in reduced palmitoylation of HTT. Genetic ablation of either Hip14 or Hip14l recapitulates many features of HD, including striatal atrophy and motor deficits. However, there are no changes in palmitoylation of HTT in either mouse model and, subsequently, the similarities between the phenotypes of these two mouse models and the HD mouse model are believed to result from underpalmitoylation of other HIP14 and HIP14L substrates. HTT acts as a modulator of HIP14 activity such that in the presence of the HD mutation, HIP14 is less active. Consequently, HIP14 substrates are less palmitoylated, leading to neuronal toxicity. This suggests that altered HIP14-HTT and HIP14L-HTT interactions in the presence of the HD mutation reduces palmitoylation and promotes mislocalization of HTT and other HIP14/HIP14L substrates. Ultimately, HD may be, in part, a disease of altered palmitoylation.

  15. Movement sequencing in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Long, Jeffrey D; Lourens, Spencer G; Stout, Julie C; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-08-01

    To examine longitudinal changes in movement sequencing in prodromal Huntington's disease (HD) participants (795 prodromal HD; 225 controls) from the PREDICT-HD study. Prodromal HD participants were tested over seven annual visits and were stratified into three groups (low, medium, high) based on their CAG-Age Product (CAP) score, which indicates likely increasing proximity to diagnosis. A cued movement sequence task assessed the impact of advance cueing on response initiation and execution via three levels of advance information. Compared to controls, all CAP groups showed longer initiation and movement times across all conditions at baseline, demonstrating a disease gradient for the majority of outcomes. Across all conditions, the high CAP group had the highest mean for baseline testing, but also demonstrated an increase in movement time across the study. For initiation time, the high CAP group showed the highest mean baseline time across all conditions, but also faster decreasing rates of change over time. With progress to diagnosis, participants may increasingly use compensatory strategies, as evidenced by faster initiation. However, this occurred in conjunction with slowed execution times, suggesting a decline in effectively accessing control processes required to translate movement into effective execution.

  16. Language functions in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoll, K; Caspary, P; Lange, H W; Noth, J

    1988-12-01

    A comprehensive language test battery (Aachen Aphasia Test) was administered to 45 patients in the early, middle or later stages of Huntington's disease (HD) and to 20 control subjects. In spontaneous speech, many HD patients exhibited a loss of conversational initiative. Dysarthria was a common finding. Reading skills were found to be impaired mainly as a consequence of dysarthria; some HD patients displayed visual dyslexia. In addition to the characteristic disturbances of writing skills due to the choreiform movement disorder, the writing of HD patients with advanced dementia indicated constructional dysgraphia, characterized by frequent omissions, perseverations and substitutions. HD patients exhibited no evidence of word-finding difficulty or other semantic deficits in spontaneous speech. There was, however, a marked impairment in visual confrontation naming, with a significant rise in naming error rate as the disease progressed in severity. In most instances, the inappropriate names referred to an object visually similar to the target object, suggesting that visual misperception is the major cause of the naming disorder in HD. Syntactical structure of spontaneous speech was typically reduced to short, simple sentence construction. Verbal stereotypes were only rarely encountered and occurred late in the course of the disease. Tests of language comprehension reflected the general degree of dementia. It is concluded that there are no primary language changes in HD. Instead, a variety of language impairments develop secondary to other neurological and neuropsychological changes.

  17. Mapping energy poverty in Huntington, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicoat, Elizabeth Anne

    Energy poverty is a growing phenomenon culminating from the combination of low to mid household income, deteriorating housing structures and rising household energy costs. Energy prices are increasing for all households, but the burden is proportionally larger for those with low to mid income. These groups must sacrifice to afford energy, and are often unable or do not have the autonomy to make structural improvements, especially if they rent their home. Data on residential dwellings from the Cabell County Tax Assessor's Office was used within a geographic information system to map where energy poverty likely exists within the city limits of Huntington, WV. It was found that one fifth of Huntington households are at a high risk of energy poverty, primarily located across the northern section of the city and in the center, surrounding Marshall University, Downtown and Cabell Huntington Hospital.

  18. Prevalence of ataxia in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Kristin E; Stoyanov, Cristina T; Marasigan, Rhul; Jenkins, Mary E; Konczak, Jürgen; Morton, Susanne M; Bastian, Amy J

    2014-01-07

    To estimate the prevalence of childhood ataxia resulting from both genetic and acquired causes. A systematic review was conducted following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) statement. Five databases were searched for articles reporting a frequency measure (e.g., prevalence, incidence) of ataxia in children. Included articles were first grouped according to the World Health Organization (WHO) regions and subsequently classified according to etiology (genetic, acquired, or mixed). Each article was assessed for its risk of bias on the domains of sampling, measurement, and analysis. Incidence values were converted to prevalence estimates whenever possible. European prevalence estimates for different etiologies of ataxia were summed to gauge the overall prevalence of childhood ataxia. One hundred fifteen articles were included in the review. More than 50% of the data originated from the Europe WHO region. Data from this region also showed the least susceptibility to bias. Little data were available for Africa and Southeast Asia. The prevalence of acquired ataxias was found to vary more greatly across regions than the genetic ataxias. Ataxic cerebral palsy was found to be a significant contributor to the overall prevalence of childhood ataxia across WHO regions. The prevalence of childhood ataxias in Europe was estimated to be ∼26/100,000 children and likely reflects a minimum prevalence worldwide. The findings show that ataxia is a common childhood motor disorder with a higher prevalence than previously assumed. More research concerning the epidemiology, assessment, and treatment of childhood ataxia is warranted.

  19. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  20. Novel Diagnostic Paradigms for Friedreich Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatti, Karlla W.; Deutsch, Eric C.; Lynch, David R.; Farmer, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most common inherited ataxia, with a wide phenotypic spectrum. It is generally caused by GAA expansions on both alleles of FXN, but a small percentage of patients are compound heterozygotes for a pathogenic expansion and a point mutation. Two recent diagnostic innovations are further characterizing individuals with the phenotype but without the classic genotypes. First, lateral-flow immunoassay is able to quantify the frataxin protein, thereby further characterizing these atypical individuals as likely affected or not affected, and providing some correlation to phenotype. It also holds promise as a biomarker for clinical trials in which the investigative agent increases frataxin. Second, gene dosage analysis and the identification of affected individuals with gene deletions introduce a novel genetic mechanism of disease. Both tests are now clinically available and suggest a new diagnostic paradigm for the disorder. Genetic counseling issues and future diagnostic testing approaches are considered as well. PMID:22752491

  1. [Genetic bases in Huntington disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, J

    1999-04-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative syndrome of late appearance in 80% of the cases. Its clinical course shows motor and cognitive disorders which lead to total incapacity of the individual 10 to 15 years after the appearance of the first syndromes. From a genetic point of view, this disease is of autosomic dominant inheritance with complete penetration. The gene (IT15) is localized in the short arm of chromosome 4 in the telemaric region 4p16.3 and it is known that the mutation is produced by an increase in the number of trinucleotides CAG (glutamine) localized in the 5' end of the gene, in the first exon. In the general population these are repeated in a number of less than 30 repetitions and in the disease population in a number greater than 36 and, in some cases, even greater than 100 repetitions. These sequences are unstable from one generation to another and this fact may explain the phenomenon of genetic anticipation shown in this disease since there is an inversely proportional correlation between the number of repetitions and the age of appearance of the first symptoms. The gene codifies for a protein known as "huntingtina" which is expressed not only in brain but also in different tissues. Although the function remains unknown, it is known that it is bound to other proteins related to the transmission of neuron signals and to the regulation of neuron death (apoptosis) among others. The defect is produced by a gain in function closely related to the number of repetitions. At present, presymptomatic and prenatal diagnosis of the disease may be achieved since the reliability of the studies is practically 100%. Nonetheless, the demand is lower than expected and this may be due to psychologic, social and legal problems, together with the lack of adequate infrastructure for completely guaranteeing the performance of these studies.

  2. Pharmacometabolomic signature of ataxia SCA1 mouse model and lithium effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Perroud

    Full Text Available We have shown that lithium treatment improves motor coordination in a spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 disease mouse model (Sca1(154Q/+. To learn more about disease pathogenesis and molecular contributions to the neuroprotective effects of lithium, we investigated metabolomic profiles of cerebellar tissue and plasma from SCA1-model treated and untreated mice. Metabolomic analyses of wild-type and Sca1(154Q/+ mice, with and without lithium treatment, were performed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and BinBase mass spectral annotations. We detected 416 metabolites, of which 130 were identified. We observed specific metabolic perturbations in Sca1(154Q/+ mice and major effects of lithium on metabolism, centrally and peripherally. Compared to wild-type, Sca1(154Q/+ cerebella metabolic profile revealed changes in glucose, lipids, and metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and purines. Fewer metabolic differences were noted in Sca1(154Q/+ mouse plasma versus wild-type. In both genotypes, the major lithium responses in cerebellum involved energy metabolism, purines, unsaturated free fatty acids, and aromatic and sulphur-containing amino acids. The largest metabolic difference with lithium was a 10-fold increase in ascorbate levels in wild-type cerebella (p<0.002, with lower threonate levels, a major ascorbate catabolite. In contrast, Sca1(154Q/+ mice that received lithium showed no elevated cerebellar ascorbate levels. Our data emphasize that lithium regulates a variety of metabolic pathways, including purine, oxidative stress and energy production pathways. The purine metabolite level, reduced in the Sca1(154Q/+ mice and restored upon lithium treatment, might relate to lithium neuroprotective properties.

  3. Kas Huntington oli prohvet? / Priit Simson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Simson Priit, 1977-

    2008-01-01

    Autor käsitleb Samuel Huntingtoni teese ning leiab, et tegelikult Huntington ei pakkunud õigustust islamiriikide ründamisele, vaid pigem hoiatas tsivilisatsioonide siseasjusse sekkumise, tekkida võiva ahelreaktsiooni eest, kus üks tsivilisatsiooni liige tõmbab sõtta ka teise

  4. Destination and source memory in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Caillaud, M.; Verny, C.; Fasotti, L.; Allain, P.

    2016-01-01

    Destination memory refers to the recall of the destination of previously relayed information, and source memory refers to the recollection of the origin of received information. We compared both memory systems in Huntington's disease (HD) participants. For this, HD participants and healthy adults

  5. Remifentanil in a patient with Huntington's chorea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    both her father and one of her brothers dying of complications of Huntington's chorea at the ages of 50 years and 45 years respectively. The aetiology of her quadriparesis was ... extension in addition to her quadreparesis due to the involvement of her cervical laminae. Her Mallampati score was. 2. She had a 30 year history ...

  6. Revisiting the neuropsychiatry of Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Antonio Lucio; Souza, Leonardo Cruz de; Rocha, Natalia Pessoa; Furr-Stimming, Erin; Lauterbach, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease classified under the choreas. Besides motor symptoms, HD is marked by cognitive and behavioral symptoms, impacting patients' functional capacity. The progression of cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptoms occur in parallel with neurodegeneration. The nature of these symptoms is very dynamic, and the major clinical challenges include executive dysfunction, apathy, depression and irritability. Herei...

  7. Chronic GM2 gangliosidosis masquerading as atypical Friedreich ataxia: clinical, morphologic, and biochemical studies of nine cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, J P; Grabowski, G A; Gordon, R E; Bender, A N; Desnick, R J

    1981-07-01

    A progressive spinocerebellar degenerative disorder was characterized in nine patients, aged 11 to 37 years, from four unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish families; affected individuals had markedly deficient beta-hexosaminidase A activity. Symptoms included early onset of cerebellar signs (tremor, incoordination, and dysarthia) and, with maturity, the development of upper and lower motor neuron disorders, marked dysarthia, and ataxia. Three older patients, aged 26, 32, and 37 years, had dementia or recurrent psychotic episodes. Membrane-bound lamellar cytoplasmic inclusions, consistent with lysosomal ganglioside accumulation, were observed in rectal ganglia. The activity of beta-hexosaminidase A was markedly deficient in all sources analyzed. Parents had activities consistent with heterozygosity, confirming autosomal-recessive transmission of the beta-hexosaminidase A-deficient gene and the adult variant disorder. Residual beta-hexosaminidase A activity, partially purified by anion-exchange chromatography from cultured skin fibroblasts of the affected individuals, was heat-labile and co-electrophoresed with normal beta-hexosaminidase A. These findings suggest that these patients were allelic for a new beta-hexosaminidase A mutation and may represent a genetic compound of this allele and the allele causing Tay-Sachs disease.

  8. Silencing Huntington's chorea: Is RNA Interference a Potential Cure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlinde A. Metz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1872, George Huntington described Huntington's disease as characterized by motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairments. Huntington's disease is a dominant and autosomal mutation on chromosome 4 featuring the insertion of numerous CAG repeats. CAG codes for the amino acid, glutmanine that forms part of the Huntingtin protein (htt. Excess glutamine attachments make htt prone to accumulate in neurons. Three genes can be considered when developing therapies for Huntington's disease. They include targeting the symptoms of the disease, the progression of the disease and the cause of the disease. By using RNA interference (RNAi, the cause of the disease can be targeted. RNAi is a method that could potentially silence the formation of abnormal htt. This paper will discuss how RNAi could potentially cure Huntington's disease, by describing the genetic and proteinomic basis of Huntington's disease, the function of RNAi in Huntington's disease and the problems of benefits of RNAi. Preliminary work using RNAi in transgenic mice has shown a decrease in the behavioural expression of the mutant Huntington gene. There are several limitations associated with using RNAi as a gene therapy. For example, the effects of RNAi are short lived. A transposition system such as Sleeping Beauty can be used to increase the integration of the gene, however, for patients who currently have Huntington's disease, RNAi may potentially be used in combination with drugs or other treatments to target both symptoms and the underlying cause of Huntington's disease. This combination could eventually alleviate many painful symptoms associated with Huntington's disease and could even stop the progressive neurodegeneration of Huntington's disease. This review concludes that a substantial amount of new research is still necessary before RNAi is directly applicable to human patients with Huntington's disease.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with ataxia PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description PRICKLE1 -related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia is a rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent ...

  10. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Mark Pierson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28, a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  11. A Metabolic Study of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasree Nambron

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease patients have a number of peripheral manifestations suggestive of metabolic and endocrine abnormalities. We, therefore, investigated a number of metabolic factors in a 24-hour study of Huntington's disease gene carriers (premanifest and moderate stage II/III and controls.Control (n = 15, premanifest (n = 14 and stage II/III (n = 13 participants were studied with blood sampling over a 24-hour period. A battery of clinical tests including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose distribution was measured using magnetic resonance imaging. We quantified fasting baseline concentrations of glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein (a, fatty acids, amino acids, lactate and osteokines. Leptin and ghrelin were quantified in fasting samples and after a standardised meal. We assessed glucose, insulin, growth hormone and cortisol concentrations during a prolonged oral glucose tolerance test.We found no highly significant differences in carbohydrate, protein or lipid metabolism markers between healthy controls, premanifest and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects. For some markers (osteoprotegerin, tyrosine, lysine, phenylalanine and arginine there is a suggestion (p values between 0.02 and 0.05 that levels are higher in patients with premanifest HD, but not moderate HD. However, given the large number of statistical tests performed interpretation of these findings must be cautious.Contrary to previous studies that showed altered levels of metabolic markers in patients with Huntington's disease, our study did not demonstrate convincing evidence of abnormalities in any of the markers examined. Our analyses were restricted to Huntington's disease patients not taking neuroleptics, anti-depressants or other medication affecting metabolic pathways. Even with the modest sample sizes studied, the lack of highly significant results, despite many being tested, suggests that

  12. A Metabolic Study of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambron, Rajasree; Silajdžić, Edina; Kalliolia, Eirini; Ottolenghi, Chris; Hindmarsh, Peter; Hill, Nathan R; Costelloe, Seán J; Martin, Nicholas G; Positano, Vincenzo; Watt, Hilary C; Frost, Chris; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease patients have a number of peripheral manifestations suggestive of metabolic and endocrine abnormalities. We, therefore, investigated a number of metabolic factors in a 24-hour study of Huntington's disease gene carriers (premanifest and moderate stage II/III) and controls. Control (n = 15), premanifest (n = 14) and stage II/III (n = 13) participants were studied with blood sampling over a 24-hour period. A battery of clinical tests including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose distribution was measured using magnetic resonance imaging. We quantified fasting baseline concentrations of glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein (a), fatty acids, amino acids, lactate and osteokines. Leptin and ghrelin were quantified in fasting samples and after a standardised meal. We assessed glucose, insulin, growth hormone and cortisol concentrations during a prolonged oral glucose tolerance test. We found no highly significant differences in carbohydrate, protein or lipid metabolism markers between healthy controls, premanifest and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects. For some markers (osteoprotegerin, tyrosine, lysine, phenylalanine and arginine) there is a suggestion (p values between 0.02 and 0.05) that levels are higher in patients with premanifest HD, but not moderate HD. However, given the large number of statistical tests performed interpretation of these findings must be cautious. Contrary to previous studies that showed altered levels of metabolic markers in patients with Huntington's disease, our study did not demonstrate convincing evidence of abnormalities in any of the markers examined. Our analyses were restricted to Huntington's disease patients not taking neuroleptics, anti-depressants or other medication affecting metabolic pathways. Even with the modest sample sizes studied, the lack of highly significant results, despite many being tested, suggests that the majority

  13. Spinocerebellar degeneration and slow saccades in three generations of a kinship: clinical and electrophysiologic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enaytolah Niakan

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Four members of a family with spinocerebellar degeneration and slow saccadic eye movements are described. Detailed electrophysiological studies revealed abnormalities of neurological pathways not apparent clinically. The patients had slow saccades as mesasured electrophysiologically, as well as absence of rapid eye movements (REM despite REM stages of sleep. These studies suggest that although saccadic eye movement and REM are mediated through the pontine paramedian reticular formation, other characteristics of REM sleep are not necessarily mediated through the same neurons.

  14. Ataxia caused by amiodarone in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, J V; Ibrahim, Amin; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2008-05-01

    Amiodarone is recommended for the cardioversion of atrial fibrillation and prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with structural heart disease, coronary artery disease or left ventricular dysfunction. It has well-recognised side-effects on the skin, lungs, liver, thyroid and eyes. Neurological side-effects, including ataxia and neuropathy, also occur, and may be more prevalent in older patients. These side-effects are reversible after cessation of amiodarone. Monitoring of amiodarone therapy should include assessment of the central and peripheral nervous system especially in older patients.

  15. MR imaging and spectroscopy in juvenile Huntington disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schapiro, Mark; Doescher, Jason [Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Cecil, Kim M.; Kiefer, Alaina M. [Imaging Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Jones, Blaise V. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Juvenile Huntington disease manifests differently from adult Huntington disease and has more variability in presentation. We describe a child with cognitive decline and adventitial movements in whom Huntington disease was confirmed with genetic testing. MR imaging showed abnormal T2 prolongation in the putamina and progressive caudate atrophy, and MR spectroscopy revealed elevated myoinositol and diminished N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, and phosphocreatine. Imaging findings of caudate atrophy and abnormal T2 prolongation in the putamina with MR spectroscopy findings consistent with dense gliosis can be helpful indicators of juvenile Huntington disease. (orig.)

  16. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoem, Gry; Koht, Jeanette

    2017-10-31

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation on the X chromosome. The major signs and symptoms are tremor, ataxia and parkinsonism. Up to one in 2 000 persons over 50 years of age will develop the syndrome. There is reason to believe that too few individuals in Norway undergo testing for this condition.

  17. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and

  18. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  19. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  20. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the neuro-degenerative and cardio-degenerative disease, Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shannon; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Jansson, Patric J; Richardson, Des R; Huang, Michael L-H

    2017-08-04

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is essential for maintaining healthy cellular function and survival. The detrimental involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in neuro-degenerative diseases has recently been highlighted in human conditions, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is another neuro-degenerative, but also cardio-degenerative condition, where mitochondrial dysfunction plays a crucial role in disease progression. Deficient expression of the mitochondrial protein, frataxin, is the primary cause of FA, which leads to adverse alterations in whole cell and mitochondrial iron metabolism. Dys-regulation of iron metabolism in these compartments, results in the accumulation of inorganic iron deposits in the mitochondrial matrix that is thought to potentiate oxidative damage observed in FA. Therefore, the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis is crucial in the progression of neuro-degenerative conditions, particularly in FA. In this review, vital mitochondrial homeostatic processes and their roles in FA pathogenesis will be discussed. These include mitochondrial iron processing, mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission processes), mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial energy production and calcium metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spino-Cerebellar Degeneration, Hormonal Disorder, Hypogonadism, Deaf Mutism and Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Post mortem examinations were done on two adult siblings (one female and one male) who had been clinically described as suffering from mental handicap, deaf mutism, ataxia, hypogonadism, and hormonal disorders. (DB)

  3. Auditory perception in individuals with Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Gary; Corben, Louise; Barker, Elizabeth; Carew, Peter; Chisari, Donella; Rogers, Meghan; Dowell, Richard; Jamaluddin, Saiful; Bryson, Rochelle; Delatycki, Martin B

    2010-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an inherited ataxia with a range of progressive features including axonal degeneration of sensory nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate auditory perception in affected individuals. Fourteen subjects with genetically defined FRDA participated. Two control groups, one consisting of healthy, normally hearing individuals and another comprised of subjects with sensorineural hearing loss, were also assessed. Auditory processing was evaluated using structured tasks designed to reveal the listeners' ability to perceive temporal and spectral cues. Findings were then correlated with open-set speech understanding. Nine of 14 individuals with FRDA showed evidence of auditory processing disorder. Gap and amplitude modulation detection levels in these subjects were significantly elevated, indicating impaired encoding of rapid signal changes. Electrophysiologic findings (auditory brainstem response, ABR) also reflected disrupted neural activity. Speech understanding was significantly affected in these listeners and the degree of disruption was related to temporal processing ability. Speech analyses indicated that timing cues (notably consonant voice onset time and vowel duration) were most affected. The results suggest that auditory pathway abnormality is a relatively common consequence of FRDA. Regular auditory evaluation should therefore be part of the management regime for all affected individuals. This assessment should include both ABR testing, which can provide insights into the degree to which auditory neural activity is disrupted, and some functional measure of hearing capacity such as speech perception assessment, which can quantify the disorder and provide a basis for intervention. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Ataxia telangiectasia: presentation and diagnostic delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, Rebecca; Pasalodos, Sara; Suri, Mohnish; Bush, Andy; Bhatt, Jayesh M

    2017-04-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare progressive, multisystem genetic disease. Families of children with ultra-rare diseases often experience significant diagnostic delays. We reviewed the diagnostic process for A-T in order to identify causes of delay in an attempt to facilitate earlier identification of A-T in the future. A retrospective case note review of 79 children at the National Paediatric A-T clinic seen since May 2009. Data were collected on the nature and age of initial symptoms, the age at first presentation, measurement of alpha feto-protein (AFP) and age of genetic diagnostic confirmation. At presentation, 71 children (90%) had ataxia. The median presentation delay (from first parental concern to presentation) was 8 months (range 0-118 months), and the median diagnostic delay (genetic confirmation of diagnosis) was 12 months (range 1-109 months). There are significant delays in presentation and diagnostic confirmation of A-T. A greater awareness of A-T and early measurement of AFP may help to improve this. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Síndrome de Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Batista da Silva

    1971-06-01

    Full Text Available A ataxia-telangiectasia, doença de Mme. Louis-Bar, é caracterizada pela associação de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, em geral com início na primeira infância, telangiectasas óculo-cutâneas, movimentos coreoatetósicos, tendência a infecções repetidas do sistema respiratório, retardo estaturo-ponderal, demenciação. São mais ou menos freqüentes os tumores do sistema reticuloendotelial. A doença é geralmente familiar, transmitida por genes recessivos, autossômicos, não ligados ao sexo. A alteração bioquímica mais encontrada consiste na diminuição ou ausência completa da fração A das gamaglobulinas, bem como na perturbação das reações de hipersensibilidade retardada. Os AA. relatam o estudo clínico, biológico e pneumencefalográfico de uma criança de 3 anos de idade, apresentando essa enfermidade desde os 18 meses de vida, sem antecedentes familiares.

  6. Personality and Neuropsychological Profiles in Friedreich Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayah, Sabrina; Rotgé, Jean-Yves; Francisque, Hélène; Gargiulo, Marcela; Czernecki, Virginie; Justo, Damian; Lahlou-Laforet, Khadija; Hahn, Valérie; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pelissolo, Antoine; Fossati, Philippe; Durr, Alexandra

    2018-04-01

    Friedreich ataxia, an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease, is the most frequent inherited ataxia. Many studies have attempted to identify cognitive and affective changes associated with the disease, but conflicting results have been obtained, depending on the tests used and because many of the samples studied were very small. We investigated personality and neuropsychological characteristics in a cohort of 47 patients with genetically confirmed disease. The neuropsychological battery assessed multiple cognition domains: processing speed, attention, working memory, executive functions, verbal memory, vocabulary, visual reasoning, emotional recognition, and social cognition. Personality was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory, and depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. We found deficits of sustained attention, processing speed, semantic capacities, and verbal fluency only partly attributable to motor deficit or depressed mood. Visual reasoning, memory, and learning were preserved. Emotional processes and social cognition were unimpaired. We also detected a change in automatic processes, such as reading. Personality traits were characterized by high persistence and low self-transcendence. The mild cognitive impairment observed may be a developmental rather than degenerative problem, due to early cerebellum dysfunction, with the impairment of cognitive and emotional processing. Disease manifestations at crucial times for personality development may also have an important impact on personality traits.

  7. [Sporadic juvenile forms of Huntington's chorea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, A P; Goncharov, V D; Burtianskii, D L; Zakhar'ev, Iu M

    1980-01-01

    Six patients with Huntington's chorea in the age of 15-24 years old, suffered from diffusive choreic hyperkynesis with slowly progressive dementia. The development of this disease in childhood and adolescence was atypical, as nobody in the family and in kin sufferred from it and it was difficult to diagnose the disease. Recognition of the disease was promoted by pneumoencephalography, electromyography and memory investigation.

  8. Ataxia cerebelar aguda na criança Acute cerebellar ataxia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriana Moura Ribeiro

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 6 crianças com ataxia cerebelar aguda. Admitem os autores a presença de um fator etiológico de caráter viral comum a todos êles, discutindo os mecanismos patogênicos com base nos casos da literatura. A evolução foi favorável em todos os pacientes, com regressão completa da sintomatologia, dentro do período de 6 a 60 dias.Clinical observations of 6 children with acute cerebellar ataxia and respective laboratorial data are reported. Considerations are made in order to support the hypothesis of involving virus. The evolution of the disorder was a nonfatal one and the patients regained normal cerebellar function within a period of 6 to 60 days.

  9. Assessment of speech in early-onset ataxia : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Marieke J.; Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, T.F.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Keegstra, Anne L.; Burger, Huibert; De Koning, Tom J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine whether paediatric ataxia speech subscores are reliably applicable for international early-onset ataxia (EOA) databases. If so, we reasoned that ataxia speech subscores should be associated with ataxia scores and involve high interobserver agreement,

  10. Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar as alterações vestibulococleares observadas em um caso de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6. O caso foi encaminhado do Hospital de Clínicas para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia de uma Instituição de Ensino e foi submetido aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliações audiológica e vestibular. O caso retrata uma paciente com diagnóstico genético de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6, do sexo feminino, com 57 anos de idade, que referiu desequilíbrio à marcha com tendência a queda para a esquerda, disartria e disfonia. Na avaliação audiológica apresentou configuração audiométrica descendente a partir da frequência de 4kHz e curva timpanométrica do tipo "A" com presença dos reflexos estapedianos bilateralmente. No exame vestibular observou-se na pesquisa da vertigem posicional presença de nistagmo vertical inferior e oblíquo, espontâneo e semiespontâneo múltiplo com características centrais (ausência de latência, paroxismo, fatigabilidade e vertigem, nistagmooptocinético abolido e hiporreflexia à prova calórica. Constataram-se alterações labirínticas que indicaram afecção do sistema vestibular central evidenciando-se a importância dessa avaliação. A existência da possível relação entre os achados com os sintomas vestibulares apresentados pela paciente apontou a relevância do exame labiríntico neste tipo de ataxia uma vez que a presença do nistagmo vertical inferior demonstrou ser frequente neste tipo de patologia.

  11. modelling gait syndrome in huntington's disease: the genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Huntington's disease (HD) which usually affects the patients at middle age results from malfunctioning of the basal ganglia. It is characterized by cognitive impairment, involuntary movements, neuropsychiatric and psychological disturbances. Early motor signs of Huntington's disease typically include the gradual onset of ...

  12. Clinical and genetic data of Huntington disease in Moroccan patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Huntington's disease (HD) occurs worldwide with prevalence varying from 0.1 to 10 /100,000 depending of the ethnic origin. Since no data is available in the Maghreb population, the aim of this study is to describe clinical and genetic characteristics of Huntington patients of Moroccan origin. Methods: Clinical ...

  13. Riluzole in Huntington's disease: a 3-year, randomized controlled study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Dubois, B.; Yebenes, J.G. de; Kremer, H.P.H.; Gaus, W.; Kraus, P.H.; Przuntek, H.; Dib, M.; Doble, A.; Fischer, W.; Ludolph, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We conducted a randomized double-blind trial of riluzole in Huntington's disease to investigate the efficacy of this antiexcitotoxic drug in slowing disease progression. METHODS: The study included 537 adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of Huntington's disease confirmed by

  14. Comprehension of Complex Discourse in Different Stages of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldert, Charlotta; Fors, Angelika; Stroberg, Sofia; Hartelius, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Huntington's disease not only affects motor speech control, but also may have an impact on the ability to produce and understand language in communication. Aims: The ability to comprehend basic and complex discourse was investigated in three different stages of Huntington's disease. Methods & Procedures: In this experimental group…

  15. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H; Kuiper, Marieke J; Lunsing, Roelinka J; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P; Sival, Deborah A

    2014-06-01

    To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean age 10y 5mo SD 3y 11mo). The investigated scales involved the commonly applied International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and PEG-board tests. We investigated the interrelatedness between individual ataxia scales, the influence of age and sex, inter- and intra-observer agreement, and test-retest reliability. Spearman's rank correlations revealed strong correlations between ICARS, SARA BARS, and PEG-board test (all prating scales are reliable, but should include age-dependent interpretation in children up to 12 years of age. To enable longitudinal interpretation of quantitative ataxia rating scales in children, European paediatric normative values are necessary. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  16. 1H MR Spectroscopy in Friedreich's Ataxia and Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, Isabelle; Hutter, Diane; Bushara, Khalaf O.; Clark, H. Brent; Gross, Myron; Eberly, Lynn E.; Gomez, Christopher M.; Öz, Gülin

    2010-01-01

    Background and aim Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) are the two most frequent forms of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias. However, brain metabolism in these disorders is poorly characterized and biomarkers of the disease progression are lacking. We aimed at assessing the neurochemical profile of the pons, the cerebellar hemisphere and the vermis in patients with FRDA and AOA2 to identify potential biomarkers of these diseases. Methods Short-echo, single voxel proton (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy data were acquired from 8 volunteers with FRDA, 9 volunteers with AOA2, and 38 control volunteers at 4T. Disease severity was assessed by the Friedreich's Ataxia Rating Scale (FARS). Results Neuronal loss/dysfunction was indicated in the cerebellar vermis and hemispheres in both diseases by lower total N-acetylaspartate levels than controls. The putative gliosis marker myo-inositol was higher than controls in the vermis and pons in AOA2 and in the vermis in FRDA. Total creatine, another potential gliosis marker, was higher in the cerebellar hemispheres in FRDA relative to controls. Higher glutamine in FRDA and lower glutamate in AOA2 than controls were observed in the vermis, indicating different mechanisms possibly leading to altered glutamatergic neurotransmission. In AOA2, total N-acetylaspartate levels in the cerebellum strongly correlated with the FARS score (p < 0.01). Conclusion Distinct neurochemical patterns were observed in the two patient populations, warranting further studies with larger patient populations to determine if the alterations in metabolite levels observed here may be utilized to monitor disease progression and treatment. PMID:20713024

  17. Ataxia crónica en pediatría

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Erazo Torricelli

    2013-01-01

    Las ataxias crónicas constituyen un grupo heterogéneo de enfermedades, que afectan al niño a diferentes edades. Así las formas congénitas, generalmente no progresivas, se observan desde los primeros meses de vida y se expresan por hipotonía y retraso motor, mucho antes de que la ataxia se haga evidente. La resonancia magnética cerebral puede ser diagnóstica en algunos cuadros, como ocurre con el síndrome de Joubert. El grupo de ataxias hereditarias progresivas, en constante expansión, suelen ...

  18. [Hereditary ataxia and sensory-motor neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Hodzić, Samiha; Zjuzin, Nadezda; Lokmic, Eldan

    2003-01-01

    The authors presented this case because of the determined characteristics in the clinical picture and electrophysiologic finding which refer to spinocerebral degeneration and neuropathia of the hereditary type, and give the possibility of the classification into two nosologic entities. One is Roussey Levy's syndrome, what is the advisable diagnosis of our patient, and another Freidreich's ataxia. Regardless to the impossibility of the establishing of diagnosis by means the specific enzimatic and genetic tests, the authors on the basis of the clinical picture, electromioncurographic findings and data from the literature of the diagnostic ally decided for Freidreich's ataxya. The neuropathy have classified into the hereditary motor sensor neuropathy--HMSN type II and presented its characteristics.

  19. Ataxia heredo-degenerativa associada a hipoacusia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Levy

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available São estudados três irmãos, respectivamente com 16, 8 e 6 anos de idade, todos do sexo masculino, com ataxia heredo-degenerativa associada, em dois dêles, a hipoacusia. Nos antecedentes há referência a moléstia semelhante em um avô e um tio-avô. É discutido o diagnóstico diferencial com a moléstia de Pièrre Marie, a doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth, a síndrome de Refsum e a neurite intersticial hipertrófica, sendo acentuada a semelhança dos casos estudados com a moléstia de Friedreich. São feitos comentários à associação da doença de Friedreich com distúrbios da audição.

  20. Communication and Huntington's Disease: Qualitative Interviews and Focus Groups with Persons with Huntington's Disease, Family Members, and Carers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartelius, Lena; Jonsson, Maria; Rickeberg, Anneli; Laakso, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Background: As an effect of the cognitive, emotional and motor symptoms associated with Huntington's disease, communicative interaction is often dramatically changed. No study has previously included the subjective reports on this subject from individuals with Huntington's disease. Aims: To explore the qualitative aspects of how communication is…

  1. The effect of piracetam on ataxia: clinical observations in a group of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince Gunal, D; Agan, K; Afsar, N; Borucu, D; Us, O

    2008-04-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders. There is no known treatment to prevent neuronal cell death in these disorders. Current treatment is purely symptomatic; ataxia is one of the most disabling symptoms and represents the main therapeutic challenge. A previous case report suggesting benefit from administration of high dose piracetam inspired the present study of the efficacy of this agent in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Piracetam is a low molecular weight derivative of gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although little is known of its mode of action, its efficacy has been documented in a wide range of clinical indications, such as cognitive disorders, dementia, vertigo and dyslexia, as well as cortical myoclonus. The present report investigated the role of high dose piracetam in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Eight patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia were given intravenous piracetam 60 g/day by a structured protocol for 14 days. The baseline and end-of-the study evaluations were based on the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Statistical analysis demonstrated a significant improvement in the patients' total score (P = 0.018) and a subscale analysis showed statistical significance for only the posture and gait disturbances item (P = 0.018). This study is providing good clinical observation in favour of high dose piracetam infusion to reduce the disability of the patients by improving their gait ataxia.

  2. Guidelines for the pathoanatomical examination of the lower brain stem in ingestive and swallowing disorders and its application to a dysphagic spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rub, U; Brunt, ER; Del Turco, D; de Vos, RAI; Gierga, K; Paulson, H; Braak, H

    Despite the fact that considerable progress has been made in the last 20 years regarding the three-phase process of ingestion and the lower brain stem nuclei involved in it, no comprehensive descriptions of the ingestion-related lower brain stem nuclei are available for neuropathologists confronted

  3. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H266

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Schmid, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    (iPSC) lines of SCA2 patients in order to study a disease-specific phenotype. Here, we demonstrate the gene correction of the iPSC line H266 clone 10 where we have exchanged the expanded CAG repeat of the ATXN2 gene with the normal length found in healthy alleles. This gene corrected cell line...

  4. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H196

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    (iPSC) lines of SCA2 patients in order to study a disease-specific phenotype. Here, we demonstrate the gene correction of the iPSC line H196 clone 7 where we have exchanged the expanded CAG repeat of the ATXN2 gene with the normal length found in healthy alleles. This gene corrected cell line...

  5. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H271

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    (iPSC) lines of SCA2 patients in order to study a disease-specific phenotype. Here, we demonstrate the gene correction of the iPSC line H271 clone 1 where we have exchanged the expanded CAG repeat of the ATXN2 gene with the normal length found in healthy alleles. This gene corrected cell line...

  6. Characterization of conservative somatic instability of the CAG repeat region in Huntington`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, F.V.; Calikoglu, A.S.; Whetsell, L.H. [H.A. Chapman Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Instability and enlargement of a CAG repeat region at the beginning of the huntingtin gene (IT-15) has been linked with Huntington`s disease. The CAG repeat size shows a highly significant correlation with age-of-onset of clinicial features in individuals with 40 or more repeats who have Huntington disease. The clinical status of nonsymptomatic individuals with 30 to 39 CAG repeats is considered ambiguous. In order to define more carefully the nature of the HD expansion instability, we examined patients in our HD population using a discriminating fluorescence-based PCR approach. The degree of somatic mutation increases with both earlier age of onset and the size of the inherited allele. A single prominent band one repeat larger than the index peak was typical in individuals with 40-41 CAG repeats. Three to four larger bands are typically discerned in individuals with 50 or more repeats. In an extreme example, an individual with approximately 95 repeats had at least 8 prominent bands. Plotting the degree of somatic mutation relative to the size of the HD allele shows somatic mutation activity increases with size. By this approach 40-60% of the alleles in a 40-41 CAG repeat HD loci is represented in the primary allele. In contrast, the primary allele represents a relatively minor proportion of the total alleles for expansions greater than 50 CAG repeats (10-20%). The limited range of somatic mutation suggest that the instability is restricted to very early stages of embryogenesis before tissue development diverges or that persistent somatic instability occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, the properties of somatic instability in Huntington`s disease have aspects that are both in common but also different from that found in other trinucleotide repeat expanding diseases such as myotonic muscular dystrophy and fragile X syndrome.

  7. Validity and reliability of the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) in multiple sclerosis patients with ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcı, Yeliz; Fil, Ayla; Keklicek, Hilal; Çetin, Barış; Armutlu, Kadriye; Dolgun, Anıl; Tuncer, Aslı; Karabudak, Rana

    2017-11-01

    Ataxia is an extremely common problem in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Thus, appropriate scales are required for detailed assessment of this issue. The aim of our study was to investigate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), which are widely used in ataxia evaluation in the context of other cerebellar diseases. This cross-sectional study included 80 MS patients with Kurtzke cerebellar functional system score (C-FSS) greater than zero and slight pyramidal involvement. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), C-FSS, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) were administered. SARA and ICARS were assessed on first admission by two physical therapists. Seven days later, second assessments were repeated in same way for reliability. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were found to be high for both ICARS and SARA (prating results were determined by five different factors that did not coincide with the ICARS sub-scales. Our study demonstrated that ICARS and SARA are both reliable in MS patients with ataxia. Although ICARS has some structural problems, it seems to be more valid given its high correlations with EDSS and C-FSS. SARA also can be preferred as a brief assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Predominance of null mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Gilad (Shlomit); R. Khosravi (Rami); D. Shkedy (Dganit); T. Uziel (Tamar); Y. Ziv (Yael); K. Savitsky (Kinneret); G. Rotman (Galit); S. Smith (Sarah); T. Chessa (Antonio); T.J. Jorgensen (Timothy); R. Harnik (Reli); M. Frydman (Moshe); O. Sanal (Ozden); S. Portnoi (Sima); Z. Goldwicz (Zipora); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); A. Gatti (Arianna); G.M. Lenoir (Gilbert); M.F. Lavin (Martin); K. Tatsumi (Kouichi); M. Wegner (Michael); Y. Shiloh (Yosef); A. Bar-Shira (Anat)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAtaxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disorder involving cerebellar degeneration, immunodeficiency, chromosomal instability, radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition. The responsible gene, ATM, was recently identified by positional cloning and found to encode a putative

  9. Seasonal ataxia: A case report of a disappearing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoade Moyo, Adebiyi; Michael Bimbo, Fawale; Morenikeji Adeyoyin, Komolafe; Valentine Nnaemeka, Amadi; Oluwatoyin, Ganiyu; Victor Oladeji, Adeyeye

    2014-09-01

    Seasonal ataxia is a clinical syndrome of acute cerebellar ataxia which follows ingestion of roasted larvae of Anaphe venata Butler, an alternative protein source consumed in western Nigeria. It was first reported in the 1950s in western Nigeria when it caused a wave of epidemics. This is the first case report of this condition in the literature since 1993. We present the case of a 35 year old woman from western Nigeria who was admitted in October 2012 with acute onset of gait instability and bilateral hand tremors, preceded by several episodes of vomiting. She had ingested a meal containing roasted larvae of the African silkworm, 2 hours before the onset of vomiting. Seasonal ataxia is an important differential diagnosis of acute cerebellar ataxia among the indigenous ethnic population of western Nigeria.It is non-fatal and treatable, with complete resolution of symptoms usually following thiamine therapy.

  10. Visuomotor ataxia. Clinical and CT scan studies in three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Genjiro; Kawada, Junya; Oda, Rokuhei; Kitagawa, Yoshinobu; Kosoegawa, Hiroshi

    1985-03-01

    Three patients with visuomotor ataxia, a disorder of hand movement to grasp objects located in the periphery of the visual field, were studied clinically and neuroradiologically with conventional and reformatted CT scans. Visuomotor ataxia was noted in the hemifield contralateral to the parieto-occipital lesion with both hands regardless the side of the lesion in this study. No dominant hemisphere for visuomotor ataxia was noted. The responsible lesions for this disorder were overlapped at Broadmann's area 7, 18, 19 and their surrounded white matter including the connecting fibers to the contralateral hemisphere via the splenium of corpus callosum. No direct lesion was found in the angular gyrus (Broadmann area 39). Visuomotor ataxia was seen with both hands in our series and it can be explained by the disconnection of either or both of the direct and crossed long association fibers between visual association areas and motor association areas at the parieto-occipital junction. (author).

  11. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to KCNC1 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliver, Karen L; Franceschetti, Silvana; Milligan, Carol J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively describe the new syndrome of myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK), including cellular electrophysiological characterization of observed clinical improvement with fever. METHODS: We analyzed clinical, electroclinical, and neuroimaging...

  12. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency May Present with Cervical Dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Becker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED is an autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with ataxia, areflexia, and proprioceptive and vibratory sensory loss. Dystonia has been reported rarely. Case Report: An 11‐year‐old female presented with dystonic head tremor and cervical and bilateral arm dystonia. Her 14‐year‐old older brother had dystonic head tremor and generalized dystonia. One year later, the brother developed dysarthria, limb dysmetria, and gait ataxia. Compound heterozygous mutations in TTPA were detected, confirming the diagnosis of AVED. Discussion: AVED may present with dystonia rather than ataxia, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive dystonia. 

  13. Altered Fractional Anisotropy in Early Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silky Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease best known for chorea. The disorder includes numerous other clinical features including mood disorder, eye movement abnormalities, cognitive disturbance, pendular knee reflexes, motor impersistence, and postural instability. We describe a mild case of HD early in the disease course with depression and subtle neurological manifestations. In addition, we review MRI and diffusion tensor imaging features in this patient. The bicaudate ratio, a measure of caudate atrophy, was increased. Fractional anisotropy values of the bilateral caudate and putamen were increased, signifying neurodegeneration of these structures in HD.

  14. Huntington disease: DNA analysis in brazilian population

    OpenAIRE

    RASKIN, SALMO; ALLAN, NASSER; TEIVE, HÉLIO A.G.; CARDOSO, FRANCISCO; HADDAD, MÔNICA SANTORO; LEVI, GILBERTO; BOY, RAQUEL; LERENA JR, JUAN; SOTOMAIOR, VANESSA SANTOS; JANZEN-DÜCK, MÔNICA; JARDIM, LAURA BANNACH; FELLANDER, FLÁVIO R.; ANDRADE, LUIZ AUGUSTO FRANCO

    2000-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is associated with expansions of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HD gene. Accurate measurement of a specific CAG repeat sequence in the HD gene in 92 Brazilian controls without HD, 44 Brazilian subjects with clinical findings suggestive of HD and 40 individuals from 6 putative HD families, showed a range from 7 to 33 repeats in normal subjects and 39 to 88 repeats in affected subjects. A trend between early age at onset of first symptoms and increasing number of repe...

  15. Ethnicity and geographic distribution of pediatric chronic ataxia in Manitoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Masood, Shaheen; Azad, Meghan; Chodirker, Bernard N

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are important determinants of disease distribution. Several disorders associated with ataxia are known to occur more commonly in certain ethnic groups; for example, the disequilibrium syndrome in the Hutterites. The aim of this study was to determine the ethnic and geographic distribution of pediatric patients with chronic ataxia in Manitoba, Canada. We identified 184 patients less than 17 years-of-age with chronic ataxia during 1991-2008 from multiple sources. Their diagnosis, ethnicity and place of residence were determined following a chart review. Most patients resided in Manitoba (N=177) and the majority in Winnipeg, the provincial capital. Thirty five Aboriginal, 29 Mennonite and 11 Hutterite patients resided in Manitoba. The latter two groups were significantly overrepresented in our cohort. Ataxia telangiectasia, mitochondrial disorders, and non-progressive ataxia of unknown etiology associated with pyramidal tracts signs and developmental delay were significantly more common in Mennonite patients. Four of five patients with neuronal migration disorders associated with chronic ataxia were Aboriginal. Few isolated disorders with chronic ataxia occurred in the 11 Hutterite patients including a Joubert syndrome related disorder. Three disorders associated with chronic ataxia were more prevalent than expected in Mennonites in Manitoba. Few rare disorders were more prevalent in the Hutterite and Aboriginal population. Further research is needed to determine the risk factors underlying these variations in prevalence within different ethnic groups. The unique risk factor profiles of each ethnic group need to be considered in health promotion endeavors. Ethnie et distribution géographique de l'ataxie chronique chez des patients d'âge pédiatrique au Manitoba.

  16. Neuroimaging Findings and Repeat Neuroimaging Value in Pediatric Chronic Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Chodirker, Bernard N; Bunge, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Chronic ataxia, greater than two months in duration, is encountered relatively commonly in clinical pediatric neurology practise and presents with diagnostic challenges. It is caused by multiple and diverse disorders. Our aims were to describe the neuroimaging features and the value of repeat neuroimaging in pediatric chronic ataxia to ascertain their contribution to the diagnosis and management. A retrospective charts and neuroimaging reports review was undertaken in 177 children with chronic ataxia. Neuroimaging in 130 of 177 patients was also reviewed. Nineteen patients had head computed tomography only, 103 brain magnetic resonance imaging only, and 55 had both. Abnormalities in the cerebellum or other brain regions were associated with ataxia. Neuroimaging was helpful in 73 patients with 30 disorders: It was diagnostic in 9 disorders, narrowed down the diagnostic possibilities in 14 disorders, and revealed important but non-diagnostic abnormalities, e.g. cerebellar atrophy in 7 disorders. Having a normal magnetic resonance imaging scan was mostly seen in genetic diseases or in the early course of ataxia telangiectasia. Repeat neuroimaging, performed in 108 patients, was generally helpful in monitoring disease evolution and in making a diagnosis. Neuroimaging was not directly helpful in 36 patients with 10 disorders or by definition the 55 patients with unknown disease etiology. Normal or abnormal neuroimaging findings and repeat neuroimaging are very valuable in the diagnosis and management of disorders associated with pediatric chronic ataxia.

  17. Harry Lee Parker and paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaas, James P; Burkholder, David B; Singer, Wolfgang; Boes, Christopher J

    2013-01-15

    To review descriptions of paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in multiple sclerosis (MS), with special attention given to Parker and his 1946 case series. Evaluation of original publications describing paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia, bibliographic information, writings, and unpublished letters from the Mayo Clinic Historical Unit. In 1940, Störring described a patient with MS with paroxysmal symptoms that included dizziness and trouble speaking, but also unilateral extremity weakness. In 1946, Parker published a series of 11 patients with paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia. Six of these patients had MS, and he recognized this phenomenon as a manifestation of the disease. The term "paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia" was first used in 1959 by Andermann and colleagues. Since that time, paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia has become a well-recognized phenomenon in MS. More recent reports have suggested that the responsible lesion is located in the midbrain, near or involving the red nucleus. Parker was the first to accurately describe paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in patients with MS.

  18. Cystathionine γ-lyase deficiency mediates neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bindu D; Sbodio, Juan I; Xu, Risheng; Vandiver, M Scott; Cha, Jiyoung Y; Snowman, Adele M; Snyder, Solomon H

    2014-05-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant disease associated with a mutation in the gene encoding huntingtin (Htt) leading to expanded polyglutamine repeats of mutant Htt (mHtt) that elicit oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and motor and behavioural changes. Huntington's disease is characterized by highly selective and profound damage to the corpus striatum, which regulates motor function. Striatal selectivity of Huntington's disease may reflect the striatally selective small G protein Rhes binding to mHtt and enhancing its neurotoxicity. Specific molecular mechanisms by which mHtt elicits neurodegeneration have been hard to determine. Here we show a major depletion of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the biosynthetic enzyme for cysteine, in Huntington's disease tissues, which may mediate Huntington's disease pathophysiology. The defect occurs at the transcriptional level and seems to reflect influences of mHtt on specificity protein 1, a transcriptional activator for CSE. Consistent with the notion of loss of CSE as a pathogenic mechanism, supplementation with cysteine reverses abnormalities in cultures of Huntington's disease tissues and in intact mouse models of Huntington's disease, suggesting therapeutic potential.

  19. Cognitive and autonomic dysfunction in presymptomatic and early Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobal, Jan; Melik, Ziva; Cankar, Ksenija; Strucl, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Huntington's disease is characterized by disorders of movement, cognition and behavior. Individuals with Huntington's disease display aberrant changes in the autonomic nervous system that are detected even before the onset of other symptoms. Subtle cognitive dysfunction may start before other clinical manifestations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the autonomic nervous system response to mental arithmetic and the relationship between the autonomic and cognitive/motor function in presymptomatic and early Huntington's disease. We examined 15 presymptomatic Huntington's disease gene carriers (PHD), 15 early Huntington's disease patients (EHD) and 30 healthy controls. PHD and EHD groups were determined according to Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor score. ECG, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cutaneous laser Doppler flux were measured during rest and during a simple mental arithmetic test. UHDRS cognitive test battery was applied to determine cognitive dysfunction. During mental arithmetic, the heart rate of PHD/EHD increased significantly less than that of controls. Decreased microvascular response to mental arithmetic was found in EHD. Significant correlations for the PHD/EHD group were found between laser Doppler flux response and Symbol Digit Modalities Test score, and between laser Doppler flux response and UHDRS motor score. It seems that central autonomic dysregulation of cardiovascular system in Huntington's disease goes along with the degeneration of other central neuronal systems. This finding is relevant as it could enable simple and noninvasive testing of disease progression.

  20. An ontology-aware integration of clinical models, terminologies and guidelines: an exploratory study of the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarouf, Haitham; Taboada, María; Rodriguez, Hadriana; Arias, Manuel; Sesar, Ángel; Sobrido, María Jesús

    2017-12-06

    Electronic rating scales represent an important resource for standardized data collection. However, the ability to exploit reasoning on rating scale data is still limited. The objective of this work is to facilitate the integration of the semantics required to automatically interpret collections of standardized clinical data. We developed an electronic prototype for the Scale of the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), broadly used in neurology. In order to address the modeling challenges of the SARA, we propose to combine the best performances from OpenEHR clinical archetypes, guidelines and ontologies. A scaled-down version of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) was built, extracting the terms that describe the SARA tests from free-text sources. This version of the HPO was then used as backbone to normalize the content of the SARA through clinical archetypes. The knowledge required to exploit reasoning on the SARA data was modeled as separate information-processing units interconnected via the defined archetypes. Each unit used the most appropriate technology to formally represent the required knowledge. Based on this approach, we implemented a prototype named SARA Management System, to be used for both the assessment of cerebellar syndrome and the production of a clinical synopsis. For validation purposes, we used recorded SARA data from 28 anonymous subjects affected by Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 36 (SCA36). When comparing the performance of our prototype with that of two independent experts, weighted kappa scores ranged from 0.62 to 0.86. The combination of archetypes, phenotype ontologies and electronic information-processing rules can be used to automate the extraction of relevant clinical knowledge from plain scores of rating scales. Our results reveal a substantial degree of agreement between the results achieved by an ontology-aware system and the human experts.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging for nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem and spinocerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Tsuguo

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can create an image of the anisotropic nature of diffusion and express it quantitatively. Nerve fibers have a large anisotropic diffusion, and it is possible to obtain images of the nerve fiber bundle. The purpose of this study is to observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI and study its potential for diagnosing the type of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and 3D-tractography images were obtained for 41 subjects with no brain stem abnormalities. We created an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map and an FA map using DTI for 16 subjects in the disease group (11 with hereditary SCD and 5 with non-hereditary SCD) and 25 in the control group. The diffusion value of the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was measured using ADC, and the degree of anisotropic diffusion was measured using FA. The pyramidal tract, superior cerebellar peduncle, and inferior cerebellar peduncle were clearly demonstrated for all cases. ADC for the middle cerebellar peduncle in spinocerebellar ataxin (SCA)1 was significantly higher, similar to that for the pons in dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). In MSA-C, ADC for both the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was significantly elevated and FA was significantly decreased. There were no significant changes in SCA3. We could observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI. FA and ADC measurements with DTI can aid in diagnosing the type of SCD. (author)

  2. Unawareness of motor phenoconversion in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Elizabeth A; Gunn, David G; Epping, Eric A; Loy, Clement T; Radford, Kylie; Griffith, Jane; Mills, James A; Long, Jeffrey D; Paulsen, Jane S

    2013-09-24

    To determine whether Huntington disease (HD) mutation carriers have motor symptoms (complaints) when definite motor onset (motor phenoconversion) is diagnosed and document differences between the groups with and without unawareness of motor signs. We analyzed data from 550 HD mutation carriers participating in the multicenter PREDICT-HD Study followed through the HD prodrome. Data analysis included demographics, the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) and the Participant HD History of symptoms, self-report of progression, and cognitive, behavioral, and imaging measures. Unawareness was identified when no motor symptoms were self-reported but when definite motor HD was diagnosed. Of 38 (6.91%) with onset of motor HD, almost half (18/38 = 47.36%) had no motor symptoms despite signs of disease on the UHDRS motor rating and consistent with unawareness. A group with motor symptoms and signs was similar on a range of measures to the unaware group. Those with unawareness of HD signs reported less depression. Patients with symptoms had more striatal atrophy on imaging measures. Only half of the patients with newly diagnosed motor HD had motor symptoms. Unaware patients were less likely to be depressed. Self-report of symptoms may be inaccurate in HD at the earliest stage.

  3. High Protein Diet and Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the huntingtin (HTT gene with expanded CAG repeats. In addition to the apparent brain abnormalities, impairments also occur in peripheral tissues. We previously reported that mutant Huntingtin (mHTT exists in the liver and causes urea cycle deficiency. A low protein diet (17% restores urea cycle activity and ameliorates symptoms in HD model mice. It remains unknown whether the dietary protein content should be monitored closely in HD patients because the normal protein consumption is lower in humans (~15% of total calories than in mice (~22%. We assessed whether dietary protein content affects the urea cycle in HD patients. Thirty HD patients were hospitalized and received a standard protein diet (13.7% protein for 5 days, followed by a high protein diet (HPD, 26.3% protein for another 5 days. Urea cycle deficiency was monitored by the blood levels of citrulline and ammonia. HD progression was determined by the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS. The HPD increased blood citrulline concentration from 15.19 μmol/l to 16.30 μmol/l (p = 0.0378 in HD patients but did not change blood ammonia concentration. A 2-year pilot study of 14 HD patients found no significant correlation between blood citrulline concentration and HD progression. Our results indicated a short period of the HPD did not markedly compromise urea cycle function. Blood citrulline concentration is not a reliable biomarker of HD progression.

  4. Ataxia telangiectasia: LET dependence of cellular inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, E.A.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Human Ataxia telangiectasia cells (AT 2SF line) have been irradiated in vitro under aerobic and hypoxic conditions with heavy-ion beams accelerated at the Berkeley Bevalac as a part of a study to characterize the radiation responses of genetically sensitive and resistant cell lines to high LET radiations. Results from track-segment exposures to neon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams accelerated to initial energies of from 225 to 670 MeV/amu provided an LET range between 30 to 1,000 KeV/μm. The data indicate: (1) The sensitivity of AT cells increases with increasing LET, similar to resistant human lines (e.g., T-1 cells). However, due to efficient repair, T-1 cells are more resistant than AT cells at LET values below 200 keV/μm; (2) Maximum cell kill occurs for both lines at 100-200 keV/μm; at higher LET the sensitivity of the two lines approach each other; (3) There is only small variation in the sensitivity of AT cells to particles of various atomic numbers at the same LET; differences are more pronounced in the LET domain between 50 and 200 keV/μm; and (4) AT cells have slightly lower OER values than T-1 cells in the range of LET studied below 200 keV/μm

  5. Acquired progressive ataxia and palatal tremor: importance of MRI evidence of hemosiderin deposition and vascular malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Eggers, Scott D Z; Milone, Margherita; Keegan, B Mark

    2011-08-01

    Oculopalatal tremor is frequently accompanied by progressive ataxia. In symptomatic oculopalatal tremor the ataxia frequently is delayed in onset. Progressive ataxia is a defining clinical feature of superficial siderosis. We report 5 cases with palatal tremor and ataxia. Four cases had evidence of intraparenchymal hemosiderin deposition on T2-gradient-echo imaging. Three cases had a brainstem vascular malformation. In two cases the hemosiderin deposition was likely due to prior trauma. The significance of these associations and possible similarities between ataxia related to superficial siderosis and ataxia and intraparenchymal hemosiderin is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. O desenvolvimento político em Huntington e Fukuyama Huntington and Fukuyama on political development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Nóbrega de Mello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo contrasta as teses de Huntington e Fukuyama sobre desenvolvimento político. As obras analisadas, Ordem política nas sociedades em mudança e O fim da história, inscrevem-se entre duas conjunturas decisivas - 1968 e 1989. Huntington desmontou a equivalência entre desenvolvimento político e modernização e Fukuyama reafirmou a democracia como o destino de todos os países e, desse modo, como o fim da história. Nesta comparação, dois eixos se sobressaem: o contexto de produção das obras e a alternância entre os polos teóricos da democracia e da estabilidade. Procura-se demonstrar como, apesar de reinserir a democracia no desenvolvimento político, a instabilidade continua a ser um foco privilegiado de análise no pensamento de Fukuyama.The article contrasts the theories of Huntington and Fukuyama on political development. The analyzed works, Political order in changing societies and The end of history, fall between two decisive historical moments - in 1968 and 1989. Huntington disassembled the equivalence between political development and modernization; Fukuyama reaffirmed democracy as the destiny of all countries and, as such, it is the end of history. In this comparison, two axes call our attention: the production context of these works and the alternation between the theoreticals poles of democracy and stability. The article shows how, although reenters democracy in the political development theory, instablility remains a prime focus of analysis in Fukuyama's thought.

  7. Américo Negrette and Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Moscovich

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a historical review of the seminal clinical contribution of Professor Américo Negrette, a Venezuelan neurologist, to the evolution of scientific knowledge about Huntington's disease.

  8. Clinical characterization of dystonia in adult patients with Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zande, N A; Massey, T H; McLauchlan, D; Pryce Roberts, A; Zutt, R; Wardle, M; Payne, G C; Clenaghan, C; Tijssen, M A J; Rosser, A E; Peall, K J

    Background and purposeHuntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative movement disorder, typically characterized by chorea. Dystonia is also recognized as part of the HD motor phenotype, although little work detailing its prevalence, distribution, severity and impact on

  9. The calpain-suppressing effects of olesoxime in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jonasz J; Ortiz Rios, Midea M; Riess, Olaf; Clemens, Laura E; Nguyen, Huu P

    2016-01-01

    Olesoxime, a small molecule drug candidate, has recently attracted attention due to its significant beneficial effects in models of several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease. Olesoxime's neuroprotective effects have been assumed to be conveyed through a direct, positive influence on mitochondrial function. In a long-term treatment study in BACHD rats, the latest rat model of Huntington's disease, olesoxime revealed a positive influence on mitochondrial function and improved specific behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes. Moreover, a novel target of the compound was discovered, as olesoxime was found to suppress the activation of the calpain proteolytic system, a major contributor to the cleavage of the disease-causing mutant huntingtin protein into toxic fragments, and key player in degenerative processes in general. Results from a second model of Huntington's disease, the Hdh (Q111) knock-in mouse, confirm olesoxime's calpain-suppressing effects and support the therapeutic value of olesoxime for Huntington's disease and other disorders involving calpain overactivation.

  10. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in preclinical Huntington disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Joost C. H.; Sijens, Paul E.; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2007-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a hereditary brain disease, causing progressive deterioration after a preclinical phase. The pathophysiology of early brain abnormalities around disease onset is largely unknown. Some preclinical mutation carriers (PMC) show structural or metabolic changes on brain imaging

  11. Unravelling and Exploiting Astrocyte Dysfunction in Huntington's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khakh, Baljit S; Beaumont, Vahri; Cachope, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytes are abundant within mature neural circuits and are involved in brain disorders. Here, we summarize our current understanding of astrocytes and Huntington's disease (HD), with a focus on correlative and causative dysfunctions of ion homeostasis, calcium signaling, and neurotransmitter...

  12. FINGERPRINT PATTERNS IN HUNTINGTON'S CHOREA AND PARKINSON'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARBEAU, A; TRUDEAU, J G; COITEUX, C

    1965-03-06

    In the course of a continuing search for means of predicting Huntington's chorea before the onset of neurological symptoms, a study of fingerprint patterns was undertaken, using the technique employed by Hodges and Simon in the investigation of patients with Wilson's disease. Fingerprint patterns of 61 patients with Huntington's chorea and 50 with Parkinson's disease were compared with norms established by Scotland Yard. Although an increased incidence of the "whorl" pattern was seen in the left second and third fingers in patients with Huntington's chorea, this finding could not be interpreted as having diagnostic or prognostic value as it was found also in some normal subjects and in occasional cases of Parkinson's disease. The pattern supposedly characteristic of Wilson's disease was also seen in persons with Huntington's chorea.

  13. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...... eminences grown as free-floating roller-tube cultures can be successfully grafted in a rat Huntington model and that a clinical MR scanner offers a useful noninvasive tool for studying striatal graft development....

  14. Ubiquitin: a potential cerebrospinal fluid progression marker in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther-Jensen, T; Simonsen, A H; Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Hjermind, L E; Nielsen, J E

    2015-10-01

    Finding early and dynamic biomarkers in Huntington's disease is a key to understanding the early pathology of Huntington's disease and potentially to tracking disease progression. This would benefit the future evaluation of potential neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies, as well as aid in identifying an optimal time point for initiating a potential therapeutic intervention. This explorative proteomics study evaluated cerebrospinal fluid from 94 Huntington's disease gene-expansion carriers (39 premanifest and 55 manifest) and 27 Huntington's disease gene-expansion negative individuals using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Differences in peak intensity from SELDI-TOF spectra were evaluated. Levels of 10 peaks were statistically significantly different between manifest gene-expansion carriers and controls. One of them identified as ubiquitin was shown to be dependent on the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale Total Functional Capacity, a pseudo-measure of disease severity (P = 0.001), and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (0.04) in manifest and CAG-age product score (P = 0.019) in all gene-expansion carriers. Multiple studies have shown that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in Huntington's disease pathogenesis and understanding of this involvement may have therapeutic potential in humans. This is the first study on cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in Huntington's disease. Furthermore it is shown that ubiquitin increases with disease progression and CAG-age product score and therefore may have the potential as a Huntington's disease progression marker, also prior to motor onset. © 2015 EAN.

  15. Ataxia crónica en pediatría

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Erazo Torricelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias crónicas constituyen un grupo heterogéneo de enfermedades, que afectan al niño a diferentes edades. Así las formas congénitas, generalmente no progresivas, se observan desde los primeros meses de vida y se expresan por hipotonía y retraso motor, mucho antes de que la ataxia se haga evidente. La resonancia magnética cerebral puede ser diagnóstica en algunos cuadros, como ocurre con el síndrome de Joubert. El grupo de ataxias hereditarias progresivas, en constante expansión, suelen comenzar después del período del lactante. Los signos clínicos destacables son la apraxia ocular y la inestabilidad de la marcha que pueden asociarse a telangiectasias oculocutáneas (ataxia-telangiectasia o a neuropatía sensitiva (ataxia de Friedreich. En esta revisión se describen en forma sucinta las ataxias congénitas y en forma más detallada las causas principales de ataxias hereditarias progresivas autosómicas recesivas, autosómicas dominantes y mitocondriales. Se destaca la importancia del estudio genético, que es la clave para lograr el diagnóstico en la mayoría de estas enfermedades. Aunque aún no hay tratamiento para la mayoría de las ataxias hereditarias progresivas, algunas sí lo tienen, como la enfermedad de Refsum, déficit de vitamina E, déficit de Coenzima Q10, por lo cual el diagnóstico en estos casos es aún más relevante. En la actualidad, el diagnóstico de los cuadros de ataxia hereditaria del niño aún no tratable es fundamental para lograr un manejo adecuado, determinar un pronóstico preciso y dar a la familia un consejo genético oportuno.

  16. Neuronal Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Marta; Oliveros, Juan C; Naranjo, Jose R; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the N-terminal poly-glutamine tract of the huntingtin (Htt) protein is responsible for Huntington disease (HD). A large number of studies have explored the neuronal phenotype of HD, but the molecular aethiology of the disease is still very poorly understood. This has hampered the development of an appropriate therapeutical strategy to at least alleviate its symptoms. In this short review, we have focused our attention on the alteration of a specific cellular mechanism common to all HD models, either genetic or induced by treatment with 3-NPA, i.e. the cellular dyshomeostasis of Ca(2+). We have highlighted the direct and indirect (i.e. transcriptionally mediated) effects of mutated Htt on the maintenance of the intracellular Ca(2+) balance, the correct modulation of which is fundamental to cell survival and the disturbance of which plays a key role in the death of the cell.

  17. Destination and source memory in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj, Mohamad; Caillaud, Marie; Verny, Christophe; Fasotti, Luciano; Allain, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Destination memory refers to the recall of the destination of previously relayed information, and source memory refers to the recollection of the origin of received information. We compared both memory systems in Huntington's disease (HD) participants. For this, HD participants and healthy adults had to put 12 items in a black or a white box (destination task), and to extract another 12 items from a blue or a red box (source task). Afterwards, they had to decide in which box each item had previously been deposited (destination memory), and from which box each item had previously been extracted (source memory). HD participants showed poorer source as well as destination recall performance than healthy adults in the proposed tasks. Correlation analysis showed that destination recall was significantly correlated with episodic recall in HD participants. Destination memory impairment in HD participants seems to be considerably influenced by their episodic memory performance. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Huntington disease : Dna analysis in brazilian population

    OpenAIRE

    Raskin, Salmo; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2000-01-01

    A doença de Huntington (DH) está associada a expansões da seqüência repetitiva de trinucleotídeos CAG no gene HD. Através de análise do número de repetições CAG em indivíduos brasileiros, amostras de 92 indivíduos-controle não afetados pela DH, 44 pacientes com DH e 40 indivíduos de 6 famílias com a DH, demonstrou-se a presença de repetições de 7 até 33 trinucleotídeos CAG nos indivíduos-controle e de 39 até 88 nos alelos mutados dos indivíduos afetados. Foi constatada relação inversa entre a...

  19. Huntington disease: DNA analysis in brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RASKIN SALMO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is associated with expansions of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HD gene. Accurate measurement of a specific CAG repeat sequence in the HD gene in 92 Brazilian controls without HD, 44 Brazilian subjects with clinical findings suggestive of HD and 40 individuals from 6 putative HD families, showed a range from 7 to 33 repeats in normal subjects and 39 to 88 repeats in affected subjects. A trend between early age at onset of first symptoms and increasing number of repeats was seen. Major increase of repeat size through paternal inheritance than through maternal inheritance was observed. Data generated from this study may have significant implications for the etiology, knowledge of the incidence, diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling and treatment of HD Brazilian patients.

  20. A case report of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Choudhary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance, movement disorder, dementia, and behavioural disturbances. It is caused by a mutation in IT15 gene on chromosome 4p16.3, which leads to unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. The onset of juvenile HD occurs before the 2nd decade of life and comprises approximately 10% of total HD patients. Juvenile HD differs in symptomatology and is usually transmitted from paternal side with genetic anticipation phenomenon. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain shows specific changes of early affection of caudate nucleus and putamen. Multidisciplinary approach with symptomatic treatment of specific symptoms is the current available management. Gene editing and gene silencing treatment are under trial. Hereby, we introduce a case of an 8-year-old boy, who presented with typical symptoms of juvenile HD, positive family history with genetic anticipation phenomenon and characteristic MRI findings.

  1. Magnetic biomineralisation in Huntington's disease transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyhum, W; Hautot, D; Dobson, J; Pankhurst, Q A

    2005-01-01

    The concentration levels of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles in transgenic R6/2 Huntington's disease (HD) mice have been investigated, using seven control and seven HD mice each from an 8 week-old litter and from a 12 week-old litter. Hysteresis and isothermal remnant magnetisation data were collected on a SQUID magnetometer, and analysed using a model comprising dia/paramagnetic, ferrimagnetic and superparamagnetic contributions, to extract the magnetite and ferritin concentrations present. It was found that magnetite was present in both superparamagnetic and blocked states. A larger spread and higher concentration of magnetite levels was found in the diseased mice for both the 8 week-old and 12 week-old batches, compared to the controls

  2. Autonomic nervous system function in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, J; Schmitz, T; Saft, C; Postert, T; Kraus, P; Epplen, J T; Przuntek, H; Agelink, M W

    2002-06-01

    To investigate whether Huntington's disease (HD) affects autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning. Twenty patients with HD who had positive genetic test results underwent standardised ANS function tests including sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) of the hands and feet, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), both during five minutes of resting and deep respiration, and an orthostatic blood pressure test. Patients were classified according to the motor subscale of the unified Huntington's disease rating scale (UHDRS; mean (SD) score 26.4 (13.6)) and divided into two subgroups: UHDRS or =25 points (mid stages, M-HD). Autonomic indices were compared with those obtained for a group of well matched healthy controls (n=60). Overall, patients showed lower HRV indices than controls. Multivariate analysis with the independent factor of "group" (controls, E-HD, M-HD) showed a significant group effect on both the high frequency power (F=4.32, p=0.017) and the coefficient of variation (F=4.23, p=0.018), indicating a significant reduction in vagal modulation in the M-HD group. There was a shift in autonomic neurocardiac balance towards sympathetic predominance in the M-HD group compared with controls (F=2.89, p=0.062). Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between the severity of clinical HD symptoms (assessed by the UHDRS) and the modulation of cardiovagal activity (p=0.028). Vagal dysregulation was present in two patients; one of them also showed a pathological blood pressure test and a latency prolongation in the SSRs of the hands. Two other patients had pathologically reduced SSR amplitudes. Only patients of the M-HD group were affected. Autonomic dysfunction is present even in the middle stages of HD and affects both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branch of the ANS.

  3. Proteasomal dysfunction in aging and Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2011-07-01

    Protein degradation plays a central role in many cellular functions. Misfolded and damaged proteins are removed from the cells to avoid toxicity. Eukaryotic cells have two main routes for clearing misfolded or toxic proteins: the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is ubiquitously present in the cytoplasm, nucleus, and various subcellular regions whereas autophagy predominantly functions in the cytoplasm. The activity of the UPS often remains at a high level, whereas basal autophagy constitutively occurs at low levels in cells for the performance of homeostatic functions. Because of the presence of the UPS in the nucleus, the UPS function may be more important for clearing misfolded proteins in the nucleus. Polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington disease (HD), show the age-dependent neurological symptoms and the accumulation of misfolded proteins that are often found in the nucleus. The selective neuropathology in HD is also found to associate with the preferential accumulation of the disease protein huntingtin in neuronal cells. Although it is clear that the UPS is important for clearing mutant huntingtin, it remains unclear whether aging or HD affects the capacity of neuronal UPS to remove toxic and misfolded proteins. In this review, we focus on the relationship between the UPS function and aging as well as Huntington disease. We also discuss findings that suggest that aging is a more important factor that can negatively impact the function of the UPS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Autophagy and protein degradation in neurological diseases." Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  5. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  6. Unusual and severe disease course in a child with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyts, I.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Wolf-Peeters, C. de; Proesmans, M.; Renard, M.; Uyttebroeck, A.; Boeck, K. de

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive syndrome of combined immunodeficiency. Hallmarks of the disease comprise progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, cancer susceptibility and variable humoral and cellular immunodeficiency. We describe a patient with AT

  7. Diabetes mellitus as the presenting feature of Friedreich's ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenal Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Friedreich's ataxia (FA are at an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance. Diabetes usually develops many years after the initial presentation. We report an 8-year-old girl who initially presented with diabetic ketoacidosis and was treated as a case of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Around a year later, she developed gait problems and ataxia. Cardiac involvement was detected on echocardiography. Genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis of FA. FA should be a diagnostic consideration in children presenting with diabetes and neurological issues, even with early presentation of the former. Early occurrence of diabetes and rapid progression of ataxia in this patient needs a better understanding of underlying genetic mechanisms.

  8. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  9. Common Data Elements for Clinical Research in Friedreich Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David R.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Schulz, Jorg B.; Perlman, Susan; Delatycki, Martin B.; Payne, R. Mark; Shaddy, Robert; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Farmer, Jennifer; Kantor, Paul; Raman, Subha V.; Hunegs, Lisa; Odenkirchen, Joanne; Miller, Kristy; Kaufmann, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Background To reduce study start-up time, increase data sharing, and assist investigators conducting clinical studies, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke embarked on an initiative to create common data elements for neuroscience clinical research. The Common Data Element Team developed general common data elements which are commonly collected in clinical studies regardless of therapeutic area, such as demographics. In the present project, we applied such approaches to data collection in Friedreich ataxia, a neurological disorder that involves multiple organ systems. Methods To develop Friedreich’s ataxia common data elements, Friedreich’s ataxia experts formed a working group and subgroups to define elements in: Ataxia and Performance Measures; Biomarkers; Cardiac and Other Clinical Outcomes; and Demographics, Laboratory Tests and Medical History. The basic development process included: Identification of international experts in Friedreich’s ataxia clinical research; Meeting via teleconference to develop a draft of standardized common data elements recommendations; Vetting of recommendations across the subgroups; Dissemination of recommendations to the research community for public comment. Results The full recommendations were published online in September 2011 at http://www.commondataelements.ninds.nih.gov/FA.aspx. The Subgroups’ recommendations are classified as core, supplemental or exploratory. Template case report forms were created for many of the core tests. Conclusions The present set of data elements should ideally lead to decreased initiation time for clinical research studies and greater ability to compare and analyze data across studies. Their incorporation into new and ongoing studies will be assessed in an ongoing fashion to define their utility in Friedreich’s ataxia. PMID:23239403

  10. Huntington's disease (HD) : the neuropathology of a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of the human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Seidel, K.; Heinsen, H.; Vonsattel, J. P.; den Dunnen, W. F.; Korf, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited, and currently untreatable, neuropsychiatric disorder. This progressive and ultimately fatal disease is named after the American physician George Huntington and according to the underlying molecular biological mechanisms is assigned to

  11. Clinical neurogenetics: fragile x-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah A; O'Keefe, Joan A

    2013-11-01

    This article summarizes the clinical findings, genetics, pathophysiology, and treatment of fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome. The disorder occurs from a CGG repeat (55-200) expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene. It manifests clinically in kinetic tremor, gait ataxia, and executive dysfunction, usually in older men who carry the genetic abnormality. The disorder has distinct radiographic and pathologic findings. Symptomatic treatment is beneficial in some patients. The inheritance is X-linked and family members may be at risk for other fragile X-associated disorders. This information is useful to neurologists, general practitioners, and geneticists. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Three novel KCNA1 mutations in episodic ataxia type I families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Brunt, ERP; Mol, GJJ; van der Vlies, P; Stulp, RP; Verlind, E; Mantel, G; Averyanov, YN; Hofstra, RMW; Buys, CHCM

    Hereditary paroxysmal ataxia, or episodic ataxia (EA), is a rare, genetically heterogeneous neurological disorder characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia. By direct sequence analysis, a different missense mutation of the potassium channel gene (KCNA1) has been identified in three families

  13. Quantitative 7T phase imaging in premanifest Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, A C; Possin, K L; Satris, G; Johnson, E; Lupo, J M; Jakary, A; Wong, K; Kelley, D A C; Kang, G A; Sha, S J; Kramer, J H; Geschwind, M D; Nelson, S J; Hess, C P

    2014-09-01

    In vivo MR imaging and postmortem neuropathologic studies have demonstrated elevated iron concentration and atrophy within the striatum of patients with Huntington disease, implicating neuronal loss and iron accumulation in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. We used 7T MR imaging to determine whether quantitative phase, a measurement that reflects both iron content and tissue microstructure, is altered in subjects with premanifest Huntington disease. Local field shift, calculated from 7T MR phase images, was quantified in 13 subjects with premanifest Huntington disease and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. All participants underwent 3T and 7T MR imaging, including volumetric T1 and 7T gradient recalled-echo sequences. Local field shift maps were created from 7T phase data and registered to caudate ROIs automatically parcellated from the 3T T1 images. Huntington disease-specific disease burden and neurocognitive and motor evaluations were also performed and compared with local field shift. Subjects with premanifest Huntington disease had smaller caudate volume and higher local field shift than controls. A significant correlation between these measurements was not detected, and prediction accuracy for disease state improved with inclusion of both variables. A positive correlation between local field shift and genetic disease burden was also found, and there was a trend toward significant correlations between local field shift and neurocognitive tests of working memory and executive function. Subjects with premanifest Huntington disease exhibit differences in 7T MR imaging phase within the caudate nuclei that correlate with genetic disease burden and trend with neurocognitive assessments. Ultra-high-field MR imaging of quantitative phase may be a useful approach for monitoring neurodegeneration in premanifest Huntington disease. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  14. Rating scales for cognition in Huntington's disease: Critique and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Marinus, Johan; Stout, Julie C; Paulsen, Jane S; Como, Peter; Duff, Kevin; Sampaio, Cristina; Goetz, Christopher G; Cubo, Esther; Stebbins, Glenn T; Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the main features of Huntington's disease and is present across the disease spectrum. As part of the International Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorder Society-sponsored project to review all clinical rating scales used in Huntington's disease, a systematic review of the literature was performed to identify cognitive scales used in Huntington's disease and make recommendations for their use. A total of 17 cognitive scales were identified and evaluated. None of the scales met criteria for a "recommended" status. For assessing severity of cognitive dysfunction, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment was "recommended with caveats." The UHDRS Cognitive Assessment, the UHDRS-For Advanced Patients cognitive section, the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale, the Frontal Assessment Battery, the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status were "suggested" for evaluating severity of cognitive impairment. The MoCA was "suggested" as a screening tool for cognitive impairment. The major challenge in the assessment of cognition in Huntington's disease is the lack of a formal definition of dementia and/or mild cognitive impairment in this disease. The committee concluded that there is a need to further validate currently available cognitive scales in Huntington's disease, but that it is premature to recommend the development of new scales. Recently developed Huntington's disease-specific scales, such as the Huntington's Disease-Cognitive Assessment Battery, hold promise but require the completion of more comprehensive clinimetric development. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. 77 FR 22616 - Huntington Asset Advisors, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ...''), Huntington Strategy Shares (``Trust''), and SEI Investments Distribution Co. Summary of Application... occur at negotiated market prices; (c) certain series to pay redemption proceeds, under certain..., Huntington U.S. Equity Rotation Strategy ETF and Huntington EcoLogical Strategy ETF (together, the ``Initial...

  16. 75 FR 38710 - Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ..., Huntington Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a permanent Special Local Regulation on the navigable waters of Huntington Bay, New York due to the annual... Championships, Huntington Bay, NY'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 13454). The Coast Guard received no comments...

  17. 75 FR 33617 - Notice of Proposed Settlement Agreement and Opportunity for Public Comment: West Huntington Spill...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... AGENCY Notice of Proposed Settlement Agreement and Opportunity for Public Comment: West Huntington Spill... United States Department of Justice on behalf of EPA, in connection with the West Huntington Spill Site, Huntington, West Virginia (``Site''). DATES: Written comments on the proposed settlement agreement must be...

  18. 75 FR 13454 - Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Championships, Huntington Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Supplemental Notice of proposed rulemaking... Special Local Regulation on the navigable waters of Huntington Bay, New York due to the annual Fran... championship swim on the waters of Huntington Bay, NY during a single day in July. This swim has historically...

  19. Placebo effect characteristics observed in a single, international, longitudinal study in Huntington's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cubo, E.; Gonzalez, M.; Puerto, I. del; Yebenes, J.G. de; Arconada, O.F.; Gabriel y Galan, J.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classically, clinical trials are based on the placebo-control design. Our aim was to analyze the placebo effect in Huntington's disease. METHODS: Placebo data were obtained from an international, longitudinal, placebo-controlled trial for Huntington's disease (European Huntington's

  20. Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    -Hirschhorn Syndrome; 4p16.3 Microduplication Syndrome; 4p Deletion Syndrome, Non-Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Stickler Syndrome; Stickler Syndrome Type 2; Stickler Syndrome Type 1; Stickler Syndrome; Mucolipidosis Type 4; X-linked Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 4; X-linked Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3; X-linked Intellectual Disability - Ataxia - Apraxia; X-linked Progressive Cerebellar Ataxia; X-linked Non Progressive Cerebellar Ataxia; X-linked Cerebellar Ataxia; Vitamin B12 Deficiency Ataxia; Toxic Exposure Ataxia; Unclassified Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia; Thyroid Antibody Ataxia; Sporadic Adult-onset Ataxia of Unknown Etiology; Spinocerebellar Ataxia With Oculomotor Anomaly; Spinocerebellar Ataxia With Epilepsy; Spinocerebellar Ataxia With Axonal Neuropathy Type 2; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 8; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 5; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 4; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 37; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 36; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 35; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 34; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 32; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 31; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 30; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 29; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 28; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 27; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 26; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 25; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 23; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 22; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 21; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 20; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 19/22; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 18; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 17; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 16; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 15/16; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 14; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 13; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 12; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 11; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 With Axonal Neuropathy; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1; Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Unknown; Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Dysmorphism

  1. Excitatory inputs to four types of spinocerebellar tract neurons in the cat and the rat thoraco-lumbar spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sony Shakya; Bannatyne, B Anne; Jankowska, Elzbieta; Hammar, Ingela; Nilsson, Elin; Maxwell, David J

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum receives information from the hindlimbs through several populations of spinocerebellar tract neurons. Although the role of these neurons has been established in electrophysiological experiments, the relative contribution of afferent fibres and central neurons to their excitatory input has only been estimated approximately so far. Taking advantage of differences in the immunohistochemistry of glutamatergic terminals of peripheral afferents and of central neurons (with vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT1 or VGLUT2, respectively), we compared sources of excitatory input to four populations of spinocerebellar neurons in the thoraco-lumbar spinal cord: dorsal spinocerebellar tract neurons located in Clarke's column (ccDSCT) and in the dorsal horn (dhDSCT) and ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT) neurons including spinal border (SB) neurons. This was done on 22 electrophysiologically identified intracellularly labelled neurons in cats and on 80 neurons labelled by retrograde transport of cholera toxin b subunit injected into the cerebellum of rats. In both species distribution of antibodies against VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 on SB neurons (which have dominating inhibitory input from limb muscles), revealed very few VGLUT1 contacts and remarkably high numbers of VGLUT2 contacts. In VSCT neurons with excitatory afferent input, the number of VGLUT1 contacts was relatively high although VGLUT2 contacts likewise dominated, while the proportions of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 immunoreactive terminals were the reverse on the two populations of DSCT neurons. These findings provide morphological evidence that SB neurons principally receive excitatory inputs from central neurons and provide the cerebellum with information regarding central neuronal activity. PMID:22371473

  2. Major Superficial White Matter Abnormalities in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Owen R; Joshi, Shantanu H; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Sanchez-Castaneda, Cristina; Narr, Katherine; Shattuck, David W; Caltagirone, Carlo; Sabatini, Umberto; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    The late myelinating superficial white matter at the juncture of the cortical gray and white matter comprising the intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received attention in Huntington's disease. It is an area of the brain that is late myelinating and is sensitive to both normal aging and neurodegenerative disease effects. Therefore, it may be sensitive to Huntington's disease processes. Structural MRI data from 25 Pre-symptomatic subjects, 24 Huntington's disease patients and 49 healthy controls was run through a cortical pattern-matching program. The surface corresponding to the white matter directly below the cortical gray matter was then extracted. Individual subject's Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data was aligned to their structural MRI data. Diffusivity values along the white matter surface were then sampled at each vertex point. DTI measures with high spatial resolution across the superficial white matter surface were then analyzed with the General Linear Model to test for the effects of disease. There was an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across much of the superficial white matter (p Huntington's disease patients increased diffusivity covered essentially the whole brain (p disease burden (p Huntington's disease. Since, the superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and function these abnormalities suggest it plays an important role in the disease.

  3. Friedreich's Ataxia: a review from a cardiology perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, T

    2011-12-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are not among the common causes of cardiomyopathy in the general population; however, cardiomyopathy is known to occur in several neuromuscular disorders including Friedreich\\'s Ataxia (FA). In patients with neuromuscular disorders, concomitant cardiac involvement contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and often leads to premature death.

  4. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, J.M.; Bush, A.; Gerven, M.; Nissenkorn, A.; Renke, M.; Yarlett, L.; Taylor, M.; Tonia, T.; Warris, A.; Zielen, S.; Zinna, S.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include

  5. Progressive dysarthria and ataxia | McAlpine | South Sudan Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Progressive dysarthria and ataxia. Lynsey McAlpine, Fiona Cran, Eluzai Hakim ...

  6. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Filippo; Barboni, Piero; Liguori, Rocco; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Savini, Giacomo; Gellera, Cinzia; Mariotti, Caterina; Rizzo, Giovanni; Tonon, Caterina; Manners, David; Lodi, Raffaele; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Optic neuropathy is common in mitochondrial disorders, but poorly characterized in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a recessive condition caused by lack of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. We investigated 26 molecularly confirmed FRDA patients by studying both anterior and posterior sections of the visual pathway using a new, integrated approach.…

  7. Molecular Alterations in a Mouse Cardiac Model of Friedreich Ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anzovino, Amy; Chiang, Shannon; Brown, Bronwyn E

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of the antioxidant response. However, studies in models of Friedreich ataxia, a neurodegenerative and cardiodegenerative disease associated with oxidative stress, reported decreased Nrf2 expression attributable to unknown me...

  8. Treatment for dysphagia (swallowing difficulties) in hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Keage, Megan J; Johansson, Kerstin; Schalling, Ellika

    2015-11-13

    Hereditary ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in progressive inco-ordination. Swallowing impairment, also known as dysphagia, is a common and potentially life threatening sequel of disease progression. The incidence and nature of dysphagia in these conditions is largely unknown. The loss of an effective and safe swallow can dramatically affect the health and well-being of an individual. Remediation of difficulties of eating and drinking is an important goal in the clinical care of people with hereditary ataxia. To assess the effects of interventions for swallowing impairment (dysphagia) in people with hereditary ataxias. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) on 14 September 2015. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Dissertation Abstracts, and Trials Registries on 24 September 2015. We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that compared treatments for hereditary ataxia with placebo or no treatment. We only included studies measuring dysphagia. Three review authors (ES, KJ, MK) independently screened all titles and abstracts. In the event of any disagreement or uncertainty over the inclusion of a particular paper, the review authors planned to meet and reach consensus. We identified no RCTs from the 519 titles and abstracts screened. We excluded papers primarily for not including participants with a hereditary ataxia (that is, being focused on other neurological conditions), being theoretical reviews rather than intervention studies, or being neither randomised nor quasi-randomised trials.We identified five papers of various design that described treatment for dysphagia, or improvement to swallow as a by-product of treatment, in people with hereditary ataxia. None of these studies were RCTs or

  9. A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic,

  10. Republished: A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic,

  11. Assessment of speech in early-onset ataxia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Marieke J; Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, Tjitske F; Lunsing, Roelineke J; Keegstra, Anne L; Burger, Huibert; De Koning, Tom J; Tijssen, Marina A J; Sival, Deborah A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether paediatric ataxia speech subscores are reliably applicable for international early-onset ataxia (EOA) databases. If so, we reasoned that ataxia speech subscores should be associated with ataxia scores and involve high interobserver agreement, including those for internationally applicable Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) syllable repetition tasks (SARASRT). Three independent paediatric neurologists and a speech therapist scored speech in 52 healthy children (mean age 10y, range 4-16y) and 40 individuals with EOA (mean age 15y, range 5-34y). We compared ataxia speech subscores for the association with age and ataxia scores as well as interobserver reliability. In healthy children, ataxia speech subscores were moderately associated with age (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale [ICARS]: r=-0.515; SARA: r=-0.321; pataxia scores (ICARS: r=0.552; SARA: r=0.336; pataxia scores (ICARS: r=0.735; SARA: r=0.730; pataxia speech subscores are associated with ataxia and also reveal high interobserver agreement, including those internationally applicable to SARASRT. We conclude that SARASRT appears to be applicable for EOA databases. However, before syllable repetition tasks are included, we would advise to wait for the results published by the international Childhood Ataxia and Cerebellar Group. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  13. Friedreich's ataxia: clinical and molecular study of 25 Brazilian cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Lilian M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Friedreich's ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder whose clinical diagnostic criteria for typical cases basically include: a early age of onset (< 20 or 25 years, b autosomal recessive inheritance, c progressive ataxia of limbs and gait, and d absence of lower limb tendon reflexes. METHODS: We studied the frequency and the size of expanded GAA and their influence on neurologic findings, age at onset, and disease progression in 25 Brazilian patients with clinical diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia - 19 typical and 6 atypical - using a long-range PCR test. RESULTS: Abnormalities in cerebellar signs, in electrocardiography, and pes cavus occurred more frequently in typical cases; however, plantar response and speech were more frequently normal in this group when the both typical and atypical cases were compared. Homozygous GAA expansion repeats were detected in 17 cases (68% - all typical cases. In 8 patients (32% (6 atypical and 2 typical, no expansion was observed, ruling out the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia. In cases with GAA expansions, foot deformity, cardiac abnormalities, and some neurologic findings occurred more frequently; however, abnormalities in cranial nerves and in tomographic findings were detected less frequently than in patients without GAA expansions. DISCUSSION: Molecular analysis was imperative for the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia, not only for typical cases but also for atypical ones. There was no genotype-phenotype correlation. Diagnosis based only on clinical findings is limited; however, it aids in better screening for suspected cases that should be tested. Evaluation for vitamin E deficiency is recommended, especially in cases without GAA expansion.

  14. The Frequency of Huntington Disease and Huntington Disease-Like 2 in the South African Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baine, Fiona K; Krause, Amanda; Greenberg, L Jacquie

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) has most recently been estimated to affect between 10.6 and 13.7 per 100,000 individuals in European populations. However, prevalence is known to differ geographically. In South Africa, the only published estimates are from a survey performed in the 1970s, an era when the disease was believed to be rare or absent in black individuals and molecular confirmation was absent. The disease phenotype in South Africa is currently attributable to mutations in both the huntington and junctophilin-3 genes, which underlie the well-known HD and the rarer HD-like 2 (HDL2) respectively. This study aimed at providing improved minimum estimates of disease frequency in South Africa, based on molecular genetic testing data. A review of all testing records for HD and HDL2 over a 20-year period was undertaken. HDL2 is virtually indistinguishable on clinical features, thus necessitating its inclusion. Based on molecular diagnostic records, minimum estimates of disease frequency are: 5.1, 2.1 and 0.25 (per 100,000 individuals) for the white, mixed ancestry and black population groups respectively. Although ascertainment remains incomplete, these minimum estimates suggest that disease frequencies are significantly higher than those previously reported in South Africa. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. 3-Hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase activity is increased in the brains of Huntington disease victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarcz, R.; Okuno, E.; White, R.J.; Bird, E.D.; Whetsell, W.O. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An excess of the tryptophan metabolite quinolinic acid in the brain has been hypothetically related to the pathogenesis of Huntington disease. Quinolinate's immediate biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase, has now been detected in human brain tissue. The activity of 3-hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase is increased in Huntington disease brains as compared to control brains. The increment is particularly pronounced in the striatum, which is known to exhibit the most prominent nerve-cell loss in Huntington disease. Thus, the Huntington disease brain has a disproportionately high capability to produce the endogenous excitotoxin quinolinic acid. This finding may be of relevance for clinical, neuropathologic, and biochemical features associated with Huntington disease

  16. Personalized gene silencing therapeutics for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, C; Skotte, N H; Southwell, A L; Hayden, M R

    2014-07-01

    Gene silencing offers a novel therapeutic strategy for dominant genetic disorders. In specific diseases, selective silencing of only one copy of a gene may be advantageous over non-selective silencing of both copies. Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Silencing both expanded and normal copies of HTT may be therapeutically beneficial, but preservation of normal HTT expression is preferred. Allele-specific methods can selectively silence the mutant HTT transcript by targeting either the expanded CAG repeat or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium with the expansion. Both approaches require personalized treatment strategies based on patient genotypes. We compare the prospect of safe treatment of HD by CAG- and SNP-specific silencing approaches and review HD population genetics used to guide target identification in the patient population. Clinical implementation of allele-specific HTT silencing faces challenges common to personalized genetic medicine, requiring novel solutions from clinical scientists and regulatory authorities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Haplotype-based stratification of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Michael J; Gillis, Tammy; Atwal, Ranjit S; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Arjomand, Jamshid; Harold, Denise; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F; Lee, Jong-Min

    2017-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in HTT, resulting in an extended polyglutamine tract in huntingtin. We and others have previously determined that the HD-causing expansion occurs on multiple different haplotype backbones, reflecting more than one ancestral origin of the same type of mutation. In view of the therapeutic potential of mutant allele-specific gene silencing, we have compared and integrated two major systems of HTT haplotype definition, combining data from 74 sequence variants to identify the most frequent disease-associated and control chromosome backbones and revealing that there is potential for additional resolution of HD haplotypes. We have used the large collection of 4078 heterozygous HD subjects analyzed in our recent genome-wide association study of HD age at onset to estimate the frequency of these haplotypes in European subjects, finding that common genetic variation at HTT can distinguish the normal and CAG-expanded chromosomes for more than 95% of European HD individuals. As a resource for the HD research community, we have also determined the haplotypes present in a series of publicly available HD subject-derived fibroblasts, induced pluripotent cells, and embryonic stem cells in order to facilitate efforts to develop inclusive methods of allele-specific HTT silencing applicable to most HD patients. Our data providing genetic guidance for therapeutic gene-based targeting will significantly contribute to the developments of rational treatments and implementation of precision medicine in HD.

  18. Cell-based technologies for Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Santoro Haddad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal genetic disorder, which causes the progressive breakdown of neurons in the human brain. HD deteriorates human physical and mental abilities over time and has no cure. Stem cell-based technologies are promising novel treatments, and in HD, they aim to replace lost neurons and/or to prevent neural cell death. Herein we discuss the use of human fetal tissue (hFT, neural stem cells (NSCs of hFT origin or embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs, in clinical and pre-clinical studies. The in vivo use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which are derived from non-neural tissues, will also be discussed. All these studies prove the potential of stem cells for transplantation therapy in HD, demonstrating cell grafting and the ability to differentiate into mature neurons, resulting in behavioral improvements. We claim that there are still many problems to overcome before these technologies become available for HD patient treatment, such as: a safety regarding the use of NSCs and pluripotent stem cells, which are potentially teratogenic; b safety regarding the transplantation procedure itself, which represents a risk and needs to be better studied; and finally c technical and ethical issues regarding cells of fetal and embryonic origin.

  19. Clinical manifestations of intermediate allele carriers in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Esther; Ramos-Arroyo, María A; Martinez-Horta, Saul; Martínez-Descalls, Asunción; Calvo, Sara; Gil-Polo, Cecilia

    2016-08-09

    There is controversy about the clinical consequences of intermediate alleles (IAs) in Huntington disease (HD). The main objective of this study was to establish the clinical manifestations of IA carriers for a prospective, international, European HD registry. We assessed a cohort of participants at risk with Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor, cognitive, and behavior domains, Total Functional Capacity (TFC), and quality of life (Short Form-36 [SF-36]). This cohort was subdivided into IA carriers (27-35 CAG) and controls (genetic status, IAs might confer a late-onset abnormal motor and cognitive phenotype. These results might have important implications for genetic counseling. NCT01590589. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Auditory dysfunction in patients with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profant, Oliver; Roth, Jan; Bureš, Zbyněk; Balogová, Zuzana; Lišková, Irena; Betka, Jan; Syka, Josef

    2017-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disease. The main clinical features are motor impairment, progressive cognitive deterioration and behavioral changes. The aim of our study was to find out whether patients with HD suffer from disorders of the auditory system. A group of 17 genetically verified patients (11 males, 6 females) with various stages of HD (examined by UHDRS - motor part and total functional capacity, MMSE for cognitive functions) underwent an audiological examination (high frequency pure tone audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, speech audiometry, speech audiometry in babble noise, auditory brainstem responses). Additionally, 5 patients underwent a more extensive audiological examination, focused on central auditory processing. The results were compared with a group of age-matched healthy volunteers. Our results show that HD patients have physiologic hearing thresholds, otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses; however, they display a significant decrease in speech understanding, especially under demanding conditions (speech in noise) compared to age-matched controls. Additional auditory tests also show deficits in sound source localization, based on temporal and intensity cues. We also observed a statistically significant correlation between the perception of speech in noise, and motoric and cognitive functions. However, a correlation between genetic predisposition (number of triplets) and function of inner ear was not found. We conclude that HD negatively influences the function of the central part of the auditory system at cortical and subcortical levels, altering predominantly speech processing and sound source lateralization. We have thoroughly characterized auditory pathology in patients with HD that suggests involvement of central auditory and cognitive areas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Tetrabenazine is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Tie-Shan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ expansion in Huntingtin protein (Htt. PolyQ expansion in Httexp causes selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN in HD patients. A number of previous studies suggested that dopamine signaling plays an important role in HD pathogenesis. A specific inhibitor of vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2 tetrabenazine (TBZ has been recently approved by Food and Drug Administration for treatment of HD patients in the USA. TBZ acts by reducing dopaminergic input to the striatum. Results In previous studies we demonstrated that long-term feeding with TBZ (combined with L-Dopa alleviated the motor deficits and reduced the striatal neuronal loss in the yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128 mice. To further investigate a potential beneficial effects of TBZ for HD treatment, we here repeated TBZ evaluation in YAC128 mice starting TBZ treatment at 2 months of age ("early" TBZ group and at 6 months of age ("late" TBZ group. In agreement with our previous studies, we found that both "early" and "late" TBZ treatments alleviated motor deficits and reduced striatal cell loss in YAC128 mice. In addition, we have been able to recapitulate and quantify depression-like symptoms in TBZ-treated mice, reminiscent of common side effects observed in HD patients taking TBZ. Conclusions Our results further support therapeutic value of TBZ for treatment of HD but also highlight the need to develop more specific dopamine antagonists which are less prone to side-effects.

  2. [Cutting-edge MRI techniques for studying neurological diseases focusing on spinocerebellar degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirohisa; Senda, Joe; Ito, Mizuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Haram, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Hazuki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Tsuboi, Takashi; Yoshida, Mari; Naganawa, Shinji; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    This symposium discusses the utility of the different MR techniques in the diagnosis and management of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). Conventional MRI is widely used and can show characteristic signal abnormalities such as putaminal hyperintensity, hyperintense putaminal rim, putaminal hypointensity, hot cross bun sign in the pontine base, and hyperintensity in the middle cerebellar peduncles strengthening a diagnosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, the diagnostic utility of these signal abnormalities in early MSA remains restricted. In addition, it should be considered that different magnetic field strengths and sequences could be influenced on the findings resulting false negative. On the other hand, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) in the pontine base, cerebellum, and putamen will be informative in the early diagnosis of MSA and other SCD prior to conventional MRI changes and even before any clinical manifestation of symptoms. Particularly, DWI, DTI, and VBM are expected to have potential as surrogate markers of disease progression. Further prospective and large studies including earlier disease stages will be needed to clarify whether these novel MR techniques will aid in the future sets of diagnostic criteria and therapeutic trials.

  3. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy1, Jagdeesh Ullal2, Aaron I Vinik21Department of Internal Medicine, Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USA; 2Strelitz Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAAbstract: This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia. Keywords: celiac disease, peripheral neuropathy, autoimmune disease, cerebellar ataxia, type 2 diabetes

  4. Ataxias and cerebellar dysfunction: involvement of synaptic plasticity deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Summary Adaptive processes within cerebellar circuits, such as long-term depression and long-term potentiation at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, have long been seen as important to cerebellar motor learning, and yet little attention has been given to any possible significance of these processes for cerebellar dysfunction and disease. Several forms of ataxia are caused by mutations in genes encoding for ion channels located at key junctures in pathways that lead to the induction of synaptic plasticity, suggesting that there might be an association between deficits in plasticity and the ataxic phenotype. Herein we explore this possibility and examine the available evidence linking the two together, highlighting specifically the role of P/Q-type calcium channels and their downstream effector small-conductance calcium-sensitive (SK2) potassium channels in the regulation of synaptic gain and intrinsic excitability, and reviewing their connections to ataxia. PMID:21232209

  5. Nephritis and cerebellar ataxia: rare presenting features of enteric fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar R

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Enteric fever is a common infectious disease of the tropical world, about 80% of these cases occur in Asian countries. Enteric fever presenting with isolated cerebellar ataxia or nephritis is rare. We report three cases of enteric fever that presented with these complications. Isolated cerebellar ataxia usually occurs in the second week, whereas in our cases it presented within first four days of fever. The common complications of enteric fever related to the urinary tract are cystitis, pyelitis, and pyelonephritis. Glomerulonephritis is uncommon. Most patients with enteric glomerulonephritis present with acute renal failure, hypertensive encephalopathy, or nephritic syndrome. In comparison, our case had milder manifestations. All three patients were treated with parenteral ceftriaxone and showed a prompt recovery.

  6. Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Masakatsu; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuura, Hiraku; Hasegawa, Tatsuhisa; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Morita, Kanako; Ishii, Ryotaro; Mizuta, Ikuko; Kasai, Takashi; Mizuno, Toshiki; Hirano, Shigeru

    2017-10-28

    Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and bilateral vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a novel ataxic disorder consisting of the triad of cerebellar impairment, bilateral vestibular hypofunction, and a somatosensory deficit. We report the first Japanese case of CANVAS. The patient is a 68-year-old Japanese male. He was referred to our university for further evaluation of progressive gait disturbance and ataxia. He exhibited horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus and sensory deficit. Nerve conduction studies showed sensory neuronopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the atrophy of vermis but not of the brainstem. The caloric stimulation and video head impulse test (vHIT) showed bilateral vestibulopathy. The visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) was also impaired. In addition to neurological and electrophysiological examinations, simple neuro-otological examinations (i.e., caloric stimulation, vHIT, and VVOR) may reveal more non-Caucasian cases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Case Report: Neuro-Imaging Findings in Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Mahvelati

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder in which cutaneous and scleral Telangiectasia, cerebellar ataxia and immunodeficiency occur. There is a high incidence of development of malignant tumors, mainly lymphomas. Cerebellar atrophy is the most prominent abnormality and is shown better by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI than CT-Scan. Intracranial hemorrhage occurs rarely. We report a 7 years old boy who admitted for recurrent pulmonary infections. His examination showed ataxic gait with decreased deep tendon reflexes in lower extremities. He had telangiectasia in the eyes and his speech was slurred and difficult. Brain MRI showed cerebellar atrophy with diffuse hyperintensity in white matter, most prominent in occipital region, which was suggestive of leukodystrophy. This white matter change was not reported before in AT.

  8. An improved assay for the determination of Huntington`s disease allele size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, C.; Klinger, K.; Miller, G. [Intergrated Genetics, Framingham, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The hallmark of Huntington`s disease (HD) is the expansion of a polymorphic (CAG)n repeat. Several methods have been published describing PCR amplification of this region. Most of these assays require a complex PCR reaction mixture to amplify this GC-rich region. A consistent problem with trinucleotide repeat PCR amplification is the presence of a number of {open_quotes}stutter bands{close_quotes} which may be caused by primer or amplicon slippage during amplification or insufficient polymerase processivity. Most assays for HD arbitrarily select a particular band for diagnostic purposes. Without a clear choice for band selection such an arbitrary selection may result in inconsistent intra- or inter-laboratory findings. We present an improved protocol for the amplification of the HD trinucleotide repeat region. This method simplifies the PCR reaction buffer and results in a set of easily identifiable bands from which to determine allele size. HD alleles were identified by selecting bands of clearly greater signal intensity. Stutter banding was much reduced thus permitting easy identification of the most relevant PCR product. A second set of primers internal to the CCG polymorphism was used in selected samples to confirm allele size. The mechanism of action of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction is not clear. It may be possible that the minimal isostabilizing effect of N,N,N trimethylglycine at 2.5 M is significant enough to affect primer specificity. The use of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction facilitated identification of HD alleles and may be appropriate for use in other assays of this type.

  9. Ethical issues and Huntington's disease | Kromberg | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The practice of genetic counselling gives rise to many ethical dilemmas, and counsellors need to be familiar with the principles of biomedical ethics. The primary principles include respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. A case of identical twins at 50% risk for Huntington's disease, in which only one ...

  10. Reduced gluconeogenesis and lactate clearance in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Knud; Nielsen, Signe M B; Campos, André

    2010-01-01

    We studied systemic and brain glucose and lactate metabolism in Huntington's disease (HD) patients in response to ergometer cycling. Following termination of exercise, blood glucose increased abruptly in control subjects, but no peak was seen in any of the HD patients (2.0 ± 0.5 vs. 0.0 ± 0.2mM, P...

  11. Biological Markers of Cognition in Prodromal Huntington's Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Kathryn V.; Kaplan, Richard F.; Snyder, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal-dominant genetic disorder, has historically been viewed as a degenerative movement disorder but it also includes psychiatric symptoms and progressive cognitive decline. There has been a lack of consensus in the literature about whether or not cognitive signs can be detected in carriers before clinical…

  12. Observations on Patient and Family Coping with Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falek, Arthur

    1979-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. No definitive method for the preclinical detection of carriers is known. The consequences of this diagnosis are discussed. The significance of genetic counseling and a description of the phases in psychological coping is presented to enable informed decision making by family…

  13. The Counselor and Genetic Disease: Huntington's Disease as a Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Nancy S.

    This speech offers a brief description of Huntington's Disease (HD): its causes, symptoms, and incidence. It then concentrates on the psychological problems of persons one of whose parents had the disease, and the role of the counselor in helping these humans cope with their fears about contacting it themselves. A relatively detailed case study is…

  14. Clinical and genetic features of Huntington disease in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Dissanayake, Vajira H W

    2013-12-05

    Huntington disease was one of the first neurological hereditary diseases for which genetic testing was made possible as early as 1993. The study describes the clinical and genetic characteristics of patients with Huntington disease in Sri Lanka. Data of 35 consecutive patients tested from 2007 to 2012 at the Human Genetics Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo was analyzed retrospectively. Clinical data and genetic diagnostic results were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics. Thirty patients had fully penetrant (FP) CAG repeat mutations and 5 had reduced penetrant (RP) CAG repeat mutations. In the FP group mean ages of onset and diagnosis were 37.5 and 40.4 years, while in the RP group it was 63.0 and 64.8 years respectively. The age of diagnosis ranged from 15 to 72 years, with 2 patients with Juvenile onset (60 years) Huntington disease. The symptoms at diagnosis were predominantly motor (32/35 -91%). Three patients had psychiatric and behavioral disorders. The age difference between onset and genetic diagnosis showed significant delay in females compared to males (p disease. In both groups, those with a family history had a significantly lower age of presentation (p genetic features seen in patients with Huntington disease in the Sri Lankan study population were similar to that previously reported in literature.

  15. Huntington II Simulation Program-POLUT. Resource Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, L.; And Others

    Instructions for using the Huntington II Simulation Program - POLUT are contained in this resource handbook. POLUT is a program written in BASIC which provides simulation of the interaction between water and waste. It creates a context within which the user can control specific variables which affect the quality of a water resource. The output is…

  16. Major Superficial White Matter Abnormalities in Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Owen R.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Sanchez-Castaneda, Cristina; Narr, Katherine; Shattuck, David W.; Caltagirone, Carlo; Sabatini, Umberto; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The late myelinating superficial white matter at the juncture of the cortical gray and white matter comprising the intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received attention in Huntington's disease. It is an area of the brain that is late myelinating and is sensitive to both normal aging and neurodegenerative disease effects. Therefore, it may be sensitive to Huntington's disease processes. Methods: Structural MRI data from 25 Pre-symptomatic subjects, 24 Huntington's disease patients and 49 healthy controls was run through a cortical pattern-matching program. The surface corresponding to the white matter directly below the cortical gray matter was then extracted. Individual subject's Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data was aligned to their structural MRI data. Diffusivity values along the white matter surface were then sampled at each vertex point. DTI measures with high spatial resolution across the superficial white matter surface were then analyzed with the General Linear Model to test for the effects of disease. Results: There was an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across much of the superficial white matter (p superficial white matter even before symptoms are present in Huntington's disease. Since, the superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and function these abnormalities suggest it plays an important role in the disease. PMID:27242403

  17. Remifentanil in a patient with Huntington's chorea - case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively few published case reports related to the anaesthetic management of Huntington's chorea (HC) exist. At the time of surgery no publications were found related to remifentanil's use in patients with HC. This case report describes the management of a confirmed HC patient requiring urgent decompression of a spinal ...

  18. The emotional experiences of family carers in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet K; Skirton, Heather; Paulsen, Jane S; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Jarmon, Lori; McGonigal Kenney, Meghan; Birrer, Emily; Hennig, Bonnie L; Honeyford, Joann

    2009-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine the emotional experience of caregiving by family carers of people with Huntington disease and to describe strategies they used to deal with that experience. Huntington disease, commonly diagnosed in young to middle adulthood, is an inherited single gene disorder involving loss of cognitive, motor and neuropsychiatric function. Many family members become caregivers as well as continuing as parents and wage earners. The emotional aspects of caregiving contribute to mental health risks for family members. Focus groups were conducted with 42 adult carers of people with Huntington disease in four United States and two Canadian Huntington disease centers between 2001 and 2005. Data were analyzed through descriptive coding and thematic analysis. All participants reported multiple aspects of emotional distress. Being a carer was described as experiencing disintegration of one's life. Carers attempted to cope by seeking comfort from selected family members, anticipating the time when the care recipient had died and/or using prescription medications. Spousal carers were distressed by the loss of their relationship with their spouse and dealt with this by no longer regarding the person as an intimate partner. Carers were concerned about the disease risk for children in their families and hoped for a cure. Emotional distress can compromise the well-being of family carers, who attempt to maintain multiple roles. Nurses should monitor carer mental health, identify sources of emotional distress and support effective strategies used by carers to mediate distress.

  19. Huntington II Simulation Program-POLUT. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, L.; And Others

    This teacher's guide is written to accompany the Huntington II Simulation Program - POLUT. POLUT is a program written in BASIC which provides simulation of the interaction between water and waste. It creates a context within which the user can control specific variables which effect the quality of a water resource. The teacher's guide provides…

  20. Biographical sketch: Thomas W. Huntington, MD (1849-1929).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Richard A

    2012-10-01

    This biographical sketch on Thomas Huntington corresponds to the historic text, The classic: case of bone transference. use of a segment of fibula to supply a defect in the tibia (1905), available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-012-2496-z .

  1. PSYCHIATRIC ASPECTS OF HUNTINGTON DISEASE – CASE REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Batta

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Huntington disease occurrs rarely, it can be encountered not only by neurologists and psychiatrists but also by other medical practitioners. Its characteristic features are involuntary movements, cognitive disorders and gradual development of dementia. Diagnosis is given on the basis of these clinical features, positive familial anamnesis, with the laboratory exclusion of other neuropsychiatric diseases and with the help of neuroimaging methods (in particular NMR. The disease can be only confirmed by means of genetic analysis.Patients and methods. In this article, four cases of patients with Huntington disease and diverse psychiatric disorders that were hospitalised at the psychiatric department of the Maribor General Hospital between October 2002 and March 2003 are described. All the patients fulfilled the valid criteria for the diagnosis of Huntington disease. However, they differed according to their accompanying psychiatric psychopathology, age and social problems.Conclusions. The purpose of this article is to draw attention to different psychiatric symptoms and clinical manifestations of Huntington disease that are often misleading in the diagnostic process. In addition, exigency of early diagnostics, guidelines for referrals to genetic testing and psychiatric monitoring of these patients are emphasised.

  2. Premanifest Huntington's disease: Examination of oculomotor abnormalities in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Jessica Y; Roos, Raymund A C

    2018-01-01

    Different oculomotor abnormalities have been reported to occur in premanifest Huntington's disease. The aim of this study is to investigate which oculomotor items of the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) are affected in premanifest individuals compared to healthy controls, and if CAG repeat length and age are correlated with oculomotor abnormalities in premanifest Huntington's disease gene carriers. We compared baseline data of 70 premanifest individuals and 27 controls who participated in the Enroll-HD study at the Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands. Premanifest gene carriers were divided in individuals near to disease onset and individuals far from disease onset. Using a logistic regression model, only horizontal ocular pursuit of the six oculomotor items of the UHDRS was significantly more frequently affected in premanifest individuals close to disease onset compared to controls (p = 0.044, OR 13.100). Age was significantly higher in premanifest individuals with affected horizontal ocular pursuit (p = 0.016, OR 1.115) and with affected vertical ocular pursuit (p = 0.030, OR 1.065) compared to premanifest individuals without ocular pursuit deficits. Our results suggest that horizontal ocular pursuit is the only affected oculomotor item of the UHDRS in premanifest individuals and could be used to assess early clinical signs of Huntington's disease. Saccade initiation and saccade velocity do not seem useful for detecting differences between premanifest individuals and controls.

  3. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatt, Jayesh M.; Bush, Andrew; Gerven, Marjo van; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Renke, Michael; Yarlett, Lian; Taylor, Malcolm; Tonia, Thomy; Warris, Adilia; Zielen, Stefan; Zinna, Shairbanu; Merkus, Peter J. F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial...

  4. Transient cerebellopontine demyelinisation revealed by MRI in acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufricht, C.A.; Tenner, W.; Rosenmayr, F.; Stiglbauer, R.

    1990-01-01

    An eight year old boy was admitted to our ward with a history of abrupt onset of rapidly progressive gait disorder, nausea, vertigo and vomiting. The clinical as well as the laboratory findings suggested the diagnosis of acute cerebellar ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, showed marked demyelinisation in the cerebellar region and visual evoked potentials were pathologic. After immunosuppression the patient promptly improved clinically and the lesions depicted by MRI disappeared almost completely. (orig.)

  5. The Development of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Kinase Inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrs, M.; Kobarecny, J.; Nepovimova, E.; Jun, D.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Moravcová, Simona; Hanzlíková, Hana; Kuca, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 10 (2014), s. 805-811 ISSN 1389-5575 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0044 Grant - others:MH CZ - DRO (University Hospital Hradec Kralove(CZ) 00179906 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Ataxia telangiectasia mutated * cancer * chemosensitization * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  6. The first knockin mouse model of episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Samuel J; Kriener, Lisa H; Heinzer, Ann K; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Hess, Ellen J

    2014-11-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with attacks of ataxia that are typically precipitated by stress, ethanol, caffeine or exercise. EA2 is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the α1A subunit of the CaV2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. To better understand the pathomechanisms of this disorder in vivo, we created the first genetic animal model of EA2 by engineering a mouse line carrying the EA2-causing c.4486T>G (p.F1406C) missense mutation in the orthologous mouse Cacna1a gene. Mice homozygous for the mutated allele exhibit a ~70% reduction in CaV2.1 current density in Purkinje cells, though surprisingly do not exhibit an overt motor phenotype. Mice hemizygous for the knockin allele (EA2/- mice) did exhibit motor dysfunction measurable by rotarod and pole test. Studies using Cre-flox conditional genetics explored the role of cerebellar Purkinje cells or cerebellar granule cells in the poor motor performance of EA2/- mice and demonstrate that manipulation of either cell type alone did not cause poor motor performance. Thus, it is possible that subtle dysfunction arising from multiple cell types is necessary for the expression of certain ataxia syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Semantic, phonologic, and verb fluency in Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Jardim Azambuja

    Full Text Available Abstract Verbal fluency tasks have been identified as important indicators of executive functioning impairment in patients with frontal lobe dysfunction. Although the usual evaluation of this ability considers phonologic and semantic criteria, there is some evidence that fluency of verbs would be more sensitive in disclosing frontostriatal physiopathology since frontal regions primarily mediate retrieval of verbs. Huntington's disease usually affects these circuitries. Objective: To compare three types of verbal fluency task in the assessment of frontal-striatal dysfunction in HD subjects. Methods: We studied 26 Huntington's disease subjects, divided into two subgroups: mild (11 and moderate (15 along with 26 normal volunteers matched for age, gender and schooling, for three types of verbal fluency: phonologic fluency (F-A-S, semantic fluency and fluency of verbs. Results: Huntington's disease subjects showed a significant reduction in the number of words correctly generated in the three tasks when compared to the normal group. Both controls and Huntington's disease subjects showed a similar pattern of decreasing task performance with the greatest number of words being generated by semantic elicitation followed by verbs and lastly phonologic criteria. We did not find greater production of verbs compared with F-A-S and semantic conditions. Moreover, the fluency of verbs distinguished only the moderate group from controls. Conclusion: Our results indicated that phonologic and semantic fluency can be used to evaluate executive functioning, proving more sensitive than verb fluency. However, it is important to point out that the diverse presentations of Huntington's disease means that an extended sample is necessary for more consistent analysis of this issue.

  8. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome: An under-recognised cause of tremor and ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalus, Sarah; King, John; Lui, Elaine; Gaillard, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a progressive degenerative movement disorder resulting from a fragile X "premutation", defined as 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The FMR1 premutation occurs in 1/800 males and 1/250 females, with FXTAS affecting 40-45% of male and 8-16% of female premutation carriers over the age of 50. FXTAS typically presents with kinetic tremor and cerebellar ataxia. FXTAS has a classical imaging profile which, in concert with clinical manifestations and genetic testing, participates vitally in its diagnosis. The revised FXTAS diagnostic criteria include two major radiological features. The "MCP sign", referring to T2 hyperintensity in the middle cerebellar peduncle, has long been considered the radiological hallmark of FXTAS. Recently included as a major radiological criterion in the diagnosis of FXTAS is T2 hyperintensity in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Other imaging features of FXTAS include T2 hyperintensities in the pons, insula and periventricular white matter as well as generalised brain and cerebellar atrophy. FXTAS is an under-recognised and misdiagnosed entity. In patients with unexplained tremor, ataxia and cognitive decline, the presence of middle cerebellar peduncle and/or corpus callosum splenium hyperintensity should raise suspicion of FXTAS. Diagnosis of FXTAS has important implications not only for the patient but also, through genetic counselling and testing, for future generations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeting the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null phenotype in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with pro-oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathanggelou, Angelo; Weston, Victoria J.; Perry, Tracey; Davies, Nicholas J.; Skowronska, Anna; Payne, Daniel T.; Fossey, John S.; Oldreive, Ceri E.; Wei, Wenbin; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Oscier, David; Coles, Steve J.; Hole, Paul S.; Darley, Richard L.; McMahon, Michael; Hayes, John D.; Moss, Paul; Stewart, Grant S.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia results in resistance to p53-dependent apoptosis and inferior responses to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Hence, p53-independent strategies are required to target Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-deficient chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated has been implicated in redox homeostasis, we investigated the effect of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia genotype on cellular responses to oxidative stress with a view to therapeutic targeting. We found that in comparison to Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-wild type chronic lymphocytic leukemia, pro-oxidant treatment of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null cells led to reduced binding of NF-E2 p45-related factor-2 to antioxidant response elements and thus decreased expression of target genes. Furthermore, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells contained lower levels of antioxidants and elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Consequently, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not tumors with 11q deletion or TP53 mutations, exhibited differentially increased sensitivity to pro-oxidants both in vitro and in vivo. We found that cell death was mediated by a p53- and caspase-independent mechanism associated with apoptosis inducing factor activity. Together, these data suggest that defective redox-homeostasis represents an attractive therapeutic target for Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:25840602

  10. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  11. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Dash, Hh

    2011-07-01

    Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  12. Ataxia and Its Association with Hearing Impairment in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roine, Irmeli; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Leite Cruzeiro, Manuel; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Ataxia, deemed usually a minor sequela, follows childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) in up to 18% of cases. Although mostly transient and benign, it can predict permanent hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. We explored the clinical meaning of ataxia by following its course in a large number of BM patients and examining its relation with hearing loss. The presence, degree (no, mild, moderate and severe) and course (transient, prolonged and late) of ataxia in BM were registered prospectively by predefined criteria. These data were compared with several patient, disease, and outcome variables including hearing loss (none, moderate, severe and profound) on day 7 of treatment and at a follow-up visit 1 month after discharge. Ataxia was present in 243 of 361 (67%) patients on day 7, being slight in 21%, moderate in 38% and severe in 41%. Its course was transient in 41%, prolonged in 24% and late in 5%, whereas 30% of the patients did not present ataxia at any time. Ataxia associated most significantly not only with several measures of BM severity and suboptimal outcome (P ataxia correlated with the extent of hearing loss (rho, 0.37; P Ataxia is more frequent and lasts longer after BM than learned from previous studies. The presence and intensity of ataxia associate with hearing loss and its magnitude.

  13. Abnormal brain MRI in a case of acute ataxia as the only sign of abdominal neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla Mohammadi, M.; Karimzadeh, P.; Khatami, A.; Jadali, F.

    2010-01-01

    Ataxia is a movement disorder that may manifest an acute, intermittent, non progressive or chronic progressive course. Ataxia alone is rare as a para neoplastic sign, especially if it is due to neuroblastoma (abdominal or chest). We report an abdominal neuroblastoma in a two-year-old girl presenting with only acute ataxia and abnormal neuroimaging. Brain MRI showed abnormal signal finding in the medulla, pons, cortico spinal tract and the periventricular space. In the abdominal CT, a mass was detected in the right adrenal gland with calcification and the histopathologic examination re-vealed neuroblastoma. We suggest in children with acute ataxia, with or without opalescence-myoclonus, neuroblastoma should be considered.

  14. Disease stage, but not sex, predicts depression and psychological distress in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Maria; Maltby, John; Shimozaki, Steve

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Depression and anxiety significantly affect morbidity in Huntington's disease. Mice. models of Huntington's disease have identified sex differences in mood-like behaviours that vary across disease lifespan, but this interaction has not previously been explored in humans with Huntington......'s disease. However, among certain medical populations, evidence of sex differences in mood across various disease stages has been found, reflecting trends among the general population that women tend to experience anxiety and depression 1.5 to 2 times more than men. The current study examined whether...... disease stage and sex, either separately or as an interaction term, predicted anxiety and depression in Huntington's disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of REGISTRY data involving 453 Huntington's disease participants from 12 European countries was undertaken using the Hospital Anxiety...

  15. Placebo effect characteristics observed in a single, international, longitudinal study in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Esther; González, Miguel; del Puerto, Inés; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Arconada, Olga Fernández; Gabriel y Galán, José María Trejo

    2012-03-01

    Classically, clinical trials are based on the placebo-control design. Our aim was to analyze the placebo effect in Huntington's disease. Placebo data were obtained from an international, longitudinal, placebo-controlled trial for Huntington's disease (European Huntington's Disease Initiative Study Group). One-hundred and eighty patients were evaluated using the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale over 36 months. A placebo effect was defined as an improvement of at least 50% over baseline scores in the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale, and clinically relevant when at least 10% of the population met it. Only behavior showed a significant placebo effect, and the proportion of the patients with placebo effect ranged from 16% (first visit) to 41% (last visit). Nondepressed patients with better functional status were most likely to be placebo-responders over time. In Huntington's disease, behavior seems to be more vulnerable to placebo than overall motor function, cognition, and function Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Acoustic characteristics of ataxic speech in Japanese patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikui, Yukiko; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Koyano, Shigeru; Hirose, Hajime; Taguchi, Takahide

    2012-01-01

    In English- and German-speaking countries, ataxic speech is often described as showing scanning based on acoustic impressions. Although the term 'scanning' is generally considered to represent abnormal speech features including prosodic excess or insufficiency, any precise acoustic analysis of ataxic speech has not been performed in Japanese-speaking patients. This raises the question of what is the most dominant acoustic characteristic of ataxic speech in Japanese subjects, particularly related to the perceptual impression of 'scanning'. The study was designed to investigate the nature of speech characteristics of Japanese ataxic subjects, particularly 'scanning', by means of acoustic analysis. The study comprised 20 Japanese cases with spinocerebellar degeneration diagnosed to have a perceptual impression of scanning by neurologists (ataxic group) and 20 age-matched normal healthy subjects (control group). Recordings of speech samples of Japanese test sentences were obtained from each subject. The recorded and digitized acoustic samples were analysed using 'Acoustic Core-8' (Arcadia Inc.). Sentence duration was significantly longer in the ataxic group as compared with the control group, indicating that the speaking rate was slower in the ataxic subjects. Segment duration remained consistent in both vowels and consonants in the control group as compared with the ataxic group. In particular, the duration of vowel segments, i.e. the nucleus of Japanese mora, was significantly invariable in the control group regardless of differences between subjects as well as in segments compared with the ataxic group. In addition, the duration of phonemically long Japanese vowels was significantly shorter in the ataxic group. The results indicate that the perceptual impression of 'scanning' in Japanese ataxic cases derives mainly from the breakdown of isochrony in terms of difficulty in keeping the length of vowel segments of Japanese invariable during speech production. In

  17. Huntington disease: a case study of early onset presenting as depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesterhus, Pia; Schimmelmann, Benno Graf; Wittkugel, Oliver; Schulte-Markwort, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Huntington disease is a dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disease characterized by choreiform movement disturbances and dementia, usually with adult onset. The rare juvenile-onset Huntington disease differs from the adult phenotype. A case presenting twice, at age 10 with all the signs of a major depression and age 14 with mutism and rigidity, is reported. Meanwhile, the father developed the adult variant of Huntington disease. The boy's diagnosis was confirmed by molecular genetic analysis and magnetic resonance imaging. It is important to be aware of hereditary conditions such as Huntington disease and to provide family counseling before genetic testing and after the diagnosis is confirmed.

  18. The assessment and treatment of postural disorders in cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquer, A; Barbieri, G; Pérennou, D

    2014-03-01

    Gait and balance disorders are often major causes of handicap in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Although it was thought that postural and balance disorders in cerebellar ataxia were not treatable, recent studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of rehabilitation programs. This article is the first systematic review on the treatment of postural disorders in cerebellar ataxia. Nineteen articles were selected, of which three were randomized, controlled trials. Various aetiologies of cerebellar ataxia were studied: five studies assessed patients with multiple sclerosis, four assessed patients with degenerative ataxia, two assessed stroke patients and eight assessed patients with various aetiologies. Accurate assessment of postural disorders in cerebellar ataxia is very important in both clinical trials and clinical practice. The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) is a simple, validated measurement tool, for which 18 of the 40 points are related to postural disorders. This scale is useful for monitoring ataxic patients with postural disorders. There is now moderate level evidence that rehabilitation is efficient to improve postural capacities of patients with cerebellar ataxia - particularly in patients with degenerative ataxia or multiple sclerosis. Intensive rehabilitation programs with balance and coordination exercises are necessary. Although techniques such as virtual reality, biofeedback, treadmill exercises with supported bodyweight and torso weighting appear to be of value, their specific efficacy has to be further investigated. Drugs have only been studied in degenerative ataxia, and the level of evidence is low. There is now a need for large, randomized, controlled trials testing rehabilitation programs suited to postural and gait disorders of patients with cerebellar ataxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients.

  20. Family caregivers' views on coordination of care in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Collaboration between family caregivers and health professionals in specialised hospitals or community-based primary healthcare systems can be challenging. During the course of severe chronic disease, several health professionals might be involved at a given time, and the patient......'s illness may be unpredictable or not well understood by some of those involved in the treatment and care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and expectations of family caregivers for persons with Huntington's disease concerning collaboration with healthcare professionals. METHODS......: To shed light on collaboration from the perspectives of family caregivers, we conducted an explorative, qualitative interview study with 15 adult participants experienced from caring for family members in all stages of Huntington's disease. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation, a cross...

  1. Preimplantation genetics and other reproductive options in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancato, Jan K; Wolfe, Erin; Sacks, Preston C

    2017-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a form of prenatal diagnosis applied to potential parents with known carrier status of a genetic disease, such as Huntington disease. It employs the use of polymerase chain reaction to amplify single cells from early embryos obtained with in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. PGD allows the couple the chance to have a pregnancy and livebirth child without Huntington disease, although there are some risks and expenses related to the procedures. Success of the procedure may be greater than standard IVF because the patients are not infertility patients, but are undergoing the procedure to avoid passing a highly deleterious disease gene to offspring. Recent advances in sequencing may allow for higher success rates as the chromosomally abnormal embryos will be identified more easily and the embryos with the highest chance of survival will be transferred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Huntington ou la culture de l'ennemi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René-Éric Dagorn

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available « Savoir de qui nous devons avoir peur » (p. 66, et accréditer « l'idée qu'il n'y a pas de politique sans désignation de l'ennemi » (p. 75 : tels sont pour Marc Crépon deux des principaux objectifs de Samuel Huntington dans son ouvrage Le choc des civilisations (Huntington, 1996 issu d'un article paru pendant l'été 1993 dans Foreign Affairs (1993 ; traduction française dans Commentaire , 1994. Car il faut dire et redire que cette théorie du ...

  3. Behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia mimicking Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T Rune; Bruhn, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral changes and cognitive decline are the core clinical manifestations in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD). The behavioral changes may include characteristic stereotypic movements. These movements, although without clear purpose, are not involuntary. Involuntary m...... and Huntington's disease-like (HDL) phenotypes. Although a definite diagnosis will require neuropathological confirmation, we conclude that a HDL phenotype may be part of the clinical spectrum of the bv-FTD phenotype....... movements are usually not seen in FTD.Two patients with involuntary choreoathetoid movements but otherwise presenting a bv-FTD-phenotype were referred and Huntington's disease (HD) was suspected. The diagnoses of bv-FTD were made after comprehensive assessment and exclusion of other diagnoses, including HD...

  4. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty

    2011-01-01

    results from 121 laboratories across 15 countries. We report on 1326 duplicate results; a discrepancy in reporting the upper allele occurred in 51% of cases, this reduced to 13.3% and 9.7% when we applied acceptable measurement errors proposed by the American College of Medical Genetics and the Draft......Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original...... European Best Practice Guidelines, respectively. Duplicate results were available for 1250 lower alleles; discrepancies occurred in 40% of cases. Clinically significant discrepancies occurred in 4.0% of cases with a potential unexplained misdiagnosis rate of 0.3%. There was considerable variation...

  5. Caregiver roles in families affected by Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2013-01-01

    AIM: The objective of this study was to explore family caregivers' experiences with the impact of Huntington's disease (HD) on the family structure and roles in the family. METHODOLOGY: We interviewed 15 family caregivers in families affected by HD, based on a semi-structured interview guide...... for impairments by taking on adult responsibilities, and in some families, a child had the role as main caregiver. The increasing need for care could cause conflicts between the role as family member and family caregiver. The burden of care within the family could fragment and isolate the family. CONCLUSIONS....... The participants were recruited through hospital departments and a lay organisation for HD in Norway. Data from the interviews were analysed with systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Huntington's disease could have a substantial impact on the family system, the shape of roles among family members...

  6. A cast-iron guarantee of ataxia and deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingde, Meena; Ell, Jonathan; Pamphlett, Roger

    2005-09-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare condition that is thought to be caused by repeated subarachnoid haemorrhages. The major clinical features are progressive bilateral hearing loss, cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal dysfunction. Ante-mortem diagnosis is now possible due to MRI and post mortem reports of this condition are becoming rare. Despite the occurrence of typical clinical features the diagnosis is often missed during life if CT scanning alone is performed. We describe a case of superficial siderosis of the CNS with clinical and post mortem findings as a reminder of this unusual condition.

  7. Ataxia, Dementia, and Hypogonadotropism Caused by Disordered Ubiquitination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margolin, David H.; Kousi, Maria; Chan, Yee-Ming

    2013-01-01

    affected patients. Neurologic and reproductive endocrine phenotypes were characterized in detail. The effects of sequence variants and the presence of an epistatic interaction were tested in a zebrafish model. RESULTS Digenic homozygous mutations in RNF216 and OTUD4, which encode a ubiquitin E3 ligase...... in zebrafish embryos induced defects in the eye, optic tectum, and cerebellum; combinatorial suppression of both genes exacerbated these phenotypes, which were rescued by nonmutant, but not mutant, human RNF216 or OTUD4 messenger RNA. All patients had progressive ataxia and dementia. Neuronal loss was observed...

  8. Ataxia cerebelar aguda na criança

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriana Moura Ribeiro

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 6 crianças com ataxia cerebelar aguda. Admitem os autores a presença de um fator etiológico de caráter viral comum a todos êles, discutindo os mecanismos patogênicos com base nos casos da literatura. A evolução foi favorável em todos os pacientes, com regressão completa da sintomatologia, dentro do período de 6 a 60 dias.

  9. [Review of the pathogenetic problem of hereditary ataxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgone, G; Gaglio, R M; Piccoli, F

    1984-01-01

    In the inherited ataxias, a heterogeneous group of relatively rare and progressive neurological disorders, abnormalities in pyruvate metabolism have been described. Pyruvate is involved in the glycolitic pathway as an important step, and utilized in the Krebs cycle, the main energy source in the brain. Furthermore, pyruvate and other intermediates in the Krebs cycle, can also serve as a precursors of amino acids for which a role as a neurotransmitter has been shown. The explanation of the basic biochemistry may serve as a basis for a more steady knowledge of the clinical and pathological findings of such diseases.

  10. The emotional experiences of family carers in Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet K.; Skirton, Heather; Paulsen, Jane S.; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Jarmon, Lori; Kenney, Meghan McGonigal; Birrer, Emily; Hennig, Bonnie L.; Honeyford, Joann

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine the emotional experience of caregiving by family carers of people with Huntington disease and to describe strategies they used to deal with that experience. Background Huntington disease, commonly diagnosed in young to middle adulthood, is an inherited single gene disorder involving loss of cognitive, motor and neuropsychiatric function. Many family members become caregivers as well as continuing as parents and wage earners. The emotional aspects of caregiving contribute to mental health risks for family members. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 42 adult carers of people with Huntington disease in four United States and two Canadian Huntington disease centers between 2001 and 2005. Data were analyzed through descriptive coding and thematic analysis. Findings All participants reported multiple aspects of emotional distress. Being a carer was described as experiencing disintegration of one’s life. Carers attempted to cope by seeking comfort from selected family members, anticipating the time when the care recipient had died and/or using prescription medications. Spousal carers were distressed by the loss of their relationship with their spouse and dealt with this by no longer regarding the person as an intimate partner. Carers were concerned about the disease risk for children in their families and hoped for a cure. Conclusion Emotional distress can compromise the well-being of family carers, who attempt to maintain multiple roles. Nurses should monitor carer mental health, identify sources of emotional distress and support effective strategies used by carers to mediate distress. PMID:19228233

  11. Mechanisms of Copper Ion Mediated Huntington's Disease Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Jonathan H.; Kama, Jibrin A.; Lieberman, Gregory; Chopra, Raman; Dorsey, Kate; Chopra, Vanita; Volitakis, Irene; Cherny, Robert A.; Bush, Ashley I.; Hersch, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a dominant polyglutamine expansion within the N-terminus of huntingtin protein and results in oxidative stress, energetic insufficiency and striatal degeneration. Copper and iron are increased in the striata of HD patients, but the role of these metals in HD pathogenesis is unknown. We found, using inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectroscopy, that elevations of copper and iron found in human HD brain are reiterated in the brains of affected HD transgeni...

  12. Striatal degeneration impairs language learning: evidence from Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Diego-Balaguer, R; Couette, M; Dolbeau, G; Dürr, A; Youssov, K; Bachoud-Lévi, A-C

    2008-11-01

    Although the role of the striatum in language processing is still largely unclear, a number of recent proposals have outlined its specific contribution. Different studies report evidence converging to a picture where the striatum may be involved in those aspects of rule-application requiring non-automatized behaviour. This is the main characteristic of the earliest phases of language acquisition that require the online detection of distant dependencies and the creation of syntactic categories by means of rule learning. Learning of sequences and categorization processes in non-language domains has been known to require striatal recruitment. Thus, we hypothesized that the striatum should play a prominent role in the extraction of rules in learning a language. We studied 13 pre-symptomatic gene-carriers and 22 early stage patients of Huntington's disease (pre-HD), both characterized by a progressive degeneration of the striatum and 21 late stage patients Huntington's disease (18 stage II, two stage III and one stage IV) where cortical degeneration accompanies striatal degeneration. When presented with a simplified artificial language where words and rules could be extracted, early stage Huntington's disease patients (stage I) were impaired in the learning test, demonstrating a greater impairment in rule than word learning compared to the 20 age- and education-matched controls. Huntington's disease patients at later stages were impaired both on word and rule learning. While spared in their overall performance, gene-carriers having learned a set of abstract artificial language rules were then impaired in the transfer of those rules to similar artificial language structures. The correlation analyses among several neuropsychological tests assessing executive function showed that rule learning correlated with tests requiring working memory and attentional control, while word learning correlated with a test involving episodic memory. These learning impairments significantly

  13. Tracking motor impairments in the progression of Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Long, JD; Paulsen, JS; Marder, K; Zhang, Y; Kim, JI; Mills, JA; Cross, S; Ryan, P; Epping, EA; Vik, S; Chiu, E; Preston, J; Goh, A; Antonopoulos, S; Loi, S

    2014-01-01

    The Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale is used to characterize motor impairments and establish motor diagnosis. Little is known about the timing of diagnostic confidence level categories and the trajectory of motor impairments during the prodromal phase. Goals of this study were to estimate the timing of categories, model the prodromal trajectory of motor impairments, estimate the rate of motor impairment change by category, and provide required sample size estimates for a test of effi...

  14. Huntington's disease: psychiatric issues of a paradigmatic neuropsychiatric disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's Disease (HD) can be considered a paradigmatic neuropsychiatric disorder that has three components: motor, cognitive and behavioral symptoms. The author synthetizes research developed on epidemiology and etipathogeny of HD and makes reference to more usual symptoms, emphasizing psychiatric symptoms, often the first manifestation of HD. About a clinical case, the author points out rhe great phenotypic variability of this disease, reflects about ways to develop the knowledge of the ...

  15. Identification of genetic variants associated with Huntington's disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensman Moss, Davina J; Pardiñas, Antonio F; Langbehn, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    at this SNP was associated with a 0·4 units per year (95% CI 0·16-0·66) reduction in the rate of change of the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) Total Motor Score, and a reduction of 0·12 units per year (95% CI 0·06-0·18) in the rate of change of UHDRS Total Functional Capacity score...

  16. Chronic subdural haematoma in patients with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlivanis, I; Andrich, J; Scholz, M; Harders, A; Saft, C; Schmieder, K

    2006-10-01

    We studied the frequency of patients who had chronic subdural haematomas (CSDH) and Huntington's disease (HD) in a 1-year study period. In our department a total of 58 patients with CSDH were treated. Four patients (6.9% of them) had HD. Surgical evacuation of the haematoma was performed in all four cases with the use of a twist drill trepanation without a drainage system.

  17. Challenges of Huntington's disease and quest for therapeutic biomarkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotrčová, Eva; Jarkovská, Karla; Valeková, Ivona; Žižková, Martina; Motlík, Jan; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, 1-2 (2015), s. 147-158 ISSN 1862-8346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : HD biomarkers * Huntington´s disease * Huntingtin neurotoxicity * Huntingtin pathogenesis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.959, year: 2015

  18. Factors contributing to institutionalization in patients with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam; Kumar, Brahma V; Margolis, Russell L; Welsh, Claire S; Ross, Christopher A

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which factors are predictive of institutionalization in Huntington's disease. Seven hundred and ninety-nine subjects with 4313 examinations from the Baltimore Huntington's Disease Center were included in the data set; 88 of these patients with an average follow-up time of 9.2 years went from living at home to being institutionalized while being observed in our clinic. We examined demographic, genetic, and clinical variables for a relationship with institutionalization using linear regressions, a Cox proportional hazards model, and χ2 or t tests in certain cases. In our linear models, scores on the Quantified Neurologic Examination (R2=0.203, Pinstitutionalization. In addition, CAG repeat length (R2=0.248, Pinstitutionalization, when controlling for age at onset. In the Cox proportional hazards model, scores on the Activities of Daily Living Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, Quantified Neurologic Examination, and Motor Impairment Score all significantly predicted placement in long-term care. Finally, institutionalized patients were shown to have a higher CAG number and a lower level of educational attainment than patients who avoided institutionalization for at least 15 years after disease onset. Neurologic findings, functional capacity, cognitive impairment, and CAG repeat length are all likely determinants of institutionalization. In contrast with other dementing conditions like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, psychiatric symptoms were not shown to predict institutionalization in Huntington's disease. This may illustrate the especially debilitating nature of the movement disorder of Huntington's disease in comparison with the other dementias. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. EFNS/ENS Consensus on the diagnosis and management of chronic ataxias in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Gaalen, J. van; Boesch, S.; Burgunder, J.M.; Durr, A.; Giunti, P.; Klockgether, T.; Mariotti, C.; Pandolfo, M.; Riess, O.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The ataxias are a challenging group of neurological diseases due the aetiological heterogeneity and the complexity of the genetic subtypes. This guideline focuses on the heredodegenerative ataxias. The aim is to provide a peer-reviewed evidence-based guideline for clinical

  20. [Gluten Ataxia: Anti-Transglutaminase-6 Antibody as a New Biomarker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenji; Nanri, Kazunori

    2017-08-01

    Gluten-related disorders (GRDs) are conditions that develop in response to the common trigger of gluten ingestion and manifest as a variety of clinical symptoms. GRDs have been considered rare in Asian countries, including Japan, because of lower consumption of wheat products than in Europe and the U.S.A. and differences in genetic background. Recently, however, GRDs, such as celiac disease and gluten ataxia, have been reported in Japan, albeit sporadically and their presence is now recognized in this country. Gluten ataxia is defined as an anti-gliadin antibody positive sporadic ataxia. Recently, it was reported that the presence of anti-transglutaminase-6 (TG6) antibody can be used to diagnose gluten ataxia. Herein, we will review evidence relating to gluten ataxia and report two cases of anti-TG6 antibody positive gluten ataxia. In patients with gluten ataxia, sensory disturbance is generally considered to be so mild that it contributes minimally to ataxia. However, our patients showed a positive Romberg sign. Deep sensory disturbance, in addition to cerebellar disturbance, may have been involved in the clinical symptoms of our cases.