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Sample records for spinal deformity problems

  1. SPINAL DEFORMITIES AFTER SELECTIVE DORSAL RHIZOTOMY

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    PATRICIO PABLO MANZONE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR used for spasticity treatment could worsen or develop spinal deformities. Our goal is to describe spinal deformities seen in patients with cerebral palsy (CP after being treated by SDR. Methods: Retrospective study of patients operated on (SDR between January/1999 and June/2012. Inclusion criteria: spinal Rx before SDR surgery, spinography, and assessment at follow-up. We evaluated several factors emphasizing level and type of SDR approach, spinal deformity and its treatment, final Risser, and follow-up duration. Results: We found 7 patients (6 males: mean age at SDR 7.56 years (4.08-11.16. Mean follow-up: 6.64 years (2.16-13, final age: 14.32 years (7.5-19. No patient had previous deformity. GMFCS: 2 patients level IV, 2 level III, 3 level II. Initial walking status: 2 community walkers, 2 household walkers, 2 functional walkers, 1 not ambulant, at the follow-up, 3 patients improved, and 4 kept their status. We found 4 TL/L laminotomies, 2 L/LS laminectomies, and 1 thoracic laminectomy. Six spinal deformities were observed: 2 sagittal, 3 mixed, and 1 scoliosis. There was no association among the type of deformity, final gait status, topographic type, GMFCS, age, or SDR approach. Three patients had surgery indication for spinal deformity at skeletal maturity, while those patients with smaller deformities were still immature (Risser 0 to 2/3 although with progressive curves. Conclusions: After SDR, patients should be periodically evaluated until they reach Risser 5. The development of a deformity does not compromise functional results but adds morbidity because it may require surgical treatment.

  2. The transformation of spinal curvature into spinal deformity: pathological processes and implications for treatment

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    Hawes Martha C

    2006-03-01

    potential to cause symptoms throughout life. Research to define patient-specific mechanics of spinal loading may allow quantification of a critical threshold at which curvature establishment and progression become inevitable, and thereby yield strategies to prevent development of spinal deformity. Even within the normal spine there is considerable flexibility with the possibility of producing many types of curves that can be altered during the course of normal movements. To create these curves during normal movement simply requires an imbalance of forces along the spine and, extending this concept a little further, a scoliotic curve is produced simply by a small but sustained imbalance of forces along the spine. In fact I would argue that no matter what you believe to be the cause of AIS, ultimately the problem can be reduced to the production of an imbalance of forces along the spine 1.

  3. Non osseous intra-spinal tumors in children and adolescents: spinal column deformity (in french)

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    Ghanem, I.; Zeller, R.; Dubousset, J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose of the study. The delay in diagnosis of spinal tumors is not rare. The chief complaint may include pain, walking disability and spinal or limb deformities. The purpose of our study is to analyze the spinal deformities associated with non osseous intra-spinal tumors, to assess the complications of treatment, and to set out a preventive protocol. Methods. The incidence and pattern of spinal deformity was assessed before tumor treatment and ultimately after laminectomy or osteoplastic laminotomy (or lamino-plasty). Results. Among the 9 cases with preexisting spinal deformity, the curve magnitude increased after laminectomy in 4. A kyphotic, kyphoscoliotic or scoliotic deformity developed in 18 cases after surgery for tumor resection. Among these 18 patients, only one had bad an adequate osteoplastic laminotomy. The treatment of spinal deformities was surgical in 12 cases, and done by either posterior or anterior and posterior combined arthrodesis. Discussion. Spinal deformity may be the main complaint of a patient who has intraspinal tumor. Prevention of post-laminectomy spinal deformity is mandatory, and could be done by osteoplastic laminotomy and the use of a brace during a minimum period of 4 to 6 months after surgery. Conclusion. Diagnosis of intraspinal tumors in children and adolescents should be done early, and lamino-arthrectomy should be replaced by osteoplastic laminotomy. (authors)

  4. Spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism).

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    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Demosthenous, Nestor; McMaster, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    Retrospective review of a case series. To present the clinical characteristics and progression of spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome. There is limited information on the development of spinal deformity and the need for treatment in this condition. The medical records and spinal radiographs of 5 consecutive patients were reviewed. All patients were followed to skeletal maturity (mean follow-up: 6.6 y). The mean age at diagnosis of spinal deformity was 11.9 years (range: 5.8 to 14.5) with 4 patients presenting in adolescence. The type of deformity was not uniform. Two patients presented in adolescence with relatively small and nonprogressive thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis, which required observation but no treatment until the end of spinal growth. Three patients underwent spinal deformity correction at a mean age of 11.7 years (range: 6 to 15.4). The first patient developed a double structural thoracic and lumbar scoliosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis extending from T3 to L4. Five years later, she developed marked degenerative changes at the L4/L5 level causing symptomatic bilateral lateral recess stenosis and affecting the L5 nerve roots. She underwent spinal decompression at L4/L5 and L5/S1 levels followed by extension of the fusion to the sacrum. The second patient developed a severe thoracic kyphosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis. The remaining patient presented at the age of 5.9 years with a severe thoracic kyphoscoliosis and underwent a 2-stage antero-posterior spinal arthrodesis. The development of spinal deformity is a common finding in children with Sotos syndrome and in our series it occurred in adolescence in 4 out of 5 patients. There is significant variability on the pattern of spine deformity, ranging from a scoliosis through kyphoscoliosis to a pure kyphosis, and also the age at presentation and need for treatment.

  5. Historical overview of spinal deformities in ancient Greece

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    Vasiliadis, Elias S; Grivas, Theodoros B; Kaspiris, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the history of spinal deformities in ancient Greece. The present study summarizes what we know today for diagnosis and management of spinal deformities in ancient Greece, mainly from the medical treatises of Hippocrates and Galen. Hippocrates, through accurate observation and logical reasoning was led to accurate conclusions firstly for the structure of the spine and secondly for its diseases. He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis. The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates. Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years. PMID:19243609

  6. Historical overview of spinal deformities in ancient Greece

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    Kaspiris Angelos

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Little is known about the history of spinal deformities in ancient Greece. The present study summarizes what we know today for diagnosis and management of spinal deformities in ancient Greece, mainly from the medical treatises of Hippocrates and Galen. Hippocrates, through accurate observation and logical reasoning was led to accurate conclusions firstly for the structure of the spine and secondly for its diseases. He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis. The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates. Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

  7. Radiographic Predictors for Mechanical Failure After Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

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    Hallager, Dennis W; Karstensen, Sven; Bukhari, Naeem

    2017-01-01

    spinal deformity surgery range 12% to 37% in literature. Although the importance of spinal and spino-pelvic alignment is well documented for surgical outcome and ideal alignment has been proposed as sagittal vertical axis (SVA) lordosis (LL) = pelvic incidence ± 9...

  8. Ileus Following Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

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    Durand, Wesley M; Ruddell, Jack H; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-05-23

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a common complication after spine surgery, with particularly high rates after adult spinal deformity surgery (ASD). Few investigations have been conducted, however, on predictors of POI following ASD. The objective of this investigation was to determine risk factors for POI in patients undergoing ASD. We also sought to determine the association between POI and in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and total charges. Data were obtained from the National/Nationwide Inpatient Sample, years 2010 - 2014. ASD patients aged ≥26 years-old were selected using ICD-9-CM codes. Multiple logistic and linear regression were utilized. In total, 59,410 patients were included in the analysis. 7.4% of patients experienced POI. On adjusted analysis, the following variables were associated with increased risk of POI: male sex (OR 1.43, CI 1.10 - 1.85), anterior surgical approach (OR 1.78, CI 1.22 - 2.60), 9+ levels fused (OR 1.84, CI 1.24 - 2.73), electrolyte disorders (OR 2.70, CI 2.15 - 3.39), and pathologic weight loss (OR 1.94, CI 1.08 - 3.46). POI was associated with significantly longer length of stay (+39%, CI 29% - 51%) and higher total charges (+23%, CI 14% - 31%). Risk factors for POI were identified. Patients suffering from ileus exhibited 2.9 days longer length of stay and ∼$80,000 higher total charges. These results may be applied clinically to identify patients at risk of POI and to consider addressing modifiable risk factors preoperatively. Future studies should be conducted with additional data to develop models capable of accurately predicting and preventing POI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Management of Spinal Deformities and Evidence of Treatment Effectiveness

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    Bettany-Saltikov, Josette; Turnbull, Deborah; Ng, Shu Yan; Webb, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The review evaluates the up-to-date evidence for the treatment of spinal deformities, including scoliosis and hyperkyphosis in adolescents and adults. Material and Methods: The PubMed database was searched for review articles, prospective controlled trials and randomized controlled trials related to the treatment of spinal deformities. Articles on syndromic scoliosis were excluded and so were the articles on hyperkyphosis of the spine with causes other than Scheuermann’s disease and osteoporosis. Articles on conservative and surgical treatments of idiopathic scoliosis, adult scoliosis and hyperkyphosis were also included. For retrospective papers, only studies with a follow up period exceeding 10 years were included. Results: The review showed that early-onset idiopathic scoliosis has a worse outcome than late-onset idiopathic scoliosis, which is rather benign. Patients with AIS function well as adults; they have no more health problems when compared to patients without scoliosis, other than a slight increase in back pain and aesthetic concern. Conservative treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) using physiotherapeutic scoliosis-specific exercises (PSSE), specifically PSSR and rigid bracing was supported by level I evidence. Yet to date, there is no high quality evidence (RCT`s) demonstrating that surgical treatment is superior to conservative treatment for the management of AIS. For adult scoliosis, there are only a few studies on the effectiveness of PSSEs and a conclusion cannot as yet be drawn. For hyperkyphosis, there is no high-quality evidence for physiotherapy, bracing or surgery for the treatment of adolescents and adults. However, bracing has been found to reduce thoracic hyperkyphosis, ranging from 55 to 80° in adolescents. In patients over the age of 60, bracing improves the balance score, and reduces spinal deformity and pain. Surgery is indicated in adolescents and adults in the presence of progression of kyphosis

  10. Problem of ''deformed'' superheavy nuclei

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    Sobiczewski, A.; Patyk, Z.; Muntian, I.

    2000-08-01

    Problem of experimental confirmation of deformed shapes of superheavy nuclei situated in the neighbourhood of 270 Hs is discussed. Measurement of the energy E 2+ of the lowest 2+ state in even-even species of these nuclei is considered as a method for this confirmation. The energy is calculated in the cranking approximation for heavy and superheavy nuclei. The branching ratio p 2+ /p 0+ between α decay of a nucleus to this lowest 2+ state and to the ground state 0+ of its daughter is also calculated for these nuclei. The results indicate that a measurement of the energy E 2+ for some superheavy nuclei by electron or α spectroscopy is a promising method for the confirmation of their deformed shapes. (orig.)

  11. Spinal deformities rehabilitation - state of the art review

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    Weiss Hans-Rudolf

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical rehabilitation aims at an improvement in function, capacity and participation. For the rehabilitation of spinal deformities, the goal is to maintain function and prevent secondary symptoms in the short- and long-term. In patients with scoliosis, predictable signs and symptoms include pain and reduced pulmonary function. Materials and methods A Pub Med review was completed in order to reveal substantial evidence for inpatient rehabilitation as performed in Germany. No evidence has been found in general to support claims for actual inpatient rehabilitation programmes as used today. Nevertheless, as there is some evidence that inpatient rehabilitation may be beneficial to patients with spinal deformities complicated by certain additional conditions, the body of evidence there is for conservative treatment of spinal deformities has been reviewed in order to allow suggestions for outpatient conservative treatment and inpatient rehabilitation. Discussion Today, for both children and adolescents, we are able to offer intensive rehabilitation programmes lasting three to five days, which enable the patients to acquire the skills necessary to prevent postures fostering scoliosis in everyday life without missing too much of school teaching subjects at home. The secondary functional impairments adult scoliosis patients might have, as in the opinion of the author, still today require the time of 3-4 weeks in the clinical in-patient setting. Time to address psychosocial as well as somatic limitations, namely chronic pains and cardiorespiratory malfunction is needed to preserve the patients working capability in the long-term. Conclusion Outpatient treatment/rehabilitation is sufficient for adolescents with spinal deformities. Inpatient rehabilitation is recommended for patients with spinal deformities and pain or severe restrictive ventilation disorder.

  12. The minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery algorithm: a reproducible rational framework for decision making in minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery.

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    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lenke, Lawrence G; Park, Paul; Wang, Michael Y; La Marca, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Mundis, Gregory M; Okonkwo, David O; Moal, Bertrand; Fessler, Richard G; Anand, Neel; Uribe, Juan S; Kanter, Adam S; Akbarnia, Behrooz; Fu, Kai-Ming G

    2014-05-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an alternative to open deformity surgery for the treatment of patients with adult spinal deformity. However, at this time MIS techniques are not as versatile as open deformity techniques, and MIS techniques have been reported to result in suboptimal sagittal plane correction or pseudarthrosis when used for severe deformities. The minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery (MISDEF) algorithm was created to provide a framework for rational decision making for surgeons who are considering MIS versus open spine surgery. A team of experienced spinal deformity surgeons developed the MISDEF algorithm that incorporates a patient's preoperative radiographic parameters and leads to one of 3 general plans ranging from MIS direct or indirect decompression to open deformity surgery with osteotomies. The authors surveyed fellowship-trained spine surgeons experienced with spinal deformity surgery to validate the algorithm using a set of 20 cases to establish interobserver reliability. They then resurveyed the same surgeons 2 months later with the same cases presented in a different sequence to establish intraobserver reliability. Responses were collected and tabulated. Fleiss' analysis was performed using MATLAB software. Over a 3-month period, 11 surgeons completed the surveys. Responses for MISDEF algorithm case review demonstrated an interobserver kappa of 0.58 for the first round of surveys and an interobserver kappa of 0.69 for the second round of surveys, consistent with substantial agreement. In at least 10 cases there was perfect agreement between the reviewing surgeons. The mean intraobserver kappa for the 2 surveys was 0.86 ± 0.15 (± SD) and ranged from 0.62 to 1. The use of the MISDEF algorithm provides consistent and straightforward guidance for surgeons who are considering either an MIS or an open approach for the treatment of patients with adult spinal deformity. The MISDEF algorithm was found to have substantial inter- and

  13. Vertebral Column Resection for Rigid Spinal Deformity.

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    Saifi, Comron; Laratta, Joseph L; Petridis, Petros; Shillingford, Jamal N; Lehman, Ronald A; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    Broad narrative review. To review the evolution, operative technique, outcomes, and complications associated with posterior vertebral column resection. A literature review of posterior vertebral column resection was performed. The authors' surgical technique is outlined in detail. The authors' experience and the literature regarding vertebral column resection are discussed at length. Treatment of severe, rigid coronal and/or sagittal malalignment with posterior vertebral column resection results in approximately 50-70% correction depending on the type of deformity. Surgical site infection rates range from 2.9% to 9.7%. Transient and permanent neurologic injury rates range from 0% to 13.8% and 0% to 6.3%, respectively. Although there are significant variations in EBL throughout the literature, it can be minimized by utilizing tranexamic acid intraoperatively. The ability to correct a rigid deformity in the spine relies on osteotomies. Each osteotomy is associated with a particular magnitude of correction at a single level. Posterior vertebral column resection is the most powerful posterior osteotomy method providing a successful correction of fixed complex deformities. Despite meticulous surgical technique and precision, this robust osteotomy technique can be associated with significant morbidity even in the most experienced hands.

  14. Craniofacial features of children with spinal deformities

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    Végh András

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this epidemiological study is to map the dentofacial anomalies that can be correlated to the two most frequent spinal diseases responsible for postural abnormalities and that can be clinically identified by the orthodontic examination. Methods Twenty-three children with Scheuermann's disease participated in the study (mean age: 14Y8M; SD: 1Y8M, 28 with Scoliosis (mean age: 14Y7M; SD: 2Y3M and a control group of 68 orthopedically healthy children (mean age: 14Y8M; SD: 0Y11M. Standardized orthodontic screening protocols were used to map the occlusal relations in the sagittal, vertical, and transversal dimensions, space relations of the maxillary and mandibular frontal segment, and the TMJ status and function. The examinations for the children with orthopedic disorders were supplemented by the evaluation of routine orthodontic radiograms – lateral cephalograms and panoramic X-rays. Results The majority of the dentofacial features examined revealed more and greater abnormalities among patients in the Scheuermann's disease group than in the scoliosis group. In the latter group the proportion of the TMJ symptoms and the consecutive functional deviations were greater. When comparing the values of the two spinal-disorder groups and the control group, statistically significant differences (p p Conclusion The more extended treatment of the malocclusions closely correlated to postural disorders draws attention to the indicators of a higher frequency and severity occurring in the case of the dentofacial deviations in the patients of the MSCH group who had previously been less examined.

  15. Development of spinal deformities in Atlantic salmon and Arctic charr fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline

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    Toften, H.; Jobling, M.

    1996-01-01

    Some individuals within populations of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline (OTC) developed spinal deformations. Possible differences in feed intake and growth of spinally deformed fish relative to fish without any deformities were investigated. Amongst Atlantic salmon, 17% of the fish fed OTC-supplemented feed developed spinal fractures, whereas none of the fish receiving the basic feed did so. Despite deformation of the spinal column, the injured fish continued to feed and grow, but at lower rates than unaffected individuals. In contrast to Atlantic salmon, Arctic charr showed no signs of spinal fractures at any time during the 65-day experiment

  16. Development of spinal deformities in Atlantic salmon and Arctic charr fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline

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    Toften, H.; Jobling, M. [Norwegian Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture, N-9005 Tromsoe (Norway)

    1996-07-01

    Some individuals within populations of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus fed diets supplemented with oxytetracycline (OTC) developed spinal deformations. Possible differences in feed intake and growth of spinally deformed fish relative to fish without any deformities were investigated. Amongst Atlantic salmon, 17% of the fish fed OTC-supplemented feed developed spinal fractures, whereas none of the fish receiving the basic feed did so. Despite deformation of the spinal column, the injured fish continued to feed and grow, but at lower rates than unaffected individuals. In contrast to Atlantic salmon, Arctic charr showed no signs of spinal fractures at any time during the 65-day experiment.

  17. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

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    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pspondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  18. Neurologic Outcomes of Complex Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

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    Lenke, Lawrence G; Fehlings, Michael G; Shaffrey, Christopher I

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, international observational study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate motor neurologic outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for complex adult spinal deformity (ASD). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The neurologic outcomes after surgical correction for ASD have been...... and 16.42% showed an improvement. At 6 months, 10.82% patients showed a decline in preoperative LEMS, 20.52% improvement, and 68.66% maintenance. This was a significant change compared with 6 weeks and at discharge. CONCLUSION: Although complex ASD surgery can restore neurologic function in patients...

  19. Symptomatic spinal cord deformity secondary to a redundant intramedullary shunt catheter

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    Quencer, R.M.; Montalvo Morse, B.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    Right arm pain, motor and sensory loss in the right arm and right facial numbness recurred in a 27 year old quadraplegic shortly after a posttraumatic spinal cord cyst (PTSCC) was shunted via a catheter into the adjacent subarachnoid space. Although shunt malfunction was clinically suspected, metrizamide computed tomography (MCT) suggested that redundancy of the catheter had caused deformity of the spinal cord. This hypothesis was confirmed at surgery when intraoperative spinal sonography (IOSS) showed that the spinal cord deformity at C 1 -C 2 disappeared when the catheter was withdrawn. This case shows that new or recurrent spinal cord symptoms may be due to a mechanical deformity of the cord rather than shunt malfunction, that restricting the length of the shunt catheter which is used to decompress PTSCCs is important, and that IOSS is an indispensible tool for visualizing the changes in spinal cord morphology during shunting procedures. (orig.)

  20. Percutaneous Iliac Screws for Minimally Invasive Spinal Deformity Surgery

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    Michael Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females. Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs.

  1. REVIEW OF ADVANCES IN COBB ANGLE CALCULATION AND IMAGE-BASED MODELLING TECHNIQUES FOR SPINAL DEFORMITIES

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    V. Giannoglou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a 3D deformity of the human spinal column that is caused from the bending of the latter, causing pain, aesthetic and respiratory problems. This internal deformation is reflected in the outer shape of the human back. The golden standard for diagnosis and monitoring of scoliosis is the Cobb angle, which refers to the internal curvature of the trunk. This work is the first part of a post-doctoral research, presenting the most important researches that have been done in the field of scoliosis, concerning its digital visualisation, in order to provide a more precise and robust identification and monitoring of scoliosis. The research is divided in four fields, namely, the X-ray processing, the automatic Cobb angle(s calculation, the 3D modelling of the spine that provides a more accurate representation of the trunk and the reduction of X-ray radiation exposure throughout the monitoring of scoliosis. Despite the fact that many researchers have been working on the field for the last decade at least, there is no reliable and universal tool to automatically calculate the Cobb angle(s and successfully perform proper 3D modelling of the spinal column that would assist a more accurate detection and monitoring of scoliosis.

  2. Quantitative analysis of relationship between the deformity of spinal cord and symptom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Kazunori; Honma, Takao; Uchiyama, Seiji; Matsumoto, Mineo; Amami, Kenichi

    1986-01-01

    Metrizamide CT (M-CT) scans of the spinal cord and dural canal were obtained in 35 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and 7 control subjects. There was a significant correlation between the deformity of the spinal cord shown on M-CT and both the severity and bilateral difference of symptoms. The decrease in the compression ratio of the spinal cord was of great importance in the determination of the degree of symptoms. M-CT failed to evaluate individual neurologic symptoms and clinical stages, and to predict prognosis. It was suggested that the deformed spinal cord is responsible for the occurrence of CSM symptoms, and that the severity becomes worse with progressing clinical symptoms in association with the compression of the spinal cord. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Spinal deformities in triploid all-female rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss )

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    Madsen, Lone; Arnbjerg, J.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2000-01-01

    A batch of experimental rainbow trout was found to have a high level of spinal deformities. An equal deformity level was found in fish from the same batch, but reared at the fish farm from where the fry originated, suggesting that the all-female triploid status of the rainbow trout might account...

  4. The Finite Deformation Dynamic Sphere Test Problem

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    Versino, Daniele [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brock, Jerry Steven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    In this manuscript we describe test cases for the dynamic sphere problem in presence of finite deformations. The spherical shell in exam is made of a homogeneous, isotropic or transverse isotropic material and elastic and elastic-plastic material behaviors are considered. Twenty cases, (a) to (t), are thus defined combining material types and boundary conditions. The inner surface radius, the outer surface radius and the material's density are kept constant for all the considered test cases and their values are ri = 10mm, ro = 20mm and p = 1000Kg/m3 respectively.

  5. Improvement of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Japanese patients with spinal kyphotic deformity who underwent surgical spinal correction.

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    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Nishino, Masafumi; Sahara, Shu; Uotani, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Sugimoto, Ken; Yamato, Yu; Togawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Sho; Hoshino, Hironobu; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Furuta, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinal kyphotic deformity occasionally results in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The effects of acid reflux on the esophagus in kyphotic patients are unclear, however, and it is unknown whether acid reflux, endoscopic GERD, and reflux-related symptoms improve following surgical spinal correction in these patients. Herein, we investigated the characteristics of GERD in kyphotic patients and the improvement in GERD following surgical correction. In 48 patients with severe kyphotic deformity scheduled for surgical spinal correction, we conducted esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-h pH monitoring and three questionnaire surveys, including the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG). We repeated these measurements after surgical correction and compared pre- and post-surgery values. Of 48 patients, 70.8% [95% CI: 55.9-83.0%, 34/48] had endoscopically evaluated esophageal mucosal injury. Regarding pH before surgery, 64.9% (CI: 47.5-79.8%, 24/37) had abnormal acid reflux (intraesophageal pH reflux decreased from 66.7% (95% CI: 41.0-86.7%) to 33.3% (95% CI: 13.3-59.0%) (P = 0.045). Surgical spinal correction in kyphosis patients improves not only kyphotic deformity-related disorders but also esophageal mucosal injury, abnormal acid reflux, and reflux-related symptoms. © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  6. Spinal Implant Density and Postoperative Lumbar Lordosis as Predictors for the Development of Proximal Junctional Kyphosis in Adult Spinal Deformity.

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    McClendon, Jamal; Smith, Timothy R; Sugrue, Patrick A; Thompson, Sara E; O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Koski, Tyler R

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate spinal implant density and proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) in adult spinal deformity (ASD). Consecutive patients with ASD receiving ≥5 level fusions were retrospectively analyzed between 2007 and 2010. ASD, elective fusions, minimum 2-year follow-up. age lordosis (LL) were predictors for PJK (P = 0.018 and 0.045, respectively). Controlling for age, BMI, and gender, postoperative LL (not implant density) continued to show significance in multivariate logistic regression model. PJK, although influenced by a multitude of factors, may be statistically related to implant density and LL. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Development and treatment of spinal deformity in patients with cerebral palsy

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    Tsirikos Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a common deformity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. This is usually associated with pelvic obliquity due to extension of the curve to the sacrum. Sagittal plane deformity is less common and often develops along with scoliosis. Spinal deformity in patients with severe neurological handicaps can affect their ability to sit and cause significant back pain or pain due to rib impingement against the elevated side of the pelvis on the concavity of the curvature. Surgical correction followed by spinal arthrodesis is indicated in patients with progressive deformities which interfere with their level of function and quality of life. Spinal deformity correction is a major task in children with multiple medical co-morbidities and can be associated with a high risk of complications including death. A well-coordinated multidisciplinary approach is required in the assessment and treatment of this group of patients with the aim to minimize the complication rate and secure a satisfactory surgical outcome. Good knowledge of the surgical and instrumentation techniques, as well as the principles of management is needed to achieve optimum correction of the deformity and balancing of the spine and pelvis. Spinal fusion has a well-documented positive impact even in children with quadriplegia or total body involvement and is the only surgical procedure which has such a high satisfaction rate among parents and caregivers.

  8. The 100 most cited papers in spinal deformity surgery: a bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane C. O’Neill

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal deformity is a condition that has been recognized for many millennia. There have been major advances in the treatment of spinal deformity in recent years and studies outlining new ideas can inspire others to further advance the speciality. The number of citations a paper receives may indicate the influence of that paper. It is therefore important that we evaluate and analyze the most cited works in our field. The aim of this study is to identify the 100 most cited papers relevant to spinal deformity surgery in the literature. A search through the Thomson Reuters Web of ScienceTM for citations related to spinal deformity surgery was performed. The number of citations, mean citation number (total number citations/years since publication, journal, authors, year of publication and country of origin of the top 100 papers was recorded. The top 100 papers were cited a combined 17,646 times, ranging from 453 to 112. The majority of papers originated from the United States (71 and were published in 20 different journals. The decade 1990-1999 was the most prolific, with 36 of the 100 papers published during this time. Papers pertaining to the management of scoliosis (49 were the most common. This study identifies the top 100 most cited papers in the field of spinal deformity surgery. While citation is not a specific marker of the scientific quality of a paper, it is a surrogate for the influence a paper has had on the orthopedic community. This list of papers provides an invaluable resource for both those in training and those actively practicing and involved in the further development of spinal deformity surgery.

  9. The 100 most cited papers in spinal deformity surgery: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Shane C; Butler, Joseph S; McGoldrick, Niall; O'Leary, Robert; Synnott, Keith

    2014-10-27

    Spinal deformity is a condition that has been recognized for many millennia. There have been major advances in the treatment of spinal deformity in recent years and studies outlining new ideas can inspire others to further advance the speciality. The number of citations a paper receives may indicate the influence of that paper. It is therefore important that we evaluate and analyze the most cited works in our field. The aim of this study is to identify the 100 most cited papers relevant to spinal deformity surgery in the literature. A search through the Thomson Reuters Web of Science™ for citations related to spinal deformity surgery was performed. The number of citations, mean citation number (total number citations/years since publication), journal, authors, year of publication and country of origin of the top 100 papers was recorded. The top 100 papers were cited a combined 17,646 times, ranging from 453 to 112. The majority of papers originated from the United States (71) and were published in 20 different journals. The decade 1990-1999 was the most prolific, with 36 of the 100 papers published during this time. Papers pertaining to the management of scoliosis (49) were the most common. This study identifies the top 100 most cited papers in the field of spinal deformity surgery. While citation is not a specific marker of the scientific quality of a paper, it is a surrogate for the influence a paper has had on the orthopedic community. This list of papers provides an invaluable resource for both those in training and those actively practicing and involved in the further development of spinal deformity surgery.

  10. Non-invasive imaging of zebrafish with spinal deformities using optical coherence tomography: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Liane; Beaudette, Kathy; Patten, Kessen; Beaulieu-Ouellet, Émilie; Strupler, Mathias; Moldovan, Florina; Boudoux, Caroline

    2013-03-01

    A zebrafish model has recently been introduced to study various genetic mutations that could lead to spinal deformities such as scoliosis. However, current imaging techniques make it difficult to perform longitudinal studies of this condition in zebrafish, especially in the early stages of development. The goal of this project is to determine whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a viable non-invasive method to image zebrafish exhibiting spinal deformities. Images of both live and fixed malformed zebrafish (5 to 21 days postfertilization) as well as wild-type fish (5 to 29 days postfertilization) were acquired non-invasively using a commercial SD-OCT system, with a laser source centered at 930nm (λ=100nm), permitting axial and lateral resolutions of 7 and 8μm respectively. Using two-dimensional images and three-dimensional reconstructions, it was possible to identify the malformed notochord as well as deformities in other major organs at different stages of formation. Visualization of the notochord was facilitated with the development of a segmentation algorithm. OCT images were compared to HE histological sections and images obtained by calcein staining. Because of the possibility of performing longitudinal studies on a same fish and reducing image processing time as compared with staining techniques and histology, the use of OCT could facilitate phenotypic characterization in studying genetic factors leading to spinal deformities in zebrafish and could eventually contribute to the identification of the genetic causes of spinal deformities such as scoliosis.

  11. Fusionless instrumentation systems for congenital scoliosis: expandable spinal rods and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib in the management of congenital spine deformities in the growing child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Muharrem; Emans, John

    2009-08-01

    Review of relevant literature including personal opinions. To review the current researches investigating the efficacy of growing rod and thoracic expansion techniques in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children, and to highlight the contrasting advantages and limitations in the fusionless treatment of progressive congenital scoliosis. Congenital scoliosis has the potential for severe spinal deformity and thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS). Conventional fusion treatments in children tend to shorten the spine further exacerbating trunk shortening and TIS. In the surgical treatment of congenital spinal deformities in young children, while reconstructing the spinal deformity, one should simultaneously pursue preserving the growth potential of the vertebrae, improving the volume, symmetry, and functions of the thorax, and protecting this improvement during the growth. Today, employed in the treatment of spinal deformities of young children, there are 2 deformity reconstruction methods serving these targets: Growing rod technique and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) with or without expansion thoracostomy. Peer-reviewed research articles and major international meeting presentations were reviewed. Methods were compared in terms of advantages and limitations. The growing rod technique is a safe and reliable method in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children who present some flexibility in the anomalous segment, or when the congenital anomaly involves a vertebral segment too long for resection, or with compensating curve with structural pattern concomitant to the congenital deformity. Expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR are the appropriate choice for severe congenital spine deformity when a large amount of growth remains. Although ventilator dependence is significantly decreasing, thoracic volume and space available for the lung are increased after expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR. Growing rod technique should be

  12. Radiography used to measure internal spinal cord deformation in an in vivo rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, E; Whyte, T; Liu, J; Tetzlaff, W; Cripton, P A

    2018-04-11

    Little is known about the internal mechanics of the in vivo spinal cord during injury. The objective of this study was to develop a method of tracking internal and surface deformation of in vivo rat spinal cord during compression using radiography. Since neural tissue is radio-translucent, radio-opaque markers were injected into the spinal cord. Two tantalum beads (260 µm) were injected into the cord (dorsal and ventral) at C5 of nine anesthetized rats. Four beads were glued to the lateral surface of the cord, caudal and cranial to the injection site. A compression plate was displaced 0.5 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm into the spinal cord and lateral X-ray images were taken before, during, and after each compression for measuring bead displacements. Potential bead migration was monitored for by comparing displacements of the internal and glued surface beads. Dorsal beads moved significantly more than ventral beads with a range in averages of 0.57-0.71 mm and 0.31-0.35 mm respectively. Bead displacements during 0.5 mm compressions were significantly lower than 2 mm and 3 mm compressions. There was no statistically significant migration of the internal beads. The results indicate the merit of this technique for measuring in vivo spinal cord deformation. The pattern of bead displacements illustrates the complex internal and surface deformations of the spinal cord during transverse compression. This information is needed for validating physical and finite element spinal cord surrogates and to define relationships between loading parameters, internal cord deformation, and biological and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Boomerang deformity of cervical spinal cord migrating between split laminae after laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S; Gomibuchi, F; Shimoda, H; Ikezawa, Y; Segawa, H; Kaneko, F; Uchiyama, S; Homma, T

    2000-04-01

    Patients with cervical compression myelopathy were studied to elucidate the mechanism underlying boomerang deformity, which results from the migration of the cervical spinal cord between split laminae after laminoplasty with median splitting of the spinous processes (boomerang sign). Thirty-nine cases, comprising 25 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 8 patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, and 6 patients with cervical disc herniation with developmental canal stenosis, were examined. The clinical and radiological findings were retrospectively compared between patients with (B group, 8 cases) and without (C group, 31 cases) boomerang sign. Moderate increase of the grade of this deformity resulted in no clinical recovery, although there was no difference in clinical recovery between the two groups. Most boomerang signs developed at the C4/5 and/or C5/6 level, where maximal posterior movement of the spinal cord was achieved. Widths between lateral hinges and between split laminae in the B group were smaller than in the C group. Flatness of the spinal cord in the B group was more severe than in the C group. In conclusion, the boomerang sign was caused by posterior movement of the spinal cord, narrower enlargement of the spinal canal and flatness of the spinal cord.

  14. Predictors of Health-Related Quality-of-Life After Complex Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreon, Leah Y.; Glassman, Steven D.; Shaffrey, Christopher I.

    2017-01-01

    , treatment effectiveness is assessed by the extent to which the procedure improves a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This is especially true in patients with complex adult spinal deformity. Methods The data set from the Scoli-Risk-1 study was queried for patients with complete 2-year SF-36......Study Design Longitudinal cohort. Objectives To identify variables that predict 2-year Short Form-36 Physical Composite Summary Score (SF-36PCS) and the Scoliosis Research Society-22R (SRS22-R) Total score after surgery for complex adult spinal deformity. Summary of Background Data Increasingly...... = .049) and type of neurologic complication (p = .068). Factors predictive of 2-year SRS-22R Total scores were maximum preoperative Cobb angle (p = .001) and the number of serious adverse events (p = .071). Conclusions Factors predictive of lower 2-year HRQOLs after surgery for complex adult spinal...

  15. Rating of intra-operative neuro-monitoring results in operative correction of the spinal deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Skripnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the work was filing the electrophysiological phenomena observed in the process of intra-operative neuromonitoring followed by development of the results’ scale of intra-operative neuro-physiological testing of the pyramidal tract. Materials and мethods. The selection for evaluation included data of 147 protocols of intra-operative neuromonitoring in 135 patients (53 males, 82 females, aged from 1 y. 5 m. to 52 years (14,1±0,7 years with spinal deformities of different etiology who underwent instrumentation spinal correction followed by fixation of thoracic / thoracolumbar spine segments using various variants of internal systems of trans-pedicular fixation. Intra-operative neuro-monitoring was performed using system «ISIS IOM» (Inomed Medizintechnik GmbH, Germany. The changes of motor evoked potentials were evaluated according to this scale. Results. Five types of pyramidal system reaction to operative invasion were revealed. According to neurophysiological criteria three grades of the risk of neurological disorders development during operative spinal deformity correction and, correspondingly, three levels of anxiety for the surgeon were defined. Conclusion. Intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring is the effective highly technological instrument to prevent neurological disorders in the spinal deformity. Offered rating scale of the risk of neurological complications gives the possibility to highlight three levels of anxiety during operative invasion.

  16. Cervical Lordosis Actually Increases With Aging and Progressive Degeneration in Spinal Deformity Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Jo; Lenke, Lawrence G; Oshima, Yasushi; Chuntarapas, Tapanut; Mesfin, Addisu; Hershman, Stuart; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Riew, K Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective. The authors hypothesized that cervical lordosis (CL) would decrease with aging and increasing degeneration. It is theorized that with age and degeneration, the cervical spine loses lordosis and becomes progressively more kyphotic; however, no studies support these conclusions in patients with various spinal deformities. The authors performed a radiographic analysis of asymptomatic adults (referring to their cervical spine) of varying ages, with differing forms of spinal deformity to the thoracic/lumbar spine to see how cervical lordosis changes with increasing age. A total of 104 total spine EOS X-rays of adult (aged >18 years) spinal deformity patients without documented neck pain, prior neck surgery, or cervical deformity were reviewed. The researchers only reviewed EOS X-rays because they allow complete visualization from occiput to feet. Cervical lordosis, standard Cobb measurements, sagittal balance parameters, and cervical degeneration were quantified radiographically by the method previously described by Gore et al. Statistical analysis was performed with 1-way analysis of variance to compare significant differences between groups aged 60 years as well as changes in sagittal balance. A p-value 60 years, respectively; p 60 years, respectively; p < .01), with the highest degeneration at the C5-6 and C6-7 disc spaces (3.7 ± 3.3 and 3.2 ± 2.9, respectively; p < .01). This increase did not correlate with the increase in CL seen with aging (r = 0.02; p = .84). Cervical lordosis increased with aging in adult spinal deformity patients. There was no relationship between cervical degeneration and lordosis despite the strong relationship seen between increasing CL in older age groups. Copyright © 2014 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of vacuum assisted closure in instrumented spinal deformities for children with postoperative deep infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canavese Federico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative deep infections are relatively common in children with instrumented spinal deformities, whose healing potential is somewhat compromised. Children with underlying diagnosis of cerebral palsy, spina bifida and other chronic debilitating conditions are particularly susceptible. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC is a newer technique to promote healing of wounds resistant to treatment by established methods. This article aims to review the efficacy of the VAC system in the treatment of deep spinal infections following spinal instrumentation and fusion in children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 33 patients with deep postoperative surgical site infection treated with wound VAC technique. We reviewed clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware, loss of correction and recurrent infections. Results : All patients successfully completed their wound VAC treatment regime. None had significant loss of correction and one had persistent infection requiring partial hardware removal. The laboratory indices normalized in all but three patients. Conclusions: Wound VAC technique is a useful tool in the armamentarium of the spinal surgeon dealing with patients susceptible to wound infections, especially those with neuromuscular diseases. It allows for retention of the instrumentation and maintenance of the spinal correction. It is reliable and easy to use.

  18. Defining a core outcome set for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kleuver, Marinus; Faraj, Sayf S A; Holewijn, Roderick M

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Routine outcome measurement has been shown to improve performance in several fields of healthcare. National spine surgery registries have been initiated in 5 Nordic countries. However, there is no agreement on which outcomes are essential to measure for adolescent and young...... adult patients with a spinal deformity. The aim of this study was to develop a core outcome set (COS) that will facilitate benchmarking within and between the 5 countries of the Nordic Spinal Deformity Society (NSDS) and other registries worldwide. Material and methods - From August 2015 to September...... consensus rounds were held. Consensus was defined as agreement between at least 5 of the 7 representatives. Data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results - Consensus was reached on the inclusion of 13 core outcome domains: "satisfaction with overall outcome of surgery", "satisfaction...

  19. A Comprehensive Analysis of the SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification and Confounding Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallager, Dennis Winge; Hansen, Lars Valentin; Dragsted, Casper Rokkjær

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses on a consecutive, prospective cohort. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification to group patients by widely used health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) scores and examine possible...... to confounding. However, age group and aetiology had individual significant effects. CONCLUSION: The SRS-Schwab sagittal modifiers reliably grouped patients graded 0 versus + / +  + according to the most widely used HRQOL scores and the effects of increasing grade level on odds for worse ODI scores remained...... confounding variables. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification includes sagittal modifiers considered important for HRQOL and the clinical impact of the classification has been validated in patients from the International Spine Study Group database; however, equivocal...

  20. Pleural Effusion in Spinal Deformity Correction Surgery- A Report of 28 Cases in a Single Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqiang Liang

    Full Text Available To analyze the occurrence, risk factors, treatment and prognosis of postoperative pleural effusion after spinal deformity correction surgery.The clinical and imaging data of 3325 patients undergoing spinal deformity correction were collected from the database of our hospital. We analyzed the therapeutic process of the 28 patients who had postoperative pleural effusion, and we identified the potential risk factors using logistic regression.Among the 28 patients with postoperative pleural effusion, 24 (85.7% suffered from hemothorax, 2 (7.1% from chylothorax, and 2 (7.1% from subarachnoid-pleural fistula. The pleural effusion occurred on the convex side in 19 patients (67.9%, on the concave side in 4 patients (14.3%, and on both sides in 4 patients (14.3%. One patient with left hemothorax was diagnosed with kyphosis. The treatment included conservative clinical observation for 5 patients and chest tube drainage for 23 patients. One patient also underwent thoracic duct ligation and pleurodesis. All of these treatments were successful. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, osteotomy and thoracoplasty were risk factors for postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery.The incidence of postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery was approximately 0.84% (28/3325, and hemothorax was the most common type. Chest tube drainage treatment was usually successful, and the prognosis was good. Adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, and had undergone osteotomy or surgery with thoracoplasty were more likely to suffer from postoperative pleural effusion.

  1. Defining a core outcome set for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleuver, Marinus; Faraj, Sayf S A; Holewijn, Roderick M; Germscheid, Niccole M; Adobor, Raphael D; Andersen, Mikkel; Tropp, Hans; Dahl, Benny; Keskinen, Heli; Olai, Anders; Polly, David W; van Hooff, Miranda L; Haanstra, Tsjitske M

    2017-12-01

    Background and purpose - Routine outcome measurement has been shown to improve performance in several fields of healthcare. National spine surgery registries have been initiated in 5 Nordic countries. However, there is no agreement on which outcomes are essential to measure for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity. The aim of this study was to develop a core outcome set (COS) that will facilitate benchmarking within and between the 5 countries of the Nordic Spinal Deformity Society (NSDS) and other registries worldwide. Material and methods - From August 2015 to September 2016, 7 representatives (panelists) of the national spinal surgery registries from each of the NSDS countries participated in a modified Delphi study. With a systematic literature review as a basis and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework as guidance, 4 consensus rounds were held. Consensus was defined as agreement between at least 5 of the 7 representatives. Data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results - Consensus was reached on the inclusion of 13 core outcome domains: "satisfaction with overall outcome of surgery", "satisfaction with cosmetic result of surgery", "pain interference", physical functioning", "health-related quality of life", "recreation and leisure", "pulmonary fatigue", "change in deformity", "self-image", "pain intensity", "physical function", "complications", and "re-operation". Panelists agreed that the SRS-22r, EQ-5D, and a pulmonary fatigue questionnaire (yet to be developed) are the most appropriate set of patient-reported measurement instruments that cover these outcome domains. Interpretation - We have identified a COS for a large subgroup of spinal deformity patients for implementation and validation in the NSDS countries. This is the first study to further develop a COS in a global perspective.

  2. Accuracy of the sagittal vertical axis in a standing lateral radiograph as a measurement of balance in spinal deformities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Royen, B.J.; Toussaint, H.M.; Kingma, I.; Bot, S.D.M.; Caspers, M.; Harlaar, J.

    1998-01-01

    Sagittal balance of the spine is becoming an important issue in the assessment of the degree of spinal deformity. On a standing lateral full- length radiograph of the spine, the plumb line, or sagittal vertical axis (SVA), can be used to determine the spinal sagittal balance. In this procedure

  3. Spinal deformities after high-energy radiotherapy for nephroblastoma in children. Report of 82 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollner, G.; Pfeil, J.; Scheibel, P.

    1987-01-01

    Study of spinal deformities in 82 cases of nephroblastoma treated surgically or by chemotherapy and high-energy radiotherapy. This paper stresses the high incidence of radiation induced scoliosis which was observed in all patients who had reached adulthood. On the basis of a detailed analysis of the relations between the height of the vertebral body and of the intervertebral space, the authors propose a theory of a compensation of the reduction in vertebral height by displacement the nucleus pulposus towards the irradiated side. This phenomenon prevents the development of scoliosis in subjects under the age of 11 years, despite an already well established deformity of the vertebral bodies. The compensation decreases with increasing age and the degree od scoliosis. This explains partly the increased degree of scoliotic deformity during puberty. Orthopaedic treatment therefore needs to be started relatively early.

  4. Assessment of stability during gait in patients with spinal deformity-A preliminary analysis using the dynamic stability margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Lugade, Vipul; Bernhardt, Kathie; Larson, A Noelle; Kaufman, Kenton

    2017-06-01

    Daily living activities are dynamic, requiring spinal motion through space. Current assessment of spinal deformities is based on static measurements from full-spine standing radiographs. Tools to assess dynamic stability during gait might be useful to enhance the standard evaluation. The aim of this study was to evaluate gait dynamic imbalance in patients with spinal deformity using the dynamic stability margin (DSM). Twelve normal subjects and 17 patients with spinal deformity were prospectively recruited. A kinematic 3D gait analysis was performed for the control group (CG) and the spinal deformity group (SDG). The DSM (distance between the extrapolated center of mass and the base of support) and time-distance parameters were calculated for the right and left side during gait. The relationship between DSM and step length was assessed using three variables: gait stability, symmetry, and consistency. Variables' accuracy was validated by a discriminant analysis. Patients with spinal deformity exhibited gait instability according to the DSM (0.25m versus 0.31m) with decreased velocity (1.1ms -1 versus 1.3ms -1 ) and decreased step length (0.32m versus 0.38m). According to the discriminant analysis, gait stability was the more accurate variable (area under the curve AUC=0.98) followed by gait symmetry and consistency. However, gait consistency showed 100% of specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of precision. The DSM showed that patients with spinal malalignment exhibit decreased gait stability, symmetry, and consistency besides gait time-distance parameter changes. Additional work is required to determine how to apply the DSM for preoperative and postoperative spinal deformity management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Validation and prediction of traditional Chinese physical operation on spinal disease using multiple deformation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Yang, Xubo; Gu, Lixu; Lu, Wenlong; Fang, Min

    2011-03-01

    Traditional Chinese medical massage is a physical manipulation that achieves satisfactory results on spinal diseases, according to its advocates. However, the method relies on an expert's experience. Accurate analysis and simulation of massage are essential for validation of traditional Chinese physical treatment. The objective of this study is to provide analysis and simulation that can reproducibly verify and predict treatment efficacy. An improved physical multi-deformation model for simulating human cervical spine is proposed. First, the human spine, which includes muscle, vertebrae and inter- vertebral disks, are segmented and reconstructed from clinical CT and MR images. Homogeneous landmark registration is employed to align the spine models before and after the massage manipulation. Central line mass spring and contact FEM deformation models are used to individually evaluate spinal anatomy variations. The response of the human spine during the massage process is simulated based on specific clinical cases. Ten sets of patient data, including muscle-force relationships, displacement of vertebrae, strain and stress distribution on inter-vertebral disks were collected, including the pre-operation, post-operation and the 3-month follow-up. The simulation results demonstrate that traditional Chinese massage could significantly affect and treat most mild spinal disease. A new method that simulates a traditional Chinese medical massage operation on the human spine may be a useful tool to scientifically validate and predict treatment efficacy.

  6. Cost Implications of Primary Versus Revision Surgery in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Rabia; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Kebaish, Khaled; Shimer, Adam; Shen, Francis; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2017-08-01

    Adult spinal deformity (ASD) is an important problem to consider in the elderly. Although studies have examined the complications of ASD surgery and have compared functional and radiographic results of primary surgery versus revision, no studies have compared the costs of primary procedures with revisions. We assessed the in-hospital costs of these 2 surgery types in patients with ASD. The PearlDiver Database, a database of Medicare records, was used in this study. Mutually exclusive groups of patients undergoing primary or revision surgery were identified. Patients in each group were queried for age, sex, and comorbidities. Thirty-day readmission rates, 30-day and 90-day complication rates, and postoperative costs of care were assessed with multivariate analysis. For analyses, significance was set at P average reimbursement of the primary surgery cohort was $57,078 ± $30,767. Reimbursement of revision surgery cohort was $52,999 ± $27,658. The adjusted difference in average costs between the 2 groups is $4773 ± $1069 (P day and 90-day adjusted difference in cost of care when sustaining any of the major medical complications in primary surgery versus revision surgery was insignificant. Patients undergoing primary and revision corrective procedures for ASD have similar readmission rates, lengths of stays, and complication rates. Our data showed a higher cost of primary surgery compared with revision surgery, although costs of sustaining postoperative complications were similar. This finding supports the decision to perform revision procedures in patients with ASD when indicated because neither outcomes nor costs are a hindrance to correction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Exercise on Spinal Deformities and Quality of Life in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Anwer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This systematic review was conducted to examine the effects of exercise on spinal deformities and quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Data Sources. Electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, and Web of Science, were searched for research articles published from the earliest available dates up to May 31, 2015, using the key words “exercise,” “postural correction,” “posture,” “postural curve,” “Cobb’s angle,” “quality of life,” and “spinal deformities,” combined with the Medical Subject Heading “scoliosis.” Study Selection. This systematic review was restricted to randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials on AIS published in English language. The quality of selected studies was assessed by the PEDro scale, the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation System (GRADE. Data Extraction. Descriptive data were collected from each study. The outcome measures of interest were Cobb angle, trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar kyphosis, vertebral rotation, and quality of life. Data Synthesis. A total of 30 studies were assessed for eligibility. Six of the 9 selected studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce the Cobb angle, angle of trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis and low-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce average lateral deviation. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions improve the quality of life. Conclusions. A supervised exercise program was superior to controls in reducing spinal deformities and improving the quality of life in patients with AIS.

  8. Ligament augmentation for prevention of proximal junctional kyphosis and proximal junctional failure in adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaee, Michael M; Deviren, Vedat; Dalle Ore, Cecilia; Scheer, Justin K; Lau, Darryl; Osorio, Joseph A; Nicholls, Fred; Ames, Christopher P

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a well-recognized, yet incompletely defined, complication of adult spinal deformity surgery. There is no standardized definition for PJK, but most studies describe PJK as an increase in the proximal junctional angle (PJA) of greater than 10°-20°. Ligament augmentation is a novel strategy for PJK reduction that provides strength to the upper instrumented vertebra (UIV) and adjacent segments while also reducing junctional stress at those levels. METHODS In this study, ligament augmentation was used in a consecutive series of adult spinal deformity patients at a single institution. Patient demographics, including age; sex; indication for surgery; revision surgery; surgical approach; and use of 3-column osteotomies, vertebroplasty, or hook fixation at the UIV, were collected. The PJA was measured preoperatively and at last follow-up using 36-inch radiographs. Data on change in PJA and need for revision surgery were collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with change in PJA and proximal junctional failure (PJF), defined as PJK requiring surgical correction. RESULTS A total of 200 consecutive patients were included: 100 patients before implementation of ligament augmentation and 100 patients after implementation of this technique. The mean age of the ligament augmentation cohort was 66 years, and 67% of patients were women. Over half of these cases (51%) were revision surgeries, with 38% involving a combined anterior or lateral and posterior approach. The mean change in PJA was 6° in the ligament augmentation group compared with 14° in the control group (p historical cohort, ligament augmentation is associated with a significant decrease in PJK and PJF. These data support the implementation of ligament augmentation in surgery for adult spinal deformity, particularly in patients with a high risk of developing PJK and PJF.

  9. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey Hwee Weng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure.The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of

  10. Analytical Evaluation of Beam Deformation Problem Using Approximate Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Kimiaeifar, A.; Domairry, G.

    2010-01-01

    The beam deformation equation has very wide applications in structural engineering. As a differential equation, it has its own problem concerning existence, uniqueness and methods of solutions. Often, original forms of governing differential equations used in engineering problems are simplified......, and this process produces noise in the obtained answers. This paper deals with the solution of second order of differential equation governing beam deformation using four analytical approximate methods, namely the Perturbation, Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM), Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) and Variational...... Iteration Method (VIM). The comparisons of the results reveal that these methods are very effective, convenient and quite accurate for systems of non-linear differential equation....

  11. Patterns of congenital bony spinal deformity and associated neural anomalies on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Trenga, Anthony P.; Singla, Anuj; Feger, Mark A.; Abel, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital malformations of the bony vertebral column are often accompanied by spinal cord anomalies; these observations have been reinforced with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the incidence of cord anomalies will increase as the number and complexity of bony vertebral abnormalities increases. Methods All patients aged ?13 years (n?=?75) presenting to the pediatric spine clinic from 2003?2013 with congenital bony spinal deformity and both radiograph...

  12. Development of a Detailed Volumetric Finite Element Model of the Spine to Simulate Surgical Correction of Spinal Deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Driscoll

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A large spectrum of medical devices exists; it aims to correct deformities associated with spinal disorders. The development of a detailed volumetric finite element model of the osteoligamentous spine would serve as a valuable tool to assess, compare, and optimize spinal devices. Thus the purpose of the study was to develop and initiate validation of a detailed osteoligamentous finite element model of the spine with simulated correction from spinal instrumentation. A finite element of the spine from T1 to L5 was developed using properties and geometry from the published literature and patient data. Spinal instrumentation, consisting of segmental translation of a scoliotic spine, was emulated. Postoperative patient and relevant published data of intervertebral disc stress, screw/vertebra pullout forces, and spinal profiles was used to evaluate the models validity. Intervertebral disc and vertebral reaction stresses respected published in vivo, ex vivo, and in silico values. Screw/vertebra reaction forces agreed with accepted pullout threshold values. Cobb angle measurements of spinal deformity following simulated surgical instrumentation corroborated with patient data. This computational biomechanical analysis validated a detailed volumetric spine model. Future studies seek to exploit the model to explore the performance of corrective spinal devices.

  13. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Mice with a targeted deletion of the tetranectin gene exhibit a spinal deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Durkin, M E; Johnsen, L

    2001-01-01

    and muscle. To test the functional role of tetranectin directly, we have generated mice with a targeted disruption of the gene. We report that the tetranectin-deficient mice exhibit kyphosis, a type of spinal deformity characterized by an increased curvature of the thoracic spine. The kyphotic angles were...... in the morphology of the vertebrae. Histological analysis of the spines of these mice revealed an apparently asymmetric development of the growth plate and of the intervertebral disks of the vertebrae. In the most advanced cases, the growth plates appeared disorganized and irregular, with the disk material...... in tissue growth and remodeling. The tetranectin-deficient mouse is the first mouse model that resembles common human kyphotic disorders, which affect up to 8% of the population....

  15. TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN ELDERLY AND SENILE PATIENTS WITH DEGENERATIVE DEFORMATIONS AND INSTABILITY OF THE SPINAL COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Mikhaylov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative  scoliosis  is  a  prevalent  issue  among  the  aging  population.  Controversy  remains   over  the  role of surgical intervention in patients with such disease. The authors  present  the results of 14-year experience in treatment of this pathology.  Various approaches  to the surgical treatment depending  on the stage of the disease and the degree of deformation, including  decompression, instrumental posterior spinal fusion, anterior spinal fusion, and osteotomy were examined. Above treatment options are based on the analysis of clinical aspects, mechanical  stability of deformation, the degree of imbalance in the body and causes of pain or neurological  deficit.The  risk of postoperative complications is extremely  high and seems to be outweighed by the  possible successful outcomes of surgical treatment. The results presented in the treatment of degenerative scoliosis mainly provide positive outcomes and can assist in the selection of treatment for this group of patients.The purpose of the  study  is to  evaluate  the  treatment outcomes  of elderly  and  senile patients with  degenerative deformations and instability of the spinal column using various surgical techniques.Material and methods. During  the present  retrospective study the authors  analyzed 437 patients (337 (77% women and  100  (23%  men  aged  60 years  and  older  who  underwent surgical  treatment at  Russian  Research  institute of traumatology and orthopaedics named  after  R.R.Vreden between  2000 and 2016. The  study  group  included  patients with  diseases and consequences  of injuries  in the  spine, leading  to its deformation and following spinal stenosis  with development of neurological  deficit in some cases.The  patients were subdivided into  four  groups  depending  on surgical  procedure.  Patients in group  I underwent decompression  of neural  structures at affected

  16. External validation of the adult spinal deformity (ASD) frailty index (ASD-FI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emily K; Vila-Casademunt, Alba; Neuman, Brian J; Sciubba, Daniel M; Kebaish, Khaled M; Smith, Justin S; Alanay, Ahmet; Acaroglu, Emre R; Kleinstück, Frank; Obeid, Ibrahim; Sánchez Pérez-Grueso, Francisco Javier; Carreon, Leah Y; Schwab, Frank J; Bess, Shay; Scheer, Justin K; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Pellisé, Ferran; Ames, Christopher P

    2018-03-30

    To assess the ability of the recently developed adult spinal deformity frailty index (ASD-FI) to predict odds of perioperative complications, odds of reoperation, and length of hospital stay after adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery using a database other than the one used to create the index. We used the ASD-FI to calculate frailty scores for 266 ASD patients who had minimum postoperative follow-up of 2 years in the European Spine Study Group (ESSG) database. Patients were enrolled from 2012 through 2013. Using ASD-FI scores, we categorized patients as not frail (NF) ( 0.5 points). Multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for preoperative and surgical factors such as operative time and blood loss, was performed to determine the relationship between ASD-FI category and odds of major complications, odds of reoperation, and length of hospital stay. We categorized 135 patients (51%) as NF, 90 patients (34%) as frail, and 41 patients (15%) as SF. Overall mean ASD-FI score was 0.29 (range 0-0.8). The adjusted odds of experiencing a major intraoperative or postoperative complication (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.0-10) or having a reoperation (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.7-8.9) were higher for SF patients compared with NF patients. Mean hospital stay was 2.1 times longer (95% CI 1.8-2.4) for SF patients compared with NF patients. Greater patient frailty, as measured by the ASD-FI, is associated with longer hospital stays and greater odds of major complications and reoperation. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  17. A modified sagittal spine postural classification and its relationship to deformities and spinal mobility in a chinese osteoporotic population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Jun Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal posture and spinal mobility have been demonstrated to cause functional impairment in the quality of life, especially in the postmenopausal osteoporotic population. Most of the literature studies focus on either thoracic kyphosis or lumbar lordosis, but not on the change of the entire spinal alignment. Very few articles reported the spinal alignment of Chinese people. The purpose of this study was threefold: to classify the spinal curvature based on the classification system defined by Satoh consisting of the entire spine alignment; to identify the change of trunk mobility; and to relate spinal curvature to balance disorder in a Chinese population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 450 osteoporotic volunteers were recruited for this study. Spinal range of motion and global curvature were evaluated noninvasively using the Spinal-Mouse® system and sagittal postural deformities were characterized. RESULTS: We found a new spine postural alignment consisting of an increased thoracic kyphosis and decreased lumbar lordosis which we classified as our modified round back. We did not find any of Satoh's type 5 classification in our population. Type 2 sagittal alignment was the most common spinal deformity (38.44%. In standing, thoracic kyphosis angles in types 2 (58.34° and 3 (58.03° were the largest and lumbar lordosis angles in types 4 (13.95° and 5 (-8.61° were the smallest. The range of flexion (ROF and range of flexion-extension (ROFE of types 2 and 3 were usually greater than types 4 and 5, with type 1 being the largest. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study classified and compared for the first time the mobility, curvature and balance in a Chinese population based on the entire spine alignment and found types 4 and 5 to present the worst balance and mobility. This study included a new spine postural alignment classification that should be considered in future population studies.

  18. Fully automatic measurements of axial vertebral rotation for assessment of spinal deformity in idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Daniel; Andersson, Mats; Knutsson, Hans; Lundström, Claes; Vavruch, Ludvig; Tropp, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Reliable measurements of spinal deformities in idiopathic scoliosis are vital, since they are used for assessing the degree of scoliosis, deciding upon treatment and monitoring the progression of the disease. However, commonly used two dimensional methods (e.g. the Cobb angle) do not fully capture the three dimensional deformity at hand in scoliosis, of which axial vertebral rotation (AVR) is considered to be of great importance. There are manual methods for measuring the AVR, but they are often time-consuming and related with a high intra- and inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present a fully automatic method for estimating the AVR in images from computed tomography. The proposed method is evaluated on four scoliotic patients with 17 vertebrae each and compared with manual measurements performed by three observers using the standard method by Aaro–Dahlborn. The comparison shows that the difference in measured AVR between automatic and manual measurements are on the same level as the inter-observer difference. This is further supported by a high intraclass correlation coefficient (0.971–0.979), obtained when comparing the automatic measurements with the manual measurements of each observer. Hence, the provided results and the computational performance, only requiring approximately 10 to 15 s for processing an entire volume, demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed method. (paper)

  19. Progression of spinal deformity in wheelchair-dependent patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who are not treated with steroids: coronal plane (scoliosis) and sagittal plane (kyphosis, lordosis) deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, F; Zurakowski, D; Bui, T; Darras, B T

    2014-01-01

    We determined the frequency, rate and extent of development of scoliosis (coronal plane deformity) in wheelchair-dependent patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who were not receiving steroid treatment. We also assessed kyphosis and lordosis (sagittal plane deformity). The extent of scoliosis was assessed on sitting anteroposterior (AP) spinal radiographs in 88 consecutive non-ambulatory patients with DMD. Radiographs were studied from the time the patients became wheelchair-dependent until the time of spinal fusion, or the latest assessment if surgery was not undertaken. Progression was estimated using a longitudinal mixed-model regression analysis to handle repeated measurements. Scoliosis ≥ 10° occurred in 85 of 88 patients (97%), ≥ 20° in 78 of 88 (89%) and ≥ 30° in 66 of 88 patients (75%). The fitted longitudinal model revealed that time in a wheelchair was a highly significant predictor of the magnitude of the curve, independent of the age of the patient (p lordosis (16 (27%) abnormal and seven (11%) normal). This study provides a baseline to assess the effects of steroids and other forms of treatment on the natural history of scoliosis in patients with DMD, and an approach to assessing spinal deformity in the coronal and sagittal planes in wheelchair-dependent patients with other neuromuscular disorders.

  20. Surgical correction of severe spinal deformities using a staged protocol of external and internal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikova, Oksana G; Shchurova, Elena N

    2018-02-01

    There is high risk of neurologic complications in one-stage management of severe rigid spinal deformities in adolescents. Therefore, gradual spine stretching variants are applied. One of them is the use of external transpedicular fixation. Our aim was to retrospectively study the outcomes of gradual correction with an apparatus for external transpedicular fixation followed by internal fixation used for high-grade kyphoscoliosis in adolescents. Twenty five patients were reviewed (mean age, 15.1 ± 0.4 years). Correction was performed in two stages: 1) gradual controlled correction with the apparatus for external transpedicular fixation; and 2) internal posterior transpedicular fixation. Rigid deformities in eight patients required discapophysectomy. Clinical and radiographic study of the outcomes was conducted immediately after treatment and at a mean long-term period of 3.8 ± 0.4 years. Pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS, 10 points). The Oswestry questionnaire (ODI scale) was used for functional assessment. Deformity correction with the external apparatus was 64.2 ± 4.6% in the main curve and 60.7 ± 3.7% in the compensatory one. It was 72.8 ± 4.1% and 66.2 ± 5.3% immediately after treatment and 70.8 ± 4.6% and 64.3 ± 4.2% at long term, respectively. Pain relieved by 33.2 ± 4.2% (p external transpedicular fixation provides gradual controlled correction for high-grade kyphoscoliosis in adolescents. Transition to internal fixation preserves the correction achieved, and correction is maintained at long term.

  1. Clinical and stereoradiographic analysis of adult spinal deformity with and without rotatory subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, E; Lafage, R; Challier, V; Diebo, B; Guigui, P; Mazda, K; Schwab, F; Skalli, W; Lafage, V

    2015-09-01

    In degenerative adult spinal deformity (ASD), sagittal malalignment and rotatory subluxation (RS) correlate with clinical symptomatology. RS is defined as axial rotation with lateral listhesis. Stereoradiography, recently developed for medical applications, provides full-body standing radiographs and 3D reconstruction of the spine, with low radiation dose. 3D stereoradiography improves analysis of RS and of its relations with transverse plane and spinopelvic parameters and clinical impact. One hundred and thirty adults with lumbar ASD and full-spine EOS® radiographs (EOS Imaging, Paris, France) were included. Spinopelvic sagittal parameters and lateral listhesis in the coronal plane were measured. The transverse plane study parameters were: apical axial vertebral rotation (apex AVR), axial intervertebral rotation (AIR) and torsion index (TI). Two groups were compared: with RS (lateral listhesis>5mm) and without RS (without lateral listhesis exceeding 5mm: non-RS). Correlations between radiologic and clinical data were assessed. RS patients were significantly older, with larger Cobb angle (37.4° vs. 26.6°, P=0.0001), more severe sagittal deformity, and greater apex AVR and TI (respectively: 22.9° vs. 11.3°, P10° without visible RS on 2D radiographs. RS patients reported significantly more frequent low back pain and radiculalgia. In this EOS® study, ASD patients with RS had greater coronal curvature and sagittal and transverse deformity, as well as greater pain. Further transverse plane analysis could allow earlier diagnosis and prognosis to guide management. 4, retrospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Halo-gravity traction in the treatment of severe spinal deformity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changsheng; Wang, Huafeng; Zheng, Zhaomin; Zhang, Zhongmin; Wang, Jianru; Liu, Hui; Kim, Yongjung Jay; Cho, Samuel

    2017-07-01

    Halo-gravity traction has been reported to successfully assist in managing severe spinal deformity. This is a systematic review of all studies on halo-gravity traction in the treatment of spinal deformity to provide information for clinical practice. A comprehensive search was conducted for articles on halo-gravity traction in the treatment of spinal deformity according to the PRISMA guidelines. Appropriate studies would be included and analyzed. Preoperative correction rate of spinal deformity, change of pulmonary function and prevalence of complications were the main measurements. Sixteen studies, a total of 351 patients, were included in this review. Generally, the initial Cobb angle was 101.1° in the coronal plane and 80.5° in the sagittal plane, and it was corrected to 49.4° and 56.0° after final spinal fusion. The preoperative correction due to traction alone was 24.1 and 19.3%, respectively. With traction, the flexibility improved 6.1% but postoperatively the patients did not have better correction. Less aggressive procedures and improved pulmonary function were observed in patients with traction. The prevalence of traction-related complications was 22% and three cases of neurologic complication related to traction were noted. The prevalence of total complications related to surgery was 32% and that of neurologic complications was 1%. Partial correction could be achieved preoperatively with halo-gravity traction, and it may help decrease aggressive procedures, improve preoperative pulmonary function, and reduce neurologic complications. However, traction could not increase preoperative flexibility or final correction. Traction-related complications, although usually not severe, were not rare.

  3. Intraspinal neural axis abnormalities in severe spinal deformity: a 10-year MRI review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Xie, Jingming; Wang, Yingsong; Bi, Ni; Li, Tao; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Zhi; Ou, Hua; Liu, Siyuan

    2018-02-14

    Documents indicated that the average prevalence of intraspinal neural axis abnormalities (INAAs) in presumed idiopathic scoliosis (PIS) patients was about 17.7%. However, paucity study focuses on the incidence of INAAs in severe spinal deformity (SSDs). In this study, we investigate the incidence of intraspinal neural axis abnormalities (IINAAs) and the clinical relevance in SSD at a single center. All the patients with SSDs admitted for spinal surgery were evaluated from 2003 to 2014. patients who present with coronal Cobb over 90° (and/or the sagittal Cobb ≥ 90°); patients with whole spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) done preoperatively; and patients with documented clinical findings preoperatively. ankylosing spondylitis, adult onset scoliosis, scoliosis secondary to bone destruction, and spinal dysraphism. 101 patients fulfilled the criteria were included. 43 patients were detected with INAAs (42.6%, 43/101). The most common INAAs was syrinx (S) (16/43, 37.2%). Of which, 43.7% (7/16), 37.5% (6/16), and 18.7% (3/16) were spindle, slit, and swelling types, respectively. Most of them were located in thoracic (6/16, 37.5%) and cervical (5/16, 31.3%) region. MRI revealed Chiari malformation with syringomyelia (C + S) in ten patients (10/43, 23.2%), Chiari malformation (C) in 6 patients (6/43, 13.9%) and others in 11 patients (11/43, 25.6%). As to the etiology, most patients with INAAs were PIS (34/43, 79.1%). On clinical examination, 16 of 101 patients (16/101, 15.8%) had abnormal neurologic signs. 15 of 16 patients (15/16, 93.7%) with abnormal neurologic signs had INAAs on MRI. On the other hand, 28 of 43 patients (28/43, 65.1%) with INAAs on MRI presented neurologically intact. 28 of 85 patients (28/85, 32.9%) with neurologically intact were detected with INAAs on MRI. The incidence of INAAs in SSDs was 42.6%. 65.1% of them present intact neurologic status. The most common neural anomaly was syrinx. Preoperative whole spine MRI must be beneficial for

  4. Terminology - glossary including acronyms and quotations in use for the conservative spinal deformities treatment: 8th SOSORT consensus paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzetti Paolo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report is the SOSORT Consensus Paper on Terminology for use in the treatment of conservative spinal deformities. Figures are provided and relevant literature is cited where appropriate. Methods The Delphi method was used to reach a preliminary consensus before the meeting, where the terms that still needed further clarification were discussed. Results A final agreement was found for all the terms, which now constitute the base of this glossary. New terms will be added after being discussed and accepted. Discussion When only one set of terms is used for communication in a place or among a group of people, then everyone can clearly and efficiently communicate. This principle applies for any professional group. Until now, no common set of terms was available in the field of the conservative treatment of scoliosis and spinal deformities. This glossary gives a common base language to draw from to discuss data, findings and treatment.

  5. Teriparatide versus low-dose bisphosphonates before and after surgery for adult spinal deformity in female Japanese patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Shoji; Hirano, Norikazu; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Nakano, Masato; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Watanabe, Kenta; Makino, Hiroto; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2017-08-01

    Complications of adult spinal deformity surgery are problematic in osteoporotic individuals. We compared outcomes between Japanese patients treated perioperatively with teriparatide vs. low-dose bisphosphonates. Fifty-eight osteoporotic adult Japanese female patients were enrolled and assigned to perioperative teriparatide (33 patients) and bisphosphonate (25 patients) groups in non-blinded fashion. Pre- and post-operative X-ray and computed tomography imaging were used to assess outcome, and rates were compared between the groups and according to age. Pain scores and Oswestry Disability Indices (ODI) were calculated before and 2 years after surgery. Adjacent vertebral fractures and implant failure, fusion failure, and poor pain and ODI outcomes were significantly more common in the bisphosphonates group than the teriparatide group. Perioperative administration of teriparatide is more effective than that of low-dose bisphosphonates in preventing complications and maintaining fusion rates in osteoporotic Japanese females with spinal deformities undergoing surgery.

  6. Terminology - glossary including acronyms and quotations in use for the conservative spinal deformities treatment: 8th SOSORT consensus paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Theodoros B; de Mauroy, Jean Claude; Négrini, Stefano; Kotwicki, Tomasz; Zaina, Fabio; Wynne, James H; Stokes, Ian A; Knott, Patrick; Pizzetti, Paolo; Rigo, Manuel; Villagrasa, Monica; Weiss, Hans Rudolf; Maruyama, Toru

    2010-11-02

    This report is the SOSORT Consensus Paper on Terminology for use in the treatment of conservative spinal deformities. Figures are provided and relevant literature is cited where appropriate. The Delphi method was used to reach a preliminary consensus before the meeting, where the terms that still needed further clarification were discussed. A final agreement was found for all the terms, which now constitute the base of this glossary. New terms will be added after being discussed and accepted. When only one set of terms is used for communication in a place or among a group of people, then everyone can clearly and efficiently communicate. This principle applies for any professional group. Until now, no common set of terms was available in the field of the conservative treatment of scoliosis and spinal deformities. This glossary gives a common base language to draw from to discuss data, findings and treatment.

  7. Incidence of spinal deformity in adults and its distribution according SRS-Schwab classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Amaral Barreto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence of spinal deformity in adults, as well as its distribution according the curve type and the occurrence of sagittal modifiers of the SRS-Schwab classification..METHODS: Radiographs in frontal and lateral views of the entire column were performed and radiographic parameters were used to diagnose the vertebral deformity for the classification according to the SRS-Schwab system.RESULTS: We included 302 patients in the study, 236 (78.1% women and 66 (21.9% men. Fifty-six of the participants were diagnosed with ASD, 50 women and 6 men. The incidence of ASD was 18.5% in the total population, ranging from 9.1% in males and 21.2% in females (p=0.04. As to age group, the incidence was 11.9% in patients between 18 and 39 years, 12% between 40 and 59 years and 28.8% in patients with 60 years of age or older, significantly higher in the oldest group (p=0.002. When analyzing the correlation between age and progression of sagittal modifiers, there was no significant difference in the PI-LL and PT modifiers, but there was significant difference of SVA modifier (p=0.008, with a higher age in individuals "++".CONCLUSION: This study presented demographic data on ASD in a Brazilian population sample. There was a higher incidence of ASD in females and individuals aged ≥ 60 years. As for the sagittal modifiers of SRS-Schwab classification, there was a correlation between increasing age and degree of progression of SVA.

  8. Patterns of congenital bony spinal deformity and associated neural anomalies on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenga, Anthony P; Singla, Anuj; Feger, Mark A; Abel, Mark F

    2016-08-01

    Congenital malformations of the bony vertebral column are often accompanied by spinal cord anomalies; these observations have been reinforced with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the incidence of cord anomalies will increase as the number and complexity of bony vertebral abnormalities increases. All patients aged ≤13 years (n = 75) presenting to the pediatric spine clinic from 2003-2013 with congenital bony spinal deformity and both radiographs and MRI were analyzed retrospectively for bone and neural pathology. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare groups for categorical dependent variables. Independent t tests were used for continuous dependent variables. Significance was set at p formation had a higher incidence of cord anomalies (73 %) than failures of formation (50 %) or segmentation (45 %) alone (p = 0.065). Deformities in the sacrococcygeal area had the highest rate of spinal cord anomalies (13 of 15 patients, 87 %). In 35 cases (47 %), MRI revealed additional bony anomalies that were not seen on the radiographs. As the number of bony malformations increased, we found a higher incidence of cord anomalies. Clinicians should have increased suspicion of spinal cord pathology in the presence of mixed failures of segmentation and formation.

  9. Adult spinal deformity treated with minimally invasive surgery. Description of surgical technique, radiological results and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, I; Luque, R; Noriega, M; Rey, J; Alía, J; Urda, A; Marco, F

    The prevalence of adult spinal deformity has been increasing exponentially over time. Surgery has been credited with good radiological and clinical results. The incidence of complications is high. MIS techniques provide good results with fewer complications. This is a retrospective study of 25 patients with an adult spinal deformity treated by MIS surgery, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Radiological improvement was SVA from 5 to 2cm, coronal Cobb angle from 31° to 6°, and lumbar lordosis from 18° to 38°. All of these parameters remained stable over time. We also present the complications that appeared in 4 patients (16%). Only one patient needed reoperation. We describe the technique used and review the references on the subject. We conclude that the MIS technique for treating adult spinal deformity has comparable results to those of the conventional techniques but with fewer complications. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of the object surface function by structured light: application to the study of spinal deformities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buendia, M.; Salvador, R.; Cibrian, R.; Sotoca, J.M.; Laguia, M.

    1999-01-01

    The projection of structured light is a technique frequently used to determine the surface shape of an object. In this paper, a new procedure is described that efficiently resolves the correspondence between the knots of the projected grid and those obtained on the object when the projection is made. The method is based on the use of three images of the projected grid. In two of them the grid is projected over a flat surface placed, respectively, before and behind the object; both images are used for calibration. In the third image the grid is projected over the object. It is not reliant on accurate determination of the camera and projector pair relative to the grid and object. Once the method is calibrated, we can obtain the surface function by just analysing the projected grid on the object. The procedure is especially suitable for the study of objects without discontinuities or large depth gradients. It can be employed for determining, in a non-invasive way, the patient's back surface function. Symmetry differences permit a quantitative diagnosis of spinal deformities such as scoliosis. (author)

  11. PROXIMAL DISABILITY AND SPINAL DEFORMITY INDEX IN PATIENTS WITH PROXIMAL FEMUR FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvio Mistro Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To evaluate the quality of life related to the spine in patients with proximal femoral fractures. Methods : Study conducted in a tertiary public hospital in patients with proximal femoral fractures caused by low-energy trauma, through the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire to asses complaints related to the spine at the time of life prior to the femoral fracture. The thoracic and lumbar spine of patients were also evaluated applying the radiographic index described by Gennant (Spinal Deformity Index, which assesses the number and severity of fractures. Results : Seventeen subjects completed the study. All had some degree of vertebral fracture. Patients were classified in the categories of severe and very severe disability in the questionnaire about quality of life. It was found that the higher SDI, the better the quality of life. Conclusion : There is a strong association of disability related to the spine in patients with proximal femoral fracture, and this complaint must be systematically evaluated in patients with appendicular fracture.

  12. Quality of life in children and adolescents undergoing spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Greg M; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2017-01-01

    Quality of life measurements evaluate surgical results from patients' reported outcomes. To assess the impact of spinal deformity treatment using the Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire. SRS-22 data was collected in 545 consecutive patients (425 females-120 males) pre-operatively, 6-, 12- and 24-months post-operatively. Variables included type and age of surgery (mean: 15.14 ± 2.07 years), gender, diagnosis and year of surgery. Age at surgery was divided in: 10-12, 13-15, and 15-19 years. Mean pre-operative SRS-22 scores for the whole group were: function 3.77 ± 0.75; pain 3.7 ± 0.97; self-image 3.14 ± 0.66; mental health 3.86 ± 0.77; total 3.62 ± 0.66. Mean 2-year post-operative scores were: function 4.39 ± 0.42; pain 4.59 ± 0.56; self-image 4.39 ± 0.51; mental health 4.43 ± 0.56; satisfaction 4.81 ± 0.40; total 4.52 ± 0.37 (padolescents.

  13. Validity of a smartphone protractor to measure sagittal parameters in adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, William Aaron; Madden, Michael; Potts, Shannon; Fogelson, Jeremy; Hershman, Stuart

    2017-10-01

    Smartphones have become an integral tool in the daily life of health-care professionals (Franko 2011). Their ease of use and wide availability often make smartphones the first tool surgeons use to perform measurements. This technique has been validated for certain orthopedic pathologies (Shaw 2012; Quek 2014; Milanese 2014; Milani 2014), but never to assess sagittal parameters in adult spinal deformity (ASD). This study was designed to assess the validity, reproducibility, precision, and efficiency of using a smartphone protractor application to measure sagittal parameters commonly measured in ASD assessment and surgical planning. This study aimed to (1) determine the validity of smartphone protractor applications, (2) determine the intra- and interobserver reliability of smartphone protractor applications when used to measure sagittal parameters in ASD, (3) determine the efficiency of using a smartphone protractor application to measure sagittal parameters, and (4) elucidate whether a physician's level of experience impacts the reliability or validity of using a smartphone protractor application to measure sagittal parameters in ASD. An experimental validation study was carried out. Thirty standard 36″ standing lateral radiographs were examined. Three separate measurements were performed using a marker and protractor; then at a separate time point, three separate measurements were performed using a smartphone protractor application for all 30 radiographs. The first 10 radiographs were then re-measured two more times, for a total of three measurements from both the smartphone protractor and marker and protractor. The parameters included lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, and pelvic tilt. Three raters performed all measurements-a junior level orthopedic resident, a senior level orthopedic resident, and a fellowship-trained spinal deformity surgeon. All data, including the time to perform the measurements, were recorded, and statistical analysis was performed to

  14. Energy spectrum inverse problem of q -deformed harmonic oscillator and WBK approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, Nguyen Anh; Thuy, Do Thi Thu; Loan, Nguyen Thi Ha; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-01-01

    Using the connection between q-deformed harmonic oscillator and Morse-like anharmonic potential we investigate the energy spectrum inverse problem. Consider some energy levels of energy spectrum of q -deformed harmonic oscillator are known, we construct the corresponding Morse-like potential then find out the deform parameter q . The application possibility of using the WKB approximation in the energy spectrum inverse problem was discussed for the cases of parabolic potential (harmonic oscillator), Morse-like potential ( q -deformed harmonic oscillator). so we consider our deformed-three-levels simple model, where the set-parameters of Morse potential and the corresponding set-parameters of level deformations are easily and explicitly defined. For practical problems, we propose the deformed- three-levels simple model, where the set-parameters of Morse potential and the corresponding set-parameters of level deformations are easily and explicitly defined. (paper)

  15. A deformable-model approach to semi-automatic segmentation of CT images demonstrated by application to the spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, Stuart S.C.; Starkschall, George; Stevens, Craig W.; Liao Zhongxing

    2004-01-01

    Because of the importance of accurately defining the target in radiation treatment planning, we have developed a deformable-template algorithm for the semi-automatic delineation of normal tissue structures on computed tomography (CT) images. We illustrate the method by applying it to the spinal canal. Segmentation is performed in three steps: (a) partial delineation of the anatomic structure is obtained by wavelet-based edge detection; (b) a deformable-model template is fitted to the edge set by chamfer matching; and (c) the template is relaxed away from its original shape into its final position. Appropriately chosen ranges for the model parameters limit the deformations of the template, accounting for interpatient variability. Our approach differs from those used in other deformable models in that it does not inherently require the modeling of forces. Instead, the spinal canal was modeled using Fourier descriptors derived from four sets of manually drawn contours. Segmentation was carried out, without manual intervention, on five CT data sets and the algorithm's performance was judged subjectively by two radiation oncologists. Two assessments were considered: in the first, segmentation on a random selection of 100 axial CT images was compared with the corresponding contours drawn manually by one of six dosimetrists, also chosen randomly; in the second assessment, the segmentation of each image in the five evaluable CT sets (a total of 557 axial images) was rated as either successful, unsuccessful, or requiring further editing. Contours generated by the algorithm were more likely than manually drawn contours to be considered acceptable by the oncologists. The mean proportions of acceptable contours were 93% (automatic) and 69% (manual). Automatic delineation of the spinal canal was deemed to be successful on 91% of the images, unsuccessful on 2% of the images, and requiring further editing on 7% of the images. Our deformable template algorithm thus gives a robust

  16. Stokes phenomena and monodromy deformation problem for nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdury, A.R.; Naskar, M.

    1986-01-01

    Following Flaschka and Newell, the inverse problem for Painleve IV is formulated with the help of similarity variables. The Painleve IV arises as the eliminant of the two second-order ordinary differential equations originating from the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. Asymptotic expansions are obtained near the singularities at zero and infinity of the complex eigenvalue plane. The corresponding analysis then displays the Stokes phenomena. The monodromy matrices connecting the solution Y /sub j/ in the sector S /sub j/ to that in S /sub j+1/ are fixed in structure by the imposition of certain conditions. It is then shown that a deformation keeping the monodromy data fixed leads to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. While Flaschka and Newell did not make any absolute determination of the Stokes parameters, the present approach yields the values of the Stokes parameters in an explicit way, which in turn can determine the matrix connecting the solutions near zero and infinity. Finally, it is shown that the integral equation originating from the analyticity and asymptotic nature of the problem leads to the similarity solution previously determined by Boiti and Pampinelli

  17. Unspecific chronic low back pain - a simple functional classification tested in a case series of patients with spinal deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Werkmann, Mario

    2009-02-17

    Up to now, chronic low back pain without radicular symptoms is not classified and attributed in international literature as being "unspecific". For specific bracing of this patient group we use simple physical tests to predict the brace type the patient is most likely to benefit from. Based on these physical tests we have developed a simple functional classification of "unspecific" low back pain in patients with spinal deformities. Between January 2006 and July 2007 we have tested 130 patients (116 females and 14 males) with spinal deformities (average age 45 years, ranging from 14 years to 69) and chronic unspecific low back pain (pain for > 24 months) along with the indication for brace treatment for chronic unspecific low back pain. Some of the patients had symptoms of spinal claudication (n = 16). The "sagittal realignment test" (SRT) was applied, a lumbar hyperextension test, and the "sagittal delordosation test" (SDT). Additionally 3 female patients with spondylolisthesis were tested, including one female with symptoms of spinal claudication and 2 of these patients were 14 years of age and the other 43yrs old at the time of testing. 117 Patients reported significant pain release in the SRT and 13 in the SDT (> or = 2 steps in the Roland & Morris VRS). 3 Patients had no significant pain release in both of the tests (manual investigation we found hypermobility at L5/S1 or a spondylolisthesis at level L5/S1. In the other patients who responded well to the SRT loss of lumbar lordosis was the main issue, a finding which, according to scientific literature, correlates well with low back pain. The 3 patients who did not respond to either test had a fair pain reduction in a generally delordosing brace with an isolated small foam pad inserted at the level of L 2/3, leading to a lordosation at this region. With the exception of 3 patients (2.3%) a clear distribution to one of the two classes has been possible. 117 patients were supplied successfully with a sagittal

  18. Spectral inverse problem for q-deformed harmonic oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The supersymmetric quantization condition is used to study the wave functions of SWKB equivalent -deformed harmonic oscillator which are obtained by using only the knowledge of bound-state spectra of -deformed harmonic oscillator. We have also studied the nonuniqueness of the obtained interactions by this ...

  19. Return to sports after surgery to correct adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a survey of the Spinal Deformity Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Ronald A; Kang, Daniel G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Sucato, Daniel J; Bevevino, Adam J

    2015-05-01

    There are no guidelines for when surgeons should allow patients to return to sports and athletic activities after spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Current recommendations are based on anecdotal reports and a survey performed more than a decade ago in the era of first/second-generation posterior implants. To identify current recommendations for return to sports and athletic activities after surgery for AIS. Questionnaire-based survey. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after corrective surgery. Type and time to return to sports. A survey was administered to members of the Spinal Deformity Study Group. The survey consisted of surgeon demographic information, six clinical case scenarios, three different construct types (hooks, pedicle screws, hybrid), and questions regarding the influence of lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) and postoperative physical therapy. Twenty-three surgeons completed the survey, and respondents were all experienced expert deformity surgeons. Pedicle screw instrumentation allows earlier return to noncontact and contact sports, with most patients allowed to return to running by 3 months, both noncontact and contact sports by 6 months, and collision sports by 12 months postoperatively. For all construct types, approximately 20% never allow return to collision sports, whereas all surgeons allow eventual return to contact and noncontact sports regardless of construct type. In addition to construct type, we found progressively distal LIV resulted in more surgeons never allowing return to collision sports, with 12% for selective thoracic fusion to T12/L1 versus 33% for posterior spinal fusion to L4. Most respondents also did not recommend formal postoperative physical therapy (78%). Of all surgeons surveyed, there was only one reported instrumentation failure/pullout without neurologic deficit after a patient went snowboarding 2 weeks postoperatively. Modern posterior instrumentation allows surgeons to recommend earlier return

  20. Correlations of capture, transport, and nutrition with spinal deformities in sandtiger sharks, Carcharias taurus, in public aquaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul A; Huber, Daniel R; Berzins, Ilze K

    2012-12-01

    A number of captive sandtiger sharks (Carcharias taurus) in public aquaria have developed spinal deformities over the past decade, ranging in severity from mild curvature to spinal fracture and severe subluxation. To determine the frequency and etiologic basis of this disease, U.S. public aquaria participated in a two-stage epidemiologic study of resident sharks: 1) a history and husbandry survey and 2) hematology, clinical chemistry, and radiography conducted during health exams. Eighteen aquaria submitted data, samples, or both from 73 specimens, including 19 affected sharks (26%). Sharks caught off the Rhode Island coast or by pound net were smaller at capture and demonstrated a higher prevalence of deformity than did larger sharks caught from other areas via hook and line. Relative to healthy sharks, affected sharks were deficient in zinc, potassium, and vitamins C and E. Capture and transport results lead to two likely etiologic hypotheses: 1) that the pound-net capture process induces spinal trauma that becomes exacerbated over time in aquarium environments or 2) that small (and presumably young) sharks caught by pound net are exposed to disease-promoting conditions (including diet or habitat deficiencies) in aquaria during the critical growth phase of their life history. The last hypothesis is further supported by nutrient deficiencies among affected sharks documented in this study; potassium, zinc, and vitamin C play critical roles in proper cartilage-collagen development and maintenance. These correlative findings indicate that public aquaria give careful consideration to choice of collection methods and size at capture and supplement diets to provide nutrients required for proper development and maintenance of cartilaginous tissue.

  1. Spine evaluation: Determination of the relationship between thoracic spinal deformity and sagittal curves by a noninvasive method DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n4p282

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Minonroze Albuquerque Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to compare sagittal plane alignment between subjects with spinal deformities and a group presenting no changes; to test the reliability of the tool used, and to determine the existence of correlations between spinal deformity and sagittal curvature measures. Forty young subjects were divided into two groups: a control group (n=20 presenting no changes or spinal deformity less than 0.5 cm in the dorsal curvature and 0.7 cm in the lumbar curvature, and an experimental group (n=20 with spinal deformities greater than those described for the control group. Spinal deformity and sagittal plane curvatures were measured using a water level-based tool and by the Adams test. Data were collected from the two groups on two distinct occasions. The Mann-Whitney test showed no difference between sampling times. A significant difference between the two groups was only observed in terms of cervical curvature. Spearman’s test revealed a linear correlation between dorsal curvature and dorsal spinal deformity in the control group, between dorsal and lumbar curves in the two groups, and between dorsal spinal deformity and lumbar and sacral curves and between sacral curvature and dorsal and lumbar curves in the experimental group. In conclusion, spinal deformity measurement is associated with sagittal plane curvatures. The method proposed here is reliable, simple and accessible and can be reproduced without high costs and damage to the patient’s health.

  2. Outcome and safety analysis of 3D printed patient specific pedicle screw jigs for complex spinal deformities: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhavuk; Gupta, Manish; Singh, Menaka; Kalyanasundaram, Dinesh

    2018-05-03

    Spinal deformities are very challenging to treat and have a great risk of neurological complications due to hardware placement during corrective surgery. Various techniques have been introduced to ensure safe and accurate placement of pedicle screws. Patient-specific screw guides with pre-drawn and pre-validated trajectory seems to be an attractive option. We have focused on developing 3D printing technique for complex spinal deformities in India. This study also aimed to compare the placement of pedicle screw with 3D printing and free hand technique. This is a retrospective comparative clinical study at an academic institutional setting. A total of 20 patients were enrolled during the study, 10 were operated with the help of 3D printing (group 1) and 10 were operated with freehand technique (group 2). Group 1 included 6 congenital, 3 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), one post tubercular kyphosis and Group 2 included 5 congenital, 4 AIS and one post tubercular kyphosis patient. Primary outcomes were measured in terms of screw violation and secondary outcome were measured in terms of Surgical time, Blood loss, Radiation exposure (no. of shoots required) and complications. MIMICS v18.0 Software was used for 3D reconstruction from CT scan images of all the patients. 3-Matic software was used to create drill guide. 3-D printer from Stratasys Mojo ABS P 430 model material cartilage (a thermoplastic material) was used for printing of vertebrae model and jigs. Two sample test of proportion was used to compare correctly and wrongly pedicle screw placement with 3D printing and freehand technique. T-test with equal variance was used for operating surgical time and blood loss. This work was carried out by collaboration of Orthopaedics Department, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi and Biomedical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi. This project received the grant of USD 60000 from Department of Biotechnology (DBT

  3. Nanostructures by Severe Plastic Deformation of Steels: Advantages and Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobatkin, S. V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to consider the features of structure evolution during severe plastic deformation (SPD of steels and its influence on mechanical properties. The investigation have been carried out mainly on low carbon steels as well as on austenitic stainless steels after SPD by torsion under high pressure (HPT and equal channel angular (ECA pressing. Structure formation dependencies on temperature deformation conditions, strain degree, chemical composition, initial state and pressure are considered. The role of phase transformations for additional grain refinement, namely, martensitic transformation, precipitation of carbide particles during SPD and heating is underlined.

  4. Measuring outcomes in adult spinal deformity surgery: a systematic review to identify current strengths, weaknesses and gaps in patient-reported outcome measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faraj, S.S.; Hooff, M.L. Van; Holewijn, R.M.; Polly, D.W.; Haanstra, T.M.; Kleuver, M. de

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adult spinal deformity (ASD) causes severe disability, reduces overall quality of life, and results in a substantial societal burden of disease. As healthcare is becoming more value based, and to facilitate global benchmarking, it is critical to identify and standardize patient-reported

  5. Unspecific chronic low back pain – a simple functional classification tested in a case series of patients with spinal deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werkmann Mario

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to now, chronic low back pain without radicular symptoms is not classified and attributed in international literature as being "unspecific". For specific bracing of this patient group we use simple physical tests to predict the brace type the patient is most likely to benefit from. Based on these physical tests we have developed a simple functional classification of "unspecific" low back pain in patients with spinal deformities. Methods Between January 2006 and July 2007 we have tested 130 patients (116 females and 14 males with spinal deformities (average age 45 years, ranging from 14 years to 69 and chronic unspecific low back pain (pain for > 24 months along with the indication for brace treatment for chronic unspecific low back pain. Some of the patients had symptoms of spinal claudication (n = 16. The "sagittal realignment test" (SRT was applied, a lumbar hyperextension test, and the "sagittal delordosation test" (SDT. Additionally 3 female patients with spondylolisthesis were tested, including one female with symptoms of spinal claudication and 2 of these patients were 14 years of age and the other 43yrs old at the time of testing. Results 117 Patients reported significant pain release in the SRT and 13 in the SDT (>/= 2 steps in the Roland & Morris VRS. 3 Patients had no significant pain release in both of the tests ( Pain intensity was high (3,29 before performing the physical tests (VRS-scale 0–5 and low (1,37 while performing the physical test for the whole sample of patients. The differences where highly significant in the Wilcoxon test (z = -3,79; p In the 16 patients who did not respond to the SRT in the manual investigation we found hypermobility at L5/S1 or a spondylolisthesis at level L5/S1. In the other patients who responded well to the SRT loss of lumbar lordosis was the main issue, a finding which, according to scientific literature, correlates well with low back pain. The 3 patients who did not

  6. Custom-Made Titanium 3-Dimensional Printed Interbody Cages for Treatment of Osteoporotic Fracture-Related Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Timothy L; Rogers, Jeffrey M; Lin, Kainu; Thompson, Robert; Owbridge, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Advances in minimally invasive interbody fusion have greatly enhanced surgeons' capability to correct adult spinal deformity with reduced morbidity. However, the feasibility of such approaches is limited in patients with previous osteoporotic fractures as the resultant vertebral deformity renders the end plate geometry incongruous with conventional interbody implants. Current 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology offers a novel solution by fabricating custom-made implants tailored to individual anatomy. We present the results of a patient with osteoporotic lumbar fractures treated by such technology. A 74-year-old woman, with previous osteoporotic fractures at L2 and L3 resulting in concave deformity of the end plates, presented with intractable radiculopathy secondary to lateral recess and foraminal stenosis (L2-3 and L3-4). A minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion at L2-3 and L3-4 was considered favorable, but due to the associated vertebral collapse, off-the-shelf implants were not compatible with patient anatomy. In silico simulation based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) imaging was thus conducted to design customized cages to cater for the depressed recipient end plates and vertebral loss. The design was converted to implantable titanium cages through 3D additive manufacturing. At surgery, a tight fit between the implants and the targeted disk space was achieved. Postoperative CT scan confirmed excellent implant-end plate matching and restoration of lost disk space. The patient began to ambulate from postoperative day 1 and at 6-month follow-up resolution of radicular symptoms and CT evidence of interbody fusion were recorded. 3D-printed custom-made interbody cages can help overcome the difficulties in deformity correction secondary to osteoporotic fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Global analysis of sagittal spinal alignment in major deformities: correlation between lack of lumbar lordosis and flexion of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Ibrahim; Hauger, Olivier; Aunoble, Stéphane; Bourghli, Anouar; Pellet, Nicolas; Vital, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    It has become well recognised that sagittal balance of the spine is the result of an interaction between the spine and the pelvis. Knee flexion is considered to be the last compensatory mechanism in case of sagittal imbalance, but only few studies have insisted on the relationship between spino-pelvic parameters and lower extremity parameters. Correlation between the lack of lumbar lordosis and knee flexion has not yet been established. A retrospective study was carried out on 28 patients with major spinal deformities. The EOS system was used to measure spinal and pelvic parameters and the knee flexion angle; the lack of lumbar lordosis was calculated after prediction of lumbar lordosis with two different formulas. Correlation analysis between the different measured parameters was performed. Lumbar lordosis correlated with sacral slope (r = -0.71) and moderately with knee flexion angle (r = 0.42). Pelvic tilt correlated moderately with knee flexion angle (r = 0.55). Lack of lumbar lordosis correlated best with knee flexion angle (r = 0.72 and r = 0.63 using the two formulas, respectively). Knee flexion as a compensatory mechanism to sagittal imbalance was well correlated to the lack of lordosis and, depending on the importance of the former parameter, the best procedure to correct sagittal imbalance could be chosen.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Different Types of Analgesia in Patients after Surgical Correction of Scoliotic Spinal Deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Georgiyants

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of epidural analgesia and anesthesia using opiates after surgical interventions for spinal scoliosis in children has beem carried out. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In the first one postoperative analgesia was carried out by intramuscular injection of promedol, in second one epidural analgesia was used with the constant introduction of ropivacaine. The authors studied the effect of these techniques on hemodynamics, the analysis of the subjective perception of pain by patients.

  9. Deep postoperative spine infection treated by negative pressure therapy in patients with progressive spinal deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Marengo, Lorenza; Corradin, Marco; Mansour, Mounira; Samba, Antoine; Andreacchio, Antonio; Rousset, Marie; Dimeglio, Alain

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study is to review the outcome of using the VAC system in children and adolescents who have developed postoperative spinal infection after posterior instrumented spinal fusion, and to evaluate whether this technique is also feasible in patients treated with posterior instrumented fusion with polyester sublaminar bands. A total of 11 out of 118 consecutive children and adolescents (5 males) with deep postoperative spinal infection were identified; infections were categorised as early (acute), delayed (subacute) or late (chronic) according to time of onset. Irrespective of the etiology and the onset, all the deep infections were managed with the reported technique. All the patients had regular clinical and radiological follow-up. Eight out of 11 patients developed an early (72.7%), 2 a delayed (18.2%) and 1 a late deep postoperative infection (9.1%); 7 out of 11 (63.6%) showed severe mental compromise. No statistically significant differences were observed for mean number of VAC dressing changes (p = 0.81) and mean length of hospitalisation comparing patients with early infection versus patients with delayed or late infections (p = 0.32). Mean number of VAC dressing changes (p = 0.02) and mean number of hospitalisation days (p = 0.05) were higher in patients with underlying neurological disorders than in those without, while mean length of hospitalisation was longer in neuromuscular patients. The application of the VAC system, as an adjunct to surgical debridement and adequate antibiotic therapy, is a reliable method for the treatment of postoperative infection in children and adolescents undergoing spinal instrumentation and fusion. It can reduce the need for further complex soft-tissue procedure, removal of hardware with consequent loss of correction, and pseudoarthrosis. Finally, the use of VAC therapy is not contraindicated in patients treated with hybrid constructs with sublaminar bands. III.

  10. Collagen Organization in Facet Capsular Ligaments Varies With Spinal Region and With Ligament Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ehsan; Zhang, Sijia; Zarei, Vahhab; Barocas, Victor H; Winkelstein, Beth A; Picu, Catalin R

    2017-07-01

    The spinal facet capsular ligament (FCL) is primarily comprised of heterogeneous arrangements of collagen fibers. This complex fibrous structure and its evolution under loading play a critical role in determining the mechanical behavior of the FCL. A lack of analytical tools to characterize the spatial anisotropy and heterogeneity of the FCL's microstructure has limited the current understanding of its structure-function relationships. Here, the collagen organization was characterized using spatial correlation analysis of the FCL's optically obtained fiber orientation field. FCLs from the cervical and lumbar spinal regions were characterized in terms of their structure, as was the reorganization of collagen in stretched cervical FCLs. Higher degrees of intra- and intersample heterogeneity were found in cervical FCLs than in lumbar specimens. In the cervical FCLs, heterogeneity was manifested in the form of curvy patterns formed by collections of collagen fibers or fiber bundles. Tensile stretch, a common injury mechanism for the cervical FCL, significantly increased the spatial correlation length in the stretch direction, indicating an elongation of the observed structural features. Finally, an affine estimation for the change of correlation length under loading was performed which gave predictions very similar to the actual values. These findings provide structural insights for multiscale mechanical analyses of the FCLs from various spinal regions and also suggest methods for quantitative characterization of complex tissue patterns.

  11. Energy spectrum inverse problem of q-deformed harmonic oscillator and entanglement of composite bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Nguyen Anh; Thu Thuy, Do Thi; Loan, Nguyen Thi Ha; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2017-06-01

    Using the simple deformed three-level model (D3L model) proposed in our early work, we study the entanglement problem of composite bosons. Consider three first energy levels are known, we can get two energy separations, and can define the level deformation parameter δ. Using connection between q-deformed harmonic oscillator and Morse-like anharmonic potential, the deform parameter q also can be derived explicitly. Like the Einstein’s theory of special relativity, we introduce the observer e˙ects: out side observer (looking from outside the studying system) and inside observer (looking inside the studying system). Corresponding to those observers, the outside entanglement entropy and inside entanglement entropy will be defined.. Like the case of Foucault pendulum in the problem of Earth rotation, our deformation energy level investigation might be useful in prediction the environment e˙ect outside a confined box.

  12. Temporary occipital fixation in young children with severe cervical-thoracic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian J; Minkara, Anas A; Angevine, Peter D; Vitale, Michael G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Anderson, Richard C E

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects of instrumentation and fusion of the occipital-cervical-thoracic spine on spinal growth in young children are poorly understood. To mitigate the effects of this surgery on the growing pediatric spine, the authors report a novel technique used in 4 children with severe cervical-thoracic instability. These patients underwent instrumentation from the occiput to the upper thoracic region for stabilization, but without bone graft at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Subsequent surgery was then performed to remove the occipital instrumentation, thereby allowing further growth and increased motion across the CVJ. METHODS Three very young children (15, 30, and 30 months old) underwent occipital to thoracic posterior segmental instrumentation due to cervical or upper thoracic dislocation, progressive kyphosis, and myelopathy. The fourth child (10 years old) underwent similar instrumentation for progressive cervical-thoracic scoliosis. Bone graft was placed at and distal to C-2 only. After follow-up CT scans demonstrated posterior arthrodesis without unintended fusion from the occiput to C-2, 3 patients underwent removal of the occipital instrumentation. RESULTS Follow-up cervical spine flexion/extension radiographs demonstrated partial restoration of motion at the CVJ. One patient has not had the occipital instrumentation removed yet, because only 4 months have elapsed since her operation. CONCLUSIONS Temporary fixation to the occiput provides increased biomechanical stability for spinal stabilization in young children, without permanently eliminating motion and growth at the CVJ. This technique can be considered in children who require longer instrumentation constructs for temporary stabilization, but who only need fusion in more limited areas where spinal instability exists.

  13. Defining a core outcome set for adolescent and young adult patients with a spinal deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kleuver, Marinus; Faraj, Sayf S A; Holewijn, Roderick M

    2017-01-01

    2016, 7 representatives (panelists) of the national spinal surgery registries from each of the NSDS countries participated in a modified Delphi study. With a systematic literature review as a basis and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework as guidance, 4...... consensus rounds were held. Consensus was defined as agreement between at least 5 of the 7 representatives. Data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results - Consensus was reached on the inclusion of 13 core outcome domains: "satisfaction with overall outcome of surgery", "satisfaction...

  14. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: From Normal Spinal Anatomy To Three-Dimensional Deformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlösser, T.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformity of the spine and trunk that primarily affects previously healthy children. It is a classic orthopedic disorder. Despite many years of dedicated research into the etio-pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis, there is not one distinct

  15. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  16. Advantages and Disadvantages of Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery and Its Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Go; Boissiere, Louis; Larrieu, Daniel; Bourghli, Anouar; Vital, Jean Marc; Gille, Olivier; Pointillart, Vincent; Challier, Vincent; Mariey, Remi; Pellisé, Ferran; Vila-Casademunt, Alba; Perez-Grueso, Francisco Javier Sánchez; Alanay, Ahmet; Acaroglu, Emre; Kleinstück, Frank; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2017-03-15

    Prospective multicenter study of adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. To clarify the effect of ASD surgery on each health-related quality of life (HRQOL) subclass/domain. For patients with ASD, surgery offers superior radiological and HRQOL outcomes compared with nonoperative care. HRQOL may, however, be affected by surgical advantages related to corrective effects, yielding adequate spinopelvic alignment and stability or disadvantages because of long segment fusion. The study included 170 consecutive patients with ASD from a multicenter database with more than 2-year follow-up period. We analyzed each HRQOL domain/subclass (short form-36 items, Oswestry Disability Index, Scoliosis Research Society-22 [SRS-22] questionnaire), and radiographic parameters preoperatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. We divided the patients into two groups each based on lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV; above L5 or S1 to ilium) or surgeon-determined preoperative pathology (idiopathic or degenerative). Improvement rate (%) was calculated as follows: 100 × |pre.-post.|/preoperative points (%) (+, advantages; -, disadvantages). The scores of all short form-36 items and SRS-22 subclasses improved at 1 and 2 years after surgery, regardless of LIV location and preoperative pathology. Personal care and lifting in Oswestry Disability Index were, however, not improved after 1 year. These disadvantages were correlated to sagittal modifiers of SRS-Schwab classification similar to other HRQOL. The degree of personal care disadvantage mainly depended on LIV location and preoperative pathology. Although personal care improved after 2 years postoperatively, no noticeable improvements in lifting were recorded. HRQOL subclass analysis indicated two disadvantages of ASD surgery, which were correlated to sagittal radiographic measures. Fusion to the sacrum or ilium greatly restricted the ability to stretch or bend, leading to limited daily activities for at least 1 year postoperatively

  17. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the semi-quantitative, pre-operative assessment of patients undergoing spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasby, Michael A; Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Henderson, Lindsay; Horsburgh, Gillian; Jordan, Brian; Michaelson, Ciara; Adams, Christopher I; Garrido, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    To compare measurements of motor evoked potential latency stimulated either magnetically (mMEP) or electrically (eMEP) and central motor conduction time (CMCT) made pre-operatively in conscious patients using transcranial and intra-operatively using electrical cortical stimulation before and after successful instrumentation for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A group initially of 51 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis aged 12-19 years was evaluated pre-operatively in the outpatients' department with transcranial magnetic stimulation. The neurophysiological data were then compared statistically with intra-operative responses elicited by transcranial electrical stimulation both before and after successful surgical intervention. MEPs were measured as the cortically evoked compound action potentials of Abductor hallucis. Minimum F-waves were measured using conventional nerve conduction methods and the lower motor neuron conduction time was calculated and this was subtracted from MEP latency to give CMCT. Pre-operative testing was well tolerated in our paediatric/adolescent patients. No neurological injury occurred in any patient in this series. There was no significant difference in the values of mMEP and eMEP latencies seen pre-operatively in conscious patients and intra-operatively in patients under anaesthetic. The calculated quantities mCMCT and eCMCT showed the same statistical correlations as the quantities mMEP and eMEP latency. The congruency of mMEP and eMEP and of mCMCT and eCMCT suggests that these measurements may be used comparatively and semi-quantitatively for the comparison of pre-, intra-, and post-operative spinal cord function in spinal deformity surgery.

  18. Calculation of the Target Lumbar Lordosis Angle for Restoring an Optimal Pelvic Tilt in Elderly Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Yu; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Kobayashi, Sho; Yasuda, Tatsuya; Togawa, Daisuke; Arima, Hideyuki; Oe, Shin; Iida, Takahiro; Matsumura, Akira; Hosogane, Naobumi; Matsumoto, Morio; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    This investigation consisted of a cross-sectional study and a retrospective multicenter case series. This investigation sought to identify the ideal lumbar lordosis (LL) angle for restoring an optimal pelvic tilt (PT) in patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). To achieve successful corrective fusion in ASD patients with sagittal imbalance, it is essential to correct the sagittal spinal alignment and obtain a suitable pelvic inclination. We determined the LL angle that would restore the optimal PT following ASD surgery. The cross-sectional study included 184 elderly volunteers (mean age 64 years) with an Oswestry Disability Index score less than 20%. The relationship between PT or LL and the pelvic incidence (PI) in normal individuals was investigated. The second study included 116 ASD patients (mean age 66 years) who underwent thoracolumbar corrective fusion at 1 of 4 spine centers. The postoperative PT values were calculated using the parameters measured. On the basis of these studies, an ideal LL angle was determined. In the cross-sectional study, the linear regression equation for the optimal PT as a function of PI was "optimal PT = 0.47 × PI - 7.5." In the second study, the postoperative PT was determined as a function of PI and corrected LL, using the equation "postoperative PT = 0.7 × PI - 0.5 × corrected LL + 8.1." The target LL angle was determined by mathematically equalizing the PTs of these 2 equations: "target LL = 0.45 × PI + 31.8." The ideal LL angle can be determined using the equation "LL = 0.45 × PI + 31.8," which can be used as a reference during surgical planning in ASD cases. 4.

  19. Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss, D-Dimer, and Fibrinogen Kinetics in Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pong, Ryan P; Leveque, Jean-Christophe A; Edwards, Alicia; Yanamadala, Vijay; Wright, Anna K; Herodes, Megan; Sethi, Rajiv K

    2018-05-02

    Antifibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid reduce operative blood loss and blood product transfusion requirements in patients undergoing surgical correction of scoliosis. The factors involved in the unrelenting coagulopathy seen in scoliosis surgery are not well understood. One potential contributor is activation of the fibrinolytic system during a surgical procedure, likely related to clot dissolution and consumption of fibrinogen. The addition of tranexamic acid during a surgical procedure may mitigate the coagulopathy by impeding the derangement in D-dimer and fibrinogen kinetics. We retrospectively studied consecutive patients who had undergone surgical correction of adult spinal deformity between January 2010 and July 2016 at our institution. Intraoperative hemostatic data, surgical time, estimated blood loss, and transfusion records were analyzed for patients before and after the addition of tranexamic acid to our protocol. Each patient who received tranexamic acid and met inclusion criteria was cohort-matched with a patient who underwent a surgical procedure without tranexamic acid administration. There were 17 patients in the tranexamic acid cohort, with a mean age of 60.7 years, and 17 patients in the control cohort, with a mean age of 60.9 years. Estimated blood loss (932 ± 539 mL compared with 1,800 ± 1,029 mL; p = 0.005) and packed red blood-cell transfusions (1.5 ± 1.6 units compared with 4.0 ± 2.1 units; p = 0.001) were significantly lower in the tranexamic acid cohort. In all single-stage surgical procedures that met inclusion criteria, the rise of D-dimer was attenuated from 8.3 ± 5.0 μg/mL in the control cohort to 3.3 ± 3.2 μg/mL for the tranexamic acid cohort (p tranexamic acid cohort to 60.6 ± 35.1 mg/dL (p = 0.004). In patients undergoing spinal surgery, intravenous administration of tranexamic acid is effective at reducing intraoperative blood loss. Monitoring of D-dimer and fibrinogen during spinal surgery suggests that tranexamic acid

  20. Problems, acceptance and social inequality: a study of the deformed leprosy patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopparty, S N

    1995-09-01

    Though the impact of social inequality on health conditions is widely known, its impact on the chronic and stigmatized disease, leprosy, has received little attention. Deformity sometimes leads to disabilities and to handicaps causing problems to the patient and his family. In this paper an attempt has been made to understand the impact of social inequality, prevalent in the form of the caste system in India on the deformed leprosy patients and on their families. This impact was examined in terms of the problems faced by the patients. A sample of 150 deformed patients and their families, drawn from two districts in Tamil Nadu, was selected for the study. About 57% of the deformed patients experienced their deformity as a handicap which caused social and economic problems while the rest did not. Of the three caste groups, the Lower Caste group experienced more severe economic problems while the Upper Caste group faced more social problems. The extent of acceptance of deformed patients in their family varied significantly among those facing and not facing problems due to their deformity. The deformed patients without any handicap were accepted in a large majority of their families (82%) regardless of their caste status. In contrast the deformed but handicapped patients were accepted differentially among the three caste groups with the Upper group accepting them in most of their families (80%) while in the Lower group much less number of families (54%) did. All the families of the deformed but not handicapped patients desired to keep their patients till their death irrespective of their caste status. On the contrary, while all the families in the Upper Caste group expressed their willingness to keep their handicapped patients in the family till their death, 10% in the Middle and 22% in the Lower Caste groups did not want to do so. This suggests the gradual marginalization, rejection and dehabilitation of the affected. Thus, one's caste status can be a broad indicator

  1. Early Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Release for Correction of Sagittal Imbalance in Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen R. Deukmedjian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to evaluate a novel surgical technique in the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis and present our early experience with the minimally invasive lateral approach for anterior longitudinal ligament release to provide lumbar lordosis and examine its impact on sagittal balance. Methods. All patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD treated with the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas interbody fusion (MIS LIF for release of the anterior longitudinal ligament were examined. Patient demographics, clinical data, spinopelvic parameters, and outcome measures were recorded. Results. Seven patients underwent release of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALR to improve sagittal imbalance. All cases were split into anterior and posterior stages, with mean estimated blood loss of 125 cc and 530 cc, respectively. Average hospital stay was 8.3 days, and mean follow-up time was 9.1 months. Comparing pre- and postoperative 36′′ standing X-rays, the authors discovered a mean increase in global lumbar lordosis of 24 degrees, increase in segmental lumbar lordosis of 17 degrees per level of ALL released, decrease in pelvic tilt of 7 degrees, and decrease in sagittal vertical axis of 4.9 cm. At the last followup, there was a mean improvement in VAS and ODI scores of 26.2% and 18.3%. Conclusions. In the authors’ early experience, release of the anterior longitudinal ligament using the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach may be a feasible alternative in correcting sagittal deformity.

  2. GLOBAL BALANCE IN ADULT SPINAL DEFORMITIES. A STUDY OF 60 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Misael Galicia Luna

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: Determine the most prevalent type of curve in our population, to quantify the radiographic parameters such as PT, IP, SS and compare the physical function according to ODI and SRS-22r. Methods: Retrospective, observational, longitudinal, single-center study, carried out from January 2010 to May 2015 at the Centro Médico ISSEMYM Ecatepec, Spine Surgery Service. Results: A total of 60 patients were obtained, 60% female, with curvatures according to SRS-Schwab, type T (28%, TL (46.6%, D (15%, N (10%, with a mean preoperative VAS of 7 for all curves and post-surgical 2 after 6 months. The SRS-22r preoperative test was 2.1 and postoperatively was 3.75, with p<0.001. Conclusions: Deformities of the adult spine are a growing disease in our country. The surgical management of deformities requires proper clinical and radiographic planning. Patients undergoing surgical treatment in our study showed curvature type TL and demonstrated significant improvement in ODI and SRS-22r.

  3. A Comprehensive Analysis of the SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification and Confounding Variables: A Prospective, Non-US Cross-sectional Study in 292 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallager, Dennis Winge; Hansen, Lars Valentin; Dragsted, Casper Rokkjær; Peytz, Nina; Gehrchen, Martin; Dahl, Benny

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional analyses on a consecutive, prospective cohort. To evaluate the ability of the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification to group patients by widely used health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) scores and examine possible confounding variables. The SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification includes sagittal modifiers considered important for HRQOL and the clinical impact of the classification has been validated in patients from the International Spine Study Group database; however, equivocal results were reported for the Pelvic Tilt modifier and potential confounding variables were not evaluated. Between March 2013 and May 2014, all adult spinal deformity patients from our outpatient clinic with sufficient radiographs were prospectively enrolled. Analyses of HRQOL variance and post hoc analyses were performed for each SRS-Schwab modifier. Age, history of spine surgery, and aetiology of spinal deformity were considered potential confounders and their influence on the association between SRS-Schwab modifiers and aggregated Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores was evaluated with multivariate proportional odds regressions. P values were adjusted for multiple testing. Two hundred ninety-two of 460 eligible patients were included for analyses. The SRS-Schwab Classification significantly discriminated HRQOL scores between normal and abnormal sagittal modifier classifications. Individual grade comparisons showed equivocal results; however, Pelvic Tilt grade + versus +  + did not discriminate patients according to any HRQOL score. All modifiers showed significant proportional odds for worse aggregated ODI scores with increasing grade levels and the effects were robust to confounding. However, age group and aetiology had individual significant effects. The SRS-Schwab sagittal modifiers reliably grouped patients graded 0 versus + / +  + according to the most widely used HRQOL scores and the

  4. Assessment of the Cross-Sectional Areas of the Psoas Major and Multifidus Muscles in Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Tomohiro; Yamato, Yu; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Kobayashi, Sho; Togawa, Daisuke; Oe, Shin; Mihara, Yuki; Kurosu, Kenta; Yamamoto, Naoto; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-08-01

    This is a case-control study. The present study aimed to compare the cross-sectional areas of the psoas major and multifidus muscles between elderly patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) and age-matched and body weight-matched controls, and to evaluate the associations between the cross-sectional areas of these muscles and the severity of spinal deformity. The study included 49 female kyphosis patients with mild scoliosis (Cobb angle muscles were calculated using preoperative L4/L5 axial computed tomography images. In group D, the following spinopelvic parameters were assessed: sagittal vertical axis, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and thoracic kyphosis. The relationships between the muscle cross-sectional areas and spinopelvic parameters were evaluated. The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle was lower in group D than in group C. However, the cross-sectional area of the psoas major muscle was not different between the 2 groups. In multiple regression analysis, the cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle was significantly associated with all spinopelvic parameters. The cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle might be lower in elderly patients with ASD than in controls. In the elderly population, the severity of sagittal spinal deformity might be correlated with the cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle. Therefore, muscle imbalances between the flexors and extensors of the spine could participate in the pathology of ASD.

  5. Analysis of factors affecting baseline SF-36 Mental Component Summary in Adult Spinal Deformity and its impact on surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmopelwa, Tiro; Ayhan, Selim; Yuksel, Selcen; Nabiyev, Vugar; Niyazi, Asli; Pellise, Ferran; Alanay, Ahmet; Sanchez Perez Grueso, Francisco Javier; Kleinstuck, Frank; Obeid, Ibrahim; Acaroglu, Emre

    2018-03-01

    To identify the factors that affect SF-36 mental component summary (MCS) in patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) at the time of presentation, and to analyse the effect of SF-36 MCS on clinical outcomes in surgically treated patients. Prospectively collected data from a multicentric ASD database was analysed for baseline parameters. Then, the same database for surgically treated patients with a minimum of 1-year follow-up was analysed to see the effect of baseline SF-36 MCS on treatment results. A clinically useful SF-36 MCS was determined by ROC Curve analysis. A total of 229 patients with the baseline parameters were analysed. A strong correlation between SF-36 MCS and SRS-22, ODI, gender, and diagnosis were found (p baseline SF-36 MCS (p baseline SF-36 MCS in an ASD population are other HRQOL parameters such as SRS-22 and ODI as well as the baseline thoracic kyphosis and gender. This study has also demonstrated that baseline SF-36 MCS does not necessarily have any effect on the treatment results by surgery as assessed by SRS-22 or ODI. Level III, prognostic study. Copyright © 2018 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SU-E-J-108: Solving the Chinese Postman Problem for Effective Contour Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J; Zhang, L; Balter, P; Court, L [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang, Y; Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a practical approach for accurate contour deformation when deformable image registration (DIR) is used for atlas-based segmentation or contour propagation in image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: A contour deformation approach was developed on the basis of 3D mesh operations. The 2D contours represented by a series of points in each slice were first converted to a 3D triangular mesh, which was deformed by the deformation vectors resulting from DIR. A set of parallel 2D planes then cut through the deformed 3D mesh, generating unordered points and line segments, which should be reorganized into a set of 2D contour points. It was realized that the reorganization problem was equivalent to solving the Chinese Postman Problem (CPP) by traversing a graph built from the unordered points with the least cost. Alternatively, deformation could be applied to a binary mask converted from the original contours. The deformed binary mask was then converted back into contours at the CT slice locations. We performed a qualitative comparison to validate the mesh-based approach against the image-based approach. Results: The DIR could considerably change the 3D mesh, making complicated 2D contour representations after deformation. CPP was able to effectively reorganize the points in 2D planes no matter how complicated the 2D contours were. The mesh-based approach did not require a post-processing of the contour, thus accurately showing the actual deformation in DIR. The mesh-based approach could keep some fine details and resulted in smoother contours than the image-based approach did, especially for the lung structure. Image-based approach appeared to over-process contours and suffered from image resolution limits. The mesh-based approach was integrated into in-house DIR software for use in routine clinic and research. Conclusion: We developed a practical approach for accurate contour deformation. The efficiency of this approach was demonstrated in both clinic and

  7. Defining Spino-Pelvic Alignment Thresholds: Should Operative Goals in Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery Account for Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafage, Renaud; Schwab, Frank; Challier, Vincent; Henry, Jensen K; Gum, Jeffrey; Smith, Justin; Hostin, Richard; Shaffrey, Christopher; Kim, Han J; Ames, Christopher; Scheer, Justin; Klineberg, Eric; Bess, Shay; Burton, Douglas; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective review of prospective, multicenter database. The aim of the study was to determine age-specific spino-pelvic parameters, to extrapolate age-specific Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) values from published Short Form (SF)-36 Physical Component Score (PCS) data, and to propose age-specific realignment thresholds for adult spinal deformity (ASD). The Scoliosis Research Society-Schwab classification offers a framework for defining alignment in patients with ASD. Although age-specific changes in spinal alignment and patient-reported outcomes have been established in the literature, their relationship in the setting of ASD operative realignment has not been reported. ASD patients who received operative or nonoperative treatment were consecutively enrolled. Patients were stratified by age, consistent with published US-normative values (Norms) of the SF-36 PCS (75  y old). At baseline, relationships between between radiographic spino-pelvic parameters (lumbar-pelvic mismatch [PI-LL], pelvic tilt [PT], sagittal vertical axis [SVA], and T1 pelvic angle [TPA]), age, and PCS were established using linear regression analysis; normative PCS values were then used to establish age-specific targets. Correlation analysis with ODI and PCS was used to determine age-specific ideal alignment. Baseline analysis included 773 patients (53.7 y old, 54% operative, 83% female). There was a strong correlation between ODI and PCS (r = 0.814, P US-normative ODI by age group. Linear regression analysis (all with r > 0.510, P US-normative PCS values demonstrated that ideal spino-pelvic values increased with age, ranging from PT = 10.9 degrees, PI-LL = -10.5 degrees, and SVA = 4.1 mm for patients under 35 years to PT = 28.5 degrees, PI-LL = 16.7 degrees, and SVA = 78.1 mm for patients over 75 years. Clinically, older patients had greater compensation, more degenerative loss of lordosis, and were more pitched forward. This study demonstrated that

  8. Practical solution of plastic deformation problems in elastic-plastic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, A; Manson, S

    1957-01-01

    A practical method for solving plastic deformation problems in the elastic-plastic range is presented. The method is one of successive approximations and is illustrated by four examples which include a flat plate with temperature distribution across the width, a thin shell with axial temperature distribution, a solid cylinder with radial temperature distribution, and a rotating disk with radial temperature distribution.

  9. Clinical effects of posterior pedicle screw fixation on spinal deformity in growing period: a report of 360 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-lei WANG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of a new kind of pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus and locked middle segment on spinal deformity in growing period.Methods Three hundred and sixty patients in growing period were involved in the present study,and among them 82 were suffering from congenital scoliosis,218 idiopathic scoliosis and 60 kyphosis.All the patients were treated with the pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus and locked middle segment.The treatment effects and postoperative complications were observed,and the Cobb angle before and after the operation was compared.Results The Cobb angle of 300 scoliosis patients was corrected from 53°±3° to 8°±2°,and the Cobb angle of 60 kyphosis patients was corrected from 60°±2° to 25°±3°,and the corrective effect was satisfactory.The correction rate of patients with Cobb angle ≤50° was 80%.Two hundred and ten patients were followed-up for 1 to 6 years,and the longitudinal growth of spine was 1.5-4.0cm.No severe complication,such as screw fracture,rod fracture or nerve injury,occurred.Conclusion The pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus had a favorable three-dimensional correction effect,and the spine growth would not be restricted,and there was no stiffness,vertebral rotation,or distortion of shaft after operation.

  10. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  11. Clinical Incidence of Sacroiliac Joint Arthritis and Pain after Sacropelvic Fixation for Spinal Deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainoh, Takeshi; Takaso, Masashi; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Arai, Gen; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sacroiliac fixation using iliac screws for highly unstable lumbar spine has been reported with an improved fusion rate and clinical results. On the other hand, there is a potential for clinical problems related to iliac fixation, including late sacroiliac joint arthritis and pain. Materials and Methods Twenty patients were evaluated. Degenerative scoliosis was diagnosed in 7 patients, failed back syndrome in 6 patients, destructive spondyloarthropathy in 4 patients, and Charcot spine in 3 patients. All patients underwent posterolateral fusion surgery incorporating lumbar, S1 and iliac screws. We evaluated the pain scores, bone union, and degeneration of sacroiliac joints by X-ray imaging and computed tomography before and 3 years after surgery. For evaluation of low back and buttock pain from sacroiliac joints 3 years after surgery, lidocaine was administered in order to examine pain relief thereafter. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. All patients showed bone union at final follow-up. Degeneration of sacroiliac joints was not seen in the 20 patients 3 years after surgery. Patients showed slight low back and buttock pain 3 years after surgery. However, not all patients showed relief of the low back and buttock pain after injection of lidocaine into the sacroiliac joint, indicating that their pain did not originate from sacroiliac joints. Conclusion The fusion rate and clinical results were excellent. Also, degeneration and pain from sacroiliac joints were not seen within 3 years after surgery. We recommend sacroiliac fixation using iliac screws for highly unstable lumbar spine. PMID:22318832

  12. Formulations and algorithms for problems on rock mass and support deformation during mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryakov, VM

    2018-03-01

    The analysis of problem formulations to calculate stress-strain state of mine support and surrounding rocks mass in rock mechanics shows that such formulations incompletely describe the mechanical features of joint deformation in the rock mass–support system. The present paper proposes an algorithm to take into account the actual conditions of rock mass and support interaction and the algorithm implementation method to ensure efficient calculation of stresses in rocks and support.

  13. Results of the 2015 Scoliosis Research Society Survey on Single Versus Dual Attending Surgeon Approach for Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Sethi, Rajiv K; Hey, Lloyd A; LaGrone, Michael O; Keefe, Malla; Aryan, Henry E; Errico, Thomas J; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert A; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Daubs, Michael D; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-06-15

    An electronic survey administered to Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) membership. To characterize surgeon practices and views regarding the use of two attending surgeons for adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. The use of two experienced attending surgeons can decrease the operative time, estimated blood loss, and perioperative complication rates. However, the current practice patterns for the use of two attending surgeons remains unknown. An electronic, 27-question survey regarding single/dual attending surgeons was administered to the SRS membership. Determinants included: surgeon/practice demographics, assistant type/level of training, and questions regarding use of two attending surgeons. Overall reporting and comparisons between groups were made: US versus international, academic versus private practice, and experience 15 years. A total of 199 surgeons responded from 27 different countries. Overall and between the groups, the respondents significantly reported believing that two attending spine surgeons improves safety, decreases complications, and improves outcomes (P < 0.01). Approximately, 67.3% reported using a second attending ≤25% of the time (33.2% do not), and 24.1% use one ≥51% of the time (similar between groups); 51.1% that have a second attending feel it's limited by reimbursement and access concerns and 71.9% have difficulty getting the second attending reimbursed. 72.3% use a second attending for ALL of the following reasons (no difference between groups): "it's safer/reduces complications," "it decreases operative time," "it decreases blood loss," "it results in improved outcomes," "it's less work and stress for me." If reimbursement was equal/assured for a second attending, 67.5% would use one "more often" or "always." The respondents feel that having a second attending surgeon improves patient care, however most do not use one often. Reasons include reimbursement/access concerns and the majority would use one if reimbursement was

  14. Overcorrection of lumbar lordosis for adult spinal deformity with sagittal imbalance: comparison of radiographic outcomes between overcorrection and undercorrection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Oh, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Young-Jun; Jung, Hyuk

    2016-08-01

    To determine the correlation of the difference between postoperative lumbar lordosis (LL) and ideal LL with the sagittal vertical axis (SVA) at the final follow-up in patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). Fifty-one patients with degenerative lumbar kyphosis (DLK) (mean age 66.5 years) who underwent surgical correction with a minimum 2-year follow-up were evaluated. Based on the difference between postoperative LL and ideal LL using the Korean version of Legaye's formula, we divided the 51 patients into two groups: overcorrection (degree of postoperative LL > ideal LL) and undercorrection (degree of postoperative LL < ideal LL). Our clinical series of patients comprised 24 in the overcorrection and 27 in the undercorrection group. No significant differences were found in preoperative pelvic incidence (PI 52.6° vs. 57.3°), sacral slope (SS 23.3° vs. 18.3°), LL (-6.9° vs. -2.3°), thoracic kyphosis (TK 4.7° vs. 4.9°) and SVA (140 vs. 139 mm) except pelvic tilt (PT 29.4° vs. 39.0°), between the two groups. All the patients in the overcorrection group and 16 in the undercorrection group achieved postoperative optimal sagittal balance based on SVA ≤ 50 mm. In addition, significant differences in PT (10.5° vs. 26.7°), SS (42.1° vs. 30.6°), LL (-64.3° vs. -37.1°), TK (22.6° vs. 15.8°), and SVA (-1 vs. 41 mm) between the two groups were observed postoperatively. Furthermore, four patients (16.7 %) in the overcorrection group and eight (50 %) in the undercorrection group had sagittal decompensation at the final follow-up. Our results showed that the difference between postoperative LL and ideal LL had a significant correlation with postoperative and final follow-up SVA in our clinical series. Overcorrection of LL is an effective treatment modality to maintain optimal sagittal alignment in patients with DLK; this suggests that it should be considered in preoperative planning for patients with ASD with sagittal imbalance.

  15. Intra-observer reproducibility and interobserver reliability of the radiographic parameters in the Spinal Deformity Study Group's AIS Radiographic Measurement Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Natasha Radhika; Moreau, Marc J; Hill, Douglas L; Mahood, James K; Raso, James

    2005-05-01

    Retrospective cross-sectional assessment of the reproducibility and reliability of radiographic parameters. To measure the intra-examiner and interexaminer reproducibility and reliability of salient radiographic features. The management and treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) depends on accurate and reproducible radiographic measurements of the deformity. Ten sets of radiographs were randomly selected from a sample of patients with AIS, with initial curves between 20 degrees and 45 degrees. Fourteen measures of the deformity were measured from posteroanterior and lateral radiographs by 2 examiners, and were repeated 5 times at intervals of 3-5 days. Intra-examiner and interexaminer differences were examined. The parameters include measures of curve size, spinal imbalance, sagittal kyphosis and alignment, maximum apical vertebral rotation, T1 tilt, spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis, and skeletal age. Intra-examiner reproducibility was generally excellent for parameters measured from the posteroanterior radiographs but only fair to good for parameters from the lateral radiographs, in which some landmarks were not clearly visible. Of the 13 parameters observed, 7 had excellent interobserver reliability. The measurements from the lateral radiograph were less reproducible and reliable and, thus, may not add value to the assessment of AIS. Taking additional measures encourages a systematic and comprehensive assessment of spinal radiographs.

  16. A computed tomographic anatomical study of the upper sacrum. Application for a user guide of pelvic fixation with iliosacral screws in adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubory, Arnaud; Bouloussa, Houssam; Riouallon, Guillaume; Wolff, Stéphane

    2017-12-01

    Widely used in traumatic pelvic ring fractures, the iliosacral (IS) screw technique for spino-pelvic fixation remains anecdotal in adult spinal deformity. The objective of this study was to assess anatomical variability of the adult upper sacrum and to provide a user guide of spino-pelvic fixation with IS screws in adult spinal deformity. Anatomical variability of the upper sacrum according to age, gender, height and weight was sought on 30 consecutive pelvic CT-scans. Thus, a user guide of spino-pelvic fixation with IS screws was modeled and assessed on ten CT-scans as described below. Two invariable landmarks usable during the surgical procedure were defined: point A (corresponding to the connector binding the IS screw to the spinal rod), equidistant from the first posterior sacral hole and the base of the S1 articular facet and 10 mm-embedded into the sacrum; point B (corresponding to the tip of the IS screw) located at the junction of the anterior third and middle third of the sacral endplate in the sagittal plane and at the middle of the endplate in the coronal plane. Point C corresponded to the intersection between the A-B direction and the external facet of the iliac wing. Three-dimensional reconstructions modeling the IS screw optimal direction according to the A-B-C straight line were assessed. Age had no effect on the anatomy of the upper sacrum. The distance between the base of the S1 superior articular facet and the top of the first posterior sacral hole was correlated with weight (r = 0.6; 95% CI [0.6-0.9]); p guide of spinopelvic fixation with IS screws seems to be reliable and reproducible independently of age, gender and morphologic characteristics but needs clinical assessment. Level IV.

  17. Numerical analysis of some problems related to the mechanics of pneumatic tires: Finite deformation/rolling contact of a viscoelastic cylinder and finite deformation of cord-reinforced rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Lin, T. L.; Hsieh, K. T.

    1984-01-01

    The formulation and numerical analysis of several problems related to the behavior of pneumatic tires are considered. These problems include the general rolling contact problem of a rubber-like viscoelastic cylinder undergoing finite deformations and the finite deformation of cord-reinforced rubber composites. New finite element models are developed for these problems. Numerical results obtained for several representative cases are presented.

  18. Automatic contour propagation using deformable image registration to determine delivered dose to spinal cord in head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, P. L.; Noble, D. J.; Harrison, K.; Bates, A. M.; Burnet, N. G.; Jena, R.; Romanchikova, M.; Sutcliffe, M. P. F.; Thomas, S. J.; Barnett, G. C.; Benson, R. J.; Jefferies, S. J.; Parker, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    To determine delivered dose to the spinal cord, a technique has been developed to propagate manual contours from kilovoltage computed-tomography (kVCT) scans for treatment planning to megavoltage computed-tomography (MVCT) guidance scans. The technique uses the Elastix software to perform intensity-based deformable image registration of each kVCT scan to the associated MVCT scans. The registration transform is then applied to contours of the spinal cord drawn manually on the kVCT scan, to obtain contour positions on the MVCT scans. Different registration strategies have been investigated, with performance evaluated by comparing the resulting auto-contours with manual contours, drawn by oncologists. The comparison metrics include the conformity index (CI), and the distance between centres (DBC). With optimised registration, auto-contours generally agree well with manual contours. Considering all 30 MVCT scans for each of three patients, the median CI is 0.759 +/- 0.003 , and the median DBC is (0.87 +/- 0.01 ) mm. An intra-observer comparison for the same scans gives a median CI of 0.820 +/- 0.002 and a DBC of (0.64 +/- 0.01 ) mm. Good levels of conformity are also obtained when auto-contours are compared with manual contours from one observer for a single MVCT scan for each of 30 patients, and when they are compared with manual contours from six observers for two MVCT scans for each of three patients. Using the auto-contours to estimate organ position at treatment time, a preliminary study of 33 patients who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancers indicates good agreement between planned and delivered dose to the spinal cord.

  19. Automatic contour propagation using deformable image registration to determine delivered dose to spinal cord in head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, P L; Noble, D J; Harrison, K; Bates, A M; Burnet, N G; Jena, R; Romanchikova, M; Sutcliffe, M P F; Thomas, S J; Barnett, G C; Benson, R J; Jefferies, S J; Parker, M A

    2017-07-12

    To determine delivered dose to the spinal cord, a technique has been developed to propagate manual contours from kilovoltage computed-tomography (kVCT) scans for treatment planning to megavoltage computed-tomography (MVCT) guidance scans. The technique uses the Elastix software to perform intensity-based deformable image registration of each kVCT scan to the associated MVCT scans. The registration transform is then applied to contours of the spinal cord drawn manually on the kVCT scan, to obtain contour positions on the MVCT scans. Different registration strategies have been investigated, with performance evaluated by comparing the resulting auto-contours with manual contours, drawn by oncologists. The comparison metrics include the conformity index (CI), and the distance between centres (DBC). With optimised registration, auto-contours generally agree well with manual contours. Considering all 30 MVCT scans for each of three patients, the median CI is [Formula: see text], and the median DBC is ([Formula: see text]) mm. An intra-observer comparison for the same scans gives a median CI of [Formula: see text] and a DBC of ([Formula: see text]) mm. Good levels of conformity are also obtained when auto-contours are compared with manual contours from one observer for a single MVCT scan for each of 30 patients, and when they are compared with manual contours from six observers for two MVCT scans for each of three patients. Using the auto-contours to estimate organ position at treatment time, a preliminary study of 33 patients who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancers indicates good agreement between planned and delivered dose to the spinal cord.

  20. Potential use of "1"8F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize hypermetabolism associated with muscle pain in patients with adult spinal deformity: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yuki; Takahashi, Miwako; Momose, Toshimitsu; Matsudaira, Ko; Oka, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) are surgically treated for pain relief; however, visualization of the exact origin of the pain with imaging modalities is still challenging. We report the first case of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with painful degenerative kyphoscoliosis and was evaluated with flourine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ("1"8F-FDG-PET/CT) preoperatively. Because her low back pain was resistant to conservative treatment, she was treated with posterior spinal correction and fusion surgery from Th2 to the ilium. One year after the surgery, her low back pain had disappeared completely. In accordance with her clinical course, "1"8F-FDG-PET imaging revealed the uptake of "1"8F-FDG in the paravertebral muscles preoperatively and showed the complete absence of uptake at 1 year after surgery. The uptake site coincided with the convex part of each curve of the lumbar spine and was thought to be the result of the increased activity of paravertebral muscles due to their chronic stretched state in the kyphotic posture. This case report suggests the possibility of using "1"8F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize increased activity in paravertebral muscles and the ensuing pain in ASD patients. (orig.)

  1. Potential use of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize hypermetabolism associated with muscle pain in patients with adult spinal deformity: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yuki [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Miwako; Momose, Toshimitsu [The University of Tokyo, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Matsudaira, Ko; Oka, Hiroyuki [The University of Tokyo, Department of Medical Research and Management for Musculoskeletal Pain, 22nd Century Medical and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) are surgically treated for pain relief; however, visualization of the exact origin of the pain with imaging modalities is still challenging. We report the first case of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with painful degenerative kyphoscoliosis and was evaluated with flourine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) preoperatively. Because her low back pain was resistant to conservative treatment, she was treated with posterior spinal correction and fusion surgery from Th2 to the ilium. One year after the surgery, her low back pain had disappeared completely. In accordance with her clinical course, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET imaging revealed the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the paravertebral muscles preoperatively and showed the complete absence of uptake at 1 year after surgery. The uptake site coincided with the convex part of each curve of the lumbar spine and was thought to be the result of the increased activity of paravertebral muscles due to their chronic stretched state in the kyphotic posture. This case report suggests the possibility of using {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize increased activity in paravertebral muscles and the ensuing pain in ASD patients. (orig.)

  2. The relationship of older age and perioperative outcomes following thoracolumbar three-column osteotomy for adult spinal deformity: an analysis of 300 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Darryl; Osorio, Joseph A; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher P

    2018-04-06

    OBJECTIVE Three-column osteotomies are increasingly being used in the elderly population to correct rigid spinal deformities. There is hesitation, however, in performing the technique in older patients because of the high risk for blood loss, longer operative times, and complications. This study assesses whether age alone is an independent risk factor for complications and length of stay. METHODS All patients with thoracolumbar adult spinal deformity (ASD) who underwent 3-column osteotomy (vertebral column resection or pedicle subtraction osteotomy) performed by the senior author from 2006 to 2016 were identified. Demographics, clinical baseline, and surgical details were collected. Outcomes of interest included perioperative complication, ICU stay, and hospital stay. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of age with outcomes of interest. RESULTS A total of 300 patients were included, and 38.3% were male. The mean age was 63.7 years: 10.3% of patients were younger than 50 years, 36.0% were 50-64 years, 45.7% were 65-79 years, and 8.0% were 80 years or older. The overall mean EBL was 1999 ml. The overall perioperative complication rate was 24.7%: 18.0% had a medical complication and 7.0% had a surgical complication. There were no perioperative or 30-day deaths. Age was associated with overall complications (p = 0.002) and medical-specific complications (p column osteotomy for ASD. Comorbidities and other unknown variables that come with age are likely what put these patients at higher risk for complications. Older age, however, is independently associated with longer ICU and hospital stays.

  3. Development of an integrated optical coherence tomography-gas nozzle system for surgical laser ablation applications: preliminary findings of in situ spinal cord deformation due to gas flow effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ronnie; Jivraj, Jamil; Vuong, Barry; Ramjist, Joel; Dinn, Nicole A; Sun, Cuiru; Huang, Yize; Smith, James A; Yang, Victor X D

    2015-01-01

    Gas assisted laser machining of materials is a common practice in the manufacturing industry. Advantages in using gas assistance include reducing the likelihood of flare-ups in flammable materials and clearing away ablated material in the cutting path. Current surgical procedures and research do not take advantage of this and in the case for resecting osseous tissue, gas assisted ablation can help minimize charring and clear away debris from the surgical site. In the context of neurosurgery, the objective is to cut through osseous tissue without damaging the underlying neural structures. Different inert gas flow rates used in laser machining could cause deformations in compliant materials. Complications may arise during surgical procedures if the dura and spinal cord are damaged by these deformations. We present preliminary spinal deformation findings for various gas flow rates by using optical coherence tomography to measure the depression depth at the site of gas delivery.

  4. Patient profiling can identify patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) at risk for conversion from nonoperative to surgical treatment: initial steps to reduce ineffective ASD management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, Peter G; Jalai, Cyrus M; Line, Breton G; Poorman, Gregory W; Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Burton, Douglas C; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Klineberg, Eric O; Hart, Robert A; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay

    2018-02-01

    Non-operative management is a common initial treatment for patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) despite reported superiority of surgery with regard to outcomes. Ineffective medical care is a large source of resource drain on the health system. Characterization of patients with ASD likely to elect for operative treatment from non-operative management may allow for more efficient patient counseling and cost savings. This study aimed to identify deformity and disability characteristics of patients with ASD who ultimately convert to operative treatment compared with those who remain non-operative and those who initially choose surgery. A retrospective review was carried out. A total of 510 patients with ASD (189 non-operative, 321 operative) with minimum 2-year follow-up comprised the patient sample. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short-Form 36 Health Assessment (SF-36), Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire (SRS-22r), and spinopelvic radiographic alignment were the outcome measures. Demographic, radiographic, and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) from a cohort of patients with ASD prospectively enrolled into a multicenter database were evaluated. Patients were divided into three treatment cohorts: Non-operative (NON=initial non-operative treatment and remained non-operative), Operative (OP=initial operative treatment), and Crossover (CROSS=initial non-operative treatment with subsequent conversion to operative treatment). NON and OP groups were propensity score-matched (PSM) to CROSS for baseline demographics (age, body mass index, Charlson Comorbidity Index). Time to crossover was divided into early (1 year). Outcome measures were compared across and within treatment groups at four time points (baseline, 6 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years). Following PSM, 118 patients were included (NON=39, OP=38, CROSS=41). Crossover rate was 21.7% (41/189). Mean time to crossover was 394 days. All groups had similar baseline sagittal alignment, but CROSS had larger

  5. External Validation of the Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Frailty Index (ASD-FI) in the Scoli-RISK-1 Patient Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emily K; Lenke, Lawrence G; Neuman, Brian J; Sciubba, Daniel M; Kebaish, Khaled M; Smith, Justin S; Qiu, Yong; Dahl, Benny T; Pellisé, Ferran; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Carreon, Leah Y; Fehlings, Michael G; Cheung, Kenneth M; Lewis, Stephen; Dekutoski, Mark B; Schwab, Frank J; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Mehdian, Hossein; Bess, Shay; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P

    2018-05-14

    Analysis of a prospective multicenter database. To assess the ability of the recently created Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Frailty Index (ASD-FI) to predict odds of major complications and length of hospital stay for patients who had more severe preoperative deformity and underwent more invasive ASD surgery compared with patients in the database used to create the index. Accurate preoperative estimates of risk are necessary given the high complication rates currently associated with ASD surgery. Patients were enrolled by participating institutions in Europe, Asia, and North America from 2009 to 2011. ASD-FI scores were used to classify 267 patients as not frail (NF) (0.5). Multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for preoperative and surgical covariates such as operative time and blood loss, was performed to determine the relationship between ASD-FI category and incidence of major complications, overall incidence of complications, and length of hospital stay. The mean ASD-FI score was 0.3 (range, 0-0.7). We categorized 105 patients as NF, 103 as frail, and 59 as SF. The adjusted odds of developing a major complication were higher for SF patients (odds ratio = 4.4; 95% CI 2.0, 9.9) compared with NF patients. After adjusting for covariates, length of hospital stay for SF patients increased by 19% (95% CI 1.4%, 39%) compared with NF patients. The odds of developing a major complication or having increased length of stay were similar between frail and NF patients. Greater patient frailty, as measured by the ASD-FI, is associated with a longer hospital stay and greater risk of major complications among patients who have severe preoperative deformity and undergo invasive surgical procedures. 2.

  6. Concerning the problem of the plastic deformation mechanism changeover in neutron-irradiated metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnikov, A.N.; Krasnoselov, V.A.; Prokhorov, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    With a phenomenological model of plastic deformation instability as a basis, an analysis was made of the neutron irradition effects on the characteristics of strength and plasticity vs. structural parameters and radiation damage morphology. It was demonstrated that the enchanced plasticity in the initial stage of neutron irradiation has to do with the solid solution disintegration. Introduction of indestructible strengthening barriers enhances the stress-resistance of the neck-formation by 1.22 times. The ''big grain'' effect is observable during the deformation channel production only. Both the deformation twinning and deformation-induced martensite transformation raise the plastic flow stability

  7. The reliability and concurrent validity of the Scoliosis Research Society-22r patient questionnaire compared with the Child Health Questionnaire-CF87 patient questionnaire for adolescent spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattes, R Christopher; Burton, Douglas C; Lai, Sue Min; Frasier, Elizabeth; Asher, Marc A

    2007-07-15

    This is a clinic-based cross-sectional study involving 2 health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) questionnaires. To compare the score distribution and reliability of the spinal deformity specific Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) questionnaire and the established generic Child Health Questionnaire-CF87 (CHQ-CF87), and to assess the concurrent validity of the SRS-22r using the CHQ-CF87 in an adolescent spine deformity population. Different questionnaires are commonly thought to be necessary to assess the HRQL of adolescent and adult populations. But since spinal deformities usually begin in the second decade of life, longitudinal follow-up with the same HRQL is desirable. The SRS-22r HRQL has recently been validated for score distribution and internal consistency in a spinal deformity population ranging in age from 7 to 78 years. The SRS-22r and CHQ-CF87 HRQLs were completed by 70 orthopedic spinal deformity outpatients 8 to 18 years of age, of whom 54 returned mailed retest questionnaires at an average of 24 days later. The ceiling effect averaged 27% for the SRS-22r and 36% for the CHQ-CF87. Respective values for internal consistency (Cronbach alpha) were 0.81 and 0.82, and for test-retest reproducibility the intraclass correlations (ICC) were 0.73 and 0.61. Concurrent validity was r > or = 0.68 or more for relevant function, pain, and mental health domains. The SRS Self-Image and particularly the Satisfaction/Dissatisfaction with Management domains did not correlate well with any CHQ-CF87 domains (r = 0.50 and 0.30, respectively). In a spinal deformity population 8 to 18 years of age, the score distribution and reliability, internal consistency, and reproducibility of the SRS-22r were at least as good as the CHQ-CF87. The SRS-22r function, pain, and mental health domains were concurrently valid in comparison to relevant CHQ-CF87 domains, but the SRS-22r self-image and satisfaction/dissatisfaction domains were not, thereby providing health-related quality

  8. Global case studies of soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS: Definitions, classifications, advances, origins, and problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shanmugam

    2017-10-01

    Problems that hinder our understanding of SSDS still remain. They are: (1 vague definitions of the phrase “soft-sediment deformation”; (2 complex factors that govern the origin of SSDS; (3 omission of vital empirical data in documenting vertical changes in facies using measured sedimentological logs; (4 difficulties in distinguishing depositional processes from tectonic events; (5 a model-driven interpretation of SSDS (i.e., earthquake being the singular cause; (6 routine application of the genetic term “seismites” to the “SSDS”, thus undermining the basic tenet of process sedimentology (i.e., separation of interpretation from observation; (7 the absence of objective criteria to differentiate 21 triggering mechanisms of liquefaction and related SSDS; (8 application of the process concept “high-density turbidity currents”, a process that has never been documented in modern oceans; (9 application of the process concept “sediment creep” with a velocity connotation that cannot be inferred from the ancient record; (10 classification of pockmarks, which are hollow spaces (i.e., without sediments as SSDS, with their problematic origins by fluid expulsion, sediment degassing, fish activity, etc.; (11 application of the Earth's climate-change model; and most importantly, (12 an arbitrary distinction between depositional process and sediment deformation. Despite a profusion of literature on SSDS, our understanding of their origin remains muddled. A solution to the chronic SSDS problem is to utilize the robust core dataset from scientific drilling at sea (DSDP/ODP/IODP with a constrained definition of SSDS.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficulty breathing. Children with this type often have joint deformities (contractures) that impair movement. In severe cases, ... Proximal spinal muscular atrophy Washington University, St. Louis: Neuromuscular Disease Center: Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patient Support and ...

  10. Association between baseline cognitive impairment and postoperative delirium in elderly patients undergoing surgery for adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Vuong, Victoria D; Fialkoff, Jared; Cheng, Joseph; Karikari, Isaac O; Bagley, Carlos A

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Postoperative delirium is common in elderly patients undergoing spine surgery and is associated with a longer and more costly hospital course, functional decline, postoperative institutionalization, and higher likelihood of death within 6 months of discharge. Preoperative cognitive impairment may be a risk factor for the development of postoperative delirium. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between baseline cognitive impairment and postoperative delirium in geriatric patients undergoing surgery for degenerative scoliosis. METHODS Elderly patients 65 years and older undergoing a planned elective spinal surgery for correction of adult degenerative scoliosis were enrolled in this study. Preoperative cognition was assessed using the validated Saint Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS) examination. SLUMS comprises 11 questions, with a maximum score of 30 points. Mild cognitive impairment was defined as a SLUMS score between 21 and 26 points, while severe cognitive impairment was defined as a SLUMS score of ≤ 20 points. Normal cognition was defined as a SLUMS score of ≥ 27 points. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and rated as absent or present on the basis of CAM. The incidence of delirium was compared in patients with and without baseline cognitive impairment. RESULTS Twenty-two patients (18%) developed delirium postoperatively. Baseline demographics, including age, sex, comorbidities, and perioperative variables, were similar in patients with and without delirium. The length of in-hospital stay (mean 5.33 days vs 5.48 days) and 30-day hospital readmission rates (12.28% vs 12%) were similar between patients with and without delirium, respectively. Patients with preoperative cognitive impairment (i.e., a lower SLUMS score) had a higher incidence of postoperative delirium. One- and 2-year patient reported outcomes scores were similar in patients with and without delirium. CONCLUSIONS

  11. The Free-Hand Technique for S2-Alar-Iliac Screw Placement: A Safe and Effective Method for Sacropelvic Fixation in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingford, Jamal N; Laratta, Joseph L; Tan, Lee A; Sarpong, Nana O; Lin, James D; Fischer, Charla R; Lehman, Ronald A; Kim, Yongjung J; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2018-02-21

    Spinopelvic fixation is an integral part of achieving solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction, especially in deformity procedures requiring substantial correction or long-segment constructs. Traditional S2-alar-iliac (S2AI) screw-placement techniques utilize fluoroscopy, increasing operative time and radiation exposure to the patient and surgeon. We describe a novel free-hand technique for S2AI screw placement in patients with adult spinal deformity. We reviewed the records of 45 consecutive patients who underwent spinopelvic fixation performed with use of S2AI screws by the senior surgeon and various fellows or residents over a 12-month period (2015 to 2016). In each case, the S2AI screws were placed utilizing a free-hand technique without fluoroscopic or image guidance. Screw position and accuracy were assessed by intraoperative O-arm imaging and analyzed using 3-dimensional interactive manipulation of computed tomography images. A total of 100 screws were placed, 51 by the senior surgeon and 49 by trainees. The mean patient age was 57.4 ± 12.7 years at the time of surgery; 37 (82.2%) of the patients were female. Preoperative diagnoses included adult idiopathic scoliosis (n = 19), adult degenerative scoliosis (n = 15), flatback syndrome (n = 2), fixed sagittal imbalance (n = 6), and distal junctional kyphosis (n = 3). Five (5%) of the screws were placed with moderate to severe cortical breaches, all of which perforated the pelvis posteriorly, with no clinically notable neurovascular or visceral complications. The breach rate did not differ significantly between the senior surgeon and trainees. The free-hand technique for S2AI screw placement, when performed in a standardized manner, was demonstrated to be safe and reliable in constructs requiring spinopelvic fixation. The accuracy of screw placement relies on visible and palpable anatomic landmarks that obviate the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy or image guidance, potentially reducing operative time

  12. Comparison of parenting styles of persons with and without spinal cord injury and their children's social competence and behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintala, D H; Herson, L; Hudler-Hull, T

    2000-01-01

    This study compared the parenting styles of 62 individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and 62 individuals without disabilities and the behavior of their children aged 6 through 13 years. The relationship between parenting style and children's behavior was assessed. Pairs were matched by gender of parent and age and gender of child. The Parenting Dimensions Inventory and the Child Behavior Checklist were administered via telephone. After controlling for income, the 2 groups did not differ in the parenting factors of warmth/structure and strictness. Their children did not differ in social competence or behavior problems. Regardless of disability status, warmth and structure were found to be the aspects of parenting that were related to children's outcomes.

  13. The prevalence of undiagnosed pre-surgical cognitive impairment and its post-surgical clinical impact in elderly patients undergoing surgery for adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Lydon, Emily; Vuong, Victoria D; Cheng, Joseph; Karikari, Isaac O; Bagley, Carlos A

    2017-09-01

    Pre-existing cognitive impairment (CI) is emerging as a predictor of poor post-operative outcomes in elderly patients. Little is known about impaired preoperative cognition and outcomes after elective spine surgery in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of neuro CI in elderly patients undergoing deformity surgery and its impact on postoperative outcomes. Elderly subjects undergoing elective spinal surgery for correction of adult degenerative scoliosis were enrolled in this study. Pre-operative baseline cognition was assessed using the Saint Louis Mental Status (SLUMS) test. SLUMS consists of 11 questions, which can give a maximum of 30 points. Mild CI was defined as a SLUMS score between 21-26 points, while severe CI was defined as a SLUMS score of ≤20 points. Normal cognition was defined as a SLUMS score of ≥27 points. Complication rates, duration of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission rates were compared between patients with and without baseline CI. Eighty-two subjects were included in this study, with mean age of 73.26±6.08 years. Fifty-seven patients (70%) had impaired cognition at baseline. The impaired cognition group had the following outcomes: increased incidence of one or more postoperative complications (39% vs. 20%), higher incidence of delirium (20% vs. 8%), and higher rate of discharge institutionalization at skilled nursing or acute rehab facilities (54% vs. 30%). The length of hospital stay and 30-day hospital readmission rates were similar between both cohorts (5.33 vs. 5.48 days and 12.28% vs. 12%, respectively). CI is highly prevalent in elderly patients undergoing surgery for adult degenerative scoliosis. Impaired cognition before surgery was associated with higher rates of post-operative delirium, complications, and discharge institutionalization. CI assessments should be considered in the pre-operative evaluations of elderly patients prior to surgery.

  14. Measuring outcomes in adult spinal deformity surgery: a systematic review to identify current strengths, weaknesses and gaps in patient-reported outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Sayf S A; van Hooff, Miranda L; Holewijn, Roderick M; Polly, David W; Haanstra, Tsjitske M; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2017-08-01

    Adult spinal deformity (ASD) causes severe disability, reduces overall quality of life, and results in a substantial societal burden of disease. As healthcare is becoming more value based, and to facilitate global benchmarking, it is critical to identify and standardize patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). This study aims to identify the current strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in PROMs used for ASD. Studies were included following a systematic search in multiple bibliographic databases between 2000 and 2015. PROMs were extracted and linked to the outcome domains of WHO's International Classification of Functioning and Health (ICF) framework. Subsequently, the clinimetric quality of identified PROMs was evaluated. The literature search identified 144 papers that met the inclusion criteria, and nine frequently used PROMs were identified. These covered 29 ICF outcome domains, which could be grouped into three of the four main ICF chapters: body function (n = 7), activity and participation (n = 19), environmental factors (n = 3), and body structure (n = 0). A low quantity (n = 3) of papers was identified that studied the clinimetric quality of PROMs. The Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 has the highest level of clinimetric quality for ASD. Outcome domains related to mobility and pain were well represented. We identified a gap in current outcome measures regarding neurological and pulmonary function. In addition, no outcome domains were measured in the ICF chapter body structure. These results will serve as a foundation for the process of seeking international consensus on a standard set of outcome domains, accompanied PROMs and contributing factors to be used in future clinical trials and spine registries.

  15. Impact of case type, length of stay, institution type, and comorbidities on Medicare diagnosis-related group reimbursement for adult spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunley, Pierce D; Mundis, Gregory M; Fessler, Richard G; Park, Paul; Zavatsky, Joseph M; Uribe, Juan S; Eastlack, Robert K; Chou, Dean; Wang, Michael Y; Anand, Neel; Frank, Kelly A; Stone, Marcus B; Kanter, Adam S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to educate medical professionals about potential financial impacts of improper diagnosis-related group (DRG) coding in adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. METHODS Medicare's Inpatient Prospective Payment System PC Pricer database was used to collect 2015 reimbursement data for ASD procedures from 12 hospitals. Case type, hospital type/location, number of operative levels, proper coding, length of stay, and complications/comorbidities (CCs) were analyzed for effects on reimbursement. DRGs were used to categorize cases into 3 types: 1) anterior or posterior only fusion, 2) anterior fusion with posterior percutaneous fixation with no dorsal fusion, and 3) combined anterior and posterior fixation and fusion. RESULTS Pooling institutions, cases were reimbursed the same for single-level and multilevel ASD surgery. Longer stay, from 3 to 8 days, resulted in an additional $1400 per stay. Posterior fusion was an additional $6588, while CCs increased reimbursement by approximately $13,000. Academic institutions received higher reimbursement than private institutions, i.e., approximately $14,000 (Case Types 1 and 2) and approximately $16,000 (Case Type 3). Urban institutions received higher reimbursement than suburban institutions, i.e., approximately $3000 (Case Types 1 and 2) and approximately $3500 (Case Type 3). Longer stay, from 3 to 8 days, increased reimbursement between $208 and $494 for private institutions and between $1397 and $1879 for academic institutions per stay. CONCLUSIONS Reimbursement is based on many factors not controlled by surgeons or hospitals, but proper DRG coding can significantly impact the financial health of hospitals and availability of quality patient care.

  16. Inclusion of inhomogeneous deformation and strength characteristics in the problem on zonal disintegration of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanyshev, AI; Belousova, OE

    2018-03-01

    The authors determine stress and deformation in a heterogeneous rock mass at the preset displacement and Cauchy stress vector at the boundary of an underground excavation. The influence of coordinates on Young’s modulus, shear modulus and ultimate strength is shown. It is found that regions of tension and compression alternate at the excavation boundary—i.e. zonal rock disintegration phenomenon is observed.

  17. The maximization of Tsallis entropy with complete deformed functions and the problem of constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomou, Thomas; Bagci, G. Baris

    2010-01-01

    By only requiring the q deformed logarithms (q exponentials) to possess arguments chosen from the entire set of positive real numbers (all real numbers), we show that the q-logarithm (q exponential) can be written in such a way that its argument varies between 0 and 1 (among negative real numbers) for 1≤q<2, while the interval 0< q≤1 corresponds to any real argument greater than 1 (positive real numbers). These two distinct intervals of the nonextensivity index q, also the expressions of the deformed functions associated with them, are related to one another through the relation (2-q), which is so far used to obtain the ordinary stationary distributions from the corresponding escort distributions, and vice versa in an almost ad hoc manner. This shows that the escort distributions are only a means of extending the interval of validity of the deformed functions to the one of ordinary, undeformed ones. Moreover, we show that, since the Tsallis entropy is written in terms of the q-logarithm and its argument, being the inverse of microstate probabilities, takes values equal to or greater than 1, the resulting stationary solution is uniquely described by the one obtained from the ordinary constraint. Finally, we observe that even the escort stationary distributions can be obtained through the use of the ordinary averaging procedure if the argument of the q-exponential lies in (-∞,0]. However, this case corresponds to, although related, a different entropy expression than the Tsallis entropy.

  18. Plastic deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitter, de L.U.

    1937-01-01

    § 1. Plastic deformation of solid matter under high confining pressures has been insufficiently studied. Jeffreys 1) devotes a few paragraphs to deformation of solid matter as a preface to his chapter on the isostasy problem. He distinguishes two properties of solid matter with regard to its

  19. Reliability of the revised Scoliosis Research Society-22 and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaires in adult spinal deformity when administered by telephone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokshan, Steven L; Godzik, Jakub; Dalton, Jonathan; Jaffe, Jennifer; Lenke, Lawrence G; Kelly, Michael P

    2016-09-01

    The non-response rates are as high as 20% to 50% after 5 years of follow-up in adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. Minimizing loss to follow-up is essential to protect the quality of data in long-term studies. Phone and internet administration of outcomes instruments has grown in popularity and has been found to not only provide a convenient way of collecting data, but also show improved response rates. The study aimed to examine the reliability of the revised Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22r) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaires in ASD patients when administered by telephone. This is a single-center, randomized crossover phone validation of ASD patients. The study included ASD patients presenting to a tertiary spine care center. The outcome measures were ODI and SRS-22r. Forty-nine patients (mean age: 55.7 years) with ASD were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either phone completion of the SRS-22r and ODI followed by in-office completion, or to in-office completion followed by phone completion. An interval of 2 to 4 weeks was placed between administrations of each version. A paired t test was used to assess the difference between the written and phone versions, and intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess homogeneity. Finally, goodness-of-fit testing was used to assess version preference. There was no significant difference between the phone and in-office versions of the SRS-22r (p=.174) or the ODI (p=.320). The intraclass correlation coefficients of the SRS-22r and ODI were 0.91 and 0.86, respectively. Completion over the phone was the most popular option (57% preferred phone, 29% preferred in-office, and 14% had no preference). Phone administration of the SRS-22r and ODI to ASD patients provides a convenient and reliable tool for reducing loss of follow-up data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of Internal Friction versus Plastic Deformations Effects in Impact Dynamics Problems of Robotic Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Alaci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical behavior study of robotic systems is obtained using multibody dynamics method. The joints met in robots are modeled in different manners. In a robotic joint the energy is lost via hysteretic work and plastic deformation work. The paper presents a comparative study for the results obtained by integration of the equations defining two limit models which describe the impact between two robot parts, modeled by the centric collision between two spheres with loss of energy. The motion equations characteristic for the two models are integrated and for a tangible situation, are presented comparatively, for different values of the coefficient of restitution, the time dependencies of impacting force between the two bodies as well as the hysteresis loops. Finally, an evaluation of the lost work during impact, for the whole range of coefficients of restitution, is completed, together with characteristic parameters of collision: approaching period, complete contact time, maximum approaching and plastic imprint.

  1. Implications of the center of rotation concept for the reconstruction of anterior column lordosis and axial preloads in spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Heiko; Mayer, Michael; Zenner, Juliane; Resch, Herbert; Niederberger, Alfred; Fierlbeck, Johann; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Acosta, Frank L

    2012-07-01

    In thoracolumbar deformity surgery, anterior-only approaches are used for reconstruction of anterior column failures. It is generally advised that vertebral body replacements (VBRs) should be preloaded by compression. However, little is known regarding the impact of different techniques for generation of preloads and which surgical principle is best for restoration of lordosis. Therefore, the authors analyzed the effect of different surgical techniques to restore spinal alignment and lordosis as well as the ability to generate axial preloads on VBRs in anterior column reconstructions. The authors performed a laboratory study using 7 fresh-frozen specimens (from T-3 to S-1) to assess the ability for lordosis reconstruction of 5 techniques and their potential for increasing preloads on a modified distractable VBR in a 1-level thoracolumbar corpectomy. The testing protocol was as follows: 1) Radiographs of specimens were obtained. 2) A 1-level corpectomy was performed. 3) In alternating order, lordosis was applied using 1 of the 5 techniques. Then, preloads during insertion and after relaxation using the modified distractable VBR were assessed using a miniature load-cell incorporated in the modified distractable VBR. The modified distractable VBR was inserted into the corpectomy defect after lordosis was applied using 1) a lamina spreader; 2) the modified distractable VBR only; 3) the ArcoFix System (an angular stable plate system enabling in situ reduction); 4) a lordosizer (a customized instrument enabling reduction while replicating the intervertebral center of rotation [COR] according to the COR method); and 5) a lordosizer and top-loading screws ([LZ+TLS], distraction with the lordosizer applied on a 5.5-mm rod linked to 2 top-loading pedicle screws inserted laterally into the vertebra). Changes in the regional kyphosis angle were assessed radiographically using the Cobb method. The bone mineral density of specimens was 0.72 ± 22.6 g/cm(2). The maximum regional

  2. Assessment of Two Analytical Methods in Solving the Linear and Nonlinear Elastic Beam Deformation Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Ganjavi, B.; Jeloudar, M. Ghanbari

    2010-01-01

    and fluid mechanics. Design/methodology/approach – Two new but powerful analytical methods, namely, He's VIM and HPM, are introduced to solve some boundary value problems in structural engineering and fluid mechanics. Findings – Analytical solutions often fit under classical perturbation methods. However......, as with other analytical techniques, certain limitations restrict the wide application of perturbation methods, most important of which is the dependence of these methods on the existence of a small parameter in the equation. Disappointingly, the majority of nonlinear problems have no small parameter at all......Purpose – In the last two decades with the rapid development of nonlinear science, there has appeared ever-increasing interest of scientists and engineers in the analytical techniques for nonlinear problems. This paper considers linear and nonlinear systems that are not only regarded as general...

  3. A Gradient-Based Multistart Algorithm for Multimodal Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Problems Based on Free-Form Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streuber, Gregg Mitchell

    Environmental and economic factors motivate the pursuit of more fuel-efficient aircraft designs. Aerodynamic shape optimization is a powerful tool in this effort, but is hampered by the presence of multimodality in many design spaces. Gradient-based multistart optimization uses a sampling algorithm and multiple parallel optimizations to reliably apply fast gradient-based optimization to moderately multimodal problems. Ensuring that the sampled geometries remain physically realizable requires manually developing specialized linear constraints for each class of problem. Utilizing free-form deformation geometry control allows these linear constraints to be written in a geometry-independent fashion, greatly easing the process of applying the algorithm to new problems. This algorithm was used to assess the presence of multimodality when optimizing a wing in subsonic and transonic flows, under inviscid and viscous conditions, and a blended wing-body under transonic, viscous conditions. Multimodality was present in every wing case, while the blended wing-body was found to be generally unimodal.

  4. Mechanically equivalent elastic-plastic deformations and the problem of plastic spin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steigmann David J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of plastic spin is phrased in terms of a notion of mechanical equivalence among local intermediate configurations of an elastic/ plastic crystalline solid. This idea is used to show that, without further qualification, the plastic spin may be suppressed at the constitutive level. However, the spin is closely tied to an underlying undistorted crystal lattice which, once specified, eliminates the freedom afforded by mechanical equivalence. As a practical matter a constitutive specification of plastic spin is therefore required. Suppression of plastic spin thus emerges as merely one such specification among many. Restrictions on these are derived in the case of rate-independent response.

  5. Changes in spinal alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system : an in-vitro mechanical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Dennis; Firkins, Paul John; Wapstra, Frits H.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection

  7. Pediatric spinal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  10. The Physiological Benefits and Problems Associated With Using Standing and Walking Orthoses in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury—A Meta-analytic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Karimi Taghi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI patients use two transportation systems that include orthosis and wheelchair. It was claimed that standing and walking bring some benefits for SCI patients, such as decreasing bone osteoporosis, preventing pressure sores, and improving various physiological functions. The main question posted here is as follows: Is there enough evidence to support the effect of walking with orthosis on the health status of the patients with SCI? A review of the relevant literature was carried out in Bioengineering Unit of Strathclyde University. The benefits of orthoses were evaluated. Evidence reported in the literature regarding the effectiveness of orthoses for improving the health condition of SCI patients is conflicting. The benefits that were mentioned in various research studies regarding using the orthosis include decreasing bone osteoporosis, preventing joint deformity, improving bowl and bladder function, improving digestive system function, decreasing muscle spasm, improving independent living, improving respiratory and cardiovascular systems function. Improvement of independence living and physiological health of the patients are the only two benefits that are supported by strong evidence. Unfortunately, conflicting results in the literature have led to criticism of most hypotheses based on theoretical grounds, with the effects of using orthoses on the health status remaining a matter of considerable debate.

  11. DIFFERENT TYPES OF INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING PROVIDES BETTERMENT IN ALTERED PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN UPPER THORACIC SPINAL CORD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muruganandam Periyasamy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory problems are usual in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries when compared to Lower thoracic spinal cord injuries. Generally there are frequent respiratory complications in the individuals with spinal cord injuries. The complications of the respiratory system are severe and more prevalent source of morbidity and mortality after the spinal cord injury due to the inefficient breathing capacity including inspiratory and expiratory abilities. The present study represents the inspiratory muscle training especially in upper thoracic spinal cord injury patients to assess the improvement in the pulmonary functions. Methods: Twenty five patients with the age between 25 -40 years with the upper spinal cord injuries were selected in the present study in order to assess the efficacy of the training. Several types of exercises were practiced including diaphragmatic breathing exercises, incentive spirometry, active cycle of breathing technique and weight training. COPD Conditions, Chest wall deformities, Hypertensive patients, Cardio vascular problems were excluded in the study. Results: The results from the study showed that significant changes were found in the patients treated with all the above mentioned techniques. Axillary level, nipple level, Xiphisternum levels were analysed and the results found to be significant after the treatment. Incentive spirometry and peak flow meter observations were also found to be significant when compare to the pretreatment. Conclusion: The present study conclude that the combined effect of incentive spriometry, diaphragmatic breathing exercises, and active cycle of breathing technique is more effective in improving the pulmonary functions in upper thoracic spinal cord injuries than single method efficiency.

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  13. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  14. Osteoporosis and the Management of Spinal Degenerative Disease (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé-Bermejo, Félix; Piñera, Angel R.; Alvarez, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become a major medical problem as the aged population of the world rapidly grows. Osteoporosis predisposes patients to fracture, progressive spinal deformities, and stenosis, and is subject to be a major concern before performing spine surgery, especially with bone fusions and instrumentation. Osteoporosis has often been considered a contraindication for spinal surgery, while in some instances patients have undergone limited and inadequate procedures in order to avoid concomitant instrumentation. As the population ages and the expectations of older patients increase, the demand for surgical treatment in older patients with osteoporosis and spinal degenerative diseases becomes progressively more important. Nowadays, advances in surgical and anesthetic technology make it possible to operate successfully on elderly patients who no longer accept disabling physical conditions. This article discusses the biomechanics of the osteoporotic spine, the diagnosis and management of osteoporotic patients with spinal conditions, as well as the novel treatments, recommendations, surgical indications, strategies and instrumentation in patients with osteoporosis who need spine operations. PMID:29299490

  15. Multidisciplinary approach for management of dentofacial deformity of a patient with goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Shenoy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a rare congenital craniofacial deformity, associated with anomalies of the head and spinal cord. The syndrome may affect the eyes, ears, face, and mouth and can also differ greatly in the degree of seriousness. The precise etiology of this syndrome is still not identified. Adult patients with dentoskeletal deformities usually need orthodontic and surgical corrections, requiring an integrated approach, patient cooperation, and systemized treatment planning. A poor facial appearance is often the patient's chief complaint, but it may be accompanied by functional problems, temporomandibular joints disorders, or psychosocial handicaps. The present case report highlights the orthodontic and surgical management of a patient with Goldenhar syndrome.

  16. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  17. Mechanics of deformable bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1950-01-01

    Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume II covers topics on the mechanics of deformable bodies. The book discusses the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of deformable bodies; the vortex theory; as well as the theory of waves. The text also describes the flow with given boundaries. Supplementary notes on selected hydrodynamic problems and supplements to the theory of elasticity are provided. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking related courses will find the book useful.

  18. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dallas, TX: American Red Cross; 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  19. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  20. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  3. Septic shock after posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with Scheuermann kyphosis and multiple body piercings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Subramanian, Ashok Sridhara

    2011-10-15

    A case report. We report septic shock as postoperative complication following an instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with multiple body piercings. The management of this potentially catastrophic complication and outcome of treatment is been discussed. Body piercing has become increasingly more common because of change in culture or as a fashion statement. This has been associated with local or generalized ill effects including tissue injury, skin and systemic infections, and septic shock. There is no clear guideline pathway regarding removal and reinsertion of body piercings in patients who undergo major surgery. Complications following orthopedic or spinal procedures associated with body piercing have not been reported. We reviewed the medical notes and radiographs of an adolescent patient with Scheuermann kyphosis and multiple body piercings who underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed septic shock. Septic shock developed on postoperative day 2 after reinsertion of all piercings following the patient's request. The patient became systemically very unwell and required intensive medical management, as well as a total course of antibiotics of 3 months. The piercings remained in situ. She did not develop a wound infection despite the presence of bacteremia and spinal instrumentation. The patient had no new piercings subsequent to her deformity procedure. Two and a half years after spinal surgery she reported no medical problems, had a balanced spine with no loss of kyphosis correction and no evidence of nonunion or recurrence of deformity. The development of septic shock as a result of piercing reinsertion in the postoperative period has not been previously reported. This is an important consideration to prevent potentially life-threatening complications following major spinal surgery.

  4. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  5. Spinal epidural hemangioma related to pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, G.S.; Millett, P.J. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); DiCarlo, E.F. [Dept. of Pathology, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Mintz, D.N. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Dept. of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY (United States); Gamache, F.W. [Department of Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Dept. of Surgery, New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY (United States); Rawlins, B.A. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Medical College of Cornell Univ., New York (United States)

    2001-05-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis presenting with myelopathy secondary to a spinal epidural hemangioma. MRI showed an epidural soft tissue mass within the spinal canal between T5 and T9 with severe spinal cord compression. Symptoms had a temporal relationship to her pregnancy. Surgical removal of the epidural hemangioma rapidly relieved her symptoms and neurologic deficits. Follow-up examination 2 years later demonstrated normal motor and sensory function, without any neurologic sequelae or progression of deformity. (orig.)

  6. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Spinal and Limb Abnormalities in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lai, Chia-Im; Leu, Yii-Rong; Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.

    2010-01-01

    There are not many studies pertaining to the spinal or limb abnormalities in people with intellectual disabilities, without a clear profile of these deformities of them, efforts to understand its characters and improve their quality of life will be impossible. Therefore, this paper aims to describe the prevalence and related factors of spinal and…

  8. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  9. Spinal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.; Carty, H.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  10. MRI in diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko; Kakinoki, Yoshio; Kimura, Humiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nagayama, Takashi; Okada, Takaharu; Watanabe, Hiromi

    1985-01-01

    64 MRI studies of 57 cases of spinal cord diseases were reviewed, and following results were obtained. (1) MRI is usefull for screening method of spinal cord diseases, as CT in cerebral diseases. (2) MRI might replaces myelography in most of spinal cord disease, and more reliable informations might be obtained by MRI than in myelography in some cases, but (3) in detection of small organic changes, some technological problems are layed regarding to the image resolution of MRI. (author)

  11. Comparison of two Dutch follow-up care models for spinal cord-injured patients and their impact on health problems, re-admissions and quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J.H.; de Witte, L.P.; Post, M.W.; Pons, C.; van Asbeck, F.W.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; van den Heuvel, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether transmural care for people with spinal cord injury living in the community has more impact on health outcomes than traditional follow-up care within the Netherlands. Design: Quasi-experiment with 12 months of follow-up. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  12. Comparison of two Dutch follow-up care models for spinal cord-injured patients and their impact on health problems, re-admissions and quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J. H. A.; de Witte, L. P.; Post, M. W. M.; Pons, C.; van Asbeck, F. W. A.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; van den Heuvel, W. J. A.

    Objective: To evaluate whether transmural care for people with spinal cord injury living in the community has more impact on health outcomes than traditional follow-up care within the Netherlands. Design: Quasi-experiment with 12 months of follow-up. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  13. Association of Shoulder Problems in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury at Discharge From Inpatient Rehabilitation With Activities and Participation 5 Years Later

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriks-Hoogland, I.E.; de Groot, Sonja; Snoek, G.J.; Stucki, G.; Post, MWM; van der Woude, L.H.

    Objective To examine whether musculoskeletal shoulder pain and limitations in shoulder range of motion (ROM) at discharge from first rehabilitation are associated with activities and participation restrictions 5 years later in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Prospective cohort study.

  14. Association of Shoulder Problems in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury at Discharge From Inpatient Rehabilitation With Activities and Participation 5 Years Later

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriks-Hoogland, Inge; de Groot, Sonja; Snoek, Govert; Stucki, Gerold; Post, Marcel.; Van der Woude, Lucas

    Objective: To examine whether musculoskeletal shoulder pain and limitations in shoulder range of motion (ROM) at discharge from first rehabilitation are associated with activities and participation restrictions 5 years later in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Prospective cohort study.

  15. Non-linear elastic deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Ogden, R W

    1997-01-01

    Classic in the field covers application of theory of finite elasticity to solution of boundary-value problems, analysis of mechanical properties of solid materials capable of large elastic deformations. Problems. References.

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  4. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  5. Is nucleon deformed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Afsar

    1992-01-01

    The surprising answer to this question Is nucleon deformed? is : Yes. The evidence comes from a study of the quark model of the single nucleon and when it is found in a nucleus. It turns out that many of the long standing problems of the Naive Quark Model are taken care of if the nucleon is assumed to be deformed. Only one value of the parameter P D ∼1/4 (which specifies deformation) fits g A (the axial vector coupling constant) for all the semileptonic decay of baryons, the F/D ratio, the pion-nucleon-delta coupling constant fsub(πNΔ), the double delta coupling constant 1 fsub(πΔΔ), the Ml transition moment μΔN and g 1 p the spin structure function of proton 2 . All this gives strong hint that both neutron and proton are deformed. It is important to look for further signatures of this deformation. When this deformed nucleon finds itself in a nuclear medium its deformation decreases. So much that in a heavy nucleus the nucleons are actually spherical. We look into the Gamow-Teller strengths, magnetic moments and magnetic transition strengths in nuclei to study this property. (author). 15 refs

  6. A valuable animal model of spinal cord injury to study motor dysfunctions, comorbid conditions, and aging associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Pascal; Guertin, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    Most animal models of contused, compressed or transected spinal cord injury (SCI) require a laminectomy to be performed. However, despite advantages and disadvantages associated with each of these models, the laminectomy itself is generally associated with significant problems including longer surgery and anaesthesia (related post-operative complications), neuropathic pain, spinal instabilities, deformities, lordosis, and biomechanical problems, etc. This review provides an overview of findings obtained mainly from our laboratory that are associated with the development and characterization of a novel murine model of spinal cord transection that does not require a laminectomy. A number of studies successfully conducted with this model provided strong evidence that it constitutes a simple, reliable and reproducible transection model of complete paraplegia which is particularly useful for studies on large cohorts of wild-type or mutant animals - e.g., drug screening studies in vivo or studies aimed at characterizing neuronal and non-neuronal adaptive changes post-trauma. It is highly suitable also for studies aimed at identifying and developing new pharmacological treatments against aging associated comorbid problems and specific SCI-related dysfunctions (e.g., stereotyped motor behaviours such as locomotion, sexual response, defecation and micturition) largely related with 'command centers' located in lumbosacral areas of the spinal cord.

  7. Analysis of the influence of various factors on the course of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Георгиевич Баиндурашвили

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study of the influence of various factors on the course of recovery of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injuries is an important and relevant problem. The main causes of thoracic and lumbar injuries of the spine in children are road accidents and catatraumas. Anatomical and physiological features of the spine and spinal cord in children have a significant influence on the nature of spinal cord injury, clinical manifestations of the injury, and method of treatment. The degree of spinal canal deformity at the level of the damaged segment is directly proportional to the severity of the neurological disorder. The time between injury to when surgery is performed will strongly influence the nature and course of recovery of motor functions. Aim. To assess the influence of different factors in pediatric patients with complicated injuries of the spine at the thoracic and thoracolumbar levels on the recovery of neurological disorders. Materials and methods. The analysis of results of the surgical treatment of 36 children (24 boys and 12 girls aged 3-17 years with damage to the spine and spinal cord in the thoracic spine and thoracolumbar junction, accompanied with neurological deficit in the form of central or peripheral paresis and paralysis, was performed. All patients underwent surgical intervention depending on the type and extent of damage. Clinical methods (i.e., detailed neurological examination as well as X-ray, CT, and MRI were used as diagnostic methods. Results. The study revealed that the most severe damage concerning neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury occurs in the thoracic spine. The extent of neurological changes depends not only on the level of damage to the spinal column but also on the magnitude of spinal canal stenosis. Surgery performed in the first hours of the injury leads to a more rapid and full recovery of the neurological deficit. Conclusion. Therefore, this study found

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  9. On deformations of linear differential systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gontsov, R.R.; Poberezhnyi, V.A.; Helminck, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    This article concerns deformations of meromorphic linear differential systems. Problems relating to their existence and classification are reviewed, and the global and local behaviour of solutions to deformation equations in a neighbourhood of their singular set is analysed. Certain classical

  10. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  11. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  12. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  13. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  14. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  15. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2013-06-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and hence is included in Category I of the WHO classification. The tuberculosis bacilli isolated from patients are of four different types with different growth kinetics and metabolic characteristics. Hence multiple drugs, which act on the different groups of the mycobacteria, are included in each anti-tuberculosis drug regimen. Prolonged and uninterrupted chemotherapy (which may be 'short course' and 'intermittent' but preferably 'directly observed') is effective in controlling the infection. Spinal Multi-drug-resistant TB and spinal TB in HIV-positive patients present unique problems in management and have much poorer prognosis. Failure of chemotherapy and emergence of drug resistance are frequent due to the failure of compliance hence all efforts must be made to improve patient compliance to the prescribed drug regimen.

  16. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar age constraints on the timing of regional deformation, south coast of New South Wales, Lachlan Fold Belt: problems and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergusson, C.L.; Phillips, D.

    2001-01-01

    Four slate samples from subduction complex rocks exposed on the south coast of New South Wales, south of Batemans Bay, were analysed by K-Ar and 40 Ar/ 39 Ar step-heating methods, One sample contains relatively abundant detrital muscovite flakes that are locally oblique to the regional cleavage in the rock, whereas the remaining samples appear to contain sparse detrital muscovite. Separates of detrital muscovite yielded plateau ages of 505 + 3 Ma and 513 + 3 Ma indicating that inheritance has not been eliminated by metamorphism and recrystallisation. Step-heating analyses of whole-rock chips from all four slate samples produced discordant apparent age spectra with 'saddle shapes' following young apparent ages at the lowest temperature increments. Elevated apparent ages associated with the highest temperature steps are attributed to the presence of variable quantities of detrital muscovite ( 40 Ar/ 39 Ar integrated ages of ca 455Ma, which are some 15-30 million years older than K-Ar ages for the same samples. These discrepancies suggest that the slates have also been affected by recoil loss/redistribution of 39 Ar, Ieading to anomalously old 40 Ar/ 39 Ar ages. Two other samples, from slaty tectonic melange and intensely cleaved slate, yielded average 40 Ar/ 39 Ar integrated ages of ca 424Ma, which are closer to associated mean K-Ar ages of 423 + 4Ma and 409 + 16Ma, respectively. Taking into account the potential influences of recoil loss/redistribution of 39 Ar and inheritance, the results from the latter samples suggest a maximum age of ca 440 Ma for deformation/metamorphism. The current results indicate that recoil and inheritance problems may also have affected whole-rock 40 Ar/ 39 Ar data reported from other regions of the Lachlan Fold Belt. Therefore, until these effects are adequately quantified, models for the evolution of the Lachlan Fold Belt, that are based on such whole-rock 40 Ar/ 39 Ar data, should be treated with caution. Copyright (2001) Geological

  17. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...... of the order of 10 nm, produced by deformation under large sliding loads. Limits to the evolution of microstructural parameters during monotonic loading have been investigated based on a characterization by transmission electron microscopy. Such limits have been observed at an equivalent strain of about 10...

  18. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  19. A study of measurement of the spinal cord of cervical myelopathy with CT-myelography and forecast of operative result from the size of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosawa, Yoshimitsu

    1985-01-01

    The antero-posterior (AP) and transverse (T) diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord were measured using CT-myelography (CT-M) in 44 patients with cervical myelopathy (CM) and 20 control subjects. The AP diameter of these canals and cord and the T diameter of the spinal canal were smaller in the CM group than in the control group. Postoperative CT-M showed that the dural canal and spinal cord had an increase in the AP diameter and T area and a decrease in the T diameter. Preoperative symptoms were well correlated with the AP diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord, and spinal cord compression. The symptoms tended to be milder with larger AT diameter and T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord and with smaller spinal cord compression and deformity. Functional damage was reversible in patients with slight spinal cord compression. Favorable operative outcome tended to be achieved when the preoperative AP diameter and T area of the spinal cord were ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 50 mm 2 , respectively. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  2. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  14. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ... a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? ...

  16. Upright, prone, and supine spinal morphology and alignment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Rob C; Colo, Dino; Schlösser, Tom P C; Vincken, Koen L; van Stralen, Marijn; Hui, Steve C N; Shi, Lin; Chu, Winnie C W; Cheng, Jack C Y; Castelein, RM

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) are usually investigated by serial imaging studies during the course of treatment, some imaging involves ionizing radiation, and the radiation doses are cumulative. Few studies have addressed the correlation of spinal deformity captured

  17. Spinal segmental dysgenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mahomed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality , seen in neonates and infants in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally . The condition is segmental with normal vertebrae above and below the malformation. This condition is commonly associated with various abnormalities that affect the heart, genitourinary, gastrointestinal tract and skeletal system. We report two cases of spinal segmental dysgenesis and the associated abnormalities.

  18. Deformation and fracture mechanics of engineering materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hertzberg, Richard W; Vinci, Richard Paul; Hertzberg, Jason L

    2012-01-01

    "Hertzberg's 5th edition of Deformation & Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials offers several new features including a greater number and variety of homework problems using more computational software...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  3. Association of Shoulder Problems in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury at Discharge From Inpatient Rehabilitation With Activities and Participation 5 Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriks-Hoogland, Inge; de Groot, Sonja; Snoek, Govert; Stucki, Gerold; Post, Marcel; van der Woude, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether musculoskeletal shoulder pain and limitations in shoulder range of motion (ROM) at discharge from first rehabilitation are associated with activities and participation restrictions 5 years later in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Prospective cohort study. Eight specialized SCI rehabilitation centers. Subjects (N=138) with an SCI admitted for first rehabilitation. Not applicable. Peak power output (POpeak), Wheelchair Skills Test (WST), FIM motor score, ability to transfer, Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD), mobility range and social behavior subscales of the Sickness Impact Profile 68 (SIPSOC), and employment status. Mean age of the subjects at discharge was 39 years, 72% were men, 32% had tetraplegia, and in 65% the SCI was motor complete. At discharge, 39% reported shoulder pain and 32% had a limited shoulder ROM. In the analyses of variance, shoulder ROM limitation, but not shoulder pain, was associated with all but 1 outcome at 5 years. In the regression analyses, ROM limitations of the shoulder were negatively associated with the ability to transfer (P=.004), FIM motor scores (PPASIPD. The presence of limitations in shoulder ROM, but not shoulder pain, at discharge is associated with limitations in activities and employment status 5 years later. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of patholo...

  5. Spinal complications in osteogenesis imperfecta: 47 patients 1-16 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; Gerver, W. J.; Breslau-Siderius, L. J.; van der Graaf, Y.; Pruijs, H. E.; van Doorne, J. M.; Beemer, F. A.; Helders, P. J.

    1998-01-01

    We examined in a cross-sectional study, 47 children (mean age 7.7 (1-16) years) with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) to find the prevalence of spinal deformities and to correlate these observations with anthropometry. The associations between dentinogenesis imperfecta, joint hypermobility and spinal

  6. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  8. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  9. Radiological examination of the spinal column in farmed rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum): experiments with Flavobacterium psychrophilum and oxytetracycline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Arnbjerg, J.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2001-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum and oxytetracycline have both been associated with spinal deformities in salmonids. Experiments were carried out to investigate whether infection with F, psychrophilum or medication with oxytetracycline (OTC) at the fry stage would result in an increased occurrence...... of infected fish. OTC treatments of up to 200 mg of OTC(kgfish)(-1) day(-1) for 10 days and repeated three times did not result in increased spinal deformities relative to untreated control groups; therefore, medication of rainbow trout with oxytetracycline did not cause deformities of the spinal column under...

  10. The effects of needle deformation during lumbar puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Özdemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to assess deformation of the tip and deflection from the axis of 22-gauge Quincke needles when they are used for diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP. Thus, it can be determined whether constructional alterations of needles are important for predicting clinical problems after diagnostic LP. Materials and Methods: The 22-gauge Quincke needles used for diagnostic LP were evaluated. A specially designed protractor was used for measurement and evaluation. Waist circumference was measured in each patient. Patients were questioned about headaches occurring after LP. Results: A total of 115 Quincke-type spinal needles used in 113 patients were evaluated. No deflection was detected in 38 (33.1% of the needles. Deflection between 0.1° and 5° occurred in 43 (37.3% of the needles and deflection ≥ 5.1° occurred in 34 patients (29.6%. Forty-seven (41.5% patients experienced post lumbar puncture headache (PLPH and 13 (11.5% patients experienced intracranial hypotension (IH. No statistically significant correlation between the degree of deflection and headache was found (P > 0.05. Epidural blood patch was performed for three patients. Deformity in the form of bending like a hook occurred in seven needles and IH occurred in six patients using these needles. Two of the needles used in three patients requiring blood patch were found to be bent. Conclusion: Deformation of needles may increase complications after LP. Needle deformation may lead to IH. In case of deterioration in the structure of the needle, termination of the puncture procedure and the use of a new needle could reduce undesirable clinical consequences, especially IH.

  11. The effects of needle deformation during lumbar puncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Demir, Caner F.; Varol, Sefer; Arslan, Demet; Yıldız, Mustafa; Akil, Eşref

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess deformation of the tip and deflection from the axis of 22-gauge Quincke needles when they are used for diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP). Thus, it can be determined whether constructional alterations of needles are important for predicting clinical problems after diagnostic LP. Materials and Methods: The 22-gauge Quincke needles used for diagnostic LP were evaluated. A specially designed protractor was used for measurement and evaluation. Waist circumference was measured in each patient. Patients were questioned about headaches occurring after LP. Results: A total of 115 Quincke-type spinal needles used in 113 patients were evaluated. No deflection was detected in 38 (33.1%) of the needles. Deflection between 0.1° and 5° occurred in 43 (37.3%) of the needles and deflection ≥ 5.1° occurred in 34 patients (29.6%). Forty-seven (41.5%) patients experienced post lumbar puncture headache (PLPH) and 13 (11.5%) patients experienced intracranial hypotension (IH). No statistically significant correlation between the degree of deflection and headache was found (P > 0.05). Epidural blood patch was performed for three patients. Deformity in the form of bending like a hook occurred in seven needles and IH occurred in six patients using these needles. Two of the needles used in three patients requiring blood patch were found to be bent. Conclusion: Deformation of needles may increase complications after LP. Needle deformation may lead to IH. In case of deterioration in the structure of the needle, termination of the puncture procedure and the use of a new needle could reduce undesirable clinical consequences, especially IH. PMID:25883480

  12. Spinal cord injuries among paragliders in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekand, T; Schaanning, E E; Varga, V; Schattel, U; Gronning, M

    2008-06-01

    A national retrospective descriptive study. To study the clinical effects of spinal cord injuries (SCIs) caused by paragliding accidents in Norway. Spinal cord units at Haukeland University Hospital, Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital and St Olav Hospital in Norway. We studied the medical files for nine patients with SCI caused by paragliding accidents to evaluate the circumstances of the accidents, and clinical effects of injury. We obtained the data from hospital patient files at all three spinal units in Norway and crosschecked them through the Norwegian Paragliding Association's voluntary registry for injuries. All patients were hospitalized from 1997 to 2006, eight men and one woman, with mean age 30.7 years. The causes of the accidents were landing problems combined with unexpected wind whirls, technical problems and limited experience with unexpected events. All patients contracted fractures in the thoracolumbal junction of the spine, most commonly at the L1 level. At clinical follow-up, all patients presented clinically incomplete SCI (American Spinal Injury Association impairment scores B-D). Their main health problems differed widely, ranging from urinary and sexual disturbances to neuropathic pain and loss of motor functioning. Only three patients returned to full-time employment after rehabilitation. Paragliding accidents cause spinal fractures predominantly in the thoracolumbal junction with subsequent SCIs and increased morbidity. All patients experienced permanent health problems that influenced daily activities and required long-time clinical follow-up and medical intervention. Better education in landing techniques and understanding of aerodynamics may reduce the risk of paragliding accidents.

  13. 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar whole rock age constraints on the timing of regional deformation, South Coast of New South Wales, Lachlan Fold Belt, Southeastern Australia: problems and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.; Fergusson, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Subduction complex rocks are well exposed on the south coast of New South Wales around Batemans Bay. Farther south in the Narooma and Bermagui region, Offier et al (1998) have determined two 40 Ar/ 39 Ar ages of 450 ± 3 Ma and 445 ± 2 Ma. They argued that these ages constrain the timing of intense underplating-related deformation and we have undertaken farther work, from an area south of Batemans Bay, to test this suggestion. The 40 Ar/ 39 Ar method applied to fine-grained, low temperature metamorphic rocks, such as slates, is beset by the problem of recoil loss and/or redistribution of 39 Ar during the irradiation process. Another problem is the difficulty of distinguishing between the contributions to 40 Ar/ 39 Ar spectra from illite/muscovite grown during the cleavage-producing deformation and detrital muscovite/illite. In the current study, four slate samples, with variable contents of detrital white mica, were analysed by both the K-Ar and 40 Ar/ 39 Ar step-heating methods. A separate of detrital white mica from one slate sample yields a plateau age of 500 ± 2 Ma. This result indicates that inheritance has not been eliminated by metamorphism as is commonly assumed and that the 40 Ar/ 39 Ar ages provide only a maximum estimate for the timing of deformation. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar analyses of state chips yield discordant, saddle-shaped age spectra, with minimum, within-saddle' ages of ca. 420 Ma. Two slate samples give identical 40 Ar/ 39 Ar integrated ages of 455 ± 2 Ma. One sample contains relatively abundant detrital bedding-parallel mica flakes that are locally oblique to the regional cleavage in the rock. The 40 Ar/ 39 Ar ages are some 20 Ma older than K-Ar ages for these same samples, suggesting that recoil loss of 39 Ar may also have affected these slates. Both recoil loss of 39 Ar and inherited white micas will yield elevated apparent ages, thus providing only maximum ages for the cleavage-producing deformation. Two other samples from slaty tectonic

  14. Computing layouts with deformable templates

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chi-Han

    2014-07-22

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of tiling a domain with a set of deformable templates. A valid solution to this problem completely covers the domain with templates such that the templates do not overlap. We generalize existing specialized solutions and formulate a general layout problem by modeling important constraints and admissible template deformations. Our main idea is to break the layout algorithm into two steps: a discrete step to lay out the approximate template positions and a continuous step to refine the template shapes. Our approach is suitable for a large class of applications, including floorplans, urban layouts, and arts and design. Copyright © ACM.

  15. Computing layouts with deformable templates

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chi-Han; Yang, Yongliang; Wonka, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of tiling a domain with a set of deformable templates. A valid solution to this problem completely covers the domain with templates such that the templates do not overlap. We generalize existing specialized solutions and formulate a general layout problem by modeling important constraints and admissible template deformations. Our main idea is to break the layout algorithm into two steps: a discrete step to lay out the approximate template positions and a continuous step to refine the template shapes. Our approach is suitable for a large class of applications, including floorplans, urban layouts, and arts and design. Copyright © ACM.

  16. Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Jain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%–30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST; however, the high turn around time of 2–6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  17. Plecospondylic spinal column in the eel Anguilla anguilla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, A.

    1956-01-01

    Several cases of deformities in the spinal column were described in fishes, viz. lordosis in the bitterling Rhodeus amarus) by ROTH (1922), in the minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus) by ROTH (1922), in the pike (Esox lucius) by ROTH (1922) and PLEHN (1924); kyphosis in the toothcarps (Cyprinodontidae) by

  18. Plecospondylic spinal column in the viviparous Cyprinodont Lebistes reticulatus (Peters)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, A.

    1955-01-01

    Description of a case of plecospondylic spinal column in the viviparous Cyprinodont Lebistes reticulatus (PETERS), the so-called guppy or millionfish. In this deformity the following phenomena have been observed: displacement of vertebrae, transformation of vertebrae, increase in size of vertebrae,

  19. Asymptomatic grotesque deformities of the cervical spine. An occupational hazard in railway porters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, P; O'Callaghan, B; Lovblad, K O

    1998-03-15

    A case report. To illustrate an extremely rare occurrence of chronic, occupational, low-grade trauma leading to asymptomatic grotesque cervical spine deformities in railroad station porters. Occupational trauma causing spinal deformities has been described in relation to thoracic and lumbar spines in miners. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of asymptomatic cervical spinal deformity in railway porters as a result of chronic occupational trauma. A magnetic resonance imaging study was performed on both patients. The magnetic resonance images showed advanced degenerative changes in the cervical spine causing obvious deformities, along with apparently normal cord signal intensity. Chronic, occupational, low-grade trauma of the cervical vertebral region is extremely unusual in industrialized countries. Nevertheless, in view of the increasing mobility of people in general and of the labor force in particular, this complication of an occupational exposure deserves attention as an unusual cause of cervical spinal deformity.

  20. Sexual and reproductive function in spinal cord injury and spinal surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Theodore H. Albright; Zachary Grabel; J. Mason DePasse; Mark A. Palumbo; Alan H. Daniels

    2015-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that sp...

  1. Natural Head Posture in the Setting of Sagittal Spinal Deformity: Validation of Chin-Brow Vertical Angle, Slope of Line of Sight, and McGregor's Slope With Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafage, Renaud; Challier, Vincent; Liabaud, Barthelemy; Vira, Shaleen; Ferrero, Emmanuelle; Diebo, Bassel G; Liu, Shian; Vital, Jean-Marc; Mazda, Keyvan; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Errico, Thomas J; Schwab, Frank J; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of horizontal gaze is an essential function of upright posture and global sagittal spinal alignment. Horizontal gaze is classically measured by the chin-brow vertical angle (CBVA), which is not readily measured on most lateral spine radiographs. To evaluate relations between CBVA and the slope of the line of sight, the slope of McGregor's line (McGS), and Oswestry Disability Index. Patients were identified from a single center database of 531 spine patients who underwent full-body EOS x-rays. Correlations between CBVA, the slope of the line of sight, and McGS were assessed. Using a quadratic regression with Oswestry Disability Index and CBVA, windows of low disability were identified. Comparison of sagittal spinopelvic parameters was carried out between patients with "ascending gaze" and "neutral position." Three hundred three patients were included (74% female, mean age 54.8 years, body mass index 26.6 ± 6.0 kg/m). CBVA strongly correlated with the slope of the line of sight (r = 0.996) and McGS (r = 0.862). Regression studies between Oswestry Disability Index and CBVA yielded a range of values corresponding to low disability (-4.7 degrees to 17.7 degrees). Similarly, a low disability range for the slope of the line of sight (-5.1 degrees to 18.5 degrees) and McGS (-5.7 degrees to 14.3 degrees) was computed. Patients with "ascending gaze" had a worse spinopelvic alignment than "neutral position" patients. The slope of the line of sight and McGS correlated strongly with CBVA and can be used as surrogate measures. The range of values for these measures corresponding to low disability was identified. These values can be used as a general guideline to assess alignment for diagnostic purposes. Cervical compensatory mechanism may modify the natural head position in sagittally misaligned patients. CBVA, chin-brow vertical angleHRQoL, health-related quality of lifeMcGS, slope of McGregor's lineODI, Oswestry Disability IndexSLs, slope of the line of sight.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... Your email address * This iframe contains the logic required to ...

  3. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  4. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  5. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  6. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, Antonio; Limbucci, Nicola; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  7. Bunionette deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce E; Nicholson, Christopher W

    2007-05-01

    The bunionette, or tailor's bunion, is a lateral prominence of the fifth metatarsal head. Most commonly, bunionettes are the result of a widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle with associated varus of the metatarsophalangeal joint. When symptomatic, these deformities often respond to nonsurgical treatment methods, such as wider shoes and padding techniques. When these methods are unsuccessful, surgical treatment is based on preoperative radiographs and associated lesions, such as hyperkeratoses. In rare situations, a simple lateral eminence resection is appropriate; however, the risk of recurrence or overresection is high with this technique. Patients with a lateral bow to the fifth metatarsal are treated with a distal chevron-type osteotomy. A widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle often requires a diaphyseal osteotomy for correction.

  8. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  10. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C.; Czech, T.; Diekmann, K.; Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Prayer, D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  13. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne, Greger; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains con...

  14. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  15. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [de

  16. [Spinal instrumentation, source of progress, but also revealing pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubousset, Jean

    2003-01-01

    addition the noticed improvements on the biological field for fusion with bone activators like BMP, Hydroxyapatite, or bone substitutes like bio-active ceramics will probably help for fusion and decrease necessity of bone grafting. It is the same about disc regeneration which is on the way. Finally it is evident that the first steps already done for spinal surgery avoiding fusion will extend.--For children and growing spine, the challenge is major, but with memory metal instruments, laser precise destruction of abnormal growing structures as well as posterior flexible instrumentation avoiding stripping of the periosteum and leaving integrity of the disc and facet joints function, improvements are also on the way.--For adult and degenerative spinal deformities and pain, the development of spinal arthroplasty already done for the disc replacement will improve as well as for the posterior joints units where artificial ligaments experience will be replaced by real artificial joints still on experiment. In conclusion, some general biological medical questions are still waiting for answers:--Neurology and erect posture--Growth and degeneration--Malignancy (comprehension and control)--Pain and suffering. And of course what is the fact of the genetics for all of these problems: plenty of work for the future.

  17. Recurrent and Transient Spinal Pain Among Commercial Helicopter Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Knut; Baardsen, Roald; Dalen, Ingvild; Larsen, Jan Petter

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on the occurrence of spinal pain, i.e., low back and neck pain, among commercial helicopter pilots, along with possible associations between pain and anthropometric and demographic factors and flying exposure. Data were collected through a subjective and retrospective survey among all the 313 (294 men, 19 women) full-time pilots employed by two helicopter companies. A questionnaire was used to assess the extent of spinal complaints in a transient and recurrent pain pattern along with information on physical activities, occupational flying experience, and airframes. The survey had 207 responders (194 men, 13 women). The pilots had extensive flying experience. Spinal pain was reported by 67%. Flying-related transient pain was reported among 50%, whereas recurrent spinal pain, not necessarily associated with flying, was reported by 52%. Women experienced more pain, but sample size prevented further conclusions. Male pilots reporting any spinal pain flew significantly more hours last year (median 500 h, IQR 400-650) versus men with no pain (median 445 h, IQR 300-550). Male pilots with transient or recurrent spinal pain did not differ from nonaffected male colleagues in the measured parameters. Spinal pain is a frequent problem among male and female commercial helicopter pilots. For men, no significant associations were revealed for transient or recurrent spinal pain with age, flying experience in years, total hours, annual flying time, type of aircraft, or anthropometric factors except for any spinal pain related to hours flown in the last year.

  18. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...

  19. Spinal decompensation in degenerative lumbar scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.A.; Mullender, M.G.; Pluymakers, W.J.; Castelein, R.M.; van Royen, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the aging population, degenerative scoliosis is a growing clinical problem. It is associated with back pain and radicular symptoms. The pathogenesis of degenerative scoliosis lies in degenerative changes of the spinal structures, such as the intervertebral disc, the facet joints and the

  20. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  1. A novel deformation mechanism for superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, H.; Sakai, M. (Toyohashi Univ. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science)

    1999-01-01

    Uniaxial compressive creep tests with strain value up to -0.1 for a [beta]-spodumene glass ceramic are conducted at 1060 C. From the observation of microstructural changes between before and after the creep deformations, it is shown that the grain-boundary sliding takes place via cooperative movement of groups of grains rather than individual grains under the large-scale-deformation. The deformation process and the surface technique used in this work are not only applicable to explain the deformation and flow of two-phase ceramics but also the superplastic deformation. (orig.) 12 refs.

  2. Disorders of spinal blood circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hevyak, O.M.; Kuzminskyy, A.P.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal strokes are rare. The most common causes of the haemorrhage are spinal cord trauma, vasculitis with signs of haemorrhagic diathesis, spinal vascular congenital anomalies (malformations) and haemangioma. By localization, haemorrhagic strokes are divided into three groups: haematomyelia, spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage, epidural hematoma. Most cavernous malformations are localized at the cervical level, fewer — at thoracic and lumbar levels of the spinal cord. The clinical case of diagno...

  3. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Nakae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models.

  4. The Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury as an Experimental Pain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models. PMID:21436995

  5. Surgical treatment of gross posttraumatic deformations in thoracic spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei E. Shul’ga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rigid severe post-traumatic thoracic spine deformities result from frequent, recent high-energy trauma in children with an increasing frequency due to a variety of reasons. These types of injuries are commonly followed by spinal cord anatomic injury; therefore, the treatment of these patients warrants special attention from the ethical viewpoint. Generally, the only indication for surgical intervention is spinal dysfunction. Considering this and the patients’ ordinary severe somatic state, surgical trauma should be minimized as much as possible. However, for adequate deformity correction, effective spine stabilization and restoration of liquorodynamics is necessary. Recent studies have reported the successful use of different methods of dorsal interventions (P/VCR in cases with unstable damages in children. Here, we present the case of a 15-year-old boy who underwent surgical treatment for coarse post-traumatic thoracic spine deformity with chronic fracture-dislocation of Th7 vertebra.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT ...

  8. Spinal cord trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 32. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  12. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school......-based prospective cohort study. All 5th and 6th grade students (11-13 years) at 14 schools in the Region of Southern Denmark were invited to participate (N = 1,348). Data were collected in 2010 and again two years later, using an e-survey completed during school time. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain...... reported their pain as relatively infrequent and of low intensity, whereas the participants with frequent pain also experienced pain of higher intensity. The two-year incidence of spinal pain varied between 40% and 60% across the physical locations. Progression of pain from one to more locations and from...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  16. Spinal Injury: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EmergencyManual/WhatToDoInMedicalEmergency/Default.aspx?id=258&terms=spinal+injuries. Accessed Jan. 8, 2015. Marx JA, et al. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ... Experiences By Topic Resources Blog Peer Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of Use Site Map ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow ... recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close ... Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal ...

  9. Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Extradural arachnoid cysts (EACs are rare causes of spinal cord compression and cauda equina. These benign lesions appear in the literature mainly as single case reports. In this article, we present the largest series found in literature, with four new cases of spinal extradural arachnoid cysts. The characteristic imaging features, details of surgical steps and strategies to prevent postoperative kyphosis in this cystic pathology will be discussed.

  10. Sexual and reproductive function in spinal cord injury and spinal surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore H. Albright

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data.

  11. Nonlinear continuum mechanics and large inelastic deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrienko, Yuriy I

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a rigorous axiomatic approach to continuum mechanics under large deformation. In addition to the classical nonlinear continuum mechanics - kinematics, fundamental laws, the theory of functions having jump discontinuities across singular surfaces, etc. - the book presents the theory of co-rotational derivatives, dynamic deformation compatibility equations, and the principles of material indifference and symmetry, all in systematized form. The focus of the book is a new approach to the formulation of the constitutive equations for elastic and inelastic continua under large deformation. This new approach is based on using energetic and quasi-energetic couples of stress and deformation tensors. This approach leads to a unified treatment of large, anisotropic elastic, viscoelastic, and plastic deformations. The author analyses classical problems, including some involving nonlinear wave propagation, using different models for continua under large deformation, and shows how different models lead t...

  12. Estudo demográfico de pacientes portadores de deformidades de coluna vertebral que aguardam cirurgia em hospital terciário de alta complexidade Estudio demográfico de pacientes con deformidades de la columna en espera de cirugía en hospital de tercer nivel de alta complejidad Demographic study of patients with spinal deformities who are awaiting surgery in a tertiary hospital of high complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Jorge Carneiro Neto

    2012-09-01

    años. Entre las malformaciones encontradas fueron identificadas: escoliosis congénita por segmentación (6 o 3,5%, formación (39 o 22,9%, mixta (34 o 20,0% y compleja (14 o 8.2%, escoliosis neuromuscular en la parálisis cerebral (PC (54 o 31,8%, miopatía (11 o 6,5%, artrogriposis (2 o 1,2% y escoliosis por neurofibromatosis (10 o 5,9%. CONCLUSIÓN: Hay una lista considerable de pacientes con deformidades de la columna que aguardan en lista de espera por el tratamiento quirúrgico a menudo durante un período bastante prolongado. Este hecho produce un problema social difícil de manejar cuando se añaden escoliosis neuromuscular y escoliosis congénita, es responsable de la gran mayoría de los casos en la espera de la cirugía.OBJECTIVE: Set the demographic characteristics of patients with secondary deformities of the spine waiting for surgical treatment in a tertiary hospital of high complexity. METHODS: Information was obtained from patient charts in the predefined period. The data were selected according to the criteria already presented and manipulated statistically. RESULTS: The study included a total of 170 patients, of which 94 were female aged between 1 and 58 years, and 76 males aged between 1 and 26 years. Among the deformities found the following were identified: congenital scoliosis were identified by segmentation (6 or 3.5%, formation (39 or 22.9%, mixed (34 or 20.0% and complex (14 or 8.2%, neuromuscular scoliosis in cerebral palsy (PC (54 or 31.8%, myopathy (11 or 6.5%, arthrogryposis (2 or 1.2% and scoliosis in neurofibromatosis (10 or 5.9%. CONCLUSION: There is a considerable list of patients with spinal deformities waiting for surgical treatment for a period of time often quite prolonged. This fact leads to a social problem difficult to handle and when added together, neuromuscular scoliosis and congenital scoliosis are responsible for the vast majority of cases awaiting surgery.

  13. Thermoelastoplastic Deformation of a Multilayer Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashkin, E. V.; Dats, E. P.

    2017-09-01

    The problem of centrally symmetric deformation of a multilayer elastoplastic ball in the process of successive accretion of preheated layers to its outer surface is considered in the framework of small elastoplastic deformations. The problems of residual stress formation in the elastoplastic ball with an inclusion and a cavity are solved under various mechanical boundary conditions on the inner surface and for prescribed thermal compression distributions. The graphs of residual stress and displacement fields are constructed.

  14. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  15. Treatments of intramedullary spinal cord tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueyama, Kazumasa; Okada, Akihiro; Echigoya, Naoki; Yokoyama, Toru; Harata, Seiko [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    In order to establish a treatment for intramedullary spinal cord tumors, histology, symptoms (preoperative, upon discharge from the hospital, and at the final follow-up examination), postoperative combination therapy, postoperative complications, and recurrence were assessed in patients with intramedullary spinal cord tumors treated in the author's hospital during the past 19 years. There were 26 subjects (astrocytoma in 8, ependymoma in 6, intramedullary neurinoma in 3, lipoma in 3, hemangioblastoma in 3, cavernous angioma in 1, capillary hemangioma in 1, and enterogenous cyst in 1). Surgery had been performed in 24 of them, and 7 of the tumors were completely resected, 6 were incompletely resected, and 3 were partially resected. Radiotherapy had been performed to treat 7 astrocytomas and 2 ependymomas. Kyphosis was noted as a postoperative complication in 1 patient with an astrocytoma who had received postoperative radiotherapy. Postoperative improvement was better in the patients who had the ependymomas, lipoma, and angioma, and in 1 patient with an astrocytoma. The astrocytomas were very difficult to completely remove surgically, and postoperative radiotherapy was thought to be indispensable. The ependymomas, hemangioblastomas, and angiomas could be surgically resected, but the surgeon must has to exercise sufficient care during the operation. The lipomas were also difficult to resect surgically and intratumoral decompression or decompression should be performed. For adolescents spinal deformity should be considered as one of the postoperative complications. (K.H.)

  16. Kyphosis in spinal tuberculosis - Prevention and correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Anil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal deformity and paraplegia/quadriplegia are the most common complications of tuberculosis (TB of spine. TB of dorsal spine almost always produces kyphosis while cervical and lumbar spine shows reversal of lordosis to begin with followed by kyphosis. kyphosis continues to increase in adults when patients are treated nonoperatively or by surgical decompression. In children, kyphosis continues to increase even after healing of the tubercular disease. The residual, healed kyphosis on a long follow-up produces painful costopelvic impingement, reduced vital capacity and eventually respiratory complications; spinal canal stenosis proximal to the kyphosis and paraplegia with healed disease, thus affecting the quality and span of life. These complications can be avoided by early diagnosis of tubercular spine lesion to heal with minimal or no kyphosis. When tubercular lesion reports with kyphosis of more than 50° or is likely to progress further, they should be undertaken for kyphus correction. The sequential steps of kyphosis correction include anterior decompression and corpectomy, posterior column shortening, posterior instrumentation, anterior bone grafting and posterior fusion. During the procedure, the spinal cord should be kept under vision so that it should not elongate. Internal kyphectomy (gibbectomy is a preferred treatment for late onset paraplegia with severe healed kyphosis.

  17. Treatments of intramedullary spinal cord tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueyama, Kazumasa; Okada, Akihiro; Echigoya, Naoki; Yokoyama, Toru; Harata, Seiko [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    In order to establish a treatment for intramedullary spinal cord tumors, histology, symptoms (preoperative, upon discharge from the hospital, and at the final follow-up examination), postoperative combination therapy, postoperative complications, and recurrence were assessed in patients with intramedullary spinal cord tumors treated in the author's hospital during the past 19 years. There were 26 subjects (astrocytoma in 8, ependymoma in 6, intramedullary neurinoma in 3, lipoma in 3, hemangioblastoma in 3, cavernous angioma in 1, capillary hemangioma in 1, and enterogenous cyst in 1). Surgery had been performed in 24 of them, and 7 of the tumors were completely resected, 6 were incompletely resected, and 3 were partially resected. Radiotherapy had been performed to treat 7 astrocytomas and 2 ependymomas. Kyphosis was noted as a postoperative complication in 1 patient with an astrocytoma who had received postoperative radiotherapy. Postoperative improvement was better in the patients who had the ependymomas, lipoma, and angioma, and in 1 patient with an astrocytoma. The astrocytomas were very difficult to completely remove surgically, and postoperative radiotherapy was thought to be indispensable. The ependymomas, hemangioblastomas, and angiomas could be surgically resected, but the surgeon must has to exercise sufficient care during the operation. The lipomas were also difficult to resect surgically and intratumoral decompression or decompression should be performed. For adolescents spinal deformity should be considered as one of the postoperative complications. (K.H.)

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of different instrumentation for spinal stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graftiaux, A G; Wattier, B; Gentil, P; Mazel, C; Skalli, W; Diop, A; Kehr, P H; Lavaste, F

    1995-12-01

    The varying problems following arthrodesis of the lumbar spine with rods or plates (too much rigidity for the first and insufficient stability for the second) have led us to conceive another type of material, flexible but with enough stability, to favorise healing of bone graft, and decrease the induced pathology on adjacent levels. An experimental study of three types of material: rigid, semi-rigid and flexible was performed on eighteen fresh cadaver spinal segments without and then with discectomy and corporectomy to find out the various types of behaviour. The flexible device seems more supple than the other materials tested: more mobility, less stiffness. Rising hysteresis is explained by plastic deformation. The semi-rigid device presents strong osseous stresses on the L3 level and a large hysteresis corresponding most likely to a mobility between the screws and plates. The rigid device has less mobility, especially in torsion, ascribed to the transverse connection. The stability is high with a small hysteresis. This is of value for bone loss or instability with displacement of the vertebral body.The second study was a modeling of the flexible device validated by comparison to the experimental study. The strains in the wire were high, decreasing with increasing diameter, but is still lower than the elastic limit. The proximity of the elastic limit may allow plastic deformation of the wire. Howewer less strains were found on the screw fixation but increase with the increase diameter of the wire. The influence of the bone quality on the behavior of the device was demonstrated.

  19. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  20. Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal Centre: Experience at Enugu, Nigeria. ... The thoracic spine{9(41%)}was most often involved. ... Five (23%) patients with injury at cervical level died from respiratory failure.

  1. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  2. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  3. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  4. Karolinska institutet 200-year anniversary. Symposium on traumatic injuries in the nervous system: injuries to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system - injuries and repair, pain problems, lesions to brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld, Mattias K; Svensson, Mikael; Tsao, Jack; Hultgren, Thomas; Landegren, Thomas; Carlstedt, Thomas; Cullheim, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The Karolinska Institutet 200-year anniversary symposium on injuries to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system gathered expertise in the spinal cord, spinal nerve, and peripheral nerve injury field spanning from molecular prerequisites for nerve regeneration to clinical methods in nerve repair and rehabilitation. The topics presented at the meeting covered findings on adult neural stem cells that when transplanted to the hypoglossal nucleus in the rat could integrate with its host and promote neuron survival. Studies on vascularization after intraspinal replantation of ventral nerve roots and microarray studies in ventral root replantation as a tool for mapping of biological patterns typical for neuronal regeneration were discussed. Different immune molecules in neurons and glia and their very specific roles in synapse plasticity after injury were presented. Novel strategies in repair of injured peripheral nerves with ethyl-cyanoacrylate adhesive showed functional recovery comparable to that of conventional epineural sutures. Various aspects on surgical techniques which are available to improve function of the limb, once the nerve regeneration after brachial plexus lesions and repair has reached its limit were presented. Moreover, neurogenic pain after amputation and its treatment with mirror therapy were shown to be followed by dramatic decrease in phantom limb pain. Finally clinical experiences on surgical techniques to repair avulsed spinal nerve root and the motoric as well as sensoric regain of function were presented.

  5. Karolinska Institutet 200-Year Anniversary. Symposium on Traumatic Injuries in the Nervous System: Injuries to the Spinal Cord and Peripheral Nervous System – Injuries and Repair, Pain Problems, Lesions to Brachial Plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld, Mattias K.; Svensson, Mikael; Tsao, Jack; Hultgren, Thomas; Landegren, Thomas; Carlstedt, Thomas; Cullheim, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The Karolinska Institutet 200-year anniversary symposium on injuries to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system gathered expertise in the spinal cord, spinal nerve, and peripheral nerve injury field spanning from molecular prerequisites for nerve regeneration to clinical methods in nerve repair and rehabilitation. The topics presented at the meeting covered findings on adult neural stem cells that when transplanted to the hypoglossal nucleus in the rat could integrate with its host and promote neuron survival. Studies on vascularization after intraspinal replantation of ventral nerve roots and microarray studies in ventral root replantation as a tool for mapping of biological patterns typical for neuronal regeneration were discussed. Different immune molecules in neurons and glia and their very specific roles in synapse plasticity after injury were presented. Novel strategies in repair of injured peripheral nerves with ethyl-cyanoacrylate adhesive showed functional recovery comparable to that of conventional epineural sutures. Various aspects on surgical techniques which are available to improve function of the limb, once the nerve regeneration after brachial plexus lesions and repair has reached its limit were presented. Moreover, neurogenic pain after amputation and its treatment with mirror therapy were shown to be followed by dramatic decrease in phantom limb pain. Finally clinical experiences on surgical techniques to repair avulsed spinal nerve root and the motoric as well as sensoric regain of function were presented. PMID:21629875

  6. Q-deformed algebras and many-body physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galetti, D; Lunardi, J T; Pimentel, B M [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, C L [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1995-11-01

    A review is presented of some applications of q-deformed algebras to many-body systems. The rotational and pairing nuclear problems will be discussed in the context of q-deformed algebras, before presenting a more microscopically based application of q-deformed concepts to many-fermion systems. (author). 30 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Dose optimisation for intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT in paediatric spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjaer, Soeren; Kaspersen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    During surgery for spinal deformities, accurate placement of pedicle screws may be guided by intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT. The purpose of this study was to identify appropriate paediatric imaging protocols aiming to reduce the radiation dose in line with the ALARA principle. Using O-arm registered (Medtronic, Inc.), three paediatric phantoms were employed to measure CTDI w doses with default and lowered exposure settings. Images from 126 scans were evaluated by two spinal surgeons and scores were compared (Kappa statistics). Effective doses were calculated. The recommended new low-dose 3-D spine protocols were then used in 15 children. The lowest acceptable exposure as judged by image quality for intraoperative use was 70 kVp/40 mAs, 70 kVp/80 mAs and 80 kVp/40 mAs for the 1-, 5- and 12-year-old-equivalent phantoms respectively (kappa = 0,70). Optimised dose settings reduced CTDI w doses 89-93%. The effective dose was 0.5 mSv (91-94,5% reduction). The optimised protocols were used clinically without problems. Radiation doses for intraoperative 3-D CT using a cone-beam flat-detector scanner could be reduced at least 89% compared to manufacturer settings and still be used to safely navigate pedicle screws. (orig.)

  8. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  9. Deformations of surface singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Szilárd, ágnes

    2013-01-01

    The present publication contains a special collection of research and review articles on deformations of surface singularities, that put together serve as an introductory survey of results and methods of the theory, as well as open problems, important examples and connections to other areas of mathematics. The aim is to collect material that will help mathematicians already working or wishing to work in this area to deepen their insight and eliminate the technical barriers in this learning process. This also is supported by review articles providing some global picture and an abundance of examples. Additionally, we introduce some material which emphasizes the newly found relationship with the theory of Stein fillings and symplectic geometry.  This links two main theories of mathematics: low dimensional topology and algebraic geometry. The theory of normal surface singularities is a distinguished part of analytic or algebraic geometry with several important results, its own technical machinery, and several op...

  10. Potentialities of spinal liquor scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlakhov, N.; Vylkanov, P.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that spinal liquor scanography is a harmless and informative method for the examination of patients, permitting to detect injury foci for spinal cord tumours in 90% cases, for acute injuries of the vertebral column and spinal cord in 89.5% cases, for herniation of nucleus pulposus in 81% cases. The method of spinal liquor scanography can be used in neurology and neurosurgery to select the method of treatment and to evaluate its efficiency

  11. Neuroradiology of the spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Molsen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiodiagnostics of the vertebral column and of the spinal cord under normal conditions and under different pathological alterations are elaborated. Especially cervical and thoracal myelography, lumbosacral myeloradiculography, spinal arteriography and phlebography as well as spinal computerized tomography are discussed in detail

  12. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  13. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  14. Spinal CT scan, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival. (Chiba, N.)

  15. Intramedullary spinal melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meic H. Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a benign lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes that at times can mimic its malignant counterpart, melanoma. Lesions of the spine usually occur in extramedullary locations and present with spinal cord compression symptoms. Because most reported spinal cases occur in the thoracic region, these symptoms usually include lower extremity weakness or numbness. The authors present a case of primary intrame­dullary spinal meningeal melanocytoma presenting with bilateral lower extremity symptoms in which the patient had no known supratentorial primary lesions. Gross total surgical resection allowed for full recovery, but early recurrence of tumor was detected on close follow-up monitoring, allowing for elective local radiation without loss of neurological function. Case reports of such tumors discuss different treatment strategies, but just as important is the close follow-up monitoring in these patients even after gross total surgical resection, since these tumors can recur.

  16. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  17. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [de

  18. Spinal Neurocysticercosis: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya P, Melina; Roa, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic illness of the central nervous system caused by the larval form of Taenia solium and its considered to be endemic in Latin America. Its diagnosis is based on imaging findings and epidemiological data; although its diagnosis can be made through the detection of specific IgG antibodies, these tests have limited availability in our environment. Central nervous system involvement is generally observed in the brain parenchyma, and less commonly in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space; only infrequently is reported to involve the structures within the spinal canal, in this article we review a case of a patient with spinal cysticercal involvement.

  19. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  20. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  1. Treatment of wrist deformities in children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya A Kochenova

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Patients with segmental lesions of the spinal cord at the С6-С7 and С5-С8 level were associated with restoration of active wrist extension up to the neutral position or more and were expected to achieve significant improvement of hand function. Patients with spinal cord lesions at the C5-Th1 level exhibited significant lesions of the muscles, along with bone deformities. Consequently, surgical treatment could only achieve functional wrist position with minimal improvement of hand function. Using differential approaches in the treatment of wrist contracture that are selected by determining the level of spinal cord lesion will enable physicians to predict the outcome and improve the function and appearance of the wrist.

  2. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  7. Occult spinal dysraphism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paediatricians, paediatric neurosurgeons, urologists, orthopaedic surgeons, occupational ... Occult spinal dysraphism refers to a diverse group of congenital abnormalities resulting from varying degrees of disordered neuro- embryogenesis. Several terms have .... can image the whole spine. T1-weighted sagittal and axial ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite David, ... injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  10. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  11. Trunk proprioception adaptations to creep deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Rousseau, Benjamin; Descarreaux, Martin

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the short-term effect of creep deformation on the trunk repositioning sense. Twenty healthy participants performed two different trunk-repositioning tasks (20° and 30° trunk extension) before and after a prolonged static full trunk flexion of 20 min in order to induce spinal tissue creep. Trunk repositioning error variables, trunk movement time and erector spinae muscle activity were computed and compared between the pre- and post-creep conditions. During the pre-creep condition, significant increases in trunk repositioning errors, as well as trunk movement time, were observed in 30° trunk extension in comparison to 20°. During the post-creep condition, trunk repositioning errors variables were significantly increased only when performing a 20° trunk extension. Erector spinae muscle activity increased in the post-creep condition, while it remained unchanged between trunk repositioning tasks. Trunk repositioning sense seems to be altered in the presence of creep deformation, especially in a small range of motion. Reduction of proprioception acuity may increase the risk of spinal instability, which is closely related to the risk of low back pain or injury.

  12. Geometric Structure of 3D Spinal Curves: Plane Regions and Connecting Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthonnaud, E.; Hilmi, R.; Dimnet, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new study of the geometric structure of 3D spinal curves. The spine is considered as an heterogeneous beam, compound of vertebrae and intervertebral discs. The spine is modeled as a deformable wire along which vertebrae are beads rotating about the wire. 3D spinal curves are compound of plane regions connected together by zones of transition. The 3D spinal curve is uniquely flexed along the plane regions. The angular offsets between adjacent regions are concentrated at level of the middle zones of transition, so illustrating the heterogeneity of the spinal geometric structure. The plane regions along the 3D spinal curve must satisfy two criteria: (i) a criterion of minimum distance between the curve and the regional plane and (ii) a criterion controlling that the curve is continuously plane at the level of the region. The geometric structure of each 3D spinal curve is characterized by the sizes and orientations of regional planes, by the parameters representing flexed regions and by the sizes and functions of zones of transition. Spinal curves of asymptomatic subjects show three plane regions corresponding to spinal curvatures: lumbar, thoracic and cervical curvatures. In some scoliotic spines, four plane regions may be detected. PMID:25031873

  13. A major QTL controls susceptibility to spinal curvature in the curveback guppy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyer Christine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature would benefit medicine and aquaculture. Heritable spinal curvature among otherwise healthy children (i.e. Idiopathic Scoliosis and Scheuermann kyphosis accounts for more than 80% of all spinal curvatures and imposes a substantial healthcare cost through bracing, hospitalizations, surgery, and chronic back pain. In aquaculture, the prevalence of heritable spinal curvature can reach as high as 80% of a stock, and thus imposes a substantial cost through production losses. The genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature is unknown and so the objective of this work is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy. Prior work with curveback has demonstrated phenotypic parallels to human idiopathic-type scoliosis, suggesting shared biological pathways for the deformity. Results A major effect QTL that acts in a recessive manner and accounts for curve susceptibility was detected in an initial mapping cross on LG 14. In a second cross, we confirmed this susceptibility locus and fine mapped it to a 5 cM region that explains 82.6% of the total phenotypic variance. Conclusions We identify a major QTL that controls susceptibility to curvature. This locus contains over 100 genes, including MTNR1B, a candidate gene for human idiopathic scoliosis. The identification of genes associated with heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy has the potential to elucidate the biological basis of spinal curvature among humans and economically important teleosts.

  14. Developing a Virtual Rock Deformation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Ougier-simonin, A.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Banker, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental rock physics plays an important role in advancing earthquake research. Despite its importance in geophysics, reservoir engineering, waste deposits and energy resources, most geology departments in U.S. universities don't have rock deformation facilities. A virtual deformation laboratory can serve as an efficient tool to help geology students naturally and internationally learn about rock deformation. Working with computer science engineers, we built a virtual deformation laboratory that aims at fostering user interaction to facilitate classroom and outreach teaching and learning. The virtual lab is built to center around a triaxial deformation apparatus in which laboratory measurements of mechanical and transport properties such as stress, axial and radial strains, acoustic emission activities, wave velocities, and permeability are demonstrated. A student user can create her avatar to enter the virtual lab. In the virtual lab, the avatar can browse and choose among various rock samples, determine the testing conditions (pressure, temperature, strain rate, loading paths), then operate the virtual deformation machine to observe how deformation changes physical properties of rocks. Actual experimental results on the mechanical, frictional, sonic, acoustic and transport properties of different rocks at different conditions are compiled. The data acquisition system in the virtual lab is linked to the complied experimental data. Structural and microstructural images of deformed rocks are up-loaded and linked to different deformation tests. The integration of the microstructural image and the deformation data allows the student to visualize how forces reshape the structure of the rock and change the physical properties. The virtual lab is built using the Game Engine. The geological background, outstanding questions related to the geological environment, and physical and mechanical concepts associated with the problem will be illustrated on the web portal. In

  15. Frequency of foot deformity in preschool girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlović Ilona

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In order to determine the moment of creation of postural disorders, regardless of the causes of this problem, it is necessary to examine the moment of entry of children into a new environment, ie. in kindergarten or school. There is a weak evidence about the age period when foot deformity occurs, and the type of these deformities. The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between the occurrence of foot deformities and age characteristics of girls. Methods. The research was conducted in preschools 'Radosno detinjstvo' in the region of Novi Sad, using the method of random selection, on the sample of 272 girls, 4-7 years of age, classified into four strata according to the year of birth. To determine the foot deformities measurement technique using computerized digitized pedografy (CDP was applied. Results. In preschool population girls pes transversoplanus and calcanei valga deformities occurred in a very high percentage (over 90%. Disturbed longitudinal instep ie flat feet also appeared in a high percentage, but we noted the improvement of this deformity according to increasing age. Namely, there was a statistically significant correlation between the age and this deformity. As a child grows older, the deformity is lower. Conclusion. This study confirmed that the formation of foot arches probably does not end at the age of 3-4 years but lasts until school age.

  16. Physical health problems in adults with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnema, Margje; Maaskant, Marian A; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M J; van Nieuwpoort, I Caroline; Drent, Madeleine L; Curfs, Leopold M G; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T R M

    2011-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder which is characterized by severe hypotonia and feeding problems in early infancy. In later childhood and adolescence, this is followed by hyperphagia and extreme obesity if the diet is not strictly controlled. Data on physical health problems in adults with PWS are scarce. We report on the prevalence of physical health problems in a Dutch cohort of adults with PWS in relation to age, BMI, and genetic subtype. Participants (n = 102) were retrieved via the Dutch Prader-Willi Parent Association and through physicians specializing in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). Details regarding physical health problem spanning the participants' lifespan were collected from caretakers through semi-structured interviews. Cardiovascular problems included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cerebrovascular accidents. Respiratory infections were frequent in adulthood. In males, cryptorchidism was almost universal, for which 28/48 males had a history of surgery, mostly orchidopexy. None of the women had a regular menstrual cycle. Sixteen individuals had a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Spinal deformation, hip dysplasia, and foot abnormalities were common. Skinpicking, leg edema, and erysipelas were frequent dermatological problems. The findings in our group support the notion that the prevalence of physical health problems is underestimated. This underscores the importance of developing monitoring programs which would help to recognize physical health problems at an early stage. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Differential diagnoses of spinal tumors; Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A wide variety of degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases can resemble the clinical presentation and imaging findings of spinal tumors. This article provides an overview of the most frequent diseases which are important to recognize for diagnostic imaging of the spine. (orig.) [German] Eine Vielzahl degenerativer, entzuendlicher und vaskulaerer Erkrankungen kann das klinische Bild und radiologische Befunde spinaler Tumoren imitieren. Dieser Artikel dient der Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten dieser Erkrankungen, deren Kenntnis wichtig fuer die spinale Bildgebung ist. (orig.)

  18. Spinal Anesthesia with Isobaric Tetracaine in Patients with Previous Lumbar Spinal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hwan; Jeon, Dong-Hyuk; Chang, Chul Ho; Lee, Sung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Previous lumbar spinal surgery (PLSS) is not currently considered as a contraindication for regional anesthesia. However, there are still problems that make spinal anesthesia more difficult with a possibility of worsening the patient's back pain. Spinal anesthesia using combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) in elderly patients with or without PLSS was investigated and the anesthetic characteristics, success rates, and possible complications were evaluated. Materials and Methods Fifty patients without PLSS (Control group) and 45 patients with PLSS (PLSS group) who were scheduled for total knee arthroplasty were studied prospectively. A CSEA was performed with patients in the left lateral position, and 10 mg of 0.5% isobaric tetracaine was injected through a 27 G spinal needle. An epidural catheter was then inserted for patient controlled analgesia. Successful spinal anesthesia was defined as adequate sensory block level more than T12. The number of skin punctures and the onset time were recorded, and maximal sensory block level (MSBL), time to 2-segment regression, success rate and complications were observed. Results The success rate of CSEA in Control group and PLSS group was 98.0%, and 93.3%, respectively. The median MSBL in PLSS group was higher than Control group [T4 (T2-L1) vs. T6 (T3-T12)] (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in the number of patients who required ephedrine for the treatment of hypotension in PLSS group (p = 0.028). Conclusion The success rate of CSEA in patients with PLSS was 93.3%, and patients experienced no significant neurological complications. The MSBL can be higher in PLSS group than Control group. PMID:19430559

  19. Deformations of superconformal theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Córdova, Clay [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Dumitrescu, Thomas T. [Department of Physics, Harvard University,17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Intriligator, Kenneth [Department of Physics, University of California,9500 Gilman Drive, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2016-11-22

    We classify possible supersymmetry-preserving relevant, marginal, and irrelevant deformations of unitary superconformal theories in d≥3 dimensions. Our method only relies on symmetries and unitarity. Hence, the results are model independent and do not require a Lagrangian description. Two unifying themes emerge: first, many theories admit deformations that reside in multiplets together with conserved currents. Such deformations can lead to modifications of the supersymmetry algebra by central and non-central charges. Second, many theories with a sufficient amount of supersymmetry do not admit relevant or marginal deformations, and some admit neither. The classification is complicated by the fact that short superconformal multiplets display a rich variety of sporadic phenomena, including supersymmetric deformations that reside in the middle of a multiplet. We illustrate our results with examples in diverse dimensions. In particular, we explain how the classification of irrelevant supersymmetric deformations can be used to derive known and new constraints on moduli-space effective actions.

  20. Quantum deformed magnon kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, César; Hernández Redondo, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The dispersion relation for planar N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills is identified with the Casimir of a quantum deformed two-dimensional kinematical symmetry, E_q(1,1). The quantum deformed symmetry algebra is generated by the momentum, energy and boost, with deformation parameter q=e^{2\\pi i/\\lambda}. Representing the boost as the infinitesimal generator for translations on the rapidity space leads to an elliptic uniformization with crossing transformations implemented through translations by t...

  1. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  2. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  3. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander [Institut M T Kassab d' orthopedie, Department of Radiology, Ksar Said (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  4. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  5. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  6. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal dermoid cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshihisa; Makita, Yasumasa; Nabeshima, Sachio; Tei, Taikyoku; Keyaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Jun; Kawamura, Junichiro

    1987-01-01

    A 25-year-old male complained of intermittent, sharp pains about the left eye and in the left side of the chest. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia and impaired perception of touch and pin-pricks in the dermatomes of Th8 and Th9 on the left side. In all four extremities, the muscle stretch reflexes were equal and slightly hyperactive, without weakness or sensory deficits. Metrizamide myelography showed defective filling at the level between the upper 8th and 9th thoracic vertebrae. The lesion was also demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) scan performed 1 hour later, appearing as an oval, radiolucent mass in the left dorsal spinal canal, which compressed the spinal cord forward and toward the right. Serial sections of the spinal canal revealed the lesion to be partly filled with contrast medium. Repeat CT scan 24 hours after metrizamide myelography showed more contrast medium in the periphery of the lesion, giving it a doughnut-shaped appearance. At surgery a smooth-surfaced cyst containing sebum and white hair was totally removed from the intradural extramedullary space. The histological diagnosis was dermoid cyst. There have been a few reported cases of intracranial epidermoid cyst in which filling of the cyst was suggested on metrizamide CT myelography. These findings may complicate the differential diagnosis of arachnoid cyst and dermoid or epidermoid cyst when only CT is used. (author)

  8. Patient evaluation in idiopathic scoliosis: Radiographic assessment, trunk deformity and back asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Progressive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) produces specific signs and symptoms, including trunk and spinal deformity and imbalance, impairment of breathing function, pain, progression during adult life, and psychological problems, as a whole resulting in an alteration of the health-related quality of life. A scoliosis-specific rehabilitation program attempts to prevent, improve, or minimize these signs and symptoms by using exercises and braces as the main tools in the rehabilitation treatment. Patient evaluation is an essential point in the decision-making process and determines the selection of the specific exercises and the specifications of the brace design. However, this article is not addressed to scoliosis management. In this present article, a complete definition and discussion of radiological aspects, such as the Cobb angle, axial rotation, curve pattern classifications, and sagittal configuration, follow a short description of the three-dimensional nature of AIS. The relationship between AIS and growth is also discussed. There is also a section dedicated to the assessment of trunk deformity and back asymmetry. Other important clinical aspects, such as pain and disability, changes in other regions of the body, muscular balance, breathing function, and health-related quality of life, are not discussed in this present article.

  9. Embolization of spinal arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Mi Young; Kim, Sun Yong; Park, Bok Hwan

    1990-01-01

    Recently, therapeutic embolization has been advocated as the treatment of choice for spinal AVM(arteriovenous malformations). The authors review our experience with two cases of spinal AVM treated by embolization using coaxial Tracker-18 microcatheter with Latvian. The patients included a 10 year old male with glomus type and a 14 year old female with juvenile type spinal AVM revealed recanalization 5 month later. Embolization provides curative or temporary treatment for spinal AVM. After embolic occlusion, delayed reassessment with arteriography is indicated, particularly if symptoms persist or recur

  10. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.

    2001-01-01

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  11. TRANSVERSAL ANALYSIS OF THE FREQUENCY OF LORDOTIC DEFORMITIES IN THE THE TELVE-YEAR OLD BOYS AND GIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselin Jovović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available of lordotic spinal deformities were determined. The sample was drawn from the population of pupils of fi fth grade from the primary school «L. Simonović» in Nikšić. The state and the structure of lordotic deformities were determined by use of combined measuring methods and techniques, applicable to the mass research in schools. The research proved that lordotic deformities are represented by a considerable percentage in the given population. The highest percentage of the deformities are mild, functional disruptions which can be successfully removed by an appropriate corrective treatment. Our sample proved that lordotic deformities appear most frequently in the lumbal area of the spinal chord.

  12. Intracrystalline deformation of calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresser, J.H.P. de

    1991-01-01

    It is well established from observations on natural calcite tectonites that intracrystalline plastic mechanisms are important during the deformation of calcite rocks in nature. In this thesis, new data are presented on fundamental aspects of deformation behaviour of calcite under conditions where

  13. The Spherical Deformation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asgar

    2003-01-01

    Miller et al. (1994) describe a model for representing spatial objects with no obvious landmarks. Each object is represented by a global translation and a normal deformation of a sphere. The normal deformation is defined via the orthonormal spherical-harmonic basis. In this paper we analyse the s...

  14. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  15. Restoring walking after spinal cord injury: operant conditioning of spinal reflexes can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aiko K; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    People with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently suffer motor disabilities due to spasticity and poor muscle control, even after conventional therapy. Abnormal spinal reflex activity often contributes to these problems. Operant conditioning of spinal reflexes, which can target plasticity to specific reflex pathways, can enhance recovery. In rats in which a right lateral column lesion had weakened right stance and produced an asymmetrical gait, up-conditioning of the right soleus H-reflex, which increased muscle spindle afferent excitation of soleus, strengthened right stance and eliminated the asymmetry. In people with hyperreflexia due to incomplete SCI, down-conditioning of the soleus H-reflex improved walking speed and symmetry. Furthermore, modulation of electromyographic activity during walking improved bilaterally, indicating that a protocol that targets plasticity to a specific pathway can trigger widespread plasticity that improves recovery far beyond that attributable to the change in the targeted pathway. These improvements were apparent to people in their daily lives. They reported walking faster and farther, and noted less spasticity and better balance. Operant conditioning protocols could be developed to modify other spinal reflexes or corticospinal connections; and could be combined with other therapies to enhance recovery in people with SCI or other neuromuscular disorders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Anyons, deformed oscillator algebras and projectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engquist, Johan

    2009-01-01

    We initiate an algebraic approach to the many-anyon problem based on deformed oscillator algebras. The formalism utilizes a generalization of the deformed Heisenberg algebras underlying the operator solution of the Calogero problem. We define a many-body Hamiltonian and an angular momentum operator which are relevant for a linearized analysis in the statistical parameter ν. There exists a unique ground state and, in spite of the presence of defect lines, the anyonic weight lattices are completely connected by the application of the oscillators of the algebra. This is achieved by supplementing the oscillator algebra with a certain projector algebra.

  17. Large poroelastic deformation of a soft material

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2014-11-01

    Flow through a porous material will drive mechanical deformation when the fluid pressure becomes comparable to the stiffness of the solid skeleton. This has applications ranging from hydraulic fracture for recovery of shale gas, where fluid is injected at high pressure, to the mechanics of biological cells and tissues, where the solid skeleton is very soft. The traditional linear theory of poroelasticity captures this fluid-solid coupling by combining Darcy's law with linear elasticity. However, linear elasticity is only volume-conservative to first order in the strain, which can become problematic when damage, plasticity, or extreme softness lead to large deformations. Here, we compare the predictions of linear poroelasticity with those of a large-deformation framework in the context of two model problems. We show that errors in volume conservation are compounded and amplified by coupling with the fluid flow, and can become important even when the deformation is small. We also illustrate these results with a laboratory experiment.

  18. Spinal sagittal contour affecting falls: cut-off value of the lumbar spine for falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Kasukawa, Yuji; Hongo, Michio; Shimada, Yoichi

    2013-06-01

    Spinal deformities reportedly affect postural instability or falls. To prevent falls in clinical settings, the determination of a cut-off angle of spinal sagittal contour associated with increase risk for falls would be useful for screening for high-risk fallers. The purpose of this study was to calculate the spinal sagittal contour angle associated with increased risk for falls during medical checkups in community dwelling elders. The subjects comprised 213 patients (57 men, 156 women) with a mean age of 70.1 years (range, 55-85 years). The upright and flexion/extension thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis angles, and the spinal inclination were evaluated with SpinalMouse(®). Postural instability was evaluated by stabilometry, using the total track length (LNG), enveloped areas (ENV), and track lengths in the lateral and anteroposterior directions (X LNG and Y LNG, respectively). The back extensor strength (BES) was measured using a strain-gauge dynamometer. The relationships among the parameters were analyzed statistically. Age, lumbar lordosis, spinal inclination, LNG, X LNG, Y LNG, and BES were significantly associated with falls (Pfalls about lumbar lordosis angles revealed that angles of 3° and less were significant for falls. The present findings suggest that increased age, spinal inclination, LNG, X LNG, Y LNG, and decreased BES and lumbar lordosis, are associated with falls. An angle of lumbar lordosis of 3° or less was associated with falls in these community-dwelling elders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Post spinal meningitis and asepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Rogerio L R; Ruiz-Neto, P P; Brandao Neto, M

    2002-07-01

    Post spinal meningitis (PSM) is a complication still currently being reported. After two PSM cases in our hospital an epidemiological study was initiated, which included a survey of techniques for asepsis that are applied in our department. Cases defined as PSM comprised meningitis within a week after spinal anesthesia. Anesthesia records, anesthesia complication files and the records of the Hospital Commission for Infection Control from 1997 to 2000 were reviewed. Asepsis techniques applied were surveyed by a questionnaire answered by all our department's anesthesiologists. The equipment and procedures for spinal anesthesia were listed. Current anesthesia textbooks were reviewed for recommendations regarding asepsis techniques in conjunction with spinal anesthesia. Three cases of PSM were identified following 38,128 spinal anesthesias whereas none was observed in 12,822 patients subjected to other types of regional or general anesthesia (P>0.05). Culture of cerebrospinal fluid yielded Streptococcus in two patients and was negative in the other patient. The asepsis technique applied by the anesthesiologists varied considerably. The literature review showed that aspects on asepsis for spinal anesthesia are poorly covered. The incidence of meningitis was similar in patients subjected to spinal anesthesia and in those subjected to other anesthetic techniques. Asepsis techniques were found to differ considerably among our staff members, reflecting the lack of well-defined published standards for this procedure. We recommend that asepsis for spinal anesthesia should not be less rigorous than for surgical asepsis.

  20. Management of unstable spinal fractures with segmental spinal instrumentation (VSP System : Results at 5 year follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Dipankar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation has been widely used for spinal stabilisation following spinal injury with variable results. The controversial points associated with spinal injury are effects of canal compromise and decompression on neurological status. Methods: Thirty four patients of unstable thoraco-lumbar fracture with or without neuro-deficit were treated by decompression and stabilisation with VSP system and followed up for 22 - 39 months (mean 29 months. The results were evaluated by neurological recovery (ASIA score, pain relief, loss of surgical correction and functional rehabilitation (FIM score. Results: We achieved a mean post-operative correction of the kyphotic deformity by 14 degrees and an average gain of 30.2% in the canal diameter by decompression. However no correlation was established between degree of canal compromise before or after the surgery with the final neurological outcome. Conclusion: Although the infrastructure for spinal injury management in developing countries is inadequate in many aspects, we find that it is still possible to achieve results, which are comparable with standard literature by adequate decompression and stabilisation followed by appropriate rehabilitation according to the social and cultural demands of the patients.

  1. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu; Roh, Sung Woo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our cli...

  2. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Who Should Be Fused? An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ashjazadeh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is mostly caused by osteoarthritis (spondylosis). Clinically, the symptoms of patients with LSS can be categorized into two groups; regional (low back pain, stiffness, and so on) or radicular (spinal stenosis mainly presenting as neurogenic claudication). Both of these symptoms usually improve with appropriate conservative treatment, but in refractory cases, surgical intervention is occasionally indicated. In the patients who primarily complain of radiculopathy with an underlying biomechanically stable spine, a decompression surgery alone using a less invasive technique may be sufficient. Preoperatively, with the presence of indicators such as failed back surgery syndrome (revision surgery), degenerative instability, considerable essential deformity, symptomatic spondylolysis, refractory degenerative disc disease, and adjacent segment disease, lumbar fusion is probably recommended. Intraoperatively, in cases with extensive decompression associated with a wide disc space or insufficient bone stock, fusion is preferred. Instrumentation improves the fusion rate, but it is not necessarily associated with improved recovery rate and better functional outcome. PMID:25187873

  3. Radiology of spinal curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered

  4. Deformations of symplectic Lie algebroids, deformations of holomorphic symplectic structures, and index theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nest, Ryszard; Tsygan, Boris

    2001-01-01

    Recently Kontsevich solved the classification problem for deformation quantizations of all Poisson structures on a manifold. In this paper we study those Poisson structures for which the explicit methods of Fedosov can be applied, namely the Poisson structures coming from symplectic Lie algebroids......, as well as holomorphic symplectic structures. For deformations of these structures we prove the classification theorems and a general a general index theorem....

  5. hyperbaric ropivacaine for spinal anaesthesia for knee arthroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, ... Spinal anaesthesia is usually adequate for these procedures but ... disorder, language problems, history of chronic pain, alcohol, drug ... identity of the solution. .... to age, sex, ASA physical status, weight where height (p > 0.05).

  6. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and problems with eye movements, taste, and speech. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect a syrinx. Surgery to drain the syrinx may be done, but ... young child or teenager who has typical symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the entire spinal cord and ... of the cause when possible A neurosurgeon ...

  7. An electromechanical based deformable model for soft tissue simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yongmin; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2009-11-01

    Soft tissue deformation is of great importance to surgery simulation. Although a significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to simulating the behaviours of soft tissues, modelling of soft tissue deformation is still a challenging problem. This paper presents a new deformable model for simulation of soft tissue deformation from the electromechanical viewpoint of soft tissues. Soft tissue deformation is formulated as a reaction-diffusion process coupled with a mechanical load. The mechanical load applied to a soft tissue to cause a deformation is incorporated into the reaction-diffusion system, and consequently distributed among mass points of the soft tissue. Reaction-diffusion of mechanical load and non-rigid mechanics of motion are combined to govern the simulation dynamics of soft tissue deformation. An improved reaction-diffusion model is developed to describe the distribution of the mechanical load in soft tissues. A three-layer artificial cellular neural network is constructed to solve the reaction-diffusion model for real-time simulation of soft tissue deformation. A gradient based method is established to derive internal forces from the distribution of the mechanical load. Integration with a haptic device has also been achieved to simulate soft tissue deformation with haptic feedback. The proposed methodology does not only predict the typical behaviours of living tissues, but it also accepts both local and large-range deformations. It also accommodates isotropic, anisotropic and inhomogeneous deformations by simple modification of diffusion coefficients.

  8. Extremely deformable structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new research stimulus has derived from the observation that soft structures, such as biological systems, but also rubber and gel, may work in a post critical regime, where elastic elements are subject to extreme deformations, though still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. This is the realm of ‘extreme mechanics’, to which this book is addressed. The possibility of exploiting highly deformable structures opens new and unexpected technological possibilities. In particular, the challenge is the design of deformable and bi-stable mechanisms which can reach superior mechanical performances and can have a strong impact on several high-tech applications, including stretchable electronics, nanotube serpentines, deployable structures for aerospace engineering, cable deployment in the ocean, but also sensors and flexible actuators and vibration absorbers. Readers are introduced to a variety of interrelated topics involving the mechanics of extremely deformable structures, with emphasis on ...

  9. Diffeomorphic Statistical Deformation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Hansen, Mads/Fogtman; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for constructing diffeomorphic statistical deformation models in arbitrary dimensional images with a nonlinear generative model and a linear parameter space. Our deformation model is a modified version of the diffeomorphic model introduced by Cootes et al....... The modifications ensure that no boundary restriction has to be enforced on the parameter space to prevent folds or tears in the deformation field. For straightforward statistical analysis, principal component analysis and sparse methods, we assume that the parameters for a class of deformations lie on a linear...... with ground truth in form of manual expert annotations, and compared to Cootes's model. We anticipate applications in unconstrained diffeomorphic synthesis of images, e.g. for tracking, segmentation, registration or classification purposes....

  10. The Spherical Deformation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asgar

    2003-01-01

    Miller et al. (1994) describe a model for representing spatial objects with no obvious landmarks. Each object is represented by a global translation and a normal deformation of a sphere. The normal deformation is defined via the orthonormal spherical-harmonic basis. In this paper we analyse the s...... a single central section of the object. We use maximum-likelihood-based inference for this purpose and demonstrate the suggested methods on real data....

  11. MR imaging of spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchberger, W.; Springer, P.; Birbamer, G.; Judmaier, W.; Kathrein, A.; Daniaux, H.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the acute and chronic stages of spinal trauma. 126 MR examinations of 120 patients were evaluated retrospectively. In 15 cases of acute spinal cord injury, correlation of MR findings with the degree of neurological deficit and eventual recovery was undertaken. Cord anomalies in the acute stage were seen in 16 patients. Intramedullary haemorrhage (n=6) and cord transection (n=2) were associated with complete injuries and poor prognosis, whereas patients with cord oedema (n=7) had incomplete injuries and recovered significant neurological function. In the chronic stage, MR findings included persistent cord compression in 8 patients, syringomyelia or post-traumatic cyst in 12, myelomalacia in 6, cord atrophy in 9, and cord transection in 7 patients. In acute spinal trauma, MR proved useful in assessing spinal cord compression and instability. In addition, direct visualisation and characterisation of posttraumatic changes within the spinal cord may offer new possibilities in establishing the prognosis for neurological recovery. In the later stages, potentially remediable causes of persistent or progressive symptoms, such as chronic spinal cord compression or syringomyelia can be distinguished from other sequelae of spinal trauma, such as myelomalacia, cord transection or atrophy. (orig.) [de

  12. Inverse transient thermoelastic deformations in thin circular plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bessel's functions with the help of the integral transform technique. Thermoelastic deformations are discussed with the help of temperature and are illustrated numer- ically. Keywords. Inverse transient; thermoelastic deformation. 1. Introduction. The inverse thermoelastic problem consists of determination of the temperature, ...

  13. Spinal cord lesions in Bangladesh: an epidemiological study 1994 - 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M F; Grangeon, C; Reed, K

    1999-12-01

    Spinal Cord Lesions are a major public health problem in Bangladesh. This epidemiological study was undertaken in order to identify the causes of spinal cord lesions and thus to allow prevention and control programs to be developed. The records of 247 patients with spinal cord lesions admitted to The Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP), Savar, Dhaka from January 1994 to June 1995 were reviewed retrospectively. Comparisons were made with the reports of studies from other countries, both developing and developed. The most common cause of traumatic lesions was a fall from a height followed by falling when carrying a heavy weight on the head and road traffic accidents. Most of the patients were between 20 - 40 years old and the overall age group ranged from 10 - 70 years. The male:female ratio was 7.5 : 1.0. Among the traumatic spinal cord lesions, 60% were paraplegics and 40% tetraplegics. Among the non-traumatic spinal cord lesions cases 84% were paraplegics and 16% tetraplegics. The leading cause of death resulted from respiratory complications and these deaths occurred in the very early period of admission. From the results it can be deduced that the high incidence of spinal cord lesion as a result from falls from a height, and from falling when carrying a heavy weight on the head, can be explained by the mainly agricultural based economy of Bangladesh. The most common age group (10 - 40 years) of patients reflects the socio-economic conditions of Bangladesh. The male:female ratio (7.5 : 1.0) of patients with a spinal cord lesion is due to the socio-economic status and to the traditional culture of the society.

  14. Risk factors of non-specific spinal pain in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szita, Julia; Boja, Sara; Szilagyi, Agnes; Somhegyi, Annamaria; Varga, Peter Pal; Lazary, Aron

    2018-05-01

    Non-specific spinal pain can occur at all ages and current evidence suggests that pediatric non-specific spinal pain is predictive for adult spinal conditions. A 5-year long, prospective cohort study was conducted to identify the lifestyle and environmental factors leading to non-specific spinal pain in childhood. Data were collected from school children aged 7-16 years, who were randomly selected from three different geographic regions in Hungary. The risk factors were measured with a newly developed patient-reported questionnaire (PRQ). The quality of the instrument was assessed by the reliability with the test-retest method. Test (N = 952) and validity (N = 897) datasets were randomly formed. Risk factors were identified with uni- and multivariate logistic regression models and the predictive performance of the final model was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. The final model was built up by seven risk factors for spinal pain for days; age > 12 years, learning or watching TV for more than 2 h/day, uncomfortable school-desk, sleeping problems, general discomfort and positive familiar medical history (χ 2  = 101.07; df = 8; p < 0.001). The probabilistic performance was confirmed with ROC analysis on the test and validation cohorts (AUC = 0.76; 0.71). A simplified risk scoring system showed increasing possibility for non-specific spinal pain depending on the number of the identified risk factors (χ 2  = 65.0; df = 4; p < 0.001). Seven significant risk factors of non-specific spinal pain in childhood were identified using the new, easy to use and reliable PRQ which makes it possible to stratify the children according to their individual risk. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  15. Problems in early diagnosis of bladder cancer in a spinal cord injury patient: Report of a case of simultaneous production of granulocyte colony stimulating factor and parathyroid hormone-related protein by squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typical symptoms and signs of a clinical condition may be absent in spinal cord injury (SCI patients. Case presentation A male with paraplegia was passing urine through penile sheath for 35 years, when he developed urinary infections. There was no history of haematuria. Intravenous urography showed bilateral hydronephrosis. The significance of abnormal outline of bladder was not appreciated. As there was large residual urine, he was advised intermittent catheterisation. Serum urea: 3.5 mmol/L; creatinine: 77 umol/L. A year later, serum urea: 36.8 mmol/l; creatinine: 632 umol/l; white cell count: 22.2; neutrophils: 18.88. Ultrasound: bilateral hydronephrosis. Bilateral nephrostomy was performed. Subsequently, blood tests showed: Urea: 14.2 mmol/l; Creatinine: 251 umol/l; Adjusted Calcium: 3.28 mmol/l; Parathyroid hormone: A repeat ultrasound scan demonstrated a tumour arising from right lateral wall; biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma. In view of persistently high white cell count and high calcium level, immunohistochemistry for G-CSF and PTHrP was performed. Dense staining of tumour cells for G-CSF and faintly positive staining for C-terminal PTHrP were observed. This patient expired about five months later. Conclusion This case demonstrates how delay in diagnosis of bladder cancer could occur in a SCI patient due to absence of characteristic symptoms and signs.

  16. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  17. Spinal dysraphism illustrated; Embroyology revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullas V Acharya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord development occurs through three consecutive periods of gastrulation, primary nerulation and secondary neurulation. Aberration in these stages causes abnormalities of the spine and spinal cord, collectively referred as spinal dysraphism. They can be broadly classified as anomalies of gastrulation (disorders of notochord formation and of integration; anomalies of primary neurulation (premature dysjunction and nondysjunction; combined anomalies of gastrulation and primary neurulation and anomalies of secondary neurulation. Correlation with clinical and embryological data and common imaging findings provides an organized approach in their diagnosis.

  18. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 1: Normal spinal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.; Allouni, A.K.; Mankad, K.; Prezzi, D.; Elias, T.; Rankine, J.; Davagnanam, I.

    2013-01-01

    The general radiologist frequently encounters studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. There are various surgical approaches and devices used in spinal surgery with an increased understanding of spinal and spinal implant biomechanics drives development of modern fixation devices. It is, therefore, important that the radiologist can recognize commonly used devices and identify their potential complications demonstrated on imaging. The aim of part 1 of this review is to familiarize the reader with terms used to describe surgical approaches to the spine, review the function and normal appearances of commonly used instrumentations, and understand the importance of the different fixation techniques. The second part of this review will concentrate on the roles that the different imaging techniques play in assessing the instrumented spine and the recognition of complications that can potentially occur.

  19. BFV-BRST analysis of the classical and quantum q-deformations of the sl(2) algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayi, O.F.

    1993-01-01

    BFV-BRST charge for q-deformed algebras is not unique. Different constructions of it in the classical as well as in the quantum phase space for the q-deformed algebra sl q (2) are discussed. Moreover, deformation of the phase space without deforming the generators of sl(2) is considered. h -q-deformation of the phase space is shown to yield the Witten's second deformation. To study the BFV-BRST cohomology problem when both the quantum phase space and the group are deformed, a two parameter deformation of sl(2) is proposed, and its BFV-BRST charge is given. (author). 21 refs

  20. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  1. Sexuality and sexual life in women with spinal cord injury: a controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreuter, M.; Siosteen, A.; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe sexual life in women with spinal cord injury. DESIGN: Controlled cross-sectional, questionnaire. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Women, 18-65 years, treated at spinal cord centres in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland and Iceland. 545 women (57%) completed the questionnaires. The age......-matched control group consisted of 507 women. The 104-item Spinal Cord Injury Women Questionnaire, was designed to assess different dimensions of sexuality. RESULTS: 80% of the women with spinal cord injury had engaged in sex after the injury. Reasons for not wanting or not having the courage to be intimate...... and sexual were physical problems, low sexual desire, low self-esteem and feelings of being unattractive. The motivations of both the women with spinal cord injury and controls to engage in sexual activity were intimacy-based rather than primarily sexual. Being in the right mood both before and during sex...

  2. The effect of Sativex in neuropathic pain and spasticity in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede; Johansen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury represent significant but still unresolved problems, which cause considerable suffering and reduced quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury. Treatment of neuropathic pain and spasticity is complicated and patients...... often receive incomplete relief from present available and recommended treatment. Cannabinoids has shown efficacy on both neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, but the studies one the topic has been too small to make a general conclusion for patients with spinal cord...... injury. Aims: To investigate the effect of Sativex (cannabinoid agonist given as an oral mucosal spray), on neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. We will include 30 patients with neuropathic pain...

  3. Spinal metastases of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materlik, B.; Steidle-Katic, U.; Feyerabend, T.; Richter, E.; Wauschkuhn, B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Extracranial metastases of malignant gliomas are rare. We report 2 cases with spinal metastases in patients suffering from glioma. Patients and Method: Two patients (33 and 57 years old) developed spinal canal metastases of a glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma Grade III respectively 25 and 9 months after surgical resection and radiotherapy. Both metastases were confirmed pathohistologically. Results: Intraspinal metastases were irradiated with a total dose of 12.6 Gy and 50 Gy. Treatment withdrawal was necessary in one patient due to reduced clinical condition. Regression of neurological symptoms was observed in the second patient. Conclusions: Spinal spread of malignant glioma should be considered during care and follow-up in glioma patients with spinal symptoms. (orig.) [de

  4. Imaging of extradural spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Naumann, N.; Reith, W.; Nabhan, A.

    2006-01-01

    There is a wide variety of spinal extradural tumors. In addition to real neoplasms, degenerative diseases, congenital abnormalities and inflammatory disorders can be causes of extradural masses. Due to the bony boundary of the spinal canal, both benign as well as malignant masses can cause progressive neurological deficits including paraplegia. Most of the spinal tumors are benign (hemangioma of the vertebral body, degenerative diseases). In younger patients congenital abnormalities and primary tumors of the spine have to be considered, whereas in adults the list of differential diagnoses should include secondary malignancies such as metastases and lymphomas as well as metabolic disorders such as osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture and Paget's disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the spine often help to make a specific diagnosis of extradural spinal lesions and represent important tools for tumor staging and preoperative evaluation. (orig.) [de

  5. Constitutive model with time-dependent deformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette

    1998-01-01

    are common in time as well as size. This problem is adressed by means of a new constitutive model for soils. It is able to describe the behavior of soils at different deformation rates. The model defines time-dependent and stress-related deformations separately. They are related to each other and they occur...... was the difference in time scale between the geological process of deposition (millions of years) and the laboratory measurements of mechanical properties (minutes or hours). In addition, the time scale relevant to the production history of the oil field was interesting (days or years)....

  6. Deformation of contour and Hawking temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chikun; Jing Jiliang

    2010-01-01

    It was found that, in an isotropic coordinate system, the tunneling approach brings a factor of 1/2 for the Hawking temperature of a Schwarzschild black hole. In this paper, we address this kind of problem by studying the relation between the Hawking temperature and the deformation of the integral contour for the scalar and Dirac particles tunneling. We find that the correct Hawking temperature can be obtained exactly as long as the integral contour deformed corresponding to the radial coordinate transform if the transformation is a non-regular or zero function at the event horizon.

  7. Investigations on fuel can plastic deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutard, J.L.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    To the extent where the elongation of claddings differs from the mean swelling, the diametral plastic deformation can include, apart from that due to fission gases or the mechanical oxide-cladding interaction, contributions due to swelling prevented along the axis or to growth phenomena. The high thermal activation of the creep of hyper quenched steel unlike cold rolled steel, gives rise to the problem of a contribution to creep in the reactor other than the term SIPA. The impact of mechanisms of diffusion deformation on the boundary decohesion criteria is discussed in conclusion [fr

  8. Spinal cord: motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Kourosh; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord motor neuron diseases affect lower motor neurons in the ventral horn. This article focuses on the most common spinal cord motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which also affects upper motor neurons. Also discussed are other motor neuron diseases that only affect the lower motor neurons. Despite the identification of several genes associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the pathogenesis of this complex disease remains elusive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, H.M.; Schiebusch, M.

    1982-01-01

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  10. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  12. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  13. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  14. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  15. Congenital bovine spinal dysmyelination is caused by a missense mutation in the SPAST gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Nissen, Peter H.; Agerholm, Jørgen S

    2010-01-01

     Bovine spinal dysmyelination (BSD) is a recessive congenital neurodegenerative disease in cattle (Bos taurus) characterized by pathological changes of the myelin sheaths in the spinal cord. The occurrence of BSD is a longstanding problem in the American Brown Swiss (ABS) breed and in several...

  16. Posteriorly directed shear loads and disc degeneration affect the torsional stiffness of spinal motion segments; a biomechanical modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homminga, Jasper Johan; Lehr, A.M.; Meijer, Gerdine; Janssen, M.M.A.; Schlösser, T.P.C.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Castelein, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the effects of posterior shear loads, disc degeneration, and the combination of both on spinal torsion stiffness. Summary of Background Data. Scoliosis is a 3-dimensional deformity of the spine that presents itself mainly in adolescent girls and elderly patients. Our concept of

  17. Change in the profile of traumatic spinal cord injury over 15 years in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárbara-Bataller, Enrique; Méndez-Suárez, José Luis; Alemán-Sánchez, Carolina; Sánchez-Enríquez, Jesús; Sosa-Henríquez, Manuel

    2018-04-05

    Traumatic spinal cord injury remains a serious public health and social problem. Although incidence rates are decreasing in our environment, it is a high cost condition that is associated with great disability. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological and demographic characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury and to analyse its epidemiological changes. This study was an observational study with prospective monitoring of all traumatic spinal cord injury patients in the Canary Islands, Spain (2.1 million inhabitants) between 2001 and 2015. Over the specified period of the study, 282 patients suffered a traumatic spinal cord injury. The crude incidence rate was 9.3 cases per million people/year. The patients' mean age increased from 38 years (2001-2005) to 48 years (2011-2015) (p spinal cord injury were falls in 44%, traffic accidents in 36.5%, diving accidents in 8.9% and others in 10.7%. While traffic accidents decreased, falls increased, particularly in the elderly (p injuries and injuries associated with poor functionality (p spinal cord injury in our environment. This change in the profile of new traumatic spinal cord injuries led us to reformulate the functional objectives planned for these patients upon admission to specialized units, to plan destination-upon-discharge in advance and to promote campaigns to prevent spinal cord injury in older adults.

  18. Isometric deformations of planar quadrilaterals with constant index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaputryaeva, E S

    2014-01-01

    We consider isometric deformations (motions) of polygons (so-called carpenter's rule problem) in the case of self-intersecting polygons with the additional condition that the index of the polygon is preserved by the motion. We provide general information about isometric deformations of planar polygons and give a complete solution of the carpenter's problem for quadrilaterals. Bibliography: 17 titles

  19. Joining by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Ken-ichiro; Bay, Niels; Fratini, Livan

    2013-01-01

    As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating opportuni......As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating...

  20. Abnormality of the spinal column in pediatric patients with lumbosacral spinal lipoma with special reference to CT findings of the lamina defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshifuji, Kazuhisa; Ochi, Satoko; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2009-01-01

    Lumbosacral spinal lipomas are usually associated with occult spinal dysraphism at the lumbosacral spine. During childfood, posterior arch defects in the lumbosacral spine are considered normal computed tomography (CT) findings because of the presence of interlaminar synchondrosis. In this study, we investigated the CT findings of the lumbosacral spine in the pediatric patients with lumbosacral spinal lipomas. We aimed to characterize the radiological features of the abnormal spinal column in case of spinal lipomas. Twenty-one patients (age, 1 month to 3 years) were enrolled in this study: 11 patients had conus lipoma; 10 patients, filum lipoma. All patients showed lamina defects of the lumbosacral spine on 3D-CT. The number of the defective laminae was significantly larger in the patients with conus lipomas than in those with filum lipomas. Although the appearance of lamina defects in the patients with filum lipoma was similar to the reported findings of defective laminae in normal children, these patients were characterized by mild scoliosis and asymmetry of the posterior arches localized in the lower sacrum and coccyx. On the other hand, the patients with conus lipoma were characterized by wider lamina defects that extended rostrally, 'open-door like' deformity of lamina, vertebral dysgenesis, thoracolumber scoliosis and heterotopic ossification. Such CT characterization of the abnormality of the lumbosacral spine in lipoma patients will be useful to differentiate the pathological spina bifida from the normal open posterior arches in childhood. (author)

  1. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  2. Spine Day 2012: spinal pain in Swiss school children- epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Brigitte; Knecht, Christina; Humphreys, Kim

    2013-10-05

    The key to a better understanding of the immense problem of spinal pain seems to be to investigate its development in adolescents. Based on the data of Spine Day 2012 (an annual action day where Swiss school children were examined by chiropractors on a voluntary basis for back problems), the aim of the present study was to gain systematic epidemiologic data on adolescent spinal pain in Switzerland and to explore risk factors per gender and per spinal area. Data (questionnaires and physical examinations) of 836 school children were descriptively analyzed for prevalence, recurrence and severity of spinal pain. Of those, 434 data sets were included in risk factor analysis. Using logistic regression analysis, psycho-social parameters (presence of parental back pain, parental smoking, media consumption, type of school bag) and physical parameters (trunk symmetry, posture, mobility, coordination, BMI) were analyzed per gender and per spinal area. Prevalence of spinal pain was higher for female gender in all areas apart from the neck. With age, a steep increase in prevalence was observed for low back pain (LBP) and for multiple pain sites. The increasing impact of spinal pain on quality of life with age was reflected in an increase in recurrence, but not in severity of spinal pain. Besides age and gender, parental back pain (Odds ratio (OR)=3.26, p=0.011) and trunk asymmetry (OR=3.36, p=0.027) emerged as risk factors for spinal pain in girls. Parental smoking seemed to increase the risk for both genders (boys: OR=2.39, p=0.020; girls: OR=2.19, p=0.051). Risk factor analysis per spinal area resulted in trunk asymmetry as risk factor for LBP (OR=3.15, p=0.015), while parental smoking increased the risk for thoracic spinal pain (TSP) (OR=2.83, p=0.036) and neck pain (OR=2.23, p=0.038). The risk for TSP was further enhanced by a higher BMI (OR=1.15, p=0.027). This study supports the view of adolescent spinal pain as a bio-psycho-social problem that should be investigated per

  3. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmel, Filip; Dumarey, Nicolas; Palestro, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor 99m Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and 67 Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [ 18 F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including radiolabelled

  4. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  5. Discrete Surface Evolution and Mesh Deformation for Aircraft Icing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David; Tong, Xiaoling; Arnoldus, Qiuhan; Collins, Eric; McLaurin, David; Luke, Edward; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2013-01-01

    Robust, automated mesh generation for problems with deforming geometries, such as ice accreting on aerodynamic surfaces, remains a challenging problem. Here we describe a technique to deform a discrete surface as it evolves due to the accretion of ice. The surface evolution algorithm is based on a smoothed, face-offsetting approach. We also describe a fast algebraic technique to propagate the computed surface deformations into the surrounding volume mesh while maintaining geometric mesh quality. Preliminary results presented here demonstrate the ecacy of the approach for a sphere with a prescribed accretion rate, a rime ice accretion, and a more complex glaze ice accretion.

  6. Deformation Characteristics of Composite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus T. AKANO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The composites provide design flexibility because many of them can be moulded into complex shapes. The carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composites exhibit excellent fatigue tolerance and high specific strength and stiffness which have led to numerous advanced applications ranging from the military and civil aircraft structures to the consumer products. However, the modelling of the beams undergoing the arbitrarily large displacements and rotations, but small strains, is a common problem in the application of these engineering composite systems. This paper presents a nonlinear finite element model which is able to estimate the deformations of the fibre-reinforced epoxy composite beams. The governing equations are based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory (EBBT with a von Kármán type of kinematic nonlinearity. The anisotropic elasticity is employed for the material model of the composite material. Moreover, the characterization of the mechanical properties of the composite material is achieved through a tensile test, while a simple laboratory experiment is used to validate the model. The results reveal that the composite fibre orientation, the type of applied load and boundary condition, affect the deformation characteristics of the composite structures. The nonlinearity is an important factor that should be taken into consideration in the analysis of the fibre-reinforced epoxy composites.

  7. Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis for scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with intraspinal anomalies. Postoperative paralytic ileus can commonly complicate scoliosis surgery. Ogilvie′s syndrome as a cause of abdominal distension and pain has not been reported following spinal deformity correction and can mimic post-surgical ileus. 12 year old female patient with double thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with Arnold-Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior spinal fusion from T 4 to L 3 with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation and autogenous iliac crest grafting. She developed abdominal distension and pain postoperatively and this deteriorated despite conservative management. Repeat ultrasounds and abdominal computer tomography scans ruled out mechanical obstruction. The clinical presentation and blood parameters excluded toxic megacolon and cecal volvulus. As the symptoms persisted, a laparotomy was performed on postoperative day 16, which demonstrated ragged tears of the colon and cecum. A right hemi-colectomy followed by ileocecal anastomosis was required. The pathological examination of surgical specimens excluded inflammatory bowel disease and vascular abnormalities. The patient made a good recovery following bowel surgery and at latest followup 3.2 years later she had no abdominal complaints and an excellent scoliosis correction. Ogilvie′s syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative ileus in patients developing prolonged unexplained abdominal distension and pain after scoliosis correction. Early diagnosis and instigation of conservative management can prevent major morbidity and mortality due to bowel ischemia and perforation.

  8. Planar dynamics of large-deformation rods under moving loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X. W.; van der Heijden, G. H. M.

    2018-01-01

    We formulate the problem of a slender structure (a rod) undergoing large deformation under the action of a moving mass or load motivated by inspection robots crawling along bridge cables or high-voltage power lines. The rod is described by means of geometrically exact Cosserat theory which allows for arbitrary planar flexural, extensional and shear deformations. The equations of motion are discretised using the generalised-α method. The formulation is shown to handle the discontinuities of the problem well. Application of the method to a cable and an arch problem reveals interesting nonlinear phenomena. For the cable problem we find that large deformations have a resonance detuning effect on cable dynamics. The problem also offers a compelling illustration of the Timoshenko paradox. For the arch problem we find a stabilising (delay) effect on the in-plane collapse of the arch, with failure suppressed entirely at sufficiently high speed.

  9. ANALYSIS OF DEFORMABILITY OF ANISOTROPIC AGRILLITE CLAYSTONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomaryov Andrey Budimirovicn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the results of deformability study of agrillite claystones are used for determination of the Jointed rock model parameters. The number of stamp, pressuremeter and compressive tests allowed to research anisotropic deformability of argillite claystone in vertical and horizontal direction. The following problems were solved during the study: 1 the in-place and laboratory experiments to calculate the anisotropy coefficient were done for anisotropic agrillite claystones with both natural moisture and total water saturation; 2 the deformation parameters were determined and the numerical simulation of the stress-strain state of claystone in field tests was carried out with the use of Plaxis 2D software application; 3 the comparative analysis was done for calculated claystone deformation and the values obtained during the in-place tests. The authors proved that agrillite claystones shows two times less deformation under loading in the horizontal direction than vertically. The ratio is obtained to determine the parameters for numerical simulation of the Jointed Rock model used as a practical tool for analysis of stress-strain behavior of anisotropic soils. The authors provided a recommended practice for consideration of specific properties of argillite claystones when carrying out foundation works.

  10. Marginally Deformed Starobinsky Gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, A.; Joergensen, J.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We show that quantum-induced marginal deformations of the Starobinsky gravitational action of the form $R^{2(1 -\\alpha)}$, with $R$ the Ricci scalar and $\\alpha$ a positive parameter, smaller than one half, can account for the recent experimental observations by BICEP2 of primordial tensor modes....

  11. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs

  12. Advanced Curvature Deformable Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Hawaii ,Institute for Astronomy,640 North A‘ohoku Place, #209 , Hilo ,HI,96720-2700 8. PERFORMING...Advanced Curvature Deformable Mirrors Christ Ftaclas1,2, Aglae Kellerer2 and Mark Chun2 Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii

  13. Estudo de acurácia em cirurgia assistida por navegação na revisão cirúrgica de deformidade vertebral Estudio de la precisión en cirugía asistida por navegación en la reoperación de deformidad espinal Study of the accuracy of navigation-assisted surgery in the surgical revision of spinal deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chárbel Jacob Junior

    2011-01-01

    segunda cirugía. En los 5 pacientes sometidos al reabordaje quirúrgico se procedió a instrumentación posterior con auxilio de la navegación. Fueron 84 tornillos pediculares implantados, siendo que 33 de éstos fueron asistidos por computación. La navegación fue empleada en los niveles de la deformidad vertebral en donde la anatomía se presentaba alterada impidiendo el uso correcto de los parámetros anatómicos para inserción de tornillos pediculares. En los demás niveles en donde era posible la correcta identificación de esos parámetros anatómicos se utilizó la técnica estándar. La TC postoperatoria fue realizada para medición del posicionamiento de los tornillos pediculares. Evaluamos los resultados obtenidos en el posicionamiento con y sin el uso de la navegación. El tiempo de fluoroscopía y el tiempo de la cirugía también fueron comparados con la regla áurea de la literatura. RESULTADOS: De los 33 tornillos implantados con navegación se observó una precisión de 94%, con una tasa de violación pedicular del 6%. CONCLUSIONES: El uso de la navegación es importante en la reoperación de las deformidades vertebrales con anatomía alterada, influenciando en el buen resultado de la cirugía.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefits of computer-assisted spine surgery in re-operations due to vertebral deformities, and verify method accuracy. METHOD: A total of five patients with vertebral deformities who had complications during prior surgery were re-operated. These patients underwent a specific Computer Tomography scan with 2mm cuts of the spine before the second surgery. In the five patients who underwent re-operation, posterior instrumentation with the aid of computer-assisted spine surgery was performed. 84 pedicle screws were implanted, and in 33 of these computer-assisted surgeries were used. The computer-assisted surgery was used at the levels of spinal deformity where anatomy was altered making correct use of anatomical parameters for insertion of

  14. Precise object tracking under deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.H

    2010-01-01

    The precise object tracking is an essential issue in several serious applications such as; robot vision, automated surveillance (civil and military), inspection, biomedical image analysis, video coding, motion segmentation, human-machine interface, visualization, medical imaging, traffic systems, satellite imaging etc. This frame-work focuses on the precise object tracking under deformation such as scaling , rotation, noise, blurring and change of illumination. This research is a trail to solve these serious problems in visual object tracking by which the quality of the overall system will be improved. Developing a three dimensional (3D) geometrical model to determine the current pose of an object and predict its future location based on FIR model learned by the OLS. This framework presents a robust ranging technique to track a visual target instead of the traditional expensive ranging sensors. The presented research work is applied to real video stream and achieved high precession results.

  15. 6. International FIG-symposium on deformation measurements. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelzer, H; Heer, R [eds.

    1997-12-31

    Due to the diversified fields of specialization of the authors, the papers span a very wide spectrum of theories, applications and case studies, concerning various problems of deformation studies in structural, geotechnical and mining engineering, in rock mechanics and earth crustal movements, covering such topics as: Design and analysis of deformations surveys; Integration of terrestrial, and space measurement techniques; New instrumental developements for automatic, continuous and telemetric data-acquisition with respect to geotechnical and geodetic applications; Monitoring and prediction of ground subsidence in mining areas, land slides and tectonic movements; Modeling and computation of deformations by Kalman-filtering techniques, finite element analysis and a special view to continuum mechanics; Application of expert systems and artificial intelligence; Description and analysis of dynamical deformation problems; special views in rock- and groundmechanics; Demonstration of mechanical engineering problems with respect to the supervision of industrial production and quality control. (orig.)

  16. 6. International FIG-symposium on deformation measurements. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelzer, H.; Heer, R. [eds.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the diversified fields of specialization of the authors, the papers span a very wide spectrum of theories, applications and case studies, concerning various problems of deformation studies in structural, geotechnical and mining engineering, in rock mechanics and earth crustal movements, covering such topics as: Design and analysis of deformations surveys; Integration of terrestrial, and space measurement techniques; New instrumental developements for automatic, continuous and telemetric data-acquisition with respect to geotechnical and geodetic applications; Monitoring and prediction of ground subsidence in mining areas, land slides and tectonic movements; Modeling and computation of deformations by Kalman-filtering techniques, finite element analysis and a special view to continuum mechanics; Application of expert systems and artificial intelligence; Description and analysis of dynamical deformation problems; special views in rock- and groundmechanics; Demonstration of mechanical engineering problems with respect to the supervision of industrial production and quality control. (orig.)

  17. Precise Object Tracking under Deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    The precise object tracking is an essential issue in several serious applications such as; robot vision, automated surveillance (civil and military), inspection, biomedical image analysis, video coding, motion segmentation, human-machine interface, visualization, medical imaging, traffic systems, satellite imaging etc. This framework focuses on the precise object tracking under deformation such as scaling, rotation, noise, blurring and change of illumination. This research is a trail to solve these serious problems in visual object tracking by which the quality of the overall system will be improved. Developing a three dimensional (3D) geometrical model to determine the current pose of an object and predict its future location based on FIR model learned by the OLS. This framework presents a robust ranging technique to track a visual target instead of the traditional expensive ranging sensors. The presented research work is applied to real video stream and achieved high precession results. xiiiThe precise object tracking is an essential issue in several serious applications such as; robot vision, automated surveillance (civil and military), inspection, biomedical image analysis, video coding, motion segmentation, human-machine interface, visualization, medical imaging, traffic systems, satellite imaging etc. This framework focuses on the precise object tracking under deformation such as scaling, rotation, noise, blurring and change of illumination. This research is a trail to solve these serious problems in visual object tracking by which the quality of the overall system will be improved. Developing a three dimensional (3D) geometrical model to determine the current pose of an object and predict its future location based on FIR model learned by the OLS. This framework presents a robust ranging technique to track a visual target instead of the traditional expensive ranging sensors. The presented research work is applied to real video stream and achieved high

  18. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  19. Order and chaos in nuclear and metal cluster deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, S.

    1995-08-01

    The vast amount of nuclear and metal cluster data indicates that shell structure and deformation are two simultaneous properties. A conflicting situation is therefore encountered as the shell structure, a firm expression of order, is apparently not compatible with the non-integrable nature of the models incorporating deformation. The main issue covered in this thesis is the intricate connection between deformation and chaotic behaviour in deformation models pertinent to nuclear structure and metal cluster physics. It is shown that, at least in some cases, it is possible to reconcile the occurrence of shell structure with non-integrability. The coupling of an axially deformed harmonic oscillator to an axially symmetric octupole term renders the problem non-integrable. The chaotic character of the motion is strongly dependent on the type of deformation, in that a prolate shape shows virtually no chaos, while in an oblate case the motion exhibits fully developed chaos when the octupole term is switched on. Whereas the problem is non-integrable, the quantum mechanical spectrum nevertheless shows some shell structure in the prolate case for particular, yet fairly large octupole strengths; for spherical or oblate deformation the shell structure disappears. This result is explained in terms of classical periodic orbits which are found by employing the 'removal of resonances method'. Particular emphasis is put on the effect of the hexadecapole deformation which is important in fission processes. The combined effect of octupole and hexadecapole deformation leads to important conclusions for the experimental work as a high degree of ambiguity is signaled for the interpretation of data. The ambiguity results from the discovery of a mutual cancellation of the octupole and hexadecapole deformation in prolate superdeformed systems. The phenomenological Nilsson model is treated in a similar way. It is argued that while in nuclei it produces good results for the low-lying levels

  20. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  1. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  2. Stress analysis and deformation prediction of sheet metal workpieces based on finite element simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Penghao; Wang Aimin; Wang Xiaolong; Zhang Yanlin

    2017-01-01

    After aluminum alloy sheet metal parts machining, the residual stress release will cause a large deformation. To solve this problem, this paper takes a aluminum alloy sheet aerospace workpiece as an example, establishes the theoretical model of elastic deformation and the finite element model, and places quantitative initial stress in each element of machining area, analyses stress release simulation and deformation. Through different initial stress release simulative analysis of deformation ...

  3. q-Deformed nonlinear maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 64; Issue 3 ... Keywords. Nonlinear dynamics; logistic map; -deformation; Tsallis statistics. ... As a specific example, a -deformation procedure is applied to the logistic map. Compared ...

  4. Physical activity is prospectively associated with spinal pain in children (CHAMPS Study-DK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Claudia; Møller, Niels Christian; Korsholm, Lars; Jespersen, Eva; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2017-09-14

    Spinal pain and physical inactivity are critical public health issues. We investigated the prospective associations of physical activity intensity with spinal pain in children. Physical activity was quantified with accelerometry in a cohort of primary school students. Over 19 months, parents of primary school students reported children's spinal pain status each week via text-messaging (self-reported spinal pain). Spinal pain reports were followed-up by trained clinicians who diagnosed each child's complaint and classified the pain as non-traumatic or traumatic. Associations were examined with logistic regression modeling using robust standard errors and reported with odds ratios (OR). Children (n = 1205, 53.0% female) with mean ± SD age of 9.4 ± 1.4 years, participated in 75,180 weeks of the study. Nearly one-third (31%) of children reported spinal pain, and 14% were diagnosed with a spinal problem. Moderate intensity physical activity was protectively associated with self-reported [OR(95%CI) = 0.84(0.74, 0.95)], diagnosed [OR(95%CI) = 0.79(0.67, 0.94)] and traumatic [OR(95%CI) = 0.77(0.61, 0.96)] spinal pain. Vigorous intensity physical activity was associated with increased self-reported [OR(95%CI) = 1.13(1.00, 1.27)], diagnosed [OR(95%CI) = 1.25(1.07, 1.45)] and traumatic [OR(95%CI) = 1.28(1.05, 1.57)] spinal pain. The inclusion of age and sex covariates weakened these associations. Physical activity intensity may be a key consideration in the relationship between physical activity behavior and spinal pain in children.

  5. Spinal infection: Evaluation with MR imaging and intraoperative spinal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan Post, M.J.; Montalvo, B.M.; Quencer, R.M.; Katz, B.H.; Green, B.A.; Elsmont, F.

    1987-01-01

    MR spine images and/or intraoperative US scans in 15 patients were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with clinical and pathologic data to determine the diagnostic value of these modalities in spinal infection. In osteomyelitis and retrospinal abscess MR imaging was definitive; in myelitis it was positive but nonspecific. In epidural abscess concomitant with meningitis, myelography with CT and intraoperative US were superior to MR imaging. Intraoperative US could be used to distinguish these processes and to monitor surgical decompression. The authors recommend that MR imaging be performed at the screening examination in cases of spinal infection, accompanied by intraoperative US in all surgical cases

  6. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Background: Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can’t tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be b...

  7. Muscle Activity Adaptations to Spinal Tissue Creep in the Presence of Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougarou, François

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to identify adaptations in muscle activity distribution to spinal tissue creep in presence of muscle fatigue. Methods Twenty-three healthy participants performed a fatigue task before and after 30 minutes of passive spinal tissue deformation in flexion. Right and left erector spinae activity was recorded using large-arrays surface electromyography (EMG). To characterize muscle activity distribution, dispersion was used. During the fatigue task, EMG amplitude root mean square (RMS), median frequency and dispersion in x- and y-axis were compared before and after spinal creep. Results Important fatigue-related changes in EMG median frequency were observed during muscle fatigue. Median frequency values showed a significant main creep effect, with lower median frequency values on the left side under the creep condition (p≤0.0001). A significant main creep effect on RMS values was also observed as RMS values were higher after creep deformation on the right side (p = 0.014); a similar tendency, although not significant, was observed on the left side (p = 0.06). A significant creep effects for x-axis dispersion values was observed, with higher dispersion values following the deformation protocol on the left side (p≤0.001). Regarding y-axis dispersion values, a significant creep x fatigue interaction effect was observed on the left side (p = 0.016); a similar tendency, although not significant, was observed on the right side (p = 0.08). Conclusion Combined muscle fatigue and creep deformation of spinal tissues led to changes in muscle activity amplitude, frequency domain and distribution. PMID:26866911

  8. Navigation and Robotics in Spinal Surgery: Where Are We Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overley, Samuel C; Cho, Samuel K; Mehta, Ankit I; Arnold, Paul M

    2017-03-01

    Spine surgery has experienced much technological innovation over the past several decades. The field has seen advancements in operative techniques, implants and biologics, and equipment such as computer-assisted navigation and surgical robotics. With the arrival of real-time image guidance and navigation capabilities along with the computing ability to process and reconstruct these data into an interactive three-dimensional spinal "map", so too have the applications of surgical robotic technology. While spinal robotics and navigation represent promising potential for improving modern spinal surgery, it remains paramount to demonstrate its superiority as compared to traditional techniques prior to assimilation of its use amongst surgeons.The applications for intraoperative navigation and image-guided robotics have expanded to surgical resection of spinal column and intradural tumors, revision procedures on arthrodesed spines, and deformity cases with distorted anatomy. Additionally, these platforms may mitigate much of the harmful radiation exposure in minimally invasive surgery to which the patient, surgeon, and ancillary operating room staff are subjected.Spine surgery relies upon meticulous fine motor skills to manipulate neural elements and a steady hand while doing so, often exploiting small working corridors utilizing exposures that minimize collateral damage. Additionally, the procedures may be long and arduous, predisposing the surgeon to both mental and physical fatigue. In light of these characteristics, spine surgery may actually be an ideal candidate for the integration of navigation and robotic-assisted procedures.With this paper, we aim to critically evaluate the current literature and explore the options available for intraoperative navigation and robotic-assisted spine surgery. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  9. Unusual causes of spinal foraminal widening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibis, A.H.; Markonis, A.; Karantanas, A.H. [Dept. of CT and MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece)

    2000-01-01

    Spinal neural foraminal widening is usually caused by benign lesions, most commonly neurofibromas. Rare lesions can also cause spinal neural foraminal widening. Computed tomography and/or MRI are the modalities of choice for studying the spinal foraminal widening. The present pictorial review describes six rare lesions, namely a lateral thoracic meningocele, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, a tuberculous abscess, an osteoblastoma, a chondrosarcoma and a malignant tumour of the lung which caused spinal neural foraminal widening. (orig.)

  10. q-Deformed Kink solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.F. de

    2003-01-01

    The q-deformed kink of the λφ 4 -model is obtained via the normalisable ground state eigenfunction of a fluctuation operator associated with the q-deformed hyperbolic functions. The kink mass, the bosonic zero-mode and the q-deformed potential in 1+1 dimensions are found. (author)

  11. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nasal complaints. Nasal deformity can be categorized as “cosmetic” or “functional.” Cosmetic deformity of the nose results in a less ... taste , nose bleeds and/or recurrent sinusitis . A cosmetic or functional nasal deformity may occur secondary to ...

  12. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  13. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  14. Functional outcome after a spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Richard Bernardus

    2008-01-01

    This thesis takes a closer look at the functional outcome after a spinal fracture. An introduction to different aspects regarding spinal fractures is presented in Chapter 1. The incidence of traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fractures without neurological deficit in the Netherlands is approximately 1.2

  15. ATYPICAL GOUT: SPINAL TOPHACEOUS INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Sergeevich Eliseev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal injury in gout occurs rarely at a young age. In the past 5 years, the Pubmed has published only 44 papers on this site of tophi mainly in gouty patients over 40 years of age. We report two such cases in patients with chronic tophaceous gout in a 28-year-old man with a 3-year history of gout and in a 30-year-old man with its 7-year history. In both cases, spinal injury with tophus masses gave rise to neurological symptomatology. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of informative value in identifying the causes of pain. In one case, the patient underwent laminectomy; histological evidence confirmed the gouty genesis of spinal injury.

  16. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  17. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  18. Deformed supersymmetric mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.; Sidorov, S.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by a recent interest in curved rigid supersymmetries, we construct a new type of N = 4, d = 1 supersymmetric systems by employing superfields defined on the cosets of the supergroup SU(2|1). The relevant worldline supersymmetry is a deformation of the standard N = 4, d = 1 supersymmetry by a mass parameter m. As instructive examples we consider at the classical and quantum levels the models associated with the supermultiplets (1,4,3) and (2,4,2) and find out interesting interrelations with some previous works on nonstandard d = 1 supersymmetry. In particular, the d = 1 systems with 'weak supersymmetry' are naturally reproduced within our SU(2|1) superfield approach as a subclass of the (1,4,3) models. A generalization to the N = 8, d = 1 case implies the supergroup SU(2|2) as a candidate deformed worldline supersymmetry

  19. Deformation Theory ( Lecture Notes )

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doubek, M.; Markl, Martin; Zima, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2007), s. 333-371 ISSN 0044-8753. [Winter School Geometry and Physics/27./. Srní, 13.01.2007-20.01.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/05/2117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : deformation * Mauerer-Cartan equation * strongly homotopy Lie algebra Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  20. Deformations of fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1977-09-01

    Results of the DBM and FEM analysis in this study indicate that a suitable rock mass for repository of radioactive waste should be moderately jointed (about 1 joint/m 2 ) and surrounded by shear zones of the first order. This allowes for a gentle and flexible deformation under tectonic stresses and prevent the development of large cross-cutting failures in the repository area. (author)

  1. The conservation laws for deformed classical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimek, M.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of deriving the conservation laws for deformed linear equations of motion is investigated. The conserved currents are obtained in explicit form and used in the construction of constants of motion. The equations for the set of non-interacting oscillators with arbitrary scale-time as well as the κ-Klein-Gordon equation are considered as an example of application of the method. (author) 9 refs

  2. Diagnostic imaging of spinal stenosis and intervertebral disc disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, J.W.; Yochum, T.R.; Rowe, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Back and neck pain are among the most common of human ailments. Low back pain, with or without leg pain, will affect most people at least once in their lifetime. Neck and shoulder pain, headache of cervical origin, and other neck-related problems are not far behind low back pain as to their incidence. Despite the widespread incidence of these complaints and the considerable associated disabilities, they remain enigmas both as to cause and treatment. A discussion of the complex etiological factors involved and the many mechanisms which interact in the production of spinal-related pain far exceeds the scope of this presentation. One area integrally related to such problems, the several causes of spinal stenosis, is the focus of this chapter

  3. Breakdowns in the deformation monitoring and their control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Weiss

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The deformation analysis from the point of view of its subject and methodology is an extensive part of geodetic and other methods for watching objects´ stabilities and for the determination of their changes using suitable quantities from deformation measurements performed in more epochs. In the monitoring of the object deformations, their characteristic points – object points (OB are measured and their stabilities or movements are registered relating to a convenient number of robust reference points (RB in the surroundings. It often happens in the monitoring that some RBs are lost (damage, destruction, etc., resulting in datum changes of the deformation net and making a reliable stability evaluation of the OBs impossible.In this contribution to the problems of right datum determination for the whole net, three methods are introduced to reduce various datums to one of them for the whole deformation net, when the original (1st datum can not be used in all epochs.

  4. Potential risks of using cement-augmented screws for spinal fusion in patients with low bone quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, M; López-Herradón, A; Piñera, A R; Tomé-Bermejo, F; Duart, J M; Vlad, M D; Rodríguez-Arguisjuela, M G; Alvarez-Galovich, L

    2017-08-01

    Dramatic increases in the average life expectancy have led to increases in the variety of degenerative changes and deformities observed in the aging spine. The elderly population can present challenges for spine surgeons, not only because of increased comorbidities, but also because of the quality of their bones. Pedicle screws are the implants used most commonly in spinal surgery for fixation, but their efficacy depends directly on bone quality. Although polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-augmented screws represent an alternative for patients with osteoporotic vertebrae, their use has raised some concerns because of the possible association between cement leakages (CLs) and other morbidities. To analyze potential complications related to the use of cement-augmented screws for spinal fusion and to investigate the effectiveness of using these screws in the treatment of patients with low bone quality. A retrospective single-center study. This study included 313 consecutive patients who underwent spinal fusion using a total of 1,780 cement-augmented screws. We analyzed potential complications related to the use of cement-augmented screws, including CL, vascular injury, infection, screw extraction problems, revision surgery, and instrument failure. There are no financial conflicts of interest to report. A total of 1,043 vertebrae were instrumented. Cement leakage was observed in 650 vertebrae (62.3%). There were no major clinical complications related to CL, but two patients (0.6%) had radicular pain related to CL at the S1 foramina. Of the 13 patients (4.1%) who developed deep infections requiring surgical debridement, two with chronic infections had possible spondylitis that required instrument removal. All patients responded well to antibiotic therapy. Revision surgery was performed in 56 patients (17.9%), most of whom had long construction. A total of 180 screws were removed as a result of revision. There were no problems with screw extraction. These results

  5. Lower Risk of Stroke after Deformity Surgery: Long Term Benefit Demonstrated by a National Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Chung Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the long-term risk of stroke in adult patients with spinal deformity. Specifically, the study addressed the possible protective effect of surgery for spinal deformity against stroke. Methods: Using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD, a monopolistic national database in Taiwan, this retrospective cohort study analyzed the incidence of stroke in patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD in a 11-year period. A total of 13,503 patients, between 55 and 75 years old, were identified for the diagnosis of ASD. The patients were grouped into two: the surgical group (n = 10,439 who received spinal fusion surgery, and the control group (n = 2124 who received other medical treatment. The incidence rates of all subsequent cerebrovascular accidents, including ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, were calculated. Hazard ratios for stroke were calculated use a full cohort and a propensity score matched cohort. Adjustments for co-morbidities that may predispose to stroke, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia and coronary heart disease were conducted. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the risk of stroke between the two groups. Results: During the total observation period of 50,450 person-years, the incidence rate of stroke in the surgical group (15.55 per 1000 person-years was significantly lower than that of the control group (20.89 per 1000 person-years, p < 0.001. Stroke was more likely to occur in the control group than in the surgical group (crude hazard ratio 1.34, p < 0.001; adjusted HR 1.28, p < 0.001, by a propensity score matched model. Conclusions: In this national cohort of more than 13,000 ASD patients covering 10 years, stroke was approximately 25% less likely to happen in patients who underwent spinal fusion surgery than those who received medical management. Therefore, spinal fusion surgery may provide a protective effect against stroke

  6. MRI of the injured spinal cord of the thoracic and lumber spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kenji; Satoh, Tetsurou; Hyodo, Hironori; Ohira, Nobuhiro; Moriai, Norio

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance studies using a 1.5 Tesla superconductive magnet were performed on 23 patients with spinal cord injury of the thoracic and lumbar regions in their chronic stages. Our results were as follows. The MR images were found to well represent the spinal cord lesions except several cases of complex displacement of the spinal cord. The size and the degree of penetration of the MRI abnormalities well correlated with the spinal cord injury; those cases of large and penetrating MRI abnormalities were represented by complete paraplegia and those of small and non-penetrating abnormalities were those of imcomplete paraplegia. However, the neurological levels of the spinal cord injury in cases of complete paraplegia appeared higher than the spinal segments indicated by the MRI. This discrepancy was thought to be explained by a concomitant, additional nerve roots involvement along with the spinal cord injury. Incidentally, the MRI of the cone lesions did not seem to be reproducible presumably as the result of its too small sensitive volume. We also discussed the problem of MRI artifacts and effects from gross anatomical displacement of traumatic origin. (author)

  7. Spinal pain in Danish school children - how often and how long? The CHAMPS Study-DK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissing, Kristina Boe; Hestbæk, Lise; Hartvigsen, Jan; Williams, Christopher; Kamper, Steven; Boyle, Eleanor; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2017-03-27

    Spinal pain in children and adolescents is a common condition, usually transitory, but the picture of spinal pain still needs elucidation, mainly due to variation in measurement methods. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of spinal pain in 8-15 year-old Danish school children, over a 3-year period. Specifically determining the characteristics of spinal pain in terms of frequency and duration. The study was a 3-year prospective longitudinal cohort study including 1400 school children. The outcomes were based on weekly text messages (SMS) to the parents inquiring about the child's musculoskeletal pain, and on clinical data from examinations of the children. The 3-year prevalence was 55%. The prevalence was 29%, 33% and 31% for each of the three study years respectively, and increased statistically significantly with age, especially for lumbopelvic pain. Most children had few and short-lasting episodes with spinal pain, but more than one out of five children had three or more episodes during a study year and 17% of all episodes lasted for more than 4 weeks. This study demonstrates that spinal pain is a substantial problem. Most episodes are brief, but there are a vast number of children with frequent and long-lasting episodes of spinal pain indicating a need for action regarding evidence-based prevention and management.

  8. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...... of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male...... factor infertility...

  9. CT diagnosis of acute spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhama, Mitsuru; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Kimura, Ko; Yamazaki, Gyoji; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shioya, Akihide

    1982-01-01

    CT pictures of 22 acute spinal injuries with damage of the spinal cord were evaluated. In the cases of spinal cord damage with bone injury, changes in the vertebral canal were fully observed by CT. In some of spinal cord damages without bone injury, narrowing of the vertebral canal was demonstrated by CT combined with CT myelography and reconstruction. Evaluation of CT number showed a high density area in damaged spinal cord in some cases. CT was thus considered to be useful as an adjunct diagnostic aid. (Ueda, J.)

  10. STANDARDIZED TERMINOLOGY OF ADULT SPINE DEFORMITY FOR BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael de Rezende Pratali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To develop a consensus for translation of the most relevant terms used in the study of Adult Spinal Deformity, from their original languages into Brazilian Portuguese. Methods : A panel of 12 experts in spine surgery from the five Brazilian regions was constituted. To obtain the standardization of terminology, the Delphi method with an electronic questionnaire was administered to participants about their opinion on the translation of 13 relevant terms chosen by literature review. Each term was considered standard when there was consensus, that is, concordance higher than 80% among participants as to the suggestion to be adopted, and then on the acceptance of the term and its abbreviation in Portuguese. Results : Initially there was consensus (over 80% concordance on the translation of seven terms in the electronic questionnaire. The other six terms that have not reached consensus were discussed at a meeting among the participants, relying on the opinion of a specialized professional in simultaneous translation of orthopedic terms in Portuguese and other professional majored in Portuguese language. It was decided how these terms should be translated and there was a consensus among all participants regarding their acceptance. Finally, there was consensus among the participants, who agreed with the translation and abbreviation of the 13 propose terms, defining its standardization for Brazilian Portuguese. Conclusion : We present a standard terminology used in the study of Adult Spinal Deformity through consensus among experts, seeking uniformity in the use of these terms in Brazilian Portuguese.

  11. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis

  12. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Application of ADM Using Laplace Transform to Approximate Solutions of Nonlinear Deformation for Cantilever Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchata Theinchai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate semianalytical solutions of Euler-Bernoulli beam equation by using Laplace transform and Adomian decomposition method (LADM. The deformation of a uniform flexible cantilever beam is formulated to initial value problems. We separate the problems into 2 cases: integer order for small deformation and fractional order for large deformation. The numerical results show the approximated solutions of deflection curve, moment diagram, and shear diagram of the presented method.

  14. Application of ADM Using Laplace Transform to Approximate Solutions of Nonlinear Deformation for Cantilever Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Theinchai, Ratchata; Chankan, Siriwan; Yukunthorn, Weera

    2016-01-01

    We investigate semianalytical solutions of Euler-Bernoulli beam equation by using Laplace transform and Adomian decomposition method (LADM). The deformation of a uniform flexible cantilever beam is formulated to initial value problems. We separate the problems into 2 cases: integer order for small deformation and fractional order for large deformation. The numerical results show the approximated solutions of deflection curve, moment diagram, and shear diagram of the presented method.

  15. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Imhof, H.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  16. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  17. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  18. Women's Sex Life After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramkova, Tatana; Skrivanova, Katerina; Dolan, Igor; Zamecnik, Libor; Sramkova, Katerina; Kriz, Jiri; Muzik, Vladimir; Fajtova, Radmila

    2017-12-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), individuals are typically considered by the general public to be asexual. Handicapped women have more problems with socio-sexual adaptation, stemming from low self-confidence, low self-esteem, and the absence of spontaneity. To determine changes in the sexual lives of women after SCI. A self-constructed questionnaire was used to map sexual function after SCI. We retrospectively compared sexual function in 30 women with SCI with that in 30 without SCI who led an active sexual life. Descriptive and inductive statistics were applied using the Student paired and non-paired t-tests and the Levene test. The main variables were presence vs absence of sexual dysfunction in a group of women after SCI and a comparison of the incidence of sexual dysfunctions in women after SCI with that of a control group. A significant difference was ascertained in women with SCI in sexual desire (P negative impact of incontinence on the sexual life of women with SCI proved significant (P Negative factors for sexual activity in women with SCI were lower sensitivity in 16 (53%), spasms and mobility problems in 12 (40%), lower desire in 11 (36%), pain in 4 (13%), and a less accommodating partner in 3 (10%). Intercourse was the preferred sexual activity in women with SCI. Compared with the period before injury, there was significant lowering of sexual desire, impaired lubrication, and orgasmic ability after SCI. A comparison of the two groups showed a difference in erotogenous zones and in reaching orgasm. Sramkova T, Skrivanova K, Dolan I, et al. Women's Sex Life After Spinal Cord Injury. Sex Med 2017;5:e255-e259. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Operating limits for subassembly deformation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The deformation of a subassembly in response to the core environment is frequently the life limiting factor for that component in an LMFBR. Deformation can occur as diametral and axial growth or bowing of the subassembly. Such deformation has caused several handling problems in both the core and the storage basket of EBR-II and may also have contributed to reactivity anomalies during reactor operation. These problems generally affect plant availability but the reactivity anomalies could lead to a potential safety hazard. Because of these effects the deformation mechanisms must be understood and modeled. Diametral and axial growth of subassembly ducts in EBR-II is due to swelling and creep and is a function of temperature, neutron fluence and stress. The source of stress in a duct is the hydraulic pressure difference across the wall. By coupling the calculated subassembly growth rate to the available clearance in the core or storage basket a limiting neutron fluence, or exposure, can be established

  20. Numerical study of suspensions of deformable particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Luca; Rosti, Marco Edoardo

    2017-11-01

    We consider a model non-Newtonian fluid consisting of a suspension of deformable particles in a Newtonian solvent. Einstein showed in his pioneering work that the relative increase in effective viscosity is a linear function of the particle volume fraction for dilute suspensions of rigid particles. Inertia has been shown to introduce deviations from the behaviour predicted by the different empirical fits, an effect that can be related to an increase of the effective volume fraction. We here focus on the effect of elasticity, i.e. visco-elastic deformable particles. To tackle the problem at hand, we perform three-dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation of a plane Couette flow with a suspension of neutrally buoyant deformable viscous hyper-elastic particles. We show that elasticity produces a shear-thinning effect in elastic suspensions (in comparison to rigid ones) and that it can be understood in terms of a reduction of the effective volume fraction of the suspension. The deformation modifies the particle motion reducing the level of mutual interaction. Normal stress differences will also be considered. European Research Council, Grant No. ERC-2013-CoG- 616186, TRITOS; SNIC (the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing).

  1. Improved image registration by sparse patch-based deformation estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjeong; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Qian; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-15

    Despite intensive efforts for decades, deformable image registration is still a challenging problem due to the potential large anatomical differences across individual images, which limits the registration performance. Fortunately, this issue could be alleviated if a good initial deformation can be provided for the two images under registration, which are often termed as the moving subject and the fixed template, respectively. In this work, we present a novel patch-based initial deformation prediction framework for improving the performance of existing registration algorithms. Our main idea is to estimate the initial deformation between subject and template in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. We argue that two image patches should follow the same deformation toward the template image if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. To this end, our framework consists of two stages, i.e., the training stage and the application stage. In the training stage, we register all training images to the pre-selected template, such that the deformation of each training image with respect to the template is known. In the application stage, we apply the following four steps to efficiently calculate the initial deformation field for the new test subject: (1) We pick a small number of key points in the distinctive regions of the test subject; (2) for each key point, we extract a local patch and form a coupled appearance-deformation dictionary from training images where each dictionary atom consists of the image intensity patch as well as their respective local deformations; (3) a small set of training image patches in the coupled dictionary are selected to represent the image patch of each subject key point by sparse representation. Then, we can predict the initial deformation for each subject key point by propagating the pre-estimated deformations on the selected training patches with the same sparse representation coefficients; and (4) we

  2. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord is situated within the vertebral canal extending from the lower end of the medulla oblongata at the upper border of first cervical vertebra. In early foetal life, it extends throughout the length of the vertebral canal, and at the time of birth, it reaches the level of third lumbar vertebra. In adult, it ends at the lower border of first lumbar vertebra and thereafter continued as filum terminale, which gets attached to tip of coccyx. Spinal cord is covered by three protective membranes called spinal meninges, diameter, arachnoid and pia mater. The diameter and arachnoid mater extent up to second sacral vertebra and the pia mater forms filum terminale and extend at the tip of coccyx. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty spinal cord cadaveric specimen were studied by dissection method after exposing the vertebral canal. The roots of spinal nerve were sectioned on both sides and the cord is released along with its coverings. The dura and arachnoid mater were incised longitudinally and the subarachnoid space, blood vessels, nerve roots, ligament denticulata, cervical and lumbar enlargements were observed. The blood vessels including radicular arteries were also studied photographed. RESULTS The spinal cord is a highly vascular structure situated within the vertebral canal, covered by diameter, arachnoid mater and pia mater. Spinal dura is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly. The pia mater forms linea splendens, which extend along the whole length of the cord in front of the anterior median fissure. The average length of the cord is 38 cm. The length and breadth of cervical enlargement was more compared to lumbar enlargement. The number of rootlets in both dorsal and ventral roots accounts more in cervical compared to other regions of the cord. The ligament denticulata is a thin transparent bands of pia mater attached on either sides of the cord between the dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The tooth like extensions are well

  3. Analysis on Wetting Deformation Properties of Silty Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinrong Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in water level that cause deformation and stability problems often occur in foundation pit engineering. Water damage is one of the main problems that will lead to disasters in foundation pit engineering. Research findings with regard to properties of wetting deformation due to water damage can be applied not only in foundation pit engineering, slope engineering, hydraulic engineering, and mining engineering but also in related issues in the field of theoretical research and practice. In this study, the characteristics of silty clay deformation after wetting are examined from the perspective of the effect of wetting on the side wall of foundation pit, and wetting experiments on silty clay of a selected area’s stratum located in Chongqing Municipality are conducted under different confining pressures and stress levels through a multi-function triaxial apparatus. Then, laws of silty clay wetting deformation are obtained, and the relationship between wetting stress level and wetting deformation amount is also figured out. The study reveals that the maximum values of wetting deformation under different confining pressures have appear at a particular stress level; therefore, the related measures should be taken to avoid this deformation in the process of construction.

  4. Deformed exterior algebra, quons and their coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Baz, M.; Hassouni, Y.

    2002-08-01

    We review the notion of the deformation of the exterior wedge product. This allows us to construct the deformation of the algebra of exterior forms over a vector space and also over an arbitrary manifold. We relate this approach to the generalized statistics and we study quons, as a particular case of these generalized statistics. We also give their statistical properties. A large part of the work is devoted to the problem of constructing coherent states for the deformed oscillators. We give a review of all the approaches existing in the literature concerning this point and enforce it with many examples. (author)

  5. Study beryllium microplastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papirov, I.I.; Ivantsov, V.I.; Nikolaenko, A.A.; Shokurov, V.S.; Tuzov, Yu.V.

    2015-01-01

    Microplastic flow characteristics systematically studied for different varieties beryllium. In isostatically pressed beryllium it decreased with increasing particle size of the powder, increasing temperature and increasing the pressing metal purity. High initial values of the limit microelasticity and microflow in some cases are due a high level of internal stresses of thermal origin and over time it can relax slowly. During long-term storage of beryllium materials with high initial resistance values microplastic deformation microflow limit and microflow stress markedly reduced, due mainly to the relaxation of thermal microstrain

  6. Stress analysis and deformation prediction of sheet metal workpieces based on finite element simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Penghao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After aluminum alloy sheet metal parts machining, the residual stress release will cause a large deformation. To solve this problem, this paper takes a aluminum alloy sheet aerospace workpiece as an example, establishes the theoretical model of elastic deformation and the finite element model, and places quantitative initial stress in each element of machining area, analyses stress release simulation and deformation. Through different initial stress release simulative analysis of deformation of the workpiece, a linear relationship between initial stress and deformation is found; Through simulative analysis of coupling direction-stress release, the superposing relationship between the deformation caused by coupling direction-stress and the deformation caused by single direction stress is found. The research results provide important theoretical support for the stress threshold setting and deformation controlling of the workpieces in the production practice.

  7. On the octupole deformation in Ra-Th region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, P.; Boening, K.; Sobiczewski, A.

    1986-03-01

    The problem of the existence of a stable octupole deformation in Ra-Th region has been reinvestigated using a Nilsson single-particle potential with a newly fitted set of parameters, which reproduce the spins of the ground states of odd-A nuclei. In the energy surfaces, calculated for 222 Ra and 222 Th, the octupole deformed minima, separated by the barriers of 150 KeV and 210 keV, respectively, have been obtained. (orig.)

  8. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  9. Nuclear fuel deformation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Brutzel, L.; Dingreville, R.; Bartel, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fuel encounters severe thermomechanical environments. Its mechanical response is profoundly influenced by an underlying heterogeneous microstructure but also inherently dependent on the temperature and stress level histories. The ability to adequately simulate the response of such microstructures, to elucidate the associated macroscopic response in such extreme environments is crucial for predicting both performance and transient fuel mechanical responses. This chapter discusses key physical phenomena and the status of current modelling techniques to evaluate and predict fuel deformations: creep, swelling, cracking and pellet-clad interaction. This chapter only deals with nuclear fuel; deformations of cladding materials are discussed elsewhere. An obvious need for a multi-physics and multi-scale approach to develop a fundamental understanding of properties of complex nuclear fuel materials is presented. The development of such advanced multi-scale mechanistic frameworks should include either an explicit (domain decomposition, homogenisation, etc.) or implicit (scaling laws, hand-shaking,...) linkage between the different time and length scales involved, in order to accurately predict the fuel thermomechanical response for a wide range of operating conditions and fuel types (including Gen-IV and TRU). (authors)

  10. Neutron halo in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shangui; Meng Jie; Ring, P.; Zhao Enguang

    2010-01-01

    Halo phenomena in deformed nuclei are investigated within a deformed relativistic Hartree Bogoliubov (DRHB) theory. These weakly bound quantum systems present interesting examples for the study of the interdependence between the deformation of the core and the particles in the halo. Contributions of the halo, deformation effects, and large spatial extensions of these systems are described in a fully self-consistent way by the DRHB equations in a spherical Woods-Saxon basis with the proper asymptotic behavior at a large distance from the nuclear center. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and detailed results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nucleus 44 Mg. The core of this nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the occurrence of this decoupling effects are discussed.

  11. Rotary deformity in degenerative spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Gwon; Kim, Jeong; Kho, Hyen Sim; Yun, Sung Su; Oh, Jae Hee; Byen, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul

    1994-01-01

    We studied to determine whether the degenerative spondylolisthesis has rotary deformity in addition to forward displacement. We have made analysis of difference of rotary deformity between the 31 study groups of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis and 31 control groups without any symptom, statistically. We also reviewed CT findings in 15 study groups. The mean rotary deformity in study groups was 6.1 degree(the standard deviation is 5.20), and the mean rotary deformity in control groups was 2.52 degree(the standard deviation is 2.16)(p < 0.01). The rotary deformity can be accompanied with degenerative spondylolisthesis. We may consider the rotary deformity as a cause of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis in case that any other cause is not detected

  12. Cervical Spinal Cord Injury at the Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service: Epidemiology of the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C.P. Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI is a significant medical and socioeconomic problem. In Victoria, Australia, there has been limited research into the incidence of CSCI. The Austin Hospital's Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service (VSCIS is a tertiary referral hospital that accepts referrals for surgical management and ongoing neurological rehabilitation for south eastern Australia. The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of CSCI managed operatively at the VSCIS over the last decade, in order to help fashion public health campaigns. Methods This was a retrospective review of medical records from January 2000 to December 2009 of all patients who underwent surgical management of acute CSCI in the VSCIS catchment region. Patients treated non-operatively were excluded. Outcome measures included: demographics, mechanism of injury and associated factors (like alcohol and patient neurological status. Results Men were much more likely to have CSCI than women, with a 4:1 ratio, and the highest incidence of CSCI for men was in their 20s (39%. The most common cause of CSCI was transport related (52%, followed by falls (23% and water-related incidents (16%. Falls were more prevalent among those >50 years. Alcohol was associated in 22% of all CSCIs, including 42% of water-related injuries. Discussion Our retrospective epidemiological study identified at-risk groups presenting to our spinal injury service. Young males in their 20s were associated with an increased risk of transport-related accidents, water-related incidents in the summer months and accidents associated with alcohol. Another high risk group were men >50 years who suffer falls, both from standing and from greater heights. Public awareness campaigns should target these groups to lower incidence of CSCI.

  13. Comparisons of MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Lee, Kil Woo; Kang, Ik Won; Yun, Ku Sub; Choi, Chul Sun; Bae, Sang Hoon

    1994-01-01

    MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the tuberculosis are well known, but sometimes it might be difficult to differentiate these lesions. Therefore we reviewed and analyzed the MR findings which would be useful for the differentiation. T1- and T2- weighted spin echo images and gadolinium-enhanced T1- weighted images were obtained with 1.5 T and 1.0 T superconductive MR imager. We reviewed MR findings in 16 cases of spinal metastases and 24 cases of spinal tuberculosis in terms of signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern, disc space involvement, spinal canal compressing feature and paraspinal soft tissue mass. The signal intensities of both lesions were hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI except those of the metastatic lesions from the prostatic carcinoma. Heterogeneous enhancement was noted in 63% of metastasis, whereas peripheral rim enhancement was noted 83% of spinal tuberculosis(p < .001). Spinal canal compression by collapsed vertebra was only noted in spinal metastasis, and that by paraspinal soft tissue was noted in both spinal metastasis and tuberculosis(p<.001). Disc space invasion was noted in 19% of spinal metastasis and 88% of spinal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis was common at lower thoracic spine(T10) and typically involved two or more adjacent vertebral bodies(96%). The important differential point between spinal metastasis and tuberculosis was the enhancement pattern, involvement of two or more contiguous vertebral bodies and the feature of spinal canal compressing. The secondary importance was the disc space involvement pattern

  14. q-deformed Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Man'ko, V I

    1993-01-01

    Brownian motion may be embedded in the Fock space of bosonic free field in one dimension.Extending this correspondence to a family of creation and annihilation operators satisfying a q-deformed algebra, the notion of q-deformation is carried from the algebra to the domain of stochastic processes.The properties of q-deformed Brownian motion, in particular its non-Gaussian nature and cumulant structure,are established.

  15. Thermostatistic properties of a q-deformed ideal Fermi gas with a general energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shukuan; Su, Guozhen; Chen, Jincan

    2007-01-01

    The thermostatistic problems of a q-deformed ideal Fermi gas in any dimensional space and with a general energy spectrum are studied, based on the q-deformed Fermi-Dirac distribution. The effects of the deformation parameter q on the properties of the system are revealed. It is shown that q-deformation results in some novel characteristics different from those of an ordinary system. Besides, it is found that the effects of the q-deformation on the properties of the Fermi systems are very different for different dimensional spaces and different energy spectrums

  16. Spinal tuberculoma in a patient with spinal myxopapillary ependymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Brijesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramedullary spinal tuberculosis is a clinical curiosity. A 19-year-old female was diagnosed and treated for lumbosacral myxopapllary ependy moma (MPE. Three years later, she presented with back pain and hypoesthesia of the left upper limb. Besides revealing local recurrence, the MRI demonstrated a fresh lesion in the cervicomedullary area. The latter was operated and the histopathology revealed a tuberculoma.

  17. q-deformed Minkowski space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogievetsky, O.; Pillin, M.; Schmidke, W.B.; Wess, J.; Zumino, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this lecture I discuss the algebraic structure of a q-deformed four-vector space. It serves as a good example of quantizing Minkowski space. To give a physical interpretation of such a quantized Minkowski space we construct the Hilbert space representation and find that the relevant time and space operators have a discrete spectrum. Thus the q-deformed Minkowski space has a lattice structure. Nevertheless this lattice structure is compatible with the operation of q-deformed Lorentz transformations. The generators of the q-deformed Lorentz group can be represented as linear operators in the same Hilbert space. (orig.)

  18. Deformable paper origami optoelectronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-19

    Deformable optoelectronic devices are provided, including photodetectors, photodiodes, and photovoltaic cells. The devices can be made on a variety of paper substrates, and can include a plurality of fold segments in the paper substrate creating a deformable pattern. Thin electrode layers and semiconductor nanowire layers can be attached to the substrate, creating the optoelectronic device. The devices can be highly deformable, e.g. capable of undergoing strains of 500% or more, bending angles of 25° or more, and/or twist angles of 270° or more. Methods of making the deformable optoelectronic devices and methods of using, e.g. as a photodetector, are also provided.

  19. Deformation behaviour of turbine foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, W.; Klitzing, R.; Pietzonka, R.; Wehr, J.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of foundation deformation on alignment in turbine generator sets have gained significance with the transition to modern units at the limit of design possibilities. It is therefore necessary to obtain clarification about the remaining operational variations of turbine foundations. Static measurement programmes, which cover both deformation processes as well as individual conditions of deformation are described in the paper. In order to explain the deformations measured structural engineering model calculations are being undertaken which indicate the effect of limiting factors. (orig.) [de

  20. Nasal Soft-Tissue Triangle Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2016-08-01

    The soft-tissue triangle is one of the least areas attended to in rhinoplasty. Any postoperative retraction, notching, or asymmetries of soft triangles can seriously affect the rhinoplasty outcome. A good understanding of the risk factors predisposing to soft triangle deformities is necessary to prevent such problems. The commonest risk factors in our study were the wide vertical domal angle between the lateral and intermediate crura, and the increased length of intermediate crus. Two types of soft triangle grafts were described to prevent and treat soft triangle deformities. The used soft triangle grafts resulted in an excellent long-term aesthetic and functional improvement. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Extent of Spine Deformity Predicts Lung Growth and Function in Rabbit Model of Early Onset Scoliosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Casey Olson

    Full Text Available Early onset deformity of the spine and chest wall (initiated <8 years of age is associated with increased morbidity at adulthood relative to adolescent onset deformity of comparable severity. Presumably, inhibition of thoracic growth during late stage alveolarization leads to an irreversible loss of pulmonary growth and thoracic function; however the natural history of this disease from onset to adulthood has not been well characterized. In this study we establish a rabbit model of early onset scoliosis to establish the extent that thoracic deformity affects structural and functional respiratory development. Using a surgical right unilateral rib-tethering procedure, rib fusion with early onset scoliosis was induced in 10 young New Zealand white rabbits (3 weeks old. Progression of spine deformity, functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, and lung mass was tracked through longitudinal breath-hold computed tomography imaging up to skeletal maturity (28 weeks old. Additionally at maturity forced vital capacity and regional specific volume were calculated as functional measurements and histo-morphometry performed with the radial alveolar count as a measure of acinar complexity. Data from tethered rib rabbits were compared to age matched healthy control rabbits (N = 8. Results show unilateral rib-tethering created a progressive spinal deformity ranging from 30° to 120° curvature, the severity of which was strongly associated with pulmonary growth and functional outcomes. At maturity rabbits with deformity greater than the median (55° had decreased body weight (89%, right (59% and left (86% lung mass, right (74% and left (69% radial alveolar count, right lung volume at total lung capacity (60%, and forced vital capacity (75%. Early treatment of spinal deformity in children may prevent pulmonary complications in adulthood and these results provide a basis for the prediction of pulmonary development from thoracic structure. This model may

  2. Global gene expression analysis of rodent motor neurons following spinal cord injury associates molecular mechanisms with development of post-injury spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienecke, Jacob; Westerdahl, Ann-Charlotte; Hultborn, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury leads to severe problems involving impaired motor, sensory and autonomic functions. After spinal injury there is an initial phase of hypo-reflexia followed by hyper-reflexia, often referred to as spasticity. Previous studies have suggested a relationship between the reappearanc...

  3. Approaches to radiotherapy in metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppl, Morten Hiul

    2018-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is caused by the progression of metastatic lesions within the vicinity of the spinal cord. The consequences are very severe with loss of neurological function and severe pain. The standard treatment is surgical intervention followed by radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. However, the majority of patients are treated with radiotherapy only due to contraindications to surgery and technical inoperability. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a technology to deliver higher radiation dose to the radiotherapy target with the use of spatial coordinates. This modality has shown positive results in treating lesions in brain and lungs. Hence, it could prove beneficial in metastatic spinal cord compression. We designed and planned a trial to investigate this method in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. The method was usable but the trial was stopped prematurely due to low accrual that made comparison with surgery impossible. Low accrual is a known problem for trials evaluating new approaches in radiotherapy. Target definition in radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression is defined by patient history, examination and imaging. Functional imaging could provide information to guide target definition with the sparring of normal tissue e.g. spinal cord and hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow. In future trials this may be used for dose escalation of spinal metastases. The trial showed that PET/MRI was feasible in this group of patients but did not change the radiotherapy target in the included patients. Neurological outcome is similar irrespective of course length and therefore single fraction radiotherapy is recommended for the majority of patients. In-field recurrence is a risk factor of both short and long fractionation schemes and re-irradiation have the potential risk of radiation-induced myelopathy. In a retrospective study of re-irradiation, we investigated the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy. In our study

  4. Spinal sagittal balance substantially influences locomotive syndrome and physical performance in community-living middle-aged and elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Akio; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Hirano, Kenichi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hasegawa, Yukiharu

    2016-03-01

    Spinal sagittal imbalance has been well known risk factor of decreased quality of life in the field of adult spinal deformity. However, the impact of spinal sagittal balance on locomotive syndrome and physical performance in community-living elderly has not yet been clarified. The present study investigated the influence of spinal sagittal alignment on locomotive syndrome (LS) and physical performance in community-living middle-aged and elderly women. A total of 125 women between the age of 40-88 years (mean 66.2 ± 9.7 years) who completed the questionnaires, spinal mouse test, physical examination and physical performance tests in Yakumo study were enrolled in this study. Participants answered the 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale (GLFS-25), the visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain (LBP), knee pain. LS was defined as having a score of >16 points on the GLFS-25. Using spinal mouse, spinal inclination angle (SIA), thoracic kyphosis angle (TKA), lumbar lordosis angle (LLA), sacral slope angle (SSA), thoracic spinal range of motion (TSROM), lumbar spinal range of motion (LSROM) were measured. Timed-up-and-go test (TUG), one-leg standing time with eyes open (OLS), and maximum stride, back muscle strength were also measured. The relationship between spinal sagittal parameters and GLFS-25, VAS and physical performance tests were analyzed. 26 people were diagnosed as LS and 99 were diagnosed as non-LS. LBP and knee pain were greater, physical performance tests were poorer, SIA were greater, LLA were smaller in LS group compared to non-LS group even after adjustment by age. SIA significantly correlated with GLFS-25, TUG, OLS and maximum stride even after adjustment by age. The cutoff value of SIA for locomotive syndrome was 6°. People with a SIA of 6° or greater were grouped as "Inclined" and people with a SIA of less than 6° were grouped as "Non-inclined". 21 people were "Inclined" and 104 were "Non-inclined". Odds ratio to fall in LS of

  5. Patterns of postural deformity in non-ambulant people with cerebral palsy: what is the relationship between the direction of scoliosis, direction of pelvic obliquity, direction of windswept hip deformity and side of hip dislocation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David; Michael, Shona; Kirkwood, Craig

    2007-12-01

    To investigate: (a) associations between the direction of scoliosis, direction of pelvic obliquity, direction of windswept deformity and side of hip subluxation/ dislocation in non-ambulant people with cerebral palsy; and (b) the lateral distribution of these postural asymmetries. Cross-sectional observational study. Posture management services in three centres in the UK. Non-ambulant people at level five on the gross motor function classification system for cerebral palsy. Direction of pelvic obliquity and lateral spinal curvature determined from physical examination, direction of windswept hip deformity derived from range of hip abduction/adduction, and presence/side of unilateral hip subluxation defined by hip migration percentage. A total of 747 participants were included in the study, aged 6-80 years (median 18 years 10 months). Associations between the direction of scoliosis and direction of pelvic obliquity, and between the direction of windswept hip deformity and side hip subluxation/dislocation were confirmed. A significant association was also seen between the direction of scoliosis and the direction of the windswept hip deformity (P<0.001) such that the convexity of the lateral spinal curve was more likely to be opposite to the direction of windsweeping. Furthermore, significantly more windswept deformities to the right (P=0.007), hips subluxed on the left (P=0.002) and lateral lumbar/lower thoracic spinal curves convex to the left (P=0.03) were observed. The individual asymmetrical postural deformities are not unrelated in terms of direction and not equally distributed to the left/right. A pattern of postural deformity was observed.

  6. Deformed chiral nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, C E; Shepard, J R [Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1991-04-18

    We compute properties of the nucleon in a hybrid chiral model based on the linear {sigma}-model with quark degrees of freedom treated explicity. In contrast to previous calculations, we do not use the hedgehog ansatz. Instead we solve self-consistently for a state with well defined spin and isospin projections. We allow this state to be deformed and find that, although d- and g-state admixtures in the predominantly s-state single quark wave functions are not large, they have profound effects on many nucleon properties including magnetic moments and g{sub A}. Our best fit parameters provide excellent agreement with experiment but are much different from those determined in hedgehog calculations. (orig.).

  7. PREVENTION OF SPINAL DISORDERS IN CHILDRENI- IV GRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejаn Gojković

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem physical activities children younger school-age children, with the basic tasks research is construction kinesitherapy adequate prevention and avoid postural disorders spinal column, optimal ontogenetic level morphological( anthropological development.The main objective research is contents teaching physical education as well as and content that can be put in regular program teaching physical education with the basic task prevention potential and eliminate disorders spinal column, with auxiliary a harmonious biological development. The entities from which he was carried out sample size for this research is defined as population students male primary schools I- IV grade.The first and basic condition was that they are included in teaching physical education in the course of this research sample is taked 400 respondents.-according to the manner elections respondents sample was targeted selected.were taken I- IV grade elementary schools in Bijeljina, Teslic, Foca and Pale.

  8. The management of spinal cord injury patients in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, C B; Rapidi, C A; Beltsios, M; Karantonis, G; Lampiris, P E

    1992-02-01

    In Greece, spinal cord injury patients have serious problems concerning their treatment, social management and vocational integration. Unfortunately the treatment of such patients is usually limited to that offered in institutions for the chronically sick, after they have received their acute initial care in general hospitals. The large number of institutional beds (1287 in 1986) in relation to the small number of active rehabilitation beds (116 beds in 1989) is noteworthy. Generally speaking, the specialisation of health personnel is limited. In practice there is no programme of social rehabilitation, except for special concessions. Disabled individuals can refer to the Professional Integration Service for their vocational reintegration. We must note that vocational counsellors do not take part in the rehabilitation team. The idea of intervention for the adaptation of architectural barriers is now beginning to be considered in theory. Physicians are making efforts to establish 'basic' spinal cord units.

  9. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  10. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  11. IBA in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for 168 Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong β → γ transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the β → γ transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ΔK=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics

  12. Spinal anesthesia: the Holy Grail?

    OpenAIRE

    Voet, Marieke; Slagt, Cornelis

    2017-01-01

    Marieke Voet, Cornelis SlagtDepartment of Anesthesiology, Pain and Palliative Care, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAfter reading the paper recently published in Local and Regional Anesthesia by Whitaker et al:1 “Spinal anesthesia after intraoperative cardiac arrest during general anesthesia in an infant,” we would like to share our thoughts. In a recently published paper by Habre et al,2 the incidence of severe critical events in pediatric anes...

  13. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Imhof, H. [University and General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics

    2006-07-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  14. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Nabina Shah; Binav Shrestha; Kamana Subba

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the...

  15. Mobile myelographic filling defects: Spinal cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Cimino, C.; Passerini, A.; La Mantia, L.

    1986-03-01

    Cysticercosis usually affects the brain and is easily demonstrated by CT. Spinal cysticercosis is much rarer and is usually diagnosed only at surgery. Myelographic demonstration of multiple rounded filling defects, some of which were mobile, allowed diagnosis of spinal extramedullary cysticercosis in an unsuspected case. The literature on spinal cysticercosis is briefly reviewed. Diagnosis is important in view of the recent development of medical treatment.

  16. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  17. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  18. Contrast enhanced CT of spinal cord angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiko; Ebitani, Tsutomu; Honma, Takao; Sofue, Muroto; Nakamura, Shigeru

    1982-01-01

    Contrast enhanced CT on 6 patients with spinal cord angioma showed enhancement in 2 of them. The conditions to produce contrast enhancement were the window width of 100 - 200, and the window level of 0 - 50. In spinal cord angioma, contrast enhanced CT is presently only an adjunct to angiography and myelography. Nevertheless, contrast enhanced CT is useful in the screening test for spinal cord angioma, in the patients who are nonindicated to angiography, and in the postoperative follow-up. (Ueda, J.)

  19. Trans-spinal direct current stimulation for the modulation of the lumbar spinal motor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuck, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Trans-spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS) is a noninvasive neuromodulatory tool for the modulation of the spinal neurocircuitry. Initial studies have shown that tsDCS is able to induce a significant and lasting change in spinal-reflex- and corticospinal information processing. It is therefore

  20. Spinal epidural hematomas examined on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejnowski, G.; Poniatowska, R.; Kozlowski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematomas are rare pathology, caused by trauma or spontaneous. In clinical examination acute spinal cord compression is observed. MRI designations appear entirely particular. In sagittal projection, biconvex mass in the dorsal, or sometimes ventral part of the spinal canal is clearly visible. This is well delineated by the thecal sac from the cord and cauda equina. MRI investigations in 3 patients revealed corresponding with spinal bone injuries and cord edema epidural hematomas. Differential diagnosis must contain subdural hematoma and epidural neoplasms or abscess. (author)