WorldWideScience

Sample records for spin-labeled perfusion mri

  1. Resting quantitative cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia measured by pulsed arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Pinkham, Amy; Loughead, James; Ruparel, Kosha; Wu, Wen-Chau; Overton, Eve; Gur, Raquel; Gur, Ruben

    2011-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling imaging (ASL) perfusion MRI is a relatively novel technique that can allow for quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. Available data on resting CBF in schizophrenia primarily comes from invasive and expensive nuclear medicine techniques that are often limited to small samples and yield mixed results. The noninvasive nature of ASL offers promise for larger-scale studies. The utilit...

  2. Arterial spin-labelling perfusion MRI and outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, Jill B. de; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, Esben T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiotherapy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vries, Linda S. de; Bel, Frank van; Alderliesten, Thomas; Negro, Simona; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J.N.L. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Hyperperfusion may be related to outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion is associated with outcome in neonates with HIE and to compare the predictive value of ASL MRI to known MRI predictive markers. Twenty-eight neonates diagnosed with HIE and assessed with MR imaging (conventional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, MR spectroscopy [MRS], and ASL MRI) were included. Perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami was measured. Outcome at 9 or 18 months of age was scored as either adverse (death or cerebral palsy) or favourable. The median (range) perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami (BGT) was 63 (28-108) ml/100 g/min in the neonates with adverse outcome and 28 (12-51) ml/100 g/min in the infants with favourable outcome (p < 0.01). The area-under-the-curve was 0.92 for ASL MRI, 0.97 for MRI score, 0.96 for Lac/NAA and 0.92 for ADC in the BGT. The combination of Lac/NAA and ASL MRI results was the best predictor of outcome (r {sup 2} = 0.86, p < 0.001). Higher ASL perfusion values in neonates with HIE are associated with a worse neurodevelopmental outcome. A combination of the MRS and ASL MRI information is the best predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  3. Arterial spin-labelling perfusion MRI and outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vis, Jill B. de; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Petersen, Esben T.; Vries, Linda S. de; Bel, Frank van; Alderliesten, Thomas; Negro, Simona; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J.N.L.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperperfusion may be related to outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion is associated with outcome in neonates with HIE and to compare the predictive value of ASL MRI to known MRI predictive markers. Twenty-eight neonates diagnosed with HIE and assessed with MR imaging (conventional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, MR spectroscopy [MRS], and ASL MRI) were included. Perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami was measured. Outcome at 9 or 18 months of age was scored as either adverse (death or cerebral palsy) or favourable. The median (range) perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami (BGT) was 63 (28-108) ml/100 g/min in the neonates with adverse outcome and 28 (12-51) ml/100 g/min in the infants with favourable outcome (p 2 = 0.86, p < 0.001). Higher ASL perfusion values in neonates with HIE are associated with a worse neurodevelopmental outcome. A combination of the MRS and ASL MRI information is the best predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  4. Arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI of breast cancer using FAIR TrueFISP: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchbender, S.; Obenauer, S.; Mohrmann, S.; Martirosian, P.; Buchbender, C.; Miese, F.R.; Wittsack, H.J.; Miekley, M.; Antoch, G.; Lanzman, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the feasibility of an unenhanced, flow-sensitive, alternating inversion recovery-balanced steady-state free precession (FAIR TrueFISP) arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for quantification of breast cancer perfusion. Materials and methods: Eighteen untreated breast tumour patients (mean age 53 ± 17 years, range 30–68 years) and four healthy controls (mean age 51 ± 14 years, range 33–68 years) were enrolled in this study and were imaged using a clinical 1.5 T MRI machine. Perfusion measurements were performed using a coronal single-section ASL FAIR TrueFISP technique in addition to a routine breast MRI examination. T1 relaxation time of normal breast parenchyma was determined in four healthy volunteers using the variable flip angle approach. The definitive diagnosis was obtained at histology after biopsy or surgery and was available for all patients. Results: ASL perfusion was successfully acquired in 13 of 18 tumour patients and in all healthy controls. The mean ASL perfusion of invasive ductal carcinoma tissue was significantly higher (88.2 ± 39.5 ml/100 g/min) compared to ASL perfusion of normal breast parenchyma (24.9 ± 12.7 ml/100 g/min; p < 0.05) and invasive lobular carcinoma (30.5 ± 4.3 ml/100 g/min; p < 0.05). No significant difference was found between the mean ASL perfusion of normal breast parenchyma and invasive lobular carcinoma tissue (p = 0.97). Conclusion: ASL MRI enables quantification of breast cancer perfusion without the use of contrast material. However, its impact on diagnosis and therapy management of breast tumours has to be evaluated in larger patient studies

  5. Quantifying fluctuations of resting state networks using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weiying; Varma, Gopal; Scheidegger, Rachel; Alsop, David C

    2016-03-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to investigate spontaneous low-frequency signal fluctuations across brain resting state networks. However, BOLD only provides relative measures of signal fluctuations. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) MRI holds great potential for quantitative measurements of resting state network fluctuations. This study systematically quantified signal fluctuations of the large-scale resting state networks using ASL data from 20 healthy volunteers by separating them from global signal fluctuations and fluctuations caused by residual noise. Global ASL signal fluctuation was 7.59% ± 1.47% relative to the ASL baseline perfusion. Fluctuations of seven detected resting state networks vary from 2.96% ± 0.93% to 6.71% ± 2.35%. Fluctuations of networks and residual noise were 6.05% ± 1.18% and 6.78% ± 1.16% using 4-mm resolution ASL data applied with Gaussian smoothing kernel of 6mm. However, network fluctuations were reduced by 7.77% ± 1.56% while residual noise fluctuation was markedly reduced by 39.75% ± 2.90% when smoothing kernel of 12 mm was applied to the ASL data. Therefore, global and network fluctuations are the dominant structured noise sources in ASL data. Quantitative measurements of resting state networks may enable improved noise reduction and provide insights into the function of healthy and diseased brain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Arterial spin labelling MRI for assessment of cerebral perfusion in children with moyamoya disease: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetti, Robert [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); O' Gorman, Ruth [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Center for MR Research, Zurich (Switzerland); Khan, Nadia [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Moyamoya Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Kellenberger, Christian J.; Scheer, Ianina [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-05-15

    This study seeks to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral perfusion imaging with arterial spin labelling (ASL) MR imaging in children with moyamoya disease compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging. Ten children (7 females; age, 9.2 {+-} 5.4 years) with moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with ASL and DSC on a 3-T MRI scanner in the same session. Cerebral perfusion images were acquired with ASL (pulsed continuous 3D ASL sequence, 32 axial slices, TR = 5.5 s, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 128 x 128) and DSC (gradient echo EPI sequence, 35 volumes of 28 axial slices, TR = 2,000 ms, TE = 36 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 96 x 96, 0.2 ml/kg Gd-DOTA). Cerebral blood flow maps were generated. ASL and DSC images were qualitatively assessed regarding perfusion of left and right ACA, MCA, and PCA territories by two independent readers using a 3-point-Likert scale and quantitative relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was calculated. Correlation between ASL and DSC for qualitative and quantitative assessment and the accuracy of ASL for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory with DSC serving as the standard of reference were calculated. With a good interreader agreement ({kappa} = 0.62) qualitative perfusion assessment with ASL and DSC showed a strong and significant correlation ({rho} = 0.77; p < 0.001), as did quantitative rCBF (r = 0.79; p < 0.001). ASL showed a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 94 %, 93 %, and 93 % for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory. In children with moyamoya disease, unenhanced ASL enables the detection of reduced perfusion per vascular territory with a good accuracy compared to contrast-enhanced DSC. (orig.)

  7. Quantification of renal allograft perfusion using arterial spin labeling MRI: initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzman, Rotem S; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Martirosian, Petros; Zgoura, Panagiota; Bilk, Philip; Kröpil, Patric; Schick, Fritz; Voiculescu, Adina; Blondin, Dirk

    2010-06-01

    To quantify renal allograft perfusion in recipients with stable allograft function and acute decrease in allograft function using nonenhanced flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR)-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging. Following approval of the local ethics committee, 20 renal allograft recipients were included in this study. ASL perfusion measurement and an anatomical T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo (HASTE) sequence were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Magnetom Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). T2-weighted MR urography was performed in patients with suspected ureteral obstruction. Patients were assigned to three groups: group a, 6 patients with stable allograft function over the previous 4 months; group b, 7 patients with good allograft function who underwent transplantation during the previous 3 weeks; group c, 7 allograft recipients with an acute deterioration of renal function. Mean cortical perfusion values were 304.8 +/- 34.4, 296.5 +/- 44.1, and 181.9 +/- 53.4 mg/100 ml/min for groups a, b and c, respectively. Reduction in cortical perfusion in group c was statistically significant. Our results indicate that ASL is a promising technique for nonenhanced quantification of cortical perfusion of renal allografts. Further studies are required to determine the clinical value of ASL for monitoring renal allograft recipients.

  8. Quantification of renal allograft perfusion using arterial spin labeling MRI: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Bilk, Philip; Kroepil, Patric; Blondin, Dirk; Martirosian, Petros; Schick, Fritz; Zgoura, Panagiota; Voiculescu, Adina

    2010-01-01

    To quantify renal allograft perfusion in recipients with stable allograft function and acute decrease in allograft function using nonenhanced flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR)-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging. Following approval of the local ethics committee, 20 renal allograft recipients were included in this study. ASL perfusion measurement and an anatomical T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo (HASTE) sequence were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Magnetom Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). T2-weighted MR urography was performed in patients with suspected ureteral obstruction. Patients were assigned to three groups: group a, 6 patients with stable allograft function over the previous 4 months; group b, 7 patients with good allograft function who underwent transplantation during the previous 3 weeks; group c, 7 allograft recipients with an acute deterioration of renal function. Mean cortical perfusion values were 304.8 ± 34.4, 296.5 ± 44.1, and 181.9 ± 53.4 mg/100 ml/min for groups a, b and c, respectively. Reduction in cortical perfusion in group c was statistically significant. Our results indicate that ASL is a promising technique for nonenhanced quantification of cortical perfusion of renal allografts. Further studies are required to determine the clinical value of ASL for monitoring renal allograft recipients. (orig.)

  9. MDMA ‘ecstasy’ increases cerebral cortical perfusion determined by bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouine, J; Gobbo, O L; Campbell, M; Gigliucci, V; Ogden, I; McHugh Smith, K; Duffy, P; Behan, B; Byrne, D; Kelly, M E; Blau, C W; Kerskens, C M; Harkin, A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess cerebral perfusion changes following systemic administration of the recreational drug 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA ‘ecstasy’) to rats. Experimental Approach Cerebral perfusion was quantified using bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI. Rats received MDMA (20 mg·kg−1; i.p.) and were assessed 1, 3 or 24 h later. Rats received MDMA (5 or 20 mg·kg−1; i.p.) and were assessed 3 h later. In addition, rats received MDMA (5 or 10 mg·kg−1; i.p.) or saline four times daily over 2 consecutive days and were assessed 8 weeks later. Perfusion-weighted images were generated in a 7 tesla (7T) MRI scanner and experimental data was fitted to a quantitative model of cerebral perfusion to generate mean transit time (MTT), capillary transit time (CTT) and signal amplitude. Key Results MDMA reduces MTT and CTT and increases amplitude in somatosensory and motor cortex 1 and 3 h following administration, indicative of an increase in perfusion. Prior exposure to MDMA provoked a long-term reduction in cortical 5-HT concentration, but did not produce a sustained effect on cerebral cortical perfusion. The response to acute MDMA challenge (20 mg·kg−1; i.p.) was attenuated in these animals indicating adaptation in response to prior MDMA exposure. Conclusions and Implications MDMA provokes changes in cortical perfusion, which are quantifiable by btASL MRI, a neuroimaging tool with translational potential. Future studies are directed towards elucidation of the mechanisms involved and correlating changes in cerebrovascular function with potential behavioural deficits associated with drug use. PMID:23517012

  10. Perfusion MRI of brain tumours: a comparative study of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling and dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaernum, Hanna; Steffensen, Elena G.; Simonsen, Carsten Wiberg; Jensen, Finn Taagehoej [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Knutsson, Linda [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Fruend, Ernst-Torben [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); GE Healthcare - Applied Science Lab Europe, Aalborg (Denmark); Lundbye-Christensen, Soeren [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg (Denmark); Shankaranarayanan, Ajit [Global Applied Science Lab, GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Alsop, David C. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Larsson, Elna-Marie [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the non-invasive 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling (PC ASL) technique with the clinically established dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) for evaluation of brain tumours. A prospective study of 28 patients with contrast-enhancing brain tumours was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI and PC ASL with whole-brain coverage. The visual qualitative evaluation of signal enhancement in tumour was scored from 0 to 3 (0 = no signal enhancement compared with white matter, 3 = pronounced signal enhancement with equal or higher signal intensity than in grey matter/basal ganglia). The extent of susceptibility artefacts in the tumour was scored from 0 to 2 (0 = no susceptibility artefacts and 2 = extensive susceptibility artefacts (maximum diameter > 2 cm)). A quantitative analysis was performed with normalised tumour blood flow values (ASL nTBF, DSC nTBF): mean value for region of interest (ROI) in an area with maximum signal enhancement/the mean value for ROIs in cerebellum. There was no difference in total visual score for signal enhancement between PC ASL and DSC relative cerebral blood flow (p = 0.12). ASL had a lower susceptibility-artefact score than DSC-MRI (p = 0.03). There was good correlation between DSC nTBF and ASL nTBF values with a correlation coefficient of 0.82. PC ASL is an alternative to DSC-MRI for the evaluation of perfusion in brain tumours. The method has fewer susceptibility artefacts than DSC-MRI and can be used in patients with renal failure because no contrast injection is needed. (orig.)

  11. Comparing kidney perfusion using noncontrast arterial spin labeling MRI and microsphere methods in an interventional swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Nathan S; Wentland, Andrew L; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Djamali, Arjang; Grist, Thomas M; Seo, Songwon; Fain, Sean B

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery-arterial spin labeling (FAIR-ASL) technique to track renal perfusion changes during pharmacologic and physiologic alterations in renal blood flow using microspheres as a gold standard. Fluorescent microsphere and FAIR-ASL perfusion were compared in the cortex of the kidney for 11 swine across 4 interventional time points: (1) under baseline conditions, (2) during an acetylcholine and fluid bolus challenge to increase perfusion, (3) initially after switching to isoflurane anesthesia, and (4) after 2 hours of isoflurane anesthesia. In 10 of the 11 swine, a bag of ice was placed on the hilum of 1 kidney at the beginning of isoflurane administration to further reduce perfusion in 1 kidney. Both ASL and microspheres tracked the expected cortical perfusion changes (P values were systematically lower compared with microsphere perfusion. Very good correlation (r = 0.81, P values in the expected physiologic range (microsphere perfusion values saturated for perfusion >550 mL/min/100 g. Cortical perfusion measured with ASL correlated with microspheres and reliably detected changes in renal perfusion in response to physiologic challenge.

  12. Perfusion imaging of brain gliomas using arterial spin labeling: correlation with histopathological vascular density in MRI-guided biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Ningning; Pang, Haopeng; Ren, Yan; Yao, Zhenwei; Feng, Xiaoyuan [Huashan Hospital Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Dang, Xuefei [Shang Hai Gamma Knife Hospital, Shanghai (China); Cheng, Wenna [Binzhou Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Department of Pharmacy, Binzhou (China); Wu, Jingsong; Yao, Chengjun [Huashan Hospital Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2017-01-15

    This study was designed to determine if cerebral blood flow (CBF) derived from arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging could be used to quantitatively evaluate the microvascular density (MVD) of brain gliomas on a ''point-to-point'' basis by matching CBF areas and surgical biopsy sites as accurate as possible. The study enrolled 47 patients with treatment-naive brain gliomas who underwent preoperative ASL, 3D T1-weighted imaging with gadolinium contrast enhancement (3D T1C+), and T2 fluid acquisition of inversion recovery (T2FLAIR) sequences before stereotactic surgery. We histologically quantified MVD from CD34-stained sections of stereotactic biopsies and co-registered biopsy locations with localized CBF measurements. The correlation between CBF and MVD was determined using Spearman's correlation coefficient. P ≤.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the 47 patients enrolled in the study, 6 were excluded from the analysis because of brain shift or poor co-registration and localization of the biopsy site during surgery. Finally, 84 biopsies from 41 subjects were included in the analysis. CBF showed a statistically significant positive correlation with MVD (ρ = 0.567; P =.029). ASL can be a useful noninvasive perfusion MR method for quantitative evaluation of the MVD of brain gliomas. (orig.)

  13. Effects of resting state condition on reliability, trait specificity, and network connectivity of brain function measured with arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengjun; Vidorreta, Marta; Katchmar, Natalie; Alsop, David C; Wolf, Daniel H; Detre, John A

    2018-06-01

    Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) provides imaging biomarkers of task-independent brain function that can be associated with clinical variables or modulated by interventions such as behavioral training or pharmacological manipulations. These biomarkers include time-averaged regional brain function as manifested by regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured using arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI and correlated temporal fluctuations of function across brain networks with either ASL or blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI. Resting-state studies are typically carried out using just one of several prescribed state conditions such as eyes closed (EC), eyes open (EO), or visual fixation on a cross-hair (FIX), which may affect the reliability and specificity of rs-fMRI. In this study, we collected test-retest ASL MRI data during 4 resting-state task conditions: EC, EO, FIX and PVT (low-frequency psychomotor vigilance task), and examined the effects of these task conditions on reliability and reproducibility as well as trait specificity of regional brain function. We also acquired resting-state BOLD fMRI under FIX and compared the network connectivity reliabilities between the four ASL conditions and the BOLD FIX condition. For resting-state ASL data, EC provided the highest CBF reliability, reproducibility, trait specificity, and network connectivity reliability, followed by EO, while FIX was lowest on all of these measures. PVT demonstrated lower CBF reliability, reproducibility and trait specificity than EO and EC. Overall network connectivity reliability was comparable between ASL and BOLD. Our findings confirm ASL CBF as a reliable, stable, and consistent measure of resting-state regional brain function and support the use of EC or EO over FIX and PVT as the resting-state condition. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Head-to-Head Visual Comparison between Brain Perfusion SPECT and Arterial Spin-Labeling MRI with Different Postlabeling Delays in Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, T; Katsuse, O; Hirano, T; Ogawa, M; Yoshida, K; Odawara, T; Hirayasu, Y; Inoue, T

    2017-08-01

    Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging has been recently developed as a noninvasive technique with magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous contrast medium for the evaluation of CBF. Our aim was to compare arterial spin-labeling MR imaging and SPECT in the visual assessment of CBF in patients with Alzheimer disease. In 33 patients with Alzheimer disease or mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer disease, CBF images were obtained by using both arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging with a postlabeling delay of 1.5 seconds and 2.5 seconds (PLD 1.5 and PLD 2.5 , respectively) and brain perfusion SPECT. Twenty-two brain regions were visually assessed, and the diagnostic confidence of Alzheimer disease was recorded. Among all arterial spin-labeling images, 84.9% of PLD 1.5 and 9% of PLD 2.5 images showed the typical pattern of advanced Alzheimer disease (ie, decreased CBF in the bilateral parietal, temporal, and frontal lobes). PLD 1.5 , PLD 2.5 , and SPECT imaging resulted in obviously different visual assessments. PLD 1.5 showed a broad decrease in CBF, which could have been due to an early perfusion. In contrast, PLD 2.5 did not appear to be influenced by an early perfusion but showed fewer pathologic findings than SPECT. The distinctions observed by us should be carefully considered in the visual assessments of Alzheimer disease. Further studies are required to define the patterns of change in arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging associated with Alzheimer disease. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Grading and outcome prediction of pediatric diffuse astrocytic tumors with diffusion and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI in comparison with 18F-DOPA PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morana, Giovanni; Tortora, Domenico; Severino, Mariasavina; Rossi, Andrea [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neuroradiology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Piccardo, Arnoldo; Cabria, Manlio [Ente Ospedaliero Ospedali Galliera, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Genoa (Italy); Puntoni, Matteo [Ente Ospedaliero Ospedali Galliera, Clinical Trial Unit, Scientific Directorate, Genoa (Italy); Nozza, Paolo [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Pathology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Ravegnani, Marcello; Consales, Alessandro; Mascelli, Samantha; Raso, Alessandro [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neurosurgery Unit, Genoa (Italy); Verrico, Antonio; Milanaccio, Claudia [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neuro-oncology Unit, Genoa (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate MRI-derived diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging in comparison with {sup 18}F-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) PET with respect to diagnostic performance in tumor grading and outcome prediction in pediatric patients with diffuse astrocytic tumors (DAT). We retrospectively analyzed 26 children with histologically proven treatment naive low and high grade DAT who underwent ASL and DWI performed within 2 weeks of {sup 18}F-DOPA PET. Relative ASL-derived cerebral blood flow max (rCBF max) and DWI-derived minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (rADC min) were compared with {sup 18}F-DOPA uptake tumor/normal tissue (T/N) and tumor/striatum (T/S) ratios, and correlated with World Health Organization (WHO) tumor grade and progression-free survival (PFS). Statistics included Pearson's chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests, Spearman's rank correlation, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, discriminant function analysis (DFA), Kaplan-Meier survival curve, and Cox analysis. A significant correlation was demonstrated between rCBF max, rADC min, and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET data (p < 0.001). Significant differences in terms of rCBF max, rADC min, and {sup 18}F-DOPA uptake were found between low- and high-grade DAT (p ≤ 0.001). ROC analysis and DFA demonstrated that T/S and T/N values were the best parameters for predicting tumor progression (AUC 0.93, p < 0.001). On univariate analysis, all diagnostic tools correlated with PFS (p ≤ 0.001); however, on multivariate analysis, only {sup 18}F-DOPA uptake remained significantly associated with outcome (p ≤ 0.03), while a trend emerged for rCBF max (p = 0.09) and rADC min (p = 0.08). The combination of MRI and PET data increased the predictive power for prognosticating tumor progression (AUC 0.97, p < 0.001). DWI, ASL and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET provide useful complementary information for pediatric DAT grading. {sup 18}F-DOPA uptake

  16. Combination of MRI hippocampal volumetry and arterial spin labeling MR perfusion at 3-Tesla improves the efficacy in discriminating Alzheimer's disease from cognitively normal elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Qian, Wenshu; Ng, Kwok Sing; Chan, Queenie; Song, You-Qiang; Chu, Leung Wing; Yau, Kelvin Kai-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging has been employed for evaluation of medial temporal atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique could detect cerebral perfusion abnormalities in AD. We hypothesized that combination of hippocampal volumetry and cerebral blood flow yield higher accuracy than either method alone in discriminating AD patients from cognitively normal elderly adults. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy controls were studied using a 3-tesla scanner. Standardized T1W 3D volumetric Fast Field Echo and QUASAR ASL sequences were employed for cerebral volumetry and perfusion respectively. Manual Right and left hippocampal volumetry was performed manually by ANALYZE software, with total intracranial volume normalization. ASL data were analyzed by institutional specially-design software to calculate cerebral blood flow of region-of-interests placed at the middle and posterior cingulate gyri. Right and left hippocampal volumes and middle and posterior cingulate gyri cerebral blood flows were significantly lower in the patients than in the controls (independent-samples t-tests, p volumetry and cerebral perfusion has improved efficacy in discriminating AD patients from cognitively normal elderly adults.

  17. Vessel encoded arterial spin labeling with cerebral perfusion: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bing; Xiao Jiangxi; Xie Cheng; Wang Xiaoying; Jiang Xuexiang; Wong, E.C.; Wang Jing; Guo Jia; Zhang Beiru; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a noninvasive vessel encoded imaging for selective mapping of the flow territories of the left and fight internal carotid arteries and vertebral-basilar arteries. Methods: Seven volunteers [(33.5 ± 4.1) years; 3 men, 4 women] and 6 patients [(55.2 ± 3.2) years; 2 men, 4 women] were given written informed consent approved by the institutional review board before participating in the study. A pseudo-continuous tagging pulse train is modified to encode all vessels of interest. The selectivity of this method was demonstrated. Regional perfusion imaging was developed on the same arterial spin labeling sequence. Perfusion-weighted images of the selectively labeled cerebral arteries were obtained by subtraction of the labeled from control images. The CBF values of hemisphere, white matter, and gray matter of volunteers were calculated. The vessel territories on patients were compared with DSA. The low perfusion areas were compared with high signal areas on T 2 -FLAIR. Results: High SNR maps of left carotid, right carotid, and basilar territories were generated in 8 minutes of scan time. Cerebral blood flow values measured with regional perfusion imaging in the complete hemisphere (32.6 ± 4.3) ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 , white matter (10.8 ± 0.9) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , and gray matter (55.6±2.9) ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 were in agreement with data in the literature. Vessel encoded imaging in patients had a good agreement with DSA. The low perfusion areas were larger than high signal areas on T 2 -FLAIR. Conclusion: We present a new method capable of evaluating both quantitatively and qualitatively the individual brain- feeding arteries in vivo. (authors)

  18. Reduction in cerebral perfusion after heroin administration: a resting state arterial spin labeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklaus Denier

    Full Text Available Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration. Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8, using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and in the insula (both hemispheres. Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment.

  19. Arterial spin-labeling perfusion imaging of childhood meningitis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex Mun-Ching; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Liu, Ho-Ling; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Toh, Cheng-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is mainly used to detect complications, is ineffective in determining the neurological status of patients with meningitis. Hemodynamic change in the brain may be more indicative of the neurological status but few imaging studies have verified this. Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion, a noninvasive MR method requiring no contrast agent injection, can be used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). We describe three pediatric patients with meningitis, who all showed regions of increased CBF on perfusion imaging. One patient, presenting with headache and conscious disturbance, had CBF changes in the frontal, temporal, and occipital regions. The other two patients, presenting with hallucinations, memory deficits, and seizures, had CBF changes in the frontal and temporal regions. ASL perfusion imaging may be helpful in assessing patients with meningitis, demonstrating CBF changes more strongly correlating with the neurological status, and detecting active brain abnormalities.

  20. Early-stage differentiation between presenile Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia using arterial spin labeling MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.E. Steketee (Rebecca); E.E. Bron (Esther); R. Meijboom (Rozanna); G.C. Houston (Gavin); S. Klein (Stefan); H.J.M.M. Mutsaerts (Henri J. M.); C. Méndez Orellana (Carolina); F.J. De Jong (Frank J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); A. van der Lugt (Aad); M. Smits (Marion)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI for the early diagnosis of and differentiation between the two most common types of presenile dementia: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and for distinguishing age-related from pathological perfusion

  1. Early-stage differentiation between presenile Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia using arterial spin labeling MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.E. Steketee (Rebecca); E.E. Bron (Esther); Meijboom, R. (Rozanna); Houston, G.C. (Gavin C.); Klein, S. (Stefan); H.J.M.M. Mutsaerts (Henri J. M.); Orellana, C.P.M. (Carolina P. Mendez); F.J. de Jong (Fransina); J.C. van Swieten (John); A. van der Lugt (Aad); M. Smits (Marion)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI for the early diagnosis of and differentiation between the two most common types of presenile dementia: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and for distinguishing age-related from pathological perfusion

  2. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with continuous arterial spin labeling: methods and clinical applications in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detre, John A. E-mail: detre@mail.med.upenn.edu; Alsop, David C

    1999-05-01

    Several methods are now available for measuring cerebral perfusion and related hemodynamic parameters using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One class of techniques utilizes electromagnetically labeled arterial blood water as a noninvasive diffusible tracer for blood flow measurements. The electromagnetically labeled tracer has a decay rate of T1, which is sufficiently long to allow perfusion of the tissue and microvasculature to be detected. Alternatively, electromagnetic arterial spin labeling (ASL) may be used to obtain qualitative perfusion contrast for detecting changes in blood flow, similar to the use of susceptibility contrast in blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI) to detect functional activation in the brain. The ability to obtain blood flow maps using a non-invasive and widely available modality such as MRI should greatly enhance the utility of blood flow measurement as a means of gaining further insight into the broad range of hemodynamically related physiology and pathophysiology. This article describes the biophysical considerations pertaining to the generation of quantitative blood flow maps using a particular form of ASL in which arterial blood water is continuously labeled, termed continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL). Technical advances permit multislice perfusion imaging using CASL with reduced sensitivity to motion and transit time effects. Interpretable cerebral perfusion images can now be reliably obtained in a variety of clinical settings including acute stroke, chronic cerebrovascular disease, degenerative diseases and epilepsy. Over the past several years, the technical and theoretical foundations of CASL perfusion MRI techniques have evolved from feasibility studies into practical usage. Currently existing methodologies are sufficient to make reliable and clinically relevant observations which complement structural assessment using MRI. Future technical improvements should further reduce the acquisition times

  3. Measurement of brain perfusion in newborns: Pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) versus pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudes, Elodie; Gilbert, Guillaume; Leppert, Ilana Ruth; Tan, Xianming; Pike, G. Bruce; Saint-Martin, Christine; Wintermark, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Background Arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be useful for identifying asphyxiated newborns at risk of developing brain injury, whether or not therapeutic hypothermia was administered. However, this technique has been only rarely used in newborns until now, because of the challenges to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution in newborns. Objective To compare two methods of ASL-PWI (i.e., single inversion-time pulsed arterial spin labeling [single TI PASL], and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling [pCASL]) to assess brain perfusion in asphyxiated newborns treated with therapeutic hypothermia and in healthy newborns. Design/methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of term asphyxiated newborns meeting the criteria for therapeutic hypothermia; four additional healthy term newborns were also included as controls. Each of the enrolled newborns was scanned at least once during the first month of life. Each MRI scan included conventional anatomical imaging, as well as PASL and pCASL PWI-MRI. Control and labeled images were registered separately to reduce the effect of motion artifacts. For each scan, the axial slice at the level of the basal ganglia was used for comparisons. Each scan was scored for its image quality. Quantification of whole-slice cerebral blood flow (CBF) was done afterwards using previously described formulas. Results A total number of 61 concomitant PASL and pCASL scans were obtained in nineteen asphyxiated newborns treated with therapeutic hypothermia and four healthy newborns. After discarding the scans with very poor image quality, 75% (46/61) remained for comparison between the two ASL methods. pCASL images presented a significantly superior image quality score compared to PASL images (p newborns. However, pCASL might be a better choice over PASL in newborns, as pCASL perfusion maps had a superior image quality that allowed a

  4. Comparing model-based and model-free analysis methods for QUASAR arterial spin labeling perfusion quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Michael A; Woolrich, Mark W; Petersen, Esben T; Golay, Xavier; Payne, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Amongst the various implementations of arterial spin labeling MRI methods for quantifying cerebral perfusion, the QUASAR method is unique. By using a combination of labeling with and without flow suppression gradients, the QUASAR method offers the separation of macrovascular and tissue signals. This permits local arterial input functions to be defined and "model-free" analysis, using numerical deconvolution, to be used. However, it remains unclear whether arterial spin labeling data are best treated using model-free or model-based analysis. This work provides a critical comparison of these two approaches for QUASAR arterial spin labeling in the healthy brain. An existing two-component (arterial and tissue) model was extended to the mixed flow suppression scheme of QUASAR to provide an optimal model-based analysis. The model-based analysis was extended to incorporate dispersion of the labeled bolus, generally regarded as the major source of discrepancy between the two analysis approaches. Model-free and model-based analyses were compared for perfusion quantification including absolute measurements, uncertainty estimation, and spatial variation in cerebral blood flow estimates. Major sources of discrepancies between model-free and model-based analysis were attributed to the effects of dispersion and the degree to which the two methods can separate macrovascular and tissue signal. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauls, Mathilde M H; Clarke, Natasha; Trippier, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    vascular territories. The aim of this trial is to test the hypothesis that tadalafil increases cerebral blood flow in older people with small vessel disease. METHODS/DESIGN: Perfusion by Arterial Spin labelling following Single dose Tadalafil In Small vessel disease (PASTIS) is a phase II randomised double......-blind crossover trial. In two visits, 7-30 days apart, participants undergo arterial spin labelling to measure cerebral blood flow and a battery of cognitive tests, pre- and post-dosing with oral tadalafil (20 mg) or placebo. SAMPLE SIZE: 54 participants are required to detect a 15% increase in cerebral blood...

  6. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) fMRI: advantages, theoretical constrains, and experimental challenges in neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borogovac, Ajna; Asllani, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a well-established correlate of brain function and therefore an essential parameter for studying the brain at both normal and diseased states. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive fMRI technique that uses arterial water as an endogenous tracer to measure CBF. ASL provides reliable absolute quantification of CBF with higher spatial and temporal resolution than other techniques. And yet, the routine application of ASL has been somewhat limited. In this review, we start by highlighting theoretical complexities and technical challenges of ASL fMRI for basic and clinical research. While underscoring the main advantages of ASL versus other techniques such as BOLD, we also expound on inherent challenges and confounds in ASL perfusion imaging. In closing, we expound on several exciting developments in the field that we believe will make ASL reach its full potential in neuroscience research.

  7. Three-dimensional whole-brain perfusion quantification using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI at multiple post-labeling delays: accounting for both arterial transit time and impulse response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Huang, Alan J; Hua, Jun; Desmond, John E; Stevens, Robert D; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) with whole-brain coverage is challenging in terms of both acquisition and quantitative analysis. In order to fit arterial spin labeling-based perfusion kinetic curves, an empirical three-parameter model which characterizes the effective impulse response function (IRF) is introduced, which allows the determination of CBF, the arterial transit time (ATT) and T(1,eff). The accuracy and precision of the proposed model were compared with those of more complicated models with four or five parameters through Monte Carlo simulations. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling images were acquired on a clinical 3-T scanner in 10 normal volunteers using a three-dimensional multi-shot gradient and spin echo scheme at multiple post-labeling delays to sample the kinetic curves. Voxel-wise fitting was performed using the three-parameter model and other models that contain two, four or five unknown parameters. For the two-parameter model, T(1,eff) values close to tissue and blood were assumed separately. Standard statistical analysis was conducted to compare these fitting models in various brain regions. The fitted results indicated that: (i) the estimated CBF values using the two-parameter model show appreciable dependence on the assumed T(1,eff) values; (ii) the proposed three-parameter model achieves the optimal balance between the goodness of fit and model complexity when compared among the models with explicit IRF fitting; (iii) both the two-parameter model using fixed blood T1 values for T(1,eff) and the three-parameter model provide reasonable fitting results. Using the proposed three-parameter model, the estimated CBF (46 ± 14 mL/100 g/min) and ATT (1.4 ± 0.3 s) values averaged from different brain regions are close to the literature reports; the estimated T(1,eff) values (1.9 ± 0.4 s) are higher than the tissue T1 values, possibly reflecting a contribution from the microvascular arterial blood compartment

  8. Studies on the clinical application of MR perfusion image using arterial spin labeling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Kenji

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for imaging brain perfusion, arterial spin labeling method was applied in clinic. Brain perfusion was imaged by FAIR and EPISTAR both of which using arterial spin labeling (ASL) method. Suitable parameters for small contamination were examined using a imaging phantom. Then normal volunteers were examined for imaging timing. Suitable time between labeling pulse and imaging pulse for brain capillary and parenchyma was 1.0 sec. For clinical application study, total 48 patients with brain diseases were examined by FAIR and/or EPISTAR. A lesion/white matter signal intensity ratio was calculated in all clinical cases. Average of signal intensity ratio in infarction, tumor and arteriovenous malformation (AVM) were 0.8, 2.2 and 18.6 at FAIR, and 0.6, 2.2 and 12.8 at EPISTAR, respectively. Low perfusion diseases such as cerebral infarction have low signal intensity ratio and high perfusion diseases such as AVM have high signal intensity ratio in both FAIR and EPISTAR. Brain lesions were imaged similarly in FAIR and EPISTAR, and no remarkable difference was found between FAIR and EPISTAR. As a result of diagnostic trial by signal intensity ratio in operated tumor, hemorrhagic cases could be diagnosed by accuracies of 75% in FAIR and 100% in EPISTAR, respectively. (author)

  9. High accuracy of arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging in differentiation of pilomyxoid from pilocytic astrocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, S.A.; Assadsangabi, R.; Hajmomenian, M.; Vossough, A. [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Santi, M. [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a relatively new tumor entity which has been added to the 2007 WHO Classification of tumors of the central nervous system. The goal of this study is to utilize arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to differentiate PMA from pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Pulsed ASL and conventional MRI sequences of patients with PMA and PA in the past 5 years were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with history of radiation or treatment with anti-angiogenic drugs were excluded. A total of 24 patients (9 PMA, 15 PA) were included. There were statistically significant differences between PMA and PA in mean tumor/gray matter (GM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) ratios (1.3 vs 0.4, p < 0.001) and maximum tumor/GM CBF ratio (2.3 vs 1, p < 0.001). Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for differentiation of PMA from PA was 0.91 using mean tumor CBF, 0.95 using mean tumor/GM CBF ratios, and 0.89 using maximum tumor/GM CBF. Using a threshold value of 0.91, the mean tumor/GM CBF ratio was able to diagnose PMA with 77 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity, and a threshold value of 0.7, provided 88 % sensitivity and 86 % specificity. There was no statistically significant difference between the two tumors in enhancement pattern (p = 0.33), internal architecture (p = 0.15), or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values (p = 0.07). ASL imaging has high accuracy in differentiating PMA from PA. The result of this study may have important applications in prognostication and treatment planning especially in patients with less accessible tumors such as hypothalamic-chiasmatic gliomas. (orig.)

  10. Perfusion deficits detected by arterial spin-labeling in patients with TIA with negative diffusion and vascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, X J; Salamon, N; Wang, D J J; He, R; Linetsky, M; Ellingson, B M; Pope, W B

    2013-01-01

    A substantial portion of clinically diagnosed TIA cases is imaging-negative. The purpose of the current study is to determine if arterial spin-labeling is helpful in detecting perfusion abnormalities in patients presenting clinically with TIA. Pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling with 3D background-suppressed gradient and spin-echo was acquired on 49 patients suspected of TIA within 24 hours of symptom onset. All patients were free of stroke history and had no lesion-specific findings on general MR, DWI, and MRA sequences. The calculated arterial spin-labeling CBF maps were scored from 1-3 on the basis of presence and severity of perfusion disturbance by 3 independent observers blinded to patient history. An age-matched cohort of 36 patients diagnosed with no cerebrovascular events was evaluated as a control. Interobserver agreement was assessed by use of the Kendall concordance test. Scoring of perfusion abnormalities on arterial spin-labeling scans of the TIA cohort was highly concordant among the 3 observers (W = 0.812). The sensitivity and specificity of arterial spin-labeling in the diagnosis of perfusion abnormalities in TIA was 55.8% and 90.7%, respectively. In 93.3% (70/75) of the arterial spin-labeling CBF map readings with positive scores (≥2), the brain regions where perfusion abnormalities were identified by 3 observers matched with the neurologic deficits at TIA onset. In this preliminary study, arterial spin-labeling showed promise in the detection of perfusion abnormalities that correlated with clinically diagnosed TIA in patients with otherwise normal neuroimaging results.

  11. Thyroid perfusion imaging as a diagnostic tool in Graves' disease. Arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging vs. colour-coded Doppler ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muessig, K. [University Hospital of Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Metabolic Diseases; Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research, Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. for Clinical Diabetology; University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Div. of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nephrology, Angiology, and Clinical Chemistry; Schraml, C.; Schwenzer, N.F. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Section on Experimental Radiology; University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Rietig, R.; Balletshofer, B. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Div. of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nephrology, Angiology, and Clinical Chemistry; Martirosian, P.; Haering, H.U.; Schick, F. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Section on Experimental Radiology; Claussen, C.D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Though increased thyroid perfusion assessed by colour-coded Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) is characteristic of Graves' disease (GD), sometimes perfusion assessment by CDUS is not possible. In these cases, arterial spin labelling (ASL), a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique allowing non-invasive thyroid perfusion quantification, may have additional diagnostic value. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ASL-MRI for assessment of increased blood perfusion in patients with GD compared to CDUS. Materials and Methods: Thyroid perfusion was measured by CDUS (volume flow rate calculated from pulsed wave Doppler signals and vessel diameter) and ASL-MRI at 1.5 T in 7 patients with GD and 10 healthy controls. Results: In patients with GD, average perfusion in both thyroid lobes was markedly increased compared to controls. Both techniques applied for volume related perfusion as well as absolute volume flow in thyroid feeding vessels provided similar results (all p = 0.0008). Using a cut-off value of 22 ml/min for the volume flow rate assessed by CDUS in the four feeding vessels allowed discrimination between patients with GD and controls in all cases. After adjusting thyroid perfusion for the differences in organ volume, both CDUS and ASL revealed also complete discrimination between health and disease. Conclusion: Thyroid perfusion measurement by ASL-MRI reliably discriminate GD from normal thyroid glands. In patients in whom thyroid arteries cannot be depicted by CDUS for technical or anatomical reasons, ASL-MRI may have additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  12. A neuroradiologist's guide to arterial spin labeling MRI in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grade, M.; Hernandez Tamames, J.A.; Pizzini, F.B.; Achten, E.; Golay, X.; Smits, M.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). This review provides a practical guide and overview of the clinical applications of ASL of the brain, as well its potential pitfalls. The technical and physiological background is also addressed. At present, main areas of interest are cerebrovascular disease, dementia and neuro-oncology. In cerebrovascular disease, ASL is of particular interest owing to its quantitative nature and its capability to determine cerebral arterial territories. In acute stroke, the source of the collateral blood supply in the penumbra may be visualised. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, the extent and severity of compromised cerebral perfusion can be visualised, which may be used to guide therapeutic or preventative intervention. ASL has potential for the detection and follow-up of arteriovenous malformations. In the workup of dementia patients, ASL is proposed as a diagnostic alternative to PET. It can easily be added to the routinely performed structural MRI examination. In patients with established Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, hypoperfusion patterns are seen that are similar to hypometabolism patterns seen with PET. Studies on ASL in brain tumour imaging indicate a high correlation between areas of increased CBF as measured with ASL and increased cerebral blood volume as measured with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. Major advantages of ASL for brain tumour imaging are the fact that CBF measurements are not influenced by breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, as well as its quantitative nature, facilitating multicentre and longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  13. A neuroradiologist's guide to arterial spin labeling MRI in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grade, M. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Hernandez Tamames, J.A. [Rey Juan Carlos University, Medical Image Analysis and Biometry Laboratory, Madrid (Spain); Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pizzini, F.B. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Verona University Hospital, Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostics and Pathology, Verona (Italy); Achten, E. [Ghent University Hospital, Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Golay, X. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Smits, M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). This review provides a practical guide and overview of the clinical applications of ASL of the brain, as well its potential pitfalls. The technical and physiological background is also addressed. At present, main areas of interest are cerebrovascular disease, dementia and neuro-oncology. In cerebrovascular disease, ASL is of particular interest owing to its quantitative nature and its capability to determine cerebral arterial territories. In acute stroke, the source of the collateral blood supply in the penumbra may be visualised. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, the extent and severity of compromised cerebral perfusion can be visualised, which may be used to guide therapeutic or preventative intervention. ASL has potential for the detection and follow-up of arteriovenous malformations. In the workup of dementia patients, ASL is proposed as a diagnostic alternative to PET. It can easily be added to the routinely performed structural MRI examination. In patients with established Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, hypoperfusion patterns are seen that are similar to hypometabolism patterns seen with PET. Studies on ASL in brain tumour imaging indicate a high correlation between areas of increased CBF as measured with ASL and increased cerebral blood volume as measured with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. Major advantages of ASL for brain tumour imaging are the fact that CBF measurements are not influenced by breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, as well as its quantitative nature, facilitating multicentre and longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  14. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Olofsson, K; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neon......Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term...

  15. Improving perfusion quantification in arterial spin labeling for delayed arrival times by using optimized acquisition schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramme, Johanna; Diehl, Volker; Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan; Guenther, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The improvement in Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion quantification, especially for delayed bolus arrival times (BAT), with an acquisition redistribution scheme mitigating the T1 decay of the label in multi-TI ASL measurements is investigated. A multi inflow time (TI) 3D-GRASE sequence is presented which adapts the distribution of acquisitions accordingly, by keeping the scan time constant. The MR sequence increases the number of averages at long TIs and decreases their number at short TIs and thus compensating the T1 decay of the label. The improvement of perfusion quantification is evaluated in simulations as well as in-vivo in healthy volunteers and patients with prolonged BATs due to age or steno-occlusive disease. The improvement in perfusion quantification depends on BAT. At healthy BATs the differences are small, but become larger for longer BATs typically found in certain diseases. The relative error of perfusion is improved up to 30% at BATs > 1500 ms in comparison to the standard acquisition scheme. This adapted acquisition scheme improves the perfusion measurement in comparison to standard multi-TI ASL implementations. It provides relevant benefit in clinical conditions that cause prolonged BATs and is therefore of high clinical relevance for neuroimaging of steno-occlusive diseases.

  16. Demonstration of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity induced by gravity and lung inflation using arterial spin labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Li [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: fanli0930@163.com; Liu Shiyuan [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: fanli7938@chinaren.com; Xiao Xiangsheng [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: lizhaobin79@163.com; Sun Fei [GE Healthcare (China)], E-mail: Fei.sun@med.ge.com

    2010-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of gravity and lung inflation on pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity in human lung using an arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence called flow sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR). Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance imaging of lung perfusion using arterial spin labeling sequence was performed in supine position in ten healthy volunteers on a 1.5 T whole body scanner (GE Healthcare). Five coronal slices at an interval of 3 cm from dorsal to ventral (labeled as P3, P6, P9, P12, P15, sequently) were obtained when the volunteers performed breath holding on end expiration and the relative pulmonary blood flow (rPBF) was measured. Then, another coronal perfusion-weighted image of P3 slice was obtained on end inspiration. Tagging efficiency of pulmonary parenchyma with IR ({delta}SI), rPBF and area of the P3 slice were analyzed. Results: (1) Along the direction of gravity, a gradient was visually perceived as a vertical increase in rPBF. There were significant statistic differences in rPBF between any two coronal planes except that between P12 and P15. In supine position, regression coefficients of right and left lung were -4.98 and -5.16, respectively. This means that rPBF decreased 4.98 (right) and 5.16 (left) for each centimeter above the dorsal. No statistical difference was seen between ROIs placed along iso-gravitational plane. (2) For a same slice, there were significant statistic differences in {delta}SI, rPBF and area at different respiratory phases (P < 0.05). Greater {delta}SI and more perfusion were observed on end expiration than on end inspiration. The area was larger on end inspiration than on end expiration. Conclusion: Both gravity and respiratory phase are important determinants of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity. FAIR is sensitive to demonstrate gravity- and respiratory phase-dependent differences in lung perfusion. Positioning the patient so that the area of interest is down-gravity and asking patient

  17. Skull metastases detecting on arterial spin labeling perfusion: Three case reports and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kyeong H; Baek, Hye J; Cho, Soo B; Moon, Jin I; Choi, Bo H; Park, Sung E; An, Hyo J

    2017-11-01

    Detection of skull metastases is as important as detection of brain metastases because early diagnosis of skull metastases is a crucial determinant of treatment. However, the skull can be a blind spot for assessing metastases on routine brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To the best of our knowledge, the finding of skull metastases on arterial spin labeling (ASL) has not been reported. ASL is a specific MRI sequence for evaluating cerebral blood flow using magnetized endogenous inflow blood. This study uses ASL as a routine sequence of brain MRI protocol and describes 3 clinical cases of skull metastases identified by ASL. The study also highlights the clinical usefulness of ASL in detecting skull metastases. Three patients with known malignancy underwent brain MRI to evaluate for brain metastases. All of the skull metastases were conspicuously depicted on routine ASL images, and the lesions correlated well with other MRI sequences. Three patients received palliative chemotherapy. Three patients are being followed up regularly at the outpatient department. The routine use of ASL may help to detect lesions in blind spots, such as skull metastases, and to facilitate the evaluation of intracranial pathologies without the use of contrast materials in exceptional situations.

  18. Quantifying Cerebellum Grey Matter and White Matter Perfusion Using Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF, studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM and white matter (WM, and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values.

  19. Quantifying cerebellum grey matter and white matter perfusion using pulsed arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Sarkar, Subhendra N; Purdy, David E; Briggs, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF), studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL) parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM), and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values.

  20. Quantifying Cerebellum Grey Matter and White Matter Perfusion Using Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Sarkar, Subhendra N.; Purdy, David E.; Briggs, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF), studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL) parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM), and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values. PMID:24949416

  1. Longitudinal Assessment of Renal Perfusion and Oxygenation in Transplant Donor-Recipient Pairs Using Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over 2 years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. Arterial spin labeling and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors before transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after transplant. After 3 months, 7 of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25 to 50 mg/d losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and fractional excretion of sodium for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 mL/min per 100 g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 mL/min per 1.73 m (33.3%; P donors, and they indicate a potentially beneficial effect of losartan in recipients.

  2. Arterial spin labelling MRI for detecting pseudocapsule defects and predicting renal capsule invasion in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Wu, Y; Xue, W; Zuo, P; Oesingmann, N; Gan, Q; Huang, Z; Wu, M; Hu, F; Kuang, M; Song, B

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate prospectively the performance of combining morphological and arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting pseudocapsule defects in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and to predict renal capsule invasion confirmed histopathologically. Twenty consecutive patients with suspicious renal tumours underwent MRI. Renal ASL imaging was performed and renal blood flow was measured quantitatively. The diagnostic performance of T2-weighted images alone, and a combination of T2-weighted and ASL images for predicting renal capsule invasion were assessed. Twenty renal lesions were evaluated in 20 patients. All lesions were clear cell RCCs (ccRCCs) confirmed at post-surgical histopathology. Fifteen ccRCCs showed pseudocapsule defects on T2-weighted images, of which 12 cases showed existing blood flow in defect areas on perfusion images. To predict renal capsule invasion, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 100%, 71.4%, 86.7%, 100%, respectively, for T2-weighted images alone, and 92.3%, 100%, 100%, 87.5%, respectively, for the combination of T2-weighted and ASL images. ASL images can reflect the perfusion of pseudocapsule defects and as such, the combination of T2-weighted and ASL images produces promising diagnostic accuracy for predicting renal capsule invasion. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent MRI Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Cerebrovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeeing, Diederik P J; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Petersen, Esben T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) results of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI studies performed in patients with cerebrovascular disease (steno-occlusive vascular disease or stroke) were systematically reviewed. SUMMARY: Thirty-one articles...... found a significant lower ASL CVR in the ipsilateral hemispheres of patients compared to controls. KEY MESSAGES: This review brings support for a reduced BOLD and ASL CVR in the ipsilateral hemisphere of patients with cerebrovascular disease. We suggest that future studies will be performed in a uniform...... way so reference values can be established and could be used to guide treatment decisions in patients with cerebrovascular disease....

  4. Early-stage differentiation between presenile Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia using arterial spin labeling MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steketee, Rebecca M.E.; Meijboom, Rozanna; Lugt, Aad van der; Smits, Marion [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Medical Informatics and Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Houston, Gavin C. [GE Healthcare, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Mutsaerts, Henri J.M.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 22660, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mendez Orellana, Carolina P. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Frank Jan de; Swieten, John C. van [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI for the early diagnosis of and differentiation between the two most common types of presenile dementia: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and for distinguishing age-related from pathological perfusion changes. Thirteen AD and 19 FTD patients, and 25 age-matched older and 22 younger controls underwent 3D pseudo-continuous ASL-MRI at 3 T. Gray matter (GM) volume and cerebral blood flow (CBF), corrected for partial volume effects, were quantified in the entire supratentorial cortex and in 10 GM regions. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic performance were evaluated in regions showing significant CBF differences between patient groups or between patients and older controls. AD compared with FTD patients had hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex, differentiating these with a diagnostic performance of 74 %. Compared to older controls, FTD patients showed hypoperfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas AD patients showed a more widespread regional hypoperfusion as well as atrophy. Regional atrophy was not different between AD and FTD. Diagnostic performance of ASL to differentiate AD or FTD from controls was good (78-85 %). Older controls showed global hypoperfusion compared to young controls. ASL-MRI contributes to early diagnosis of and differentiation between presenile AD and FTD. (orig.)

  5. Early-stage differentiation between presenile Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia using arterial spin labeling MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steketee, Rebecca M.E.; Meijboom, Rozanna; Lugt, Aad van der; Smits, Marion; Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan; Houston, Gavin C.; Mutsaerts, Henri J.M.M.; Mendez Orellana, Carolina P.; Jong, Frank Jan de; Swieten, John C. van

    2016-01-01

    To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI for the early diagnosis of and differentiation between the two most common types of presenile dementia: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and for distinguishing age-related from pathological perfusion changes. Thirteen AD and 19 FTD patients, and 25 age-matched older and 22 younger controls underwent 3D pseudo-continuous ASL-MRI at 3 T. Gray matter (GM) volume and cerebral blood flow (CBF), corrected for partial volume effects, were quantified in the entire supratentorial cortex and in 10 GM regions. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic performance were evaluated in regions showing significant CBF differences between patient groups or between patients and older controls. AD compared with FTD patients had hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex, differentiating these with a diagnostic performance of 74 %. Compared to older controls, FTD patients showed hypoperfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas AD patients showed a more widespread regional hypoperfusion as well as atrophy. Regional atrophy was not different between AD and FTD. Diagnostic performance of ASL to differentiate AD or FTD from controls was good (78-85 %). Older controls showed global hypoperfusion compared to young controls. ASL-MRI contributes to early diagnosis of and differentiation between presenile AD and FTD. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of cerebral white matter perfusion using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling 3T magnetic resonance imaging--an experimental and theoretical investigation of feasibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chau Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study was aimed to experimentally and numerically investigate the feasibility of measuring cerebral white matter perfusion using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at a relatively fine resolution to mitigate partial volume effect from gray matter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Research Ethics Committee approved this study. On a clinical 3T MR system, ten healthy volunteers (5 females, 5 males, age = 28 ± 3 years were scanned after providing written informed consent. PCASL imaging was performed with varied combinations of labeling duration (τ = 1000, 1500, 2000, and 2500 ms and post-labeling delay (PLD = 1000, 1400, 1800, and 2200 ms, at a spatial resolution (1.56 x 1.56 x 5 mm(3 finer than commonly used (3.5 x 3.5 mm(2, 5-8 mm in thickness. Computer simulations were performed to calculate the achievable perfusion-weighted signal-to-noise ratio at varied τ, PLD, and transit delay. RESULTS: Based on experimental and numerical data, the optimal τ and PLD were found to be 2000 ms and 1500-1800 ms, respectively, yielding adequate SNR (~2 to support perfusion measurement in the majority (~60% of white matter. The measurement variability was about 9% in a one-week interval. The measured white matter perfusion and perfusion ratio of gray matter to white matter were 15.8-27.5 ml/100ml/min and 1.8-4.0, respectively, depending on spatial resolution as well as the amount of deep white matter included. CONCLUSION: PCASL 3T MRI is able to measure perfusion in the majority of cerebral white matter at an adequate signal-to-noise ratio by using appropriate tagging duration and post-labeling delay. Although pixel-wise comparison may not be possible, region-of-interest based flow quantification is feasible.

  7. Temporal and extra-temporal hypoperfusion in medial temporal lobe epilepsy evaluated by arterial-spin-labeling based MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Lianfang; Zhang Zhiqiang; Lu Guangming; Yuan Cuiping; Wang Zhengge; Wang Haoxue; Huang Wei; Wei Fangyuan; Chen Guanghui; Tan Qifu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of the lateralization of unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) by using arterial-spin-labeling (ASL) based perfusion MR imaging and investigate the changes of perfusion in the regions related to mTLE network and the relationship between the perfusion and the clinical status. Methods: Twenty-five patients with left-sided and 23 with right-sided mTLE were enrolled, and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) of related region was measured based on pulsed-ASL sequence on Siemens 3 T scanner. The CBF of the mTLE group were compared with that in the controls by using ANOVA analysis. The asymmetric indices of CBF in the medial temporal lobe were calculated as the lesion side compared with the normal side in matched region in mTLE group. Results: Compared with the volunteers, the patients with mTLE showed the decrease of CBF in the bilateral medial and lateral temporal, the frontal and parietal regions relating to the default-mode network and more serious in lesion side. The CBF values of the medial temporal lobe were negatively correlated with the epilepsy duration (r=-0.51, P<0.01). The asymmetric index of CBF as-0.01 has a 76.0% (19/25) sensitivity and a 78.3% (18/23) specificity to distinguish the lesion side. Conclusions: The decrease of CBF in the temporal and extra-temporal region by ASL-based MRI suggests the functional abnormalities in the network involved by mTLE. The ASL technique is a useful tool for lateralizing the unilateral mTLE. (authors)

  8. Resting state cerebral blood flow with arterial spin labeling MRI in developing human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Duan, Yunsuo; Peterson, Bradley S; Asllani, Iris; Zelaya, Fernando; Lythgoe, David; Kangarlu, Alayar

    2018-07-01

    The development of brain circuits is coupled with changes in neurovascular coupling, which refers to the close relationship between neural activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Studying the characteristics of CBF during resting state in developing brain can be a complementary way to understand the functional connectivity of the developing brain. Arterial spin labeling (ASL), as a noninvasive MR technique, is particularly attractive for studying cerebral perfusion in children and even newborns. We have collected pulsed ASL data in resting state for 47 healthy subjects from young children to adolescence (aged from 6 to 20 years old). In addition to studying the developmental change of static CBF maps during resting state, we also analyzed the CBF time series to reveal the dynamic characteristics of CBF in differing age groups. We used the seed-based correlation analysis to examine the temporal relationship of CBF time series between the selected ROIs and other brain regions. We have shown the developmental patterns in both static CBF maps and dynamic characteristics of CBF. While higher CBF of default mode network (DMN) in all age groups supports that DMN is the prominent active network during the resting state, the CBF connectivity patterns of some typical resting state networks show distinct patterns of metabolic activity during the resting state in the developing brains. Copyright © 2018 European Paediatric Neurology Society. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging in the differentiation of parasellar meningioma and cavernous haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Lou, Xin; Liu, Meng-Yu; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Shi, Kai-Ning; Ma, Lin

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging (3D-ASL) in distinguishing cavernous haemangioma from parasellar meningioma, using histological data as a reference standard. Patients with parasellar meningioma or parasellar cavernous haemangioma underwent conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by DWI and 3D-ASL using a 3.0 Tesla MRI. The minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (minADC) from DWI and the maximal normalized cerebral blood flow (nCBF) from 3D-ASL were measured in each tumour. Diagnosis was confirmed by histology. MinADC was significantly lower and nCBF significantly higher in meningioma (n = 19) than cavernous haemangioma (n = 15). There was a significant negative correlation between minADC and nCBF (r = -0.605). DWI and 3D-ASL are useful in differentiating cavernous haemangiomas from parasellar meningiomas, particularly in situations when the appearance on conventional MRI sequences is otherwise ambiguous. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Novelties in radiology: arterial spin labeling, the gadolinium-free MR perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Fabricio Guimaraes; Maldjian, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) technique that assesses cerebral blood flow. This method has been mainly used for investigative purposes with very few centers in the world performing it on a routine clinical basis. ASL has already been validated and proven to be useful in the assessment of a growing number of diseases and conditions. As with any recently established technique, ASL has some limitations that need to be overcome to become more widely used and to be part of the daily routine of the neuroimaging specialist. Currently, four major current ASL techniques are available: pulsed ASL (PASL), continuous ASL (CASL), pseudo-continuous ASL (PCASL) and velocity-selective ASL (VSASL). This article describe these techniques

  11. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Maria J; Olofsson, Kern; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-09-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neonates. Examinations were performed on unsedated infants at postmenstrual age of 39-40 wk in both groups. Due to motion, reliable data were obtained from 23 preterm and 6 term infants. Perfusion in the basal ganglia (39 and 30 mL/100 g/min for preterm and term neonates, respectively) was significantly higher (p neonates at term-equivalent age and in term neonates. Perfusion was significantly higher (p = 0.01) in the preterm group than in the term infants, indicating that RCP may be influenced by developmental and postnatal ages. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that noninvasive ASL at 3T may be used to measure RCP in healthy unsedated preterm and term neonates. ASL is, therefore, a viable tool that will allow serial studies of RCP in high-risk neonates.

  12. Correlation between arterial spin labeling MRI and dynamic FDG on PET-MR in Alzheimer’s disease and non-Alzhiemer’s disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David; Goubran, Maged; Wilson, Eugene; Xu, Guofan; Tripathi, Pragya; Holley, Dawn; Chao, Steven; Wintermark, Max; Quon, Andrew; Zeineh, Michael; Vasanawala, Minal; Zaharchuk, Greg [Stanford University, California (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Regional hypoperfusion on Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) MRI and corresponding regions of hypometabolism on FDG PET have been reported in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). To our knowledge these correlations have not been studied under simultaneous acquisition. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of ASL with FDG PET under simultaneous acquisition on PET-MR and to explore this correlation as a possible biomarker for AD. Dynamic FDG and ASL imaging was performed using a simultaneous TOF-enabled PET-MR scanner in 7 subjects without AD and 3 subjects with AD. Average age was 68±5 years. Automated atlas-based segmentation was performed using T2 MRI using the Talairach atlas. Quantitative analysis of ASL and FDG (delayed 45-75 minute scan) was performed in five regions using the pons as a reference region for both perfusion and metabolism. Statistical analyses included Spearman’s correlation and student’s t-test. Significant correlation of relative perfusion and metabolism was found in two of the five brain regions including the putamen (p = 0.018) and the hippocampus (p = 0.031). In addition, there was significant difference between the relative perfusion and metabolism of the thalamus (p = 0.04). No difference was seen between the AD and non-AD groups. Simultaneous PET-MR demonstrates a positive correlation of perfusion of ASL with metabolism on FDG PET in the hippocampus and putamen. The putamen correlation has previously been reported in the literature on a non-simultaneous ASL and FDG imaging. The thalamus was noted to have a difference in the relative perfusion and metabolism representing a perfusion-metabolism mismatch. Future studies should explore the correlation in additional brain regions and the meaning of perfusion-metabolism mismatches as potential imaging biomarkers for patients with and without AD.

  13. Stability of MR brain-perfusion measurement using arterial spin labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petr, Jan; Hofheinz, Frank; Platzek, Ivan; Schramm, Georg; Van Den Hoff, Jorg [Helmholtz-Center Dresden-Rossendorf, PET Center, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MR technique for assessment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) that does not require use of contrast agents which makes it a less invasive alternative to the 15O-H2O-PET measurement. The repeatability of ASL has been studied extensively but mainly in young healthy volunteers. We have tested repeatability of ASL under realistic clinical conditions in elderly brain tumor patients acquired with a Philips Ingenuity TF PET/MR in the context of an ongoing 11C-Methionine PET/MR study. Twenty three patients (age 54.8±13.0 y) were scanned on two or more session. The patients underwent 6 weeks of concurrent radiochemotherapy with Temozolomide between the first session and second measurement. The mean relative difference of gray matter CBF was 18.6% between the first two session and 13.0% for the second session and further on. The mean gray matter CBF was 46.6±7.2 mL/min/100 g on the first sessions and there was a significant decrease of 9.8% between first and second session (p=0.027). In summary, the ASL presents measurement of CBF with reasonable repeatability also in elderly patients under clinical conditions when it is not possible to control for all sources of variation. Significant decrease of CBF in healthy tissue was observed after the radiochemotherapy. Prospectively, the ASL data together with the also acquired 11C-Methionine PET will be evaluated regarding their separate and combined ability to predict patient outcome and effectiveness of the performed radiochemotherapy.

  14. Measurement of brain perfusion in newborns: Pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL versus pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Boudes

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates that both ASL methods are feasible to assess brain perfusion in healthy and sick newborns. However, pCASL might be a better choice over PASL in newborns, as pCASL perfusion maps had a superior image quality that allowed a more detailed identification of the different brain structures.

  15. Cerebral Perfusion Measurements in Elderly with Hypertension Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutsaerts, H J M M; van Dalen, J W; Heijtel, D F R

    2015-01-01

    (CV) and physiological correlations with age and gender were compared between the three perfusion parameters. RESULTS: There was no difference in CV between CBFcrushed and CBFnon-crushed (15-24%, p>0.4) but the CV of ATT (4-9%) was much smaller. The total gray matter correlations with age and gender...... for group analyses in elderly with hypertension. The obtained flow territories provide knowledge on vascular anatomy of elderly with hypertension and can be used in future studies to investigate regional vascular effects....

  16. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow in Chronic Kidney Disease Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-Ping; Tan, Huan; Thacker, Jon M; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ying; Kohn, Orly; Sprague, Stuart M; Prasad, Pottumarthi V

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is known to be associated with reduced renal blood flow. However, data to-date in humans is limited. In this study, non-invasive arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI data was acquired in 33 patients with diabetes and stage-3 CKD, and 30 healthy controls. A significantly lower renal blood flow both in cortex (108.4±36.4 vs . 207.3±41.8; pblood flow were correlated with eGFR, and cortical blood flow was found to be confounded by age and BMI. However, in a subset of subjects that were matched for age and BMI (n=6), the differences between CKD and control subjects remained significant both in cortex (107.4±42.8 vs . 187.51±20.44; p=0.002) and medulla (15.43±8.43 vs . 39.18±11.13; p=0.002). A threshold value to separate healthy and CKD was estimated to be Cor_BF=142.9 and Med_BF=24.1. These results support the use of ASL in the evaluation of renal blood flow in patients with moderate level of CKD. Whether these measurements can identify subjects at risk of progressive CKD requires further longitudinal follow-up.

  17. Intra-arterial high signals on arterial spin labeling perfusion images predict the occluded internal carotid artery segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogabe, Shu; Satomi, Junichiro; Tada, Yoshiteru; Kanematsu, Yasuhisa; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Yagi, Kenji; Yoshioka, Shotaro; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Mure, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Izumi; Kitazato, Keiko T.; Nagahiro, Shinji; Abe, Takashi; Harada, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Nobuaki; Kaji, Ryuji

    2017-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) involves perfusion imaging using the inverted magnetization of arterial water. If the arterial arrival times are longer than the post-labeling delay, labeled spins are visible on ASL images as bright, high intra-arterial signals (IASs); such signals were found within occluded vessels of patients with acute ischemic stroke. The identification of the occluded segment in the internal carotid artery (ICA) is crucial for endovascular treatment. We tested our hypothesis that high IASs on ASL images can predict the occluded segment. Our study included 13 patients with acute ICA occlusion who had undergone angiographic and ASL studies within 48 h of onset. We retrospectively identified the high IAS on ASL images and angiograms and recorded the occluded segment and the number of high IAS-positive slices on ASL images. The ICA segments were classified as cervical (C1), petrous (C2), cavernous (C3), and supraclinoid (C4). Of seven patients with intracranial ICA occlusion, five demonstrated high IASs at C1-C2, suggesting that high IASs could identify stagnant flow proximal to the occluded segment. Among six patients with extracranial ICA occlusion, five presented with high IASs at C3-C4, suggesting that signals could identify the collateral flow via the ophthalmic artery. None had high IASs at C1-C2. The mean number of high IAS-positive slices was significantly higher in patients with intra- than extracranial ICA occlusion. High IASs on ASL images can identify slow stagnant and collateral flow through the ophthalmic artery in patients with acute ICA occlusion and help to predict the occlusion site. (orig.)

  18. Intra-arterial high signals on arterial spin labeling perfusion images predict the occluded internal carotid artery segment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogabe, Shu; Satomi, Junichiro; Tada, Yoshiteru; Kanematsu, Yasuhisa; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Yagi, Kenji; Yoshioka, Shotaro; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Mure, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Izumi; Kitazato, Keiko T.; Nagahiro, Shinji [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Neurosurgery, Tokushima (Japan); Abe, Takashi; Harada, Masafumi [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Radiology, Tokushima (Japan); Yamamoto, Nobuaki; Kaji, Ryuji [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Biomedical Biosciences, Tokushima (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) involves perfusion imaging using the inverted magnetization of arterial water. If the arterial arrival times are longer than the post-labeling delay, labeled spins are visible on ASL images as bright, high intra-arterial signals (IASs); such signals were found within occluded vessels of patients with acute ischemic stroke. The identification of the occluded segment in the internal carotid artery (ICA) is crucial for endovascular treatment. We tested our hypothesis that high IASs on ASL images can predict the occluded segment. Our study included 13 patients with acute ICA occlusion who had undergone angiographic and ASL studies within 48 h of onset. We retrospectively identified the high IAS on ASL images and angiograms and recorded the occluded segment and the number of high IAS-positive slices on ASL images. The ICA segments were classified as cervical (C1), petrous (C2), cavernous (C3), and supraclinoid (C4). Of seven patients with intracranial ICA occlusion, five demonstrated high IASs at C1-C2, suggesting that high IASs could identify stagnant flow proximal to the occluded segment. Among six patients with extracranial ICA occlusion, five presented with high IASs at C3-C4, suggesting that signals could identify the collateral flow via the ophthalmic artery. None had high IASs at C1-C2. The mean number of high IAS-positive slices was significantly higher in patients with intra- than extracranial ICA occlusion. High IASs on ASL images can identify slow stagnant and collateral flow through the ophthalmic artery in patients with acute ICA occlusion and help to predict the occlusion site. (orig.)

  19. Enhancement of automated blood flow estimates (ENABLE) from arterial spin-labeled MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Chappell, Michael A; Ramirez, Joel; Schwindt, Graeme; Masellis, Mario; Black, Sandra E; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2018-03-01

    To validate a multiparametric automated algorithm-ENhancement of Automated Blood fLow Estimates (ENABLE)-that identifies useful and poor arterial spin-labeled (ASL) difference images in multiple postlabeling delay (PLD) acquisitions and thereby improve clinical ASL. ENABLE is a sort/check algorithm that uses a linear combination of ASL quality features. ENABLE uses simulations to determine quality weighting factors based on an unconstrained nonlinear optimization. We acquired a set of 6-PLD ASL images with 1.5T or 3.0T systems among 98 healthy elderly and adults with mild cognitive impairment or dementia. We contrasted signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of cerebral blood flow (CBF) images obtained with ENABLE vs. conventional ASL analysis. In a subgroup, we validated our CBF estimates with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) CBF images. ENABLE produced significantly increased SNR compared to a conventional ASL analysis (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P < 0.0001) and this similarity was strongly related to ASL SNR (t = 24, P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that ENABLE improves CBF image quality from multiple PLD ASL in dementia cohorts at either 1.5T or 3.0T, achieved by multiparametric quality features that guided postprocessing of dementia ASL. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:647-655. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. [MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, G; Bauman, G

    2016-02-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O2-enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies.

  1. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, G.; Bauman, G.

    2016-01-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O 2 -enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [de

  2. A two-stage model for in vivo assessment of brain tumor perfusion and abnormal vascular structure using arterial spin labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W Hales

    Full Text Available The ability to assess brain tumor perfusion and abnormalities in the vascular structure in vivo could provide significant benefits in terms of lesion diagnosis and assessment of treatment response. Arterial spin labeling (ASL has emerged as an increasingly viable methodology for non-invasive assessment of perfusion. Although kinetic models have been developed to describe perfusion in healthy tissue, the dynamic behaviour of the ASL signal in the brain tumor environment has not been extensively studied. We show here that dynamic ASL data acquired in brain tumors displays an increased level of 'biphasic' behaviour, compared to that seen in healthy tissue. A new two-stage model is presented which more accurately describes this behaviour, and provides measurements of perfusion, pre-capillary blood volume fraction and transit time, and capillary bolus arrival time. These biomarkers offer a novel contrast in the tumor and surrounding tissue, and provide a means for measuring tumor perfusion and vascular structural abnormalities in a fully non-invasive manner.

  3. Potentials and Challenges for Arterial Spin Labeling in Pharmacological Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Danny J. J.; Chen, Yufen; Fernández-Seara, María A.; Detre, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) is increasingly being used in drug discovery and development to speed the translation from the laboratory to the clinic. The two primary methods in phMRI include blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast and arterial spin-labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI. BOLD contrast has been widely applied in existing phMRI studies. However, because of the lack of absolute quantification and poor reproducibility over time scales longer than hours or across s...

  4. Perfusion imaging of parotid gland tumours: usefulness of arterial spin labeling for differentiating Warthin's tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Haruo [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro [Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu (Japan); Okuaki, Tomoyuki [Philips Healthcare, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    To assess prospectively the efficacy of arterial spin labelling (ASL) against conventional and diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging for differentiating parotid gland tumours. We included 10 pleomorphic adenomas, 12 Warthin's tumours, and nine malignant tumours of the parotid glands. Only tumours larger than 10 mm were included in this study. All parotid gland tumours underwent T1-weighted, T2-weighted, DW, and ASL imaging. Tumour-to-parotid gland signal intensity ratios (SIRs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of solid components were correlated with these pathologies. SIRs on T2-weighted images and ADCs were higher in pleomorphic adenomas than in Warthin's tumours (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.01). SIRs on ASL were higher in Warthin's tumours than in pleomorphic adenomas (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.05). Az value of SIRs on ASL for differentiating Warthin's tumours from the other pathologies was 0.982. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of SIRs on ASL for the diagnosis of Warthin's tumours at an optimal SIR threshold of over 8.70 were 91.7 %, 94.7 %, and 93.5 %, respectively. ASL with SIR measurements could non-invasively evaluate tumour blood flow of parotid gland tumours and differentiate Warthin's tumours from pleomorphic adenomas and malignant tumours. (orig.)

  5. Quantitative arterial spin labelling perfusion measurements in rat models of renal transplantation and acute kidney injury at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Klotz, Sarah; Hoeger, Simone; Yard, Benito A.; Kraemer, Bernhard K. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Medicine V

    2017-05-01

    To employ ASL for the measurement of renal cortical perfusion in particular renal disorders typically associated with graft loss and to investigate its potential to detect and differentiate the related functional deterioration i.e., in a setting of acute kidney injury (AKI) as well as in renal grafts showing acute and chronic transplant rejection. 14 Lewis rats with unilateral ischaemic AKI and 43 Lewis rats with renal grafts showing acute or chronic rejections were used. All ASL measurements in this study were performed on a 3 T MR scanner using a FAIR True-FISP approach to assess renal blood flow (RBF). Perfusion maps were calculated and the cortical blood flow was determined using a region-of-interest based analysis. RBF of healthy and AKI kidneys as well as of both rejection models, were compared. In a subsample of 20 rats, creatinine clearance was measured and correlated with cortical perfusion. RBF differs significantly between healthy and AKI kidneys (P < 0.001) with a mean difference of 213 ± 80 ml/100 g/min. Renal grafts with chronic rejections show a significantly higher (P < 0.001) mean cortical perfusion (346 ± 112 ml/100 g/min) than grafts with acute rejection (240 ± 66 ml/100 g/min). Both transplantation models have a significantly (P < 0.001) lower perfusion than healthy kidneys. Renal creatinine clearance is significantly correlated (R = 0.85, P < 0.001) with cortical blood flow. Perfusion measurements with ASL have the potential to become a valuable diagnostic tool, regarding the detection of renal impairment and the differentiation of disorders that lead to a loss of renal function and that are typically associated with graft loss.

  6. Quantitative arterial spin labelling perfusion measurements in rat models of renal transplantation and acute kidney injury at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Klotz, Sarah; Hoeger, Simone; Yard, Benito A.; Kraemer, Bernhard K.

    2017-01-01

    To employ ASL for the measurement of renal cortical perfusion in particular renal disorders typically associated with graft loss and to investigate its potential to detect and differentiate the related functional deterioration i.e., in a setting of acute kidney injury (AKI) as well as in renal grafts showing acute and chronic transplant rejection. 14 Lewis rats with unilateral ischaemic AKI and 43 Lewis rats with renal grafts showing acute or chronic rejections were used. All ASL measurements in this study were performed on a 3 T MR scanner using a FAIR True-FISP approach to assess renal blood flow (RBF). Perfusion maps were calculated and the cortical blood flow was determined using a region-of-interest based analysis. RBF of healthy and AKI kidneys as well as of both rejection models, were compared. In a subsample of 20 rats, creatinine clearance was measured and correlated with cortical perfusion. RBF differs significantly between healthy and AKI kidneys (P < 0.001) with a mean difference of 213 ± 80 ml/100 g/min. Renal grafts with chronic rejections show a significantly higher (P < 0.001) mean cortical perfusion (346 ± 112 ml/100 g/min) than grafts with acute rejection (240 ± 66 ml/100 g/min). Both transplantation models have a significantly (P < 0.001) lower perfusion than healthy kidneys. Renal creatinine clearance is significantly correlated (R = 0.85, P < 0.001) with cortical blood flow. Perfusion measurements with ASL have the potential to become a valuable diagnostic tool, regarding the detection of renal impairment and the differentiation of disorders that lead to a loss of renal function and that are typically associated with graft loss.

  7. White Matter Hyperintensity Volume and Cerebral Perfusion in Older Individuals with Hypertension Using Arterial Spin-Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, J. W.; Mutsaerts, H. J. M. M.; Nederveen, A. J.; Vrenken, H.; Steenwijk, M. D.; Caan, M. W. A.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; van Gool, W. A.; Richard, E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin in elderly patients with hypertension may be part of a general cerebral perfusion deficit, involving not only the white matter hyperintensities but also the surrounding normal-appearing white matter and gray matter. We

  8. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin; Lou, Xin; Gui, Qiu-Ping; Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. (orig.)

  9. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng [302 Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Lou, Xin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gui, Qiu-Ping [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Beijing (China); Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan [General Electric Healthcare (China) Co., Ltd., Beijing; Wang, Danny J.J. [University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. (orig.)

  10. Cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labeling MRI at resting state in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Gordon, Marc L; Goldberg, Terry E

    2017-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging uses arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). In this review, based on ASL studies in the resting state, we discuss state-of-the-art technical and data processing improvements in ASL, and ASL CBF changes in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other types of dementia. We propose that vascular and AD risk factors should be considered when evaluating CBF changes in aging, and that other validated biomarkers should be used as inclusion criteria or covariates when evaluating CBF changes in MCI and AD. With improvements in hardware and experimental design, ASL is proving to be an increasingly promising tool for exploring pathogenetic mechanisms, early detection, monitoring disease progression and pharmacological response, and differential diagnosis of AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Automatic assessment of cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a method based on Active Appearance Models (AAM) is applied for automatic registration of myocardial perfusion MRI. A semi-quantitative perfusion assessment of the registered image sequences is presented. This includes the formation of perfusion maps for three parameters; maximum up...

  12. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging of the brain: feasibility of cerebral blood flow measurements with FAIR-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegger, Lars; Martirosian, Petros; Schwenzer, Nina; Bisdas, Sotirios; Kolb, Armin; Pfannenberg, Christina; Claussen, Claus D; Pichler, Bernd; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) with simultaneous data acquisition promises a comprehensive evaluation of cerebral pathophysiology on a molecular, anatomical, and functional level. Considering the necessary changes to the MR scanner design the feasibility of arterial spin labeling (ASL) is unclear. To evaluate whether cerebral blood flow imaging with ASL is feasible using a prototype PET/MRI device. ASL imaging of the brain with Flow-sensitive Alternating Inversion Recovery (FAIR) spin preparation and true fast imaging in steady precession (TrueFISP) data readout was performed in eight healthy volunteers sequentially on a prototype PET/MRI and a stand-alone MR scanner with 128 × 128 and 192 × 192 matrix sizes. Cerebral blood flow values for gray matter, signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative signal change were compared. Additionally, the feasibility of ASL as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol was demonstrated in five patients with intracerebral tumors. Blood flow maps showed good delineation of gray and white matter with no discernible artifacts. The mean blood flow values of the eight volunteers on the PET/MR system were 51 ± 9 and 51 ± 7 mL/100 g/min for the 128 × 128 and 192 × 192 matrices (stand-alone MR, 57 ± 2 and 55 ± 5, not significant). The value for signal-to-noise (SNR) was significantly higher for the PET/MRI system using the 192 × 192 matrix size (P change (δS) was significantly lower for the 192 × 192 matrix size (P = 0.02). ASL imaging as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol could successfully be accomplished in all patients in diagnostic image quality. ASL brain imaging is feasible with a prototype hybrid PET/MRI scanner, thus adding to the value of this novel imaging technique.

  14. Spin labels. Applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangopol, T.P.; Frangopol, M.; Ionescu, S.M.; Pop, I.V.; Benga, G.

    1980-11-01

    The main applications of spin labels in the study of biomembranes, enzymes, nucleic acids, in pharmacology, spin immunoassay are reviewed along with the fundamentals of the spin label method. 137 references. (author)

  15. Renal blood flow using arterial spin labelling MRI and calculated filtration fraction in healthy adult kidney donors Pre-nephrectomy and post-nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutajar, Marica; Hilton, Rachel; Olsburgh, Jonathon; Marks, Stephen D; Thomas, David L; Banks, Tina; Clark, Christopher A; Gordon, Isky

    2015-08-01

    Renal plasma flow (RPF) (derived from renal blood flow, RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) allow the determination of the filtration fraction (FF), which may have a role as a non-invasive renal biomarker. This is a hypothesis-generating pilot study assessing the effect of nephrectomy on renal function in healthy kidney donors. Eight living kidney donors underwent arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and GFR measurement prior to and 1 year after nephrectomy. Chromium-51 labelled ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid ((51)Cr-EDTA) with multi-blood sampling was undertaken and GFR calculated. The RBF and GFR obtained were used to calculate FF. All donors showed an increase in single kidney GFR of 24 - 75 %, and all but two showed an increase in FF (-7 to +52 %) after nephrectomy. The increase in RBF, and hence RPF, post-nephrectomy was not as great as the increase in GFR in seven out of eight donors. As with any pilot study, the small number of donors and their relatively narrow age range are potential limiting factors. The ability to measure RBF, and hence RPF, non-invasively, coupled with GFR measurement, allows calculation of FF, a biomarker that might provide a sensitive indicator of loss of renal reserve in potential donors. • Non-invasive MRI measured renal blood flow and calculated renal plasma flow. • Effect of nephrectomy on blood flow and filtration in donors is presented. • Calculated filtration fraction may be a useful new kidney biomarker.

  16. Application of Arterial Spin Labelling in Detecting Retinal Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Vaghefi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Here, we have tried to quantify the chorioretinal blood perfusion in patients who are clinically identified to be suffering from retinal ischemia using arterial spin labelling (ASL MRI. Method: Four participants, diagnosed with retinal ischemia based on their structural OCT and angiography test, were then scanned using anatomical MRI as well as ASL. We optimized MR parameters to maximize resolution and target fixation, blinking, and breathing ques to minimize motion artifacts. Results: Participants had a maximum of ∼50 mL/100 mL/min of blood perfusion, which is below the normal values of ∼200 mL/100 mL/min. It also appeared that thinning of the choroid contributes more to the measured decreased chorioretinal perfusion, compared to slowed arterial filling time. Conclusion: Decreased chorioretinal perfusion is a multifactorial event and has been implicated in several posterior eye pathologies. Based on our current results, it seems that ischemia of the eye could be due to anatomy (tissue volume and/or functionality (arterial flow.

  17. Origins of intersubject variability of blood oxygenation level dependent and arterial spin labeling fMRI: implications for quantification of brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Goodyear, Bradley G

    2012-12-01

    Accurate localization of brain activity using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been challenged because of the large BOLD signal within distal veins. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques offer greater sensitivity to the microvasculature but possess low temporal resolution and limited brain coverage. In this study, we show that the physiological origins of BOLD and ASL depend on whether percent change or statistical significance is being considered. For BOLD and ASL fMRI data collected during a simple unilateral hand movement task, we found that in the area of the contralateral motor cortex the centre of gravity (CoG) of the intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of BOLD fMRI was near the brain surface for percent change in signal, whereas the CoG of the intersubject CV for Z-score was in close proximity of sites of brain activity for both BOLD and ASL. These findings suggest that intersubject variability of BOLD percent change is vascular in origin, whereas the origin of inter-subject variability of Z-score is neuronal for both BOLD and ASL. For longer duration tasks (12 s or greater), however, there was a significant correlation between BOLD and ASL percent change, which was not evident for short duration tasks (6 s). These findings suggest that analyses directly comparing percent change in BOLD signal between pre-defined regions of interest using short duration stimuli, as for example in event-related designs, may be heavily weighted by large-vessel responses rather than neuronal responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging of cerebral hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Masashi; Egashira, Yoshiaki; Azama, Shinya; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Kitano, Isao; Irie, Hiroyuki; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Kawashima, Masatou

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the characteristics of brain perfusion measured by arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) in cerebral hemorrhages. Brain blood flow values (CBF-ASL values) for cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and segmented cerebral regions were measured by ASL-MRI in 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients in acute or subacute stages. We assessed the lateralities of CBF-ASL values and the relationships between CBF-ASL values and other imaging findings and clinical manifestations. Both the 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and the 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients had significantly low CBF-ASL values of the contralateral cerebellum in subacute stage, suggesting that ASL-MRI might delineate crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD). Ipsilateral low CBF-ASL values were observed in frontal lobes and thalami with a putaminal hemorrhage and lentiform nuclei, temporal lobes, and parietal lobes with a thalamic hemorrhage, suggesting that ASL-MRI showed the ipsilateral cerebral diaschisis (ICD). In the putaminal hemorrhage patients, the hematoma volume negatively affected both the bilateral cerebellar and cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. In the thalamic hemorrhage patients, a concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage caused low cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. The use of ASL-MRI is sensitive to the perfusion abnormalities and could thus be helpful to estimate functional abnormalities in cerebral hemorrhage patients. (orig.)

  19. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging of cerebral hemorrhages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saga University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Nishihara, Masashi; Egashira, Yoshiaki; Azama, Shinya; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Kitano, Isao; Irie, Hiroyuki [Saga University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Yakushiji, Yusuke [Saga University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan); Kawashima, Masatou [Saga University, Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Saga (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to identify the characteristics of brain perfusion measured by arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) in cerebral hemorrhages. Brain blood flow values (CBF-ASL values) for cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and segmented cerebral regions were measured by ASL-MRI in 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients in acute or subacute stages. We assessed the lateralities of CBF-ASL values and the relationships between CBF-ASL values and other imaging findings and clinical manifestations. Both the 19 putaminal hemorrhage patients and the 20 thalamic hemorrhage patients had significantly low CBF-ASL values of the contralateral cerebellum in subacute stage, suggesting that ASL-MRI might delineate crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD). Ipsilateral low CBF-ASL values were observed in frontal lobes and thalami with a putaminal hemorrhage and lentiform nuclei, temporal lobes, and parietal lobes with a thalamic hemorrhage, suggesting that ASL-MRI showed the ipsilateral cerebral diaschisis (ICD). In the putaminal hemorrhage patients, the hematoma volume negatively affected both the bilateral cerebellar and cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. In the thalamic hemorrhage patients, a concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage caused low cerebral hemispheric CBF-ASL values. The use of ASL-MRI is sensitive to the perfusion abnormalities and could thus be helpful to estimate functional abnormalities in cerebral hemorrhage patients. (orig.)

  20. Renal blood flow using arterial spin labelling MRI and calculated filtration fraction in healthy adult kidney donors pre-nephrectomy and post-nephrectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutajar, Marica; Clark, Christopher A.; Gordon, Isky [University College London, Imaging and Biophysics Unit, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Hilton, Rachel; Olsburgh, Jonathon [Renal Unit, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Marks, Stephen D. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, David L. [University College London, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Banks, Tina [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Renal plasma flow (RPF) (derived from renal blood flow, RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) allow the determination of the filtration fraction (FF), which may have a role as a non-invasive renal biomarker. This is a hypothesis-generating pilot study assessing the effect of nephrectomy on renal function in healthy kidney donors. Eight living kidney donors underwent arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and GFR measurement prior to and 1 year after nephrectomy. Chromium-51 labelled ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid ({sup 51}Cr-EDTA) with multi-blood sampling was undertaken and GFR calculated. The RBF and GFR obtained were used to calculate FF. All donors showed an increase in single kidney GFR of 24 - 75 %, and all but two showed an increase in FF (-7 to +52 %) after nephrectomy. The increase in RBF, and hence RPF, post-nephrectomy was not as great as the increase in GFR in seven out of eight donors. As with any pilot study, the small number of donors and their relatively narrow age range are potential limiting factors. The ability to measure RBF, and hence RPF, non-invasively, coupled with GFR measurement, allows calculation of FF, a biomarker that might provide a sensitive indicator of loss of renal reserve in potential donors. (orig.)

  1. Renal blood flow using arterial spin labelling MRI and calculated filtration fraction in healthy adult kidney donors pre-nephrectomy and post-nephrectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutajar, Marica; Clark, Christopher A.; Gordon, Isky; Hilton, Rachel; Olsburgh, Jonathon; Marks, Stephen D.; Thomas, David L.; Banks, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Renal plasma flow (RPF) (derived from renal blood flow, RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) allow the determination of the filtration fraction (FF), which may have a role as a non-invasive renal biomarker. This is a hypothesis-generating pilot study assessing the effect of nephrectomy on renal function in healthy kidney donors. Eight living kidney donors underwent arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and GFR measurement prior to and 1 year after nephrectomy. Chromium-51 labelled ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid ( 51 Cr-EDTA) with multi-blood sampling was undertaken and GFR calculated. The RBF and GFR obtained were used to calculate FF. All donors showed an increase in single kidney GFR of 24 - 75 %, and all but two showed an increase in FF (-7 to +52 %) after nephrectomy. The increase in RBF, and hence RPF, post-nephrectomy was not as great as the increase in GFR in seven out of eight donors. As with any pilot study, the small number of donors and their relatively narrow age range are potential limiting factors. The ability to measure RBF, and hence RPF, non-invasively, coupled with GFR measurement, allows calculation of FF, a biomarker that might provide a sensitive indicator of loss of renal reserve in potential donors. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral blood flow measured by arterial-spin labeling MRI: A useful biomarker for characterization of minimal hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Long Jiang; Zhong, Jianhui; Wang, Ze; Qi, Rongfeng; Shi, Donghong; Lu, Guang Ming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of arterial-spin labeling (ASL) MRI to non-invasively characterize the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in cirrhotic patients and to assess the potential of ASL MRI to characterize minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Materials and methods: This study was approved by the local ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Thirty six cirrhosis patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (16 MHE patients and 20 non hepatic encephalopathy (non-HE) patients) and 25 controls underwent ASL MRI, and CBF was measured for each subject. One-way ANOCOVA test with age and gender as covariences was used to compare CBF difference among three groups, and post hoc analysis was performed between each two groups. Region-based correlation analysis was applied between Child–Pugh score, venous blood ammonia level, neuropsychological tests and CBF values in cirrhosis patients. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used for assessing CBF measurements in ASL MRI to differentiate MHE from non-HE patients. Results: The gray matter CBF of MHE patients (71.09 ± 11.88 mL min −1 100 g −1 ) was significantly higher than that of non-HE patients (55.28 ± 12.30 mL min −1 100 g −1 , P < 0.01) and controls (52.09 ± 9.27 mL min −1 100 g −1 , P < 0.001). Voxel-wise ANOCOVA results showed that CBFs were significantly different among three groups in multiple gray matter areas (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). Post hoc comparisons showed that CBF of these brain regions was increased in MHE patients compared with controls and non-HE patients (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). CBF of the right putamen was of the highest sensitivity (93.8%) and moderate specificity (75.0%) for characterization of MHE when using the cutoff value of 50.57 mL min −1 100 g −1 . CBFs in the bilateral median cingulate gyri, left supramarginal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right heschl gyrus and right superior

  3. Cerebral blood flow measured by arterial-spin labeling MRI: A useful biomarker for characterization of minimal hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210016 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China); Zhong, Jianhui [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Box648, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642-8648 (United States); Wang, Ze [Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Qi, Rongfeng; Shi, Donghong [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of arterial-spin labeling (ASL) MRI to non-invasively characterize the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in cirrhotic patients and to assess the potential of ASL MRI to characterize minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Materials and methods: This study was approved by the local ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Thirty six cirrhosis patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (16 MHE patients and 20 non hepatic encephalopathy (non-HE) patients) and 25 controls underwent ASL MRI, and CBF was measured for each subject. One-way ANOCOVA test with age and gender as covariences was used to compare CBF difference among three groups, and post hoc analysis was performed between each two groups. Region-based correlation analysis was applied between Child–Pugh score, venous blood ammonia level, neuropsychological tests and CBF values in cirrhosis patients. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used for assessing CBF measurements in ASL MRI to differentiate MHE from non-HE patients. Results: The gray matter CBF of MHE patients (71.09 ± 11.88 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}) was significantly higher than that of non-HE patients (55.28 ± 12.30 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}, P < 0.01) and controls (52.09 ± 9.27 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}, P < 0.001). Voxel-wise ANOCOVA results showed that CBFs were significantly different among three groups in multiple gray matter areas (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). Post hoc comparisons showed that CBF of these brain regions was increased in MHE patients compared with controls and non-HE patients (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). CBF of the right putamen was of the highest sensitivity (93.8%) and moderate specificity (75.0%) for characterization of MHE when using the cutoff value of 50.57 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}. CBFs in the bilateral median cingulate gyri, left supramarginal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right

  4. Arterial spin labelling in imaging of renal diseases and renal allograft pathology; MRT-Perfusionsmessung mit Arterial Spin Labelling. Anwendung fuer die Niere und Transplantatniere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kuehn, Bernd [Siemens AG/Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Arterial Spin Labelling (ASL) is a technique for non-invasive and contrast-free assessment of perfusion with MRI. Renal ASL allows examination of renal pathophysiology, evaluation of the course of renal disease and therapy effects by longitudinal measurements as well as characterization of renal tumors. In this article, techniques of ASL will be explained and challenges of renal ASL will be emphasized. In addition, examples for clinical application of ASL for diagnosis of renal disease and renal allograft pathology will be given.

  5. Quantitative lung perfusion evaluation using Fourier decomposition perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Åsmund; Corteville, Dominique M R; Fischer, Andre; Henzler, Thomas; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Zöllner, Frank G; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-08-01

    To quantitatively evaluate lung perfusion using Fourier decomposition perfusion MRI. The Fourier decomposition (FD) method is a noninvasive method for assessing ventilation- and perfusion-related information in the lungs, where the perfusion maps in particular have shown promise for clinical use. However, the perfusion maps are nonquantitative and dimensionless, making follow-ups and direct comparisons between patients difficult. We present an approach to obtain physically meaningful and quantifiable perfusion maps using the FD method. The standard FD perfusion images are quantified by comparing the partially blood-filled pixels in the lung parenchyma with the fully blood-filled pixels in the aorta. The percentage of blood in a pixel is then combined with the temporal information, yielding quantitative blood flow values. The values of 10 healthy volunteers are compared with SEEPAGE measurements which have shown high consistency with dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI. All pulmonary blood flow (PBF) values are within the expected range. The two methods are in good agreement (mean difference = 0.2 mL/min/100 mL, mean absolute difference = 11 mL/min/100 mL, mean PBF-FD = 150 mL/min/100 mL, mean PBF-SEEPAGE = 151 mL/min/100 mL). The Bland-Altman plot shows a good spread of values, indicating no systematic bias between the methods. Quantitative lung perfusion can be obtained using the Fourier Decomposition method combined with a small amount of postprocessing. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. SU-E-I-65: Estimation of Tagging Efficiency in Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling (pCASL) MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, M [Chang Gung University, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China); Yan, F; Tseng, Y; Chen, C [Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welf, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lin, C [GE Healthcare, Taiwan (China); GE Healthcare China, Beijing (China); Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: pCASL was recommended as a potent approach for absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in clinical practice. However, uncertainties of tagging efficiency in pCASL remain an issue. This study aimed to estimate tagging efficiency by using short quantitative pulsed ASL scan (FAIR-QUIPSSII) and compare resultant CBF values with those calibrated by using 2D Phase Contrast (PC) MRI. Methods: Fourteen normal volunteers participated in this study. All images, including whole brain (WB) pCASL, WB FAIR-QUIPSSII and single-slice 2D PC, were collected on a 3T clinical MRI scanner with a 8-channel head coil. DeltaM map was calculated by averaging the subtraction of tag/control pairs in pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII images and used for CBF calculation. Tagging efficiency was then calculated by the ratio of mean gray matter CBF obtained from pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII. For comparison, tagging efficiency was also estimated with 2D PC, a previously established method, by contrast WB CBF in pCASL and 2D PC. Feasibility of estimation from a short FAIR-QUIPSSII scan was evaluated by number of averages required for obtaining a stable deltaM value. Setting deltaM calculated by maximum number of averaging (50 pairs) as reference, stable results were defined within ±10% variation. Results: Tagging efficiencies obtained by 2D PC MRI (0.732±0.092) were significantly lower than which obtained by FAIRQUIPPSSII (0.846±0.097) (P<0.05). Feasibility results revealed that four pairs of images in FAIR-QUIPPSSII scan were sufficient to obtain a robust calibration of less than 10% differences from using 50 pairs. Conclusion: This study found that reliable estimation of tagging efficiency could be obtained by a few pairs of FAIR-QUIPSSII images, which suggested that calibration scan in a short duration (within 30s) was feasible. Considering recent reports concerning variability of PC MRI-based calibration, this study proposed an effective alternative for CBF quantification with pCASL.

  7. Visual cortex reactivity in sedated children examined with perfusion MRI (FAIR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A.P.; Rostrup, Egill; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo

    2002-01-01

    Sleeping and sedated children can respond to visual stimulation with a decrease in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal response. The contribution of metabolic and hemodynamic parameters to this inverse signal response is incompletely understood. It has been hypothesized...... that it is caused by a relatively greater increase of oxygen consumption compared to rCBF (regional cerebral blood flow) increase. We studied the rCBF changes during visual stimulation in four sedated children, aged 4-71 months, and four alert adults, with an arterial water spin labeling technique (FAIR) and BOLD f.......99-2.93), respectively. Thus, in the children, an rCBF increase could not be detected by perfusion MRI, but indications of a FAIR signal decrease were found. An rCBF decrease in the primary visual cortex during stimulation has not been reported previously, but it is a possible explanation for the negative BOLD response...

  8. Perfusion MRI in CNS disease: current concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, M.; Giesel, F.; Le-Huu, M.; Stieltjes, B.; Tengg, H. von; Weber, M.-A.

    2004-01-01

    Today there are several indications for cerebral perfusion MRI. The major indications routinely used in increasing numbers of imaging centers include cerebrovascular disease, tumor imaging and recently psychiatric disorders. Perfusion MRI is based on the injection of a gadolinium chelate and the rapid acquisition of images as the bolus of contrast agent passes through the blood vessels in the brain. The contrast agent causes a signal change; this signal change over time can be analysed to measure cerebral hemodynamics. The quality of brain perfusion studies is very dependent on the contrast agent used: a robust and strong signal decrease with a compact bolus is needed. MultiHance (gadobenate dimeglumine, Gd-BOPTA) is the first of a new class of paramagnetic MR contrast agents with a weak affinity for serum proteins. Due to the interaction of Gd-BOPTA with serum albumin, MultiHance presents with significantly higher T1- and T2-relaxivities enabling a sharper bolus profile. This article reviews the indications of perfusion MRI and the performance of MultiHance in MR perfusion of different diseases. Previous studies using perfusion MRI for a variety of purposes required the use of double dose of contrast agent to achieve a sufficiently large signal drop to enable the acquisition of a clear input function and the calculation of perfusion rCBV and rCBF maps of adequate quality. Recent studies with Multi-Hance suggest that only a single dose of this agent is needed to cause a signal drop of about 30% which is sufficient to allow the calculation of high quality rCBV and rCBF maps. (orig.)

  9. MRI of pulmonary perfusion; MRT der Lungenperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Risse, F.; Semmler, W. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie; Kauczor, H.-U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Lung perfusion is a crucial prerequisite for effective gas exchange. Quantification of pulmonary perfusion is important for diagnostic considerations and treatment planning in various diseases of the lungs. Besides disorders of pulmonary vessels such as acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension, these also include diseases of the respiratory tract and lung tissue as well as pulmonary tumors. This contribution presents the possibilities and technical requirements of MRI for diagnostic work-up of pulmonary perfusion. (orig.) [German] Die Perfusion der Lunge ist eine entscheidende Voraussetzung fuer einen effektiven Gasaustausch. Die Bestimmung der Lungenperfusion ist bei verschiedenen Erkrankungen der Lunge fuer Diagnostik und Therapieplanung bedeutsam. Hierzu zaehlen neben Erkrankungen der Lungengefaesse wie akute Lungenembolie und pulmonale Hypertension ebenso Erkrankungen der Atemwege, des Lungengeruests und Lungentumoren. In diesem Beitrag werden die Moeglichkeiten und technischen Voraussetzungen der MRT zur Diagnostik der Lungenperfusion dargestellt. (orig.)

  10. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...... turbo-FLASH (fast low-angle shot) sequence and Gd-DTPA has been presented. Here, an extension of the model is presented taking into account fast and slow water exchange between the compartments, enabling the calculation of the unidirectional influx constant (Ki) for Gd-DTPA, the distribution volume...... of Gd-DTPA (lambda), the vascular blood volume (Vb), and the time delay through the coronary arteries (delta T). The model was evaluated by computer simulation and used on experimental results from seven healthy subjects. The results in the healthy volunteers for a region of interest placed...

  11. Reliability of Three Dimentional Pseudo-continuous Arterial Spin Labeling: A Volumetric Cerebral Perfusion Imaging with Different Post-labeling Time and Functional State in Health Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Qi; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Ma, Lin

    2018-03-30

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of three dimensional spiral fast spin echo pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (3D pc-ASL) in measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) with different post-labeling delay time (PLD) in the resting state and the right finger taping state. Methods 3D pc-ASL and three dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo (3D T1-FSPGR) sequence were applied to eight healthy subjects twice at the same time each day for one week interval. ASL data acquisition was performed with post-labeling delay time (PLD) 1.5 seconds and 2.0 seconds in the resting state and the right finger taping state respectively. CBF mapping was calculated and CBF value of both the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) was automatically extracted. The reliability was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman plot. Results ICC of the GM (0.84) and WM (0.92) was lower at PLD 1.5 seconds than that (GM, 0.88; WM, 0.94) at PLD 2.0 seconds in the resting state, and ICC of GM (0.88) was higher in the right finger taping state than that in the resting state at PLD 1.5 seconds. ICC of the GM and WM was 0.71 and 0.78 for PLD 1.5 seconds and PLD 2.0 seconds in the resting state at the first scan, and ICC of the GM and WM was 0.83 and 0.79 at the second scan, respectively. Conclusion This work demonstrated that 3D pc-ASL might be a reliable imaging technique to measure CBF over the whole brain at different PLD in the resting state or controlled state.

  12. Cerebral perfusion characteristics show differences in younger versus older children with sickle cell anaemia: Results from a multiple-inflow-time arterial spin labelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Hales, Patrick W; Barker, Simon; Cox, Timothy C S; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clark, Chris A

    2018-03-30

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is associated with chronic anaemia and oxygen desaturation, which elevate cerebral blood flow (CBF) and increase the risk of neurocognitive complications. Arterial spin labelling (ASL) provides a methodology for measuring CBF non-invasively; however, ASL techniques using only a single inflow time are not sufficient to fully characterize abnormal haemodynamic behaviour in SCA. This study investigated haemodynamic parameters from a multi-inflow-time ASL acquisition in younger (8-12 years) and older (13-18 years) children with SCA with and without silent cerebral infarction (SCI+/-) (n = 20 and 19 respectively, 6 and 4 SCI+ respectively) and healthy controls (n = 9 and 7 respectively). Compared with controls, CBF was elevated globally in both groups of patients. In the younger SCA patients, blood oxygen content was negatively correlated with CBF in the middle and posterior cerebral artery territories and significantly positively correlated with bolus arrival time (BAT) in the anterior and middle cerebral artery territories. In older children, SCA patients had significantly shorter BAT than healthy controls and there was a significant negative correlation between CBF and oxygen content only in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery, with a trend for a correlation in the anterior cerebral artery but no relationship for the middle cerebral artery territory. In the younger group, SCI+ patients had significantly higher CBF in the posterior cerebral artery territory (SCI+ mean = 92.78 ml/100 g/min; SCI- mean = 72.71 ml/100 g/min; F = 4.28, p = 0.04), but this no longer reached significance when two children with abnormal transcranial Doppler and one with haemoglobin SC disease were excluded, and there were no significant differences between patients with and without SCI in the older children. With age, there appears to be increasing disparity between patients and controls in terms of the relationship between CBF and oxygen

  13. Characterizing Resting-State Brain Function Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, Kay; Wang, Danny J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an increasingly established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that is finding broader applications in studying the healthy and diseased brain. This review addresses the use of ASL to assess brain function in the resting state. Following a brief technical description, we discuss the use of ASL in the following main categories: (1) resting-state functional connectivity (FC) measurement: the use of ASL-based cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements as an alternative to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) technique to assess resting-state FC; (2) the link between network CBF and FC measurements: the use of network CBF as a surrogate of the metabolic activity within corresponding networks; and (3) the study of resting-state dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and cerebral metabolism: the use of dynamic CBF information obtained using ASL to assess dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and oxidative metabolism in the resting state. In addition, we summarize some future challenges and interesting research directions for ASL, including slice-accelerated (multiband) imaging as well as the effects of motion and other physiological confounds on perfusion-based FC measurement. In summary, this work reviews the state-of-the-art of ASL and establishes it as an increasingly viable MRI technique with high translational value in studying resting-state brain function. PMID:26106930

  14. Dynamic subcortical blood flow during male sexual activity with ecological validity : A perfusion NRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Farrell, Michael J.; Boessen, Ruud; Denton, Derek A.; Gavrilescu, Maria; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco J.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Egan, Gary F.

    This study used arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI to measure brain perfusion in a group of healthy men under conditions that closely resembled customary sexual behavior. Serial perfusion measures for 30 min during two self-limited periods of partnered penis stimulation, and during post-stimulatory

  15. Clinical evaluation of non-invasive perfusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasu, Miyuki

    2000-01-01

    A spin labeling method to measure cerebral blood flow without a contrast medium was developed and applied clinically to obtain a non-invasive perfusion-weighted image. The purpose of this study is to compare the non-invasive perfusion-weighted image using FAIR with the well-established PWI using a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. Of 41 lesions which revealed decreased perfusion, 13 were shown to be low signal intensity areas on FAIR. Therefore, detection rate of FAIR for hypoperfusion was 32%. Of 8 lesions which revealed increased perfusion, 7 demonstrated high intensity on FAIR. Therefore, detection rate of FAIR for hyperperfusion was 88%. Seven lesions were found to have a mean pixel value of zero on PWI. Of these lesions, 5 lesions could be detected as high signal intensity area on FAIR. The rCBV- and rCBF index ratios of hypoperfused lesions detected on FAIR were significantly lower than those of lesions which were not detected on FAIR (p=0.007, p=0.01). As concerns the lesions detected of FAIR, there were positive correlation between rCBV- or rCBF index ratio and FAIR signal ratio (rCBV ratio: ρ=0.873, p=0.0002, rCBF index ratio: ρ=0.858, p=0.0003). FAIR is valuable clinical tool to detect perfusion abnormality semi-quantitatively without contrast medium, although it showed relatively low detection rate for hypoperfused lesions. (author)

  16. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P effects of anesthesia and trauma due to micro probe insertion are strong confounding factors and need close attention for study planning and conduction of experiments. Investigation of the correlation of perfusion and oxygenation sensitive MRI methods with micro probe measurements in pathologic tissue such as tumors is now of compelling interest

  17. Visual Assessment of Brain Perfusion MRI Scans in Dementia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fällmar, David; Lilja, Johan; Velickaite, Vilma; Danfors, Torsten; Lubberink, Mark; Ahlgren, André; van Osch, Matthias J P; Kilander, Lena; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2016-05-01

    Functional imaging is becoming increasingly important for the detection of neurodegenerative disorders. Perfusion MRI with arterial spin labeling (ASL) has been reported to provide promising diagnostic possibilities but is not yet widely used in routine clinical work. The aim of this study was to compare, in a clinical setting, the visual assessment of subtracted ASL CBF maps with and without additional smoothing, to FDG-PET data. Ten patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia and 11 age-matched cognitively healthy controls were examined with pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Three diagnostic physicians visually assessed the pCASL maps after subtraction only, and after postprocessing using Gaussian smoothing and GLM-based beta estimate functions. The assessment scores were compared to FDG PET values. Furthermore, the ability to discriminate patients from healthy elderly controls was assessed. Smoothing improved the correlation between visually assessed regional ASL perfusion scores and the FDG PET SUV-r values from the corresponding regions. However, subtracted pCASL maps discriminated patients from healthy controls better than smoothed maps. Smoothing increased the number of false-positive patient identifications. Application of beta estimate functions had only a marginal effect. Spatial smoothing of ASL images increased false positive results in the discrimination of hypoperfusion conditions from healthy elderly. It also decreased interreader agreement. However, regional characterization and subjective perception of image quality was improved. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  18. Arterial spin labeling blood flow magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yupin P; Song, Rui; Liang, Chang hong; Chen, Xin; Liu, Bo

    2012-08-15

    A multitude of evidence suggests that iodinated contrast material causes nephrotoxicity; however, there have been no previous studies that use arterial spin labeling (ASL) blood flow functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the alterations in effective renal plasma flow between normointensive and hypertensive rats following injection of contrast media. We hypothesized that FAIR-SSFSE arterial spin labeling MRI may enable noninvasive and quantitative assessment of regional renal blood flow abnormalities and correlate with disease severity as assessed by histological methods. Renal blood flow (RBF) values of the cortex and medulla of rat kidneys were obtained from ASL images postprocessed at ADW4.3 workstation 0.3, 24, 48, and 72 h before and after injection of iodinated contrast media (6 ml/kg). The H&E method for morphometric measurements was used to confirm the MRI findings. The RBF values of the outer medulla were lower than those of the cortex and the inner medulla as reported previously. Iodinated contrast media treatment resulted in decreases in RBF in the outer medulla and cortex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), but only in the outer medulla in normotensive rats. The iodinated contrast agent significantly decreased the RBF value in the outer medulla and the cortex in SHR compared with normotensive rats after injection of the iodinated contrast media. Histological observations of kidney morphology were also consistent with ASL perfusion changes. These results demonstrate that the RBF value can reflect changes of renal perfusion in the cortex and medulla. ASL-MRI is a feasible and accurate method for evaluating nephrotoxic drugs-induced kidney damage.

  19. Improved visualization of delayed perfusion in lung MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risse, Frank; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Semmler, Wolfhard; Puderbach, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The investigation of pulmonary perfusion by three-dimensional (3D) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was proposed recently. Subtraction images are generated for clinical evaluation, but temporal information is lost and perfusion defects might therefore be masked in this process. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a simple analysis strategy and classification for 3D-DCE-MRI perfusion datasets in the lung without omitting the temporal information. Materials and methods: Pulmonary perfusion measurements were performed in patients with different lung diseases using a 1.5 T MR-scanner with a time-resolved 3D-GRE pulse sequence. 25 3D-volumes were acquired after iv-injection of 0.1 mmol/kg KG Gadolinium-DTPA. Three parameters were determined for each pixel: (1) peak enhancement S n,max normalized to the arterial input function to detect regions of reduced perfusion; (2) time between arterial peak enhancement in the large pulmonary artery and tissue peak enhancement τ to visualize regions with delayed bolus onset; and (3) ratio R = S n,max /τ was calculated to visualize impaired perfusion, irrespectively of whether related to reduced or delayed perfusion. Results: A manual selection of peak perfusion images is not required. Five different types of perfusion can be found: (1) normal perfusion; (2) delayed non-reduced perfusion; (3) reduced non-delayed perfusion; (4) reduced and delayed perfusion; and (5) no perfusion. Types II and IV could not be seen in subtraction images since the temporal information is necessary for this purpose. Conclusions: The analysis strategy in this study allows for a simple and observer-independent visualization and classification of impaired perfusion in dynamic contrast-enhanced pulmonary perfusion MRI by using the temporal information of the datasets.

  20. Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome in diabetic feet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jie [Cardiovascular Imaging Lab, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J. [Washington University School of Medicine, The Program in Physical Therapy, St. Louis, MO (United States); Muccigross, David; Hildebolt, Charles F. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Fan, Zhaoyang [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gao, Fabao [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Curci, John [Washington University School of Medicine, The Department of Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to evaluate skeletal muscle perfusion in the diabetic foot based on the concept of angiosomes of the foot. Five healthy volunteers and five participants with diabetes (HbA1c = 7.2 ± 1.8 %) without a history of peripheral artery disease were examined. The non-contrast perfusion measurements were performed during a toe flexion challenge. Absolute perfusion maps were created and two regions (medial and lateral) on the maps were segmented based on angiosomes. Regional difference in the perfusion of foot muscle was readily visualized in the MRI perfusion angiosomes during the challenge. In the participants with diabetes, the perfusion during toe flexion challenge was significantly lower than in healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). The average perfusion for the medial plantar region of the right foot was lower in subjects with diabetes (38 ± 9 ml/min/100 g) than in healthy subjects (93 ± 33 ml/min/100 g). Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome maps demonstrate the feasibility of determining regional perfusion in foot muscles during toe challenge and may facilitate evaluation of muscle perfusion in diabetic feet. (orig.)

  1. Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome in diabetic feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jie; Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J.; Muccigross, David; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Fan, Zhaoyang; Gao, Fabao; Curci, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to evaluate skeletal muscle perfusion in the diabetic foot based on the concept of angiosomes of the foot. Five healthy volunteers and five participants with diabetes (HbA1c = 7.2 ± 1.8 %) without a history of peripheral artery disease were examined. The non-contrast perfusion measurements were performed during a toe flexion challenge. Absolute perfusion maps were created and two regions (medial and lateral) on the maps were segmented based on angiosomes. Regional difference in the perfusion of foot muscle was readily visualized in the MRI perfusion angiosomes during the challenge. In the participants with diabetes, the perfusion during toe flexion challenge was significantly lower than in healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). The average perfusion for the medial plantar region of the right foot was lower in subjects with diabetes (38 ± 9 ml/min/100 g) than in healthy subjects (93 ± 33 ml/min/100 g). Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome maps demonstrate the feasibility of determining regional perfusion in foot muscles during toe challenge and may facilitate evaluation of muscle perfusion in diabetic feet. (orig.)

  2. Retrospective respiratory triggering renal perfusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Michaely, Henrik J.; Schoenberg, Stefan O. (Dept. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Mannheim, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)), e-mail: ulrike.attenberger@medma.uni-heidelberg.de; Sourbron, Steven P. (Div. of Medical Physics, Univ. of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Reiser, Maximilian F. (Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospitals Munich, Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Munich (Germany))

    2010-12-15

    Background: Artifacts of respiratory motion are one of the well-known limitations of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) of the kidney. Purpose: To propose and evaluate a retrospective triggering approach to minimize the effect of respiratory motion in DCE-MRI of the kidney. Material and Methods: Nine consecutive patients underwent renal perfusion measurements. Data were acquired with a 2D saturation-recovery TurboFLASH sequence. In order to test the dependence of the results on size and location of the manually drawn triggering regions of interest (ROIs), three widely differing triggering regions were defined by one observer. Mean value, standard deviation, and variability of the renal function parameters plasma flow (FP), plasma volume (VP), plasma transit time (TP), tubular flow (FT), tubular volume (VT), and tubular transit time (TT) were calculated on a per-patient basis. Results: The results show that triggered data have adequate temporal resolution to measure blood flow. The overall average values of the function parameters were: 152.77 (FP), 15.18 (VP), 6,73 (TP), 18.50 (FT), 35.36 (VT), and 117.67 (TT). The variability (calculated in % SD from the mean value) for three different respiratory triggering regions defined on a per-patient basis was between 0.81% and 9.87% for FP, 1.45% and 8.19% for VP, 0% and 9.63% for TP, 2.15% and 12.23% for TF, 0.8% and 17.28% for VT, and 1.97% and 12.87% for TT. Conclusion: Triggering reduces the oscillations in the signal curves and produces sharper parametric maps. In contrast to numerically challenging approaches like registration and segmentation it can be applied in clinical routine, but a (semi)-automatic approach to select the triggering ROI is desirable to reduce user dependence.

  3. MRI-based assessment of liver perfusion and hepatocyte injury in the murine model of acute hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Krzysztof; Bartel, Zaneta; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Sitek, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Chlopicki, Stefan; Skorka, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    To assess alterations in perfusion and liver function in the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced mouse model of acute liver failure (ALF) using two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based methods: dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with Gd-EOB-DTPA contrast agent and arterial spin labelling (ASL). BALB/c mice were studied using a 9.4 T MRI system. The IntraGateFLASH TM and FAIR-EPI pulse sequences were used for optimum mouse abdomen imaging. The average perfusion values for the liver of the control and ConA group were equal to 245 ± 20 and 200 ± 32 ml/min/100 g (p = 0.008, respectively). DCE-MRI showed that the time to the peak of the image enhancement was 6.14 ± 1.07 min and 9.72 ± 1.69 min in the control and ConA group (p < 0.001, respectively), while the rate of the contrast wash-out in the control and ConA group was 0.037 ± 0.008 and 0.021 ± 0.008 min -1 (p = 0.004, respectively). These results were consistent with hepatocyte injury in the ConA-treated mice as confirmed by histopathological staining. Both the ASL and DCE-MRI techniques represent a reliable methodology to assess alterations in liver perfusion and hepatocyte integrity in murine hepatitis.

  4. Investigation of the mechanisms mediating MDMA "Ecstasy"-induced increases in cerebro-cortical perfusion determined by btASL MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouine, J; Kelly, M E; Jennings-Murphy, C; Duffy, P; Gorman, I; Gormley, S; Kerskens, C M; Harkin, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Acute administration of the recreational drug of abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) has previously been shown to increase cerebro-cortical perfusion as determined by bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI. The purpose of the current study was to assess the mechanisms mediating these changes following systemic administration of MDMA to rats. Pharmacological manipulation of serotonergic, dopaminergic and nitrergic transmission was carried out to determine the mechanism of action of MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion using btASL MRI. Fenfluramine (10 mg/kg), like MDMA (20 mg/kg), increased cortical perfusion. Increased cortical perfusion was not obtained with the 5-HT2 receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (1 mg/kg). Depletion of central 5-HT following systemic administration of the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) produced effects similar to those observed with MDMA. Pre-treatment with the 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (4 mg/kg) or with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (30 mg/kg), however, failed to produce any effect alone or influence the response to MDMA. Pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (1 mg/kg) failed to influence the changes in cortical perfusion obtained with MDMA. Treatment with the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg) provoked no change in cerebral perfusion alone yet attenuated the MDMA-related increase in cortical perfusion. Cortical 5-HT depletion is associated with increases in perfusion although this mechanism alone does not account for MDMA-related changes. A role for NO, a key regulator of cerebrovascular perfusion, is implicated in MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion.

  5. Functional localization in the human brain: Gradient-echo, spin-echo, and arterial spin-labeling fMRI compared with neuronavigated TMS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekhoff, S.; Uludag, K.; Sparing, R.; Tittgemeyer, M.; von Cramon, D.Y.; Grefkes, C.

    2010-01-01

    A spatial mismatch of up to 14 mm between optimal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) site and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal has consistently been reported for the primary motor cortex. The underlying cause might be the effect of magnetic susceptibility around large

  6. Conformational change of spin labelled myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajnberg, E.; Ribeiro, P.C.; Nascimento, O.R.; Bemski, G.

    1978-01-01

    A conformational change of spin labelled myoglobin have been followed by measuring the spin label's (isothiocyanate) correlation time for temperatures between 18 0 C and 44 0 C. The correlation time was calculated from Electrom Paramagnetic Ressonance Spectra using the components of the espectroscopic and hiperfine tensors obtained by fitting the powder spectra using Lefebvre and Maruani's program- [pt

  7. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens; Reitz, Matthias; Schmidt, Nils O.; Bolar, Divya S.; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml.kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s and -1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s and -1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s and 1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml.min and -1.100g and -1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found good

  8. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neuroradiology; Reitz, Matthias; Schmidt, Nils O. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neurosurgery; Bolar, Divya S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States). Radiology; Adalsteinsson, Elfar [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    2015-05-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml.kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s {sup and} -1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s {sup and} -1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s {sup and} 1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml.min {sup and} -1.100g {sup and} -1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood

  9. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for perfusion quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, during bolus passage of a paramagnetic contrast agent, is used world-wide to obtain parameters that reflect the pathological state of tissue. Abnormal perfusion occurs in diseases such as stoke and tumour. Consequently, perfusion quantication could have signi cant...... clinical value both in diagnosis and treatment of such pathologies. One approach for perfusion quanti cation involves using the contrast mechanism that a ects the transverse relaxation rates of the magnetization, R2 or R 2 , since this provides the most pronounced effect. However, the linearity between...

  10. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging; Methoden der MRT zur Ventilations- und Perfusionsbildgebung der Lunge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, G. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Bauman, G. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin - Radiologische Physik, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [German] Die separate Beurteilung von Atemmechanik, Gasaustauschprozessen und Lungenzirkulation ist wesentlich fuer die Diagnose und Therapie von Lungenerkrankungen. Klinische Lungenfunktionstests sind aufgrund ihrer zumeist nur globalen Aussage oft nicht hinreichend spezifisch in der Differenzialdiagnostik oder eingeschraenkt sensitiv bei der

  11. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  12. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  13. Improved calculation of the equilibrium magnetization of arterial blood in arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Knutsson, Linda

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To propose and assess an improved method for calculating the equilibrium magnetization of arterial blood ( M0a), used for calibration of perfusion estimates in arterial spin labeling. METHODS: Whereas standard M0a calculation is based on dividing a proton density-weighted image by an ave...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in children presenting migraine with aura: Association of hypoperfusion detected by arterial spin labelling and vasospasm on MR angiography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiot, Domitille; Longuet, Romain; Bruneau, Bertrand; Treguier, Catherine; Carsin-Vu, Aline; Corouge, Isabelle; Gomes, Constantin; Proisy, Maïa

    2018-04-01

    Objective A child presenting with a first attack of migraine with aura usually undergoes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to rule out stroke. The purpose of this study was to report vascular and brain perfusion findings in children suffering from migraine with aura on time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) and MR perfusion imaging using arterial spin labelling (ASL). Methods We retrospectively included all children who had undergone an emergency MRI examination with ASL and TOF-MRA sequences for acute neurological deficit and were given a final diagnosis of migraine with aura. The ASL perfusion maps and TOF-MRA images were independently assessed by reviewers blinded to clinical data. A mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) value was obtained for each cerebral lobe after automatic data post-processing. Results Seventeen children were finally included. Hypoperfusion was identified in one or more cerebral lobes on ASL perfusion maps by visual assessment in 16/17 (94%) children. Vasospasm was noted within the intracranial vasculature on the TOF-MRA images in 12/17 (71%) children. All (100%) of the abnormal TOF-MRA images were associated with homolateral hypoperfusion. Mean CBF values were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) in visually hypoperfused lobes than in normally perfused lobes. Conclusion ASL and TOF-MRA are two totally non-invasive, easy-to-use MRI sequences for children in emergency settings. Hypoperfusion associated with homolateral vasospasm may suggest a diagnosis of migraine with aura.

  15. Quantification of MRI measured myocardial perfusion reserve in healthy humans: A comparison with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Hove, J.D.; Kofoed, K.F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a noninvasive quantitative MRI technique, the K-i perfusion method, for myocardial perfusion in humans using N-13-ammonia PET as a reference method. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy males (64 +/- 8 years) were examined with combined PET and MRI perfusion imaging at rest and...

  16. Patient satisfaction with coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, myocardial perfusion MRI, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging and conventional coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feger, S.; Rief, M.; Zimmermann, E.; Richter, F.; Roehle, R. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Schoenenberger, E. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department of Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate patient acceptance of noninvasive imaging tests for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), including single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI), stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coronary CT angiography (CTA) in combination with CT myocardial stress perfusion (CTP), and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Intraindividual comparison of perception of 48 patients from the CORE320 multicentre multinational study who underwent rest and stress SPECT-MPI with a technetium-based tracer, combined CTA and CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine), MRI, and CCA. The analysis was performed by using a validated questionnaire. Patients had significantly more concern prior to CCA than before CTA/CTP (p < 0.001). CTA/CTP was also rated as more comfortable than SPECT-MPI (p = 0.001). Overall satisfaction with CT was superior to that of MRI (p = 0.007). More patients preferred CT (46 %; p < 0.001) as a future diagnostic test. Regarding combined CTA/CTP, CTP was characterised by higher pain levels and an increased frequency of angina pectoris during the examination (p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a higher degree of pain during SPECT-MPI with adenosine stress compared to physical exercise (p = 0.016). All noninvasive cardiac imaging tests are well accepted by patients, with CT being the preferred examination. (orig.)

  17. A capillary-based perfusion phantom for simulation of brain perfusion for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciak, A.; Kronfeld, A.; Mueller-Forell, W.; Wille, C.; Kempski, O.; Stoeter, P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The measurement of the CBF is a non-standardized procedure and there are no reliable gold standards. This abstract shows a capillary-based perfusion-phantom for CE-DSC-MRI. It has equivalent flow properties to those within the tissue capillary system of the human brain and allows the validation of the Siemens Perfusion (MR) software. Materials and Methods: The perfusion phantom consists of a dialyzer for the simulation of the capillary system, a feeding tube for simulation of the AIF and a pulsatile pump for simulation of the heart. Using this perfusion phantom, the exact determination of the gold standard CBF due to the well-known geometry of the phantom is easy. It was validated based on different perfusion measurements. These measurements were investigated with standard software (Siemens Perfusion MR). The software determined the CBF within the capillary system. Based on this CBF, a comparison to the gold standard was made with several different flow speeds. After AIF selection, a total of 726 CBF data points were automatically extracted by the software. Results: This results in a comparison of the gold standard CBF to these 726 CBF values. Therefore, a reproducible and reliable deviation estimation between gold standard CBF and measured CBF using the software was computed. It can be shown that the deviation between gold standard and software-based evaluation ranges between 1 and 31 %. Conclusion: There is no significance for any correlation between flow speed and amount of deviation. The mean measured CBF is 11.4 % higher than the gold standard CBF (p-value < 0.001). Using this kind of perfusion-phantom, the validation of different software systems allows reliable conclusions about their quality. (orig.)

  18. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI-dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We, are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin......-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...... the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI-dependent....

  19. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  20. Diagnostic performance of dual-energy CT stress myocardial perfusion imaging: direct comparison with cardiovascular MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemo-dynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a per-vessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p=0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis.

  1. Arterial spin labelling shows functional depression of non-lesion tissue in chronic Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Holly; Specht, Karsten; Beaumont, Helen; Parkes, Laura M; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Zahn, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Behavioural impairment post-stroke is a consequence of structural damage and altered functional network dynamics. Hypoperfusion of intact neural tissue is frequently observed in acute stroke, indicating reduced functional capacity of regions outside the lesion. However, cerebral blood flow (CBF) is rarely investigated in chronic stroke. This study investigated CBF in individuals with chronic Wernicke's aphasia (WA) and examined the relationship between lesion, CBF and neuropsychological impairment. Arterial spin labelling CBF imaging and structural MRIs were collected in 12 individuals with chronic WA and 13 age-matched control participants. Joint independent component analysis (jICA) investigated the relationship between structural lesion and hypoperfusion. Partial correlations explored the relationship between lesion, hypoperfusion and language measures. Joint ICA revealed significant differences between the control and WA groups reflecting a large area of structural lesion in the left posterior hemisphere and an associated area of hypoperfusion extending into grey matter surrounding the lesion. Small regions of remote cortical hypoperfusion were observed, ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion. Significant correlations were observed between the neuropsychological measures (naming, repetition, reading and semantic association) and the jICA component of interest in the WA group. Additional ROI analyses found a relationship between perfusion surrounding the core lesion and the same neuropsychological measures. This study found that core language impairments in chronic WA are associated with a combination of structural lesion and abnormal perfusion in non-lesioned tissue. This indicates that post-stroke impairments are due to a wider disruption of neural function than observable on structural T1w MRI. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H. (Den Sundhedsfaglige Kandidatuddannelse, Aarhus Universitet Bygning 1264, Aarhus (Denmark); University College Nordjylland, Aalborg (Denmark)), Email: hnt@ucn.dk; Steffensen, E. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsson, E. M. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Background. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the evaluation of brain tumors. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is usually obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using normal appearing white matter as reference region. The emerging perfusion technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose. To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods. Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and rCBV maps, with contralateral normal appearing white matter and cerebellum as reference regions. Larger ROIs were drawn for histogram analyses. The type and grade of the gliomas were obtained by histopathology. Statistical comparison was made between diffuse astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastomas. Results. rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r = 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r = 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated (0.61 < r < 0.93), whereas for kurtosis and peak height, the correlation coefficient was about 0.3 when comparing rCBF and rCBV values for the same reference region. Neither rCBF nor rCBV quantification provided a statistically significant difference between the three types of gliomas. However, both rCBF and rCBV tended to increase with tumor grade and to be lower in patients who had undergone resection/treatment. Conclusion. rCBF measurements normalized to white matter

  3. MRI for the assessment of organ perfusion in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odudu, Aghogho; Francis, Susan T; McIntyre, Christopher W

    2012-11-01

    Recent data have highlighted the importance of quantitative measures of organ perfusion and functional reserve. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the assessment of markers of perfusion without the use of contrast media. Techniques such as arterial spin labelling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging have been available for some time, but advances in the technology and concerns over the safety of contrast media in renal disease have spurred renewed interest and development. ASL measures perfusion, whereas BOLD imaging provides a marker of blood oxygenation, arising from the compound effect of a number of measures including perfusion, blood volume and oxygen consumption; thus, the techniques are complementary rather than analogous. They were initially confined to brain imaging as inherently low signal, susceptibility effects and motion limited their use in thoracic and abdominal organs. Advances in technology have led to robust sequences that can quantify clinically relevant changes and correlate well with reference standards. Novel approaches are likely to accelerate translation into clinical practice. The noninvasive and repeatable nature of ASL and BOLD imaging makes it likely that they will be increasingly used in clinical research. Using a developmental framework, we suggest that the application of these techniques to thoracic and abdominal organs requires validation before they are suitable for generalized clinical use. The demand for these techniques is likely to be driven by the incentive to avoid the use of contrast media.

  4. Arterial spin labelling reveals prolonged arterial arrival time in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bachari, Sarah; Parkes, Laura M; Vidyasagar, Rishma; Hanby, Martha F; Tharaken, Vivek; Leroi, Iracema; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, yet effective disease modifying treatments are still lacking. Neurodegeneration involves multiple interacting pathological pathways. The extent to which neurovascular mechanisms are involved is not well defined in IPD. We aimed to determine whether novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, including arterial spin labelling (ASL) quantification of cerebral perfusion, can reveal altered neurovascular status (NVS) in IPD. Fourteen participants with IPD (mean ± SD age 65.1 ± 5.9 years) and 14 age and cardiovascular risk factor matched control participants (mean ± SD age 64.6 ± 4.2 years) underwent a 3T MRI scan protocol. ASL images were collected before, during and after a 6 minute hypercapnic challenge. FLAIR images were used to determine white matter lesion score. Quantitative images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial arrival time (AAT) were calculated from the ASL data both at rest and during hypercapnia. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) images were calculated, depicting the change in CBF and AAT relative to the change in end-tidal CO2. A significant (p = 0.005) increase in whole brain averaged baseline AAT was observed in IPD participants (mean ± SD age 1532 ± 138 ms) compared to controls (mean ± SD age 1335 ± 165 ms). Voxel-wise analysis revealed this to be widespread across the brain. However, there were no statistically significant differences in white matter lesion score, CBF, or CVR between patients and controls. Regional CBF, but not AAT, in the IPD group was found to correlate positively with Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) scores. These findings provide further evidence of alterations in NVS in IPD.

  5. A Unifying model of perfusion and motion applied to reconstruction of sparsely sampled free-breathing myocardial perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    The clinical potential of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is currently limited by respiratory induced motion of the heart. This paper presents a unifying model of perfusion and motion in which respiratory motion becomes an integral part of myocardial perfusion...... quantification. Hence, the need for tedious manual motion correction prior to perfusion quantification is avoided. In addition, we demonstrate that the proposed framework facilitates the process of reconstructing DCEMRI from sparsely sampled data in the presence of respiratory motion. The paper focuses primarily...... on the underlying theory of the proposed framework, but shows in vivo results of respiratory motion correction and simulation results of reconstructing sparsely sampled data....

  6. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI-Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Li [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: fanli0930@163.com; Liu Shiyuan [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Sun Fei [GE Healthcare China (China)], E-mail: Fei.sun@med.ge.com; Xiao Xiangsheng [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: lizhaobin79@163.com

    2009-04-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. Results: One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P > 0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Conclusion: Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  7. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI-Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Li; Liu Shiyuan; Sun Fei; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. Results: One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P > 0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Conclusion: Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  8. Comparison with myocardial perfusion MRI and myocardial perfusion SPECT in the diagnostic performance of coronary artery disease. A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Kunihiro; Kubota, Makoto; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    We compared the diagnostic abilities of stress myocardial perfusion MRI (myocardial perfusion MRI) and myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), using a meta-analysis method. We investigated the diagnostic abilities of MRI and SPECT in similar subject groups in reports written in English or Japanese. The reports to be used for analysis were selected according to a ''screening standard,'' which was established in advance. After consolidating the data from the selected reports, we compared the integrated odds ratio, the point estimation values of sensibility/specificity, and the summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. For the analysis, six reports were selected (subjects: 153, coronary-artery target sites: 447). Meta-analysis revealed that the diagnostic ability of myocardial perfusion MRI was superior to that of myocardial perfusion SPECT regarding each of the parameters. This is considered to be supportive evidence of the usefulness of myocardial perfusion MRI. (author)

  9. Differences in perfusion parameters between upper and lower lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvopoulou, Vasiliki; Vlahos, Lampros; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela; Maris, Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the influence of age, sex and spinal level on perfusion parameters of normal lumbar bone marrow with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI). Sixty-seven subjects referred for evaluation of low back pain or sciatica underwent DCE MRI of the lumbar spine. After subtraction of dynamic images, a region of interest (ROI) was placed on each lumbar vertebral body of all subjects, and time intensity curves were generated. Consequently, perfusion parameters were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to search for perfusion differences among lumbar vertebrae and in relation to age and sex. Upper (L1, L2) and lower (L3, L4, L5) vertebrae showed significant differences in perfusion parameters (p<0.05). Vertebrae of subjects younger than 50 years showed significantly higher perfusion compared to vertebrae of older ones (p<0.05). Vertebrae of females demonstrated significantly increased perfusion compared to those of males of corresponding age (p<0.05). All perfusion parameters, except for washout (WOUT), showed a mild linear correlation with age. Time to maximum slope (TMSP) and time to peak (TTPK) showed the same correlation with sex (0.22< r<0.32, p<0.05). Our results indicate increased perfusion of the upper compared to the lower lumbar spine, of younger compared to older subjects and of females compared to males. (orig.)

  10. Differences in perfusion parameters between upper and lower lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savvopoulou, Vasiliki; Vlahos, Lampros; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela [University of Athens, Areteion Hospital, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Maris, Thomas G. [University of Crete, Deparment of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion (Greece)

    2008-09-15

    To investigate the influence of age, sex and spinal level on perfusion parameters of normal lumbar bone marrow with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI). Sixty-seven subjects referred for evaluation of low back pain or sciatica underwent DCE MRI of the lumbar spine. After subtraction of dynamic images, a region of interest (ROI) was placed on each lumbar vertebral body of all subjects, and time intensity curves were generated. Consequently, perfusion parameters were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to search for perfusion differences among lumbar vertebrae and in relation to age and sex. Upper (L1, L2) and lower (L3, L4, L5) vertebrae showed significant differences in perfusion parameters (p<0.05). Vertebrae of subjects younger than 50 years showed significantly higher perfusion compared to vertebrae of older ones (p<0.05). Vertebrae of females demonstrated significantly increased perfusion compared to those of males of corresponding age (p<0.05). All perfusion parameters, except for washout (WOUT), showed a mild linear correlation with age. Time to maximum slope (TMSP) and time to peak (TTPK) showed the same correlation with sex (0.22perfusion of the upper compared to the lower lumbar spine, of younger compared to older subjects and of females compared to males. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of selective arterial spin labeling using 1D and 2D tagging RF pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstandin, Simon; Heiler, Patrick M.; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Scharf, Johann [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2011-07-01

    Generic arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques label all brain feeding arteries. In this work, we used two different selective ASL (SASL) methods to show the perfusion of one single artery. A slice selective inversion of an area including the desired vessel was compared to a multidimensional RF pulse with Gaussian profile to label only the artery of interest. Perfusion images with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm{sup 3} are shown that were acquired after tagging only the internal carotid artery of healthy volunteers. In addition, both techniques were applied to a patient with an extra-intracranial bypass to illustrate its perfusion territory. These perfusion images are consistent with a standard angiography. SASL imaging with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm{sup 3} is possible in a total scan time of 5 min. The presented MR techniques may in part replace the assessment of revascularization success by conventional angiography. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of selective arterial spin labeling using 1D and 2D tagging RF pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstandin, Simon; Heiler, Patrick M.; Schad, Lothar R.; Scharf, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Generic arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques label all brain feeding arteries. In this work, we used two different selective ASL (SASL) methods to show the perfusion of one single artery. A slice selective inversion of an area including the desired vessel was compared to a multidimensional RF pulse with Gaussian profile to label only the artery of interest. Perfusion images with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm 3 are shown that were acquired after tagging only the internal carotid artery of healthy volunteers. In addition, both techniques were applied to a patient with an extra-intracranial bypass to illustrate its perfusion territory. These perfusion images are consistent with a standard angiography. SASL imaging with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm 3 is possible in a total scan time of 5 min. The presented MR techniques may in part replace the assessment of revascularization success by conventional angiography. (orig.)

  13. Gray matter perfusion correlates with disease severity in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Randall R; Schuff, Norbert; Miller, Robert G; Weiner, Michael W

    2010-03-09

    The goal of this study is to determine if regional brain perfusion, as measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI, is correlated with clinical measures of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease severity. The presence of such a relationship would indicate a possible role for ASL perfusion as a marker of disease severity and upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. Disease severity was assessed in 16 subjects with ALS (age 54 +/- 11) using the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS) and the pulmonary function measure, forced vital capacity (FVC). Upper motor neuron involvement was assessed by testing rapid tapping of the fingers and feet. Magnetic resonance perfusion images were coregistered with structural T1-weighted MRI, corrected for partial volume effects using the structural images and normalized to a study-specific atlas. Correlations between perfusion and ALS disease severity were analyzed, using statistical parametric mapping, and including age as a factor. Analyses were adjusted for multiple clusters. ALS severity, as measured by the ALSFRS and FVC, was correlated with gray matter perfusion. This correlation was predominantly observed in the hemisphere contralateral to the more affected limbs. ALSFRS scores correlated with perfusion in the contralateral frontal and parietal lobe (p frontal lobe (p frontal lobe (p Upper motor neuron involvement, as measured by rapid finger tapping, correlated bilaterally with perfusion in the middle cingulate gyrus (p < 0.001). Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) severity is correlated with brain perfusion as measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion. This correlation appears to be independent of brain atrophy. ASL perfusion may be a useful tool for monitoring disease progression and assessing treatment effects in ALS.

  14. Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, S; Rodriguez, C; Moser, D; Toma, S; Hofmeister, J; Sinanaj, I; Van De Ville, D; Giannakopoulos, P; Lovblad, K-O

    2013-10-10

    In young individuals, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine receptors and vasoconstriction has direct repercussions on task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. To date, no study has explored the effect of caffeine on brain activation patterns during highly demanding cognitive tasks in the elderly. This prospective, placebo-controlled crossover design comprises 24 healthy elderly individuals (mean age 68.8 ± 4.0 years, 17 females) performing a 2-back working memory (WM) task in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses include complimentary assessment of task-related activations (general linear model, GLM), functional connectivity (tensorial independent component analysis, TICA), and baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling). Despite a reduction in whole-brain global perfusion (-22.7%), caffeine-enhanced task-related GLM activation in a local and distributed network is most pronounced in the bilateral striatum and to a lesser degree in the right middle and inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, left superior and inferior parietal lobule as well as in the cerebellum bilaterally. TICA was significantly enhanced (+8.2%) in caffeine versus placebo in a distributed and task-relevant network including the pre-frontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the ventral premotor cortex and the parietal cortex as well as the occipital cortex (visual stimuli) and basal ganglia. The inverse comparison of placebo versus caffeine had no significant difference. Activation strength of the task-relevant-network component correlated with response accuracy for caffeine yet not for placebo, indicating a selective cognitive effect of caffeine. The present findings suggest that acute caffeine intake enhances WM-related brain activation as well as functional connectivity of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI in elderly individuals. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, Monika; Puderbach, Michael; Zuna, Ivan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Fink, Christian; Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Plathow, Christian; Tuengerthal, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) using contrast-enhanced 3D MRI. Correlation assessment of perfusion changes with structural abnormalities. Eleven CF patients (9 f, 2 m; median age 16 years) were examined at 1.5 T. Morphology: HASTE coronal, transversal (TR/TE/α/ST: 600 ms/28 ms/180 /6 mm), breath-hold 18 s. Perfusion: Time-resolved 3D GRE pulse sequence (FLASH, TE/TR/α: 0.8/1.9 ms/40 ), parallel imaging (GRAPPA, PAT 2). Twenty-five data sets were acquired after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide, 3-5 ml/s. A total of 198 lung segments were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus and scored for morphological and perfusion changes. Statistical analysis was performed by Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results showed that perfusion defects were observed in all patients and present in 80% of upper, and 39% of lower lobes. Normal lung parenchyma showed homogeneous perfusion (86%, P<0.0001). Severe morphological changes led to perfusion defects (97%, P<0.0001). Segments with moderate morphological changes showed normal (53%) or impaired perfusion (47%). In conclusion, pulmonary perfusion is easy to judge in segments with normal parenchyma or severe changes. In moderately damaged segments, MRI of lung perfusion may help to better assess actual functional impairment. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion has the potential for early vascular functional assessment and therapy control in CF patients. (orig.)

  16. Estimation of perfusion properties with MR Fingerprinting Arterial Spin Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Katherine L; Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Noll, Douglas C; Griswold, Mark A; Gulani, Vikas; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis

    2018-03-12

    In this study, the acquisition of ASL data and quantification of multiple hemodynamic parameters was explored using a Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) approach. A pseudo-continuous ASL labeling scheme was used with pseudo-randomized timings to acquire the MRF ASL data in a 2.5 min acquisition. A large dictionary of MRF ASL signals was generated by combining a wide range of physical and hemodynamic properties with the pseudo-random MRF ASL sequence and a two-compartment model. The acquired signals were matched to the dictionary to provide simultaneous quantification of cerebral blood flow, tissue time-to-peak, cerebral blood volume, arterial time-to-peak, B 1 , and T 1. A study in seven healthy volunteers resulted in the following values across the population in grey matter (mean ± standard deviation): cerebral blood flow of 69.1 ± 6.1 ml/min/100 g, arterial time-to-peak of 1.5 ± 0.1 s, tissue time-to-peak of 1.5 ± 0.1 s, T 1 of 1634 ms, cerebral blood volume of 0.0048 ± 0.0005. The CBF measurements were compared to standard pCASL CBF estimates using a one-compartment model, and a Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement with a minor bias. Repeatability was tested in five volunteers in the same exam session, and no statistical difference was seen. In addition to this validation, the MRF ASL acquisition's sensitivity to the physical and physiological parameters of interest was studied numerically. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Grading of cerebral gilomas: correlation with perfusion MRI, spectroscopic MRI and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.; Cha, S.; Knopp, E.A.; Johnson, G.; Litt, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between perfusion MRI (pMRI), spectroscopic MRI (sMRI) and histopathologic grading of primary glial neoplasms. Echo-planar pMRI has already been shown to be a robust physiological tool in preoperatively predicting tumor grade and guiding stereotactic biopsy (1). Thirty-four patients with a primary glial neoplasm underwent conventional MR imaging, T2*-weighted echo planar pMRI and sMRI. Four rCBV measurements were obtained from the colour maps of each lesion to determine the maximum rCBV. Spectroscopic MRI utilizing 2D chemical shift imaging at a TE of 135 provided multi-voxel spectroscopic data in sixteen of these patients. The maximum Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and minimum NAA/Cr ratios were obtained as well as documenting the presence of lactate and lipids. This was compared with the histopathological grading (including staining with H and E, GFAP, vimentin and MIB1, proliferative index) obtained from volumetric resection or stereotactic biopsy. The maximum rCBV in high grade tumors (n=26) ranged from 1.34 to 5.15, with a mean of 3.00 ± 1.21 (SD), and in the low grade tumors (n=8) ranged from 1.47 to 2.49, with a mean of 1.81 ± 1.21 (SD).This difference was statistically significant (p<0.001; Student t test). Maximum values for Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr and minimum NAA/Cr values were 3.24 ± 3.26, 2.49 ± 1.17 and 1.02 ± 0.34, respectively in the high grade (n = 11), and 1.3 ± 0.39, 1.58 ± 0.45 and 0.89 ± 0.37 respectively in the low-grade tumors (n = 5). A statistically significant difference was found for the Cho/Cr ratio (p<0.05) between the high grade and low grade groups. Relative CBV measurements and spectroscopic metabolic ratios are complementary and correlate with histopathology (2,3). These tools provide powerful physiological and metabolic information for preoperative prediction of tumor grade and will guide pre and post operative planning and management. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Spin labelling of human erythrocytes with nitroxide radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagalj, C.; DePaoli, T.C.P.; Hager, A.A.; Palaoro, L.A.; Rubin de Celis, E.; Farach, H.A.; Poole, C.P. jr

    1984-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were labelled with nitroxide, the spin label SYNVAR 101, under various experimantal conditions. A study was made of the influence of antireductants on the labelling efficiency and the kinetics of the radical decay during the labelling process

  19. Comparative study of pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling and dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging by histogram analysis in evaluation of glial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Atsuko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi; Takahashi, Hiroto; Matsuo, Chisato; Fujiwara, Takuya; Fujiwara, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2018-06-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive perfusion technique that may be an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) for assessment of brain tumors. To our knowledge, there have been no reports on histogram analysis of ASL. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ASL is comparable with DSC-MRI in terms of differentiating high-grade and low-grade gliomas by evaluating the histogram analysis of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the entire tumor. Thirty-four patients with pathologically proven glioma underwent ASL and DSC-MRI. High-signal areas on contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images or high-intensity areas on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were designated as the volumes of interest (VOIs). ASL-CBF, DSC-CBF, and DSC-cerebral blood volume maps were constructed and co-registered to the VOI. Perfusion histogram analyses of the whole VOI and statistical analyses were performed to compare the ASL and DSC images. There was no significant difference in the mean values for any of the histogram metrics in both of the low-grade gliomas (n = 15) and the high-grade gliomas (n = 19). Strong correlations were seen in the 75th percentile, mean, median, and standard deviation values between the ASL and DSC images. The area under the curve values tended to be greater for the DSC images than for the ASL images. DSC-MRI is superior to ASL for distinguishing high-grade from low-grade glioma. ASL could be an alternative evaluation method when DSC-MRI cannot be used, e.g., in patients with renal failure, those in whom repeated examination is required, and in children.

  20. Perfusion MRI as a neurosurgical tool for improved targeting in stereotactic tumor biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, M; Monet, P; Desenclos, C; Peltier, J; Fichten, A; Toussaint, P; Sevestre, H; Deramond, H; Le Gars, D

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic biopsies are subject to sampling errors (essentially due to target selection). The presence of contrast enhancement is not a reliable marker of malignancy. The goal of the present study was to determine whether perfusion-weighted imaging can improve target selection in stereotactic biopsies. We studied 21 consecutive stereotactic biopsies between June 2009 and March 2010. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was integrated into our neuronavigator. Perfusion-weighted imaging was used as an adjunct to conventional MRI data for target determination. Conventional MRI alone was used to determine the trajectory. We found a linear correlation between regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and vessel density (number of vessels per mm(2); R = 0.64; p < 0.001). Perfusion-weighted imaging facilitated target determination in 11 cases (52.4%), all of which were histopathologically diagnosed as glial tumors. For glial tumors, which presented with contrast enhancement, perfusion-weighted imaging identified a more precisely delimited target in 9 cases, a different target in 1 case, and exactly the same target in 1 other case. In all cases, perfusion-selected sampling provided information on cellular features and tumor grading. rCBV was significantly associated with grading (p < 0.01), endothelial proliferation (p < 0.01), and vessel density (p < 0.01). For lesions with rCBV values ≤1, perfusion-weighted MRI did not help to determine the target but was useful for surgical management. For stereotactic biopsies, targeting based on perfusion-weighted imaging is a feasible method for reducing the sampling error and improving target selection in the histopathological diagnosis of tumors with high rCBVs. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Improving the Grading Accuracy of Astrocytic Neoplasms Noninvasively by Combining Timing Information with Cerebral Blood Flow: A Multi-TI Arterial Spin-Labeling MR Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Zhao, B; Wang, G; Xiang, J; Xu, S; Liu, Y; Zhao, P; Pfeuffer, J; Qian, T

    2016-12-01

    .40%. Multi-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging can evaluate perfusion dynamics by combining normalized bolus arrival time and normalized CBF values derived from multiple TIs. It is superior to single-TI arterial spin-labeling imaging and conventional MR imaging features when applied independently and can improve the diagnostic accuracy when combined with conventional MR imaging for grading astrocytomas. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. Contrast optimization in multiphase arterial spin labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Paschoal, Andre M.; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Moll, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Multiphase ASL is an effective way to overcome the regional variation of the transit time that difficult the estimation of perfusion values. However, with conventional multiple phases ASL techniques, the ASL contrast at later phases is impaired due to repeated application of excitation pulses and longitudinal relaxation making it difficult to evaluate the tissue perfusion in regions where the transit time is longer. In the present study, we show an improvement of the acquisition scheme by exploring a modulation on the flip angle of the MR acquisition to keep the ASL contrast constant over multiple phases. (author)

  3. Quantitative analysis of pulmonary perfusion using time-resolved parallel 3D MRI - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Buhmann, R.; Plathow, C.; Puderbach, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Risse, F.; Ley, S.; Meyer, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: to assess the use of time-resolved parallel 3D MRI for a quantitative analysis of pulmonary perfusion in patients with cardiopulmonary disease. Materials and methods: eight patients with pulmonary embolism or pulmonary hypertension were examined with a time-resolved 3D gradient echo pulse sequence with parallel imaging techniques (FLASH 3D, TE/TR: 0.8/1.9 ms; flip angle: 40 ; GRAPPA). A quantitative perfusion analysis based on indicator dilution theory was performed using a dedicated software. Results: patients with pulmonary embolism or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension revealed characteristic wedge-shaped perfusion defects at perfusion MRI. They were characterized by a decreased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) and pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and increased mean transit time (MTT). Patients with primary pulmonary hypertension or eisenmenger syndrome showed a more homogeneous perfusion pattern. The mean MTT of all patients was 3.3 - 4.7 s. The mean PBF and PBV showed a broader interindividual variation (PBF: 104-322 ml/100 ml/min; PBV: 8 - 21 ml/100 ml). Conclusion: time-resolved parallel 3D MRI allows at least a semi-quantitative assessment of lung perfusion. Future studies will have to assess the clinical value of this quantitative information for the diagnosis and management of cardiopulmonary disease. (orig.) [de

  4. A Short Introduction to Arterial Spin Labeling and its Application to Flow Territory Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, T; Helle, M; Jansen, O

    2015-10-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an emerging method for the assessment of perfusion in various diseases of the brain. In ASL, the magnetization of arterial blood water spins is manipulated in a complete non-invasive way before flowing into the tissue of interest. This allows absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow, thereby, presenting an alternative to contrast-enhanced methods based on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, its potential application for flow territory mapping can provide additional information of the individual configuration of intracerebral blood flow. This article gives a brief overview of the basic ASL methodology and its approaches to image individual perfusion territories. Additionally, the utilization of ASL in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases is presented to provide examples of potential applications of (territorial) ASL in clinical routine.

  5. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  6. Neuroradiological findings in primary progressive aphasia: CT, MRI and cerebral perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinnatamby, R.; Antoun, N.A.; Freer, C.E.L.; Miles, K.A.; Hodges, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is defined as progressive decline in language for 2 or more years with preservation of activities of daily living and general cognitive functions. Whereas the clinical features of this syndrome have been well documented, the neuroradiological findings have not been studied systematically. We studied 13 patients with PPA retrospectively: 10 underwent CT, 12 MRI and 12 cerebral perfusion studies using 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT. CT and MR images were scored for focal atrophy by two independent assessors. Initial qualitative assessment of SPECT images was confirmed by quantitative analysis. CY was normal in 5 patients. Focal atrophy, affecting predominantly the left temporal lobe, was seen in 4 of 10 patients on CT, and 10 of 12 on MRI. Atrophy was localised primarily to the superior and middle temporal gyri on MRI. All 12 patients who underwent SPECT had unilateral temporal lobe perfusion defects, in 2 patients of whom MRI was normal. CT is relatively insensitive to focal abnormalities in PPA; MRI and SPECT are the imaging modalities of choice. MRI allows accurate, specific localisation of atrophy with the temporal neocortex. SPECT may reveal a functional decrease in cerebral perfusion prior to establishment of structural change. (orig.)

  7. Neuroradiological findings in primary progressive aphasia: CT, MRI and cerebral perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnatamby, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Antoun, N.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Freer, C.E.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Miles, K.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hodges, J.R. [Dept. of Neurology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is defined as progressive decline in language for 2 or more years with preservation of activities of daily living and general cognitive functions. Whereas the clinical features of this syndrome have been well documented, the neuroradiological findings have not been studied systematically. We studied 13 patients with PPA retrospectively: 10 underwent CT, 12 MRI and 12 cerebral perfusion studies using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT. CT and MR images were scored for focal atrophy by two independent assessors. Initial qualitative assessment of SPECT images was confirmed by quantitative analysis. CY was normal in 5 patients. Focal atrophy, affecting predominantly the left temporal lobe, was seen in 4 of 10 patients on CT, and 10 of 12 on MRI. Atrophy was localised primarily to the superior and middle temporal gyri on MRI. All 12 patients who underwent SPECT had unilateral temporal lobe perfusion defects, in 2 patients of whom MRI was normal. CT is relatively insensitive to focal abnormalities in PPA; MRI and SPECT are the imaging modalities of choice. MRI allows accurate, specific localisation of atrophy with the temporal neocortex. SPECT may reveal a functional decrease in cerebral perfusion prior to establishment of structural change. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion and perfusion MRI for the localisation of epileptogenic foci in drug-resistant epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiniger, P.; El-Koussy, M.; Kiefer, C.; Oswald, H.; Schroth, G.; Schindler, K.; Donati, F.; Loevblad, K.O.; Wissmeyer, M.; Mariani, L.; Weder, B.

    2002-01-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy is an important clinical challenge, both diagnostically and therapeutically. More and more surgical options are being considered, but precise presurgical assessment is necessary. We prospectively studied eight patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, who underwent clinical examination, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal MRI, including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted echoplanar sequences. Lesions suspected on SPECT of being epileptogenic showed mild hypoperfusion, while the diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) revealed increased apparent diffusion coefficients relative to the other side. However, these abnormalities were not visible on the corresponding maps. We showed that DWI and perfusion-weighted MRI could be used confirm the characteristics and site of an epileptogenic area in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of contrast agent dosage for perfusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, G.; Benner, T.; Heiland, S.; Reith, W.; Sartor, K.; Forsting, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we investigated, whether increasing the dosage of a paramagnetic contrast agent results in a stronger signal decrease in T 2 *-weighted perfusion sequences and therefore more meaningful parameter maps. Material and methods: In a prospective study bolus injection of gadolinium-DTPA was performed at dosages of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mmol/kg body weight (BW) in 10 patients each. Before, during and after bolus injection 40 T 2 *-weighted images of a reference brain slice were acquired within 65.6 seconds on a 1.0 T clinical scanner and perfusion parameters were calculated. Results: Due to the limited signal decrease during bolus passage and the resulting low signal-difference-to-noise ratio (ΔS/N) no reliable differentiation of gray and white matter was possible at a contrast agent dosage of 0.1 mmol/kg BW. Only at higher dosages, both, signal decrease and ΔS/N were strong enough to allow differentiation of gray and white matter and to yield reliable parameter maps. Conclusion: For meaningful MR perfusion imaging at 1.0 T and with the given sequence a contrast agent dosage of at least 0.2 mmol/kg BW is necessary, if a 0.5-molar contrast agent is used. (orig.) [de

  10. TH-CD-206-01: Expectation-Maximization Algorithm-Based Tissue Mixture Quantification for Perfusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, H; Xing, L [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Liang, Z [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Li, L [City University of New York College of Staten Island, Staten Island, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of estimating the tissue mixture perfusions and quantifying cerebral blood flow change in arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MR images. Methods: The proposed perfusion MR image analysis framework consists of 5 steps: (1) Inhomogeneity correction was performed on the T1- and T2-weighted images, which are available for each studied perfusion MR dataset. (2) We used the publicly available FSL toolbox to strip off the non-brain structures from the T1- and T2-weighted MR images. (3) We applied a multi-spectral tissue-mixture segmentation algorithm on both T1- and T2-structural MR images to roughly estimate the fraction of each tissue type - white matter, grey matter and cerebral spinal fluid inside each image voxel. (4) The distributions of the three tissue types or tissue mixture across the structural image array are down-sampled and mapped onto the ASL voxel array via a co-registration operation. (5) The presented 4-dimensional expectation-maximization (4D-EM) algorithm takes the down-sampled three tissue type distributions on perfusion image data to generate the perfusion mean, variance and percentage images for each tissue type of interest. Results: Experimental results on three volunteer datasets demonstrated that the multi-spectral tissue-mixture segmentation algorithm was effective to initialize tissue mixtures from T1- and T2-weighted MR images. Compared with the conventional ASL image processing toolbox, the proposed 4D-EM algorithm not only generated comparable perfusion mean images, but also produced perfusion variance and percentage images, which the ASL toolbox cannot obtain. It is observed that the perfusion contribution percentages may not be the same as the corresponding tissue mixture volume fractions estimated in the structural images. Conclusion: A specific application to brain ASL images showed that the presented perfusion image analysis method is promising for detecting subtle changes in tissue perfusions

  11. TH-CD-206-01: Expectation-Maximization Algorithm-Based Tissue Mixture Quantification for Perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H; Xing, L; Liang, Z; Li, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of estimating the tissue mixture perfusions and quantifying cerebral blood flow change in arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MR images. Methods: The proposed perfusion MR image analysis framework consists of 5 steps: (1) Inhomogeneity correction was performed on the T1- and T2-weighted images, which are available for each studied perfusion MR dataset. (2) We used the publicly available FSL toolbox to strip off the non-brain structures from the T1- and T2-weighted MR images. (3) We applied a multi-spectral tissue-mixture segmentation algorithm on both T1- and T2-structural MR images to roughly estimate the fraction of each tissue type - white matter, grey matter and cerebral spinal fluid inside each image voxel. (4) The distributions of the three tissue types or tissue mixture across the structural image array are down-sampled and mapped onto the ASL voxel array via a co-registration operation. (5) The presented 4-dimensional expectation-maximization (4D-EM) algorithm takes the down-sampled three tissue type distributions on perfusion image data to generate the perfusion mean, variance and percentage images for each tissue type of interest. Results: Experimental results on three volunteer datasets demonstrated that the multi-spectral tissue-mixture segmentation algorithm was effective to initialize tissue mixtures from T1- and T2-weighted MR images. Compared with the conventional ASL image processing toolbox, the proposed 4D-EM algorithm not only generated comparable perfusion mean images, but also produced perfusion variance and percentage images, which the ASL toolbox cannot obtain. It is observed that the perfusion contribution percentages may not be the same as the corresponding tissue mixture volume fractions estimated in the structural images. Conclusion: A specific application to brain ASL images showed that the presented perfusion image analysis method is promising for detecting subtle changes in tissue perfusions

  12. Assessment of brain perfusion with MRI: methodology and application to acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandin, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    We review the methodology of brain perfusion measurements with MRI and their application to acute stroke, with particular emphasis on the work awarded by the 6th Lucien Appel Prize for Neuroradiology. The application of the indicator dilution theory to the dynamic susceptibility-weighted bolus-tracking method is explained, as is the approach to obtaining quantitative measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV). Our contribution to methodological developments, such as CBV measurement with the frequency-shifted burst sequence, development of the PRESTO sequence, comparison of different deconvolution methods and of spin- and gradient-echo sequences, and the validation of MRI measurements against positron emission tomography is summarised. The pathophysiology of brain ischaemia and the role of neuroimaging in the setting of acute stroke are reviewed, with an introduction to the concepts of ischaemic penumbra and diffusion/perfusion mismatch. Our work on the determination of absolute CBF and CBV thresholds for predicting the area of infarct growth, identification of the best perfusion parameters (relative or absolute) for predicting the area of infarct growth and the role of MR angiography is also summarised. We conclude that MRI is a very powerful way to assess brain perfusion and that its use might help in selecting patients who will benefit most from treatment such as thrombolysis. (orig.)

  13. Myocardial perfusion MRI with sliding-window conjugate-gradient HYPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lan; Kino, Aya; Griswold, Mark; Mistretta, Charles; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2009-10-01

    First-pass perfusion MRI is a promising technique for detecting ischemic heart disease. However, the diagnostic value of the method is limited by the low spatial coverage, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and cardiac motion-related image artifacts. In this study we investigated the feasibility of using a method that combines sliding window and CG-HYPR methods (SW-CG-HYPR) to reduce the acquisition window for each slice while maintaining the temporal resolution of one frame per heartbeat in myocardial perfusion MRI. This method allows an increased number of slices, reduced motion artifacts, and preserves the relatively high SNR and spatial resolution of the "composite images." Results from eight volunteers demonstrate the feasibility of SW-CG-HYPR for accelerated myocardial perfusion imaging with accurate signal intensity changes of left ventricle blood pool and myocardium. Using this method the acquisition time per cardiac cycle was reduced by a factor of 4 and the number of slices was increased from 3 to 8 as compared to the conventional technique. The SNR of the myocardium at peak enhancement with SW-CG-HYPR (13.83 +/- 2.60) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the conventional turbo-FLASH protocol (8.40 +/- 1.62). Also, the spatial resolution of the myocardial perfection images was significantly improved. SW-CG-HYPR is a promising technique for myocardial perfusion MRI. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Impaired glymphatic perfusion after strokes revealed by contrast-enhanced MRI: a new target for fibrinolysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaberel, Thomas; Gakuba, Clement; Goulay, Romain; Martinez De Lizarrondo, Sara; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Emery, Evelyne; Touze, Emmanuel; Vivien, Denis; Gauberti, Maxime

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of different stroke subtypes on the glymphatic system using MRI. We first improved and characterized an in vivo protocol to measure the perfusion of the glymphatic system using MRI after minimally invasive injection of a gadolinium chelate within the cisterna magna. Then, the integrity of the glymphatic system was evaluated in 4 stroke models in mice including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intracerebral hemorrhage, carotid ligature, and embolic ischemic stroke. We were able to reliably evaluate the glymphatic system function using MRI. Moreover, we provided evidence that the glymphatic system was severely impaired after SAH and in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, but was not altered after carotid ligature or in case of intracerebral hemorrhage. Notably, this alteration in glymphatic perfusion reduced brain clearance rate of low-molecular-weight compounds. Interestingly, glymphatic perfusion after SAH can be improved by intracerebroventricular injection of tissue-type plasminogen activator. Moreover, spontaneous arterial recanalization was associated with restoration of the glymphatic function after embolic ischemic stroke. SAH and acute ischemic stroke significantly impair the glymphatic system perfusion. In these contexts, injection of tissue-type plasminogen activator either intracerebroventricularly to clear perivascular spaces (for SAH) or intravenously to restore arterial patency (for ischemic stroke) may improve glymphatic function. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in the acute phase of transient global amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI in TGA in the acute phase.From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF and volume (CBV were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN. CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB Software Library (FSL.Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women. On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus.Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in larger data sets and serial PWI

  16. New Developments in Spin Labels for Pulsed Dipolar EPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J. Fielding

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spin labelling is a chemical technique that enables the integration of a molecule containing an unpaired electron into another framework for study. Given the need to understand the structure, dynamics, and conformational changes of biomacromolecules, spin labelling provides a relatively non-intrusive technique and has certain advantages over X-ray crystallography; which requires high quality crystals. The technique relies on the design of binding probes that target a functional group, for example, the thiol group of a cysteine residue within a protein. The unpaired electron is typically supplied through a nitroxide radical and sterically shielded to preserve stability. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR techniques allow small magnetic couplings to be measured (e.g., <50 MHz providing information on single label probes or the dipolar coupling between multiple labels. In particular, distances between spin labels pairs can be derived which has led to many protein/enzymes and nucleotides being studied. Here, we summarise recent examples of spin labels used for pulse EPR that serve to illustrate the contribution of chemistry to advancing discoveries in this field.

  17. EPR and NMR spectroscopy on spin-labeled proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finiguerra, Michelina Giuseppina

    2011-01-01

    Spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) have been employed to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The surface polarity of four single cysteine mutants of the Zn-azurin in frozen solution were studied using 275 GHz EPR (J-band), with the advantage compared to 9 GHz (X-band) and

  18. Study of Nicorandil stress perfusion MRI in diagnosing ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Toshiki; Iwai, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Soji; Hayashi, Ryuji

    2006-01-01

    The excellent spatial resolution of myocardial stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging is effective for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. When dipyridamole or adenosine triphosphate is used as a pharmacological stress in cardiac MRI, non-magnetic instruments are required for infusion of these drugs in a MRI room. We attempted to use nicorandil as a pharmacological stressor. Nicorandil exhibited KATP channel opening and nitrate effects, and could be infused without any special instruments. Based on the coronary artery stenosis assessed by coronary angiography, according to the criteria of the American Heart Association (AHA), the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of nicorandil perfusion MRI for the detection of coronary artery stenosis was 85%, 57% and 74.3%, respectively. No major side effects were observed, except for mild hypotension (mean 10 mmHg) after infusion of the drug. It was concluded that myocardial perfusion MRI examination using nicorandil could be performed non-invasively and safely for the evaluation of coronary vessel disease in patients. (author)

  19. Perfusion MRI for the prediction of treatment response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Joon Seok; Baek, Song-Ee; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Suh, Jinsuk; Kim, Ki Whang; Kim, Daehong; Myoung, Sungmin; Choi, Junjeong; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of perfusion MRI as a potential biomarker for predicting response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer. Thirty-nine patients with primary rectal carcinoma who were scheduled for preoperative CRT were prospectively recruited. Perfusion MRI was performed with a 3.0-T MRI system in all patients before therapy, at the end of the 2nd week of therapy, and before surgery. The K trans (volume transfer constant) and V e (extracellular extravascular space fraction) were calculated. Before CRT, the mean tumour K trans in the downstaged group was significantly higher than that in the non-downstaged group (P = 0.0178), but there was no significant difference between tumour regression grade (TRG) responders and TRG non-responders (P = 0.1392). Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences for evolution of K trans values both between downstaged and non-downstaged groups (P = 0.0215) and between TRG responders and TRG non-responders (P = 0.0001). Regarding V e , no significant differences were observed both between downstaged and non-downstaged groups (P = 0.689) or between TRG responders and TRG non-responders (P = 0.887). Perfusion MRI of rectal cancer can be useful for assessing tumoural K trans changes by CRT. Tumours with high pre-CRT K trans values tended to respond favourably to CRT, particularly in terms of downstaging criteria. (orig.)

  20. The rotational mobility of spin labels in wool creatine depending on temperature, humidity and deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobodzhanov, P.Kh.; Yusupov, I.Kh.; Marupov, R.

    2001-01-01

    Present article is devoted to study of rotational mobility of spin labels in wool creatine depending on temperature, humidity and deformation. The experimental data of study of structure and molecular mobility of wool creatine modified by spin labels was considered.

  1. Renal Cell Carcinoma Perfusion before and after Radiofrequency Ablation Measured with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Tze Min; Sourbron, Steven; Wilson, Daniel Jonathan; Magee, Derek; Gregory, Walter Martin; Selby, Peter John; Buckley, David L

    2018-01-08

    To investigate if the early treatment effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be detected with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI and to correlate RCC perfusion with RFA treatment time. 20 patients undergoing RFA of their 21 RCCs were evaluated with DCE-MRI before and at one month after RFA treatment. Perfusion was estimated using the maximum slope technique at two independent sittings. Total RCC blood flow was correlated with total RFA treatment time, tumour location, size and histology. DCE-MRI examinations were successfully evaluated for 21 RCCs (size from 1.3 to 4 cm). Perfusion of the RCCs decreased significantly ( p measuring RCC perfusion before and after RFA. Perfusion significantly decreases in the zone of ablation, suggesting that it may be useful for the assessment of treatment efficacy. Pre-RFA RCC blood flow may be used to predict RFA treatment time.

  2. Assessment of tumor blood flow and its correlation with histopathologic features in skull base meningiomas and schwannomas by using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Kazuyuki; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hirohiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate whether pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL)-MRI can adequately evaluate tumor perfusion even if the tumors are located in the skull base region and evaluate the correlation between tumor blood flow (TBF) and the histopathologic features of skull base meningiomas and schwannomas. Materials and methods: We enrolled 31 patients with skull base meningioma (n = 14) and schwannoma (n = 17) who underwent surgical resection. TBF was calculated from pcASL. Tissue sections were stained with CD34 to evaluate microvessel area (MVA). TBF and MVA ratio were compared between meningiomas and schwannomas using Mann–Whitney U-test. The correlations between MVA ratio and TBF were evaluated in each tumor by using single linear regression analysis and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (r s ). Results: MVA ratio and TBF were significantly higher in meningioma than in schwannoma (both p < 0.01). Correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations between MVA ratio and both mean and max TBF for meningiomas (r s = 0.89, 0.81, both p < 0.01). There was a weak positive correlation between MVA ratio and mean TBF for schwannomas (r s = 0.43, p = 0.04). However, no significant correlation was found between MVA ratio and max TBF for schwannoma. Conclusions: pcASL-MRI is useful for evaluating tumor perfusion even if the tumors are located in the skull base region. Moreover, pcASL-TBF was significantly higher in most meningiomas compared to schwannomas, which can help in the differential diagnosis of the 2 tumor types even without the use of contrast material

  3. MRI and MRA of kidney transplants - evaluation of vessels and perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, W.; Pfammatter, T.; Krestin, G.P.; Debatin, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To document the value of fast contrast enhanced-sequences in the assessment of the vascular supply and parenchymal perfusion in renal transplants. Patients: 18 recipients of a renal transplant were examined with a 1.5-Tesla-MR-system. The protocol included fast contrast enhanced 3D MR angiography and coronal 2D GRE sequences. The transplant artery and vein were assessed as well as regional parenchymal perfusion. Results: 3D MRA detected three transplant artery stenoses and one occlusion. In addition, two renal vein thromboses and one compression were identified. Perfusion deficits were documented in 8 renal transplants: Renal infarction (n=4), cortical necrosis (n=2), acute tubular necrosis (n=1) and venous ischemia (n=1). Fluid collections were documented as well as dilatation of the collecting system and abnormalities of the surrounding tissues. Conclusion: Contrast enhanced MRI and MRA permit a comprehensive assessment of renal transplants without inducing nephrotoxicity. (orig.) [de

  4. Diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI in a patient with a prolonged reversible ischaemic neurological deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann-Haefelin, T.; Wittsack, H.J.; Wenserski, F.; Li, T.Q.; Moseley, M.E.; Siebler, M.; Freund, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    We report acute and follow-up diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI (DWI, PWI) findings in a patient with a prolonged reversible ischaemic neurological deficit. PWI 12 h after the patient was last seen to be without symptoms revealed a large perfusion deficit in the left posterior MCA territory with a relatively inconspicuous and much smaller abnormality on DWI. Follow-up showed resolution of abnormalities on both DWI and PWI, and conventional MRI was normal, apart from a very slight abnormality, visible only on FLAIR images, at the centre of the initially DWI-positive region. These findings demonstrate the utility of PWI when be used in combination with DWI to investigate the pathophysiology of transient ischemic syndromes. (orig.)

  5. Arterial spin labeling-based Z-maps have high specificity and positive predictive value for neurodegenerative dementia compared to FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faellmar, David; Larsson, Elna-Marie [Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Haller, Sven [Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Affidea CDRC - Centre Diagnostique Radiologique de Carouge, Carouge (Switzerland); Lilja, Johan [Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Uppsala (Sweden); Hermes Medical Solutions, Stockholm (Sweden); Danfors, Torsten [Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Uppsala (Sweden); Kilander, Lena [Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics, Uppsala (Sweden); Tolboom, Nelleke; Croon, Philip M.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Egger, Karl [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Kellner, Elias [Medical Center University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Verfaillie, Sander C.J.; Ossenkoppele, Rik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institutes of Neurology and Healthcare Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Cerebral perfusion analysis based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI has been proposed as an alternative to FDG-PET in patients with neurodegenerative disease. Z-maps show normal distribution values relating an image to a database of controls. They are routinely used for FDG-PET to demonstrate disease-specific patterns of hypometabolism at the individual level. This study aimed to compare the performance of Z-maps based on ASL to FDG-PET. Data were combined from two separate sites, each cohort consisting of patients with Alzheimer's disease (n = 18 + 7), frontotemporal dementia (n = 12 + 8) and controls (n = 9 + 29). Subjects underwent pseudocontinuous ASL and FDG-PET. Z-maps were created for each subject and modality. Four experienced physicians visually assessed the 166 Z-maps in random order, blinded to modality and diagnosis. Discrimination of patients versus controls using ASL-based Z-maps yielded high specificity (84%) and positive predictive value (80%), but significantly lower sensitivity compared to FDG-PET-based Z-maps (53% vs. 96%, p < 0.001). Among true-positive cases, correct diagnoses were made in 76% (ASL) and 84% (FDG-PET) (p = 0.168). ASL-based Z-maps can be used for visual assessment of neurodegenerative dementia with high specificity and positive predictive value, but with inferior sensitivity compared to FDG-PET. (orig.)

  6. Technological advances in site-directed spin labeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, Wayne L; López, Carlos J; Altenbach, Christian; Yang, Zhongyu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular flexibility over a wide time range is of central importance to the function of many proteins, both soluble and membrane. Revealing the modes of flexibility, their amplitudes, and time scales under physiological conditions is the challenge for spectroscopic methods, one of which is site-directed spin labeling EPR (SDSL-EPR). Here we provide an overview of some recent technological advances in SDSL-EPR related to investigation of structure, structural heterogeneity, and dynamics of proteins. These include new classes of spin labels, advances in measurement of long range distances and distance distributions, methods for identifying backbone and conformational fluctuations, and new strategies for determining the kinetics of protein motion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel method to assess pial collateralization from stroke perfusion MRI: subdividing Tmax into anatomical compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potreck, Arne; Seker, Fatih; Hoffmann, Angelika; Pfaff, Johannes; Bendszus, Martin; Heiland, Sabine; Pham, Mirko; Nagel, Simon

    2017-01-01

    To develop and validate a quantitative and observer-independent method to evaluate pial collateral circulation by DSC-perfusion MRI and test whether this novel method delivers diagnostic information which is redundant to or independent from conventional penumbra imaging by the mismatch approach. We retrospectively identified 47 patients with M1 occlusion who underwent MR diffusion/perfusion imaging and mechanical thrombectomy at our facility. By automated registration and segmentation, T max delays were attributed specifically to the pial, cortical and parenchymal compartments. The resulting pial volumes at delay were defined as the pial T max map-assessed collateral score (TMACS) and correlated with gold standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Mismatch ratio was assessed by conventional penumbra defining MRI criteria. Strong correlation was found between TMACS and angiographically assessed collateral score (Pearson ρ = -0.74, p < 0.001). In multiple logistic regression, both good collaterals according to TMACS [OR 4.3 (1.1-19, p = 0.04)] and mismatch ratio ≥ 3.5 [OR 12.3 (1.88-249, p = 0.03)] were independent predictors of favourable clinical outcome. Perfusion delay in the pial compartment, as evaluated by TMACS, closely reflects the extent of pial collaterals in gold-standard DSA. TMACS and mismatch ratio were found to be complementary predictors of a favourable clinical outcome, each adding independent predictive information. (orig.)

  8. Meningiomas with conventional MRI findings resembling intraaxial tumors: can perfusion-weighted MRI be helpful in differentiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakyemez, Bahattin; Yildirim, Nalan; Erdogan, Cueneyt; Parlak, Mufit; Kocaeli, Hasan; Korfali, Ender

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of perfusion-weighted MRI to the differentiation of meningiomas with atypical conventional MRI findings from intraaxial tumors. We retrospectively analyzed 54 meningiomas, 12 glioblastomas and 13 solitary metastases. We detected 6 meningiomas with atypical features on conventional MRI resembling intraaxial tumors. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBV) ratios of all tumors were calculated via perfusion-weighted MRI. The signal intensity-time curves were plotted and three different curve patterns were observed. The type 1 curve resembled normal brain parenchyma or the postenhancement part was minimally below the baseline, the type 2 curve was similar to the type 1 curve but with the postenhancement part above the baseline, and the type 3 curve had the postenhancement part below the baseline accompanied by widening of the curve. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. On CBV images meningiomas were hypervascular and the mean rCBV ratio was 10.58±2.00. For glioblastomas and metastatic lesions, the rCBV ratios were 5.02±1.40 and 4.68±1.54, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in rCBV ratios between meningiomas and glioblastomas and metastases (P<0.001). Only one of the meningiomas displayed a type 2 curve while five showed a type 3 curve. Glioblastomas and metastases displayed either a type 1 or a type 2 curve. None of the meningiomas showed a type 1 curve and none of the glioblastomas or metastases showed a type 3 curve. (orig.)

  9. Meningiomas with conventional MRI findings resembling intraaxial tumors: can perfusion-weighted MRI be helpful in differentiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, Bahattin [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Bursa State Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Yildirim, Nalan; Erdogan, Cueneyt; Parlak, Mufit [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Kocaeli, Hasan; Korfali, Ender [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Bursa (Turkey)

    2006-10-15

    To investigate the contribution of perfusion-weighted MRI to the differentiation of meningiomas with atypical conventional MRI findings from intraaxial tumors. We retrospectively analyzed 54 meningiomas, 12 glioblastomas and 13 solitary metastases. We detected 6 meningiomas with atypical features on conventional MRI resembling intraaxial tumors. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBV) ratios of all tumors were calculated via perfusion-weighted MRI. The signal intensity-time curves were plotted and three different curve patterns were observed. The type 1 curve resembled normal brain parenchyma or the postenhancement part was minimally below the baseline, the type 2 curve was similar to the type 1 curve but with the postenhancement part above the baseline, and the type 3 curve had the postenhancement part below the baseline accompanied by widening of the curve. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. On CBV images meningiomas were hypervascular and the mean rCBV ratio was 10.58{+-}2.00. For glioblastomas and metastatic lesions, the rCBV ratios were 5.02{+-}1.40 and 4.68{+-}1.54, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in rCBV ratios between meningiomas and glioblastomas and metastases (P<0.001). Only one of the meningiomas displayed a type 2 curve while five showed a type 3 curve. Glioblastomas and metastases displayed either a type 1 or a type 2 curve. None of the meningiomas showed a type 1 curve and none of the glioblastomas or metastases showed a type 3 curve. (orig.)

  10. Effects of global signal regression and subtraction methods on resting-state functional connectivity using arterial spin labeling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, João Paulo Santos; Mônaco, Luciana da Mata; Paschoal, André Monteiro; Oliveira, Ícaro Agenor Ferreira de; Leoni, Renata Ferranti

    2018-05-16

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that is finding broader applications in functional studies of the healthy and diseased brain. To promote improvement in cerebral blood flow (CBF) signal specificity, many algorithms and imaging procedures, such as subtraction methods, were proposed to eliminate or, at least, minimize noise sources. Therefore, this study addressed the main considerations of how CBF functional connectivity (FC) is changed, regarding resting brain network (RBN) identification and correlations between regions of interest (ROI), by different subtraction methods and removal of residual motion artifacts and global signal fluctuations (RMAGSF). Twenty young healthy participants (13 M/7F, mean age = 25 ± 3 years) underwent an MRI protocol with a pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) sequence. Perfusion-based images were obtained using simple, sinc and running subtraction. RMAGSF removal was applied to all CBF time series. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) was used for RBN identification, while Pearson' correlation was performed for ROI-based FC analysis. Temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) was higher in CBF maps obtained by sinc subtraction, although RMAGSF removal had a significant effect on maps obtained with simple and running subtractions. Neither the subtraction method nor the RMAGSF removal directly affected the identification of RBNs. However, the number of correlated and anti-correlated voxels varied for different subtraction and filtering methods. In an ROI-to-ROI level, changes were prominent in FC values and their statistical significance. Our study showed that both RMAGSF filtering and subtraction method might influence resting-state FC results, especially in an ROI level, consequently affecting FC analysis and its interpretation. Taking our results and the whole discussion together, we understand that for an exploratory assessment of the brain, one could avoid removing RMAGSF to

  11. Global low perfusion and latent ischemic lesions desclosed by PET and MRI in polycythermia hypertonica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Kameyama, Masakuni; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Nabatame, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    Polycythemia hypertonica was first reported by Geisboeck in 1905 (Geisboeck's syndrome), which has been well known to accompany a high risk for cerebrovascular disorders, and relatively poor prognosis. We performed PET and MRI study on two patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. In both cases, PET study revealed that there were no focal abnormalities in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), but global CBF and CMRO2 decreased to low levels. On MRI study, we also found multiple small ischemic lesions in the deep structures in the cerebral hemisphere as well as brain stem, which were considered to be coincided with the perfusion territories of perforating arteries. Many of the lesions revealed by MRI were not apparent on X-ray CT scan, and were asymptomatic clinically. We consider that global low perfusion and many small latent ischemic lesions are characteristic for Geisboeck's syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to control high hematocrit values and hypertension from an early stage of the patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. (author)

  12. Global low perfusion and latent ischemic lesions desclosed by PET and MRI in polycythemia hypertonica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, K.; Kameyama, M.; Akiguchi, I.; Fukuyama, H.; Nabatame, H.

    1987-04-01

    Polycythemia hypertonica, first reported by Geisboeck in 1905 (Geisboeck's syndrome), has been known for an accompanying high risk of cerebrovascular disorders and relatively poor prognosis. We performed PET and MRI study on two patients with Geisboeck's syndrome. In both cases, PET study revealed that there were no focal abnormalities in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/), but global CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ decreased to low levels. On MRI study, we also found multiple small ischemic lesions in the deep structures in the cerebral hemisphere as well as brain stem, which were considered to be coincided with the perfusion territories of perforating arteries. Many of the lesions revealed by MRI were not apparent on X-ray CT scan, and were asymptomatic clinically. We consider that global low perfusion and many small latent ischemic lesions are characteristic of Geisboeck's syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to control high hematocrit values and hypertension from an early stage of the patients with Geisboeck's syndrome.

  13. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging provides additional information as compared to anatomical imaging for decision-making in vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijwegt, M.C.; Mey, A.G.L. van der; Wiggers-deBruine, F.T.; Malessy, M.J.A; Osch, M.J.P. van

    2016-01-01

    •DSC/ASL-MRI can be acquired in growing VS with sufficient image quality.•In most patients DSC and ASL techniques provide similar qualitative scores.•These techniques can be of importance in future decision-making. DSC/ASL-MRI can be acquired in growing VS with sufficient image quality. In most patients DSC and ASL techniques provide similar qualitative scores. These techniques can be of importance in future decision-making. The added value of perfusion MRI for decision-making in vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients is unknown. MRI offers two perfusion methods: the first employing contrast agent (dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI) that provides information on cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF), the second by magnetic labeling of blood (arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI), providing CBF-images. The goal of the current study is to investigate whether DSC and ASL perfusion MRI provides complimentary information to current anatomical imaging in treatment selection process of VS. Nine patients with growing VS with extrameatal diameter >9 mm were included (>2 mm/year and 20% volume expansion/year) and one patient with 23 mm extrameatal VS without growth. DSC and ASL perfusion MRI were obtained on 3 T MRI. Perfusion in VS was scored as hyperintense, hypointense or isointense compared to the contralateral region. Seven patients showed hyperintense signal on DSC and ASL sequences. Three patients showed iso- or hypointense signal on at least one perfusion map (1 patient hypointense on both DSC-MRI and ASL; 1 patient isointense on DSC-CBF; 1 patient isointense on ASL). All patients showed enhancement on post-contrast T1 anatomical scan. Perfusion MR provides additional information compared to anatomical imaging for decision-making in VS

  14. Visual cortex reactivity in sedated children examined with perfusion MRI (FAIR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A P; Rostrup, E; Miranda, M J

    2002-01-01

    that it is caused by a relatively greater increase of oxygen consumption compared to rCBF (regional cerebral blood flow) increase. We studied the rCBF changes during visual stimulation in four sedated children, aged 4-71 months, and four alert adults, with an arterial water spin labeling technique (FAIR) and BOLD f...

  15. Unsupervised motion-compensation of multi-slice cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for registration of single and multi-slice cardiac perfusion MRI. Utilising computer intensive analyses of variance and clustering in an annotated training set off-line, the presented method is capable of providing registration without any manual interaction...... in less than a second per frame. Changes in image intensity during the bolus passage are modelled by a slice-coupled active appearance model, which is augmented with a cluster analysis of the training set. Landmark correspondences are optimised using the MDL framework due to Davies et al. Image search...

  16. Focal status epilepticus: follow-up by perfusion- and diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koussy, M.; Loevblad, K.O.; Kiefer, C.; Schroth, G.; Mathis, J.; Stepper, F.

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI demonstrated bright right temporoparietal cortex, right hippocampus, and left cerebellum in a 63-year-old female suffering a focal convulsive status epilepticus. Hyperperfusion was noted in the right temporoparietal region. Two days later, a tendency to normalization of most of the diffusion and perfusion changes was noted, apart from the right hippocampus which became brighter on diffusion- and T2-weighted images. On the tenth day the apparent diffusion coefficient was slightly elevated, getting brighter on T2-weighted images with suspected mild post-contrast enhancement. We postulate that the discharging right hippocampus suffered cytotoxic edema, which later progressed to cell damage. (orig.)

  17. Focal status epilepticus: follow-up by perfusion- and diffusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Koussy, M; Loevblad, K O; Kiefer, C; Schroth, G [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bern, Inselspital (Switzerland); Mathis, J; Stepper, F [Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Inselspital (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI demonstrated bright right temporoparietal cortex, right hippocampus, and left cerebellum in a 63-year-old female suffering a focal convulsive status epilepticus. Hyperperfusion was noted in the right temporoparietal region. Two days later, a tendency to normalization of most of the diffusion and perfusion changes was noted, apart from the right hippocampus which became brighter on diffusion- and T2-weighted images. On the tenth day the apparent diffusion coefficient was slightly elevated, getting brighter on T2-weighted images with suspected mild post-contrast enhancement. We postulate that the discharging right hippocampus suffered cytotoxic edema, which later progressed to cell damage. (orig.)

  18. ASAP (Automatic Software for ASL Processing): A toolbox for processing Arterial Spin Labeling images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato Abad, Virginia; García-Polo, Pablo; O'Daly, Owen; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Zelaya, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The method of Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) has experienced a significant rise in its application to functional imaging, since it is the only technique capable of measuring blood perfusion in a truly non-invasive manner. Currently, there are no commercial packages for processing ASL data and there is no recognized standard for normalizing ASL data to a common frame of reference. This work describes a new Automated Software for ASL Processing (ASAP) that can automatically process several ASL datasets. ASAP includes functions for all stages of image pre-processing: quantification, skull-stripping, co-registration, partial volume correction and normalization. To assess the applicability and validity of the toolbox, this work shows its application in the study of hypoperfusion in a sample of healthy subjects at risk of progressing to Alzheimer's disease. ASAP requires limited user intervention, minimizing the possibility of random and systematic errors, and produces cerebral blood flow maps that are ready for statistical group analysis. The software is easy to operate and results in excellent quality of spatial normalization. The results found in this evaluation study are consistent with previous studies that find decreased perfusion in Alzheimer's patients in similar regions and demonstrate the applicability of ASAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-operative monitoring of tissue transfers: advantages using contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) with dynamic perfusion analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamby, P; Prantl, L; Fellner, C; Geis, S; Jung, E M

    2011-01-01

    The immediate evaluation of microvascular tissue flaps with respect to microcirculation after transplantation is crucial for optimal monitoring and outcome. The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the clinical value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced MRI (ceMRI) for monitoring the integrity of tissue flaps in plastic surgery. To this end, we investigated 10 patients (47 ± 16 a) between postoperative day 7 and 14 who underwent flap surgery in order to cover tissue defects in various body regions. For CEUS we utilized the GE LOGIQ E9 equipped with a linear transducer (6-9 MHz). After application of 2.4 ml SonoVue, the tissue perfusion was detected in Low MI-Technique (MI present, both technologies provide an optimal assessment of perfusion in cutaneous, subcutaneous and muscle tissue layers, whereby the detection of fatty tissue perfusion is currently more easily detected using CEUS compared to ceMRI.

  20. Quantification of the effect of water exchange in dynamic contrast MRI perfusion measurements in the brain and heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Rosenbaum, S; Fritz-Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of myocardial and brain perfusion when using exogenous contrast agents (CAs) such as gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) and MRI is affected by the diffusion of water between compartments. This water exchange may have an impact on signal enhancement, or, equivalently, on the longitudinal...... exchange can have a significant effect on perfusion estimation (F) in the brain when using Gd-DTPA, where it acts as an intravascular contrast agent....

  1. Investigating tumor perfusion by hyperpolarized (13) C MRI with comparison to conventional gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI and pathology in orthotopic human GBM xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Ilwoo; von Morze, Cornelius; Lupo, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    glioblastoma (GBM) model for the characterization of tumor perfusion and compared with standard Gd-based dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI data and immunohistochemical analysis from resected brains. Distinct HMCP perfusion characteristics were observed within the GBM tumors compared with contralateral...... for tumor that exhibited high levels of hyperpolarized HMCP signal. The results from this study have demonstrated that hyperpolarized HMCP data can be used as an indicator of tumor perfusion in an orthotopic xenograft model for GBM. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  2. Simultaneous detection of landmarks and key-frame in cardiac perfusion MRI using a joint spatial-temporal context model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Xue, Hui; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Guetter, Christoph; Kellman, Peter; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Arai, Andrew; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Littmann, Arne; Georgescu, Bogdan; Guehring, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven clinical significance in diagnosis of heart diseases. However, analysis of perfusion data is time-consuming, where automatic detection of anatomic landmarks and key-frames from perfusion MR sequences is helpful for anchoring structures and functional analysis of the heart, leading toward fully automated perfusion analysis. Learning-based object detection methods have demonstrated their capabilities to handle large variations of the object by exploring a local region, i.e., context. Conventional 2D approaches take into account spatial context only. Temporal signals in perfusion data present a strong cue for anchoring. We propose a joint context model to encode both spatial and temporal evidence. In addition, our spatial context is constructed not only based on the landmark of interest, but also the landmarks that are correlated in the neighboring anatomies. A discriminative model is learned through a probabilistic boosting tree. A marginal space learning strategy is applied to efficiently learn and search in a high dimensional parameter space. A fully automatic system is developed to simultaneously detect anatomic landmarks and key frames in both RV and LV from perfusion sequences. The proposed approach was evaluated on a database of 373 cardiac perfusion MRI sequences from 77 patients. Experimental results of a 4-fold cross validation show superior landmark detection accuracies of the proposed joint spatial-temporal approach to the 2D approach that is based on spatial context only. The key-frame identification results are promising.

  3. Renal Cell Carcinoma Perfusion before and after Radiofrequency Ablation Measured with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Min Wah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate if the early treatment effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA on renal cell carcinoma (RCC can be detected with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI and to correlate RCC perfusion with RFA treatment time. Materials and methods: 20 patients undergoing RFA of their 21 RCCs were evaluated with DCE-MRI before and at one month after RFA treatment. Perfusion was estimated using the maximum slope technique at two independent sittings. Total RCC blood flow was correlated with total RFA treatment time, tumour location, size and histology. Results: DCE-MRI examinations were successfully evaluated for 21 RCCs (size from 1.3 to 4 cm. Perfusion of the RCCs decreased significantly (p < 0.0001 from a mean of 203 (±80 mL/min/100 mL before RFA to 8.1 (±3.1 mL/min/100 mL after RFA with low intra-observer variability (r ≥ 0.99, p < 0.0001. There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.95 between time to complete ablation and pre-treatment total RCC blood flow. Tumours with an exophytic location exhibit the lowest mean RFA treatment time. Conclusion: DCE-MRI can detect early treatment effects by measuring RCC perfusion before and after RFA. Perfusion significantly decreases in the zone of ablation, suggesting that it may be useful for the assessment of treatment efficacy. Pre-RFA RCC blood flow may be used to predict RFA treatment time.

  4. Peptide-membrane Interactions by Spin-labeling EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Tatyana I.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established method that has recently grown in popularity as an experimental technique, with multiple applications in protein and peptide science. The growth is driven by development of labeling strategies, as well as by considerable technical advances in the field, that are paralleled by an increased availability of EPR instrumentation. While the method requires an introduction of a paramagnetic probe at a well-defined position in a peptide sequence, it has been shown to be minimally destructive to the peptide structure and energetics of the peptide-membrane interactions. In this chapter, we describe basic approaches for using SDSL EPR spectroscopy to study interactions between small peptides and biological membranes or membrane mimetic systems. We focus on experimental approaches to quantify peptide-membrane binding, topology of bound peptides, and characterize peptide aggregation. Sample preparation protocols including spin-labeling methods and preparation of membrane mimetic systems are also described. PMID:26477253

  5. Arterial Transit Time-corrected Renal Blood Flow Measurement with Pulsed Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Tsuchiyama, Katsuki; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hirohiko

    2017-01-10

    The importance of arterial transit time (ATT) correction for arterial spin labeling MRI has been well debated in neuroimaging, but it has not been well evaluated in renal imaging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of pulsed continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) MRI with multiple post-labeling delay (PLD) acquisition for measuring ATT-corrected renal blood flow (ATC-RBF). A total of 14 volunteers were categorized into younger (n = 8; mean age, 27.0 years) and older groups (n = 6; 64.8 years). Images of pcASL were obtained at three different PLDs (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 s), and ATC-RBF and ATT were calculated using a single-compartment model. To validate ATC-RBF, a comparative study of effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) measured by 99m Tc-MAG3 scintigraphy was performed. ATC-RBF was corrected by kidney volume (ATC-cRBF) for comparison with ERPF. The younger group showed significantly higher ATC-RBF (157.68 ± 38.37 mL/min/100 g) and shorter ATT (961.33 ± 260.87 ms) than the older group (117.42 ± 24.03 mL/min/100 g and 1227.94 ± 226.51 ms, respectively; P renal ASL-MRI as debated in brain imaging.

  6. Parametric Response Maps of Perfusion MRI May Identify Recurrent Glioblastomas Responsive to Bevacizumab and Irinotecan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Domenico; Cuppini, Lucia; Anghileri, Elena; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Eoli, Marica

    2014-01-01

    Background Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) can be used to measure key aspects of tumor vascularity in vivo and recent studies suggest that perfusion imaging may be useful in the early assessment of response to angiogenesis inhibitors. Aim of this work is to compare Parametric Response Maps (PRMs) with the Region Of Interest (ROI) approach in the analysis of tumor changes induced by bevacizumab and irinotecan in recurrent glioblastomas (rGBM), and to evaluate if changes in tumor blood volume measured by perfusion MRI may predict clinical outcome. Methods 42 rGBM patients with KPS ≥50 were treated until progression, as defined by MRI with RANO criteria. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) variation after 8 weeks of treatment was calculated through semi-automatic ROI placement in the same anatomic region as in baseline. Alternatively, rCBV variations with respect to baseline were calculated into the evolving tumor region using a voxel-by-voxel difference. PRMs were created showing where rCBV significantly increased, decreased or remained unchanged. Results An increased blood volume in PRM (PRMCBV+) higher than 18% (first quartile) after 8 weeks of treatment was associated with increased progression free survival (PFS; 24 versus 13 weeks, p = 0.045) and overall survival (OS; 38 versus 25 weeks, p = 0.016). After 8 weeks of treatment ROI analysis showed that mean rCBV remained elevated in non responsive patients (4.8±0.9 versus 5.1±1.2, p = 0.38), whereas decreased in responsive patients (4.2±1.3 versus 3.8±1.6 p = 0.04), and re-increased progressively when patients approached tumor progression. Conclusions Our data suggest that PRMs can provide an early marker of response to antiangiogenic treatment and warrant further confirmation in a larger cohort of GBM patients. PMID:24675671

  7. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballinger Michelle R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed.

  8. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Pelgrim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT, including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET. This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD, as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings.

  9. Transit time corrected arterial spin labeling technique aids to overcome delayed transit time effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Kang, Kyung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-hoon; Park, Sun-Won; Hwang, Moonjung; Lebel, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of transit time corrected cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps based on multi-phase arterial spin labeling MR perfusion imaging (ASL-MRP). The Institutional Review Board of our hospital approved this retrospective study. Written informed consent was waived. Conventional and multi-phase ASL-MRPs and dynamic susceptibility contrast MR perfusion imaging (DSC-MRP) were acquired for 108 consecutive patients. Vascular territory-based volumes of interest were applied to CBF and time to peak (TTP) maps obtained from DSC-MRP and CBF maps obtained from conventional and multi-phase ASL-MRPs. The concordances between normalized CBF (nCBF) from DSC-MRP and nCBF from conventional and transition time corrected CBF maps from multi-phase ASL-MRP were evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis. In addition, the dependence of difference between nCBF (ΔnCBF) values obtained from DSC-MRP and conventional ASL-MRP (or multi-phase ASL-MRP) on TTP obtained from DSC-MRP was also analyzed using regression analysis. The values of nCBFs from conventional and multi-phase ASL-MRPs had lower values than nCBF based on DSC-MRP (mean differences, 0.08 and 0.07, respectively). The values of ΔnCBF were dependent on TTP values from conventional ASL-MRP technique (F = 5.5679, P = 0.0384). No dependency of ΔnCBF on TTP values from multi-phase ASL-MRP technique was revealed (F = 0.1433, P > 0.05). The use of transit time corrected CBF maps based on multi-phase ASL-MRP technique can overcome the effect of delayed transit time on perfusion maps based on conventional ASL-MRP. (orig.)

  10. Transit time corrected arterial spin labeling technique aids to overcome delayed transit time effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Kang, Kyung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-hoon [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun-Won [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Moonjung [GE Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lebel, R.M. [GE Healthcare Canada, Calgary (Canada)

    2018-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of transit time corrected cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps based on multi-phase arterial spin labeling MR perfusion imaging (ASL-MRP). The Institutional Review Board of our hospital approved this retrospective study. Written informed consent was waived. Conventional and multi-phase ASL-MRPs and dynamic susceptibility contrast MR perfusion imaging (DSC-MRP) were acquired for 108 consecutive patients. Vascular territory-based volumes of interest were applied to CBF and time to peak (TTP) maps obtained from DSC-MRP and CBF maps obtained from conventional and multi-phase ASL-MRPs. The concordances between normalized CBF (nCBF) from DSC-MRP and nCBF from conventional and transition time corrected CBF maps from multi-phase ASL-MRP were evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis. In addition, the dependence of difference between nCBF (ΔnCBF) values obtained from DSC-MRP and conventional ASL-MRP (or multi-phase ASL-MRP) on TTP obtained from DSC-MRP was also analyzed using regression analysis. The values of nCBFs from conventional and multi-phase ASL-MRPs had lower values than nCBF based on DSC-MRP (mean differences, 0.08 and 0.07, respectively). The values of ΔnCBF were dependent on TTP values from conventional ASL-MRP technique (F = 5.5679, P = 0.0384). No dependency of ΔnCBF on TTP values from multi-phase ASL-MRP technique was revealed (F = 0.1433, P > 0.05). The use of transit time corrected CBF maps based on multi-phase ASL-MRP technique can overcome the effect of delayed transit time on perfusion maps based on conventional ASL-MRP. (orig.)

  11. The precision of DCE-MRI using the tissue homogeneity model with continuous formulation of the perfusion parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoš, Michal; Jiřík, Radovan; Kratochvíla, Jiří; Standara, M.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Torfinn, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 5 (2014), s. 505-513 ISSN 0730-725X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2380; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 ; RVO:68081731 Keywords : dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) * perfusion * parameter estimation * bolus arrival time Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 2.090, year: 2014

  12. A capillary-based perfusion phantom for simulation of brain perfusion for MRI; Ein kapillarbasiertes Phantom zur Simulation der Gehirnperfusion mit der Magnet-Resonanz-Tomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciak, A.; Kronfeld, A.; Mueller-Forell, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Wille, C. [Fachhochschule Bingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Informatik; Kempski, O. [Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurochirurgische Pathophysiologie; Stoeter, P. [CEDIMAT, Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic). Inst. of Neuroradiology

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The measurement of the CBF is a non-standardized procedure and there are no reliable gold standards. This abstract shows a capillary-based perfusion-phantom for CE-DSC-MRI. It has equivalent flow properties to those within the tissue capillary system of the human brain and allows the validation of the Siemens Perfusion (MR) software. Materials and Methods: The perfusion phantom consists of a dialyzer for the simulation of the capillary system, a feeding tube for simulation of the AIF and a pulsatile pump for simulation of the heart. Using this perfusion phantom, the exact determination of the gold standard CBF due to the well-known geometry of the phantom is easy. It was validated based on different perfusion measurements. These measurements were investigated with standard software (Siemens Perfusion MR). The software determined the CBF within the capillary system. Based on this CBF, a comparison to the gold standard was made with several different flow speeds. After AIF selection, a total of 726 CBF data points were automatically extracted by the software. Results: This results in a comparison of the gold standard CBF to these 726 CBF values. Therefore, a reproducible and reliable deviation estimation between gold standard CBF and measured CBF using the software was computed. It can be shown that the deviation between gold standard and software-based evaluation ranges between 1 and 31 %. Conclusion: There is no significance for any correlation between flow speed and amount of deviation. The mean measured CBF is 11.4 % higher than the gold standard CBF (p-value < 0.001). Using this kind of perfusion-phantom, the validation of different software systems allows reliable conclusions about their quality. (orig.)

  13. Superselective pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen-Kondering, Ulf [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Lindner, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lindner@uksh.de [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Osch, Matthias J.P. van [C. J. Gorter Center for High Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Rohr, Axel; Jansen, Olav [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Helle, Michael [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Now with Philips GmbH Innovative Technologies, Research Laboratories, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Superselective arterial spin labeling was capable of acquiring angiograms of individually selected arteries. • Image quality was similar compared with a routinely used time-of-flight angiography. • Superselective arterial spin labeling was utilized in patients with arterio-venous malformations and made it possible to visualize individual feeding vessels in a complete non-invasive way - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a novel non-contrast enhanced, vessel-selective magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) approach based on superselective pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) for the morphologic assessment of intracranial arteries when compared to a clinically used time-of-flight (TOF) MRA. Materials and methods: Three sets of selective ASL angiographies (right and left internal carotid artery, basilar artery) as well as one TOF data set were obtained from each of the five volunteers included in this study on a clinical 1.5T system. The depiction of arterial segments as well as their delineation was evaluated and independently analyzed by two radiologists. Additionally, the ASL angiography approach was performed in two patients suffering from arterio-venous malformations (AVM) in order to illustrate potential applications in a clinical setting. Results: In both angiography techniques, intracranial arteries and their segments (distal branches up to A5 segments of the anterior cerebral arteries, M8 segments of the middle cerebral arteries, and P5 segments of the posterior cerebral arteries) were continuously depicted with excellent inter-reader agreement (κ > 0.81). In AVM patients, reconstructed images of the TOF angiography presented similar information about the size and shape of the AVM as did superselective ASL angiography. In addition, the acquired ASL angiograms of selected vessels allowed assessing the blood supply of individually labeled arteries to the AVM which could also be confirmed by digital subtraction angiography

  14. Superselective pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen-Kondering, Ulf; Lindner, Thomas; Osch, Matthias J.P. van; Rohr, Axel; Jansen, Olav; Helle, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Superselective arterial spin labeling was capable of acquiring angiograms of individually selected arteries. • Image quality was similar compared with a routinely used time-of-flight angiography. • Superselective arterial spin labeling was utilized in patients with arterio-venous malformations and made it possible to visualize individual feeding vessels in a complete non-invasive way - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a novel non-contrast enhanced, vessel-selective magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) approach based on superselective pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) for the morphologic assessment of intracranial arteries when compared to a clinically used time-of-flight (TOF) MRA. Materials and methods: Three sets of selective ASL angiographies (right and left internal carotid artery, basilar artery) as well as one TOF data set were obtained from each of the five volunteers included in this study on a clinical 1.5T system. The depiction of arterial segments as well as their delineation was evaluated and independently analyzed by two radiologists. Additionally, the ASL angiography approach was performed in two patients suffering from arterio-venous malformations (AVM) in order to illustrate potential applications in a clinical setting. Results: In both angiography techniques, intracranial arteries and their segments (distal branches up to A5 segments of the anterior cerebral arteries, M8 segments of the middle cerebral arteries, and P5 segments of the posterior cerebral arteries) were continuously depicted with excellent inter-reader agreement (κ > 0.81). In AVM patients, reconstructed images of the TOF angiography presented similar information about the size and shape of the AVM as did superselective ASL angiography. In addition, the acquired ASL angiograms of selected vessels allowed assessing the blood supply of individually labeled arteries to the AVM which could also be confirmed by digital subtraction angiography

  15. Perfusion characteristics of late radiation injury of parotid glands: quantitative evaluation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Chen, Cheng-Yu.; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Huang, Guo-Shu; Jen, Yee-Min; Liu, Hua-Shan; Wang, Chao-Ying; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chai, Yao-Te

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to quantitatively investigate the alteration of parotid perfusion after irradiation using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) based on a two-compartment tracer kinetic model. This study enrolled 19 patients (53.2±14.9 years) treated by head and neck radiotherapy and 19 age-relevant and sex-matched subjects as a control group. Perfusion parameters (K el , k 21 and A) of parotid glands were analyzed based on the Brix model from T1-weighted DCE-MRI. Suitability of the Brix model was evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation for the goodness-of-fit. Analysis of nonlinear goodness-of-fit showed that the Brix model is appropriate in evaluating the parotid perfusion (R 2 = 0.938±0.050). The irradiated parotid glands showed significantly lower K el (P 21 (P < 0.05) and consequently significantly higher value of peak enhancement (P<0.0005) and time-to-peak (P<0.0005) compared with non-irradiated ones, suggestive of gradual and prolonged accumulation and delayed wash-out of contrast agent due to increased extracellular extravascular space and decreased vascular permeability in the irradiated glands. Linear regression analysis showed dose-dependent perfusion changes of the irradiated parotid glands. We conclude that quantitative DCE-MRI is a potential tool in investigating parotid gland perfusion changes after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  16. Temporal evolution of ischemic lesions in nonhuman primates: a diffusion and perfusion MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    Full Text Available Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and perfusion MRI were used to examine the spatiotemporal evolution of stroke lesions in adult macaques with ischemic occlusion.Permanent MCA occlusion was induced with silk sutures through an interventional approach via the femoral artery in adult rhesus monkeys (n = 8, 10-21 years old. The stroke lesions were examined with high-resolution DWI and perfusion MRI, and T2-weighted imaging (T2W on a clinical 3T scanner at 1-6, 48, and 96 hours post occlusion and validated with H&E staining.The stroke infarct evolved via a natural logarithmic pattern with the mean infarct growth rate = 1.38 ± 1.32 ml per logarithmic time scale (hours (n = 7 in the hyperacute phase (1-6 hours. The mean infarct volume after 6 hours post occlusion was 3.6±2.8 ml (n = 7, by DWI and increased to 3.9±2.9 ml (n = 5, by T2W after 48 hours, and to 4.7±2.2ml (n = 3, by T2W after 96 hours post occlusion. The infarct volumes predicted by the natural logarithmic function were correlated significantly with the T2W-derived lesion volumes (n = 5, r = 0.92, p = 0.01 at 48 hours post occlusion. The final infarct volumes derived from T2W were correlated significantly with those from H&E staining (r = 0.999, p < 0.0001, n = 4. In addition, the diffusion-perfusion mismatch was visible generally at 6 hours but nearly diminished at 48 hours post occlusion.The infarct evolution follows a natural logarithmic pattern in the hyperacute phase of stroke. The logarithmic pattern of evolution could last up to 48 hours after stroke onset and may be used to predict the infarct volume growth during the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The nonhuman primate model, MRI protocols, and post data processing strategy may provide an excellent platform for characterizing the evolution of acute stroke lesion in mechanistic studies and therapeutic interventions of stroke disease.

  17. Clinical evaluation of pulmonary perfusion MRI using FAIR (flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery)-HASTE (Half-Fourier Single-Shot TurboSE) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Sei, Tetsurou; Sato, Shuhei; Yabuki, Takayuki; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The FAIR-HASTE method is a kind of noninvasive perfusion MR imaging obtained without the use of contrast media. By subtracting a flow-insensitive image from a flow-sensitive image, contrast enhancement of inflowing blood achieved. In the present study, we applied pulmonary perfusion FAIR-HASTE sequence for 23 patients with various pulmonary diseases, and compared the findings with those by pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and Gadolinium perfusion MRI. Pulmonary perfusion imaging with the FAIR-HASTE method was possible in all clinical cases, and the findings corresponded well to those obtained by perfusion MRI using contrast media or pulmonary scintigraphy. The FAIR-HASTE method is a promising method for the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion. (author)

  18. Changes in cerebral blood flow after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt can help predict the development of hepatic encephalopathy: An arterial spin labeling MR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Wang, Ze [Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Qi, Rong Feng; Shi, Donghong [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Fan, Xinxin [Research Institute of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: kevinzhanglongjiang@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Background and purpose: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) are still unclear. Our aim is to assess the TIPS-induced CBF changes and their potential clinical significance using the arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Nine cirrhotic patients underwent ASL 1–8 days before and 4–7 days after TIPS. CBF was calculated at each voxel and mean CBF values were computed in the whole brain, gray matter and white matter. Changes of CBFs before and after TIPS were compared by paired t-test. Results: Voxel-wise results showed CBF diffusely increased in patients after TIPS, but no region with significant decrease in CBF was found, nor was any significant mean CBF difference detected in the whole brain, gray matter and white matter. Six patients out of nine showed a global CBF increase of 9–39%; one patient presented a global CBF decrease of 6%; another two showed a global CBF decrease of 16% and 31% respectively. Follow-up studies showed that the two patients with greatly decreased global CBF suffered from multiple episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) after TIPS and one died of OHE. Conclusions: CBF derived from noninvasive ASL MRI could be used as a useful biomarker to predict the development of OHE through consecutively tracking CBF changes in patients with inserted TIPS. Increased CBFs in many cortical regions could be common effects of the TIPS procedure, while decreased global CBF following TIPS might indicate the development of OHE.

  19. RosettaEPR: rotamer library for spin label structure and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S Alexander

    Full Text Available An increasingly used parameter in structural biology is the measurement of distances between spin labels bound to a protein. One limitation to these measurements is the unknown position of the spin label relative to the protein backbone. To overcome this drawback, we introduce a rotamer library of the methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL into the protein modeling program Rosetta. Spin label rotamers were derived from conformations observed in crystal structures of spin labeled T4 lysozyme and previously published molecular dynamics simulations. Rosetta's ability to accurately recover spin label conformations and EPR measured distance distributions was evaluated against 19 experimentally determined MTSSL labeled structures of T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein LeuT and 73 distance distributions from T4 lysozyme and the membrane protein MsbA. For a site in the core of T4 lysozyme, the correct spin label conformation (Χ1 and Χ2 is recovered in 99.8% of trials. In surface positions 53% of the trajectories agree with crystallized conformations in Χ1 and Χ2. This level of recovery is on par with Rosetta performance for the 20 natural amino acids. In addition, Rosetta predicts the distance between two spin labels with a mean error of 4.4 Å. The width of the experimental distance distribution, which reflects the flexibility of the two spin labels, is predicted with a mean error of 1.3 Å. RosettaEPR makes full-atom spin label modeling available to a wide scientific community in conjunction with the powerful suite of modeling methods within Rosetta.

  20. Comparative utility of MRI perfusion with MSIDR and DWIBS for the characterization of breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Bin; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background. In recent years, breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to evaluate the morphology and functional markers of breast lesions, which might influence local staging and surgical planning. Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of a one stop MRI protocol combined with diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS), T2*-weighted perfusion imaging (T2*-PWI) and delayed contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI (T1W-C+). Material and Methods. All experiments were conducted with a 3-T clinical MRI scanner. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and detectability of lesions in DWIBS, the maximal signal intensity drop rate (MSIDR) in T2*-PWI and the intensity increasing rate (IIR) on T1W-C+ were compared between breast malignancies (n = 29) and benign lesions (n = 31). The time-signal curves in the T2*-PWI sequences were classified into two subtypes (a and b) according to the end of the curve. The ADC, MSIDR, the first maximal signal intensity decrease time (MSIDT), and IIR between the malignant and benign lesions were statistically analyzed by unpaired t-tests. Results. Overall, 90% of the lesions were detected by DWIBS. There were significant differences in ADC, MSIDR, and IIR between the carcinomas and benign lesions. The Ib subtype in T2*-PWI demonstrated a specificity of 66.7% in differentiating between carcinomas and benign lesions. At a fixed specificity of 93.5%, the MSIDR, IIR, and ADC differentiated breast carcinomas from benign lesions with sensitivities of 82.8%, 44.8%, and 86.2%, respectively. Conclusion. DWIBS might be a compensation sequence for detecting breast lesions in pre-contrast sequences. MSIDR from T2*-PWI had the best specificity index, and the two subtypes in the T2*-PWI curve were helpful in the differential diagnosis of carcinomas from benign lesions

  1. What’s the clinical significance of adding diffusion and perfusion MRI in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and solitary brain metastasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Mourad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the additional diagnostic value of diffusion and perfusion MRI in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and solitary brain metastasis. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 24 patients with histologically proven brain tumors who underwent conventional MRI with analysis of diffusion (DWI and perfusion (PWI MRI findings of each tumor. The Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC values were calculated in the minimum (ADC-MIN, mean (ADC-MEAN, and maximum (ADC-MAX in all the tumors and the peritumoral regions. The PWI data was expressed as maximum regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV of the tumors and peritumoral regions. Results: After adding diffusion and perfusion to conventional MRI findings, we found that the accuracy of differentiation between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and solitary metastasis increased from 70% to 90%.There is a significant difference in DWI signal intensity between GBM and metastatic tumors (P < 0.05. The ADC values of GBM were lower than that of metastatic tumors. On perfusion MRI, the maximum rCBV of the peritumoral region (rCBVP of GBM was higher than that of brain metastases (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The addition of diffusion and perfusion to the MRI protocol increases the accuracy of differentiation between GBM and solitary brain metastasis and should be considered routinely. Keywords: Diffusion MRI, Perfusion MRI, GBM, Solitary brain metastases

  2. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging; Quantitative Perfusionsbildgebung in der Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zeichnet sich durch einen ueberlegenen Gewebekontrast aus, waehrend sie nichtinvasiv und frei von ionisierender Strahlung ist. Sie bietet Zugang zu Gewebe- und Organfunktion. Eine dieser funktionellen bildgebenden Verfahren ist die Perfusionsbildgebung. Mit dieser Technik koennen u. a. Gewebeperfusion und Kapillarpermeabilitaet aus dynamischen Bilddaten bestimmt werden. Perfusionsbildgebung mithilfe der MRT kann durch 2 Ansaetze, naemlich ''arterial spin labeling'' (ASL) und dynamische kontrastverstaerkte (DCE-)MRT durchgefuehrt werden. Waehrend die erste Methode magnetisch

  3. A spin labelling study of immunomodulating peptidoglycan monomer and adamantyltripeptides entrapped into liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frkanec, Ruza; Noethig-Laslo, Vesna; Vranesić, Branka; Mirosavljević, Krunoslav; Tomasić, Jelka

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of immunostimulating compounds, the peptidoglycan monomer (PGM) and structurally related adamantyltripeptides (AdTP1 and AdTP2), respectively, with phospholipids in liposomal bilayers were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. (1). The fatty acids bearing the nitroxide spin label at different positions along the acyl chain were used to investigate the interaction of tested compounds with negatively charged multilamellar liposomes. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra were studied at 290 and 310 K. The entrapment of the adamantyltripeptides affected the motional properties of all spin labelled lipids, while the entrapment of PGM had no effect. (2). Spin labelled PGM was prepared and the novel compound bearing the spin label attached via the amino group of diaminopimelic acid was chromatographically purified and chemically characterized. The rotational correlation time of the spin labelled molecule dissolved in buffer at pH 7.4 was studied as a function of temperature. The conformational change was observed above 300 K. The same effect was observed with the spin labelled PGM incorporated into liposomes. Such effect was not observed when the spin labelled PGM was studied at alkaline pH, probably due to the hydrolysis of PGM molecule. The study of possible interaction with liposomal membrane is relevant to the use of tested compounds incorporated into liposomes, as adjuvants in vivo.

  4. Role of FDG-PET/MRI, FDG-PET/CT, and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Tumor Recurrence in Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Badve, Chaitra; Garg, Vasant; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Rogers, Lisa; Sloan, Andrew; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R; Wolansky, Leo J

    2018-01-01

    To compare the utility of quantitative PET/MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI (pMRI), and PET/CT in differentiating radiation necrosis (RN) from tumor recurrence (TR) in patients with treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The study included 24 patients with GBM treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and temozolomide who presented with progression on imaging follow-up. All patients underwent PET/MRI and pMRI during a single examination. Additionally, 19 of 24 patients underwent PET/CT on the same day. Diagnosis was established by pathology in 17 of 24 and by clinical/radiologic consensus in 7 of 24. For the quantitative PET/MRI and PET/CT analysis, a region of interest (ROI) was drawn around each lesion and within the contralateral white matter. Lesion to contralateral white matter ratios for relative maximum, mean, and median were calculated. For pMRI, lesion ROI was drawn on the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps and histogram metrics were calculated. Diagnostic performance for each metric was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and area under curve (AUC) was calculated. In 24 patients, 28 lesions were identified. For PET/MRI, relative mean ≥ 1.31 resulted in AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100%. For pMRI, CBV max ≥3.32 yielded an AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and NPV measuring 100%. The joint model utilizing r-mean (PET/MRI) and CBV mode (pMRI) resulted in AUC of 1.0. Our study demonstrates that quantitative PET/MRI parameters in combination with DSC pMRI provide the best diagnostic utility in distinguishing RN from TR in treated GBMs. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  5. Bevacizumab treatment in malignant meningioma with additional radiation necrosis. An MRI diffusion and perfusion case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, J.P. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MVZ MediClin, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Seifert, M.; Greschus, S. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Schaefer, N.; Herrlinger, U. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Division of Clinical Neurooncology, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Glas, M. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Division of Clinical Neurooncology, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); University of Bonn Medical Center, Stem Cell Pathologies, Institute of Reconstructive Neurobiology, Bonn (Germany); MediClin Robert Janker Clinic, Clinical Cooperation Unit Neurooncology, Bonn (Germany); Lammering, G. [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MVZ MediClin, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); MediClin Robert Janker Clinic, Clinical Cooperation Unit Neurooncology, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Recently two retrospective cohort studies report efficacy of bevacizumab in patients with recurrent atypical and anaplastic meningioma. Another successful therapeutic option of bevacizumab seems to be treatment of cerebral radiation necrosis. However, the antiangiogenic effects in MRI diffusion and perfusion in meningiomas have not been previously described in detail. The objective of this research was to evaluate the clinical and MR imaging effects of bevacizumab in a malignant meningioma patient harboring additional cerebral radiation necrosis. We report the case of an 80-year-old woman who underwent bevacizumab therapy (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 2 months) for treatment of a symptomatic radiation necrosis in malignant meningiomatosis of World Health Organization (WHO) grade III. The patient was closely monitored with MRI including diffusion and perfusion studies. Upon bevacizumab therapy, the clinical situation was well stabilized over a period of 4 months until the patient unfortunately died due to pneumonia/septicemia probably unrelated to bevacizumab therapy. Consecutive MRI demonstrated 4 important aspects: (1) considerable decrease of the contrast medium (CM)-enhanced radiation necrosis, (2) mixed response with respect to the meningiomatosis with stable and predominantly growing tumor lesions, (3) a new diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion in a CM-enhanced tumor as described in gliomas, which we did not interpret as a response to bevacizumab therapy, and (4) new thrombembolic infarcts, which are a known side-effect of bevacizumab treatment. Bevacizumab is effective in the treatment of radiation necrosis. We could not confirm the potential antitumor effect of bevacizumab in this patient. However, we could describe several new radiographic effects of bevacizumab therapy in malignant meningioma. (orig.) [German] In zwei aktuellen retrospektiven Kohortenstudien konnte eine Wirksamkeit von Bevacizumab bei Patienten mit rezidivierenden atypischen und

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion measurement of the brain using T-1-weighted MRI at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Hansen, A.E.; Berg, H.K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for the measurement of brain perfusion based on dynamic contrast-enhanced T-1-weighted MR imaging. Materials and Methods: Dynamic imaging of the first pass of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent was performed using a 3T whole-body magnet and a T-1-weighted fast...... field echo sequence. The input function was obtained from the internal carotid artery. An initial T-1 measurement was performed in order to convert the MR signal to concentration of the contrast agent. Pixelwise and region of interest (ROI)based calculation of cerebral perfusion (CBF) was performed...... inside the infarct core was, 9 mL/100g/min in one of the stroke patients. The other stroke patient had postischemic hyperperfusion and CBF was 140 mL/100g/min. Conclusion: Absolute values of brain perfusion can be obtained using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These values correspond,to expected values...

  7. Estimation of arterial arrival time and cerebral blood flow from QUASAR arterial spin labeling using stable spline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Marco; Peruzzo, Denis; Mehndiratta, Amit; Pillonetto, Gianluigi; Petersen, Esben Thade; Golay, Xavier; Chappell, Michael A; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2015-12-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) permits the application of deconvolution approaches for the absolute quantification of cerebral perfusion. Currently, oscillation index regularized singular value decomposition (oSVD) combined with edge-detection (ED) is the most commonly used method. Its major drawbacks are nonphysiological oscillations in the impulse response function and underestimation of perfusion. The aim of this work is to introduce a novel method to overcome these limitations. A system identification method, stable spline (SS), was extended to address ASL peculiarities such as the delay in arrival of the arterial blood in the tissue. The proposed framework was compared with oSVD + ED in both simulated and real data. SS was used to investigate the validity of using a voxel-wise tissue T1 value instead of using a single global value (of blood T1 ). SS outperformed oSVD + ED in 79.9% of simulations. When applied to real data, SS exhibited a physiologically realistic range for perfusion and a higher mean value with respect to oSVD + ED (55.5 ± 9.5 SS, 34.9 ± 5.2 oSVD + ED mL/100 g/min). SS can represent an alternative to oSVD + ED for the quantification of QUASAR ASL data. Analysis of the retrieved impulse response function revealed that using a voxel wise tissue T1 might be suboptimal. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The association between neurological deficit in acute ischemic stroke and mean transit time. Comparison of four different perfusion MRI algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellinger, Peter D.; Latour, Lawrence L.; Chalela, Julio A.; Warach, Steven; Wu, Chen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the perfusion MRI (pMRI) algorithm which yields a volume of hypoperfused tissue that best correlates with the acute clinical deficit as quantified by the NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and therefore reflects critically hypoperfused tissue. A group of 20 patients with a first acute stroke and stroke MRI within 24 h of symptom onset were retrospectively analyzed. Perfusion maps were derived using four different algorithms to estimate relative mean transit time (rMTT): (1) cerebral blood flow (CBF) arterial input function (AIF)/singular voxel decomposition (SVD); (2) area peak; (3) time to peak (TTP); and (4) first moment method. Lesion volumes based on five different MTT thresholds relative to contralateral brain were compared with each other and correlated with NIHSS score. The first moment method had the highest correlation with NIHSS (r=0.79, P<0.001) followed by the AIF/SVD method, both of which did not differ significantly from each other with regard to lesion volumes. TTP and area peak derived both volumes, which correlated poorly or only moderately with NIHSS scores. Data from our pilot study suggest that the first moment and the AIF/SVD method have advantages over the other algorithms in identifying the pMRI lesion volume that best reflects clinical severity. At present there seems to be no need for extensive postprocessing and arbitrarily defined delay thresholds in pMRI as the simple qualitative approach with a first moment algorithm is equally accurate. Larger sample sizes which allow comparison between imaging and clinical outcomes are needed to refine the choice of best perfusion parameter in pMRI. (orig.)

  9. Myocardial perfusion quantification using simultaneously acquired 13 NH3 -ammonia PET and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients at rest and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Karl P; Nekolla, Stephan G; Rischpler, Christoph; Zhang, Shelley HuaLei; Hayes, Carmel; Langwieser, Nicolas; Ibrahim, Tareq; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Schwaiger, Markus

    2018-04-19

    Systematic differences with respect to myocardial perfusion quantification exist between DCE-MRI and PET. Using the potential of integrated PET/MRI, this study was conceived to compare perfusion quantification on the basis of simultaneously acquired 13 NH 3 -ammonia PET and DCE-MRI data in patients at rest and stress. Twenty-nine patients were examined on a 3T PET/MRI scanner. DCE-MRI was implemented in dual-sequence design and additional T 1 mapping for signal normalization. Four different deconvolution methods including a modified version of the Fermi technique were compared against 13 NH 3 -ammonia results. Cohort-average flow comparison yielded higher resting flows for DCE-MRI than for PET and, therefore, significantly lower DCE-MRI perfusion ratios under the common assumption of equal arterial and tissue hematocrit. Absolute flow values were strongly correlated in both slice-average (R 2  = 0.82) and regional (R 2  = 0.7) evaluations. Different DCE-MRI deconvolution methods yielded similar flow result with exception of an unconstrained Fermi method exhibiting outliers at high flows when compared with PET. Thresholds for Ischemia classification may not be directly tradable between PET and MRI flow values. Differences in perfusion ratios between PET and DCE-MRI may be lifted by using stress/rest-specific hematocrit conversion. Proper physiological constraints are advised in model-constrained deconvolution. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Coherence transfer and electron T1-, T2-relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2017-01-01

    -hyperfine anisotropies of isolated nitroxide spin labels. Results compatible with earlier treatments by Redfield theory are obtained without specifically evaluating matrix elements. Extension to single-transition operators for isolated nitroxides predicts electron coherence transfer by pseudosecular electron...

  11. Evaluation of femoral perfusion in a rabbit model of steroid-induced osteonecrosis by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with a high magnetic field MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shigeki; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Saito, Masazumi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Ishida, Masashi; Kuribayashi, Masaaki; Ikegami, Akira; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate perfusion during the early phase after steroid administration in vivo using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with a high magnetic field MRI system. The main pathogenesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis is considered to be ischemia. A single dose of methylprednisolone (MPSL) was injected into nine rabbits. DCE-MRI was performed for these rabbits before MPSL administration and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after administration. Time-signal intensity curves were created for each femur based on the signal intensity to evaluate perfusion. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated and the value before MPSL administration and the minimal value after administration were compared statistically. ER, IS, and AUC values after MPSL administration significantly decreased (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively). All of them decreased by the 5th day in 56% of the femora and by the 14th day in 83%, and some femora even showed a decrease from the 1st day. In this study, decreased perfusion in the femora after steroid administration was proven. Additionally, we could show that it occurred from the early days after steroid administration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Diffusion- and Perfusion-weighted MRI Studies Just Before and After Removal of Hypertensive Putaminal Hematoma: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    木下, 良正; 安河内, 秀興; 原田, 篤邦; 津留, 英智; 奥寺, 利男; 横田, 晃; Yoshimasa, KINOSHITA; Hideoki, YASUKOUCHI; Atsukuni, HARADA; Eichi, TSURU; Toshio, OKUDERA; Akira, YOKOTA; 宗像水光会総合病院 脳神経外科; 宗像水光会総合病院 脳神経外科; 宗像水光会総合病院 脳神経外科

    2007-01-01

    It has been suspected that a zone of perihematomal ischemia analogous to an ischemic penumbra exists in patients with subacute putaminal hemorrhage who showed transient neurological improvement with hyperbaric oxygenation therapy (HBO). A 54-year-old woman, who suffered from left putaminal hemorrhage, was examined for regional hemodynamics in the perihematomal region just before and just after the removal of putaminal hematoma in the subacute period by diffusion and perfusion MRI. The pyramid...

  13. Comparison of brain perfusion SPECT and MRI findings in children with neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis and in their families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayit, E.; Yorulmaz, I; Gumuser, F.G.; Dirik, E.; Bekis, R.; Kaya, G.; Durak, H.

    2002-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL) are among the progressive encephalopathies of childhood that are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. In this study we specifically aimed to investigate any white-matter changes in the carriers (parents) and the healthy siblings of individuals with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis disease and whether we may be able to predict the occurrence of any neurological symptoms in healthy children in the future thus enabling early management. Since the NCLs are genetically determined diseases, we investigated fifteen individuals in three families that had diseased children of the juvenile type, with brain perfusion SPECT and MRI. Brain perfusion SPECT was performed after administering 222-555 MBq (6-15 mCi) Tc-99m hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) intravenously in a dimmed and quiet room. Imaging was performed at least one hour after injection, with a three headed gamma camera equipped with high resolution collimators. A Metz filter (FWHM: 11 mm) was used for processing. Cranial MRI was performed with an imager operating at 1.5 Tesla. Spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted and FLAIR slices were obtained for each individual. In all of the five diseased children we observed pathologic findings both on MRI and Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. The findings on MRI were mainly features of cerebral and cerebellar atrophy and the observations on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT were regional perfusion abnormalities. We observed some structural abnormalities on MRI in four of the parents and two of the four healthy siblings. We also noted perfusion abnormalities on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT in two of the parents and two of the healthy siblings. Because the disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, the parents and the healthy siblings were not supposed to exhibit any demonstrable brain lesions, but the brain perfusion SPECT and MRI examinations clearly revealed multiple lesions in some of the parents and healthy siblings. Detailed neurological examinations of these

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI of High Grade Brain Gliomas Obtained with Arterial or Venous Waveform Input Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Silvano; Crisi, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion estimates of high-grade brain gliomas (HGG) due to the use of an input function (IF) obtained respectively from arterial (AIF) and venous (VIF) approaches by two different commercially available software applications. This prospective study includes 20 patients with pathologically confirmed diagnosis of high-grade gliomas. The data source was processed by using two DCE dedicated commercial packages, both based on the extended Toft model, but the first customized to obtain input function from arterial measurement and the second from sagittal sinus sampling. The quantitative parametric perfusion maps estimated from the two software packages were compared by means of a region of interest (ROI) analysis. The resulting input functions from venous and arterial data were also compared. No significant difference has been found between the perfusion parameters obtained with the two different software packages (P-value < .05). The comparison of the VIFs and AIFs obtained by the two packages showed no statistical differences. Direct comparison of DCE-MRI measurements with IF generated by means of arterial or venous waveform led to no statistical difference in quantitative metrics for evaluating HGG. However, additional research involving DCE-MRI acquisition protocols and post-processing would be beneficial to further substantiate the effectiveness of venous approach as the IF method compared with arterial-based IF measurement. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  15. MRI findings in multifetal pregnancies complicated by twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carolina V.A.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Linam, Leann E.; Calvo Garcia, Maria A.; Rubio, Eva I. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lim, Foong-Yen [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP) is a rare complication in multifetal monochorionic pregnancies in which a normal ''pump'' twin provides circulation to an abnormal acardiac co-twin, resulting in high-output cardiac dysfunction in the pump twin. To define fetal MRI findings of TRAP sequence. Fetal MR images were retrospectively reviewed in 35 pregnancies complicated by TRAP sequence. Abnormalities of the pump twin, acardiac twin, umbilical cord, placenta and amniotic fluid were reviewed. Acardiac twins were classified as: acephalus (51%), anceps (40%), amorphus (9%), acormus (0%). Common findings in acardiac twins include subcutaneous edema (77%), absent cardiac structures (86%), absent or abnormal thoracic cavity (100%), abnormal abdominal organs (100%), superior limbs absent (46%) or abnormal (51%), and inferior limbs present but abnormal (83%). There were pump twin findings of cardiac dysfunction in 43% and intracranial ischemic changes in 3%. Umbilical cord anomalies were present in 97%. Acardiac twins present with a predictable pattern of malformation with poorly developed superior structures, more normally formed inferior structures and absent or rudimentary heart. Although usually absent, abnormal heart structures can be seen and do not exclude TRAP sequence. Pump twins are commonly normal with exception of findings of cardiac dysfunction and possible brain ischemia. (orig.)

  16. Regional MRI Perfusion Measures Predict Motor/Executive Function in Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrosini Z. Papadaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS demonstrate brain hemodynamic changes and also suffer from difficulties in processing speed, memory, and executive functions. Objective. To explore whether brain hemodynamic disturbances in CIS patients correlate with executive functions. Methods. Thirty CIS patients and forty-three healthy subjects, matched for age, gender, education level, and FSIQ, were administered tests of visuomotor learning and set shifting ability. Cerebral blood volume (CBV, cerebral blood flow (CBF, and mean transit time (MTT values were estimated in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM and normal-appearing deep gray Matter (NADGM structures, using a perfusion MRI technique. Results. CIS patients showed significantly elevated reaction time (RT on both tasks, while their CBV and MTT values were globally increased, probably due to inflammatory vasodilation. Significantly, positive correlation coefficients were found between error rates on the inhibition condition of the visuomotor learning task and CBV values in occipital, periventricular NAWM and both thalami. On the set shifting condition of the respective task significant, positive associations were found between error rates and CBV values in the semioval center and periventricular NAWM bilaterally. Conclusion. Impaired executive function in CIS patients correlated positively with elevated regional CBV values thought to reflect inflammatory processes.

  17. Perfusion kinetics in human brain tumor with DCE-MRI derived model and CFD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, A; Bansal, A; Singh, A; Sinha, N

    2017-07-05

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death all over the world. Among the strategies that are used for cancer treatment, the effectiveness of chemotherapy is often hindered by factors such as irregular and non-uniform uptake of drugs inside tumor. Thus, accurate prediction of drug transport and deposition inside tumor is crucial for increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic treatment. In this study, a computational model of human brain tumor is developed that incorporates dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data into a voxelized porous media model. The model takes into account realistic transport and perfusion kinetics parameters together with realistic heterogeneous tumor vasculature and accurate arterial input function (AIF), which makes it patient specific. The computational results for interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) and tracer concentration show good agreement with the experimental results. The computational model can be extended further for predicting the deposition of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor environment as well as selection of the best chemotherapeutic drug for a specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of steroid on brain tumors and surround edemas : observation with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps of perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ju Youl; Sun, Joo Sung; Kim, Sun Yong; Kim, Ji Hyung; Suh, Jung Ho; Cho, Kyung Gi; Kim, Jang Sung

    2000-01-01

    To observe the hemodynamic change in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas after steroid treatment, and then investigate the clinical usefulness of perfusion MRI. We acquired conventional and perfusion MR images in 15 patients with various intracranial tumors (4 glioblastoma multiformes, 4 meningiomas, 3 metastatic tumors, 1 anaplastic ependymoma, 1 anaplastic astrocytoma, 1 hemangioblastoma, and 1 pilocytic astrocytoma). For perfusion MR imaging, a 1.5T unit employing the gradient-echo EPI technique was used, and further perfusion MR images were obtained 2-10 days after intravenous steroid therapy. After processing of the raw data, regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were reconstructed. The maps were visually evaluated by comparing relative perfusion in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas with that in contralateral white matter. Objective evaluations were performed by comparing the perfusion ratios of brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Visual evaluations of rCBV maps, showed that in most brain tumors (67%, 10/15), perfusion was high before steroid treatment and showed in (80%, 12/15) decreased afterwards. Objective evaluation, showed that in all brain tumors, perfusion decreased. Visual evaluation of perfusion change in peritumoral edemas revealed change in only one case, but objective evaluation indicated that perfusion decreased significantly in all seven cases. rCBV maps acquired by perfusion MR imaging can provide hemodynamic information about brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Such maps could prove helpful in the preoperative planning of brain tumor surgery and the monitoring of steroid effects during conservative treatment. (author)

  19. Arterial spin-labeling assessment of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity as a predictor of histologic grade of astrocytic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtner, J; Schöpf, V; Schewzow, K; Kasprian, G; Weber, M; Woitek, R; Asenbaum, U; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Hainfellner, J A; Widhalm, G; Wolfsberger, S; Prayer, D

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed arterial spin-labeling is a noninvasive MR imaging perfusion method performed with the use of water in the arterial blood as an endogenous contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to determine the inversion time with the largest difference in normalized intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. Thirty-three patients with gliomas, histologically classified as low-grade (n = 7) or high-grade astrocytomas (n = 26) according to the World Health Organization brain tumor classification, were included. A 3T MR scanner was used to perform pulsed arterial spin-labeling measurements at 8 different inversion times (370 ms, 614 ms, 864 ms, 1114 ms, 1364 ms, 1614 ms, 1864 ms, and 2114 ms). Normalized intratumoral signal intensity was calculated, which was defined by the signal intensity ratio of the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue for all fixed inversion times. A 3-way mixed ANOVA was used to reveal potential differences in the normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. The difference in normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas obtained the most statistically significant results at 370 ms (P = .003, other P values ranged from .012-.955). The inversion time by which to differentiate high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas by use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity was 370 ms in our study. The normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values at this inversion time mainly reflect the labeled intra-arterial blood bolus and therefore could be referred to as normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity. Our data indicate that the use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values allows differentiation between low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas and thus may serve as a new, noninvasive marker for astrocytoma grading.

  20. Value of conventional, and diffusion- and perfusion weighted MRI in the management of patients with unclear cerebral pathology, admitted to the intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundgren, P.C.; Reinstrup, P.; Romner, B.; Holtaas, S.; Maly, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the extent to which diffusion- and perfusion- weighted MRI combined with conventional MRI could be helpful in the evaluation of intensive care unit (ICU) patients who have unknown or unclear cerebral pathology underlying a serious clinical condition. Twenty-one ICU patients with disparity between the findings on brain CT scan and their clinical status were studied. All patients underwent conventional MR and diffusion-weighted imaging and 14 also had MR perfusion studies. Abnormalities were present on diffusion-weighted imaging of 17 of the 21 patients and on perfusion-weighted studies of 7 of 14 patients. The MRI results changed the preliminary/working diagnosis in six patients. In eight other patients, MRI revealed additional pathology that had not been suspected clinically, and/or characterized more closely findings that had already been detected by CT or suspected clinically. MRI showed abnormalities in four of the five patients who had normal CT. MRI findings suggested a negative clinical outcome in all nine patients who subsequently died. MRI findings also suggested positive long-term outcome in five of nine patients who improved significantly as based on Glasgow and extended Glasgow outcome scales. In the three unconscious patients who had normal diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging the clinical outcome was good. This study suggests that MRI in seriously ill ICU patients with unclear cerebral pathology can provide information that changes, characterizes, or supports diagnoses and/or prognoses and therefore facilitates further management. (orig.)

  1. Insulin resistance is associated with lower arterial blood flow and reduced cortical perfusion in cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Berman, Sara E; Rivera-Rivera, Leonardo A; Krause, Rachel A; Oh, Jennifer M; Beeri, Michal S; Rowley, Howard A; Wieben, Oliver; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Schrage, William G

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with poor cerebrovascular health and increased risk for dementia. Little is known about the unique effect of IR on both micro- and macrovascular flow particularly in midlife when interventions against dementia may be most effective. We examined the effect of IR as indexed by the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) on cerebral blood flow in macro- and microvessels utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged individuals. We hypothesized that higher HOMA-IR would be associated with reduced flow in macrovessels and lower cortical perfusion. One hundred and twenty cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults (57 ± 5 yrs) underwent fasting blood draw, phase contrast-vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (PC VIPR) MRI, and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion. Higher HOMA-IR was associated with lower arterial blood flow, particularly within the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), and lower cerebral perfusion in several brain regions including frontal and temporal lobe regions. Higher blood flow in bilateral ICAs predicted greater cortical perfusion in individuals with lower HOMA-IR, a relationship not observed among those with higher HOMA-IR. Findings provide novel evidence for an uncoupling of macrovascular blood flow and microvascular perfusion among individuals with higher IR in midlife. PMID:27488909

  2. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X; Rios Piedra, Edgar A; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  3. Noise reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling based Functional Connectivity using nuisance variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Jann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different noise reduction strategies (NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8±1.3y and 13 typically developing (TD children (1f/12m; age 13.9±3years in conjunction with noise reduction strategies. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC to other areas of the default mode network (DMN in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that

  4. Improving quality of arterial spin labeling MR imaging at 3 Tesla with a 32-channel coil and parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Petr, Jan; Bannier, Elise; Barillot, Christian; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-01

    To compare 12-channel and 32-channel phased-array coils and to determine the optimal parallel imaging (PI) technique and factor for brain perfusion imaging using Pulsed Arterial Spin labeling (PASL) at 3 Tesla (T). Twenty-seven healthy volunteers underwent 10 different PASL perfusion PICORE Q2TIPS scans at 3T using 12-channel and 32-channel coils without PI and with GRAPPA or mSENSE using factor 2. PI with factor 3 and 4 were used only with the 32-channel coil. Visual quality was assessed using four parameters. Quantitative analyses were performed using temporal noise, contrast-to-noise and signal-to-noise ratios (CNR, SNR). Compared with 12-channel acquisition, the scores for 32-channel acquisition were significantly higher for overall visual quality, lower for noise and higher for SNR and CNR. With the 32-channel coil, artifact compromise achieved the best score with PI factor 2. Noise increased, SNR and CNR decreased with PI factor. However mSENSE 2 scores were not always significantly different from acquisition without PI. For PASL at 3T, the 32-channel coil at 3T provided better quality than the 12-channel coil. With the 32-channel coil, mSENSE 2 seemed to offer the best compromise for decreasing artifacts without significantly reducing SNR, CNR. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A novel method to assess pial collateralization from stroke perfusion MRI: subdividing T{sub max} into anatomical compartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potreck, Arne; Seker, Fatih; Hoffmann, Angelika; Pfaff, Johannes; Bendszus, Martin; Heiland, Sabine; Pham, Mirko [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nagel, Simon [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To develop and validate a quantitative and observer-independent method to evaluate pial collateral circulation by DSC-perfusion MRI and test whether this novel method delivers diagnostic information which is redundant to or independent from conventional penumbra imaging by the mismatch approach. We retrospectively identified 47 patients with M1 occlusion who underwent MR diffusion/perfusion imaging and mechanical thrombectomy at our facility. By automated registration and segmentation, T{sub max} delays were attributed specifically to the pial, cortical and parenchymal compartments. The resulting pial volumes at delay were defined as the pial T{sub max} map-assessed collateral score (TMACS) and correlated with gold standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Mismatch ratio was assessed by conventional penumbra defining MRI criteria. Strong correlation was found between TMACS and angiographically assessed collateral score (Pearson ρ = -0.74, p < 0.001). In multiple logistic regression, both good collaterals according to TMACS [OR 4.3 (1.1-19, p = 0.04)] and mismatch ratio ≥ 3.5 [OR 12.3 (1.88-249, p = 0.03)] were independent predictors of favourable clinical outcome. Perfusion delay in the pial compartment, as evaluated by TMACS, closely reflects the extent of pial collaterals in gold-standard DSA. TMACS and mismatch ratio were found to be complementary predictors of a favourable clinical outcome, each adding independent predictive information. (orig.)

  6. Focal time-to-peak changes on perfusion MRI in children with Moyamoya disease: correlation with conventional angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Dong-Seok; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jinna; Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Moyamoya disease is a chronic progressive steno-occlusion of the distal internal carotid arteries with unknown etiology. As the classical presentation of childhood Moyamoya disease is ischemic stroke, cerebral hemodynamic evaluation is important for patient selection for surgery to prevent recurrent ischemic attacks. Perfusion MR imaging has been applied to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics. Purpose: To correlate the 'basal time-to-peak preservation sign', 'auto-synangiosis sign', and 'posterior involvement sign' on time-to-peak map of perfusion MRI with catheter angiography. Material and Methods: Thirty-four children (6.91 ± 3.08 years) with Moyamoya disease who underwent both perfusion-weighted MRI and catheter angiography were enrolled in this study. Given catheter angiography as a reference standard, basal time-to-peak preservation sign, auto-synangiosis sign, and posterior involvement sign were evaluated on time-to-peak maps. Results: The basal time-to-peak preservation sign was accurate for the diagnosis of childhood Moyamoya disease; both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. The auto-synangiosis sign showed lower sensitivity (65%), however, with an acceptable specificity (98%). The posterior involvement sign showed lower sensitivity (61%) but had an acceptable specificity (96%). Conclusion: The basal time-to-peak preservation sign may be a universal finding in childhood Moyamoya disease. The auto-synangiosis and posterior involvement sign may be useful in determining transdural collateral status and posterior circulation involvement in childhood Moyamoya disease

  7. Identification of a candidate biomarker from perfusion MRI to anticipate glioblastoma progression after chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, J. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Tensaouti, F. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Chaltiel, L. [Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Biostatistics, Toulouse (France); Lotterie, J.A. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); CHU Rangueil, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Catalaa, I. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); CHU Rangueil, Department of Radiology, Toulouse (France); Sunyach, M.P. [Centre Leon Berard, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); Ibarrola, D. [CERMEP - Imagerie du Vivant, Lyon (France); Noel, G. [EA 3430, University of Strasbourg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Paul Strauss, Strasbourg (France); Truc, G. [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dijon (France); Walker, P. [University of Burgundy, Laboratory of Electronics, Computer Science and Imaging (Le2I), UMR 6306 CNRS, Dijon (France); Magne, N. [Institut de cancerologie Lucien-Neuwirth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); Charissoux, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Ken, S. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Medical Physics, Toulouse (France); Peran, P. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, UMR 1214, Toulouse (France); Berry, I. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (France); CHU Rangueil, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, UMR 1214, Toulouse (France); Moyal, E.C. [Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1037, Centre de Recherches contre le Cancer de Toulouse, Toulouse (FR); Laprie, A. [INSERM UMR 1214, TONIC (TOulouse NeuroImaging Centre), Toulouse (FR); Institut Claudius Regaud/Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (FR); Universite Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (FR)

    2016-11-15

    To identify relevant relative cerebral blood volume biomarkers from T2* dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging to anticipate glioblastoma progression after chemoradiation. Twenty-five patients from a prospective study with glioblastoma, primarily treated by chemoradiation, were included. According to the last follow-up MRI confirmed status, patients were divided into: relapse group (n = 13) and control group (n = 12). The time of last MR acquisition was t{sub end}; MR acquisitions performed at t{sub end-2M}, t{sub end-4M} and t{sub end-6M} (respectively 2, 4 and 6 months before t{sub end}) were analyzed to extract relevant variations among eleven perfusion biomarkers (B). These variations were assessed through R(B), as the absolute value of the ratio between ∇B from t{sub end-4M} to t{sub end-2M} and ∇B from t{sub end-6M} to t{sub end-4M}. The optimal cut-off for R(B) was determined using receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis. The fraction of hypoperfused tumor volume (F{sub h}P{sub g}) was a relevant biomarker. A ratio R(F{sub h}P{sub g}) ≥ 0.61 would have been able to anticipate relapse at the next follow-up with a sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of 92.3 %/63.6 %/79.2 %. High R(F{sub h}Pg) (≥0.61) was associated with more relapse at t{sub end} compared to low R(F{sub h}Pg) (75 % vs 12.5 %, p = 0.008). Iterative analysis of F{sub h}P{sub g} from consecutive examinations could provide surrogate markers to predict progression at the next follow-up. (orig.)

  8. MRI to assess renal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artunc, Ferruh; Rossi, Cristina; Boss, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    In addition to excellent anatomical depiction, MRI techniques have expanded to study functional aspects of renal physiology, such as renal perfusion, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or tissue oxygenation. This review will focus on current developments with an emphasis on clinical applicability. The method of GFR determination is largely heterogeneous and still has weaknesses. However, the technique of employing liver disappearance curves has been shown to be accurate in healthy persons and patients with chronic kidney disease. In potential kidney donors, complete evaluation of kidney anatomy and function can be accomplished in a single-stop investigation. Techniques without contrast media can be utilized to measure renal tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI) or perfusion (arterial spin labeling) and could aid in the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic renal diseases, such as renal artery stenosis. Diffusion imaging techniques may provide information on spatially restricted water diffusion and tumor cellularity. Functional MRI opens new horizons in studying renal physiology and pathophysiology in vivo. Although extensively utilized in research, labor-intensive postprocessing and lack of standardization currently limit the clinical applicability of functional MRI. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical value of functional magnetic resonance techniques for early discovery and characterization of kidney disease.

  9. Reversible changes in echo planar perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI in status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flacke, S.; Keller, E.; Urbach, H.; Wuellner, U.; Hamzei, F.

    2000-01-01

    Perfusion imaging (PI) demonstrated increased perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed high signal limited to the left temporoparietal cortex in a 68-year-old man with nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The EEG showed a slow delta-wave focus. The patient recovered and PI, DWI and EEG changes completely resolved. (orig.)

  10. Reversible changes in echo planar perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI in status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flacke, S; Keller, E; Urbach, H [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Bonn (Germany); Wuellner, U; Hamzei, F [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Perfusion imaging (PI) demonstrated increased perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed high signal limited to the left temporoparietal cortex in a 68-year-old man with nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The EEG showed a slow delta-wave focus. The patient recovered and PI, DWI and EEG changes completely resolved. (orig.)

  11. Accelerated territorial arterial spin labeling based on shared rotating control acquisition: an observer study for validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamano, Hironori; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Takayama, Yukihisa; Nagao, Eiki; Sagiyama, Koji; Honda, Hiroshi; Zimine, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Shared rotating control acquisition can shorten the imaging time of territorial arterial spin labeling (tASL) by 33% compared with the normal control acquisition scheme but potentially results in an inaccurate estimate of vascular territories due to imperfect magnetization transfer compensation. Our purpose was to validate the accuracy of the shared rotating control acquisition method in evaluation of vascular territories. Twenty-four patients underwent tASL at a 3.0-T MRI with the conventional normal control acquisition method. Composite vascular territory maps, in which the blood flows from the right and left internal carotid arteries and the posterior circulation were encoded in red-green-blue, were generated as a normal averaged control-label scheme and as a simulated shared rotating control scheme. Two observers independently reported the most dominant territorial flow in 26 brain regions corresponding to the arterial segments at three post-labeling time points. Inter-reader and inter-method agreements were analyzed using κ statistics. Overall inter-reader agreements were excellent for both the normal control and the shared rotating control methods (κ = 0.98, respectively). Overall inter-method agreement was also excellent (κ = 0.98), although relatively low agreement was noted in the bilateral posterior cerebral artery territories (κ = 0.79 to 0.93). Our results suggested that tASL using shared rotating control acquisition can provide information on the vascular territories comparable to that obtained using the normal control acquisition while substantially shortening the imaging time. (orig.)

  12. Prognostic value of preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion parameters for high-grade glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyte, Agne [Vilnius University, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius (Lithuania); Katsaros, Vasileios K. [General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Advanced Imaging Modalities - CT and MRI, Athens (Greece); University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Liouta, Evangelia; Stranjalis, Georgios [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Boskos, Christos [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Radiation Oncology, Athens (Greece); Papanikolaou, Nickolas [Champalimaud Foundation, Department of Radiology, Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon (Portugal); Usinskiene, Jurgita [National Cancer Institute, Vilnius (Lithuania); Affidea Lietuva, Vilnius (Lithuania); Bisdas, Sotirios [University College London Hospitals, Department of Neuroradiology, The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    The prognostic value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI perfusion and its histogram analysis-derived metrics is not well established for high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate DCE perfusion transfer coefficient (K{sup trans}), vascular plasma volume fraction (v{sub p}), extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), reverse transfer constant (k{sub ep}), and initial area under gadolinium concentration time curve (IAUGC) as predictors of progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG patients. Sixty-nine patients with suspected anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma underwent preoperative DCE-MRI scans. DCE perfusion whole tumor region histogram parameters, clinical details, and PFS and OS data were obtained. Univariate, multivariate, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were conducted. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was employed to identify perfusion parameters with the best differentiation performance. On univariate analysis, v{sub e} and skewness of v{sub p} had significant negative impacts, while k{sub ep} had significant positive impact on OS (P < 0.05). v{sub e} was also a negative predictor of PFS (P < 0.05). Patients with lower v{sub e} and IAUGC had longer median PFS and OS on Kaplan-Meier analysis (P < 0.05). K{sup trans} and v{sub e} could also differentiate grade III from IV gliomas (area under the curve 0.819 and 0.791, respectively). High v{sub e} is a consistent predictor of worse PFS and OS in HGG glioma patients. v{sub p} skewness and k{sub ep} are also predictive for OS. K{sup trans} and v{sub e} demonstrated the best diagnostic performance for differentiating grade III from IV gliomas. (orig.)

  13. Correlation of Perfusion MRI and 18F-FDG PET Imaging Biomarkers for Monitoring Regorafenib Therapy in Experimental Colon Carcinomas with Immunohistochemical Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbach, Ralf S.; Fendler, Wolfgang P.; Kazmierczak, Philipp M.; Hacker, Marcus; Rominger, Axel; Carlsen, Janette; Hirner-Eppeneder, Heidrun; Schuster, Jessica; Moser, Matthias; Havla, Lukas; Schneider, Moritz J.; Ingrisch, Michael; Spaeth, Lukas; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Cyran, Clemens C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate a multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI / 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose-(18F-FDG)-PET imaging protocol for monitoring regorafenib therapy effects on experimental colorectal adenocarcinomas in rats with immunohistochemical validation. Materials and Methods Human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts (HT-29) were implanted subcutaneously in n = 17 (n = 10 therapy group; n = 7 control group) female athymic nude rats (Hsd:RH-Foxn1rnu). Animals were imaged at baseline and after a one-week daily treatment protocol with regorafenib (10 mg/kg bodyweight) using a multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI/18F-FDG-PET imaging protocol. In perfusion MRI, quantitative parameters of plasma flow (PF, mL/100 mL/min), plasma volume (PV, %) and endothelial permeability-surface area product (PS, mL/100 mL/min) were calculated. In 18F-FDG-PET, tumor-to-background-ratio (TTB) was calculated. Perfusion MRI parameters were correlated with TTB and immunohistochemical assessments of tumor microvascular density (CD-31) and cell proliferation (Ki-67). Results Regorafenib significantly (pregorafenib therapy effects on experimental colorectal adenocarcinomas in vivo with significant correlations between perfusion MRI parameters and 18F-FDG-PET validated by immunohistochemistry. PMID:25668193

  14. Spin label evidence for the role of lysoglycerophosphatides in cellular membranes of hibernating mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, A D [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park; Aloia, R C; Lyons, J; Snipes, W; Pengelley, E T

    1975-01-01

    The phospholipid composition of ground squirrel heart muscle changes during hibernation: more lysoglycerophosphatides are found in the hibernating state than in the active state. Phase transitions inferred from spin label motion occur in the usual manner typical of mammalian mitochondria for the mitochondria and mitochondrial lipids from active squirrels. However, a conspicuous absence of a spin label-detectable phase transition is observed in equivalent preparations from hibernating animals. The addition of lysolecithin to preparations from active squirrels removes the break and induces a straight line in the Arrhenius plot. The lack of a spin label-detectable phase transition in hibernating animals, therefore, is attributed to an increased content of lysoglycerophosphatides present in the phospholipids during hibernation.

  15. Spin-labeled 1-alkyl-1-nitrosourea synergists of antitumor antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadjeva, V; Koldamova, R

    2001-01-01

    A new method for synthesis of four spin-labeled structural analogues of the antitumor drug 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU), using ethyl nitrite for nitrosation of the intermediate spin-labeled ureas has been described. In vitro synergistic effects of 1-ethyl-3-[4-(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl)]-1-nitrosourea (3b) on the cytotoxicity of bleomycin and farmorubicin were found in human lymphoid leukemia tumor cells. We measured the tissue distribution of 3b in organ homogenates of C57BL mice by an electron paramagnetic resonance method. The spin-labeled nitrosourea was mainly localized in the lungs. Our results strongly support the development and validation of a new approach for synthesis of less toxic nitrosourea derivatives as potential synergists of antitumor drugs.

  16. Arterial spin labeling MR imaging for characterisation of renal masses in patients with impaired renal function: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, Ivan; Rafatzand, Khashayar; Robson, Philip; Alsop, David C.; Wagner, Andrew A.; Atkins, Michael B.; Rofsky, Neil M.

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility of arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of vascularity of renal masses in patients with impaired renal function. Between May 2007 and November 2008, 11/67 consecutive patients referred for MRI evaluation of a renal mass underwent unenhanced ASL-MRI due to moderate-to-severe chronic or acute renal failure. Mean blood flow in vascularised and non-vascularised lesions and the relation between blood flow and final diagnosis of malignancy were correlated with a 2-sided homogeneous variance t-test and the Fisher Exact Test, respectively. A p value 2 (range 7-39). The average blood flow of 11 renal masses interpreted as ASL-positive (134 +/- 85.7 mL/100 g/min) was higher than that of 6 renal masses interpreted as ASL-negative (20.5 +/- 8.1 mL/100 g/min)(p = 0.015). ASL-positivity correlated with malignancy (n = 3) or epithelial atypia (n = 1) at histopathology or progression at follow up (n = 7). ASL detection of vascularity in renal masses in patients with impaired renal function is feasible and seems to indicate neoplasia although the technique requires further evaluation. (orig.)

  17. Arterial spin labeling MR imaging for characterisation of renal masses in patients with impaired renal function: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Ivan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Rafatzand, Khashayar; Robson, Philip; Alsop, David C. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wagner, Andrew A. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Surgery, Division of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Atkins, Michael B. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA (United States); Rofsky, Neil M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Departments of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2012-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility of arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of vascularity of renal masses in patients with impaired renal function. Between May 2007 and November 2008, 11/67 consecutive patients referred for MRI evaluation of a renal mass underwent unenhanced ASL-MRI due to moderate-to-severe chronic or acute renal failure. Mean blood flow in vascularised and non-vascularised lesions and the relation between blood flow and final diagnosis of malignancy were correlated with a 2-sided homogeneous variance t-test and the Fisher Exact Test, respectively. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Seventeen renal lesions were evaluated in 11 patients (8 male; mean age = 70 years) (range 57-86). The median eGFR was 24 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} (range 7-39). The average blood flow of 11 renal masses interpreted as ASL-positive (134 +/- 85.7 mL/100 g/min) was higher than that of 6 renal masses interpreted as ASL-negative (20.5 +/- 8.1 mL/100 g/min)(p = 0.015). ASL-positivity correlated with malignancy (n = 3) or epithelial atypia (n = 1) at histopathology or progression at follow up (n = 7). ASL detection of vascularity in renal masses in patients with impaired renal function is feasible and seems to indicate neoplasia although the technique requires further evaluation. (orig.)

  18. Advances in the synthesis of nitroxide radicals for use in biomolecule spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Marius M; Lovett, Janet E; Anderson, Edward A

    2018-02-05

    EPR spectroscopy is an increasingly useful analytical tool to probe biomolecule structure, dynamic behaviour, and interactions. Nitroxide radicals are the most commonly used radical probe in EPR experiments, and many methods have been developed for their synthesis, as well as incorporation into biomolecules using site-directed spin labelling. In this Tutorial Review, we discuss the most practical methods for the synthesis of nitroxides, focusing on the tunability of their structures, the manipulation of their sidechains into spin labelling handles, and their installation into biomolecules.

  19. Evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI in the differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Vibeke Andrée; Simonsen, Helle J; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To investigate if perfusion measured with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can be used to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence in patients with high-grade glioma. METHODS: The study was approved by the institutional review board...... to measure cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Subjects also underwent FDG-PET and lesions were classified as either metabolically active or inactive. Follow-up clinical MRI and lesion histology in case of additional tissue resection was used...... to determine whether lesions were regressing or progressing. RESULTS: Fourteen enhancing lesions could be classified as progressing (11) or regressing (three). An empirical threshold of 2.0 ml/100 g for CBV allowed detection of regressing lesions with a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 100 %. FDG-PET...

  20. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI and MR angiography of pulmonary embolism in pigs after a single injection of a blood pool MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Bock, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs using a single injection of the blood pool contrast Gadomer. PE was induced in five domestic pigs by injection of autologous blood thrombi. Contrast-enhanced first-pass 3D perfusion MRI (TE/TR/FA: 1.0 ms/2.2 ms/40 ; voxel size: 1.3 x 2.5 x 4.0 mm 3 ; TA: 1.8 s per data set) and high-resolution 3D MRA (TE/TR/FA: 1.4 ms/3.4 ms/40 ; voxel size: 0.8 x 1.0 x 1.6 mm 3 ) was performed during and after a single injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of Gadomer. Image data were compared to pre-embolism Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and post-embolism thin-section multislice CT (n=2). SNR measurements were performed in the pulmonary arteries and lung. One animal died after induction of PE. In all other animals, perfusion MRI and MRA could be acquired after a single injection of Gadomer. At perfusion MRI, PE could be detected by typical wedge-shaped perfusion defects. While the visualization of central PE at MRA correlated well with the CT, peripheral PE were only visualized by CT. Gadomer achieved a higher peak SNR of the lungs compared to Gd-DTPA (21±8 vs. 13±3). Contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MRA of PE can be combined using a single injection of the blood pool contrast agent Gadomer. (orig.)

  1. Non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation assessment of the human lung by means of fourier decomposition in proton MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Puderbach, Michael; Deimling, Michael; Jellus, Vladimir; Chefd'hotel, Christophe; Dinkel, Julien; Hintze, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schad, Lothar R

    2009-09-01

    Assessment of regional lung perfusion and ventilation has significant clinical value for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. In this work a new method of non-contrast-enhanced functional lung MRI (not dependent on intravenous or inhalative contrast agents) is proposed. A two-dimensional (2D) true fast imaging with steady precession (TrueFISP) pulse sequence (TR/TE = 1.9 ms/0.8 ms, acquisition time [TA] = 112 ms/image) was implemented on a 1.5T whole-body MR scanner. The imaging protocol comprised sets of 198 lung images acquired with an imaging rate of 3.33 images/s in coronal and sagittal view. No electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory triggering was used. A nonrigid image registration algorithm was applied to compensate for respiratory motion. Rapid data acquisition allowed observing intensity changes in corresponding lung areas with respect to the cardiac and respiratory frequencies. After a Fourier analysis along the time domain, two spectral lines corresponding to both frequencies were used to calculate the perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images. The described method was applied in preliminary studies on volunteers and patients showing clinical relevance to obtain non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation data.

  2. Mastication induces long-term increases in blood perfusion of the trigeminal principal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, A; Manara, R; Conforti, R; Paccone, A; Secondulfo, C; Lorusso, L; Sbordone, L; Di Salle, F; Monda, M; Tedeschi, G; Esposito, F

    2015-12-17

    Understanding mechanisms for vessel tone regulation within the trigeminal nuclei is of great interest because some headache syndromes are due to dysregulation of such mechanisms. Previous experiments on animal models suggest that mastication may alter neuron metabolism and blood supply in these nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis in humans, arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure blood perfusion within the principal trigeminal nucleus (Vp) and in the dorsolateral-midbrain (DM, including the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus) in healthy volunteers, before and immediately after a mastication exercise consisting of chewing a gum on one side of the mouth for 1 h at 1 bite/s. The side preference for masticating was evaluated with a chewing test and the volume of the masseter muscle was measured on T1-weighted MRI scans. The results demonstrated that the mastication exercise caused a perfusion increase within the Vp, but not in the DM. This change was correlated to the preference score for the side where the exercise took place. Moreover, the basal Vp perfusion was correlated to the masseter volume. These results indicate that the local vascular tone of the trigeminal nuclei can be constitutively altered by the chewing practice and by strong or sustained chewing. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stockbower, Grace E; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Wolk, David A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or "stress test", may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T 1 -exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate W n commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14 N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14 N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b=W n /(2W e ), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in 14 N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14 N-relaxation: T 1 n =1/W n . Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level 15 N-nitroxide system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stearic acid spin labels in lipid bilayers :  insight through atomistic simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stimson, L.M.; Dong, L.; Karttunen, M.E.J.; Wisniewska, A.; Dutka, M.; Róg, T.

    2007-01-01

    Spin-labeled stearic acid species are commonly used for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of cell membranes to investigate phase transitions, fluidity, and other physical properties. In this paper, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the position and behavior

  6. Conformational changes of plasma fibronectin detected upon adsorption to solid substrates: A spin-label study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, C.; Lai, Chingsan

    1989-01-01

    Changes in local environment of the free sulfhydryl groups in plasma fibronectin upon adsorption of the protein to polystyrene beads have been examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-label spectroscopy. The two free sulfhydryl groups per subunit of plasma fibronectin were modified chemically with an [ 15 N, 2 H]maleimide spin-label. For soluble fibronectin, both free sulfhydryl groups shown to be in confined environments as evidenced from the labeled protein exhibiting a strongly immobilized ESR spectrum as described previously using [ 14 N, 1 H]maleimide spin-labels. When the labeled protein was adsorbed to the beads, half of the strongly immobilized component was found to convert into a weakly immobilized component, a result indicating that one of the two labeled sites becomes exposed and exhibits a fast tumbling motion. Experiments conducted using various spin-labeled fibronectin fragments suggest that the newly exposed labeled site is located between the DNA-binding and the cell-binding regions of the molecule. The data obtained indicate that, upon adsorption to polystyrene beads, plasma fibronectin undergoes a conformational change through which the buried free sulfhydryl group near the cell-binding region of the molecule is exposed. This observation may have important implications regarding the expression of cell adhesive properties of the fibronectin molecule

  7. Exploring the local conformational space of a membrane protein by site-directed spin labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopar, D.; Strancar, J.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular modeling based on a hybrid evolutionary optimization and an information condensation algorithm, called GHOST, of spin label ESR spectra was applied to study the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins. The new method is capable of providing detailed molecular information about the

  8. Physiological and psychological individual differences influence resting brain function measured by ASL perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, M; Coen, S J; Farmer, A D; Aziz, Q; Williams, S C R; Alsop, D C; Fukudo, S; O'Gorman, R L

    2014-09-01

    Effects of physiological and/or psychological inter-individual differences on the resting brain state have not been fully established. The present study investigated the effects of individual differences in basal autonomic tone and positive and negative personality dimensions on resting brain activity. Whole-brain resting cerebral perfusion images were acquired from 32 healthy subjects (16 males) using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. Neuroticism and extraversion were assessed with the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised. Resting autonomic activity was assessed using a validated measure of baseline cardiac vagal tone (CVT) in each individual. Potential associations between the perfusion data and individual CVT (27 subjects) and personality score (28 subjects) were tested at the level of voxel clusters by fitting a multiple regression model at each intracerebral voxel. Greater baseline perfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and cerebellum was associated with lower CVT. At a corrected significance threshold of p individual autonomic tone and psychological variability influence resting brain activity in brain regions, previously shown to be associated with autonomic arousal (dorsal ACC) and personality traits (amygdala, caudate, etc.) during active task processing. The resting brain state may therefore need to be taken into account when interpreting the neurobiology of individual differences in structural and functional brain activity.

  9. ¹⁸F-FDG PET metabolic parameters and MRI perfusion and diffusion parameters in hepatocellular carcinoma: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Jun Ahn

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Glucose metabolism, perfusion, and water diffusion may have a relationship or affect each other in the same tumor. The understanding of their relationship could expand the knowledge of tumor characteristics and contribute to the field of oncologic imaging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between metabolism, vasculature and cellularity of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, using multimodality imaging such as ¹⁸F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI, and diffusion weighted imaging(DWI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-one patients with advanced HCC underwent ¹⁸F-FDG PET, DCE-MRI, and DWI before treatment. Maximum standard uptake values (SUV(max from ¹⁸F-FDG-PET, variables of the volume transfer constant (K(trans from DCE-MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC from DWI were obtained for the tumor and their relationships were examined by Spearman's correlation analysis. The influence of portal vein thrombosis on SUV(max and variables of K(trans and ADC was evaluated by Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: SUV(max showed significant negative correlation with K(trans(max (ρ = -0.622, p = 0.002. However, variables of ADC showed no relationship with variables of K(trans or SUV(max (p>0.05. Whether portal vein thrombosis was present or not did not influence the SUV max and variables of ADC and K(trans (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: In this study, SUV was shown to be correlated with K(trans in advanced HCCs; the higher the glucose metabolism a tumor had, the lower the perfusion it had, which might help in guiding target therapy.

  10. Limbic system perfusion in Alzheimer's disease measured by MRI-coregistered HMPAO SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, David J.A.; Black, Sandra E.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic, semi-quantitative analysis of limbic perfusion in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) using coregistered single-photon emission tomography (SPET) images aligned to magnetic resonance (MR) images. Limbic perfusion in 40 patients with mild to moderate AD was compared with that of 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched normal controls (NC). HMPAO SPET scans and 3D T1-weighted MR images were acquired for each subject. Structures of the limbic system (i.e. hippocampus, amygdala, anterior thalamus, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies, basal forebrain, septal area and cingulate, orbitofrontal and parahippocampal cortices) were traced on the MR images and transferred to the coregistered SPET scans. Perfusion ratios for all limbic regions were calculated relative to cerebellar perfusion. General linear model multivariate analysis revealed that, overall, limbic structures showed significant hypoperfusion (F=7.802, P 2 =0.695) in AD patients compared with NC. Greatest differences (d≥0.8) were found in the hippocampus, as well as all areas of the cingulate cortex. Significant relative hypoperfusion was also apparent in the parahippocampal cortex, amygdala/entorhinal cortex, septal area and anterior thalamus, all of which showed medium to large effect sizes (d=0.6-0.8). No significant relative perfusion differences were detected in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies or orbitofrontal cortex. Logistic regression indicated that posterior cingulate cortex perfusion was able to discriminate AD patients from NC with 93% accuracy (95% sensitivity, 88% specificity). The current results suggest that most, but not all, limbic structures show significant relative hypoperfusion in AD. These findings validate previous post-mortem studies and could be useful in improving diagnostic accuracy, monitoring disease progression and evaluating potential treatment strategies in AD. (orig.)

  11. Limbic system perfusion in Alzheimer's disease measured by MRI-coregistered HMPAO SPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, David J.A. [Institute of Medical Science, Research Program in Aging, Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Black, Sandra E. [Cognitive Neurology Unit and Research Program in Aging, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Research Program in Aging, Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Caldwell, Curtis B. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, CN (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic, semi-quantitative analysis of limbic perfusion in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) using coregistered single-photon emission tomography (SPET) images aligned to magnetic resonance (MR) images. Limbic perfusion in 40 patients with mild to moderate AD was compared with that of 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched normal controls (NC). HMPAO SPET scans and 3D T1-weighted MR images were acquired for each subject. Structures of the limbic system (i.e. hippocampus, amygdala, anterior thalamus, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies, basal forebrain, septal area and cingulate, orbitofrontal and parahippocampal cortices) were traced on the MR images and transferred to the coregistered SPET scans. Perfusion ratios for all limbic regions were calculated relative to cerebellar perfusion. General linear model multivariate analysis revealed that, overall, limbic structures showed significant hypoperfusion (F=7.802, P<0.00001, {eta}{sup 2}=0.695) in AD patients compared with NC. Greatest differences (d{>=}0.8) were found in the hippocampus, as well as all areas of the cingulate cortex. Significant relative hypoperfusion was also apparent in the parahippocampal cortex, amygdala/entorhinal cortex, septal area and anterior thalamus, all of which showed medium to large effect sizes (d=0.6-0.8). No significant relative perfusion differences were detected in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies or orbitofrontal cortex. Logistic regression indicated that posterior cingulate cortex perfusion was able to discriminate AD patients from NC with 93% accuracy (95% sensitivity, 88% specificity). The current results suggest that most, but not all, limbic structures show significant relative hypoperfusion in AD. These findings validate previous post-mortem studies and could be useful in improving diagnostic accuracy, monitoring disease progression and evaluating potential treatment strategies in AD. (orig.)

  12. Orientation of spin-labeled light chain 2 of myosin heads in muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, T

    1990-07-20

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (e.p.r.) spectroscopy has been used to monitor the orientation of spin labels attached rigidly to a reactive SH residue on the light chain 2 (LC2) of myosin heads in muscle fibers. e.p.r. spectra from spin-labeled myosin subfragment-1 (S1), allowed to diffuse into unlabeled rigor (ATP-free) fibers, were roughly approximated by a narrow angular distribution of spin labels centered at 66 degrees relative to the fiber axis, indicating a uniform orientation of S1 bound to actin. On the other hand, spectra from spin-labeled heavy meromyosin (HMM) were roughly approximated by two narrow angular distributions centered at 42 degrees and 66 degrees, suggesting that the LC2 domains of the two HMM heads have different orientations. In contrast to S1 or HMM, the spectra from rigor fibers, in which LC2 of endogenous myosin heads was labeled, showed a random orientation which may be due to distortion imposed by the structure of the filament lattice and the mismatch of the helical periodicities of the thick and thin filaments. However, spectra from the fibers in the presence of ATP analog 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMPPNP) were approximated by two narrow angular distributions similar to those obtained with HMM. Thus, AMPPNP may cause the LC2 domain to be less flexible and/or the S2 portion to be more flexible, so as to release the distortion of the LC2 domain and make it return to its natural position. At high ionic strength, AMPPNP disoriented the spin labels as ATP did under relaxing conditions, suggesting that the myosin head is detached from and/or weakly (flexibly) attached to a thin filament.

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopy versus magnetic resonance imaging to study brain perfusion in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, P; Hansen, A; Warfield, S K; Dukhovny, D; Soul, J S

    2014-01-15

    The measurement of brain perfusion may provide valuable information for assessment and treatment of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). While arterial spin labeled perfusion (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides noninvasive and direct measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) values, it is logistically challenging to obtain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) might be an alternative, as it permits noninvasive and continuous monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation at the bedside. The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between measurements of brain perfusion by NIRS and by MRI in term newborns with HIE treated with hypothermia. In this prospective cohort study, ASL-MRI and NIRS performed during hypothermia were used to assess brain perfusion in these newborns. Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) values, measured from 1-2 MRI scans for each patient, were compared to mixed venous saturation values (SctO2) recorded by NIRS just before and after each MRI. Analysis included groupings into moderate versus severe HIE based on their initial background pattern of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Twelve concomitant recordings were obtained of seven neonates. Strong correlation was found between SctO2 and CBF in asphyxiated newborns with severe HIE (r=0.88; p value=0.0085). Moreover, newborns with severe HIE had lower CBF (likely lower oxygen supply) and extracted less oxygen (likely lower oxygen demand or utilization) when comparing SctO2 and CBF to those with moderate HIE. NIRS is an effective bedside tool to monitor and understand brain perfusion changes in term asphyxiated newborns, which in conjunction with precise measurements of CBF obtained by MRI at particular times, may help tailor neuroprotective strategies in term newborns with HIE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of glioma response to radiotherapy using 3D pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling and 3D segmented volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jianrui; Diao, Qiang; Lin, YuanKai; Zhang, Jun; Li, Lin; Yang, Gang; Fang, Xiaokun; Li, Xie; Chen, YingQi; Zheng, Ling, E-mail: lingzheng1989@yeah.net; Lu, Guangming, E-mail: guangminglu1905@163.com

    2016-11-15

    Background: Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, in some cases, radiotherapy may be the preferred treatment option especially for elderly people who cannot endure surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy on glioma. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MR imaging technique that allows for a quantitative determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. Tumor volume is still an important determinant for evaluating treatment response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the tumor perfusion parameters and tumor volume and assess the effects of radiotherapy on glioma using pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) technique. Methods: 35 patients with gliomas, histologically classified as low-grade group (n = 16) and high-grade group (n = 19), treated with radiotherapy only or before using other therapies were included in this study. MR examinations, including T1 weighted image and pcASL, were performed before and 4, 8, 12, 16 weeks after radiotherapy. Regional CBF of normal tissue, mean tumor blood flow (TBF{sub mean}), maximum tumor blood flow (TBF{sub max}), and tumor volume were evaluated at each time point. Both the percentage change in CBF (CBF ratio), TBF{sub mean} (TBF{sub mean} ratio), TBF{sub max} (TBF{sub max} ratio) and the percentage change in tumor volume (volume ratio) were calculated using values obtained before and after radiotherapy. The correlation between the volume ratio and CBF ratio, TBF{sub mean} ratio, TBF{sub max} ratio was assessed using linear regression analysis and Pearson’s correlation. Results: The TBF{sub mean} and TBF{sub max} of high-grade gliomas were significantly higher than that of low-grade group. In high-grade group, a strong correlation was demonstrated between the tumor volume and the TBF{sub max} before radiotherapy (R{sup 2} = 0.35, r{sub s} = 0.59, p < 0.05). There was also a significant correlation between the TBF

  15. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using free-breathing MRI and prospective slice tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Kelle, Sebastian; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    . This study demonstrates the feasibility of patient-adapted 3D PST on a 3.0 Tesla MR system. Eight patients underwent free-breathing studies of myocardial perfusion, simultaneously collecting data with and without PST. On average, PST reduced residual in-plane motion by a factor of 2, compared...

  16. MRI-CEST assessment of tumour perfusion using X-ray iodinated agents: comparison with a conventional Gd-based agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anemone, Annasofia; Consolino, Lorena [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Molecolari e Scienze per la Salute, Torino (Italy); Longo, Dario Livio [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini (CNR) c/o Centro di Biotecnologie Molecolari, Torino (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    X-ray iodinated contrast media have been shown to generate contrast in MR images when used with the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) approach. The aim of this study is to compare contrast enhancement (CE) capabilities and perfusion estimates between radiographic molecules and a Gd-based contrast agent in two tumour murine models with different vascularization patterns. MRI-CEST and MRI-CE T{sub 1w} images were acquired in murine TS/A and 4 T1 breast tumours upon sequential i.v. injection of iodinated contrast media (iodixanol, iohexol, and iopamidol) and of gadoteridol. The signal enhancements observed in the two acquisition modalities were evaluated using Pearson's correlation, and the correspondence in the spatial distribution was assessed by a voxelwise comparison. A significant, positive correlation was observed between iodinated contrast media and gadoteridol for tumour contrast enhancement and perfusion values for both tumour models (r = 0.51-0.62). High spatial correlations were observed in perfusion maps between iodinated molecules and gadoteridol (r = 0.68-0.86). Tumour parametric maps derived by iodinated contrast media and gadoteridol showed high spatial similarities. A good to strong spatial correlation between tumour perfusion parameters derived from MRI-CEST and MRI-CE modalities indicates that the two procedures provide similar information. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of first-pass and second-bolus dynamic susceptibility perfusion MRI in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, M.V.; Besenski, Nada; Rumboldt, Zoran; Wooten, Caroline; Dorlon, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate whether the T1 shortening effect caused by contrast leakage into brain tumors, a well-known confounding effect in the quantification of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) measurements, may be corrected by the administration of a predose of gadolinium-DTPA. As part of their presurgical imaging protocol, 25 patients with primary brain tumors underwent two consecutive dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion MR studies. Intratumoral rCBV measurements and normalized rCBV values obtained during the first-pass and second-bolus studies were compared (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test). The frequency of relatively increased rCBV ratios on the second-bolus study was compared between enhancing and non-enhancing neoplasms (Fisher's exact test). Postprocessing perfusion studies were evaluated for image quality on a scale of 0-3 (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test). Four studies were excluded due to unacceptable image quality. Mean normalized rCBVs were 9.04 (SD 4.64) for the first-pass and 7.99 (SD 3.84) for the second-bolus study. There was no statistically significant difference between the two perfusion studies in either intratumoral rCBV (P=0.237) or rCBV ratio (P=0.181). Five enhancing and four non-enhancing tumors showed a relative increase in rCBV ratio on the second-bolus study, without a significant difference between the groups. Image quality was not significantly different between perfusion studies. Our results did not demonstrate a significant difference between first-pass and second-bolus rCBV measurements in DSC perfusion MR imaging. The administration of a predose of gadolinium-DTPA does not appear to be an efficient way of compensating for the underestimation of intratumoral rCBV values due to the T1 shortening effect. (orig.)

  18. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grova, C [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Jannin, P [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Biraben, A [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Buvat, I [INSERM U494, CHU Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Benali, H [INSERM U494, CHU Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Bernard, A M [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Eugene Marquis, Rennes (France); Scarabin, J M [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Gibaud, B [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France)

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were

  19. Correlation of perfusion MRI and 18F-FDG PET imaging biomarkers for monitoring regorafenib therapy in experimental colon carcinomas with immunohistochemical validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf S Eschbach

    Full Text Available To investigate a multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI / 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose-(18F-FDG-PET imaging protocol for monitoring regorafenib therapy effects on experimental colorectal adenocarcinomas in rats with immunohistochemical validation.Human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts (HT-29 were implanted subcutaneously in n = 17 (n = 10 therapy group; n = 7 control group female athymic nude rats (Hsd:RH-Foxn1rnu. Animals were imaged at baseline and after a one-week daily treatment protocol with regorafenib (10 mg/kg bodyweight using a multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI/18F-FDG-PET imaging protocol. In perfusion MRI, quantitative parameters of plasma flow (PF, mL/100 mL/min, plasma volume (PV, % and endothelial permeability-surface area product (PS, mL/100 mL/min were calculated. In 18F-FDG-PET, tumor-to-background-ratio (TTB was calculated. Perfusion MRI parameters were correlated with TTB and immunohistochemical assessments of tumor microvascular density (CD-31 and cell proliferation (Ki-67.Regorafenib significantly (p<0.01 suppressed PF (81.1±7.5 to 50.6±16.0 mL/100mL/min, PV (12.1±3.6 to 7.5±1.6% and PS (13.6±3.2 to 7.9±2.3 mL/100mL/min as well as TTB (3.4±0.6 to 1.9±1.1 between baseline and day 7. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly (p<0.03 lower tumor microvascular density (CD-31, 7.0±2.4 vs. 16.1±5.9 and tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67, 434.0 ± 62.9 vs. 663.0 ± 98.3 in the therapy group. Perfusion MRI parameters ΔPF, ΔPV and ΔPS showed strong and significant (r = 0.67-0.78; p<0.01 correlations to the PET parameter ΔTTB and significant correlations (r = 0.57-0.67; p<0.03 to immunohistochemical Ki-67 as well as to CD-31-stainings (r = 0.49-0.55; p<0.05.A multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI/PET imaging protocol allowed for non-invasive monitoring of regorafenib therapy effects on experimental colorectal adenocarcinomas in vivo with significant correlations between perfusion MRI parameters and 18F

  20. Monitoring Cell Death in Regorafenib-Treated Experimental Colon Carcinomas Using Annexin-Based Optical Fluorescence Imaging Validated by Perfusion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp M Kazmierczak

    Full Text Available To investigate annexin-based optical fluorescence imaging (OI for monitoring regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas in rats, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry.Subcutaneous human colon carcinomas (HT-29 in athymic rats (n = 16 were imaged before and after a one-week therapy with regorafenib (n = 8 or placebo (n = 8 using annexin-based OI and perfusion MRI at 3 Tesla. Optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and MRI tumor perfusion parameters (plasma flow PF, mL/100mL/min; plasma volume PV, % were assessed. On day 7, tumors underwent immunohistochemical analysis for tumor cell apoptosis (TUNEL, proliferation (Ki-67, and microvascular density (CD31.Apoptosis-targeted OI demonstrated a tumor-specific probe accumulation with a significant increase of tumor SNR under therapy (mean Δ +7.78±2.95, control: -0.80±2.48, p = 0.021. MRI detected a significant reduction of tumor perfusion in the therapy group (mean ΔPF -8.17±2.32 mL/100 mL/min, control -0.11±3.36 mL/100 mL/min, p = 0.036. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly more apoptosis (TUNEL; 11392±1486 vs. 2921±334, p = 0.001, significantly less proliferation (Ki-67; 1754±184 vs. 2883±323, p = 0.012, and significantly lower microvascular density (CD31; 107±10 vs. 182±22, p = 0.006 in the therapy group.Annexin-based OI allowed for the non-invasive monitoring of regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry.

  1. Quantification of myocardial blood flow with dynamic perfusion 3.0 Tesla MRI: Validation with (15) O-water PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Manabe, Osamu; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Naya, Masanao; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Kenji; Mori, Yuki; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Tamaki, Nagara; Katoh, Chietsugu

    2015-09-01

    To develop and validate a method for quantifying myocardial blood flow (MBF) using dynamic perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MBFMRI ) at 3.0 Tesla (T) and compare the findings with those of (15) O-water positron emission tomography (MBFPET ). Twenty healthy male volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (15) O-water positron emission tomography (PET) at rest and during adenosine triphosphate infusion. The single-tissue compartment model was used to estimate the inflow rate constant (K1). We estimated the extraction fraction of Gd-DTPA using K1 and MBF values obtained from (15) O-water PET for the first 10 subjects. For validation, we calculated MBFMRI values for the remaining 10 subjects and compared them with the MBFPET values. In addition, we compared MBFMRI values of 10 patients with coronary artery disease with those of healthy subjects. The mean resting and stress MBFMRI values were 0.76 ± 0.10 and 3.04 ± 0.82 mL/min/g, respectively, and showed excellent correlation with the mean MBFPET values (r = 0.96, P < 0.01). The mean stress MBFMRI value was significantly lower for the patients (1.92 ± 0.37) than for the healthy subjects (P < 0.001). The use of dynamic perfusion MRI at 3T is useful for estimating MBF and can be applied for patients with coronary artery disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dissociative part-dependent resting-state activity in dissociative identity disorder: a controlled FMRI perfusion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R; Reinders, Antje A T S; Nijenhuis, Ellert R S; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J P; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the "Emotional Part" (EP) and the "Apparently Normal Part" (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are consistent with TSDP and inconsistent with the idea

  3. Dissociative part-dependent resting-state activity in dissociative identity disorder: a controlled FMRI perfusion study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda R Schlumpf

    Full Text Available In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP, studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the "Emotional Part" (EP and the "Apparently Normal Part" (ANP, have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors.Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls.Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events.DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are consistent with TSDP and inconsistent

  4. Site-Directed Spin-Labeling of Nucleic Acids by Click Chemistry. Detection of Abasic Sites in Duplex DNA by EPR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Snorri; Vogel, Stefan; Shelke, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    and the nitroxide spin label. The spin label was used to detect, for the first time, abasic sites in duplex DNA by X-band CW-EPR spectroscopy and give information about other structural deformations as well as local conformational changes in DNA. For example, reduced mobility of the spin label in a mismatched pair...... label out of the duplex and toward the solution. Thus, reposition of the spin label, when acting as a mercury(II)-controlled mechanical lever, can be readily detected by EPR spectroscopy. The ease of incorporation and properties of the new spin label make it attractive for EPR studies of nucleic acids...

  5. Convenient biosynthetic preparation of isomeric spin-labelled radioactive phosphatidic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhne, L.; Stanacev, N.Z. (Toronto Univ., Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry)

    1982-11-01

    A convenient method for the enzymatic preparation of sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H)phosphatidic acids carrying also 5-, 12-, or 16-nitroxide stearic acids, from sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H) glycerophosphate and isolated guinea pig liver microsomes, is described in detail. The procedure allows a simultaneous preparation of three spin-labelled sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H)phosphatidic acids of yields 3-3.5..mu..mol of each compound which is >99% pure in respect to the radioactivity and which contains 25 mol% of spin-labelled fatty acids. These phosphatidic acids were approximately equally distributed between the primary and the secondary hydroxyl when 12- or 16-nitroxide stearic acids were used or predominantly (75%) associated with the secondary hydroxyl of sn-3-(2-/sup 3/H)phosphatidic acid when 5-nitroxide stearic acid was present in the incubation mixture.

  6. Saturation recovery EPR spin-labeling method for quantification of lipids in biological membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Camenisch, Theodore G; Hyde, James S; Subczynski, Witold K

    2017-12-01

    The presence of integral membrane proteins induces the formation of distinct domains in the lipid bilayer portion of biological membranes. Qualitative application of both continuous wave (CW) and saturation recovery (SR) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling methods allowed discrimination of the bulk, boundary, and trapped lipid domains. A recently developed method, which is based on the CW EPR spectra of phospholipid (PL) and cholesterol (Chol) analog spin labels, allows evaluation of the relative amount of PLs (% of total PLs) in the boundary plus trapped lipid domain and the relative amount of Chol (% of total Chol) in the trapped lipid domain [ M. Raguz, L. Mainali, W. J. O'Brien, and W. K. Subczynski (2015), Exp. Eye Res., 140:179-186 ]. Here, a new method is presented that, based on SR EPR spin-labeling, allows quantitative evaluation of the relative amounts of PLs and Chol in the trapped lipid domain of intact membranes. This new method complements the existing one, allowing acquisition of more detailed information about the distribution of lipids between domains in intact membranes. The methodological transition of the SR EPR spin-labeling approach from qualitative to quantitative is demonstrated. The abilities of this method are illustrated for intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes from porcine eye lenses. Statistical analysis (Student's t -test) of the data allowed determination of the separations of mean values above which differences can be treated as statistically significant ( P ≤ 0.05) and can be attributed to sources other than preparation/technique.

  7. Spin labeled amino acid nitrosourea derivatives--synthesis and antitumour activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleva, A; Raikov, Z; Ilarionova, M; Todorov, D

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of three spin labeled derivatives of N-[N'-(chloroethyl)-N'-nitrosocarbamoyl] amino acids is reported. The new nitrosoureas are obtained by condensation of the corresponding N-[N'-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-nitrosocarbamoyl] amino acid with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-4-aminopiperidine using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Their chemical structures are confirmed by elemental analysis, IR, MS, and EPR spectroscopy. All newly synthesized compounds showed high antitumour activity against the lymphoid leukemia L1210 in BDF1 mice.

  8. Measurement of extracellular volume and transit time heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion MRI in patients after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Karl P; Rischpler, Christoph; Hayes, Carmel; Ibrahim, Tareq; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Haase, Axel; Schwaiger, Markus; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2017-06-01

    To assess the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion MRI to measure extracellular volume (ECV) and to investigate the possibility of estimating capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) in patients after myocardial infarction and successful revascularization. Twenty-four perfusion data sets were acquired on a 3 Tesla positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI scanner. Three perfusion models of different complexity were implemented in a hierarchical fashion with an Akaike information criterion being used to determine the number of fit parameters supported by the data. Results were compared sector-wise to ECV from an equilibrium T 1 mapping method (modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI)). ECV derived from the perfusion analysis correlated well with equilibrium measurements (R² = 0.76). Estimation of CTH was supported in 16% of sectors (mostly remote). Inclusion of a nonzero CTH parameter usually led to lower estimates of first-pass extraction and slightly higher estimates of blood volume and flow. Estimation of the capillary permeability-surface area product was feasible in 81% of sectors. Transit time heterogeneity has a measurable effect on the kinetic analysis of myocardial perfusion MRI data, and Gd-DTPA extravasation in the myocardium is usually not flow-limited in infarct-related pathology. Measurement of myocardial ECV using perfusion imaging could provide a scan-time efficient alternative to methods based on T 1 mapping. Magn Reson Med 77:2320-2330, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Carbonic Anhydrase: Transition Metal Ions and Spin-Labeled Sulfonamides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, June S.; Mushak, Paul; Coleman, Joseph E.

    1970-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (esr) spectra of Cu(II) and Co(II) carbonic anhydrase, and a spin-labeled sulfonamide complex of the Zn(II) enzyme, are reported. The coordination geometry of Cu(II) bound in the enzyme appears to have approximately axial symmetry. Esr spectra of enzyme complexes with metal-binding anions also show axial symmetry and greater covalency, in the order ethoxzolamide cyanide complex suggests the presence of two, and probably three, equivalent nitrogen ligands from the protein. Esr spectra of the Co(II) enzyme and its complexes show two types of Co(II) environment, one typical of the native enzyme and the 1:1 CN- complex, and one typical of a 2:1 CN- complex. Co(II) in the 2:1 complex appears to be low-spin and probably has a coordination number of 5. Binding of a spin-labeled sulfonamide to the active center immobilizes the free radical. The similarity of the esr spectra of spin-labeled Zn(II) and Co(II) carbonic anhydrases suggests that the conformation at the active center is similar in the two metal derivatives. PMID:4320976

  10. Temperature-induced changes in lecithin model membranes detected by novel covalent spin-labelled phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhne-Sekalec, L; Stanacev, N Z

    1977-02-01

    Several spin-labelled phospholipids carrying covalently bound 5-doxylstearic acid (2-(3-carboxydecyl)-2-hexyl-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxazolidinoxyl) were intercalated in liposomes of saturated and unsaturated lecithins. Temperature-induced changes of these liposomes, detected by the spin-labelled phospholipids, were found to be in agreement with the previously described transitions of hydrocarbon chains of host lecithins detected by different probes and different techniques, establishing that spin-labelled phosopholipids are sensitive probes for the detection of temperature-induced changes in lecithin model membranes. In addition to the detection of already-known transitions in lecithin liposomes, the coexistence of two distinctly different enviroments was observed above the characteristic transition temperature. This phenomenon was tentatively attributed to the influence of the lecithin polar group on the fluidity of fatty acyl chains near the polar group. Combined with other results from the literature, the coexistence of two environments could be associated with the coexistence of two conformational isomers of lecithin, differing in the orientation of the polar head group with respect to the plane of bilayer. These findings have been discussed in view of the present state of knowledge regarding temperature-induced changes in model membranes.

  11. Spin-labelling study of interactions of ovalbumin with multilamellar liposomes and specific anti-ovalbumin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brgles, Marija; Mirosavljević, Krunoslav; Noethig-Laslo, Vesna; Frkanec, Ruza; Tomasić, Jelka

    2007-03-10

    Ovalbumin (OVA) has been used continuously as the model antigen in numerous studies of immune reactions and antigen processing, very often encapsulated into liposomes. The purpose of this work was to study the possible interactions of spin-labelled OVA and lipids in liposomal membranes using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. OVA was covalently spin-labelled with 4-maleimido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO-maleimide), characterized and encapsulated into multilamellar, negatively charged liposomes. ESR spectra of this liposomal preparation gave evidence for the interaction of OVA with the lipid bilayers. Such an interaction was also evidenced by the ESR spectra of liposomal preparation containing OVA, where liposomes were spin-labelled with n-doxyl stearic acids. The spin-labelled OVA retains its property to bind specific anti-OVA antibodies, as shown by ESR spectroscopy, but also in ELISA for specific anti-OVA IgG.

  12. MRI in acute cerebral ischaemia: perfusion imaging with superparamagnetic iron oxide in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, M.; Reith, W.; Doerfler, A.; Kummer, R. von; Hacke, W.; Sartor, K.

    1994-01-01

    An imaging technique capable of detecting ischaemic cerebral injury at an early stage could improve diagnosis in acute or transient cerebral ischaemia. We compared the ability of superparamagnetically contrast-enhanced MRI and conventional T2-weighted MRI to detect ischaemic injury early after unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in 12 male Wistar rats. Permanent vessel occlusion was achieved by a transvascular approach, which has the advantage of not requiring a craniectom. At 45-60 min after the procedure, the animals had conventional T2-weighted MRI before and after administration of a superparamagnetic contrast agent (iron oxide particles). Unenhanced images were normal in all animals. After administration of iron oxide particles, the presumed ischaemic area was clearly visible, as relatively increased signal, in all animals; this high signal area corresponded to the area of ischaemic brain infarction seen on histological studies. Our results suggest that superparamagnetic iron particles may significantly reduce the interval between an ischaemic insult and the appearance of parenchymal changes on MRI. (orig./UWA)

  13. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed “The QUASAR reproducibility study”. Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87±0.95mm and rotations of 1.56±0.66°. Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4±7.5 [ml/100g/min] with a between subject standard variation SDb = 5.5 [ml/100g/min] and a within subject standard deviation SDw = 4.7 [ml/100g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies. PMID:19660557

  14. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies.

  15. Toward fully automated processing of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI for acute ischemic cerebral stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsuh; Leira, Enrique C; Callison, Richard C; Ludwig, Bryan; Moritani, Toshio; Magnotta, Vincent A; Madsen, Mark T

    2010-05-01

    We developed fully automated software for dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) to efficiently and reliably derive critical hemodynamic information for acute stroke treatment decisions. Brain MR PWI was performed in 80 consecutive patients with acute nonlacunar ischemic stroke within 24h after onset of symptom from January 2008 to August 2009. These studies were automatically processed to generate hemodynamic parameters that included cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, and the mean transit time (MTT). To develop reliable software for PWI analysis, we used computationally robust algorithms including the piecewise continuous regression method to determine bolus arrival time (BAT), log-linear curve fitting, arrival time independent deconvolution method and sophisticated motion correction methods. An optimal arterial input function (AIF) search algorithm using a new artery-likelihood metric was also developed. Anatomical locations of the automatically determined AIF were reviewed and validated. The automatically computed BAT values were statistically compared with estimated BAT by a single observer. In addition, gamma-variate curve-fitting errors of AIF and inter-subject variability of AIFs were analyzed. Lastly, two observes independently assessed the quality and area of hypoperfusion mismatched with restricted diffusion area from motion corrected MTT maps and compared that with time-to-peak (TTP) maps using the standard approach. The AIF was identified within an arterial branch and enhanced areas of perfusion deficit were visualized in all evaluated cases. Total processing time was 10.9+/-2.5s (mean+/-s.d.) without motion correction and 267+/-80s (mean+/-s.d.) with motion correction on a standard personal computer. The MTT map produced with our software adequately estimated brain areas with perfusion deficit and was significantly less affected by random noise of the PWI when compared with the TTP map. Results of image

  16. MRI evaluation of cerebral perfusion changes in patients with MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Sheng; Qi Zhaoyue; Xiao Jiangxi; Jiang Xuexiang; Yang Yanling

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the changes of cerebral perfusion in patients with MELAS syndrome by using MR perfusion technique. Methods: Thirteen patients with MELAS syndrome and 13 controls with normal neurological conditions were scanned with the sequence of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery exempting separate T 1 measurement (FAIREST). Their rCBF values were obtained in regions of bilateral basilar nuclei and thalami, as well as bilateral temporal lobes and occipital lobes. Regression analysis was carried out to determine the effect of location and side on the measurement of rCBF in controls. One-way ANOVA was conducted to compare rCBF values among the control group, the lesion ROIs and normal ROIs of the MELAS syndrome group. Results: The values of rCBF were 0.83 ± 0.23, 1.17± 0.30, 0.93 ± 0.28, and 1.11 ± 0.25 for the left basilar ganglia, thalamus, temporal lobe, and occipital lobe respectively, while they were 0.77 ± 0.15, 1.03 ± 0.34, 1.06 ± 0.23, and 1.09 ± 0.23 for the right basilar ganglia, thalamus, temporal lobe, and occipital lobe respectively. Regression analysis revealed no effect of location and side on the rCBF (P>0.05). The rCBF value for control group was 1.00 + 0. 28, while it was 1.01 ± 0.31 for the normal ROIs and 1.95 ± 0.43 for the lesion ROIs in the MELAS syndrome group (F=54.99, P<0.01). The rCBF of the lesion ROIs in the MELAS syndrome group was significantly higher than the normal ROIs and the control group. Conclusion: CBF maps can reveal changes of cerebral blood flow in patients with ictal MELAS, which suggests increased perfusion in the stroke-like lesions. (authors)

  17. Early MRI changes in glioblastoma in the period between surgery and adjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Amelio, Dante; Ricciardi, Giuseppe K; Zoccatelli, Giada; Magon, Stefano; Pizzini, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Amichetti, Maurizio; Beltramello, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the increase in MRI contrast enhancement (CE) occurring in glioblastoma during the period between surgery and initiation of chemo-radiotherapy, thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were analyzed by early post-operative magnetic resonance (EPMR) imaging within three days of surgery and by pre-adjuvant magnetic resonance (PAMR) examination before adjuvant therapy. Areas of new CE were investigated by use of EPMR diffusion-weighted imaging and PAMR perfusion imaging (by arterial spin-labeling). PAMR was acquired, on average, 29.9 days later than EPMR (range 20-37 days). During this period an increased area of CE was observed for 17/37 patients. For 3/17 patients these regions were confined to areas of reduced EPMR diffusion, suggesting postsurgical infarct. For the other 14/17 patients, these areas suggested progression. For 11/17 patients the co-occurrence of hyperperfusion in PAMR perfusion suggested progression. PAMR perfusion and EPMR diffusion did not give consistent results for 3/17 patients for whom small new areas of CE were observed, presumably because of the poor spatial resolution of perfusion imaging. Before initiation of adjuvant therapy, areas of new CE of resected glioblastomas are frequently observed. Most of these suggest tumor progression, according to EPMR diffusion and PAMR perfusion criteria.

  18. Characterization of glial tumors in PET/CT 18F-dopa and in perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nioche, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    MRI provides morphological information about a tumour, as well as information regarding its micro-vascularisation of the tumour. In PET/CT, accumulation of 18 F-Dopa in tumour cells results from the metabolic activity greater than that of healthy tissues.We studied 28 gliomas for which we analysed data from MRI and PET/CT. A registration method has been developed to combine information from both PET and MRI and to extract volumes of interest consistent with the information included in the two modalities. In these volumes, the tumour compartment and normal tissue compartment were identified using a Gaussian mixture model. Parameters from PET or MRI data were then calculated in these compartments. ROC analyses combined with linear discriminant analyses were used to assess whether joint observation of standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV) or of relative rk1 and rCBV could distinguish between low grade and high grade tumours. We found that using this joint analysis, 82% of high-grade tumors and 70% of low grade tumors were correctly classified (AUC of 0.88 for [SUVmax, rCBV] and of 0.92 for [rk1, rCBV]). Considering the combined information from [SUVmax, rCBV], the sensitivity for detecting high-grade tumors was 95% with a specificity of 60%. The negative predictive value was 52% for a positive predictive value of 95%. Similarly, considering the combined information from [rk1, rCBV], we also obtain a specificity of 60% associated with a 95% sensitivity for detecting high-grade tumors, with a negative predictive value of 60% and positive predictive value of 95%. Our work shows that joint analysis of information from microvascular and metabolic is possible by combining PET and MR imaging data. However, we found that, in our patient population, the microvascular information obtained through MR did not achieve better discrimination than the metabolic information derived from PET only. (author)

  19. Longitudinal MRI study of cortical thickness, perfusion, and metabolite levels in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järnum, Hanna; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Steffensen, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) display morphologic, functional, and metabolic brain abnormalities in limbic-cortical regions at a baseline magnetic resonance (MR) scan and whether these changes are normalized in MDD patients in remission at a follow......-acetylaspartate, myo-inositol, and glutamate levels in MDD patients compared with healthy controls at baseline. CONCLUSION: Using novel MRI techniques, we have found abnormalities in cerebral regions related to cortical-limbic pathways in MDD patients....

  20. Perfusion MRI abnormalities in the absence of diffusion changes in a case of moyamoya-like syndrome in neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koussy, Marwan; Kiefer, Claus; Schroth, Gerhard; Loevblad, Karl-Olof; Steinlin, Maja

    2002-01-01

    We report on a 12-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis type 1 who suffered a transient ischemic attack. Angiography revealed occlusion of intracranial arteries, moyamoya vessels and leptomeningeal collaterals. The conventional T2-weighted and the diffusion-weighted MRI images demonstrated no pathology. Dynamic first-pass postgadolinium T2* perfusion-weighted MRI depicted altered hemodynamics in the vascular territory of the left middle cerebral artery, which defined this region as ischemic tissue at risk. The patient suffered a repeat transient ischemic attack5 days later. (orig.)

  1. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria, contrast enhancement and perfusion MRI for assessing progression in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tensaouti, Fatima [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); Khalifa, Jonathan [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Lusque, Amelie [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Biostatistics, Toulouse (France); Plas, Benjamin [CHU Toulouse, Department of Neurosurgery, Toulouse (France); Lotterie, Jean Albert; Berry, Isabelle [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); CHU Toulouse, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Laprie, Anne [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Toulouse Center for Cancer Research (U1037), Inserm, Toulouse (France); Lubrano, Vincent [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); CHU Toulouse, Department of Neurosurgery, Toulouse (France)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), with respect to the Macdonald criteria and changes in contrast-enhancement (CE) volume. Related variations in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated. Forty-three patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 were included. All underwent surgical resection, followed by temozolomide-based chemoradiation. MR images were retrospectively reviewed. Times to progression (TTPs) according to RANO criteria, Macdonald criteria and increased CE volume (CE-3D) were compared, and the percentage change in the 75th percentile of rCBV (rCBV75) was evaluated. After a median follow-up of 22.7 months, a total of 39 patients had progressed according to RANO criteria, 32 according to CE-3D, and 42 according to Macdonald. Median TTPs were 6.4, 9.3, and 6.6 months, respectively. Overall agreement was 79.07% between RANO and CE-3D and 93.02% between RANO and Macdonald. The mean percentage change in rCBV75 at RANO progression onset was over 73% in 87.5% of patients. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CE-3D criterion is not yet suitable to assess progression in routine clinical practice. Indeed, the accurate threshold is still not well defined. To date, in our opinion, early detection of disease progression by RANO combined with advanced MRI imaging techniques like MRI perfusion and diffusion remains the best way to assess disease progression. Further investigations that would examine the impact of treatment modifications after progression determined by different criteria on overall survival would be of great value. (orig.)

  2. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria, contrast enhancement and perfusion MRI for assessing progression in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tensaouti, Fatima; Khalifa, Jonathan; Lusque, Amelie; Plas, Benjamin; Lotterie, Jean Albert; Berry, Isabelle; Laprie, Anne; Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth; Lubrano, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), with respect to the Macdonald criteria and changes in contrast-enhancement (CE) volume. Related variations in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated. Forty-three patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 were included. All underwent surgical resection, followed by temozolomide-based chemoradiation. MR images were retrospectively reviewed. Times to progression (TTPs) according to RANO criteria, Macdonald criteria and increased CE volume (CE-3D) were compared, and the percentage change in the 75th percentile of rCBV (rCBV75) was evaluated. After a median follow-up of 22.7 months, a total of 39 patients had progressed according to RANO criteria, 32 according to CE-3D, and 42 according to Macdonald. Median TTPs were 6.4, 9.3, and 6.6 months, respectively. Overall agreement was 79.07% between RANO and CE-3D and 93.02% between RANO and Macdonald. The mean percentage change in rCBV75 at RANO progression onset was over 73% in 87.5% of patients. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CE-3D criterion is not yet suitable to assess progression in routine clinical practice. Indeed, the accurate threshold is still not well defined. To date, in our opinion, early detection of disease progression by RANO combined with advanced MRI imaging techniques like MRI perfusion and diffusion remains the best way to assess disease progression. Further investigations that would examine the impact of treatment modifications after progression determined by different criteria on overall survival would be of great value. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2010-01-01

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  4. Morphological and functional MRI, MRS, perfusion and diffusion changes after radiosurgery of brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Sung Tae; Byun, Hong Sik; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keonha; Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Jung II

    2009-01-01

    Radiosurgery is a noninvasive procedure where spatially accurate and highly conformal doses of radiation are targeted at brain lesions with an ablative intent. Recently, radiosurgery has been established as an effective technique for local treatment of brain metastasis. After radiosurgery, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of the therapeutic response and of any complications. The therapeutic approach depends on the imaging findings obtained after radiosurgery, which have a role in the decision making to perform additional invasive modalities (repeat resection, biopsy) to obtain a definite diagnosis and to improve the survival of patients. Conventional MR imaging findings are mainly based on morphological alterations of tumors. However, there are variable imaging findings of radiation-induced changes including radiation necrosis in the brain. Radiologists are sometimes confused by radiation-induced injuries, including radiation necrosis, that are seen on conventional MR imaging. The pattern of abnormal enhancement on follow-up conventional MR imaging closely mimics that of a recurrent brain metastasis. So, classifying newly developed abnormal enhancing lesions in follow-up of treated brain metastasis with correct diagnosis is one of the key goals in neuro-oncologic imaging. To overcome limitations of the use of morphology-based conventional MR imaging, several physiological-based functional MR imaging methods have been used, namely diffusion-weighted imaging, perfusion MR imaging, and proton MR spectroscopy, for the detection of hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. These imaging modalities provide additional information to allow clinicians to make proper decisions regarding patient treatment.

  5. Functional MRI procedures in the diagnosis of brain tumors. Perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, M.; Heiland, S.; Sartor, K.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the increased diagnostic accuracy of contrast material enhanced MR imaging, specification and grading of brain tumors are still only approximate at best: neither morphology, nor relaxation times or contrast material enhancement reliably predict tumor histology or tumor grade. As histology and tumor grade strongly influence which therapy concept is chosen, a more precise diagnosis is mandatory. With diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI, PWI) it is now possible to obtain important information regarding the cellular matrix and the relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) of brain tumors, which cannot be obtained with standard MR techniques. These dynamic-functional imaging techniques are very useful in the preoperative diagnosis of gliomas, lymphomas, and metastases, as well as in the differentiation of these neoplastic lesions from abscesses, atypical ischemic infarctions, and tumor-like manifestations of demyelinating disease. Additionally, they appear suitable for determining glioma grade and regions of active tumor growth which should be the target of stereotactic biopsy and therapy. After therapy these techniques are helpful to better assess the tumor response to therapy, possible therapy failure and therapy complications such as radiation necrosis. (orig.) [de

  6. DCE-MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma: perfusion quantification with Tofts model versus shutter-speed model--initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajamovich, Guido H; Huang, Wei; Besa, Cecilia; Li, Xin; Afzal, Aneela; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Taouli, Bachir

    2016-02-01

    To quantify hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) perfusion and flow with the fast exchange regime-allowed Shutter-Speed model (SSM) compared to the Tofts model (TM). In this prospective study, 25 patients with HCC underwent DCE-MRI. ROIs were placed in liver parenchyma, portal vein, aorta and HCC lesions. Signal intensities were analyzed employing dual-input TM and SSM models. ART (arterial fraction), K (trans) (contrast agent transfer rate constant from plasma to extravascular extracellular space), ve (extravascular extracellular volume fraction), kep (contrast agent intravasation rate constant), and τi (mean intracellular water molecule lifetime) were compared between liver parenchyma and HCC, and ART, K (trans), v e and k ep were compared between models using Wilcoxon tests and limits of agreement. Test-retest reproducibility was assessed in 10 patients. ART and v e obtained with TM; ART, ve, ke and τi obtained with SSM were significantly different between liver parenchyma and HCC (p < 0.04). Parameters showed variable reproducibility (CV range 14.7-66.5% for both models). Liver K (trans) and ve; HCC ve and kep were significantly different when estimated with the two models (p < 0.03). Our results show differences when computed between the TM and the SSM. However, these differences are smaller than parameter reproducibilities and may be of limited clinical significance.

  7. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in moyamoya disease compared with clinical assessments and other MR imaging finings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tnogucci@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Kawashima, Masatou [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Nishihara, Masashi; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Matsushima, Toshio [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Irie, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to identify the causal factors for the perfusion distribution obtained with ASL-MRI by comparing ASL-MRI with clinical information and other MRI findings in moyamoya disease. Methods: Seventy-one patients with moyamoya disease underwent ASL-MRI and other MRI, including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging (FLAIR) and three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) on 3.0-Tesla MRI system. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values (ASL values) for the cerebral hemispheres (142 sides) were measured on CBF maps generated by ASL-MRI. Relationships between the ASL values and the following 9 factors were assessed: sex, family history, revascularization surgery, age at MR exam, age at onset, the steno-occlusive severity on MRA (MRA score), degree of basal collaterals, degree of leptomeningeal high signal intensity seen on FLAIR, and size of ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident lesion (CVA score). Results: Patients with a family history had significantly higher ASL values than those without such a history. There were significant negative correlations between ASL values and age at MR exam, MRA score, and CVA score. Conclusions: ASL-MRI may have cause-and-effect or mutual associations with family history, current patient age, size of CVA lesion, and intracranial arterial steno-occlusive severity in Moyamoya disease.

  8. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in moyamoya disease compared with clinical assessments and other MR imaging finings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Kawashima, Masatou; Nishihara, Masashi; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Matsushima, Toshio; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to identify the causal factors for the perfusion distribution obtained with ASL-MRI by comparing ASL-MRI with clinical information and other MRI findings in moyamoya disease. Methods: Seventy-one patients with moyamoya disease underwent ASL-MRI and other MRI, including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging (FLAIR) and three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) on 3.0-Tesla MRI system. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values (ASL values) for the cerebral hemispheres (142 sides) were measured on CBF maps generated by ASL-MRI. Relationships between the ASL values and the following 9 factors were assessed: sex, family history, revascularization surgery, age at MR exam, age at onset, the steno-occlusive severity on MRA (MRA score), degree of basal collaterals, degree of leptomeningeal high signal intensity seen on FLAIR, and size of ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident lesion (CVA score). Results: Patients with a family history had significantly higher ASL values than those without such a history. There were significant negative correlations between ASL values and age at MR exam, MRA score, and CVA score. Conclusions: ASL-MRI may have cause-and-effect or mutual associations with family history, current patient age, size of CVA lesion, and intracranial arterial steno-occlusive severity in Moyamoya disease

  9. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b = Wn/(2We), preserves...... of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14N-relaxation: T1 n = 1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted...

  10. Insight into the labeling mechanism of acceleration selective arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Sophie; Petersen, Esben T; Van Osch, Matthias J P

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acceleration selective arterial spin labeling (AccASL) is a spatially non-selective labeling technique, used in traditional ASL methods, which labels spins based on their flow acceleration rather than spatial localization. The exact origin of the AccASL signal within the vasculature......-ASL, combined AccASL and VS-ASL signal, and signal from one module with crushing from the other. RESULTS: The label created with AccASL has an overlap of approximately 50% in the vascular region with VS-ASL, but also originates from smaller vessels closer to the capillaries. CONCLUSION: AccASL is able to label...

  11. In vivo and ex vivo EPR detection of spin-labelled ovalbumin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramović, Zrinka; Brgles, Marija; Habjanec, Lidija; Tomasić, Jelka; Sentjurc, Marjeta; Frkanec, Ruza

    2010-10-01

    In this study, spin-labelled ovalbumin (SL-OVA), free or entrapped in liposomes, was administered to mice subcutaneously (s.c.) or intravenously (i.v.) with the aim to determine the conditions for pharmacokinetic studies of spin-labelled proteins by EPR and to measure the time course of SL-OVA distribution in vivo in live mice and ex vivo in isolated organs. Upon s.c. administration, the decay of the EPR signal was followed for 60min at the site of application using an L-band EPR spectrometer. Within this time period, the signal of free SL-OVA was diminished by about 70%. It was estimated with the help of the oxidizing agent K(3)[(FeCN)(6)] that approximately 30% was a consequence of the spin label reduction to EPR non-visible hydroxylamine and about 40% was due to the SL-OVA elimination from the site of measurement. For liposome encapsulated SL-OVA, the intensity diminished only by approx. 40% in the same period, indicating that liposomes successfully protect the protein from reduction. EPR signal could not be detected directly over live mouse organs within 60min after s.c. application of SL-OVA. With the available L-band EPR spectrometer, the measurements at the site of s.c. application are possible if the amount of SL-OVA applied to a mouse is more than 3mg. For the pharmacokinetic studies of the protein distribution in organs after s.c. or i.v. injection the concentration of the spin-labelled protein should be more than 0.5mmol/kg. After i.v. administration, only ex vivo measurements were possible using an X-band EPR spectrometer, since the total amount of SL-OVA was not sufficient for in vivo detection and also because of rapid reduction of nitroxide. After 2min, the protein was preferentially distributed to liver and, to a smaller extent, to spleen.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein–protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces

  13. Interactions of the spin-labeled chloroethylnitrosourea SLCNUgly with electrode-supported lipid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacheva, Bilyana; Georgieva, Radostina; Karabaliev, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The spin-labeled chloroethylnitrosourea containig glycine SLCNUgly is an analogue of the clinically used nitrosourea drug lomustine (1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea, CCNU), showing promising properties and features in vitro as well as in vivo. In this work the interaction of SLCNUgly with a lipid model membrane is investigated. The presented results indicate penetration of the drug in the membranes without causing defects of the lipid structure and reveal the potential of both SLCNUgly and electrode-supported lipid films as models for investigating nitrosourea drugs-membrane interactions.

  14. Comparison of semi-quantitative and quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluations of vertebral marrow perfusion in a rat osteoporosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingqi; Xiong, Zuogang; Zhang, Jiulong; Qiu, Yuyou; Hua, Ting; Tang, Guangyu

    2017-11-14

    This study aims to investigate the technical feasibility of semi-quantitative and quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the assessment of longitudinal changes of marrow perfusion in a rat osteoporosis model, using bone mineral density (BMD) measured by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histopathology as the gold standards. Fifty rats were randomly assigned to the control group (n=25) and ovariectomy (OVX) group whose bilateral ovaries were excised (n=25). Semi-quantitative and quantitative DCE-MRI, micro-CT, and histopathological examinations were performed on lumbar vertebrae at baseline and 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks after operation. The differences between the two groups in terms of semi-quantitative DCE-MRI parameter (maximum enhancement, E max ), quantitative DCE-MRI parameters (volume transfer constant, K trans ; interstitial volume, V e ; and efflux rate constant, K ep ), micro-CT parameter (BMD), and histopathological parameter (microvessel density, MVD) were compared at each of the time points using an independent-sample t test. The differences in these parameters between baseline and other time points in each group were assessed via Bonferroni's multiple comparison test. A Pearson correlation analysis was applied to assess the relationships between DCE-MRI, micro-CT, and histopathological parameters. In the OVX group, the E max values decreased significantly compared with those of the control group at weeks 6 and 9 (p=0.003 and 0.004, respectively). The K trans values decreased significantly compared with those of the control group from week 3 (pquantitative DCE-MRI, the quantitative DCE-MRI parameter K trans is a more sensitive and accurate index for detecting early reduced perfusion in osteoporotic bone.

  15. Autonomic Function Impairment and Brain Perfusion Deficit in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Che Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAutonomic disorders have been recognized as important Parkinson’s disease (PD components. Some vulnerable structures are related to the central autonomic network and have also been linked to autonomic function alterations. The aims of the study are to evaluate the severity of the autonomic dysfunction and the cortical hypoperfusion using arterial spin labeling (ASL MRI. And then, possible relationships of significant between-group differences in perfusion pattern to clinical variables and autonomic functions were examined to determine the pharmaceutical effects of dopaminergic treatment on cerebral blood flow (CBF in patients with PD.MethodsBrain ASL MRI was carried out in 20 patients with PD (6 men and 14 women, mean age: 63.3 ± 6.4 years and 22 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers to assess whole-brain CBF and the effects of dopaminergic therapy on perfusion. All subjects underwent a standardized evaluation of cardiovagal and adrenergic function including a deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, and 5-min head-up tilt test. Perfusion MRI data were acquired on a 3.0 T scanner with a pulsed continuous ASL technique. The CBF, autonomic parameters, and clinical data were analyzed after adjusting for age and sex.ResultsPatients exhibited a decline in autonomic function (rapid heart rate in response to deep breathing, low baroreflex sensitivity, high systolic and diastolic pressure, and altered tilting test response, widespread low CBF, and robust response to dopaminergic therapy. Lower perfusion in the middle frontal gyrus was associated with increased clinical disease severity (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale I score, P < 0.001. Lower perfusion in autonomic control areas, such as the frontal lobe and insula, were significantly associated with autonomic impairment (P < 0.001.ConclusionsOur study indicates that PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that changes the perfusion of central nervous system

  16. Measurement of Murine Single-Kidney Glomerular Filtration Rate Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Tang, Hui; Mishra, Prasanna K; Macura, Slobodan I; Lerman, Lilach O

    2018-06-01

    To develop and validate a method for measuring murine single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). This prospective study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. A fast longitudinal relaxation time (T 1 ) measurement method was implemented to capture gadolinium dynamics (1 s/scan), and a modified two-compartment model was developed to quantify GFR as well as renal perfusion using 16.4T MRI in mice 2 weeks after unilateral renal artery stenosis (RAS, n = 6) or sham (n = 8) surgeries. This approach was validated by comparing model-derived GFR and perfusion to those obtained by fluorescein isothiocyanante (FITC)-inulin clearance and arterial spin labeling (ASL), respectively, using the Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlations and Bland-Altman analysis. The compartmental model provided a good fitting to measured gadolinium dynamics in both normal and RAS kidneys. The proposed DCE-MRI method offered assessment of single-kidney GFR and perfusion, comparable to the FITC-inulin clearance (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.95 and Spearman's correlation coefficient ρ = 0.94, P < 0.0001, and mean difference -7.0 ± 11.0 μL/min) and ASL (r = 0.92 and ρ = 0.84, P < 0.0001, and mean difference 4.4 ± 66.1 mL/100 g/min) methods. The proposed DCE-MRI method may be useful for reliable noninvasive measurements of single-kidney GFR and perfusion in mice. Magn Reson Med 79:2935-2943, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Toward the fourth dimension of membrane protein structure: insight into dynamics from spin-labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaourab, Hassane S; Steed, P Ryan; Kazmier, Kelli

    2011-11-09

    Trapping membrane proteins in the confines of a crystal lattice obscures dynamic modes essential for interconversion between multiple conformations in the functional cycle. Moreover, lattice forces could conspire with detergent solubilization to stabilize a minor conformer in an ensemble thus confounding mechanistic interpretation. Spin labeling in conjunction with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy offers an exquisite window into membrane protein dynamics in the native-like environment of a lipid bilayer. Systematic application of spin labeling and EPR identifies sequence-specific secondary structures, defines their topology and their packing in the tertiary fold. Long range distance measurements (60 Å-80 Å) between pairs of spin labels enable quantitative analysis of equilibrium dynamics and triggered conformational changes. This review highlights the contribution of spin labeling to bridging structure and mechanism. Efforts to develop methods for determining structures from EPR restraints and to increase sensitivity and throughput promise to expand spin labeling applications in membrane protein structural biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Task Related Cerebral Blood Flow Changes of Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: An Arterial Spin Labeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland; Boissoneault, Jeff; Craggs, Jason G; Lai, Song; Robinson, Michael E

    2018-01-01

    One hallmark of chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is task related worsening of fatigue. Global brain hypoperfusion, abnormal regional activation, and altered functional connectivity of brain areas associated with cognition and memory have been reported but remain controversial. We enrolled 17 female participants fulfilling the CDC Criteria for ME/CFS and 16 matched healthy controls (HC). Using a 3T-Phillips Achieva MRI-scanner, pseudo-continuous arterial spin-labeling (pCASL), was used to study the dynamics of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and their relationship to mental fatigue in ME/CFS patients and HC during a demanding cognitive task, i.e. modified Paced-Auditory-Serial-Addition-Testing (PASAT). ME/CFS subjects reported more fatigue than HC at baseline (p fatigue in ME/CFS participants and HC. Although not different between groups, overall CBF significantly increased over the first 3 min of the PASAT and then decreased thereafter. Regional CBF (rCBF) changes were significantly different between groups during the post-task recovery period. Whereas improvement of fatigue of ME/CFS subjects was associated with decreased rCBF in both superior temporal gyri (STG), precuneus, and fusiform gyrus, it was associated with increased rCBF in the same areas in HC. Our results suggest that ME/CFS is associated with normal global CBF at rest and during a strenuous task (PASAT); however rCBF of several brain regions associated with memory, goal-oriented attention, and visual function was differentially associated with recovery from fatigue in ME/CFS patients and HC.

  19. On the search for new anticancer drugs 14: the plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of spin-labeled thio-TEPA (SL-O-TT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, P L; Cohen, B E; Sosnovsky, G; Davis, T A; Egorin, M J

    1985-01-01

    We defined the plasma and tissue concentrations and pharmacokinetics of SL-O-TT, a spin-labeled analog of thio-TEPA, in 35-44-g male Swiss Webster mice that had received spin-labeled thio-TEPA at a dosage of 10 mg/kg. Concentrations of spin-labeled thio-TEPA in ethyl acetate extracts of tissue and plasma were determined by gas-liquid chromatography and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Plasma concentrations of spin-labeled thio-TEPA declined in a biexponential fashion that was well described by the equation: Ct = 21.5e-0.276t + 2.30e-0.026t indicating a half-life alpha of 2.5 min and a half-life beta of 26.6 min. After 2 h there was still spin-labeled thio-TE-PA in plasma, but not in tissues. In tissues, no spin-labeled thio-TEPA was detected with gas-liquid chromatography 15 min after injection, but with electron-spin resonance label was found in lung and skeletal muscle. The main metabolite of spin-labeled thio-TEPA is spin-labeled TEPA, where oxidative desulfurization is invoked as the main metabolic mechanism. Reduction of the spin label to the hydroxylamine was also observed with time.

  20. Ion Channel Conformation and Oligomerization Assessment by Site-Directed Spin Labeling and Pulsed-EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliotas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are multimeric integral membrane proteins that respond to increased lipid bilayer tension by opening their nonselective pores to release solutes and relieve increased cytoplasmic pressure. These systems undergo major conformational changes during gating and the elucidation of their mechanism requires a deep understanding of the interplay between lipids and proteins. Lipids are responsible for transmitting lateral tension to MS channels and therefore play a key role in obtaining a molecular-detail model for mechanosensation. Site-directed spin labeling combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful spectroscopic tool in the study of proteins. The main bottleneck for its use relates to challenges associated with successful isolation of the protein of interest, introduction of paramagnetic labels on desired sites, and access to specialized instrumentation and expertise. The design of sophisticated experiments, which combine a variety of existing EPR methodologies to address a diversity of specific questions, require knowledge of the limitations and strengths, characteristic of each particular EPR method. This chapter is using the MS ion channels as paradigms and focuses on the application of different EPR techniques to ion channels, in order to investigate oligomerization, conformation, and the effect of lipids on their regulation. The methodology we followed, from the initial strategic selection of mutants and sample preparation, including protein purification, spin labeling, reconstitution into lipid mimics to the complete set-up of the pulsed-EPR experiments, is described in detail. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterizing Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Binding to Human Serum Albumin by Spin-Labeling and EPR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauenschild, Till; Reichenwallner, Jörg; Enkelmann, Volker; Hinderberger, Dariush

    2016-08-26

    Drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) has been characterized by a spin-labeling and continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectroscopic approach. Specifically, the contribution of functional groups (FGs) in a compound on its albumin-binding capabilities is quantitatively described. Molecules from different drug classes are labeled with EPR-active nitroxide radicals (spin-labeled pharmaceuticals (SLPs)) and in a screening approach CW-EPR spectroscopy is used to investigate HSA binding under physiological conditions and at varying ratios of SLP to protein. Spectral simulations of the CW-EPR spectra allow extraction of association constants (KA ) and the maximum number (n) of binding sites per protein. By comparison of data from 23 SLPs, the mechanisms of drug-protein association and the impact of chemical modifications at individual positions on drug uptake can be rationalized. Furthermore, new drug modifications with predictable protein binding tendency may be envisaged. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. In the search for new anticancer drugs XII. Synthesis and biological evaluation of spin labeled nitrosoureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovsky, G; Li, S W

    1985-04-15

    The spin labeled nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(1-oxyl-2,2,6,6- tetramethyl-piperidinyl)-1-nitrosourea (SLCNU, 4) and its analogues 5-7 were synthesized either by a regio-selective method or by a conventional route via the nitrosation of the spin labeled intermediates (11a-e). Nitrosation of the ureas 11a-e with dinitrogen tetraoxide resulted in better yields than those obtained with sodium nitrite. The nitrosoureas 4-8 were tested for their anticancer activity against the lymphocytic leukemia P388 in mice. Thus, either at the equal molar dose or at the dose of equal toxicity level, the SLCNU (4) was found to be more active than the clinically used CCNU (1). Unlike CCNU (1) whose LD50 is 56 mg/kg, the SLCNU (4) possesses a low toxicity (LD50 123 mg/kg). Therefore, SLCNU (4) is a promising new entry into the nitrosourea class of anticancer drugs.

  3. Temperature-induced variation in the intrinsic hyperfine separation of a tightly bound nitroxide spin label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    Recently there has been increasing interest in studying the rotational motion of biological molecules by monitoring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of spin labels which are tightly bound to the molecule of interest. Theoretical studies have shown that in the slow motion region the correlation time may be determined by comparing the apparent hyperfine separation (HFS) in the presence of rotational motion with the rigid limit HFS in the absence of rotational motion. The majority of work to date has assumed the tightly bound nitroxide label to act simply as a reporter group for molecular motion, exhibiting little or no intrinsic environmental or temperature sensitivity. However, we have demonstrated that the rigid limit EPR spectra exhibit a substantial intrinsic temperature dependence, with the rigid limit HFS of MAL-6-labelled carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) decreasing by nearly 10G over the temperature range -196/sup 0/C to +45/sup 0/C. The steepest temperature dependence was also found to occur over the 0 to 40/sup 0/C temperature range where most biological measurements are made. This strong temperature dependence in the intrinsic HFS was shown to produce substantial errors in correlation time calculations if it was not explicitly recognized and appropriate corrections made. This detailed behavior of this intrinsic temperature dependence suggests that it is most probably produced by equilibrium hydrogen bonding between the nitroxide NO/sup ./ group and an unidentified proton donor within the spin label binding site. (RJC)

  4. WE-AB-202-12: Voxel-Wise Analysis of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Perfusion Maps in Multi-Parametric MRI of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstroem, K; Casares-Magaz, O; Muren, L; Roervik, J; Andersen, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-parametric MRI (mp-MRI) is being introduced in radiotherapy (RT) of prostate cancer, including for tumour delineation in focal boosting strategies. We recently developed an image-based tumour control probability model, based on cell density distributions derived from apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Beyond tumour volume and cell densities, tumour hypoxia is also an important determinant of RT response. Since tissue perfusion from mp-MRI has been related to hypoxia we have explored the patterns of ADC and perfusion maps, and the relations between them, inside and outside prostate index lesions. Methods: ADC and perfusion maps from 20 prostate cancer patients were used, with the prostate and index lesion delineated by a dedicated uro-radiologist. To reduce noise, the maps were averaged over a 3×3×3 voxel cube. Associations between different ADC and perfusion histogram parameters within the prostate, inside and outside the index lesion, were evaluated with the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. In the voxel-wise analysis, scatter plots of ADC vs perfusion were analysed for voxels in the prostate, inside and outside of the index lesion, again with the associations quantified with the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Overall ADC was lower inside the index lesion than in the normal prostate as opposed to ktrans that was higher inside the index lesion than outside. In the histogram analysis, the minimum ktrans was significantly correlated with the maximum ADC (Pearson=0.47; p=0.03). At the voxel level, 15 of the 20 cases had a statistically significant inverse correlation between ADC and perfusion inside the index lesion; ten of the cases had a Pearson < −0.4. Conclusion: The minimum value of ktrans across the tumour was correlated to the maximum ADC. However, on the voxel level, the ‘local’ ktrans in the index lesion is inversely (i.e. negatively) correlated to the ‘local’ ADC in most patients. Research agreement with

  5. Assessment of myocardial perfusion with MRI using a modified dual bolus method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husso, M; Sipola, P; Manninen, H; Vainio, P; Kuittinen, T; Hartikainen, J; Saarakkala, S; Töyräs, J; Kuikka, J

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of regional myocardial blood flow (rMBF) with first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (FP-MRI) requires two contrast agent injections (dual bolus technique), inducing error in the determined rMBF if the injections differ. We hypothesize that using input and residue curves of the same injection would be more reliable. We aim to introduce and evaluate a novel method to correct the high concentration arterial input function (AIF) for determination of rMBF. Sixteen patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were examined before and after chemotherapy. The input function was solved by correcting initial high concentration AIF using the ratio of low and high contrast AIF areas, normalized by corresponding heart rates (modified dual bolus method). For comparison, the scaled low contrast AIF was used as an input function (dual bolus method). Unidirectional transfer coefficient K trans  was calculated using both methods. K trans -values determined with the dual bolus (0.81 ± 0.32 ml g −1  min −1 ) and modified dual bolus (0.77 ± 0.42 ml g −1  min −1 ) methods were in agreement (p = 0.21). Mean K trans -values increased from 0.76 ± 0.43 to 0.89 ± 0.55 ml g −1  min −1  after chemotherapy (p = 0.17). The modified dual bolus technique agrees with the dual bolus technique (R2 = 0.899) when the low and high contrast injections are similar. However, when this is not the case, the modified dual bolus technique may be more reliable. (paper)

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectral components of spin-labeled lipids in saturated phospholipid bilayers: effect of cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverton Silva Camargos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy was used to study the main structural accommodations of spin labels in bilayers of saturated phosphatidylcholines with acyl chain lengths ranging from 16 to 22 carbon atoms. EPR spectra allowed the identification of two distinct spectral components in thermodynamic equilibrium at temperatures below and above the main phase transition. An accurate analysis of EPR spectra, using two fitting programs, enabled determination of the thermodynamic profile for these major probe accommodations. Focusing the analysis on two-component EPR spectra of a spin-labeled lipid, the influence of 40 mol % cholesterol in DPPC was studied.

  7. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ghisleni

    Full Text Available Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women. Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women.

  8. Arterial spin labeling in patients with chic cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease - Correlation with 15O-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamano, Hironori; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Abe, Koichiro; Yamashita, Koji; Honda, Hiroshi; Togao, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Heterogeneity of arterial transit time due to cerebral artery steno-occlusive lesions hampers accurate regional cerebral blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling (ASL). Purpose: To assess the feasibility of regional cerebral blood flow measurement by ASL with multiple-delay time sampling in patients with steno-occlusive diseases by comparing with positron emission tomography (PET), and to determine whether regional arterial transit time measured by this ASL technique is correlated with regional mean transit time, a PET index of perfusion pressure. Material and Methods: Sixteen patients with steno-occlusive diseases received both ASL and 15 O-PET. The mean regional cerebral blood flow measured by ASL and PET, regional arterial transit time by ASL, and regional mean transit time by PET were obtained by a region-of-interest analysis. Correlation between regional cerebral blood flow by ASL and that by PET, and correlation between regional arterial transit time by ASL and regional mean transit time by PET were tested using Pearson's correlation coefficient for both absolute and relative values. A multivariate regression analysis was performed to test whether regional arterial transit time by ASL was a significant contributor in modeling regional mean transit time by PET after controlling the effect of regional cerebral blood flow by ASL. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between regional cerebral blood flow by ASL and that by PET for both absolute (r = 0.520, P < 0.0001) and relative (r = 0.691, P < 0.0001) values. A significant positive correlation was found between regional arterial transit time by ASL and regional mean transit time by PET both for absolute (r = 0.369, P = 0.0002) and relative (r = 0.443, P < 0.0001) values. The regression analysis revealed that regional arterial transit time by ASL was a significant contributor in modeling regional mean transit time by PET after controlling regional cerebral blood flow by ASL

  9. Regional association of pCASL-MRI with FDG-PET and PiB-PET in people at risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD is a small subset of Alzheimer's disease that is genetically determined with 100% penetrance. It provides a valuable window into studying the course of pathologic processes that leads to dementia. Arterial spin labeling (ASL MRI is a potential AD imaging marker that non-invasively measures cerebral perfusion. In this study, we investigated the relationship of cerebral blood flow measured by pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL MRI with measures of cerebral metabolism (FDG PET and amyloid deposition (Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET. Thirty-one participants at risk for ADAD (age 39±13 years, 19 females were recruited into this study, and 21 of them received both MRI and FDG and PiB PET scans. Considerable variability was observed in regional correlations between ASL-CBF and FDG across subjects. Both regional hypo-perfusion and hypo-metabolism were associated with amyloid deposition. Cross-sectional analyses of each biomarker as a function of the estimated years to expected dementia diagnosis indicated an inverse relationship of both perfusion and glucose metabolism with amyloid deposition during AD development. These findings indicate that neurovascular dysfunction is associated with amyloid pathology, and also indicate that ASL CBF may serve as a sensitive early biomarker for AD. The direct comparison among the three biomarkers provides complementary information for understanding the pathophysiological process of AD.

  10. Early perfusion changes within 1 week of systemic treatment measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may predict survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bang-Bin; Yu, Chih-Wei; Liang, Po-Chin [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Hsu, Chao-Yu [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Department of Radiology, New Taipei City (China); Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Oncology, Taipei City (China); Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Taipei City Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei City (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China)

    2017-07-15

    To correlate early changes in the parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) within 1 week of systemic therapy with overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Eighty-nine patients with advanced HCC underwent DCE-MRI before and within 1 week following systemic therapy. The relative changes of six DCE-MRI parameters (Peak, Slope, AUC, Ktrans, Kep and Ve) of the tumours were correlated with OS using the Kaplan-Meier model and the double-sided log-rank test. All patients died and the median survival was 174 days. Among the six DCE-MRI parameters, reductions in Peak, AUC, and Ktrans, were significantly correlated with one another. In addition, patients with a high Peak reduction following treatment had longer OS (P = 0.023) compared with those with a low Peak reduction. In multivariate analysis, a high Peak reduction was an independent favourable prognostic factor in all patients [hazard ratio (HR), 0.622; P = 0.038] after controlling for age, sex, treatment methods, tumour size and stage, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status. Early perfusion changes within 1 week following systemic therapy measured by DCE-MRI may aid in the prediction of the clinical outcome in patients with advanced HCC. (orig.)

  11. Spin Label Studies of the Hemoglobin-Membrane Interaction During Sickle Hemoglobin Polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcon Dieguez, Jose E.; Rodi, Pablo; Lores Guevara, Manuel A.; Gennaro, Ana Maria

    2009-12-01

    An enhanced hemoglobin-membrane association has been previously documented in Sickle Cell Anemia. However, it is not known how this interaction is modified during the hemoglobin S polymerization process. In this work, we use a model of reconstituted erythrocytes from ghost membranes whose cytoskeleton proteins had been previously labeled with the 4-maleimido Tempo spin label, and that were subsequently resealed with hemoglobin S or A solutions. Using EPR spectroscopy, we studied the time dependence of the spectral W/S parameter, indicative of the conformational state of cytoskeleton proteins (mainly spectrin) under spontaneous deoxygenation, with the aim of detecting the eventual effects due to hemoglobin S polymerization. The differences observed in the temporal behaviour of W/S in erythrocytes reconstituted with both hemoglobins were considered as experimental evidence of an increment in hemoglobin S-membrane interaction, as a result of the polymerization process of hemoglobin S under spontaneous deoxygenation. (author)

  12. Effect of some radiosensitising drugs on human erythrocyte membrane - - spin label study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, K P [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biology and Agriculture Div.

    1982-02-01

    Electron spin resonance and spin label techniques have been employed to study the effects of local anaesthetic drugs, procaine and tetracaine, on human erythrocyte membrane. Both the drugs altered the protein and lipid arrangements in the membrane and these changes were reversible. Procaine had greater effect on the labels attached to proteins while tetracaine fluidized interior of lipid bilayer to a greater extent. The differential effects of these drugs on the protein and lipid labels have been interpreted in terms of their relative penetrability in the membrane. Present results have explained that radiation induced enhanced killing of cells in the presence of these drugs might be due to the alterations in membrane, particularly proteins both structural and enzymatic. In addition, these results indicate a possible relationship between drug-induced structural changes in membrane and their anaesthetic potency.

  13. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurachevsky, Andrey; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains

  14. Time-resolved 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI: comparison of different k-space acquisition strategies at 1.5 and 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Ingrisch, Michael; Dietrich, Olaf; Herrmann, Karin; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F; Schönberg, Stefan O; Fink, Christian

    2009-09-01

    Time-resolved pulmonary perfusion MRI requires both high temporal and spatial resolution, which can be achieved by using several nonconventional k-space acquisition techniques. The aim of this study is to compare the image quality of time-resolved 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI with different k-space acquisition techniques in healthy volunteers at 1.5 and 3 T. Ten healthy volunteers underwent contrast-enhanced time-resolved 3D pulmonary MRI on 1.5 and 3 T using the following k-space acquisition techniques: (a) generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) with an internal acquisition of reference lines (IRS), (b) GRAPPA with a single "external" acquisition of reference lines (ERS) before the measurement, and (c) a combination of GRAPPA with an internal acquisition of reference lines and view sharing (VS). The spatial resolution was kept constant at both field strengths to exclusively evaluate the influences of the temporal resolution achieved with the different k-space sampling techniques on image quality. The temporal resolutions were 2.11 seconds IRS, 1.31 seconds ERS, and 1.07 VS at 1.5 T and 2.04 seconds IRS, 1.30 seconds ERS, and 1.19 seconds VS at 3 T.Image quality was rated by 2 independent radiologists with regard to signal intensity, perfusion homogeneity, artifacts (eg, wrap around, noise), and visualization of pulmonary vessels using a 3 point scale (1 = nondiagnostic, 2 = moderate, 3 = good). Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio in the lungs was assessed. At 1.5 T the lowest image quality (sum score: 154) was observed for the ERS technique and the highest quality for the VS technique (sum score: 201). In contrast, at 3 T images acquired with VS were hampered by strong artifacts and image quality was rated significantly inferior (sum score: 137) compared with IRS (sum score: 180) and ERS (sum score: 174). Comparing 1.5 and 3 T, in particular the overall rating of the IRS technique (sum score: 180) was very similar at both field

  15. Protein rotational dynamics investigated with a dual EPR/optical molecular probe. Spin-labeled eosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C E; Hustedt, E J; Beechem, J M; Beth, A H

    1993-01-01

    An acyl spin-label derivative of 5-aminoeosin (5-SLE) was chemically synthesized and employed in studies of rotational dynamics of the free probe and of the probe when bound noncovalently to bovine serum albumin using the spectroscopic techniques of fluorescence anisotropy decay and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and their long-lifetime counterparts phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR. Previous work (Beth, A. H., Cobb, C. E., and J. M. Beechem, 1992. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy III. 504-512) has shown that the spin-label moiety only slightly altered the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 5-SLE when compared with 5-SLE whose nitroxide had been reduced with ascorbate and with the diamagnetic homolog 5-acetyleosin. In the present work, we have utilized time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and linear EPR spectroscopies to observe and quantitate the psec motions of 5-SLE in solution and the nsec motions of the 5-SLE-bovine serum albumin complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR studies have been carried out to observe and quantitate the microseconds motions of the 5-SLE-albumin complex in glycerol/buffer solutions of varying viscosity. These latter studies have enabled a rigorous comparison of rotational correlation times obtained from these complementary techniques to be made with a single probe. The studies described demonstrate that it is possible to employ a single molecular probe to carry out the full range of fluorescence, phosphorescence, EPR, and saturation transfer EPR studies. It is anticipated that "dual" molecular probes of this general type will significantly enhance capabilities for extracting dynamics and structural information from macromolecules and their functional

  16. Modulating effect of new potential antimelanomic agents, spin-labeled triazenes and nitrosoureas on the DOPA-oxidase activity of tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadjeva, V; Zheleva, A; Raikova, E

    1999-07-01

    The modulating effect of newly synthesized alkylating spin labeled triazene and spin labeled nitrosourea derivatives on the DOPA-oxidase activity of mushroom tyrosinase has been investigated by Bumett's spectrophotometric method (Burnett et al., 1967). All spin labeled triazenes have exhibited activating effect on DOPA-oxidase activity of tyrosinase, whereas clinically used triazene (DTIC), which does not contain nitroxide moiety, have showed inhibiting effect. At the same experimental conditions the spin labeled aminoacid nitrosoureas have showed dual effect - activating, in the beginning of the enzyme reaction and inhibiting later on. It is deduced that the activating effect of the spin labeled compounds is due to the nitroxide moiety and the inhibiting effect of all compounds depends on their half-life time. This study might contribute to make more clear the mechanism of action of the new compounds and on the other hand would come in quite useful as a preliminary prognosis for their antimelanomic activity.

  17. Update on the MRI Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Borowski, Bret J; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Fox, Nick C; Thompson, Paul M; Schuff, Norbert; Krueger, Gunnar; Killiany, Ronald J; DeCarli, Charles S; Dale, Anders M; Weiner, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Functions of the ADNI MRI core fall into three categories: (1) those of the central MRI core lab at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, needed to generate high quality MRI data in all subjects at each time point; (2) those of the funded ADNI MRI core imaging analysis groups responsible for analyzing the MRI data, and (3) the joint function of the entire MRI core in designing and problem solving MR image acquisition, pre-processing and analyses methods. The primary objective of ADNI was and continues to be improving methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer's disease. Our approach to the present (“ADNI-GO”) and future (“ADNI-2”, if funded) MRI protocol will be to maintain MRI methodological consistency in previously enrolled “ADNI-1” subjects who are followed longitudinally in ADNI-GO and ADNI-2. We will modernize and expand the MRI protocol for all newly enrolled ADNI-GO and ADNI-2 subjects. All newly enrolled subjects will be scanned at 3T with a core set of three sequence types: 3D T1-weighted volume, FLAIR, and a long TE gradient echo volumetric acquisition for micro hemorrhage detection. In addition to this core ADNI-GO and ADNI-2 protocol, we will perform vendor specific pilot sub-studies of arterial spin labeling perfusion, resting state functional connectivity and diffusion tensor imaging. One each of these sequences will be added to the core protocol on systems from each MRI vendor. These experimental sub-studies are designed to demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring useful data in a multi-center (but single vendor) setting for these three emerging MRI applications. PMID:20451869

  18. Effect of thiol reactive reagents and ionizing radiation on the permeability of erythrocyte membrane for non-electrolyte spin labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdzinski, K.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents some results on the effect of PCMB and NEM on the transport of non-electrolyte spin labels: TEMPO and TEMPOL across non-irradiated and irradiated porcine erythrocyte. Irradiated erythrocytes exhibited increased inhibitory effect of thiol reactive compounds in the TEMPO and TEMPOL transport compared to non-irradiated erythrocytes. (orig.)

  19. High-resolution MRI for the quantitative evaluation of subendocardial and subepicardial perfusion under pharmalogical stress and at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, C.O.; Savio, K. del; Brackertz, A.; Beer, M.; Hahn, D.; Koestler, H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: MR stress perfusion imaging of the heart allows the quantification of myocardial perfusion and the evaluation of myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) and the ratio of subendocardial to subepicardial perfusion at rest and under adenosine stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-resolution GRAPPA sequence for quantitative MR first pass perfusion imaging in healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: First pass stress and rest perfusion studies were performed on 10 healthy volunteers using a 1.5 T MR scanner with a multislice SR-TrueFISP first pass perfusion sequence with a GRAPPA algorithm (acceleration factor 3) in prebolus technique and an image resolution of 1.8 x 1.8 mm. For the comparison group, we examined 12 different healthy volunteers with a standard first pass perfusion SR-TrueFISP sequence using a resolution of 2.7 x 3.3 mm. Myocardial contours were manually delineated followed by an automatic division of the myocardium into two rings with an equal thickness for the subendo- and subepicardial layer. Eight sectors per slice were evaluated using contamination and baseline correction. Results: Using the GRAPPA sequence, the ratio of subendo- to subepimyocardial perfusion was 1.18 ± 0.32 for the examination at rest. Under pharmacologically induced stress, the ratio was 1.08 ± 0.27. For the standard sequence the ratio was 1.15 ± 0.28 at rest and 1.11 ± 0.33 under stress. For the high resolution sequence higher mean values for the subendo- to subepimyocardial ratio were obtained with comparable standard deviations. The difference between the sequences was not significant. Conclusion: The evaluation of subendomyocardial and subepimyocardial perfusion is feasible with a high-resolution first pass perfusion sequence. The use of a higher resolution to avoid systematic error leads to increased image noise. However, no relevant reduction in the quantitative perfusion values under stress and at rest was able to be depicted. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of Bifunctional Spin Labels for Investigating the Structural and Dynamic Properties of Membrane Proteins Using EPR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Indra D; Craig, Andrew F; Dunagum, Megan M; McCarrick, Robert M; Lorigan, Gary A

    2017-10-05

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a very powerful technique to study structural and dynamic properties of membrane proteins. The most widely used spin label is methanthiosulfonate (MTSL). However, the flexibility of this spin label introduces greater uncertainties in EPR measurements obtained for determining structures, side-chain dynamics, and backbone motion of membrane protein systems. Recently, a newer bifunctional spin label (BSL), 3,4-bis(methanethiosulfonylmethyl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-2,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrol-1-yloxy, has been introduced to overcome the dynamic limitations associated with the MTSL spin label and has been invaluable in determining protein backbone dynamics and inter-residue distances due to its restricted internal motion and fewer size restrictions. While BSL has been successful in providing more accurate information about the structure and dynamics of several proteins, a detailed characterization of the spin label is still lacking. In this study, we characterized BSLs by performing CW-EPR spectral line shape analysis as a function of temperature on spin-labeled sites inside and outside of the membrane for the integral membrane protein KCNE1 in POPC/POPG lipid bilayers and POPC/POPG lipodisq nanoparticles. The experimental data revealed a powder pattern spectral line shape for all of the KCNE1-BSL samples at 296 K, suggesting the motion of BSLs approaches the rigid limit regime for these series of samples. BSLs were further utilized to report for the first time the distance measurement between two BSLs attached on an integral membrane protein KCNE1 in POPC/POPG lipid bilayers at room temperature using dipolar line broadening CW-EPR spectroscopy. The CW dipolar line broadening EPR data revealed a 15 ± 2 Å distance between doubly attached BSLs on KCNE1 (53/57-63/67) which is consistent with molecular dynamics modeling and the solution NMR structure of KCNE1 which yielded a

  1. Detection of Local Tumor Recurrence After Definitive Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Histogram Analysis of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced T1-Weighted Perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Park, Ji Eun; Sung, Yu Sub; Kim, Namkug; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the added value of histogram analysis of the ratio of initial to final 90-second time-signal intensity AUC (AUCR) for differentiating local tumor recurrence from contrast-enhancing scar on follow-up dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI of patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AUCR histogram parameters were assessed among tumor recurrence (n = 19) and contrast-enhancing scar (n = 27) at primary sites and compared using the t test. ROC analysis was used to determine the best differentiating parameters. The added value of AUCR histogram parameters was assessed when they were added to inconclusive conventional MRI results. Histogram analysis showed statistically significant differences in the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of the AUCR values between the two groups (p Histogram analysis of AUCR can improve the diagnostic yield for local tumor recurrence during surveillance after treatment for HNSCC.

  2. Neural correlates of the psychedelic state as determined by fMRI studies with psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Erritzoe, David; Williams, Tim; Stone, James M; Reed, Laurence J; Colasanti, Alessandro; Tyacke, Robin J; Leech, Robert; Malizia, Andrea L; Murphy, Kevin; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Feilding, Amanda; Wise, Richard G; Nutt, David J

    2012-02-07

    Psychedelic drugs have a long history of use in healing ceremonies, but despite renewed interest in their therapeutic potential, we continue to know very little about how they work in the brain. Here we used psilocybin, a classic psychedelic found in magic mushrooms, and a task-free functional MRI (fMRI) protocol designed to capture the transition from normal waking consciousness to the psychedelic state. Arterial spin labeling perfusion and blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI were used to map cerebral blood flow and changes in venous oxygenation before and after intravenous infusions of placebo and psilocybin. Fifteen healthy volunteers were scanned with arterial spin labeling and a separate 15 with BOLD. As predicted, profound changes in consciousness were observed after psilocybin, but surprisingly, only decreases in cerebral blood flow and BOLD signal were seen, and these were maximal in hub regions, such as the thalamus and anterior and posterior cingulate cortex (ACC and PCC). Decreased activity in the ACC/medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was a consistent finding and the magnitude of this decrease predicted the intensity of the subjective effects. Based on these results, a seed-based pharmaco-physiological interaction/functional connectivity analysis was performed using a medial prefrontal seed. Psilocybin caused a significant decrease in the positive coupling between the mPFC and PCC. These results strongly imply that the subjective effects of psychedelic drugs are caused by decreased activity and connectivity in the brain's key connector hubs, enabling a state of unconstrained cognition.

  3. Neural correlates of the psychedelic state as determined by fMRI studies with psilocybin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Erritzoe, David; Williams, Tim; Stone, James M.; Reed, Laurence J.; Colasanti, Alessandro; Tyacke, Robin J.; Leech, Robert; Malizia, Andrea L.; Murphy, Kevin; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Feilding, Amanda; Wise, Richard G.; Nutt, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Psychedelic drugs have a long history of use in healing ceremonies, but despite renewed interest in their therapeutic potential, we continue to know very little about how they work in the brain. Here we used psilocybin, a classic psychedelic found in magic mushrooms, and a task-free functional MRI (fMRI) protocol designed to capture the transition from normal waking consciousness to the psychedelic state. Arterial spin labeling perfusion and blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI were used to map cerebral blood flow and changes in venous oxygenation before and after intravenous infusions of placebo and psilocybin. Fifteen healthy volunteers were scanned with arterial spin labeling and a separate 15 with BOLD. As predicted, profound changes in consciousness were observed after psilocybin, but surprisingly, only decreases in cerebral blood flow and BOLD signal were seen, and these were maximal in hub regions, such as the thalamus and anterior and posterior cingulate cortex (ACC and PCC). Decreased activity in the ACC/medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was a consistent finding and the magnitude of this decrease predicted the intensity of the subjective effects. Based on these results, a seed-based pharmaco-physiological interaction/functional connectivity analysis was performed using a medial prefrontal seed. Psilocybin caused a significant decrease in the positive coupling between the mPFC and PCC. These results strongly imply that the subjective effects of psychedelic drugs are caused by decreased activity and connectivity in the brain's key connector hubs, enabling a state of unconstrained cognition. PMID:22308440

  4. Perfusion MRI before and after acetazolamide administration for assessment of cerebrovascular reserve capacity in patients with symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion: comparison with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Holtmannspoetter, M.; Brueckmann, H. [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Mehrkens, J.H.; Schmid-Elsaesser, R. [University of Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Linke, R. [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Steiger, H.J. [Heinrich-Heine University, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bruening, R. [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Asklepios Klinik Barmbek, Department of Radiology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Impaired cerebral vascular reserve (CVR) in patients with symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion is regarded as a possible indication for performing extra-/intracranial (EC/IC) bypass surgery. As perfusion MR imaging (MRI) can demonstrate cerebral haemodynamics at capillary level, our hypothesis was that perfusion MRI could be used in these patients for the evaluation of CVR following acetazolamide challenge in a similar way to single photon emission CT (SPECT) and might provide additional information. Enrolled in the study were 12 patients (mean age 61.3 years; 11 male, 1 female) with symptomatic unilateral ICA occlusion proven by angiography. Both perfusion MRI and 99m-technetium-ethyl-cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) SPECT were performed before and after injection of acetazolamide (Diamox,1000 mg i.v.). CVR parameters including regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCBV), and mean transit times (MTT) were measured by perfusion MRI. The patients with impaired CVR proven by SPECT (n = 9) had a negative mean rCBF increment (-46.52%), negative rCBV increment (-13.5%) and delayed MTT (mean +2.98 s), respectively, on the occluded side (Student's t-test all P < 0.05). The patients with sufficient CVR (n = 3) had a mean rCBF increment of 1.2%, a decrement of rCBV of 10.46%, and a mean MTT shortening of 0.27 s following the acetazolamide injection. Perfusion MRI before and after acetazolamide administration compares favourably with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT for the detection of impaired CVR. The impact that perfusion MRI studies (before and after acetazolamide administration) might have on the treatment decision in patients with ICA occlusion has yet to be determined by a prospective study. (orig.)

  5. Perfusion maps of the whole liver based on high temporal and spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI (4D THRIVE): Feasibility and initial results in focal liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenegrachts, Kenneth; Ghekiere, Johan; Denolin, Vincent; Gabriele, Beck; Herigault, Gwen; Haspeslagh, Marc; Daled, Peter; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap; Rigauts, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a new imaging sequence (4D THRIVE) for whole liver perfusion in high temporal and spatial resolution. Feasibility of parametric mapping and its potential for characterizing focal liver lesions (FLLs) are investigated. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients suspected for colorectal liver metastases (LMs) were included. Parametric maps were evaluated qualitatively (ring-enhancement and lesion heterogeneity) and compared to three-phased contrast-enhanced MRI. Quantitative analysis was based on average perfusion values of entire FLLs. Reference standard comprised surgery with histopathology or follow-up imaging. Fisher's exact test was used for qualitative and Kruskal-Wallis test for quantitative analysis. Results: In total 29 LMs, 17 hemangiomas and 4 focal nodular hyperplasias were evaluated. FLLs could be differentiated by qualitative assessment of parametric maps respectively three-phased contrast-enhanced MRI (Fisher's p < 0.001 for comparisons between LMs and hemangiomas and LMs and FNHs for both ring-enhancement and lesion heterogeneity) rather than by quantitative analysis of parametric maps (Chi-square for Kep = 0.33 (p = 0.847) and Chi-square for Kel = 1.35 (p = 0.509)). Conclusion: This preliminary study shows potential of 4D THRIVE for whole liver imaging enabling calculation of parametric maps. Qualitative rather than quantitative analysis was accurate for differentiating malignant and benign FLLs.

  6. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav; Boretius, Susann

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development.

  7. Differentiating Primary CNS Lymphoma from Malignant Glioma using 123I-IMP SPECT and Arterial Spin labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tamio; Sato, Kenichi; Ozaki, Yoshimaru; Asanome, Taku; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Ono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Using conventional CT or MRI methods, the differentiation of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and malignant glioma (MG) is difficult because of overlapping imaging characteristics. Pretreatment differentiation between PCNSL and MG is essential for therapeutic decision making because post operative adjuvant therapy is extremely different. We examined the utility of N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I]iodoamphetamine SPECT (IMP SPECT) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in differentiating PCNSL from MG. Twenty PCNSL and ten MG patients underwent IMP SPECT and ASL. Early SPECT image (E) was initiated 20 min after intravenous injection of 222 MBq 123 I-IMP, and delayed image (D) and ultrade-layed image (UD) were initiated 3 h and 24 h, respectively, after the injection. SPECT images were visually analyzed with a color-grading scale (low, iso, and high), and the tumor-to-normal activity ratio (T/N) was calculated for all three images. The pulsed ASL was performed using a 3-T system. We set regions of interest in the tumor and symmetrically in the contralateral white matter on the cerebral blood flow (CBF) map and estimated tumor blood flow (TBF)/CBF ratio (TBF/CBF). 1) IMP SPECT: (1) Visual image analysis of PCNSL cases showed high accumulation of 123 I-IMP up-take on D and UD, whereas most MG cases showed low accumulation. (2) T/Ns of PCNSL were significantly higher than those of MG on D and UD (E: 1.13 vs. 0.95, p>0.05; D: 1.23 vs. 0.86, p<0.01; UD: 1.40 vs. 0.86, p<0.01). 2) ASL: TBF/CBFs of MG were higher than those of PCNSL, particularly in glioblastoma patients [1.84 vs. 6.22 (III; 1.51, IV; 8.58)]. IMP SPECT and ASL are helpful tools for differentiating primary CNS lymphoma from MG. Using these examinations, we could perform adjuvant therapy without biopsy in deep-seated tumors. (author)

  8. Assessment of the zonal variation of perfusion parameters in the femoral head. A 3-T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzik, Jean-Francois [Lille Catholic University, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic Hospitals, Lille (France); Littoral Cote d' Opale University, Lille University, Lille (France); Lefebvre, Guillaume [University of Lille Nord de France, Musculoskeletal Imaging Department, Centre de Consultation et d' Imagerie de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHU Lille, Lille (France); Behal, Helene [University of Lille Nord de France, Biostatistics Department, Lille Regional University Hospital, Lille (France); Verclytte, Sebastien [Lille Catholic University, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic Hospitals, Lille (France); Hardouin, Pierre [Lille University, Littoral Cote d' Opale University, Lille (France); Teixeira, Pedro [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Hopital Central, Nancy (France); Cotten, Anne [Littoral Cote d' Opale University, Lille University, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Musculoskeletal Imaging Department, Centre de Consultation et d' Imagerie de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHU Lille, Lille (France)

    2018-02-15

    The objective was to describe MR perfusion characteristics of the femoral head, with a focus on the subchondral bone. This prospective monocentric study was approved by our local Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the right hip was performed in 59 adults with suspected spondyloarthritis (32 women, 28 men). Mean age was 37.5 (±12.5) years. Regions of interest were drawn in the femoral head epiphysis, in the subchondral areas the most exposed to mechanical load (superolateral, anterosuperior, and posterior zones) and in areas less exposed to mechanical load (inferior subchondral zone and center of the femoral head). Semi-quantitative and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the Tofts model. Statistical analysis was performed with a linear mixed model to compare the perfusion parameters in the different femoral head zones. Extravascular extracellular volume and area under the curve were lower in the superolateral zone than in the inferior zone (p = 0.0135 and p < 0.0001 respectively) and the central zone (p = 0.007 and p = 0.0134 respectively). Extravascular extracellular volume and rate constant were lower in the anterosuperior zone than in the inferior zones (p = 0.011 and p = 0.029). In the anterosuperior zone, extravascular extracellular volume was lower, and time to peak was higher than in the central zones (p = 0.0056 and p = 0.0013 respectively). No significant differences were found for any values between other paired zones. The perfusion of femoral head subchondral bone assessed with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is not homogeneous: the areas exposed to more mechanical loading are less perfused. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of the zonal variation of perfusion parameters in the femoral head. A 3-T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzik, Jean-Francois; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Behal, Helene; Verclytte, Sebastien; Hardouin, Pierre; Teixeira, Pedro; Cotten, Anne

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to describe MR perfusion characteristics of the femoral head, with a focus on the subchondral bone. This prospective monocentric study was approved by our local Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the right hip was performed in 59 adults with suspected spondyloarthritis (32 women, 28 men). Mean age was 37.5 (±12.5) years. Regions of interest were drawn in the femoral head epiphysis, in the subchondral areas the most exposed to mechanical load (superolateral, anterosuperior, and posterior zones) and in areas less exposed to mechanical load (inferior subchondral zone and center of the femoral head). Semi-quantitative and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the Tofts model. Statistical analysis was performed with a linear mixed model to compare the perfusion parameters in the different femoral head zones. Extravascular extracellular volume and area under the curve were lower in the superolateral zone than in the inferior zone (p = 0.0135 and p < 0.0001 respectively) and the central zone (p = 0.007 and p = 0.0134 respectively). Extravascular extracellular volume and rate constant were lower in the anterosuperior zone than in the inferior zones (p = 0.011 and p = 0.029). In the anterosuperior zone, extravascular extracellular volume was lower, and time to peak was higher than in the central zones (p = 0.0056 and p = 0.0013 respectively). No significant differences were found for any values between other paired zones. The perfusion of femoral head subchondral bone assessed with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is not homogeneous: the areas exposed to more mechanical loading are less perfused. (orig.)

  10. Conformational change in full-length mouse prion: A site-directed spin-labeling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inanami, Osamu; Hashida, Shukichi; Iizuka, Daisuke; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Hiraoka, Wakako; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Nakamura, Hideo; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Kuwabara, Mikinori

    2005-01-01

    The structure of the mouse prion (moPrP) was studied using site-directed spin-labeling electron spin resonance (SDSL-ESR). Since a previous NMR study by Hornemanna et al., [Hornemanna, Korthb, Oeschb, Rieka, Widera, Wuethricha, Glockshubera, Recombinant full-length murine prion protein, mPrP (23-231): purification and spectroscopic characterization, FEBS Lett. 413 (1997) 277-281] has indicated that N96, D143, and T189 in moPrP are localized in a Cu 2+ binding region, Helix1 and Helix2, respectively, three recombinant moPrP mutations (N96C, D143C, and T189C) were expressed in an Escherichia coli system, and then refolded by dialysis under low pH and purified by reverse-phase HPLC. By using the preparation, we succeeded in preserving a target cystein residue without alteration of the α-helix structure of moPrP and were able to apply SDSL-ESR with a methane thiosulfonate spin label to the full-length prion protein. The rotational correlation times (τ) of 1.1, 3.3, and 4.8 ns were evaluated from the X-band ESR spectra at pH 7.4 and 20 deg C for N96R1, D143R1, and T189R1, respectively. τ reflects the fact that the Cu 2+ binding region is more flexible than Helix1 or Helix2. ESR spectra recorded at various temperatures revealed two phases together with a transition point at around 20 deg C in D143R1 and T189R1, but not in N96R1. With the variation of pH from 4.0 to 7.8, ESR spectra of T189R1 at 20 deg C showed a gradual increase of τ from 2.9 to 4.8 ns. On the other hand, the pH-dependent conformational changes in N96R1 and D143R1 were negligible. These results indicated that T189 located in Helix2 possessed a structure sensitive to physiological pH changes; simultaneously, N96 in the Cu 2+ binding region and D143 in Helix1 were conserved

  11. Combined T1-based perfusion MRI and MR angiography in kidney: First experience in normals and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, Martine [Department of Radiology/BEFY, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: martine.dujardin@gmail.com; Luypaert, Rob [Department of Radiology/BEFY, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: rluypaer@vub.ac.be; Vandenbroucke, F. [Department of Radiology/BEFY, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederik.vandenbroucke@uzbrussel.be; Van der Niepen, Patricia [Department of Nephrology, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: hemovnnp@az.vub.ac.be; Sourbron, Steven [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munchen (Germany)], E-mail: Steven.Sourbron@med.uni-muenchen.de; Verbeelen, Dierik [Department of Nephrology, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: dierik.verbeelen@uzbrussel.be; Stadnik, T. [Department of Radiology/BEFY, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: tadeusz.stadnik@uzbrussel.be; Mey, Johan de [Department of Radiology/BEFY, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: johan.demey@uzbrussel.be

    2009-03-15

    Objectives: To investigate the feasibility of implementing quantitative T1-perfusion in the routine MRA-protocol and to obtain a first experience in normals and pathology. Materials and methods: For perfusion imaging, IR-prepared FLASH (one 4 mm slice at mid-renal level, TR 4.4 ms, TE 2.2 ms, TI 180 ms, FA 50 deg., matrix 128 x 256, bandwidth per pixel 300, 400 dynamics, temporal resolution 0.3 s, total measurement time 2 min) was applied during the injection of 10 ml of standard 0.5 mmol/ml Gadolinium-DTPA solution at 2 ml/s, followed by 3DCE-MRA with bolus tracking (TR 5.4, TE 1.4, FA 40 deg., matrix 192 x 512, NSA 1, slice thickness 1.5 mm), using a second dose of 0.1 mmol Gadolinium-DTPA per kg body weight with a maximum of 20 ml. The T1-weighted signals (perfusion data) were converted to tissue tracer concentrations and deconvolved with an inflow corrected AIF; blood flow, distribution volume, mean transit time and blood flow heterogeneity were derived. Results: MRA quality was uncompromised by the first bolus administered for perfusion purposes. In the normals, average cortical RBF, RVD and MTT were 1.2 ml/min/ml (S.D. 0.3 ml/min/ml), 0.4 ml/ml (S.D. 0.1 ml/ml) and 21 s (S.D. 4 s). These RBF values are lower than those found in the literature, probably due to residual AIF inflow effects. The sensitivity of the technique was sufficient to demonstrate altered perfusion in the examples of pathology. Conclusion: Combined quantitative T1-perfusion and MRA have a potential for noninvasive renovascular screening and may provide an anatomical and physiological evaluation of renal status.

  12. Diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography, stress dual-energy CT perfusion, and stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography for coronary artery disease: Comparison with combined invasive coronary angiography and stress perfusion cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyun Woo; Ko, Sung Min; Hwang, Hweung Kon; So, Young; Yi, Jeong Geun [Konkuk University Medical Center, Research Institute of Biomedical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Jeong [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress dual-energy computed tomography perfusion (DE-CTP), stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and the combinations of CCTA with myocardial perfusion imaging (CCTA + DE-CTP and CCTA + SPECT) for identifying coronary artery stenosis that causes myocardial hypoperfusion. Combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (SP-CMR) imaging are used as the reference standard. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 25 patients with suspected coronary artery disease, who underwent CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, SP-CMR, and ICA. The reference standard was defined as ≥ 50% stenosis by ICA, with a corresponding myocardial hypoperfusion on SP-CMR. For per-vascular territory analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 96, 96, 68, 93, and 68%, respectively, and specificities were 72, 75, 89, 85, and 94%, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were 0.84 ± 0.05, 0.85 ± 0.05, 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.89 ± 0.04, and 0.81 ± 0.06, respectively. For per-patient analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 100, 100, 89, 100, and 83%, respectively; the specificities were 14, 43, 57, 43, and 57%, respectively; and the AUCs were 0.57 ± 0.13, 0.71 ± 0.11, 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.71 ± 0.11, and 0.70 ± 0.11, respectively. The combination of CCTA and DE-CTP enhances specificity without a loss of sensitivity for detecting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis, as defined by combined ICA and SP-CMR.

  13. Cerebral Blood Flow Measurement Using fMRI and PET: A Cross-Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean J. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An important aspect of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is the study of brain hemodynamics, and MR arterial spin labeling (ASL perfusion imaging has gained wide acceptance as a robust and noninvasive technique. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF measurements obtained with ASL fMRI have not been fully validated, particularly during global CBF modulations. We present a comparison of cerebral blood flow changes (ΔCBF measured using a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR ASL perfusion method to those obtained using H2O15 PET, which is the current gold standard for in vivo imaging of CBF. To study regional and global CBF changes, a group of 10 healthy volunteers were imaged under identical experimental conditions during presentation of 5 levels of visual stimulation and one level of hypercapnia. The CBF changes were compared using 3 types of region-of-interest (ROI masks. FAIR measurements of CBF changes were found to be slightly lower than those measured with PET (average ΔCBF of 21.5±8.2% for FAIR versus 28.2±12.8% for PET at maximum stimulation intensity. Nonetheless, there was a strong correlation between measurements of the two modalities. Finally, a t-test comparison of the slopes of the linear fits of PET versus ASL ΔCBF for all 3 ROI types indicated no significant difference from unity (P>.05.

  14. Sequences of 12 monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl spin-label antibodies for NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leahy, D.J.; Rule, G.S.; Whittaker, M.M.; McConnell, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies specific for a spin-labeled dinitrophenyl hapten (DNP-SL) have been produces for use in NMR studies. They have been named AN01 and ANO3-AN12. The stability constants for the association of these antibodies with DNP-SL and related haptens were measured by fluorescence quenching. cDNA clones coding for the heavy and light chains of each antibody and of an additional anti-DNP-SL monoclonal antibody, ANO2, have been isolated. The nucleic acid sequence of the 5' end of each clone has been determined, and the amino acid sequence of the variable regions of each antibody has been deduced from the cDNA sequence. The sequences are relatively heterogeneous, but both the heavy and the light chains of ANO1 and ANO3 are derived from the same variable-region gene families as those of the ANO2 antibody. ANO7 has a heavy chain that is related to that of ANO2, and ANO9 has a related light chain. ANO5 and ANO6 are unrelated to ANO2 but share virtually identical heavy and light chains. Preliminary NMR difference spectra comparing related antibodies show that sequence-specific assignment of resonances is possible. Such spectra also provide a measure of structural relatedness

  15. EPR spin probe and spin label studies of some low molecular and polymer micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, A. M.; Kasaikin, V. A.; Timofeev, V. P.

    1998-12-01

    The rotational mobility of spin probes of different shape and size in low molecular and polymer micelles has been studied. Several probes having nitroxide fragment localized either in the vicinity of micelle interface or in the hydrocarbon core have been used. Upon increasing the number of carbon atoms in hydrocarbon chain of detergent from 7 to 13 (sodium alkyl sulfate micelles) or from 12 to 16 (alkyltrimethylammonium bromide micelles) the rotational mobility of spin probes is decreased by the factor 1.5-2.0. The spin probe rotational mobility in polymer micelles (the complexes of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides and polymethacrylic or polyacrylic acids) is less than mobility in free micelles of the same surfactants. The study of EPR-spectra of spin labeled polymethacrylic acid (PMA) indicated that formation of water soluble complexes of polymer and alkyltrimethylammonium bromides in alkaline solutions (pH 9) does not affect the polymer segmental mobility. On the other hand, the polymer complexes formation in slightly acidic water solution (pH 6) breaks down the compact PMA conformation, thus increasing the polymer segmental mobility. Possible structures of polymer micelles are discussed.

  16. Location of the higher affinity copper site on human hemoglobin by the use of the spin label technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, M.; Louro, S.R.W.

    1983-11-01

    Addition of copper (II) ions to Cys β-93 maleimide spin-labelled human hemoglobin A produces a dramatic decrease in the amplitude of the spin-label ESR spectra. This effect was analyzed in the framework of Leigh's theory which permits interspin distances to be deduced from the effect of dipolar coupling on the ESR spectra and led to an estimate of 9A as the distance between the label and the higher affinity copper site. Taking into account the previous results which suggest that four nitrogen atoms coordinate with copper, and that the N terminal val β-1 and His β-2 residues are involved, the location of the higher affinity copper site is proposed to be at the β 1 β 2 interface of the hemoglobin molecule, involving the N terminal of one β subunit and the C terminal of the other. (Author) [pt

  17. Structure and dynamics of spin-labeled insulin entrapped in a silica matrix by the sol-gel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanea, E; Gruian, C; Rickert, C; Steinhoff, H-J; Simon, V

    2013-08-12

    The structure and conformational dynamics of insulin entrapped into a silica matrix was monitored during the sol to maturated-gel transition by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Insulin was successfully spin-labeled with iodoacetamide and the bifunctional nitroxide reagent HO-1944. Room temperature continuous wave (cw) EPR spectra of insulin were recorded to assess the mobility of the attached spin labels. Insulin conformation and its distribution within the silica matrix were studied using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) and low-temperature cw-EPR. A porous oxide matrix seems to form around insulin molecules with pore diameters in the order of a few nanometers. Secondary structure of the encapsulated insulin investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy proved a high structural integrity of insulin even in the dried silica matrix. The results show that silica encapsulation can be used as a powerful tool to effectively isolate and functionally preserve biomolecules during preparation, storage, and release.

  18. Quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamic parameters by QUASAR arterial spin labeling in Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal Elderly adults at 3-tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Henry K F; Chan, Queenie; Zhang, Zhipeng; Petersen, Esben T; Qiu, Deqiang; Zhang, Linda; Yau, Kelvin K W; Chu, Leung-Wing; Golay, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to investigate the role of vascular impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that the hemodynamic parameters monitoring cerebrovascular integrity, i.e., cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood volume (aBV), and arterial transit time (aTT), would be affected. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy control (HC) subjects underwent 3T MRI scanning. Two separate blood flow acquisitions were obtained with 1 slice overlap for whole brain coverage. CBF, aBV, and aTT maps were calculated using in-house software. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed on SPM5. Region-of-interest (ROI) studies of ten selected cerebral regions were also conducted. There were significant differences in mini mental status exam (MMSE) (AD: 16.3 ± 4.55, HC: 28.5 ± 2.00) and Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) scores (AD: 25.25 ± 9.64, HC: 5.51 ± 2.62) between the 2 groups (p QUASAR ASL, we found patterns of regional hemodynamic impairment typical of moderate AD, suggesting underlying vascular abnormality. As potential biomarkers, these hemodynamic parameters could differentiate patients from volunteers, and possibly indicate the conversion from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment to AD.

  19. A fast analysis method for non-invasive imaging of blood flow in individual cerebral arteries using vessel-encoded arterial spin labelling angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Michael A.; Okell, Thomas W.; Payne, Stephen J.; Jezzard, Peter; Woolrich, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) MRI offers a non-invasive means to create blood-borne contrast in vivo for dynamic angiographic imaging. By spatial modulation of the ASL process it is possible to uniquely label individual arteries over a series of measurements, allowing each to be separately identified in the resulting angiographic images. This separation requires appropriate analysis for which a general Bayesian framework has previously been proposed. Here this framework is adapted for clinical dynamic angiographic imaging. This specifically addresses the issues of computational speed of the algorithm and the robustness required to deal with real patient data. An algorithm is proposed that can incorporate planning information about the arteries being imaged whilst adapting for subsequent patient movement. A fast maximum a posteriori solution is adopted and shown to be only marginally less accurate than Monte Carlo sampling under simulation. The final algorithm is demonstrated on in vivo data with analysis on a time scale of the order of 10 min, from both a healthy control and a patient with a vertebro-basilar occlusion. PMID:22322066

  20. Communication: Orientational self-ordering of spin-labeled cholesterol analogs in lipid bilayers in diluted conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardash, Maria E.; Dzuba, Sergei A., E-mail: dzuba@kinetics.nsc.ru [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia, and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-07

    Lipid-cholesterol interactions are responsible for different properties of biological membranes including those determining formation in the membrane of spatial inhomogeneities (lipid rafts). To get new information on these interactions, electron spin echo (ESE) spectroscopy, which is a pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), was applied to study 3β-doxyl-5α-cholestane (DCh), a spin-labeled analog of cholesterol, in phospholipid bilayer consisted of equimolecular mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. DCh concentration in the bilayer was between 0.1 mol.% and 4 mol.%. For comparison, a reference system containing a spin-labeled 5-doxyl-stearic acid (5-DSA) instead of DCh was studied as well. The effects of “instantaneous diffusion” in ESE decay and in echo-detected (ED) EPR spectra were explored for both systems. The reference system showed good agreement with the theoretical prediction for the model of spin labels of randomly distributed orientations, but the DCh system demonstrated remarkably smaller effects. The results were explained by assuming that neighboring DCh molecules are oriented in a correlative way. However, this correlation does not imply the formation of clusters of cholesterol molecules, because conventional continuous wave EPR spectra did not show the typical broadening due to aggregation of spin labels and the observed ESE decay was not faster than in the reference system. So the obtained data evidence that cholesterol molecules at low concentrations in biological membranes can interact via large distances of several nanometers which results in their orientational self-ordering.

  1. Mobility of TOAC spin-labelled peptides binding to the Src SH3 domain studied by paramagnetic NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors, Hanna E. [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands); Koning, Peter E. de; Wouter Drijfhout, Jan [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion (Netherlands); Venezia, Brigida; Ubbink, Marcellus [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.ubbink@chem.leidenuniv.nl

    2008-07-15

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement provides a tool for studying the dynamics as well as the structure of macromolecular complexes. The application of side-chain coupled spin-labels is limited by the mobility of the free radical. The cyclic, rigid amino acid spin-label TOAC (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid), which can be incorporated straightforwardly by peptide synthesis, provides an attractive alternative. In this study, TOAC was incorporated into a peptide derived from focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the interaction of the peptide with the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of Src kinase was studied, using paramagnetic NMR. Placing TOAC within the binding motif of the peptide has a considerable effect on the peptide-protein binding, lowering the affinity substantially. When the TOAC is positioned just outside the binding motif, the binding constant remains nearly unaffected. Although the SH3 domain binds weakly and transiently to proline-rich peptides from FAK, the interaction is not very dynamic and the relative position of the spin-label to the protein is well-defined. It is concluded that TOAC can be used to generate reliable paramagnetic NMR restraints.

  2. Mobility of TOAC spin-labelled peptides binding to the Src SH3 domain studied by paramagnetic NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindfors, Hanna E.; Koning, Peter E. de; Wouter Drijfhout, Jan; Venezia, Brigida; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2008-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement provides a tool for studying the dynamics as well as the structure of macromolecular complexes. The application of side-chain coupled spin-labels is limited by the mobility of the free radical. The cyclic, rigid amino acid spin-label TOAC (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid), which can be incorporated straightforwardly by peptide synthesis, provides an attractive alternative. In this study, TOAC was incorporated into a peptide derived from focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the interaction of the peptide with the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of Src kinase was studied, using paramagnetic NMR. Placing TOAC within the binding motif of the peptide has a considerable effect on the peptide-protein binding, lowering the affinity substantially. When the TOAC is positioned just outside the binding motif, the binding constant remains nearly unaffected. Although the SH3 domain binds weakly and transiently to proline-rich peptides from FAK, the interaction is not very dynamic and the relative position of the spin-label to the protein is well-defined. It is concluded that TOAC can be used to generate reliable paramagnetic NMR restraints

  3. [Myocardial microcirculation in humans--new approaches using MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Christian M; Bauer, Wolfgang R

    2003-03-01

    oxygen breathing. In patients with CAD, myocardial regions with decreased perfusion reserve could be identified. perfusion reserve could be identified. Performing the described spin-labeling technique with an intravascular CA facilitates the determination of the intra-extracapillary water proton exchange frequency and the RBV. In a patient study, the effect of the intravascular CA Feruglose (Amersham) on relaxation rate in myocardium (R1(myo)) in the steady state was investigated (Figure 1). The dependence of R1(myo) on R1(blood) was characterized and compared with a theoretical model which allowed determination of the intra-extracapillary water proton exchange frequency (f = 0.48 s(-1)) and the intracapillary blood volume (RBV = 12.9%). A linear response range of Delta R1(myo) on Delta R1(blood) was estimated which, in future studies, will allow the determination of RBV with intravascular CA (Figure 2). T2* We anticipated that poststenotic vasodilatation implies a capillary recruitment. Almost all (i.e., > 90%) of intramyocardial blood residues in that type of vessel. Due to their large arteriovenous oxygenation difference, myocardial capillaries contain considerable amounts of deoxyhemoglobin (Figure 3). Hence, in regions with autoregulatory capillary recruitment the tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin should be elevated when compared to myocardium supplied by a normal vessel (Figure 5b). Due to its paramagnetic property and its intravascular confinement, the natural CA deoxyhemoglobin may be assessed by susceptibility sensitive, or also called blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI. For T2* measurements, a segmented gradient echo pulse sequence was used, which acquired ten successive gradient echoes per rf excitation in a single breathhold. In volunteers, there was an increase in T2* of about 10% under dipyridamole-induced stress (Figure 4). This means a decrease of the intracapillary deoxyhemoglobin concentration, whereas the oxygen consumption under

  4. A hybrid breath hold and continued respiration-triggered technique for time-resolved 3D MRI perfusion studies in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintze, C.; Stemmer, A.; Bock, M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of lung cancer perfusion is impaired by respiratory motion. Imaging times for contrast agent wash-out studies often exceed breath hold capabilities, and respiration triggering reduces temporal resolution. Temporally resolved volume acquisition of entire tumors is required to assess heterogeneity. Therefore, we developed and evaluated an MR measurement technique that exceeds a single breath hold, and provides a variable temporal resolution during acquisition while suspending breath-dependent motion. 20 patients with suspected lung cancer were subjected to perfusion studies using a spoiled 3D gradient echo sequence after bolus injection of 0.07 mmol/kg body weight of Gd-DTPA. 10 acquisitions in expiratory breath hold were followed by 50 navigator-triggered acquisitions under free breathing. Post-processing allowed for co-registration of the 3D data sets. An ROI-based visualization of the signal-time curves was performed. In all cases motion-suspended, time-resolved volume data sets (40 x 33 x 10 cm 3 , voxel size: 2.1 x 2.1 x 5.0 mm 3 ) were generated with a variable, initially high temporal resolution (2.25 sec) that was synchronized with the breath pattern and covered up to 8(1)/(2) min. In 7 / 20 cases a remaining offset could be reduced by rigid co-registration. The tumors showed fast wash-in, followed by rapid signal decay (8 / 20) or a plateau. The feasibility of a perfusion study with hybrid breath hold and navigator-triggered time-resolved 3D MRI which combines high initial temporal resolution during breath hold with a long wash-out period under free breathing was demonstrated. (orig.)

  5. Perfusion MRI derived indices of microvascular shunting and flow control correlate with tumor grade and outcome in patients with cerebral glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Mouridsen, Kim; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Deficient microvascular blood flow control is thought to cause tumor hypoxia and increase resistance to therapy. In glioma patients, we tested whether perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) based indices of microvascular flow control provide more information on tumor grade and patient outcome...... than does the established PWI angiogenesis marker, cerebral blood volume (CBV). Material and Methods: Seventy-two glioma patients (sixty high-grade, twelve low-grade gliomas) were included. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) and COV, its ratio to blood mean transit time, provide indices...... of microvascular flow control and the extent to which oxygen can be extracted by tumor tissue. The ability of these parameters and CBV to differentiate tumor grade were assessed by receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression. Their ability to predict time to progression and overall survival...

  6. Validation of Fourier decomposition MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using visual and automated scoring of pulmonary perfusion in young cystic fibrosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Puderbach, Michael; Heimann, Tobias; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Fritzsching, Eva; Mall, Marcus A.; Eichinger, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To validate Fourier decomposition (FD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Materials and methods: Thirty-four CF patients (median age 4.08 years; range 0.16–30) were examined on a 1.5-T MR imager. For FD MR imaging, sets of lung images were acquired using an untriggered two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession sequence. Perfusion-weighted images were obtained after correction of the breathing displacement and Fourier analysis of the cardiac frequency from the time-resolved data sets. DCE data sets were acquired with a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. The FD and DCE images were visually assessed for perfusion defects by two readers independently (R1, R2) using a field based scoring system (0–12). Software was used for perfusion impairment evaluation (R3) of segmented lung images using an automated threshold. Both imaging and evaluation methods were compared for agreement and tested for concordance between FD and DCE imaging. Results: Good or acceptable intra-reader agreement was found between FD and DCE for visual and automated scoring: R1 upper and lower limits of agreement (ULA, LLA): 2.72, −2.5; R2: ULA, LLA: ±2.5; R3: ULA: 1.5, LLA: −2. A high concordance was found between visual and automated scoring (FD: 70–80%, DCE: 73–84%). Conclusions: FD MR imaging provides equivalent diagnostic information to DCE MR imaging in CF patients. Automated assessment of regional perfusion defects using FD and DCE MR imaging is comparable to visual scoring but allows for percentage-based analysis

  7. Validation of Fourier decomposition MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using visual and automated scoring of pulmonary perfusion in young cystic fibrosis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Grzegorz, E-mail: g.bauman@dkfz.de [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael, E-mail: m.puderbach@dkfz.de [Chest Clinics at the University of Heidelberg, Clinics for Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (Germany); Heimann, Tobias, E-mail: t.heimann@dkfz.de [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, Annette, E-mail: kopp@dkfz.de [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Biostatistics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Fritzsching, Eva, E-mail: eva.fritzsching@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Translational Pulmonology and Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg (Germany); Mall, Marcus A., E-mail: marcus.mall@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Translational Pulmonology and Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg (Germany); Eichinger, Monika, E-mail: m.eichinger@dkfz.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To validate Fourier decomposition (FD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Materials and methods: Thirty-four CF patients (median age 4.08 years; range 0.16–30) were examined on a 1.5-T MR imager. For FD MR imaging, sets of lung images were acquired using an untriggered two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession sequence. Perfusion-weighted images were obtained after correction of the breathing displacement and Fourier analysis of the cardiac frequency from the time-resolved data sets. DCE data sets were acquired with a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. The FD and DCE images were visually assessed for perfusion defects by two readers independently (R1, R2) using a field based scoring system (0–12). Software was used for perfusion impairment evaluation (R3) of segmented lung images using an automated threshold. Both imaging and evaluation methods were compared for agreement and tested for concordance between FD and DCE imaging. Results: Good or acceptable intra-reader agreement was found between FD and DCE for visual and automated scoring: R1 upper and lower limits of agreement (ULA, LLA): 2.72, −2.5; R2: ULA, LLA: ±2.5; R3: ULA: 1.5, LLA: −2. A high concordance was found between visual and automated scoring (FD: 70–80%, DCE: 73–84%). Conclusions: FD MR imaging provides equivalent diagnostic information to DCE MR imaging in CF patients. Automated assessment of regional perfusion defects using FD and DCE MR imaging is comparable to visual scoring but allows for percentage-based analysis.

  8. IDH mutant and 1p/19q co-deleted oligodendrogliomas: tumor grade stratification using diffusion-, susceptibility-, and perfusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yu; Xing, Zhen; She, Dejun; Yang, Xiefeng; Zheng, Yingyan; Xiao, Zebin; Cao, Dairong [First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Department of Radiology, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Wang, Xingfu [First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Department of Pathology, Fuzhou (China)

    2017-06-15

    Currently, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion are proven diagnostic biomarkers for both grade II and III oligodendrogliomas (ODs). Non-invasive diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI) are widely used to provide physiological information (cellularity, hemorrhage, calcifications, and angiogenesis) of neoplastic histology and tumor grade. However, it is unclear whether DWI, SWI, and DSC-PWI are able to stratify grades of IDH-mutant and 1p/19q co-deleted ODs. We retrospectively reviewed the conventional MRI (cMRI), DWI, SWI, and DSC-PWI obtained on 33 patients with IDH-mutated and 1p/19q co-deleted ODs. Features of cMRI, normalized ADC (nADC), intratumoral susceptibility signals (ITSSs), normalized maxim CBV (nCBV), and normalized maximum CBF (nCBF) were compared between low-grade ODs (LGOs) and high-grade ODs (HGOs). Receiver operating characteristic curve and logistic regression were applied to determine diagnostic performances. HGOs tended to present with prominent edema and enhancement. nADC, ITSSs, nCBV, and nCBF were significantly different between groups (all P < 0.05). The combination of SWI and DSC-PWI for grading resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 100.00 and 93.33%, respectively. IDH-mutant and 1p/19q co-deleted ODs can be stratified by grades using cMRI and advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques including DWI, SWI, and DSC-PWI. Combined ITSSs with nCBV appear to be a promising option for grading molecularly defined ODs in clinical practice. (orig.)

  9. Facing Contrast-Enhancing Gliomas: Perfusion MRI in Grade III and Grade IV Gliomas according to Tumor Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luisa Di Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral neoangiogenesis characterizes high grade gliomas. Relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV, calculated with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC Perfusion-Weighted Imaging (PWI, allows for the estimation of vascular density over the tumor bed. The aim of the study was to characterize putative tumoral neoangiogenesis via the study of maximal rCBV with a Region of Interest (ROI approach in three tumor areas—the contrast-enhancing area, the nonenhancing tumor, and the high perfusion area on CBV map—in patients affected by contrast-enhancing glioma (grades III and IV. Twenty-one patients were included: 15 were affected by grade IV and 6 by grade III glioma. Maximal rCBV values for each patient were averaged according to glioma grade. Although rCBV from contrast-enhancement and from nonenhancing tumor areas was higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (5.58 and 2.68; 3.01 and 2.2, resp., the differences were not significant. Instead, rCBV recorded in the high perfusion area on CBV map, independently of tumor compartment, was significantly higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (7.51 versus 3.78, P=0.036. In conclusion, neoangiogenesis encompasses different tumor compartments and CBV maps appear capable of best characterizing the degree of neovascularization. Facing contrast-enhancing brain tumors, areas of high perfusion on CBV maps should be considered as the reference areas to be targeted for glioma grading.

  10. Molecular order and T1-relaxation, cross-relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Derek

    2018-05-01

    Interpretation of saturation-recovery EPR experiments on nitroxide spin labels whose angular rotation is restricted by the orienting potential of the environment (e.g., membranes) currently concentrates on the influence of rotational rates and not of molecular order. Here, I consider the dependence on molecular ordering of contributions to the rates of electron spin-lattice relaxation and cross relaxation from modulation of N-hyperfine and Zeeman anisotropies. These are determined by the averages and , where θ is the angle between the nitroxide z-axis and the static magnetic field, which in turn depends on the angles that these two directions make with the director of uniaxial ordering. For saturation-recovery EPR at 9 GHz, the recovery rate constant is predicted to decrease with increasing order for the magnetic field oriented parallel to the director, and to increase slightly for the perpendicular field orientation. The latter situation corresponds to the usual experimental protocol and is consistent with the dependence on chain-labelling position in lipid bilayer membranes. An altered dependence on order parameter is predicted for saturation-recovery EPR at high field (94 GHz) that is not entirely consistent with observation. Comparisons with experiment are complicated by contributions from slow-motional components, and an unexplained background recovery rate that most probably is independent of order parameter. In general, this analysis supports the interpretation that recovery rates are determined principally by rotational diffusion rates, but experiments at other spectral positions/field orientations could increase the sensitivity to order parameter.

  11. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Sheila G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Grupo de Biofisica e Fisica Aplicada a Medicina, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, C.P. 131, 74001-970, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Cristina Nonato, M. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia de Proteinas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe S/N, 14040-903, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Costa-Filho, Antonio J., E-mail: ajcosta@ffclrp.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  12. Accuracy of F-DOPA PET and perfusion-MRI for differentiating radionecrotic from progressive brain metastases after radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicone, Francesco; Papa, Annalisa; Scopinaro, Francesco [Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy). Unit of Nuclear Medicine; ' ' Sapienza' ' Univ., Rome (Italy). Dept. of Surgical and Medicine Sciences and Translational Medicine; Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo [' ' Sapienza' ' Univ., Rome (Italy). Dept. of Surgical and Medicine Sciences and Translational Medicine; Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy). Unit of Radiotherapy; Romano, Andrea; Tavanti, Francesca; Bozzao, Alessandro [Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy). Unit of Neuroradiology; Rome Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Organs (Ne.S.M.O.S.)

    2015-01-15

    We assessed the performance of 6-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA) PET for differentiating radionecrosis (RN) from tumour progression (PD) in a population of patients with brain metastases, treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. The accuracy of F-DOPA PET was compared with that of perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (perfusion-MR). In 42 patients with a total of 50 brain metastases from various primaries F-DOPA PET/CT was performed because of suspected radiological progression at the site of previously irradiated brain metastasis. Several semiquantitative PET parameters were recorded, and their diagnostic accuracy was compared by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The diagnosis was established by either surgery or follow-up. A comparison was made between F-DOPA PET and perfusion-MR sequences acquired no more than 3 weeks apart. Definitive outcome was available in 46 of the 50 lesions (20 PD, 26 RN). Of the 46 lesions, 11 were surgically excised while in the remaining 35 lesions the diagnosis was established by radiological and clinical criteria. The best diagnostic performance was obtained using the semiquantitative PET parameter maximum lesion to maximum background uptake ratio (SUVL{sub max}/Bkgr{sub max}). With a cut-off value of 1.59, a sensitivity of 90 % and a specificity of 92.3 % were achieved in differentiating RN from PD lesions (accuracy 91.3 %). Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) derived from perfusion-MR was available for comparison in 37 of the 46 metastases. Overall accuracy of rCBV was lower than that of all semiquantitative PET parameters under study. The best differentiating rCBV cut-off value was 2.14; this yielded a sensitivity of 86.7 % and a specificity of 68.2 % (accuracy 75.6 %). F-DOPA PET is a highly accurate tool for differentiating RN from PD brain metastases after stereotactic radiosurgery. In this specific setting, F-DOPA PET seems to perform better than perfusion-MR. (orig.)

  13. WE-FG-206-05: New Arterial Spin Labeling Method for Simultaneous Estimation of Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume, Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, M; Whitlow, C; Jung, Y [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) method for simultaneously measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial transit time (ATT), and arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) without the use of a contrast agent. Methods: A series of multi-TI ASL images were acquired from one healthy subject on a 3T Siemens Skyra, with the following parameters: PCASL labeling with variable TI [300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000, 3500, 4000] ms, labeling bolus 1400 ms when TI allows, otherwise 100 ms less than TI, TR was minimized for each TI, two sinc shaped pre-saturation pulses were applied in the imaging plane immediately before 2D EPI acquisition. 64×64×24 voxels, 5 mm slice thickness, 1 mm gap, full brain coverage, 6 averages per TI, no crusher gradients, 11 ms TE, scan time of 4:56. The perfusion weighted time-series was created for each voxel and fit to a novel model. The model has two components: 1) the traditional model developed by Buxton et al., accounting for CBF and ATT, and 2) a box car function characterizing the width of the labeling bolus, with variable timing and height in proportion to the aCBV. All three parameters were fit using a nonlinear fitting routine that constrained all parameters to be positive. The main purpose of the high-temporal resolution TI sampling for the first second of data acquisition was to precisely estimate the blood volume component for better detection of arrival time and magnitude of signal. Results: Whole brain maps of CBF, ATT, and aCBV were produced, and all three parameters maps are consistent with similar maps described in the literature. Conclusion: Simultaneous mapping of CBF, ATT, and aCBV is feasible with a clinically tractable scan time (under 5 minutes).

  14. Differentiation of residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation necrosis with arterial spin labeling and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging-derived metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; El-Serougy, Lamiaa; Gaballa, Gada; Talaat, Mona [Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mansoura (Egypt); Abdelsalam, Mohamed [Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2018-02-15

    The aim of this study is to differentiate recurrent/residual gliomas from postradiation changes using arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived metrics. Prospective study was conducted upon 42 patients with high-grade gliomas after radiotherapy only or prior to other therapies that underwent routine MR imaging, ASL, and DTI. The tumor blood flow (TBF), fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) of the enhanced lesion and related edema were calculated. The lesion was categorized as recurrence/residual or postradiation changes. There was significant differences between residual/recurrent gliomas and postradiation changes of TBF (P = 0.001), FA (P = 0.001 and 0.04), and MD (P = 0.001) of enhanced lesion and related edema respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of TBF of enhanced lesion and related edema used to differentiate residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation changes were 0.95 and 0.93 and of MD were 0.95 and 0.81 and of FA were 0.81 and 0.695, respectively. Combined ASL and DTI metrics of the enhanced lesion revealed AUC of 0.98, accuracy of 95%, sensitivity of 93.8%, specificity of 95.8%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 93.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 95.8%. Combined metrics of ASL and DTI of related edema revealed AUC of 0.97, accuracy of 92.5%, sensitivity of 93.8%, specificity of 91.7%, PPV of 88.2%, and NPV of 95.7. Combined ASL and DTI metrics of enhanced lesion and related edema are valuable noninvasive tools in differentiating residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation changes. (orig.)

  15. Contrast optimization in multiphase arterial spin labeling; Otimizacao do contraste em ASL multi-fase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Paschoal, Andre M., E-mail: paiva@ifsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (CIERMag/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Foerster, Bernd U. [Philips Medical Systems LatAm, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Moll, Jorge [Instituto D' Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    Multiphase ASL is an effective way to overcome the regional variation of the transit time that difficult the estimation of perfusion values. However, with conventional multiple phases ASL techniques, the ASL contrast at later phases is impaired due to repeated application of excitation pulses and longitudinal relaxation making it difficult to evaluate the tissue perfusion in regions where the transit time is longer. In the present study, we show an improvement of the acquisition scheme by exploring a modulation on the flip angle of the MR acquisition to keep the ASL contrast constant over multiple phases. (author)

  16. The Impact of Carotid Artery Stenting on Cerebral Perfusion, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeAsymptomatic carotid artery stenosis can lead to not only stroke but also cognition impairment. Although it has been proven that carotid artery stenting (CAS can reduce the risk of future strokes, the effect of CAS on cognition is conflicting. In recent years, pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL MRI and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI have been employed in cognitive impairment studies. For the present study, cognition is evaluated in severe asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients undergoing CAS, and the mechanisms underlying the cognitive change are explored by pASL MRI and R-fMRI.Materials and methodsWe prospectively enrolled 24 asymptomatic, severe (≥70%, unilateral internal carotid artery stenosis patients, who were expecting the intervention of CAS. Cognition assessment (including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Minimum Mental State Examination, the Digit Symbol Test, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Verbal Memory Test and an integrated MRI program (pASL MRI, and R-fMRI were administered 7 days before and 3 months after CAS.Results16 subjects completed the follow-up study. After stenting, significant improvement in the scores of the MMSE, the Verbal Memory test, and the delayed recall was found. No significant difference was found in the scores of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Digit Symbol Test, and the immediate recall. After CAS treatment, asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients showed increased perfusion in the left frontal gyrus, increased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF in the right precentral gyrus, and increased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC in the right supra frontal gyrus. However, no significant correlations were found between these imaging changes and cognition assessments.ConclusionSuccessful CAS can partly improve cognition in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients. The cognition

  17. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI in differential diagnosis between radionecrosis and neoangiogenesis in cerebral metastases using rCBV, rCBF and K2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Mario; Frauenfelder, Giulia; Senese, Rossana; Zeccolini, Fabio; Schena, Emiliano; Giurazza, Francesco; Jäger, Hans Rolf

    2018-07-01

    Distinction between treatment-related changes and tumour recurrence in patients who have received radiation treatment for brain metastases can be difficult on conventional MRI. In this study, we investigated the ability of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion in differentiating necrotic changes from pathological angiogenesis and compared measurements of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and K2, using a dedicated software. Twenty-nine patients with secondary brain tumors were included in this retrospective study and underwent DSC perfusion MRI with a 3-month follow-up imaging after chemo- or radiation-therapy. Region-of-interests were drawn around the contrast enhancing lesions and measurements of rCBV, rCBF and K2 were performed in all patients. Based on subsequent histological examination or clinico-radiological follow-up, the cohort was divided in two groups: recurrent disease and stable disease. Differences between the two groups were analyzed using the Student's t test. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of rCBV measurements were analyzed considering three different cut-off values. Between patients with and without disease, only rCBV and rCBF values were significant (p < 0.05). The only cut-off value giving the best diagnostic accuracy of 100% was rCBV = 2.1 (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 100%). Patients with tumor recurrence showed a higher mean value of rCBV (mean = 4.28, standard deviation = 2.09) than patients with necrotic-related changes (mean = 0.77, standard deviation = 0.44). DSC-MRI appears a clinically useful method to differentiate between tumor recurrence, tumor necrosis and pseudoprogression in patients treated for cerebral metastases. Relative CBV using a cut-off value of 2.1 proved to be the most accurate and reliable parameter.

  18. Tumor metabolism and perfusion ratio assessed by 18F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI in breast cancer patients: Correlation with tumor subtype and histologic prognostic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Young-Sil [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Ajou University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Doo Kyoung [Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yong Sik; Han, Sehwan [Department of Surgery, Ajou University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hee, E-mail: medhand@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • In non-triple negative breast cancer, metabolic parameter (SUVmax) was significantly correlated with perfusion parameters (Kep and Ve). • In triple negative cancers, any perfusion parameters did not correlated with metabolic parameters. • Higher SUVmax, higher SUVmax/Ktrans, higher MTV50/Ktrans, higher TLG50/Ktrans, higher TLG50/Ve ratios were significantly correlated with TNBC. • In triple negative breast cancer, perfusion and metabolic parameters are not significantly correlated. • Triple negative breast cancer showed higher metabolic–perfusion ratios compared to non-triple negative breast cancer. - Abstract: Objective: Our purpose was to evaluate whether breast cancer with high metabolic–perfusion ratio would be associated with poor histopathologic prognostic factors and whether triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) would show high metabolic–perfusion ratio compared to non-triple negative breast cancer (non-TNBC). Methods: From March 2011 to November 2011, 67 females with invasive ductal carcinoma of breast who underwent both MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT were included. Perfusion parameters including Ktrans, Kep and Ve were acquired from Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Metabolic parameters including the standardized uptake value (SUV) and volumetric metabolic parameters including metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were obtained from F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). Results: In non-TNBC, SUVmax was significantly correlated with Kep (ρ = 0.298, p = 0.036) and Ve (ρ = −0.286, p = 0.044). In TNBC, there was no significant correlation between all perfusion and metabolic parameters. Compared to non-TNBC, higher SUVmax (10.2 vs 5.3, p < 0.001), higher SUVmax/Ktrans (56.02 vs 20.3, p < 0.001), higher MTV50/Ktrans (7.8 vs 16.54, p < 0.001), higher TLG50/Ktrans (36.49 vs 12.3, p < 0.001), higher TLG50/Ve (91.34 vs 27.1 p = 0.022) were

  19. Differentiating primary CNS lymphoma from glioblastoma multiforme: assessment using arterial spin labeling, diffusion-weighted imaging, and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Abe, Koichiro; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Iwaki, Toru [Kyushu University, Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in differentiating primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) from glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs). Fifty-six patients including 19 with PCNSL and 37 with GBM were retrospectively studied. From the ASL data, an absolute tumor blood flow (aTBF) and a relative tumor blood flow (rTBF) were obtained within the enhancing portion of each tumor. In addition, the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) and the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) were obtained from DWI and FDG-PET data, respectively. Each of the four parameters was compared between PCNSLs and GBMs using Kruskal-Wallis test. The performance in discriminating between PCNSLs and GBMs was evaluated using the receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) values were compared among the four parameters using a nonparametric method. The aTBF, rTBF, and ADCmin were significantly higher in GBMs (mean aTBF {+-} SD = 91.6 {+-} 56.0 mL/100 g/min, mean rTBF {+-} SD = 2.61 {+-} 1.61, mean ADCmin {+-} SD = 0.78 {+-} 0.19 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) than in PCNSLs (mean aTBF {+-} SD = 37.3 {+-} 10.5 mL/100 g/min, mean rTBF {+-} SD = 1.24 {+-} 0.37, mean ADCmin {+-} SD = 0.61 {+-} 0.13 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) (p < 0.005, respectively). In addition, SUVmax was significantly lower in GBMs (mean {+-} SD = 13.1 {+-} 6.34) than in PCNSLs (mean {+-} SD = 22.5 {+-} 7.83) (p < 0.005). The AUC for aTBF (0.888) was higher than those for rTBF (0.810), ADCmin (0.768), and SUVmax (0.848), although their difference was not statistically significant. ASL perfusion imaging is useful for differentiating PCNSLs from GBMs as well as DWI and FDG-PET. (orig.)

  20. State-of-the-art MRI techniques in neuroradiology: principles, pitfalls, and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viallon, Magalie [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, UMR CNRS 5220 - INSERM U1044, INSA de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon-Saint-Etienne, Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint Etienne (France); Cuvinciuc, Victor; Barnaure-Nachbar, Isabelle; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Haller, Sven [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Delattre, Benedicte; Toso-Patel, Seema; Becker, Minerva [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Merlini, Laura [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the most relevant state-of-the-art magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, which are clinically available to investigate brain diseases. MR acquisition techniques addressed include notably diffusion imaging (diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI)) as well as perfusion imaging (dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC), arterial spin labeling (ASL), and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)). The underlying models used to process these images are described, as well as the theoretic underpinnings of quantitative diffusion and perfusion MR imaging-based methods. The technical requirements and how they may help to understand, classify, or follow-up neurological pathologies are briefly summarized. Techniques, principles, advantages but also intrinsic limitations, typical artifacts, and alternative solutions developed to overcome them are discussed. In this article, we also review routinely available three-dimensional (3D) techniques in neuro MRI, including state-of-the-art and emerging angiography sequences, and briefly introduce more recently proposed 3D quantitative neuro-anatomy sequences, and new technology, such as multi-slice and multi-transmit imaging. (orig.)

  1. State-of-the-art MRI techniques in neuroradiology: principles, pitfalls, and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viallon, Magalie; Cuvinciuc, Victor; Barnaure-Nachbar, Isabelle; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Haller, Sven; Delattre, Benedicte; Toso-Patel, Seema; Becker, Minerva; Merlini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the most relevant state-of-the-art magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, which are clinically available to investigate brain diseases. MR acquisition techniques addressed include notably diffusion imaging (diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI)) as well as perfusion imaging (dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC), arterial spin labeling (ASL), and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)). The underlying models used to process these images are described, as well as the theoretic underpinnings of quantitative diffusion and perfusion MR imaging-based methods. The technical requirements and how they may help to understand, classify, or follow-up neurological pathologies are briefly summarized. Techniques, principles, advantages but also intrinsic limitations, typical artifacts, and alternative solutions developed to overcome them are discussed. In this article, we also review routinely available three-dimensional (3D) techniques in neuro MRI, including state-of-the-art and emerging angiography sequences, and briefly introduce more recently proposed 3D quantitative neuro-anatomy sequences, and new technology, such as multi-slice and multi-transmit imaging. (orig.)

  2. Hepatic necro-inflammation and elevated liver enzymes: Evaluation with MRI perfusion imaging with gadoxetic acid in chronic hepatitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, B.-B.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Yu, C.-W.; Kao, J.-H.; Lee, H.-S.; Liang, P.-C.; Wei, S.-Y.; Hwang, R.-M.; Shih, T.T.-F.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate liver necro-inflammation and function by using gadoxetic acid-enhanced dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), with histological analysis as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Seventy-nine subjects (21 healthy subjects; 58 chronic hepatitis patients) who received gadoxetic acid-enhanced DCE-MRI were divided into three subgroups: no (A0, n = 31), mild (A1, n = 27), and moderate–severe (A2–A3, n = 21) activities. Two DCE-MRI models were measured: (1) a dual-input single-compartment model to obtain absolute arterial, portal venous, and total blood flow, arterial fraction (ART), distribution volume, and mean transit time; (2) a curve analysis method to obtain peak, slope, and AUC (area under curve). The serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels also obtained. Statistical testing included Kruskal–Wallis tests for continuous data, Pearson's correlation tests, and multiple linear regression analyses. Results: Hepatic necro-inflammatory activity grades were significantly correlated with fibrotic stages, serum ALT level, ART and AUC. ART was helpful to predict the mild activity (≤A1 versus >A1; Az = 0.728), whereas AUC could differentiate no activity from any activity (A0 versus >A0; Az = 0.703). Peak, slope and AUC were all associated with AST and ALT (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced DCE-MRI parameters may be used to evaluate the severity of hepatic necro-inflammation and function

  3. Pulsed arterial spin labeling using TurboFLASH with suppression of intravascular signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Gaby S; Lewis, David P; Branch, Craig A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate quantification of perfusion with the ADC techniques requires the suppression of the majority of the intravascular signal. This is normally achieved with the use of diffusion gradients. The TurboFLASH sequence with its ultrashort repetition times is not readily amenable to this scheme. This report demonstrates the implementation of a modified TurboFLASH sequence for FAIR imaging. Intravascular suppression is achieved with a modified preparation period that includes a driven equilibrium Fourier transform (DEFT) combination of 90 degrees-180 degrees-90 degrees hard RF pulses subsequent to the inversion delay. These pulses rotate the perfusion-prepared magnetization into the transverse plane where it can experience the suitably placed diffusion gradients before being returned to the longitudinal direction by the second 90 degrees pulse. A value of b = 20-30 s/mm(2) was thereby found to suppress the majority of the intravascular signal. For single-slice perfusion imaging, quantification is only slightly modified. The technique can be readily extended to multislice acquisition if the evolving flow signal after the DEFT preparation is considered. An advantage of the modified preparation scheme is evident in the multislice FAIR images by the preservation of the sign of the magnetization difference. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. DNA with Parallel Strand Orientation: A Nanometer Distance Study with Spin Labels in the Watson-Crick and the Reverse Watson-Crick Double Helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunnicke, Dorith; Ding, Ping; Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2015-10-29

    Parallel-stranded (ps) DNA characterized by its sugar-phosphate backbones pointing in the same direction represents an alternative pairing system to antiparallel-stranded (aps) DNA with the potential to inhibit transcription and translation. 25-mer oligonucleotides were selected containing only dA·dT base pairs to compare spin-labeled nucleobase distances over a range of 10 or 15 base pairs in ps DNA with those in aps DNA. By means of the copper(I)-catalyzed Huisgen-Meldal-Sharpless alkyne-azide cycloaddition, the spin label 4-azido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl was clicked to 7-ethynyl-7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine to yield 25-mer oligonucleotides incorporating two spin labels. The interspin distances between spin labeled residues were determined by pulse EPR spectroscopy. The results reveal that in ps DNA these distances are between 5 and 10% longer than in aps DNA when the labeled DNA segment is located near the center of the double helix. The interspin distance in ps DNA becomes shorter compared with aps DNA when one of the spin labels occupies a position near the end of the double helix.

  5. Non-invasive assessment of intratumoral vascularity using arterial spin labeling: A comparison to susceptibility-weighted imaging for the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphoma and glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtner, J.; Schöpf, V.; Preusser, M.; Asenbaum, U.; Woitek, R.; Wöhrer, A.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Wolfsberger, S.; Prayer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Using conventional MRI methods, the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphomas (PCNSL) and other primary brain tumors, such as glioblastomas, is difficult due to overlapping imaging characteristics. This study was designed to discriminate tumor entities using normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values (nVITS) obtained from pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), combined with intratumoral susceptibility signals (ITSS) from susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Thirty consecutive patients with glioblastoma (n = 22) and PCNSL (n = 8), histologically classified according to the WHO brain tumor classification, were included. MRIs were acquired on a 3 T scanner, and included PASL and SWI sequences. nVITS was defined by the signal intensity ratio between the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue, as obtained by PASL images. ITSS was determined as intratumoral low signal intensity structures detected on SWI sequences and were divided into four different grades. Potential differences in the nVITS and ITSS between glioblastomas and PCNSLs were revealed using statistical testing. To determine sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy, as well as an optimum cut-off value for the differentiation of PCNSL and glioblastoma, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was used. We found that nVITS (p = 0.011) and ITSS (p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in glioblastoma than in PCNSL. The optimal cut-off value for nVITS was 1.41 and 1.5 for ITSS, with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of more than 95%. These findings indicate that nVITS values have a comparable diagnostic accuracy to ITSS values in differentiating glioblastoma and PCNSL, offering a completely non-invasive and fast assessment of tumoral vascularity in a clinical setting

  6. Non-invasive assessment of intratumoral vascularity using arterial spin labeling: A comparison to susceptibility-weighted imaging for the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphoma and glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtner, J; Schöpf, V; Preusser, M; Asenbaum, U; Woitek, R; Wöhrer, A; Hainfellner, J A; Wolfsberger, S; Prayer, D

    2014-05-01

    Using conventional MRI methods, the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphomas (PCNSL) and other primary brain tumors, such as glioblastomas, is difficult due to overlapping imaging characteristics. This study was designed to discriminate tumor entities using normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values (nVITS) obtained from pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), combined with intratumoral susceptibility signals (ITSS) from susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Thirty consecutive patients with glioblastoma (n=22) and PCNSL (n=8), histologically classified according to the WHO brain tumor classification, were included. MRIs were acquired on a 3T scanner, and included PASL and SWI sequences. nVITS was defined by the signal intensity ratio between the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue, as obtained by PASL images. ITSS was determined as intratumoral low signal intensity structures detected on SWI sequences and were divided into four different grades. Potential differences in the nVITS and ITSS between glioblastomas and PCNSLs were revealed using statistical testing. To determine sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy, as well as an optimum cut-off value for the differentiation of PCNSL and glioblastoma, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was used. We found that nVITS (p=0.011) and ITSS (p=0.001) values were significantly higher in glioblastoma than in PCNSL. The optimal cut-off value for nVITS was 1.41 and 1.5 for ITSS, with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of more than 95%. These findings indicate that nVITS values have a comparable diagnostic accuracy to ITSS values in differentiating glioblastoma and PCNSL, offering a completely non-invasive and fast assessment of tumoral vascularity in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-invasive assessment of intratumoral vascularity using arterial spin labeling: A comparison to susceptibility-weighted imaging for the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphoma and glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtner, J., E-mail: julia.furtner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Schöpf, V., E-mail: veronika.schoepf@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Preusser, M., E-mail: matthias.preusser@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Medicine I, Division of Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Asenbaum, U., E-mail: ulrika.asenbaum@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Woitek, R., E-mail: ramona.woitek@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wöhrer, A., E-mail: adelheid.woehrer@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Hainfellner, J.A., E-mail: johannes.hainfellner@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wolfsberger, S., E-mail: stefan.wolfsberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D., E-mail: daniela.prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center-Central Nervous System Tumors Unit (CCC-CNS), Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-15

    Using conventional MRI methods, the differentiation of primary cerebral lymphomas (PCNSL) and other primary brain tumors, such as glioblastomas, is difficult due to overlapping imaging characteristics. This study was designed to discriminate tumor entities using normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values (nVITS) obtained from pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL), combined with intratumoral susceptibility signals (ITSS) from susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Thirty consecutive patients with glioblastoma (n = 22) and PCNSL (n = 8), histologically classified according to the WHO brain tumor classification, were included. MRIs were acquired on a 3 T scanner, and included PASL and SWI sequences. nVITS was defined by the signal intensity ratio between the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue, as obtained by PASL images. ITSS was determined as intratumoral low signal intensity structures detected on SWI sequences and were divided into four different grades. Potential differences in the nVITS and ITSS between glioblastomas and PCNSLs were revealed using statistical testing. To determine sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy, as well as an optimum cut-off value for the differentiation of PCNSL and glioblastoma, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was used. We found that nVITS (p = 0.011) and ITSS (p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in glioblastoma than in PCNSL. The optimal cut-off value for nVITS was 1.41 and 1.5 for ITSS, with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of more than 95%. These findings indicate that nVITS values have a comparable diagnostic accuracy to ITSS values in differentiating glioblastoma and PCNSL, offering a completely non-invasive and fast assessment of tumoral vascularity in a clinical setting.

  8. Increased Brain Perfusion Persists over the First Month of Life in Term Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia: Does it Reflect Activated Angiogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Henna; Lechpammer, Mirna; Jensen, Frances E; Warfield, Simon K; Hansen, Anne H; Kosaras, Bela; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-06-01

    Many asphyxiated newborns still develop brain injury despite hypothermia therapy. The development of brain injury in these newborns has been related partly to brain perfusion abnormalities. The purposes of this study were to assess brain hyperperfusion over the first month of life in term asphyxiated newborns and to search for some histopathological clues indicating whether this hyperperfusion may be related to activated angiogenesis following asphyxia. In this prospective cohort study, regional cerebral blood flow was measured in term asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia around day 10 of life and around 1 month of life using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arterial spin labeling. A total of 32 MRI scans were obtained from 24 term newborns. Asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia displayed an increased cerebral blood flow in the injured brain areas around day 10 of life and up to 1 month of life. In addition, we looked at the histopathological clues in a human asphyxiated newborn and in a rat model of neonatal encephalopathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed in the injured brain of an asphyxiated newborn treated with hypothermia in the first days of life and of rat pups 24-48 h after the hypoxic-ischemic event, and the endothelial cell count increased in the injured cortex of the pups 7 and 11 days after hypoxia-ischemia. Our data showed that the hyperperfusion measured by imaging persisted in the injured areas up to 1 month of life and that angiogenesis was activated in the injured brain of asphyxiated newborns.

  9. QUANTITATIVE CHANGES IN REGIONAL CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW INDUCED BY COLD, HEAT AND ISCHEMIC PAIN: A CONTINUOUS ARTERIAL SPIN LABELING STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Michael A.; Deshpande, Hrishikesh; Ness, Timothy; Deutsch, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of arterial spin labeling methods, has allowed measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantitatively and to show the pattern of cerebral activity associated with any state such as a sustained pain state or changes due to a neurotropic drug. Methods We studied the differential effects of three pain conditions in ten healthy subjects on a 3T scanner during resting baseline, heat, cold and ischemic pain using continuous arterial spin labeling. Results Cold pain showed the greatest absolute rCBF increases in left anterior cingulate cortex, left amygdala, left angular gyrus, and Brodmann Area 6, and a significant rCBF decrease in the cerebellum. Changes in rCBF were characteristic of the type of pain condition: cold and heat pain showed increases, while the ischemic condition showed a reduction in mean absolute gray matter flow compared to rest. An association of subjects’ pain tolerance and cerebral blood flow was noted. Conclusions The observation that quantitative rCBF changes are characteristic of the pain task employed and that there is a consistent rCBF change in Brodman area 6, an area responsible for the integration of a motor response to pain, should provide extremely useful information in the quest to develop an imaging biomarker of pain. Conceivably, response in BA6 may serve as an objective measure of analgesic efficacy. PMID:22913924

  10. Computing distance distributions from dipolar evolution data with overtones: RIDME spectroscopy with Gd(iii)-based spin labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Katharina; Mertens, Valerie; Qi, Mian; Nalepa, Anna I; Godt, Adelheid; Savitsky, Anton; Jeschke, Gunnar; Yulikov, Maxim

    2017-07-21

    Extraction of distance distributions between high-spin paramagnetic centers from relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) data is affected by the presence of overtones of dipolar frequencies. As previously proposed, we account for these overtones by using a modified kernel function in Tikhonov regularization analysis. This paper analyzes the performance of such an approach on a series of model compounds with the Gd(iii)-PyMTA complex serving as paramagnetic high-spin label. We describe the calibration of the overtone coefficients for the RIDME kernel, demonstrate the accuracy of distance distributions obtained with this approach, and show that for our series of Gd-rulers RIDME technique provides more accurate distance distributions than Gd(iii)-Gd(iii) double electron-electron resonance (DEER). The analysis of RIDME data including harmonic overtones can be performed using the MATLAB-based program OvertoneAnalysis, which is available as open-source software from the web page of ETH Zurich. This approach opens a perspective for the routine use of the RIDME technique with high-spin labels in structural biology and structural studies of other soft matter.

  11. Quantitative changes in regional cerebral blood flow induced by cold, heat and ischemic pain: a continuous arterial spin labeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Michael A; Deshpande, Hrishikesh; Ness, Timothy; Deutsch, Georg

    2012-10-01

    The development of arterial spin labeling methods has allowed measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantitatively and to show the pattern of cerebral activity associated with any state such as a sustained pain state or changes due to a neurotropic drug. The authors studied the differential effects of three pain conditions in 10 healthy subjects on a 3 Tesla scanner during resting baseline, heat, cold, and ischemic pain using continuous arterial spin labeling. Cold pain showed the greatest absolute rCBF increases in left anterior cingulate cortex, left amygdala, left angular gyrus, and Brodmann area 6, and a significant rCBF decrease in the cerebellum. Changes in rCBF were characteristic of the type of pain condition: cold and heat pain showed increases, whereas the ischemic condition showed a reduction in mean absolute gray matter flow compared with rest. An association of subjects' pain tolerance and cerebral blood flow was noted. The observation that quantitative rCBF changes are characteristic of the pain task used and that there is a consistent rCBF change in Brodman area 6, an area responsible for the integration of a motor response to pain, should provide extremely useful information in the quest to develop an imaging biomarker of pain. Conceivably, response in BA6 may serve as an objective measure of analgesic efficacy.

  12. Evaluation of femoral perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after simultaneous initiation of electrical stimulation and steroid treatment in an osteonecrosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroki; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Ishida, Masashi; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Shigeki; Ikegami, Akira; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-04-30

    This study aimed to evaluate femoral perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for two weeks after the simultaneous initiation of electrical stimulation (ES) and steroid treatment in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis (ON) model. A single dose of methylprednisolone was injected into 14 rabbits. Seven rabbits underwent ES (ES group), and seven rabbits did not (control group). DCE-MRI was performed before steroid administration and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after steroid administration. Regions of interest were set in the bilateral proximal femora. The enhancement ratio, initial slope, and area under the curve were analyzed. These parameters were evaluated after steroid administration in each group and between the two groups, and the ratios of ON in both groups were compared. In the control group, the minimum values of all parameters decreased significantly after steroid administration (P < 0.05), but in the ES group, the parameters did not decrease. In the ES group, all parameter values were significantly increased on the 10th and 14th days (P < 0.05). All parameter values in the ES group were significantly higher than those in the control group on the 14th day (P < 0.05). In the control group, ON was detected in three of five rabbits (in three of ten femora). In the ES group, ON was not detected. These results suggest that increased femoral blood flow elicited by ES may be related to ON prevention after steroid administration.

  13. Measurement of the arterial concentration of Gd-DTPA using MRI: a step toward quantitative perfusion imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B

    1996-01-01

    A noninvasive method using an inversion recovery turbo-FLASH for dynamic measurement of the arterial input function represented by the bolus passage of Gd-DTPA in the descending aorta is presented, and the results are compared with the input function obtained by arterial blood samples. A good...... accordance between the two input functions was found, indicating that it is possible to measure the input function to the myocardium using MRI. A variation between the two concentration curves of 5% at upslope, 2.7% at peak point, and ... inversion time peak concentration....

  14. Improved perfusion quantification in FAIR imaging by offset correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidaros, Karam; Andersen, Irene Klærke; Gesmar, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    Perfusion quantification using pulsed arterial spin labeling has been shown to be sensitive to the RF pulse slice profiles. Therefore, in Flow-sensitive Alternating-Inversion Recovery (FAIR) imaging the slice selective (ss) inversion slab is usually three to four times thicker than the imaging...... slice. However, this reduces perfusion sensitivity due to the increased transit delay of the incoming blood with unperturbed spins. In the present article, the dependence of the magnetization on the RF pulse slice profiles is inspected both theoretically and experimentally. A perfusion quantification...... model is presented that allows the use of thinner ss inversion slabs by taking into account the offset of RF slice profiles between ss and nonselective inversion slabs. This model was tested in both phantom and human studies. Magn Reson Med 46:193-197, 2001...

  15. Correlation between the rate of bioreduction of nitroxide spin label by human tumor cells and their low-dose radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, H.J.; Peric, M.; Nguyen, T.D.; Spencer, D.P.; Bowman, M.K.; Beckett, M.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss a correlation observed between the bioreduction of nitroxide spin label by four human tumor cell lines and a normal tissue fibroblast clone and their low-dose radiation response, specifically their D Q . In measurements of the bioreduction rate of several other cell lines, this correlation appears to persist. In order to define the mechanism of this correlation, they have begun by subtly altering the measurement conditions. The original conditions for measurement involved adding the spin label to cells whose culture medium had been changed (the label was added to the new medium). By delaying the addition of the label to the culture medium, they substantially reduced the variation of the bioreduction rate between the cell lines. This implies that the fresh medium provides a nonspecific irritant or disequilibrium to the cultured cell system to which they response variably by accelerating, among other things, the metabolic process responsible for spin label bioreduction

  16. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  17. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  18. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of spin labelled double and single-strand DNA for EPR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, C; Danilāne, L; Oganesyan, V S

    2018-05-16

    We report the first application of fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to the prediction of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of spin labelled DNA. Models for two structurally different DNA spin probes with either the rigid or flexible position of the nitroxide group in the base pair, employed in experimental studies previously, have been developed. By the application of the combined MD-EPR simulation methodology we aimed at the following. Firstly, to provide a test bed against a sensitive spectroscopic technique for the recently developed improved version of the parmbsc1 force field for MD modelling of DNA. The predicted EPR spectra show good agreement with the experimental ones available from the literature, thus confirming the accuracy of the currently employed DNA force fields. Secondly, to provide a quantitative interpretation of the motional contributions into the dynamics of spin probes in both duplex and single-strand DNA fragments and to analyse their perturbing effects on the local DNA structure. Finally, a combination of MD and EPR allowed us to test the validity of the application of the Model-Free (M-F) approach coupled with the partial averaging of magnetic tensors to the simulation of EPR spectra of DNA systems by comparing the resultant EPR spectra with those simulated directly from MD trajectories. The advantage of the M-F based EPR simulation approach over the direct propagation techniques is that it requires motional and order parameters that can be calculated from shorter MD trajectories. The reported MD-EPR methodology is transferable to the prediction and interpretation of EPR spectra of higher order DNA structures with novel types of spin labels.

  19. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300 kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. [Diffusion weighted imaging and perfusion weighted imaging in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant renal masses on 3.0 T MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowen; Wang, Peijun; Ma, Liang; Shao, Zhihong; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-20

    To explore the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) in identifying benign and malignant renal masses and differentiating the histological types of renal masses. Fifteen healthy volunteers and 46 patients with renal masses proven by pathology, including clear cell carcinomas (n = 18), papillary carcinomas (n = 8), chromophobe carcinomas (n = 7) and angiomyolipomas (n = 13), were examined with DWI and PWI scan at 3.0 T MRI. ANOVA was employed to compare the values of transfer constant (K(trans)), rate constant of backflux (Kep) and extra-vascular extra-cellular space fractional volume (Ve) proceeded by PWI and the value of ADC resulted from DWI between normal kidney and different histological types of renal masses. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was used to analyze and compare the diagnostic value of the methods of PWI and DWI in differentiating benign and malignant renal masses. The ADC value of normal renal parenchyma was (2.10 ± 0.24) × 10⁻³ mm²/s, which was statistically higher than benign and malignant renal masses (P 0.05).Values of K(trans), Kep and Ve between normal renal parenchyma and different histological types of renal masses had statistical differences.Values of K(trans) and Ve in three histological types of malignant renal masses were statistically higher than those of benign renal masses.Kep value of clear cell carcinoma was significantly higher than that of benign renal masses (P benign and malignant renal masses. The K(trans) of benign and malignant renal masses had the largest AUC (AUC = 0.937) at a threshold of 0.38/min. And there were a sensitivity of 87.9% and a specificity of 85.7%. The AUC of ADC was 0.823, sensitivity 72.7% and specificity 92.9%. The ADC threshold for differentiating benign from malignant masses was 1.40 × 10⁻³ mm²/s; AUC of Ve 0.803, sensitivity 78.8% and specificity 71.4%, a threshold of 0.29/min; Kep showed lower diagnostic value. 3.0 T MRI DWI and PWI

  1. Mononitroxides and proximate dinitroxides derived by oxidation of 2,2,4,4,5,5-hexasubstituted imidazolidines. A new series of nitroxide and dinitroxide spin labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keana, J.F.W.; Norton, R.S.; Morello, M.; Van Engen, D.; Clardy, J.

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis and some properties of two members of a new series of rigid dinitroxides in which the nitroxide groups are separated from each other by only one carbon atom are reported. The synthesis of reverse intermediate imidazolidine mononitroxides which may have potential as new spin labels is also reported

  2. Sequence- and structure-dependent DNA base dynamics: Synthesis, structure, and dynamics of site and sequence specifically spin-labeled DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaltenstein, A.; Robinson, B.H.; Hopkins, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    A nitroxide spin-labeled analogue of thymidine (1a), in which the methyl group is replaced by an acetylene-tethered nitroxide, was evaluated as a probe for structural and dynamics studies of sequence specifically spin-labeled DNA. Residue 1a was incorporated into synthetic deoxyoligonucleotides by using automated phosphite triester methods. 1 H NMR, CD, and thermal denaturation studies indicate that 1a (T) does not significantly alter the structure of 5'-d(CGCGAATT*CGCG) from that of the native dodecamer. EPR studies on monomer, single-stranded, and duplexed DNA show that 1a readily distinguishes environments of different rigidity. Comparison of the general line-shape features of the observed EPR spectra of several small duplexes (12-mer, 24-mer) with simulated EPR spectra assuming isotropic motion suggests that probe 1a monitors global tumbling of small duplexes. Increasing the length of the DNA oligomers results in significant deviation from isotropic motion, with line-shape features similar to those of calculated spectra of objects with isotropic rotational correlation times of 20-100 ns. EPR spectra of a spin-labeled GT mismatch and a T bulge in long DNAs are distinct from those of spin-labeled Watson-Crick paired DNAs, further demonstrating the value of EPR as a tool in the evaluation of local dynamic and structural features in macromolecules

  3. Spin labelled nitrosoureas and triazenes and their non-labelled clinically used analogues--a comparative study on their physicochemical properties and antimelanomic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleva, A M; Gadjeva, V G

    2001-01-16

    Physicochemical properties, such as half life time (tau0.5), alkylating and carbamoylating activity and in vivo antimelanomic effects against B16 melanoma of spin labeled (containing nitroxyl free radical moiety) amino acid nitrosoureas, synthesized in our laboratory, have been studied and compared to those of the antitumor drug N'-cyclohexyl-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea (lomustine, CCNU). We have shown that the introduction of amino acid moieties and the replacement of cyclohexylamine with nitroxyl moiety leads to a faster decomposition, higher alkylating, lower carbamoylating activity, better antimelanomic activity and lower general toxicity, when compared to those of CCNU. It was also established that spin labeled triazenes, previously synthesized by us, were more stable in phosphate saline than their nonlabeled analogue, 5-(3,3-dimethyltriazene-1-yl)-imidazole-4-carboxamide (dacarbazine, DTIC). A higher cytotoxicity to B16 melanoma cells than to YAC-1 and lymphocytes was demonstrated for all spin labeled triazenes, in comparison with DTIC. An assumption has been made to explain the lower general toxicity of the spin labeled nitrosoureas compared to that of CCNU. Based on the results presented, we accept that a new trend for synthesis of more selective and less toxic nitrosourea and triazene derivatives as potential antimelanomic drugs might be developed.

  4. Using intravoxel incoherent motion MR imaging to study the renal pathophysiological process of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in rats: Comparison with conventional DWI and arterial spin labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Long; Zhang, Bin [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Southern Medical University, Graduate College, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Wen-bo; Liang, Chang-hong; Zhang, Shui-xing [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Chan, Kannie W.Y.; Li, Yu-guo; Liu, Guan-shu [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of MR Research, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the potential of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) to assess the renal pathophysiological process in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI). Twenty-seven rats were induced with CIAKI model, six rats were imaged longitudinally at 24 h prior to and 30 min, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after administration; three rats were randomly chosen from the rest for serum creatinine and histological studies. D, f, D* and ADC were calculated from IVIM, and renal blood flow (RBF) was obtained from arterial spin labelling (ASL). A progressive reduction in D and ADC was observed in cortex (CO) by 3.07 and 8.62 % at 30 min, and by 25.77 and 28.16 % at 48 h, respectively. A similar change in outer medulla (OM) and inner medulla (IM) was observed at a later time point (12-72 h). D values were strongly correlated with ADC (r = 0.885). As perfusion measurement, a significant decrease was shown for f in 12-48 h and an increase in 72-96 h. A slightly different trend was found for D*, which was decreased by 26.02, 21.78 and 10.19 % in CO, OM and IM, respectively, at 30 min. f and D* were strongly correlated with RBF in the cortex (r = 0.768, r = 0.67), but not in the medulla. IVIM is an effective imaging tool for monitoring progress in renal pathophysiology undergoing CIAKI. (orig.)

  5. Volumetric assessment of recurrent or progressive gliomas: comparison between F-DOPA PET and perfusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicone, Francesco [Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy). Unit of Nuclear Medicine; Rome Sapienza Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Surgical and Medical Sciences and tranlational Medicine; Research Centre Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neureoscience and Medicine; Filss, Christian P.; Langen, Karl-Josef [Research Centre Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neureoscience and Medicine; RWTH Aachen Univ. Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia [Rome Sapienza Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Surgical and Medical Sciences and tranlational Medicine; Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy). Unit of Radiotherapy; Rossi-Espagnet, Camilla; Bozzao, Alessandro [Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy). Unit of Neuroradiology; Rome Sapienza Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Organs (Ne.S.M.O.S.); Papa, Annalisa; Scopinaro, Francesco [Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy). Unit of Nuclear Medicine; Rome Sapienza Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Surgical and Medical Sciences and tranlational Medicine; Galldiks, Norbert [Research Centre Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neureoscience and Medicine; Cologne Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Shah, N. Jon [Research Centre Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neureoscience and Medicine

    2015-05-01

    To compare the diagnostic information obtained with 6-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA) PET and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps in recurrent or progressive glioma. All patients with recurrent or progressive glioma referred for F-DOPA imaging at our institution between May 2010 and May 2014 were retrospectively included, provided that macroscopic disease was visible on conventional MRI images and that rCBV maps were available for comparison. The final analysis included 50 paired studies (44 patients). After image registration, automatic tumour segmentation of both sets of images was performed using the average signal in a large reference VOI including grey and white matter multiplied by 1.6. Tumour volumes identified by both modalities were compared and their spatial congruence calculated. The distances between F-DOPA uptake and rCBV hot spots, tumour-to-brain ratios (TBRs) and normalized histograms were also computed. On visual inspection, 49 of the 50 F-DOPA and 45 of the 50 rCBV studies were classified as positive. The tumour volume delineated using F-DOPA (F-DOPA{sub vol} {sub 1.6}) greatly exceeded that of rCBV maps (rCBV{sub vol} {sub 1.6}). The median F-DOPA{sub vol} {sub 1.6} and rCBV{sub vol} {sub 1.6} were 11.44 ml (range 0 - 220.95 ml) and 1.04 ml (range 0 - 26.30 ml), respectively (p < 0.00001). Overall, the median overlapping volume was 0.27 ml, resulting in a spatial congruence of 1.38 % (range 0 - 39.22 %). The mean hot spot distance was 27.17 mm (±16.92 mm). F-DOPA uptake TBR was significantly higher than rCBV TBR (1.76 ± 0.60 vs. 1.15 ± 0.52, respectively; p < 0.0001). The histogram analysis showed that F-DOPA provided better separation of tumour from background. In 6 of the 50 studies (12 %), however, physiological uptake in the striatum interfered with tumour delineation. The information provided by F-DOPA PET and rCBV maps are substantially different. Image interpretation is easier and a larger tumour extent

  6. Contralateral thalamic hypoperfusion on brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sang Kyun; Yoo, Kyung Moo; Yum, Ha Yong

    2000-01-01

    Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful for the localization of cerebrovascular lesion and sometimes reveals more definite lesion than radiologic imaging modality such as CT or MRI does. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brain perfusion SPECT in patients with hemisensory impairment. Thirteen consecutive patients (M:F= 8:5, mean age = 48) who has hemisensory impairment were included. Brain perfusion SPECT was performed after intravenous injection of 1110 MBq of Tc-99m ECD. The images were obtained using a dual-head gamma camera with ultra-high resolution collimator. Semiquantitative analysis was performed after placing multiple ROIs on cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. There were 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment and 3 patients with right-sided symptom. Only 2 patients revealed abnormal signal change in the thalamus on MRI. But brain perfusion SPECT showed decreased perfusion in the thalamus in 9 patients. Six patients among 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment revealed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. The other 4 patients revealed no abnormality. Two patients among 3 patients with right hemisensory impairment also showed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. One patients with right hemisensory impairment showed ipsilateral perfusion decrease. Two patients who had follow-up brain perfusion SEPCT after treatment revealed normalization of perfusion in the thalamus. Brain perfusion SPECT might be a useful tool in diagnosing patients with hemisensory impairment

  7. Imaging Human Brain Perfusion with Inhaled Hyperpolarized 129Xe MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Madhwesha R; Stewart, Neil J; Griffiths, Paul D; Norquay, Graham; Wild, Jim M

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of directly imaging perfusion of human brain tissue by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with inhaled hyperpolarized xenon 129 ( 129 Xe). Materials and Methods In vivo imaging with 129 Xe was performed in three healthy participants. The combination of a high-yield spin-exchange optical pumping 129 Xe polarizer, custom-built radiofrequency coils, and an optimized gradient-echo MR imaging protocol was used to achieve signal sensitivity sufficient to directly image hyperpolarized 129 Xe dissolved in the human brain. Conventional T1-weighted proton (hydrogen 1 [ 1 H]) images and perfusion images by using arterial spin labeling were obtained for comparison. Results Images of 129 Xe uptake were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 31 ± 9 and demonstrated structural similarities to the gray matter distribution on conventional T1-weighted 1 H images and to perfusion images from arterial spin labeling. Conclusion Hyperpolarized 129 Xe MR imaging is an injection-free means of imaging the perfusion of cerebral tissue. The proposed method images the uptake of inhaled xenon gas to the extravascular brain tissue compartment across the intact blood-brain barrier. This level of sensitivity is not readily available with contemporary MR imaging methods. © RSNA, 2017.

  8. Cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia: two sides of the same coin?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfaillie, Sander C.J.; Adriaanse, Sofie M.; Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Benedictus, Marije R.; Ossenkoppele, Rik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre and Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wattjes, Mike P.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre and Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre and Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijer, Joost P.A. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal (FTD) dementia can be differentiated using [{sup 18}F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET. Since cerebral blood flow (CBF) is related to glucose metabolism, our aim was to investigate the extent of overlap of abnormalities between AD and FTD. Normalized FDG-PET and arterial spin labelling (ASL-MRI)-derived CBF was measured in 18 AD patients (age, 64 ± 8), 12 FTD patients (age, 61 ± 8), and 10 controls (age, 56 ± 10). Voxel-wise comparisons, region-of-interest (ROI), correlation, and ROC curve analyses were performed. Voxel-wise comparisons showed decreased CBF and FDG uptake in AD compared with controls and FTD in both precuneus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Compared with controls and AD, FTD patients showed both hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). ASL and FDG were related in precuneus (r = 0.62, p < 0.001), IPL (r = 0.61, p < 0.001), and mPFC across groups (r = 0.74, p < 001). ROC analyses indicated comparable performance of perfusion and metabolism in the precuneus (AUC, 0.72 and 0.74), IPL (0.85 and 0.94) for AD relative to FTD, and in the mPFC in FTD relative to AD (both 0.68). Similar patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism were observed in regions typically associated with AD and FTD, suggesting that ASL-MRI provides information comparable to FDG-PET. (orig.)

  9. Cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia: two sides of the same coin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfaillie, Sander C.J.; Adriaanse, Sofie M.; Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Benedictus, Marije R.; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Wattjes, Mike P.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L.; Scheltens, Philip; Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Kuijer, Joost P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal (FTD) dementia can be differentiated using [ 18 F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET. Since cerebral blood flow (CBF) is related to glucose metabolism, our aim was to investigate the extent of overlap of abnormalities between AD and FTD. Normalized FDG-PET and arterial spin labelling (ASL-MRI)-derived CBF was measured in 18 AD patients (age, 64 ± 8), 12 FTD patients (age, 61 ± 8), and 10 controls (age, 56 ± 10). Voxel-wise comparisons, region-of-interest (ROI), correlation, and ROC curve analyses were performed. Voxel-wise comparisons showed decreased CBF and FDG uptake in AD compared with controls and FTD in both precuneus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Compared with controls and AD, FTD patients showed both hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). ASL and FDG were related in precuneus (r = 0.62, p < 0.001), IPL (r = 0.61, p < 0.001), and mPFC across groups (r = 0.74, p < 001). ROC analyses indicated comparable performance of perfusion and metabolism in the precuneus (AUC, 0.72 and 0.74), IPL (0.85 and 0.94) for AD relative to FTD, and in the mPFC in FTD relative to AD (both 0.68). Similar patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism were observed in regions typically associated with AD and FTD, suggesting that ASL-MRI provides information comparable to FDG-PET. (orig.)

  10. Na+/substrate Coupling in the Multidrug Antiporter NorM Probed with a Spin-labeled Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, P. Ryan; Stein, Richard A.; Mishra, Smriti; Goodman, Michael C.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2013-01-01

    NorM of the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of transporters couples the efflux of a broad range of hydrophobic molecules to an inward Na+ gradient across the cell membrane. Several crystal structures of MATE transporters revealed distinct substrate binding sites leading to differing models of the mechanism of ion-coupled substrate extrusion. In the experiments reported here, we observed that a spin-labeled derivative of daunorubicin, Ruboxyl, is transported by NorM from Vibrio cholerae. It is therefore ideal to characterize mechanistically relevant binding interactions with NorM and to directly address the coupling of ion and drug binding. Fluorescence and EPR experiments revealed that Ruboxyl binds to NorM with micromolar affinity and becomes immobilized upon binding, even in the presence of Na+. Using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we determined that Ruboxyl binds to a single site on the periplasmic side of the protein. The presence of Na+ did not translocate the substrate to a second site as previously proposed. These experiments surprisingly show that Na+ does not affect the affinity or location of the substrate binding site on detergent-solubilized NorM, thus suggesting that additional factors beyond simple mutual exclusivity of binding, such as the presence of a Na+ gradient across the native membrane, govern Na+/drug coupling during antiport. PMID:23902581

  11. Kinetics of rapid covalent bond formation of aniline with humic acid: ESR investigations with nitroxide spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinka, Kevin; Matthies, Michael; Theiling, Marius; Hideg, Kalman; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics used in livestock farming are distributed to farmland by application of slurry as fertilizer. Previous work suggests rapid covalent binding of the aniline moiety to humic acids found in soil. In the current work, kinetics of this binding were measured in X-band EPR spectroscopy by incubating Leonardite humic acid (LHA) with a paramagnetic aniline spin label (anilino-NO (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl)). Binding was detected by a pronounced broadening of the spectral lines after incubation of LHA with anilino-NO. The time evolution of the amplitude of this feature was used for determining the reaction kinetics. Single- and double-exponential models were fitted to the data obtained for modelling one or two first-order reactions. Reaction rates of 0.16 min-1 and 0.012 min-1, were found respectively. Addition of laccase peroxidase did not change the kinetics but significantly enhanced the reacting fraction of anilino-NO. This EPR-based method provides a technically simple and effective method for following rapid binding processes of a xenobiotic substance to humic acids.

  12. SimLabel: a graphical user interface to simulate continuous wave EPR spectra from site-directed spin labeling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, E; Le Breton, N; Martinho, M; Mileo, E; Belle, V

    2017-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) combined with continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions in proteins. SDSL-EPR is based on the selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study, followed by cw EPR analysis. To extract valuable quantitative information from SDSL-EPR spectra and thus give reliable interpretation on biological system dynamics, numerical simulations of the spectra are required. Such spectral simulations can be carried out by coding in MATLAB using functions from the EasySpin toolbox. For non-expert users of MATLAB, this could be a complex task or even impede the use of such simulation tool. We developed a graphical user interface called SimLabel dedicated to run cw EPR spectra simulations particularly coming from SDSL-EPR experiments. Simlabel provides an intuitive way to visualize, simulate, and fit such cw EPR spectra. An example of SDSL-EPR spectra simulation concerning the study of an intrinsically disordered region undergoing a local induced folding is described and discussed. We believe that this new tool will help the users to rapidly obtain reliable simulated spectra and hence facilitate the interpretation of their results. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  14. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. The effects of general anesthetics on ESR spectra of spin labels in phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing purified Na,K-ATPase or microsomal protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Makiko, E-mail: shibu@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Hiraoki, Toshifumi [Division of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University (Japan); Kimura, Kunie; Fukushima, Kazuaki [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Suzuki, Kuniaki [Department of Molecular Cell Pharmacology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the effects of general anesthetics on liposome using ESR spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two spin labels, 5-DSA and 16-DSA, were located in different position in liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anesthetics did not change the environment around the spin labels in the liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anesthetics remained on the surface of the lipid bilayer of liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteins in the liposome did not change the effects of anesthetics on liposome. - Abstract: We investigated the effects of general anesthetics on liposome containing spin labels, 5-doxyl stearic acid (5-DSA) and 16-doxyl stearic acid (16-DSA), and purified Na,K-ATPase or membrane protein of microsome using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The spectra of 16-DSA in liposomes with both proteins showed three sharp signals compared with 5-DSA. The difference in the order parameter S value of 5-DSA and 16-DSA suggested that the nitroxide radical location of 5-DSA and 16-DSA were different in the membrane bilayer. The results were almost the same as those obtained in liposomes without proteins. The addition of sevoflurane, isoflurane, halothane, ether, ethanol and propofol increased the intensity of the signals, but the clinical concentrations of anesthetics did not significantly alter the S and {tau} values, which are indices of the fluidity of the membrane. These results suggest that anesthetics remain on the surface of the lipid bilayer and do not act on both the inside hydrophobic area and the relatively hydrophilic area near the surface. These results and others also suggest that the existence of Na,K-ATPase and microsomal proteins did not affect the environment around the spin labels in the liposome and the effects of anesthetics on liposome as a model membrane.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin label titration: a novel method to investigate random and site-specific immobilization of enzymes onto polymeric membranes with different properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Colvin, Joshua; Liu Jiangling; Wang Jianquan; Bachas, Leonidas; Bhattacharrya, Dibakar

    2002-01-01

    The immobilization of biological molecules onto polymeric membranes to produce biofunctional membranes is used for selective catalysis, separation, analysis, and artificial organs. Normally, random immobilization of enzymes onto polymeric membranes leads to dramatic reduction in activity due to chemical reactions involved in enzyme immobilization, multiple-point binding, etc., and the extent of activity reduction is a function of membrane hydrophilicity (e.g. activity in cellulosic membrane >> polysulfone membrane). We have used molecular biology to effect site-specific immobilization of enzymes in a manner that orients the active site away from the polymeric membrane surface, thus resulting in higher enzyme activity that approaches that in solution and in increased stability of the enzyme relative to the enzyme in solution. A prediction of this site-specific method of enzyme immobilization, which in this study with subtilisin and organophosphorus hydrolase consists of a fusion tag genetically added to these enzymes and subsequent immobilization via the anti-tag antibody and membrane-bound protein A, is that the active site conformation will more closely resemble that of the enzyme in solution than is the case for random immobilization. This hypothesis was confirmed using a new electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin label active site titration method that determines the amount of spin label bound to the active site of the immobilized enzyme. This value nearly perfectly matched the enzyme activity, and the results suggested: (a) a spectroscopic method for measuring activity and thus the extent of active enzyme immobilization in membrane, which may have advantages in cases where optical methods can not be used due to light scattering interference; (b) higher spin label incorporation (and hence activity) in enzymes that had been site-specifically immobilized versus random immobilization; (c) higher spin label incorporation in enzymes immobilized onto hydrophilic

  17. Combining EPR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography to elucidate the structure and dynamics of conformationally constrained spin labels in T4 lysozyme single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consentius, Philipp; Gohlke, Ulrich; Loll, Bernhard; Alings, Claudia; Heinemann, Udo; Wahl, Markus C; Risse, Thomas

    2017-08-09

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling is used to investigate the structure and dynamics of conformationally constrained spin labels in T4 lysozyme single crystals. Within a single crystal, the oriented ensemble of spin bearing moieties results in a strong angle dependence of the EPR spectra. A quantitative description of the EPR spectra requires the determination of the unit cell orientation with respect to the sample tube and the orientation of the spin bearing moieties within the crystal lattice. Angle dependent EPR spectra were analyzed by line shape simulations using the stochastic Liouville equation approach developed by Freed and co-workers and an effective Hamiltonian approach. The gain in spectral information obtained from the EPR spectra of single crystalline samples taken at different frequencies, namely the X-band and Q-band, allows us to discriminate between motional models describing the spectra of isotropic solutions similarly well. In addition, it is shown that the angle dependent single crystal spectra allow us to identify two spin label rotamers with very similar side chain dynamics. These results demonstrate the utility of single crystal EPR spectroscopy in combination with spectral line shape simulation techniques to extract valuable dynamic information not readily available from the analysis of isotropic systems. In addition, it will be shown that the loss of electron density in high resolution diffraction experiments at room temperature does not allow us to conclude that there is significant structural disorder in the system.

  18. Medial Occipital Lobe Hyperperfusion Identified by Arterial Spin-Labeling: A Poor Prognostic Sign in Patients with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Havenon, A; Sultan-Qurraie, A; Tirschwell, D; Cohen, W; Majersik, J; Andre, J B

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy carries an uncertain prognosis. We sought to retrospectively assess the prognostic value of arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in 22 adult patients diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Quantitative CBF maps were generated from the M0 map, and arterial spin-labeling data on a per-voxel basis were regionally interrogated via visual inspection and ROI placement. Hyperperfusion was defined as regional increases in CBF of >20% (relative to global CBF) and/or >100 mL/100 g/min. Eleven of 22 patients had prominent bilateral medial occipital lobe hyperperfusion, all of whom died before hospital discharge. One patient who had nondistinct arterial spin-labeling hyperperfusion and restricted diffusion survived. Medial occipital lobe hyperperfusion is a distinctive pattern that merits prospective investigation in a cohort of patients with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy to determine its predictive ability in patients with a higher likelihood of survival. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Support vector machine learning-based fMRI data group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Childress, Anna R; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A

    2007-07-15

    To explore the multivariate nature of fMRI data and to consider the inter-subject brain response discrepancies, a multivariate and brain response model-free method is fundamentally required. Two such methods are presented in this paper by integrating a machine learning algorithm, the support vector machine (SVM), and the random effect model. Without any brain response modeling, SVM was used to extract a whole brain spatial discriminance map (SDM), representing the brain response difference between the contrasted experimental conditions. Population inference was then obtained through the random effect analysis (RFX) or permutation testing (PMU) on the individual subjects' SDMs. Applied to arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion fMRI data, SDM RFX yielded lower false-positive rates in the null hypothesis test and higher detection sensitivity for synthetic activations with varying cluster size and activation strengths, compared to the univariate general linear model (GLM)-based RFX. For a sensory-motor ASL fMRI study, both SDM RFX and SDM PMU yielded similar activation patterns to GLM RFX and GLM PMU, respectively, but with higher t values and cluster extensions at the same significance level. Capitalizing on the absence of temporal noise correlation in ASL data, this study also incorporated PMU in the individual-level GLM and SVM analyses accompanied by group-level analysis through RFX or group-level PMU. Providing inferences on the probability of being activated or deactivated at each voxel, these individual-level PMU-based group analysis methods can be used to threshold the analysis results of GLM RFX, SDM RFX or SDM PMU.

  20. Simultaneous Multiagent Hyperpolarized 13C Perfusion Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert A.; Reed, Galen D.

    2014-01-01

    in simulations. "Tripolarized" perfusion MRI methods were applied to initial preclinical studies with differential conditions of vascular permeability, in normal mouse tissues and advanced transgenic mouse prostate tumors. Results: Dynamic imaging revealed clear differences among the individual tracer...... distributions. Computed permeability maps demonstrated differential permeability of brain tissue among the tracers, and tumor perfusion and permeability were both elevated over values expected for normal tissues. Conclusion: Tripolarized perfusion MRI provides new molecular imaging measures for specifically...

  1. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-01-01

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A

  2. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-09-22

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A.

  3. Circular dichroism and site-directed spin labeling reveal structural and dynamical features of high-pressure states of myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Michael T.; Horwitz, Joseph; McCoy, John; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Excited states of proteins may play important roles in function, yet are difficult to study spectroscopically because of their sparse population. High hydrostatic pressure increases the equilibrium population of excited states, enabling their characterization [Akasaka K (2003) Biochemistry 42:10875–85]. High-pressure site-directed spin-labeling EPR (SDSL-EPR) was developed recently to map the site-specific structure and dynamics of excited states populated by pressure. To monitor global secondary structure content by circular dichroism (CD) at high pressure, a modified optical cell using a custom MgF2 window with a reduced aperture is introduced. Here, a combination of SDSL-EPR and CD is used to map reversible structural transitions in holomyoglobin and apomyoglobin (apoMb) as a function of applied pressure up to 2 kbar. CD shows that the high-pressure excited state of apoMb at pH 6 has helical content identical to that of native apoMb, but reversible changes reflecting the appearance of a conformational ensemble are observed by SDSL-EPR, suggesting a helical topology that fluctuates slowly on the EPR time scale. Although the high-pressure state of apoMb at pH 6 has been referred to as a molten globule, the data presented here reveal significant differences from the well-characterized pH 4.1 molten globule of apoMb. Pressure-populated states of both holomyoglobin and apoMb at pH 4.1 have significantly less helical structure, and for the latter, that may correspond to a transient folding intermediate. PMID:24248390

  4. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow Intravenous pyelogram References Rottenberg G, Andi AC. Renal ...

  5. Interleaved MRI/MRS study of muscle perfusion, oxygenation and high energy phosphate metabolism in normal subjects and Becker's myopathic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, J.F.; Brillault-Salvat, C.; Giacomini, E.; Bloch, G.; Duboc, D.; Jehenson, P.

    1998-01-01

    We present the first results of a study comparing patients suffering from Becker's myopathy and normal volunteers. We simultaneously assessed perfusion, oxygenation and high-energy phosphate metabolism using an interleaved NMR/NMRS approach. Muscle metabolism does not seem to differ in Becker's patients, except for myoglobin reoxygenation rates. (authors)

  6. Measurement of brain perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability, using dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI at 3 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Courivaud, Frédéric; Rostrup, Egill

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of vascular properties is essential to diagnosis and follow-up and basic understanding of pathogenesis in brain tumors. In this study, a procedure is presented that allows concurrent estimation of cerebral perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain permeability from dynamic T(1)-weighted...... on a pixel-by-pixel basis of cerebral perfusion, cerebral blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability.......Assessment of vascular properties is essential to diagnosis and follow-up and basic understanding of pathogenesis in brain tumors. In this study, a procedure is presented that allows concurrent estimation of cerebral perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain permeability from dynamic T(1)-weighted...... imaging of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent passing through the brain. The methods are applied in patients with brain tumors and in healthy subjects. Perfusion was estimated by model-free deconvolution using Tikhonov's method (gray matter/white matter/tumor: 72 +/- 16/30 +/- 8/56 +/- 45 mL/100 g...

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced, contrast-enhanced perfusion and angiographic MRI sequences for pulmonary embolism diagnosis: results of independent sequence readings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, Marie Pierre [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Departments of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Hotel-Dieu, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Sanchez, Olivier; Meyer, Guy [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Respiratory and intensive care and, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); INSERM Unite 765, Paris (France); Lefort, Catherine; Couchon, Sophie; Hernigou, Anne; Frija, Guy [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Departments of Radiology, Paris (France); Niarra, Ralph [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Clinical Epidemiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Chatellier, Gilles [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Clinical Epidemiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); INSERM CIC-EC E4, Paris (France)

    2013-09-15

    To independently evaluate unenhanced, contrast-enhanced perfusion and angiographic MR sequences for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis. Prospective investigation, including 274 patients who underwent perfusion, unenhanced 2D steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) and contrast-enhanced 3D angiographic MR sequences on a 1.5-T unit, in addition to CTA (CT angiography). Two independent readers evaluated each sequence independently in random order. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and inter-reader agreement were calculated for each sequence, excluding sequences judged inconclusive. Sensitivity was also calculated according to PE location. Contrast-enhanced angiographic sequences showed the highest sensitivity (82.9 and 89.7 %, reader 1 and reader 2, respectively), specificity (98.5 and 100 %) and agreement (kappa value 0.77). Unenhanced angiographic sequences, although less sensitive overall (68.7 and 76.4 %), were sensitive for the detection of proximal PE (92.7 and 100 %) and showed high specificity (96.1 and 99.1 %) and good agreement (kappa value 0.62). Perfusion sequences showed lower sensitivity (75.0 and 79.3 %), specificity (84.8 and 89.7 %) and agreement (kappa value 0.51), and a negative predictive value of 84.8 % at best. Compared with contrast-enhanced angiographic sequences, unenhanced sequences demonstrate lower sensitivity, except for proximal PE, but high specificity and agreement. The negative predictive value of perfusion sequences was insufficient to safely rule out PE. (orig.)

  8. The additional value of first pass myocardial perfusion imaging during peak dose of dobutamine stress cardiac MRI for the detection of myocardial ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Daniel D.; Janssen, Caroline H. C.; Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Van Dijkman, Paul R. M.; Overbosch, Jelle; Willems, Tineke P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    Purpose of this study was to assess the additional value of first pass myocardial perfusion imaging during peak dose of dobutamine stress Cardiac-MR (CMR). Dobutamine Stress CMR was performed in 115 patients with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia on a 1.5 T system (Magnetom Avanto,

  9. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Vestergaard, Mark B.; Lindberg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Capillary transit time heterogeneity, measured as CTH, may set the upper limit for extraction of substances in brain tissue, e.g., oxygen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MRI (DCE-MRI) at 3 Tesla (T), in estimating CTH...

  10. Perfusion Quantification Using Gaussian Process Deconvolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke; Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Rasmussen, Carl Edward

    2002-01-01

    The quantification of perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) requires deconvolution to obtain the residual impulse response function (IRF). In this work, a method using the Gaussian process for deconvolution (GPD) is proposed. The fact that the IRF is smooth is incorporated...

  11. Perfusion CT in acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, Bernd; Roether, Joachim; Fiehler, Jens; Thomalla, Goetz

    2015-01-01

    Modern multislice CT scanners enable multimodal protocols including non-enhanced CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion. A 64-slice CT scanner provides 4-cm coverage. To cover the whole brain, a 128 - 256-slice scanner is needed. The use of perfusion CT requires an optimized scan protocol in order to reduce exposure to radiation. As compared to non-enhanced CT and CT angiography, the use of CT perfusion increases detection rates of cerebral ischemia, especially small cortical ischemic lesions, while the detection of lacunar and infratentorial stroke lesions remains limited. Perfusion CT enables estimation of collateral flow in acute occlusion of large intra- or extracranial arteries. Currently, no established reliable thresholds are available for determining infarct core and penumbral tissue by CT perfusion. Moreover, perfusion parameters depend on the processing algorithms and the software used for calculation. However, a number of studies point towards a reduction of cerebral blood volume (CBV) below 2 ml/100 g as a critical threshold that identifies infarct core. Large CBV lesions are associated with poor outcome even in the context of recanalization. The extent of early ischemic signs on non-enhanced CT remains the main parameter from CT imaging to guide acute reperfusion treatment. Nevertheless, perfusion CT increases diagnostic and therapeutic certainty in the acute setting. Similar to stroke MRI, perfusion CT enables the identification of tissue at risk of infarction by the mismatch between infarct core and the larger area of critical hypoperfusion. Further insights into the validity of perfusion parameters are expected from ongoing trials of mechanical thrombectomy in stroke.

  12. Measurement of perfusion using the first-pass dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) MRI in neurooncology. Physical basics and clinical applications; Perfusionsmessung mit der T2*-Kontrastmitteldynamik in der Neuroonkologie. Physikalische Grundlagen und klinische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.-A.; Giesel, F.L.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Essig, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Radiologie; Risse, F.; Schad, L.R. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg (Germany). Abteilung Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie

    2005-07-01

    Perfusion imaging in the central nervous system (CNS) is mostly performed using the first-pass dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) MRI. The first-pass of a contrast bolus in brain tissue is monitored by a series of T2*-weighted MR images. The susceptibility effect of the paramagnetic contrast agent leads to a signal loss that can be converted, using the principles of the indicator dilution theory, into an increase of the contrast agent concentration. From these data, parameter maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and flow (CBF) can be derived. Regional CBF and CBV values can be obtained by region-of-interest analysis. This review article describes physical basics of DSC MRI and summarizes the literature of DSC MRI in neurooncological issues. Studies, all with relatively limited patient numbers, report that DSC MRI is useful in the preoperative diagnosis of gliomas, CNS-lymphomas, and solitary metastases, as well as in the differentiation of these neoplastic lesions from infections and tumor-like manifestations of demyelinating disease. Additionally, DSC MRI is suitable for determining glioma grade and regions of active tumor growth which should be the target of stereotactic biopsy. After therapy, DSC MRI helps better assessing the tumor response to therapy, residual tumor after therapy, and possible treatment failure and therapy-related complications, such as radiation necrosis. The preliminary results show that DSC MRI is a diagnostic tool depicting regional variations in microvasculature of normal and diseased brains. (orig.) [German] Die MRT-Perfusionsmessungen im Zentralnervensystem (ZNS) werden derzeit hauptsaechlich mit der kontrastmittelverstaerkten T2*-Dynamik durchgefuehrt, die die Passage eines schnellen Kontrastmittelbolus mit einer Serie von T2*-gewichteten MRT-Aufnahmen verfolgt und charakterisiert. Dabei wird der Signalabfall, bedingt durch den Suszeptibilitaetseffekt des paramagnetischen Kontrastmittels, mittels geeigneter

  13. Functional MRI procedures in the diagnosis of brain tumors. Perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging; Funktionelle MR-Verfahren in der Diagnostik intraaxialer Hirntumoren. Perfusions- und Diffusions-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Neurologische Klinik, Abteilung Neuroradiologie; Heiland, S.; Sartor, K.

    2002-08-01

    Despite the increased diagnostic accuracy of contrast material enhanced MR imaging, specification and grading of brain tumors are still only approximate at best: neither morphology, nor relaxation times or contrast material enhancement reliably predict tumor histology or tumor grade. As histology and tumor grade strongly influence which therapy concept is chosen, a more precise diagnosis is mandatory. With diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI, PWI) it is now possible to obtain important information regarding the cellular matrix and the relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) of brain tumors, which cannot be obtained with standard MR techniques. These dynamic-functional imaging techniques are very useful in the preoperative diagnosis of gliomas, lymphomas, and metastases, as well as in the differentiation of these neoplastic lesions from abscesses, atypical ischemic infarctions, and tumor-like manifestations of demyelinating disease. Additionally, they appear suitable for determining glioma grade and regions of active tumor growth which should be the target of stereotactic biopsy and therapy. After therapy these techniques are helpful to better assess the tumor response to therapy, possible therapy failure and therapy complications such as radiation necrosis. (orig.) [German] Die radiologische Diagnostik intraaxialer Hirntumoren ist durch die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) erheblich verbessert worden, besonders nach Einfuehrung der paramagnetischen Kontrastmittel. Mit konventionellen MR-Verfahren ist aber noch keine verlaessliche Unterscheidung zwischen Gliomen, Metastasen, primaeren Lymphomen und tumorsimulierenden entzuendlichen Erkrankungen moeglich. In dieser Hinsicht vielversprechend sind neue, funktionell-dynamische MR-Verfahren, mit denen sich nicht-invasiv die zerebrale Wasserdiffusion und Mikrozirkulation erfassen lassen und die eine bessere Gewebecharakterisierung erlauben als die herkoemmlichen MR-Methoden. Die Perfusions-MRT erfasst

  14. Is there any correlation between model-based perfusion parameters and model-free parameters of time-signal intensity curve on dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in breast cancer patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Boram; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Tae Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dukyong [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Hyunee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To find out any correlation between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) model-based parameters and model-free parameters, and evaluate correlations between perfusion parameters with histologic prognostic factors. Model-based parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) of 102 invasive ductal carcinomas were obtained using DCE-MRI and post-processing software. Correlations between model-based and model-free parameters and between perfusion parameters and histologic prognostic factors were analysed. Mean Kep was significantly higher in cancers showing initial rapid enhancement (P = 0.002) and a delayed washout pattern (P = 0.001). Ve was significantly lower in cancers showing a delayed washout pattern (P = 0.015). Kep significantly correlated with time to peak enhancement (TTP) (ρ = -0.33, P < 0.001) and washout slope (ρ = 0.39, P = 0.002). Ve was significantly correlated with TTP (ρ = 0.33, P = 0.002). Mean Kep was higher in tumours with high nuclear grade (P = 0.017). Mean Ve was lower in tumours with high histologic grade (P = 0.005) and in tumours with negative oestrogen receptor status (P = 0.047). TTP was shorter in tumours with negative oestrogen receptor status (P = 0.037). We could acquire general information about the tumour vascular physiology, interstitial space volume and pathologic prognostic factors by analyzing time-signal intensity curve without a complicated acquisition process for the model-based parameters. (orig.)

  15. Cardiopulmonary fitness correlates with regional cerebral grey matter perfusion and density in men with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J MacIntosh

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with positive effects on the brain but there is a paucity of clinical neuroimaging data in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, a cardiovascular condition associated with grey matter loss. The purpose of this study was to determine which brain regions are impacted by cardiopulmonary fitness and with the change in fitness after 6 months of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.CAD patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging at baseline, and peak volume of oxygen uptake during exercise testing (VO2Peak was measured at baseline and after 6 months of training. T1-weighted structural images were used to perform grey matter (GM voxel-based morphometry (VBM. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL was used to produce cerebral blood flow (CBF images. VBM and CBF data were tested voxel-wise using VO2Peak and age as explanatory variables.In 30 men with CAD (mean age 65±7 years, VBM and CBF identified 7 and 5 respective regions positively associated with baseline VO2Peak. These included the pre- and post-central, paracingulate, caudate, hippocampal regions and converging findings in the putamen. VO2Peak increased by 20% at follow-up in 29 patients (t = 9.6, df = 28, p<0.0001. Baseline CBF in the left post-central gyrus and baseline GM density in the right putamen predicted greater change in VO2Peak.Perfusion and GM density were associated with fitness at baseline and with greater fitness gains with exercise. This study identifies new neurobiological correlates of fitness and demonstrates the utility of multi-modal MRI to evaluate the effects of exercise in CAD patients.

  16. Spin-labelled derivatives of cardiotonic steroids as tools for characterization of the extracellular entrance to the Na+ ,K+ -ATPase binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-Hua; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Andersen, Jacob Lauwring; Esmann, Mikael; Fedosova, Natalya U

    2018-04-24

    The information obtained from crystallized complexes of the Na + ,K + -ATPase with cardiotonic steroids (CTS) is not sufficient to explain differences in the inhibitory properties of CTS such as stereoselectivity of CTS-binding or effect of glycosylation on the preference to enzyme isoforms. The uncertainty is related to the spacial organization of the hydrophilic cavity at the entrance of the CTS-binding site. Therefore, there is a need to supplement the crystallographic description with data obtained in aqueous solution, where molecules have significant degree of flexibility. This work addresses the applicability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) method for the purpose. We have designed and synthesized spin-labelled compounds based on the cinobufagin steroid core. The length of the spacer arms between the steroid core and the nitroxide group determines the position of the reporting group (N-O) confined to the binding site. High affinity to Na + ,K + -ATPase is inferred from their ability to inhibit enzymatic activity. The differences between the EPR spectra in the absence and presence of high ouabain concentrations identify the signature peaks originating from the fraction of the spin-labels bound within the ouabain site. The degree of perturbations of the EPR spectra depends on the length of the spacer arm. Docking of the compounds into the CTS-site suggests which elements of the protein structure might be responsible for interference with the spin-label (e.g. steric clashes or immobilization). Thus, the method is suitable for gathering information on the cavity leading to the CTS-binding site in Na + ,K + -ATPase in all conformations with high affinity to CTS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Morpholino spin-labeling for base-pair sequencing of a 3'-terminal RNA stem by proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements: yeast ribosomal 5S RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Marshall, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Base-pair sequences for 5S and 5.8S RNAs are not readily extracted from proton homonuclear nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivity experiments alone, due to extensive peak overlap in the downfield (11-15 ppm) proton NMR spectrum. In this paper, we introduce a new method for base-pair proton peak assignment for ribosomal RNAs, based upon the distance-dependent broadening of the resonances of base-pair protons spatially proximal to a paramagnetic group. Introduction of a nitroxide spin-label covalently attached to the 3'-terminal ribose provides an unequivocal starting point for base-pair hydrogen-bond proton NMR assignment. Subsequent NOE connectivities then establish the base-pair sequence for the terminal stem of a 5S RNA. Periodate oxidation of yeast 5S RNA, followed by reaction with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy (TEMPO-NH2) and sodium borohydride reduction, produces yeast 5S RNA specifically labeled with a paramagnetic nitroxide group at the 3'-terminal ribose. Comparison of the 500-MHz 1H NMR spectra of native and 3'-terminal spin-labeled yeast 5S RNA serves to identify the terminal base pair (G1 . C120) and its adjacent base pair (G2 . U119) on the basis of their proximity to the 3'-terminal spin-label. From that starting point, we have then identified (G . C, A . U, or G . U) and sequenced eight of the nine base pairs in the terminal helix via primary and secondary NOE's

  18. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  19. Poly(I:C) model of schizophrenia in rats induces sex-dependent functional brain changes detected by MRI that are not reversed by aripiprazole treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dražanová, Eva; Rudá-Kučerová, J.; Krátká, Lucie; Horská, K.; Demlová, R.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Kašpárek, T.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 137, MAR (2018), s. 146-155 ISSN 0361-9230 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : aripiprazole * arterial spin labelling * wistar rats * schizophrenia * sex * MRI Impact factor: 3.033, year: 2016

  20. Cerebral perfusion abnormalities in therapy-resistant epilepsy in childhood: comparison between EEG, MRI and 99Tcm-ECD brain SPET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattimo, A; Burroni, L; Bertelli, P; Volterrani, D; Vella, A

    1996-01-01

    We performed 99Tcm-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) interictal single photon emission tomography (SPET) in 26 children with severe therapy-resistant epilepsy. All the children underwent a detailed clinical examination, an electroencephalogram (EEG) investigation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 21 of the 26 children, SPET demonstrated brain blood flow abnormalities, in 13 cases in the same territories that showed EEG alterations. MRI showed structural lesions in 6 of the 26 children, while SPET imaging confirmed these abnormalities in only 5 children. The lesion not detected on SPET was shown to be 3 mm thick on MRI. Five symptomatic patients had normal SPET. In one of these patients, the EEG findings were normal and MRI revealed a small calcific nodule (4 mm thick); in the others, the EEG showed non-focal but diffuse abnormalities. These data confirm that brain SPET is sensitive in detecting and localizing hypoperfused areas that could be associated with epileptic foci in this group of patients, even when the MRI image is normal.