WorldWideScience

Sample records for spin-dependent conductivity effects

  1. Direct observation of the spin-dependent Peltier effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, J; Bakker, F L; Slachter, A; Dejene, F K; van Wees, B J

    2012-02-05

    The Peltier coefficient describes the amount of heat that is carried by an electrical current when it passes through a material. When two materials with different Peltier coefficients are placed in contact with one another, the Peltier effect causes a net flow of heat either towards or away from the interface between them. Spintronics describes the transport of electric charge and spin angular momentum by separate spin-up and spin-down channels in a device. The observation that spin-up and spin-down charge transport channels are able to transport heat independently of each other has raised the possibility that spin currents could be used to heat or cool the interface between materials with different spin-dependent Peltier coefficients. Here, we report the direct observation of the heating and cooling of such an interface by a spin current. We demonstrate this spin-dependent Peltier effect in a spin-valve pillar structure that consists of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-ferromagnetic metal. Using a three-dimensional finite-element model, we extract spin-dependent Peltier coefficients in the range -0.9 to -1.3 mV for permalloy. The magnetic control of heat flow could prove useful for the cooling of nanoscale electronic components or devices.

  2. Spin-dependent Peltier effect in 3D topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Kubis, Tillmann; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    The Peltier effect represents the heat carrying capacity of a certain material when current passes through it. When two materials with different Peltier coefficients are placed together, the Peltier effect causes heat to flow either towards or away from the interface between them. This work utilizes the spin-polarized property of 3D topological insulator (TI) surface states to describe the transport of heat through the spin-up and spin-down channels. It has been observed that the spin channels are able to carry heat independently of each other. Spin currents can therefore be employed to supply or extract heat from an interface between materials with spin-dependent Peltier coefficients. The device is composed of a thin film of Bi2Se3 sandwiched between two layers of Bi2Te3. The thin film of Bi2Se3serves both as a normal and topological insulator. It is a normal insulator when its surfaces overlap to produce a finite band-gap. Using an external gate, Bi2Se3 film can be again tuned in to a TI. Sufficiently thick Bi2Te3 always retain TI behavior. Spin-dependent Peltier coefficients are obtained and the spin Nernst effect in TIs is shown by controlling the temperature gradient to convert charge current to spin current.

  3. Spin-dependent electron many-body effects in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, P.; Kerachian, Y.; van Driel, H. M.; Smirl, Arthur L.

    2005-12-01

    Time- and polarization-resolved differential transmission measurements employing same and oppositely circularly polarized 150fs optical pulses are used to investigate spin characteristics of conduction band electrons in bulk GaAs at 295K . Electrons and holes with densities in the 2×1016cm-3-1018cm-3 range are generated and probed with pulses whose center wavelength is between 865 and 775nm . The transmissivity results can be explained in terms of the spin sensitivity of both phase-space filling and many-body effects (band-gap renormalization and screening of the Coulomb enhancement factor). For excitation and probing at 865nm , just above the band-gap edge, the transmissivity changes mainly reflect spin-dependent phase-space filling which is dominated by the electron Fermi factors. However, for 775nm probing, the influence of many-body effects on the induced transmission change are comparable with those from reduced phase space filling, exposing the spin dependence of the many-body effects. If one does not take account of these spin-dependent effects one can misinterpret both the magnitude and time evolution of the electron spin polarization. For suitable measurements we find that the electron spin relaxation time is 130ps .

  4. Morphology effects on spin-dependent transport and recombination in polyfluorene thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richards; van Schooten, K. J.; Malissa, H.; Joshi, G.; Jamali, S.; Lupton, J. M.; Boehme, C.

    2016-12-01

    We have studied the role of spin-dependent processes on conductivity in polyfluorene (PFO) thin films by preforming continuous wave (cw) electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) spectroscopy at temperatures between 10 K and room temperature using microwave frequencies between about 1 GHz and 20 GHz, as well as pulsed EDMR at the X band (10 GHz). Variable frequency EDMR allows us to establish the role of spin-orbit coupling in spin-dependent processes whereas pulsed EDMR allows for the observation of coherent spin motion effects. We used PFO for this study in order to allow for the investigation of the effects of microscopic morphological ordering since this material can adopt two distinct intrachain morphologies: an amorphous (glassy) phase, in which monomer units are twisted with respect to each other, and an ordered (β) phase, where all monomers lie within one plane. In thin films of organic light-emitting diodes, the appearance of a particular phase can be controlled by deposition parameters and solvent vapor annealing, and is verified by electroluminescence spectroscopy. Under bipolar charge-carrier injection conditions, we conducted multifrequency cw EDMR, electrically detected Rabi spin-beat experiments, and Hahn echo and inversion-recovery measurements. Coherent echo spectroscopy reveals electrically detected electron-spin-echo envelope modulation due to the coupling of the carrier spins to nearby nuclear spins. Our results demonstrate that, while conformational disorder can influence the observed EDMR signals, including the sign of the current changes on resonance as well as the magnitudes of local hyperfine fields and charge-carrier spin-orbit interactions, it does not qualitatively affect the nature of spin-dependent transitions in this material. In both morphologies, we observe the presence of at least two different spin-dependent recombination processes. At room temperature and 10 K, polaron-pair recombination through weakly spin-spin coupled

  5. Angular-Dependent EDMR Linewidth for Spin-Dependent Space-Charge-Limited Conduction in a Polycrystalline Pentacene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunito Fukuda

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spin-dependent space-charge-limited carrier conduction in a Schottky barrier diode using polycrystalline p-type π-conjugated molecular pentacene is explored using multiple-frequency electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR spectroscopy with a variable-angle configuration. The measured EDMR spectra are decomposed into two components derived, respectively, from mobile and trapped positive polarons. The linewidth of the EDMR signal for the trapped polarons increases with increasing resonance magnetic field for an in-plane configuration where the normal vector of the device substrate is perpendicular to the resonance magnetic field, while it is independent of the field for an out-of-plane configuration. This difference is consistent with the pentacene arrangement on the device substrate, where pentacene molecules exhibit a uniaxial orientation on the out-of-substrate plane. By contrast, the mobile polarons do not show anisotropic behavior with respect to the resonance magnetic field, indicating that the anisotropic effect is averaged out owing to carrier motion. These results suggest that the orientational arrangements of polycrystalline pentacene molecules in a nano thin film play a crucial role in spin-dependent electrical conduction.

  6. Angular-dependent EDMR linewidth for spin-dependent space charge limited conduction in a polycrystalline pentacene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Kunito; Asakawa, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    Spin-dependent space charge limited carrier conduction in a Schottky barrier diode using polycrystalline p-type π-conjugated molecular pentacene is explored using multiple-frequency electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) spectroscopy with a variable-angle configuration. The measured EDMR spectra are decomposed into two components derived respectively from mobile and trapped positive polarons. The linewidth of the EDMR signal for the trapped polarons increases with increasing resonance magnetic field for an in-plane configuration where the normal vector of the device substrate is perpendicular to the resonance magnetic field, while it is independent of the field for an out-of-plane configuration. This difference is consistent with the pentacene arrangement on the device substrate, where pentacene molecules exhibit a uniaxial orientation on the out-of-substrate plane. By contrast, the mobile polarons do not show anisotropic behavior with respect to the resonance magnetic field, indicating that the anisotropic effect is averaged out owing to carrier motion. These results suggest that the orientational arrangements of polycrystalline pentacene molecules in a nano thin film play a crucial role in spin-dependent electrical conduction.

  7. Spin-dependent tunnelling at infrared frequencies: magnetorefractive effect in magnetic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovsky, A.B.; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2004-01-01

    We present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical results on magnetorefractive effect in magnetic metal-insulator nanogranular alloys with tunnel-type magnetoresistance focusing on its relation with high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling

  8. Spin-dependent tunnelling at infrared frequencies: magnetorefractive effect in magnetic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, A.B. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2004-05-01

    We present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical results on magnetorefractive effect in magnetic metal-insulator nanogranular alloys with tunnel-type magnetoresistance focusing on its relation with high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling.

  9. Spin-dependent relativistic effect on heavy quarkonium properties in medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yubing

    1997-01-01

    Spin-dependent relativistic effect on the binding and dissociation of the heavy quarkonium in a thermal environment is investigated. The result shows that the interactions could influence the heavy quarkonium properties in medium

  10. Direct observation of the spin-dependent Peltier effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipse, J.; Bakker, F. L.; Slachter, A.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    The Peltier coefficient describes the amount of heat that is carried by an electrical current when it passes through a material(1). When two materials with different Peltier coefficients are placed in contact with one another, the Peltier effect causes a net flow of heat either towards or away from

  11. Realization of tunable spin-dependent splitting in intrinsic photonic spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Xiaohui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, and Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Laboratory for spin photonics, College of Physics and Microelectronic Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Hengyang Normal University, Hengyang 421002 (China); Yi, Xunong [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, and Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Zhou, Xinxing; Liu, Yachao; Shu, Weixing; Wen, Shuangchun [Laboratory for spin photonics, College of Physics and Microelectronic Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Luo, Hailu, E-mail: hailuluo@hnu.edu.cn [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, and Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Laboratory for spin photonics, College of Physics and Microelectronic Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-10-13

    We report the realization of tunable spin-dependent splitting in intrinsic photonic spin Hall effect. By breaking the rotational symmetry of a cylindrical vector beam, the intrinsic vortex phases that the two spin components of the vector beam carries, which is similar to the geometric Pancharatnam-Berry phase, are no longer continuous in the azimuthal direction, and leads to observation of spin accumulation at the opposite edge of the beam. Due to the inherent nature of the phase and independency of light-matter interaction, the observed photonic spin Hall effect is intrinsic. Modulating the topological charge of the vector beam, the spin-dependent splitting can be enhanced and the direction of spin accumulation is switchable. Our findings may provide a possible route for generation and manipulation of spin-polarized photons, and enables spin-based photonics applications.

  12. High-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic nanocomposites: Magnetorefractive effect and magnetoimpedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, Alexander [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Kozlov, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Nedukh, Sergey [Institute of Radiophysics and Electronics NAS of Ukraine, Kharkov 61085 (Ukraine); Tarapov, Sergey [Institute of Radiophysics and Electronics NAS of Ukraine, Kharkov 61085 (Ukraine)

    2005-07-15

    Since the dielectric permittivity is linear with frequency-dependent conductivity, high-frequency properties for any kind of magnetic materials with the high magnetoresistance depend on magnetization. It manifests as magnetorefractive effect (MRE) in the infrared region of spectrum and as magnetoimpedance (MI) in the frequency range between radio and microwaves. The main mechanism of both MRE and MI in nanocomposites with tunnel-type magnetoresistance is high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling. We report on recent results of theoretical and experimental investigations of MRE and MI in nanocomposites Co{sub 51.5}Al{sub 19.5}O{sub 29}, Co{sub 50.2}Ti{sub 9.1}O{sub 40.7}, Co{sub 52.3}Si{sub 12.2}O{sub 35.5} and (Co{sub 0,4}Fe{sub 0,6}){sub 48}(MgF){sub 52}. Most of the obtained experimental data for MRE and MI are consistent with the theory based on considering the tunnel junction between adjacent granules in percolation cluster as a capacitor.

  13. Spin-dependent tunneling conductance in 2D structures in zero magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhansky, I.V.; Averkiev, N.S.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the spin-orbit interaction on the tunneling between two-dimensional electron layers is considered. A general expression for the tunneling current is obtained with the Rashba and Dresselhaus effects and also elastic scattering of charge carriers on impurities taken into account. It is shown that the particular form of the tunneling conductance as a function of the voltage between layers is extremely sensitive to the relationship between the Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters. This makes it possible to determine the parameters of the spin-orbit interaction and the quantum scattering time directly from measurements of the tunneling conductance in the absence of magnetic field

  14. Spin-dependent Hall effect in degenerate semiconductors: a theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M

    2008-01-01

    The spin-dependent Hall (SDH) effect in degenerate semiconductors is investigated theoretically. Starting from a two-component drift-diffusion equation, an expression for SDH voltage (V SDH ) is derived, and drift and diffusive contributions to V SDH are studied. For the possible enhancement of the diffusive part, degenerate and nondegenerate cases are examined. We find that due to an increase in the diffusion coefficient V SDH increases in a degenerate semiconductor, consistent with the experimental observations. The expression for V SDH is reduced in three limiting cases, namely diffusive, drift-diffusion crossover and drift, and is analysed. The results agree with those obtained in recent theoretical investigations.

  15. The Kubo-Greenwood spin-dependent electrical conductivity of 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides and group-IV materials: A Green's function study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Bui Dinh; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2018-04-01

    The spin-dependent electrical conductivity of counterparts of graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and group-IV nanosheets, have investigated by a magnetic exchange field (MEF)-induction to gain the electronic transport properties of charge carriers. We have implemented a k.p Hamiltonian model through the Kubo-Greenwood formalism in order to address the dynamical behavior of correlated Dirac fermions. Tuning the MEF enables one to control the effective mass of carriers in group-IV and TMDs, differently. We have found the Dirac-like points in a new quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state at strong MEFs for both structures. For both cases, a broad peak in electrical conductivity originated from the scattering rate and entropy is observed. Spin degeneracy at some critical MEFs is another remarkable point. We have found that in the limit of zero or uniform MEFs with respect to the spin-orbit interaction, the large resulting electrical conductivity depends on the spin sub-bands in group-IV and MLDs. Featuring spin-dependent electronic transport properties, one can provide a new scenario for future possible applications.

  16. Effects of nuclear structure in the spin-dependent scattering of weakly interacting massive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, M. A.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.

    1993-06-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear from factors for spin-dependent elastic scattering of dark matter WIMPs from123Te and131Xe isotopes, proposed to be used for dark matter detection. A method based on the theory of finite Fermi systems was used to describe the reduction of the single-particle spin-dependent matrix elements in the nuclear medium. Nucleon single-particle states were calculated in a realistic shell model potential; pairing effects were treated within the BCS model. The coupling of the lowest single-particle levels in123Te to collective 2+ excitations of the core was taken into account phenomenologically. The calculated nuclear form factors are considerably less then the single-particle ones for low momentum transfer. At high momentum transfer some dynamical amplification takes place due to the pion exchange term in the effective nuclear interaction. But as the momentum transfer increases, the difference disappears, the momentum transfer increases and the quenching effect disappears. The shape of the nuclear form factor for the131Xe isotope differs from the one obtained using an oscillator basis.

  17. Effects of nuclear structure in the spin-dependent scattering of weakly interacting massive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, M.A.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.

    1993-01-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear from factors for spin-dependent elastic scattering of dark matter WIMPs from 123 Te and 131 Xe isotopes, proposed to be used for dark matter detection. A method based on the theory of finite Fermi systems was used to describe the reduction of the single-particle spin-dependent matrix elements in the nuclear medium. Nucelon single-particle states were calculated in a realistic shell model potential; pairing effects were treated within the BCS model. The coupling of the lowest single-particle levels in 123 Te to collective 2 + excitations of the core was taken into account phenomenologically. The calculated nuclear form factors are considerably less then the single-particle ones for low momentum transfer. At high momentum transfer some dynamical amplification takes place due to the pion exchange term in the effective nuclear interaction. But as the momentum transfer increases, the difference disappears, the momentum transfer increases and quenching effect disappears. The shape of the nuclear form factor for the 131 Xe isotope differs from the one obtained using an oscillator basis. (orig.)

  18. Generalized spin-dependent WIMP-nucleus interactions and the DAMA modulation effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun; Yoon, Jong-Hyun, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: koreasds@naver.com, E-mail: pledge200@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Guided by non-relativistic Effective Field Theory (EFT) we classify the most general spin-dependent interactions between a fermionic Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) and nuclei, and within this class of models we discuss the viability of an interpretation of the DAMA modulation result in terms of a signal from WIMP elastic scatterings using a halo-independent approach. We find that, although several relativistic EFT's can lead to a spin-dependent cross section, in some cases with an explicit, non-negligible dependence on the WIMP incoming velocity, three main scenarios can be singled out in the non-relativistic limit which approximately encompass them all, and that only differ by their dependence on the transferred momentum. For two of them compatibility between DAMA and other constraints is possible for a WIMP mass below 30 GeV, but only for a WIMP velocity distribution in the halo of our Galaxy which departs from a Maxwellian. This is achieved by combining a suppression of the WIMP effective coupling to neutrons (to evade constraints from xenon and germanium detectors) to an explicit quadratic or quartic dependence of the cross section on the transferred momentum (that leads to a relative enhancement of the expected rate off sodium in DAMA compared to that off fluorine in droplet detectors and bubble chambers). For larger WIMP masses the same scenarios are excluded by scatterings off iodine in COUPP.

  19. Spin-dependent delay time and Hartman effect in asymmetrical graphene barrier under strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Farhad; Mirershadi, Soghra

    2018-01-01

    We study the spin-dependent tunneling time, including group delay and dwell time, in a graphene based asymmetrical barrier with Rashba spin-orbit interaction in the presence of strain, sandwiched between two normal leads. We find that the spin-dependent tunneling time can be efficiently tuned by the barrier width, and the bias voltage. Moreover, for the zigzag direction strain although the oscillation period of the dwell time does not change, the oscillation amplitude increases by increasing the incident electron angle. It is found that for the armchair direction strain unlike the zigzag direction the group delay time at the normal incidence depends on the spin state of electrons and Hartman effect can be observed. In addition, for the armchair direction strain the spin polarization increases with increasing the RSOI strength and the bias voltage. The magnitude and sign of spin polarization can be manipulated by strain. In particular, by applying an external electric field the efficiency of the spin polarization is improved significantly in strained graphene, and a fully spin-polarized current is generated.

  20. How to realize a spin-dependent Seebeck diode effect in metallic zigzag γ-graphyne nanoribbons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qing-Bo; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2017-11-30

    The spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE) is one of the core topics of spin caloritronics. In the traditional device designs of spin-dependent Seebeck rectifiers and diodes, finite spin-dependent band gaps of materials are required to realize the on-off characteristic in thermal spin currents, and nearly zero charge current should be achieved to reduce energy dissipation. Here, we propose that two ferromagnetic zigzag γ-graphyne nanoribbons (ZγGNRs) without any spin-dependent band gaps around the Fermi level can not only exhibit the SDSE, but also display rectifier and diode effects in thermal spin currents characterized by threshold temperatures, which originates from the compensation effect occurring in spin-dependent transmissions but not from the spin-splitting band gaps in materials. The metallic characteristics of ZγGNRs bring about an advantage that the gate voltage is an effective route to adjust the symmetry of spin-splitting bands to obtain pure thermal spin currents. The results provide a new mechanism to realize spin-Seebeck rectifier and diode effects in 2D materials and expand material candidates towards spin-Seebeck device applications.

  1. Spin-dependent Hall effect in degenerate semiconductors: a theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrish Miah, M [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2008-10-15

    The spin-dependent Hall (SDH) effect in degenerate semiconductors is investigated theoretically. Starting from a two-component drift-diffusion equation, an expression for SDH voltage (V{sub SDH}) is derived, and drift and diffusive contributions to V{sub SDH} are studied. For the possible enhancement of the diffusive part, degenerate and nondegenerate cases are examined. We find that due to an increase in the diffusion coefficient V{sub SDH} increases in a degenerate semiconductor, consistent with the experimental observations. The expression for V{sub SDH} is reduced in three limiting cases, namely diffusive, drift-diffusion crossover and drift, and is analysed. The results agree with those obtained in recent theoretical investigations.

  2. Edge-defect induced spin-dependent Seebeck effect and spin figure of merit in graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Bo; Wu, Dan-Dan; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2017-10-11

    By using the first-principle calculations combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function approach, we have studied spin caloritronic properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with different edge defects. The theoretical results show that the edge-defected GNRs with sawtooth shapes can exhibit spin-dependent currents with opposite flowing directions by applying temperature gradients, indicating the occurrence of the spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE). The edge defects bring about two opposite effects on the thermal spin currents: the enhancement of the symmetry of thermal spin-dependent currents, which contributes to the realization of pure thermal spin currents, and the decreasing of the spin thermoelectric conversion efficiency of the devices. It is fortunate that applying a gate voltage is an efficient route to optimize these two opposite spin thermoelectric properties towards realistic device applications. Moreover, due to the existence of spin-splitting band gaps, the edge-defected GNRs can be designed as spin-dependent Seebeck diodes and rectifiers, indicating that the edge-defected GNRs are potential candidates for room-temperature spin caloritronic devices.

  3. Nuclear-spin-dependent parity-nonconserving effects in thallium, lead and bismuth atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khriplovich, I.B.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent P-odd optical activity in atomic Tl, Pb and Bi is calculated. Its magnitude is expressed analytically through the main contribution to the optical rotation, which is independent of nuclear spin. The accuracy of results is discussed. 31 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Effect of Δ-isobar excitation on spin-dependent observables of elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, S.; Oryu, S.; Chmielewski, K.; Sauer, P.U.

    2000-01-01

    Δ-isobar excitation in the nuclear medium yields an effective three-nucleon force. A coupled-channel formulation with Δ-isobar excitation developed previously is used. The three-particle scattering equations are solved by a separable expansion of the two-baryon transition matrix for elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering. The effect of Δ-isobar excitation on the spin-dependent observables is studied at energies above 50 MeV nucleon lab energy. (author)

  5. Spin dependent surface recombination in silicon p-n junctions: the effect of irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D [Laboratoire Central de Recherches, 91 - Corbeville par Orsay (France); Pepper, M [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Cavendish Lab.

    1980-06-01

    The results are presented of an investigation of spin dependent recombination in (100) oriented, gate controlled Si diodes irradiated by 30 keV electrons. After irradiation, recombination at the Si-SiO/sub 2/ interface is increased, and saturation of the spin resonance increases the diode forward current by 5 parts in 10/sup 4/. The results cannot be described by a conventional Shockley-Read recombination model. An alternative picture is proposed involving recombination between trapped electrons and trapped holes.

  6. The influence of the spin-dependent phases of tunneling electrons on the conductance of a point ferromagnet/isolator/d-wave superconductor contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopyanov, B P

    2010-05-12

    The influence of the spin-dependent phase shifts (SDPSs) associated with the electronic reflection and transmission amplitudes acquired by electrons upon scattering at the potential barrier on the Andreev reflection probability of electron and hole excitations for a ferromagnet/isolator/d-wave superconductor (FIS) contact and on the charge conductance of the FIS contact is studied. Various superconductor orientations are considered. It has been found that for strong ferromagnets and ultrathin interface potential for the {110} oriented d-wave superconductor the presence of the SDPS can lead to the appearance of finite-voltage peaks in the charge conductance of the F/I/d-wave superconductor contact. On the contrary, for the {100} orientation of the d-wave superconductor the presence of the SDPS can lead to restoration of the zero-voltage peak and suppression of finite-voltage peaks. The spin-dependent amplitudes of the Andreev reflection probability and energy levels of the spin-dependent Andreev bound states are found.

  7. Effect of the δ-potential on spin-dependent electron tunneling in double barrier semiconductor heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, L. Bruno; Gnanasekar, K.; Karunakaran, M.

    2018-06-01

    The effect of δ-potential was studied in GaAs/Ga0.6Al0·4As double barrier heterostructure with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction. The role of barrier height and position of the δ- potential in the well region was analysed on spin-dependent electron tunneling using transfer matrix method. The spin-separation between spin-resonances on energy scale depends on both height and position of the δ- potential, whereas the tunneling life time of electrons highly influenced by the position of the δ- potential and not on the height. These results might be helpful for the fabrication of spin-filters.

  8. Large-scale nuclear structure calculations for spin-dependent WIMP scattering with chiral effective field theory currents

    OpenAIRE

    Klos, P.; Menéndez, J.; Gazit, D.; Schwenk, A.

    2013-01-01

    We perform state-of-the-art large-scale shell-model calculations of the structure factors for elastic spin-dependent WIMP scattering off 129,131Xe, 127I, 73Ge, 19F, 23Na, 27Al, and 29Si. This comprehensive survey covers the non-zero-spin nuclei relevant to direct dark matter detection. We include a pedagogical presentation of the formalism necessary to describe elastic and inelastic WIMP-nucleus scattering. The valence spaces and nuclear interactions employed have been previously used in nucl...

  9. Spin-polarization and spin-dependent logic gates in a double quantum ring based on Rashba spin-orbit effect: Non-equilibrium Green's function approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, Leila; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Spin-dependent electron transport in an open double quantum ring, when each ring is made up of four quantum dots and threaded by a magnetic flux, is studied. Two independent and tunable gate voltages are applied to induce Rashba spin-orbit effect in the quantum rings. Using non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we study the effects of electron-electron interaction on spin-dependent electron transport and show that although the electron-electron interaction induces an energy gap, it has no considerable effect when the bias voltage is sufficiently high. We also show that the double quantum ring can operate as a spin-filter for both spin up and spin down electrons. The spin-polarization of transmitted electrons can be tuned from −1 (pure spin-down current) to +1 (pure spin-up current) by changing the magnetic flux and/or the gates voltage. Also, the double quantum ring can act as AND and NOR gates when the system parameters such as Rashba coefficient are properly adjusted

  10. Effects of V-shaped edge defect and H-saturation on spin-dependent electronic transport of zigzag MoS2 nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xin-Mei; Long, Meng-Qiu; Cui, Li-Ling; Xiao, Jin; Zhang, Xiao-Jiao; Zhang, Dan; Xu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Based on nonequilibrium Green's function in combination with density functional theory calculations, the spin-dependent electronic transport properties of one-dimensional zigzag molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) nanoribbons with V-shaped defect and H-saturation on the edges have been studied. Our results show that the spin-polarized transport properties can be found in all the considered zigzag MoS 2 nanoribbons systems. The edge defects, especially the V-shaped defect on the Mo edge, and H-saturation on the edges can suppress the electronic transport of the systems. Also, the spin-filtering and negative differential resistance behaviors can be observed obviously. The mechanisms are proposed for these phenomena. - Highlights: • The spin-dependent electronic transport of zigzag MoS 2 nanoribbons. • The effects of V-shaped edge defect and H-saturation. • The effects of spin-filter and negative differential resistance can be observed

  11. Spin-Dependent Transport through Chiral Molecules Studied by Spin-Dependent Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Molecular spintronics (spin + electronics), which aims to exploit both the spin degree of freedom and the electron charge in molecular devices, has recently received massive attention. Our recent experiments on molecular spintronics employ chiral molecules which have the unexpected property of acting as spin filters, by way of an effect we call “chiral-induced spin selectivity” (CISS). In this Account, we discuss new types of spin-dependent electrochemistry measurements and their use to probe the spin-dependent charge transport properties of nonmagnetic chiral conductive polymers and biomolecules, such as oligopeptides, L/D cysteine, cytochrome c, bacteriorhodopsin (bR), and oligopeptide-CdSe nanoparticles (NPs) hybrid structures. Spin-dependent electrochemical measurements were carried out by employing ferromagnetic electrodes modified with chiral molecules used as the working electrode. Redox probes were used either in solution or when directly attached to the ferromagnetic electrodes. During the electrochemical measurements, the ferromagnetic electrode was magnetized either with its magnetic moment pointing “UP” or “DOWN” using a permanent magnet (H = 0.5 T), placed underneath the chemically modified ferromagnetic electrodes. The spin polarization of the current was found to be in the range of 5–30%, even in the case of small chiral molecules. Chiral films of the l- and d-cysteine tethered with a redox-active dye, toludin blue O, show spin polarizarion that depends on the chirality. Because the nickel electrodes are susceptible to corrosion, we explored the effect of coating them with a thin gold overlayer. The effect of the gold layer on the spin polarization of the electrons ejected from the electrode was investigated. In addition, the role of the structure of the protein on the spin selective transport was also studied as a function of bias voltage and the effect of protein denaturation was revealed. In addition to

  12. Spin-dependent optics with metasurfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical spin-Hall effect (OSHE is a spin-dependent transportation phenomenon of light as an analogy to its counterpart in condensed matter physics. Although being predicted and observed for decades, this effect has recently attracted enormous interests due to the development of metamaterials and metasurfaces, which can provide us tailor-made control of the light-matter interaction and spin-orbit interaction. In parallel to the developments of OSHE, metasurface gives us opportunities to manipulate OSHE in achieving a stronger response, a higher efficiency, a higher resolution, or more degrees of freedom in controlling the wave front. Here, we give an overview of the OSHE based on metasurface-enabled geometric phases in different kinds of configurational spaces and their applications on spin-dependent beam steering, focusing, holograms, structured light generation, and detection. These developments mark the beginning of a new era of spin-enabled optics for future optical components.

  13. Spin-dependent transport properties of a GaMnAs-based vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaki, Toshiki, E-mail: kanaki@cryst.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Asahara, Hirokatsu; Ohya, Shinobu, E-mail: ohya@cryst.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tanaka, Masaaki, E-mail: masaaki@ee.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-14

    We fabricate a vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (spin-MOSFET) structure, which is composed of an epitaxial single-crystal heterostructure with a ferromagnetic-semiconductor GaMnAs source/drain, and investigate its spin-dependent transport properties. We modulate the drain-source current I{sub DS} by ∼±0.5% with a gate-source voltage of ±10.8 V and also modulate I{sub DS} by up to 60% with changing the magnetization configuration of the GaMnAs source/drain at 3.5 K. The magnetoresistance ratio is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that obtained in the previous studies on spin MOSFETs. Our result shows that a vertical structure is one of the hopeful candidates for spin MOSFET when the device size is reduced to a sub-micron or nanometer scale.

  14. Spin-dependent transport properties of a GaMnAs-based vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaki, Toshiki; Asahara, Hirokatsu; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    We fabricate a vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (spin-MOSFET) structure, which is composed of an epitaxial single-crystal heterostructure with a ferromagnetic-semiconductor GaMnAs source/drain, and investigate its spin-dependent transport properties. We modulate the drain-source current I DS by ∼±0.5% with a gate-source voltage of ±10.8 V and also modulate I DS by up to 60% with changing the magnetization configuration of the GaMnAs source/drain at 3.5 K. The magnetoresistance ratio is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that obtained in the previous studies on spin MOSFETs. Our result shows that a vertical structure is one of the hopeful candidates for spin MOSFET when the device size is reduced to a sub-micron or nanometer scale

  15. Spin dependent photon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, A.V.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1989-01-01

    Spin dependent structure functions of the photon are studied using the operator product expansion. There are new twist-two photon and gluon operators which contribute. The structure functions g 1 and F 3 are calculable in QCD, but differ from their free quark values. The corrections to F 3 are suppressed by 1/log Q 2 . The calculation is an extension of the analysis of Witten for the spin averaged structure functions F 1 and F 2 . (orig.)

  16. Spin-Dependent Scattering Effects and Dimensional Crossover in a Quasi-Two-Dimensional Disordered Electron System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG YongHong; WANG YongGang; LIU Mei; WANG Jin

    2002-01-01

    Two kinds of spin-depcndcnt scattering effects (magnetic-iinpurity and spin-orbit scatterings) axe investi-gated theoretically in a quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) disordered electron system. By making use of the diagrammatictechniques in perturbation theory, we have calculated the dc conductivity and magnetoresistance due to weak-localizationeffects, the analytical expressions of them are obtained as functions of the interlayer hopping energy and the charac-teristic times: elastic, inelastic, magnetic and spin-orbit scattering times. The relevant dimensional crossover behaviorfrom 3D to 2D with decreasing the interlayer coupling is discussed, and the condition for the crossover is shown to bedependent on the aforementioned scattering times. At low temperature there exists a spin-dcpendent-scattering-induccddimensional crossover in this system.

  17. Spin-dependent parton distributions in the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloet, I.C. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter and Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Bentz, W. [Department of Physics, School of Science, Tokai University Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Thomas, A.W. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2005-04-15

    Spin-dependent quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for a nucleon in the nuclear medium. We utilize a modified NJL model where the nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state. Scalar and vector mean fields are incorporated in the nuclear medium and these fields couple to the confined quarks in the nucleon. The effect of these fields on the spin-dependent distributions and consequently the axial charges is investigated. Our results for the 'spin-dependent EMC effect' are also discussed.

  18. Charge Hall effect driven by spin-dependent chemical potential gradients and Onsager relations in mesoscopic systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hankiewicz, E. M.; Li, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Niu, Q.; Shen, S.-Q.; Sinova, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 15 (2005), 155305/1-155305/5 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC510 Grant - others:Research Grant Council of Hong Kong(SQS)(CN) DE-FG03-02ER45958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : spin Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.185, year: 2005

  19. Transport spin dependent in nanostructures: Current and geometry effect of quantum dots in presence of spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Gutiérrez, H.; Pérez-Merchancano, S. T.; Beltran-Rios, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we study the quantum electron transport through a Quantum Dots Structure (QDs), with different geometries, embedded in a Quantum Well (QW). The behaviour of the current through the nanostructure (dot and well) is studied considering the orbital spin coupling of the electrons and the Rashba effect, by means of the second quantization theory and the standard model of Green’s functions. Our results show the behaviour of the current in the quantum system as a function of the electric field, presenting resonant states for specific values of both the external field and the spin polarization. Similarly, the behaviour of the current on the nanostructure changes when the geometry of the QD and the size of the same are modified as a function of the polarization of the electron spin and the potential of quantum confinement.

  20. On the spin-dependent sensitivity of XENON100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-11-15

    The latest XENON100 data severely constrains dark matter elastic scattering off nuclei, leading to impressive upper limits on the spin-independent cross-section. The main goal of this paper is to stress that the same data set has also an excellent spin-dependent sensitivity, which is of utmost importance in probing dark matter models. We show in particular that the constraints set by XENON100 on the spin-dependent neutron cross-section are by far the best at present, whereas the corresponding spin-dependent proton limits lag behind other direct detection results. The effect of nuclear uncertainties on the structure functions of xenon isotopes is analysed in detail and found to lessen the robustness of the constraints, especially for spin-dependent proton couplings. Notwith-standing, the spin-dependent neutron prospects for XENON1T and DARWIN are very encouraging. We apply our constraints to well-motivated dark matter models and demonstrate that in both mass-degenerate scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric standard model the spin-dependent neutron limits can actually override the spin-independent limits. This opens the possibility of probing additional unexplored regions of the dark matter parameter space with the next generation of ton-scale direct detection experiments.

  1. On the spin-dependent sensitivity of XENON100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    The latest XENON100 data severely constrains dark matter elastic scattering off nuclei, leading to impressive upper limits on the spin-independent cross-section. The main goal of this paper is to stress that the same data set has also an excellent spin-dependent sensitivity, which is of utmost importance in probing dark matter models. We show in particular that the constraints set by XENON100 on the spin-dependent neutron cross-section are by far the best at present, whereas the corresponding spin-dependent proton limits lag behind other direct detection results. The effect of nuclear uncertainties on the structure functions of xenon isotopes is analysed in detail and found to lessen the robustness of the constraints, especially for spin-dependent proton couplings. Notwith-standing, the spin-dependent neutron prospects for XENON1T and DARWIN are very encouraging. We apply our constraints to well-motivated dark matter models and demonstrate that in both mass-degenerate scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric standard model the spin-dependent neutron limits can actually override the spin-independent limits. This opens the possibility of probing additional unexplored regions of the dark matter parameter space with the next generation of ton-scale direct detection experiments.

  2. Spin-dependent transport through interacting graphene armchair nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, Sonja; Mayrhofer, Leonhard; Grifoni, Milena

    2010-01-01

    We investigate spin effects in transport across fully interacting, finite-size graphene armchair nanoribbons (ACNs) contacted to collinearly spin-polarized leads. In such systems, the presence of short-range Coulomb interaction between bulk states and states localized at the ribbon ends leads to novel spin-dependent phenomena. Specifically, the total spin of the low-energy many-body states is conserved during tunneling but that of the bulk and end states is not. As a consequence, in the single-electron regime, dominated by Coulomb blockade phenomena, we find pronounced negative differential conductance features for ACNs contacted to parallel polarized leads. These features are, however, absent in an anti-parallel contact configuration, which in turn leads, within a certain gate and bias voltage region, to a negative tunneling magneto-resistance. Moreover, we analyze the changes in the transport characteristics under the influence of an external magnetic field.

  3. Electromagnetic pulse-driven spin-dependent currents in semiconductor quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Berakdar, Jamal

    2009-04-08

    We investigate the non-equilibrium charge and spin-dependent currents in a quantum ring with a Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) driven by two asymmetric picosecond electromagnetic pulses. The equilibrium persistent charge and persistent spin-dependent currents are investigated as well. It is shown that the dynamical charge and the dynamical spin-dependent currents vary smoothly with a static external magnetic flux and the SOI provides a SU(2) effective flux that changes the phases of the dynamic charge and the dynamic spin-dependent currents. The period of the oscillation of the total charge current with the delay time between the pulses is larger in a quantum ring with a larger radius. The parameters of the pulse fields control to a certain extent the total charge and the total spin-dependent currents. The calculations are applicable to nanometre rings fabricated in heterojunctions of III-V and II-VI semiconductors containing several hundreds of electrons.

  4. The spin dependent odderon in the diquark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanowski, Lech [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Warsaw (Poland); Zhou, Jian, E-mail: jzhou@sdu.edu.cn [School of Physics, & Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation (MOE), Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-09-10

    In this short note, we report a di-quark model calculation for the spin dependent odderon and demonstrate that the asymmetrical color source distribution in the transverse plane of a transversely polarized hadron plays an essential role in yielding the spin dependent odderon. This calculation confirms the earlier finding that the spin dependent odderon is closely related to the parton orbital angular momentum.

  5. Spin-dependent potentials from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koma, Y.

    2006-09-01

    The spin-dependent corrections to the static inter-quark potential are phenomenologically relevant to describing the fine and hyperfine spin splitting of the heavy quarkonium spectra. We investigate these corrections, which are represented as the field strength correlators on the quark-antiquark source, in SU(3) lattice gauge theory. We use the Polyakov loop correlation function as the quark-antiquark source, and by employing the multi-level algorithm, we obtain remarkably clean signals for these corrections up to intermediate distances of around 0.6 fm. Our observation suggests several new features of the corrections. (orig.)

  6. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; Tokarski, J. T.; Sanders, G. D.; Kuhns, P. L.; McGill, S. A.; Reyes, A. P.; Reno, J. L.; Stanton, C. J.; Bowers, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs /A l0.1G a0.9As quantum well film epoxy bonded to a Si substrate with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from the electronic structure and differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the electron conduction band using a modified k .p model based on the Pidgeon-Brown model. Comparison of theory with experiment facilitated the assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband Landau level transitions. The results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in optical nuclear polarization in semiconductors.

  7. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μ B for B n N n−1 , 2 μ B for B n N n , and 3 μ B for B n N n+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short B n N n+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long B n N n+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (B n N n−1 and B n N n ). The proposed short B n N n+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied.

  8. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on the wave vector and spin dependent transmission probability for the GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M; Zhao, Z B; Fan, L B

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit coupling (SOC) on the transmission of electrons through the GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is studied. It is found that the Dresselhaus SOC causes the evident dependence of the transmission probability on the spin polarization and the in-plane wave vector of electrons, and also induces evident spin splitting of the resonant peaks in the (E z -k) plane. Because the magnitude of the Rashba SOC is relatively small, its effect on the transmission of electrons is much less. As k increases, the peaks of transmission probability for spin-up electrons (T + ) shift to a higher energy region and increase in magnitude, while the peaks of transmission probability for spin-down electrons (T − ) shift to a lower energy region and decrease in magnitude. The polarization efficiency (P) is found to peak at the resonant energies and increases with the in-plane wave vector. Moreover, the built-in electric field caused by the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization can increase the amplitude of P. Results obtained here are helpful for the efficient spin injection into the III-nitride heterostructures by nonmagnetic means from the device point of view. (paper)

  9. Solvable model of spin-dependent transport through a finite array of quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdonin, S A; Dmitrieva, L A; Kuperin, Yu A; Sartan, V V

    2005-01-01

    The problem of spin-dependent transport of electrons through a finite array of quantum dots attached to a 1D quantum wire (spin gun) for various semiconductor materials is studied. The Breit-Fermi term for spin-spin interaction in the effective Hamiltonian of the device is shown to result in a dependence of transmission coefficient on the spin orientation. The difference of transmission probabilities for singlet and triplet channels can reach a few per cent for a single quantum dot. For several quantum dots in the array due to interference effects it can reach approximately 100% for some energy intervals. For the same energy intervals the conductance of the device reaches the value ∼1 in [e 2 /πℎ] units. As a result a model of the spin gun which transforms the spin-unpolarized electron beam into a completely polarized one is suggested

  10. Spin-dependent tunneling transport into CrO2 nanorod devices with nonmagnetic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yipu; Schmitt, Andrew L; Jin, Song

    2008-08-01

    Single-crystal nanorods of half-metallic chromium dioxide (CrO2) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Spin-dependent electrical transport was investigated in individual CrO2 nanorod devices contacted with nonmagnetic metallic electrodes. Negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed at low temperatures due to the spin-dependent direct tunneling through the contact barrier and the high spin polarization in the half-metallic nanorods. The magnitude of this negative magnetoresistance decreases with increasing bias voltage and temperature due to spin-independent inelastic hopping through the barrier, and a small positive magnetoresistance was found at room temperature. It is believed that the contact barrier and the surface state of the nanorods have great influence on the spin-dependent transport limiting the magnitude of MR effect in this first attempt at spin filter devices of CrO2 nanorods with nonmagnetic contacts.

  11. Moments of nucleon spin-dependent generalized parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroers, W.; Brower, R.C.; Dreher, P.; Edwards, R.; Fleming, G.; Haegler, Ph.; Heller, U.M.; Lippert, Th.; Negele, J.W.; Pochinsky, A.V.; Renner, D.B.; Richards, D.; Schilling, K.

    2004-01-01

    We present a lattice measurement of the first two moments of the spin-dependent GPD H∼(x, ξ, t). From these we obtain the axial coupling constant and the second moment of the spin-dependent forward parton distribution. The measurements are done in full QCD using Wilson fermions. In addition, we also present results from a first exploratory study of full QCD using Asqtad sea and domain-wall valence fermions

  12. Spin-dependent Seebeck coefficients of Ni80Fe20 and Co in nanopillar spin valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejene, F. K.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have experimentally determined the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of permalloy (Ni80Fe20) and cobalt (Co) using nanopillar spin valve devices, a stack of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic layer. The devices were specifically designed to separate heat-related effects from

  13. Theoretical models of the spin-dependent charge-carrier dynamics in metals and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with spin-dependent carrier dynamics in semiconductors and metals. We are especially interested in the dynamics on ultrashort timescales, which can be driven by ultrashort optical excitation, and use of a theoretical description in terms of the dynamical spin-density matrix. The first part of this thesis is concerned with spin-dependent carrier dynamics in bulk GaAs. For conduction electrons in GaAs, the most important mechanisms, by which an electron spin polarization can be destroyed, are the Dyakonov-Perel and Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanisms. For the Dyakonov-Perel effect, our treatment is the first calculation of the dynamics of the spindensity matrix for bulk GaAs. From our microsopic calculation, we extract spin-dephasing times. In particular, we can describe the dependence of the spin-dephasing time for a wide range of n-doping concentrations and explain the spin-dephasing dynamics in and out of the motional-narrowing regime. For the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism, i.e., the exchange interaction of electronics with holes, approximate relaxation times for limiting cases were derived about 30 years ago. We show that these approaches provide an incomplete picture of spin relaxation, and are only valid for high or low densities, whereas the microscopic calculation is capable of explaining the electronic dynamics also for intermediate doping densities, which are most interesting for typical experiments. The spin-dependent hole dynamics in GaAs is much faster than that of electrons, because the p-like hole bands experience the spin-orbit interaction directly, rather than through the interaction with other bands. The resulting spin relaxation is sometimes referred to as an Elliott-Yafet mechanism. For the first time, we present results for the microscopic dynamics of this mechanism for holes in bulk GaAs, and we discuss the different results that may be obtained with different measurement techniques. We also analyze the importance of ''spin hot

  14. Spin dependent disorder in a junction device with spin orbit couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Sudin; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Using the multi-probe Landauer-BUttiker formula and Green's function approach, we calculate the longitudinal conductance (LC) and spin Hall conductance (SHC) numerically in a two-dimensional junction system with the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin orbit coupling (SOC) and spin dependent disorder (SDD) in presence of both random onsite and hopping disorder strengths. It has been found that when the strengths of the RSOC and DSOC are same, the SHC vanishes. Further in presence of random onsite or hopping disorder, the SHC is still zero when the strengths of the two types of SOC, that is Rashba and Dressselhaus are the same. This indicates that the cancellation of SHC is robust even in the presence of random disorder. Only with the inclusion of SDD (onsite or hopping), a non-zero SHC is found and it increases as the strength of SDD increases. The physical implication of the existence of a non-zero SHC has been explored in this work. Finally, we have compared the effect of onsite SDD and hopping SDD on both longitudinal and spin Hall conductances. (paper)

  15. Spin-dependent transport in cobalt nanocontacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarau, G.

    2007-04-16

    The magnetoresistance response of cobalt nanocontacts with varying geometries formed between two extended electrodes has been experimentally investigated and linked to micromagnetic simulations. The contribution of the nanoconstriction to the measured magnetoresistance signal has been separated from that of the electrode bulk. The different nanocontact geometries exhibit different shape anisotropies resulting in a characteristic behavior of the magnetization at each nanocontact. The magnetization reversal processes are explained on the basis of the anisotropic magnetoresistance and domain wall scattering effects. The domain wall resistance takes positive values, which is in agreement with models based on the spin mistracking inside the domain wall. The 4 K MR measurements are found to be influenced by the exchange bias effect between the ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes and the antiferromagnetic oxidized Co surface. When cooling down in an applied magnetic field, the uniform biased Co layer behaves as if it possesses a unidirectional anisotropy axis along the field cooling direction. In the zero field cooling case, the exchange bias varies locally throughout the sample giving rise to non-reproducible successive MR traces. (orig.)

  16. Impact of Disorder on Spin Dependent Transport Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed

    2016-07-03

    The impact of the spin degree of freedom on the transport properties of electrons traveling through magnetic materials has been known since the pioneer work of Mott [1]. Since then it has been demonstrated that the spin angular momentum plays a key role in the scattering process of electrons in magnetic multilayers. This role has been emphasized by the discovery of the Giant Magnetoresistance in 1988 by Fert and Grunberg [2, 3]. Among the numerous applications and effects that emerged in mesoscopic devices two mechanisms have attracted our attention during the course of this thesis: the spin transfer torque and the spin Hall effects. The former consists in the transfer of the spin angular momentum from itinerant carriers to local magnetic moments [4]. This mechanism results in the current-driven magnetization switching and excitations, which has potential application in terms of magnetic data storage and non-volatile memories. The latter, spin Hall effect, is considered as well to be one of the most fascinating mechanisms in condensed matter physics due to its ability of generating non-equilibrium spin currents without the need for any magnetic materials. In fact the spin Hall effect relies only on the presence of the spin-orbit interaction in order to create an imbalance between the majority and minority spins. The objective of this thesis is to investigate the impact of disorder on spin dependent transport phenomena. To do so, we identified three classes of systems on which such disorder may have a dramatic influence: (i) antiferromagnetic materials, (ii) impurity-driven spin-orbit coupled systems and (iii) two dimensional semiconducting electron gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Antiferromagnetic materials - We showed that in antiferromagnetic spin-valves, spin transfer torque is highly sensitive to disorder, which prevents its experimental observation. To solve this issue, we proposed to use either a tunnel barrier as a spacer or a local spin torque using

  17. Influence of soliton distributions on the spin-dependent electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on Su–Schrieffer–Heeger (SSH) Hamiltonian and using a generalized Green's function formalism, wecalculate the spin-dependent currents, the electronic transmission and tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). We found that the presence of a uniform distribution of the soliton centres along the molecular chain ...

  18. Higher order spin-dependent terms in D0-brane scattering from the matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArthur, I.N.

    1998-01-01

    The potential describing long-range interactions between D0-branes contains spin-dependent terms. In the matrix model, these should be reproduced by the one-loop effective action computed in the presence of a non-trivial fermionic background ψ. The v 3 ψ 2 /r 8 term in the effective action has been computed by Kraus and shown to correspond to a spin-orbit interaction between D0-branes, and the ψ 8 /r 11 term in the static potential has been obtained by Barrio et al. In this paper, the v 2 ψ 4 /r 9 term is computing in the matrix model and compared with the corresponding results of Morales et al. obtained using string theoretic methods. The technique employed is adapted to the underlying supersymmetry of the matrix model, and should be useful in the calculation of spin-dependent effects in more general Dp-brane scatterings. (orig.)

  19. Large Current Modulation and Spin-Dependent Tunneling of Vertical Graphene/MoS$_{2}$ Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Myoung, Nojoon; Seo, Kyungchul; Lee, Seung Joo; Ihm, Gukhyung

    2013-01-01

    Vertical graphene heterostructures have been introduced as an alternative architecture for electronic devices by using quantum tunneling. Here, we present that the current on/off ratio of vertical graphene field-effect transistors is enhanced by using an armchair graphene nanoribbon as an electrode. Moreover, we report spin-dependent tunneling current of the graphene/MoS2 heterostructures. When an atomically thin MoS2 layer sandwiched between graphene electrodes becomes magnetic, Dirac fermio...

  20. The spin-dependent neutralino-nucleus form factor for 127I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ressell, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of detailed shell model calculations of the spin-dependent elastic form factor for the nucleus 127 I. the calculations were performed in extremely large model spaces which adequately describe the configuration mixing in this nucleus. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental values of the magnetic moment are found. Other nuclear observables are also compared to experiment. The dependence of the form factor upon the model space and effective interaction is discussed

  1. Origin of spin-dependent asymmetries in electron transmission through ultrathin ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokhale, M.P.; Mills, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of exchange asymmetries in the transmission of electrons through ultrathin films of ferromagnetic Fe. The results account nicely for the magnitude of the asymmetries observed by Pappas et al. in photoemission studies of Cu covered by an ultrathin film of Fe. We argue that exchange asymmetry in the transmissivity of the Fe film, rather than the spin dependence of the electron mean free path, is responsible for the effects reported by these authors

  2. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Accardi, Alberto [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  3. Static spin-dependent forces between heavy quarks in the classical approximation to dual QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.; Ball, J.S.; Zachariasen, F.

    1991-01-01

    We compute the static spin-dependent forces V S (R) (proportional to σ 1 ·σ 2 ) and V T (R) (proportional to 3σ 1 ·Rσ 2 ·R-σ 1 ·σ 2 ) between two quarks separated by R. This is done by treating the (weak) spin-dependent effects as a perturbation on the spin-independent potentials and fields computed earlier for dual QCD. What results is a definite prediction for the heavy-quark potentials which are similar to, but different in form from, those used in phenomenological treatments. Calculations of the masses and splittings of heavy-quark states using our potentials will provide a further test of the dual superconductor picture of QCD

  4. Large current modulation and spin-dependent tunneling of vertical graphene/MoS2 heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoung, Nojoon; Seo, Kyungchul; Lee, Seung Joo; Ihm, G

    2013-08-27

    Vertical graphene heterostructures have been introduced as an alternative architecture for electronic devices by using quantum tunneling. Here, we present that the current on/off ratio of vertical graphene field-effect transistors is enhanced by using an armchair graphene nanoribbon as an electrode. Moreover, we report spin-dependent tunneling current of the graphene/MoS2 heterostructures. When an atomically thin MoS2 layer sandwiched between graphene electrodes becomes magnetic, Dirac fermions with different spins feel different heights of the tunnel barrier, leading to spin-dependent tunneling. Our finding will develop the present graphene heterostructures for electronic devices by improving the device performance and by adding the possibility of spintronics based on graphene.

  5. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q{sup 2} dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}(x) and G{sub 2}(x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g{sub 1}(x) and g{sub 2}(x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon.

  6. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q 2 dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g 1 (x) and G 2 (x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g 1 (x) and g 2 (x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon

  7. Spin-dependent Nucleon Structure Studies at MIT/Bates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botto, T.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary results from recent measurements of the proton, neutron and deuterium electro-magnetic form factors obtained by the BLAST collaboration at the MIT/Bates Linear Accelerator Facility. BLAST (Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid) is a large-acceptance multi-purpose detector dedicated to studies of exclusive spin-dependent electron scattering from internal polarized targets. BLAST makes use of stored electron beam currents in excess of 150 mA with a 60-70% polarization. The electron beam is let through a 15 mm diameter, 60 cm long open-ended storage cell which is fed with ultra-pure, high-polarization H1,D1 gas from an Atomic Beam Source. The target polarization can be rapidly reversed between different vector and tensor target states, thus minimizing systematic uncertainties. The target spin can be oriented to any in-plane direction via a set of Helmholtz coils. Target polarizations in the storage cell of up to 80% (vector) and 70% (tensor) have been routinely achieved over a period of several months. Our data on the D-vector(e-vector,e'n) reaction off vector polarized deuterium allow for a unique extraction of the neutron charge form factor G E n . At same time, complementary measurements of G M n , T20 and the spin-dependent nucleon momentum distributions in deuterium are obtained via the D-vector(e-vector,e'), D (e-vector,e'd) and D (e-vector,e'p) reactions. In addition, BLAST data on vector polarized hydrogen will provide novel measurements of the GE/GM form-factor ratio on the proton as well as of the spin-dependent electro-excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance. Such comprehensive program on few body physics is now well underway and preliminary data will be presented

  8. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g 1 n (x, Q 2 ) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized 3 He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 with an average Q 2 of 5 GeV 2 . The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 dx g 1 n (x, 5 GeV 2 ) = -0.036 ± 0.004(stat.) ± 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g 1 n at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x → 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g 1 p and g 1 n paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 , determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule

  9. Ab initio study of spin-dependent transport in carbon nanotubes with iron and vanadium adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    (majority or minority) being scattered depends on the adsorbate and is explained in terms of d-state filling. We contrast the single-walled carbon nanotube results to the simpler case of the adsorbate on a flat graphene sheet with periodic boundary conditions and corresponding width in the zigzag direction......We present an ab initio study of spin-dependent transport in armchair carbon nanotubes with transition metal adsorbates: iron or vanadium. The method based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions is used to compute the electronic structure and zero-bias conductance...

  10. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  11. Spin-dependent tunneling transport in a lateral magnetic diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Shi, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Based on the gate-tunable two-dimensional electron gas, we have constructed laterally a double-barrier resonant tunneling structure by employing a peculiar triple-gate configuration, namely a ferromagnetic gate sandwiched closely by a pair of Schottky gates. Because of the in-plane stray field of ferromagnetic gate, the resulting bound spin state in well gives rise to the remarkable resonant spin polarization following the spin-dependent resonant tunneling regime. Importantly, by aligning the bound spin state through surface gate-voltage configuration, this resonant spin polarization can be externally manipulated, showing the desirable features for the spin-logic device applications. -- Highlights: ► A lateral spin-RTD was proposed by applying triple-gate modulated 2DEG. ► Spin-dependent resonant tunneling transport and large resonant spin polarization has been clarified from the systematic simulation. ► Both electric and/or magnetic strategies can be employed to modulate the system spin transport, providing the essential features for the spin-logic application.

  12. Longitudinal spin dependence of massive lepton pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E. L.; Gordon, L. E.; Klasen, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize recent work in which they demonstrate that the Compton subprocess, q + g -> γ* + q also dominates the Drell-Yan cross section in polarized and unpolarized proton-proton reactions for values of the transverse momentum Q T of the pair that are larger than roughly half of the pair mass Q, Q T > Q/2. The Drell-Yan process is therefore a valuable, heretofore overlooked, independent source of constraints on the spin-averaged and spin-dependent gluon densities. Although the Drell-Yan cross section is smaller than the prompt photon cross section, massive lepton pair production is cleaner theoretically since long-range fragmentation contributions are absent as are the experimental and theoretical complications associated with isolation of the real photon. Moreover, the dynamics of spin-dependence in hard-scattering processes is a sufficiently complex topic, and its understanding at an early stage in its development, that several defensible approaches for extracting polarized parton densities deserve to be pursued with the expectation that consistent results must emerge

  13. Medium energy inelastic proton-nucleus scattering with spin dependent NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Auger, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    The previously proposed effective profile expansion method for the Glauber multiple scattering model calculation has been extended to the case of proton-nucleus inelastic scattering with spin dependent NN interaction. Using the method which turns out to be computationally simple and of relatively wider applicability, a study of sensitivity of proton-nucleus inelastic scattering calculation to the sometimes neglected momentum transfer dependence of the NN scattering amplitude has been made. We find that the calculated polarization is particularly sensitive in this respect. (author)

  14. Bottom quark contribution to spin-dependent dark matter detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmian Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a previously overlooked bottom quark contribution to the spin-dependent cross section for Dark Matter (DM scattering from the nucleon. While the mechanism is relevant to any supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, for illustrative purposes we explore the consequences within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM. We study two cases, namely those where the DM is predominantly Gaugino or Higgsino. In both cases, there is a substantial, viable region in parameter space (mb˜−mχ≲O(100 GeV in which the bottom contribution becomes important. We show that a relatively large contribution from the bottom quark is consistent with constraints from spin-independent DM searches, as well as some incidental model dependent constraints.

  15. Monte Carlo determination of the spin-dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campostrini, M.; Moriarty, K.J.M.; Rebbi, C.

    1987-05-01

    Calculation of the bound states of heavy quark systems by a Hamiltonian formulation based on an expansion of the interaction into inverse powers of the quark mass is discussed. The potentials for the spin-orbit and spin-spin coupling between quark and antiquark, which are responsible for the fine and hyperfine splittings in heavy quark spectroscopy, are expressed as expectation values of Wilson loop factors with suitable insertions of chromomagnetic or chromoelectric fields. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to evaluate the expectation values and, from them, the spin-dependent potentials. The Monte Carlo calculation is reported to show a long-range, non-perturbative component in the interaction

  16. Spin-dependent transport in ferromagnet/semiconductor/ferromagnet junctions: a fully relativistic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Voicu; Ebert, Hubert; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Zeller, Rudolf; Dederichs, Peter H

    2004-01-01

    We present a fully relativistic generalization of the Landauer-Buettiker formalism that has been implemented within the framework of the spin-polarized relativistic screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method. This approach, going beyond the two-current model, supplies a more general description of the electronic transport. It is shown that the relativistic conductance can be split in terms of individual spin-diagonal and spin-off-diagonal (spin-flip) components, which allows a detailed analysis of the influence of spin-orbit-coupling-induced spin-flip processes on the spin-dependent transport. We apply our method to calculate the ballistic conductance in Fe/GaAs/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions. We find that, by removing the spin selection rules, the spin-orbit coupling strongly influences the conductance, not only qualitatively but also quantitatively, especially in the anti-parallel alignment of the magnetization in the two Fe leads

  17. Quantitative determination of spin-dependent quasiparticle renormalization in ferromagnetic 3d metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Varykhalov, Andrei; Fink, Joerg; Rader, Oliver; Duerr, Hermann; Eberhardt, Wolfgang [Bessy GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Spin dependent low-energy electronic excitations in 3d ferromagnets are of special interest due to the need of a microscopic understanding of the electronic structure of solids. Low-energy electrons (or holes) become dressed by a cloud of excitations resulting in quasiparticles of a finite lifetime and a different effective mass. These type of excitations have been studied by many theoretical methods, and it has been found that because of many body effects no sharp quasiparticle peaks exist for binding energies larger than 2 eV. Interestingly, it has been shown that strong correlation effects could particularly affect majority spin electrons, leading to a pronounced damping of quasiparticles at binding energies around 2 eV and above. In order to give an experimental corroboration to these findings, we have performed a systematic study of the spin-dependent quasiparticle lifetime and band structure of ferromagnetic 3d transition metal surfaces by means of spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. On hcp Co(0001), fcc Ni(111) and bcc Fe(110), we have found a more pronounced renormalization of the majority spin quasiparticle spectral weight going from Ni to Co which are both strong ferromagnets. For Fe, a weak ferromagnet, such a process becomes more prominent in the minority channel.

  18. Analytical approaches to the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions at NNLO approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajegheh, Maral; Nejad, S. Mohammad Moosavi; Khanpour, Hamzeh; Tehrani, S. Atashbar

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present SMKA18 analysis, which is a first attempt to extract the set of next-to-next-leading-order (NNLO) spin-dependent parton distribution functions (spin-dependent PDFs) and their uncertainties determined through the Laplace transform technique and Jacobi polynomial approach. Using the Laplace transformations, we present an analytical solution for the spin-dependent Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations at NNLO approximation. The results are extracted using a wide range of proton g1p(x ,Q2) , neutron g1n(x ,Q2) , and deuteron g1d(x ,Q2) spin-dependent structure functions data set including the most recent high-precision measurements from COMPASS16 experiments at CERN, which are playing an increasingly important role in global spin-dependent fits. The careful estimations of uncertainties have been done using the standard Hessian error propagation. We will compare our results with the available spin-dependent inclusive deep inelastic scattering data set and other results for the spin-dependent PDFs in literature. The results obtained for the spin-dependent PDFs as well as spin-dependent structure functions are clearly explained both in the small and large values of x .

  19. Magnetic reconstruction induced magnetoelectric coupling and spin-dependent tunneling in Ni/KNbO_3/Ni multiferroic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hu; Dai, Jian-Qing; Song, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetoelectric coupling and spin-polarized tunneling in Ni/KNbO_3/Ni multiferroic tunnel junctions with asymmetric interfaces based on density functional theory. The junctions have two stable polarization states. We predict a peculiar magnetoelectric effect in such junctions originating from the magnetic reconstruction of Ni near the KO-terminated interface. This reconstruction is induced by the reversal of the ferroelectric polarization of KNbO_3. Furthermore, the change in the magnetic ordering filters the spin-dependent current. This effect leads to a change in conductance by about two orders of magnitude. As a result we obtain a giant tunneling electroresistance effect. In addition, there exist sizable tunneling magnetoresistance effects for two polarization states. - Highlights: • We study the ME coupling and electron tunneling in Ni/KNbO_3/Ni junctions. • There is magnetic reconstruction of Ni atoms near the KO-terminated interface. • A peculiar magnetoelectric coupling effect is obtained. • Predicted giant tunneling electroresistance effects.

  20. Spin dependence in the neutralization of He+ ions in metals: An analysis of different contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alducin, M.

    2005-01-01

    We study the spin polarization of the Auger electrons produced during the neutralization of He + ions in a free electron gas. In this process, one metal electron decays to the unoccupied state and a second electron is promoted to a continuum excited state. Although the spin of the decaying electron is fixed, both spins are allowed for the excited one. The states of the electrons involved in this Auger capture process are described by the spin-dependent Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from density functional theory and the local spin approximation. The Auger capture rates indicate a strong polarization of the excited electron. In a paramagnetic free electron gas, there are two mechanisms accounting for this effect, the spin-dependent screening and the interference between indistinguishable processes when the involved electrons are in the same spin state. In a spin-polarized medium, the difference in the density of spin-up and spin-down electrons is a new ingredient to be considered. As a result, the excited electrons preferably come from the majority band, even in the case of He + ions with spin opposite to that of the majority band embedded in a low spin-polarized free electron gas

  1. Spin-dependent electronic transport properties of transition metal atoms doped α-armchair graphyne nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotoohi, Somayeh; Haji-Nasiri, Saeed

    2018-04-01

    Spin-dependent electronic transport properties of single 3d transition metal (TM) atoms doped α-armchair graphyne nanoribbons (α-AGyNR) are investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method combined with density functional theory (DFT). It is found that all of the impurity atoms considered in this study (Fe, Co, Ni) prefer to occupy the sp-hybridized C atom site in α-AGyNR, and the obtained structures remain planar. The results show that highly localized impurity states are appeared around the Fermi level which correspond to the 3d orbitals of TM atoms, as can be derived from the projected density of states (PDOS). Moreover, Fe, Co, and Ni doped α-AGyNRs exhibit magnetic properties due to the strong spin splitting property of the energy levels. Also for each case, the calculated current-voltage characteristic per super-cell shows that the spin degeneracy in the system is obviously broken and the current becomes strongly spin dependent. Furthermore, a high spin-filtering effect around 90% is found under the certain bias voltages in Ni doped α-AGyNR. Additionally, the structure with Ni impurity reveals transfer characteristic that is suitable for designing a spin current switch. Our findings provide a high possibility to design the next generation spin nanodevices with novel functionalities.

  2. Conduct Disorder and Neighborhood Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Wesley G; Perez, Nicholas M; Reingle Gonzalez, Jennifer M

    2018-05-07

    There has been a considerable amount of scholarly attention to the relationship between neighborhood effects and conduct disorder, particularly in recent years. Having said this, it has been nearly two decades since a comprehensive synthesis of this literature has been conducted. Relying on a detailed and comprehensive search strategy and inclusion criteria, this article offers a systematic and interdisciplinary review of 47 empirical studies that have examined neighborhood effects and conduct disorder. Described results suggest that there are generally robust linkages between adverse neighborhood factors and conduct disorder and externalizing behavior problems, as 67 of the 93 (72.04%) effect sizes derived from these studies yielded statistically significant neighborhood effects. The review also identifies salient mediating and moderating influences. It discusses study limitations and directions for future research as well.

  3. Spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Mryasov, Oleg N; LeClair, Patrick R

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of electron tunnelling has been known since the advent of quantum mechanics, but continues to enrich our understanding of many fields of physics, as well as creating sub-fields on its own. Spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has recently aroused enormous interest and has developed in a vigorous field of research. The large tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) observed in MTJs garnered much attention due to possible applications in non-volatile random-access memories and next-generation magnetic field sensors. This led to a number of fundamental questions regarding the phenomenon of SDT. In this review article we present an overview of this field of research. We discuss various factors that control the spin polarization and magnetoresistance in MTJs. Starting from early experiments on SDT and their interpretation, we consider thereafter recent experiments and models which highlight the role of the electronic structure of the ferromagnets, the insulating layer, and the ferromagnet/insulator interfaces. We also discuss the role of disorder in the barrier and in the ferromagnetic electrodes and their influence on TMR. (topical review)

  4. Shape Biased Low Power Spin Dependent Tunneling Magnetic Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondra, Mark; Qian, Zhenghong; Wang, Dexin; Nordman, Cathy; Anderson, John

    2001-10-01

    Spin Dependent Tunneling (SDT) devices are leading candidates for inclusion in a number of Unattended Ground Sensor applications. Continued progress at NVE has pushed their performance to 1OOs of pT I rt. Hz 1 Hz. However, these sensors were designed to use an applied field from an on-chip coil to create an appropriate magnetic sensing configuration. The power required to generate this field (^100mW) is significantly greater than the power budget (^lmW) for a magnetic sensor in an Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) application. Consequently, a new approach to creating an ideal sensing environment is required. One approach being used at NVE is "shape biasing." This means that the physical layout of the SDT sensing elements is such that the magnetization of the sensing film is correct even when no biasing field is applied. Sensors have been fabricated using this technique and show reasonable promise for UGS applications. Some performance trade-offs exist. The power is easily tinder 1 MW, but the sensitivity is typically lower by a factor of 10. This talk will discuss some of the design details of these sensors as well as their expected ultimate performance.

  5. Spin-dependent Goos–Hänchen shift and spin beam splitter in gate-controllable ferromagnetic graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, B.

    2014-01-01

    The transmission and Goos–Hänchen (GH) shift for charge carriers in gate-controllable ferromagnetic graphene induced by ferromagnetic insulator are investigated theoretically. Numerical results demonstrate that spin-up and spin-down electrons exhibit remarkably different transmission and GH shifts. The spin-dependent GH shifts directly demonstrate the spin beam splitting effect, which can be controlled by the voltage of gate. We attribute the spin beam splitting effect to the combination of tunneling through potential barrier and Zeeman interaction from the magnetic field and the exchange proximity interaction between the ferromagnetic insulator and graphene. In view of the spin beam splitting effect and the spin-dependent GH shifts, the gate-controllable ferromagnetic graphene might be utilized to design spin beam splitter

  6. Spin-dependent Goos–Hänchen shift and spin beam splitter in gate-controllable ferromagnetic graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Liu, Y., E-mail: stslyl@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wang, B., E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The transmission and Goos–Hänchen (GH) shift for charge carriers in gate-controllable ferromagnetic graphene induced by ferromagnetic insulator are investigated theoretically. Numerical results demonstrate that spin-up and spin-down electrons exhibit remarkably different transmission and GH shifts. The spin-dependent GH shifts directly demonstrate the spin beam splitting effect, which can be controlled by the voltage of gate. We attribute the spin beam splitting effect to the combination of tunneling through potential barrier and Zeeman interaction from the magnetic field and the exchange proximity interaction between the ferromagnetic insulator and graphene. In view of the spin beam splitting effect and the spin-dependent GH shifts, the gate-controllable ferromagnetic graphene might be utilized to design spin beam splitter.

  7. Constraints on Exotic Spin-Dependent Interactions Between Matter and Antimatter from Antiprotonic Helium Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, Filip; Fadeev, Pavel; Flambaum, Victor V.; Jackson Kimball, Derek F.; Kozlov, Mikhail G.; Stadnik, Yevgeny V.; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-05-01

    Heretofore undiscovered spin-0 or spin-1 bosons can mediate exotic spin-dependent interactions between standard model particles. Here, we carry out the first search for semileptonic spin-dependent interactions between matter and antimatter. We compare theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium to constrain exotic spin- and velocity-dependent interactions between electrons and antiprotons.

  8. Controlling spin-dependent tunneling by bandgap tuning in epitaxial rocksalt MgZnO films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D L; Ma, Q L; Wang, S G; Ward, R C C; Hesjedal, T; Zhang, X-G; Kohn, A; Amsellem, E; Yang, G; Liu, J L; Jiang, J; Wei, H X; Han, X F

    2014-12-02

    Widespread application of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for information storage has so far been limited by the complicated interplay between tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio and the product of resistance and junction area (RA). An intricate connection exists between TMR ratio, RA value and the bandgap and crystal structure of the barrier, a connection that must be unravelled to optimise device performance and enable further applications to be developed. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to tailor the bandgap of an ultrathin, epitaxial Zn-doped MgO tunnel barrier with rocksalt structure. This structure is attractive due to its good Δ1 spin filtering effect, and we show that MTJs based on tunable MgZnO barriers allow effective balancing of TMR ratio and RA value. In this way spin-dependent transport properties can be controlled, a key challenge for the development of spintronic devices.

  9. A lattice calculation of the nucleon's spin-dependent structure function g2 revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Schaefer, A.; Schierholz, G.

    2000-11-01

    Our previous calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g 2 is revisited. The interest in this structure function is to a great extent motivated by the fact that it receives contributions from twist-two as well as from twist-three operators already in leading order of 1/Q 2 thus offering the unique possibility of directly assessing higher-twist effects. In our former calculation the lattice operators were renormalized perturbatively and mixing with lower-dimensional operators was ignored. However, the twist-three operator which gives rise to the matrix element d 2 mixes non-perturbatively with an operator of lower dimension. Taking this effect into account leads to a considerably smaller value of d 2 , which is consistent with the experimental data. (orig.)

  10. Spin-dependent transport and functional design in organic ferromagnetic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guichao Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Organic ferromagnets are intriguing materials in that they combine ferromagnetic and organic properties. Although challenges in their synthesis still remain, the development of organic spintronics has triggered strong interest in high-performance organic ferromagnetic devices. This review first introduces our theory for spin-dependent electron transport through organic ferromagnetic devices, which combines an extended Su–Schrieffer–Heeger model with the Green’s function method. The effects of the intrinsic interactions in the organic ferromagnets, including strong electron–lattice interaction and spin–spin correlation between π-electrons and radicals, are highlighted. Several interesting functional designs of organic ferromagnetic devices are discussed, specifically the concepts of a spin filter, multi-state magnetoresistance, and spin-current rectification. The mechanism of each phenomenon is explained by transmission and orbital analysis. These works show that organic ferromagnets are promising components for spintronic devices that deserve to be designed and examined in future experiments.

  11. Theory of spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, J.

    2002-01-01

    Rigorous theory of the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) based on the real-space Kubo formula and fully realistic tight-binding bands fitted to an ab initio band structure is described. It is first applied to calculate the TMR of two Co electrodes separated by a vacuum gap. The calculated TMR ratio reaches ∼65% in the tunnelling regime but can be as high as 280% in the metallic regime when the vacuum gap is of the order of the Co interatomic distance (abrupt domain wall). It is also shown that the spin polarization P of the tunnelling current is negative in the metallic regime but becomes positive P∼35% in the tunnelling regime. Calculation of the TMR of an epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe(001) junction is also described. The calculated optimistic TMR ratio is in excess of 1000% for an MgO barrier of ∼20 atomic planes and the spin polarization of the tunnelling current is positive for all MgO thicknesses. It is also found that spin-dependent tunnelling in an Fe/MgO/Fe(001) junction is not entirely determined by states at the Γ point (k parallel = 0) even for MgO thicknesses as large as ∼20 atomic planes. Finally, it is demonstrated that the TMR ratio calculated from the Kubo formula remains non-zero when one of the Co electrodes is covered with a copper layer. It is shown that non-zero TMR is due to quantum well states in the Cu layer which do not participate in transport. Since these only occur in the down-spin channel, their loss from transport creates a spin asymmetry of electrons tunnelling from a Cu interlayer, i.e. non-zero TMR. Numerical modelling is used to show that diffuse scattering from a random distribution of impurities in the barrier may cause quantum well states to evolve into propagating states, in which case the spin asymmetry of the non-magnetic layer is lost and with it the TMR. (author)

  12. Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.J. Anderson; H.M. Wade; T.L. Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m · K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations

  13. Energy spectra in $p$-shell $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei and $^{19}_{\\Lambda}\\textrm{F}$ and spin-dependent $\\Lambda N$ interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Isaka, Masahiro; Motoba, Toshio

    2018-01-01

    Energy spectra of $0s$-orbit $\\Lambda$ states in $p$-shell $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei ($^{A}_\\Lambda Z$) and those in $^{19}_{\\Lambda}\\textrm{F}$ are studied with the microscopic cluster model and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics using the $G$-matrix effective $\\Lambda N$ ($\\Lambda NG$) interactions. Spin-dependent terms of the ESC08a version of the $\\Lambda NG$ interactions are tested and phenomenologically tuned to reproduce observed energy spectra in $p$-shell $^{A}_\\Lambda Z$. Spin-dependent...

  14. A nonperturbative treatment of spin-dependent interactions of light and heavy quarkonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeberl, F.

    1986-01-01

    We propose a nonrelativistic potential model with a regularized Coulomb potential at short range which leads to spin-dependent interactions which are at most as singular as 1/r. The Schroedinger equation is solved numerically including all spin-dependent interactions nonperturbatively. The predicted spectrum of light and heavy quarkonia is in remarkable agreement with experiment. Even the leptonic decay widths as well as the M1 transitions are in agreement with experiment. (Author)

  15. Measurement of the spin dependent structure functions of proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rith, K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results from the EMC experiment on the spin dependent structure function g 1 p (x) of the proton are discussed. They suggest that the nucleon spin does not originate from quark spins but rather from angular orbital momentum and gluon contributions. A proposed experiment at HERA is presented which will allow a very accurate measurement of the spin dependent structure functions and their integrals of both proton and neutron and a precise test of the Bjorken sum rule. (orig.)

  16. Realization of spin-dependent splitting with arbitrary intensity patterns based on all-dielectric metasurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Yachao; He, Yongli; Zhou, Junxiao; Luo, Hailu, E-mail: hailuluo@hnu.edu.cn; Wen, Shuangchun [Laboratory for Spin Photonics, School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-07-27

    We report the realization of spin-dependent splitting with arbitrary intensity patterns based on all-dielectric metasurfaces. Compared with the plasmonic metasurfaces, the all-dielectric metasurface exhibits more high transmission efficiency and conversion efficiency, which makes it possible to achieve the spin-dependent splitting with arbitrary intensity patterns. Our findings suggest a way for generation and manipulation of spin photons, and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications.

  17. Measuring nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation with molecules: Experimental methods and analysis of systematic errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. It has been proposed to study NSD-PV effects using an enhancement of the observable effect in diatomic molecules [D. DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 023003 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.023003]. Here we demonstrate highly sensitive measurements of this type, using the test system 138Ba19F. We show that systematic errors associated with our technique can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. With ˜170 h of data, we measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei.

  18. Demonstration of a Sensitive Method to Measure Nuclear-Spin-Dependent Parity Violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus, and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. We demonstrate measurements of NSD-PV that use an enhancement of the effect in diatomic molecules, here using the test system 138Ba 19. Our sensitivity surpasses that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement. We show that systematic errors can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. We measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with total uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz , for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei including 137Ba in 137BaF, where |W |/(2 π )≈5 Hz is expected.

  19. Spin-dependent scattering by a potential barrier on a nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abranyos, Yonatan; Gumbs, Godfrey; Fekete, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The electron spin effects on the surface of a nanotube have been considered through the spin-orbit interaction (SOI), arising from the electron confinement on the surface of the nanotube. This is of the same nature as the Rashba-Bychkov SOI at a semiconductor heterojunction. We estimate the effect of disorder within a potential barrier on the transmission probability. Using a continuum model, we obtain analytic expressions for the spin-split energy bands for electrons on the surface of nanotubes in the presence of SOI. First we calculate analytically the amplitudes of scattering from a potential barrier located around the axis of the nanotube into spin-dependent states. The effect of disorder on the scattering process is included phenomenologically and induces a reduction in the transition probability. We analyze the relative role of SOI and disorder in the transmission probability which depends on the angular and linear momentum of the incoming particle, and its spin orientation. Finally we demonstrate that in the presence of disorder, perfect transmission may not be achieved for finite barrier heights.

  20. Tritium conductivity and isotope effect in proton-conducting perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukundan, R.; Brosha, E.L.; Birdsell, S.A.; Costello, A.L.; Garzon, F.H.; Willms, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The tritium ion conductivities of SrZr 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 and BaCe 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 have been measured by ac impedance analysis. The high tritium conductivity of these perovskites could potentially lead to their application as an electrochemical membrane for the recovery of tritium from tritiated gas streams. The conductivities of these perovskites, along with SrCe 0.95 Yb 0.05 O 2.975 , were also measured in hydrogen- and deuterium-containing atmospheres to illustrate the isotope effect. For the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples, the impedance plot consists of two clearly resolved arcs, a bulk and a grain boundary arc, in the temperature range 50--350 C. However, for the strontium cerate sample, the clear resolution of the bulk conductivity was not possible and only the total conductivity was measurable. Thus, the isotope effect was clearly established only for the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples. The decrease in bulk conductivity with increasing isotope mass was found to be a result of an increase in the activation energy for conduction accompanied by a decrease in the pre-exponential factor. Since the concentration of the mobile species (H+, D+, or T+) should remain relatively constant at T < 350 C, this increase in activation energy is directly attributable to the increased activation energy for the isotope mobility

  1. Limits on Spin-Dependent WIMP-Nucleon Cross Section Obtained from the Complete LUX Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fallon, S. R.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present experimental constraints on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon elastic cross sections from the total 129.5 kg yr exposure acquired by the Large Underground Xenon experiment (LUX), operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota (USA). A profile likelihood ratio analysis allows 90% C.L. upper limits to be set on the WIMP-neutron (WIMP-proton) cross section of σn=1.6 ×10-41 cm2 (σp=5 ×10-40 cm2 ) at 35 GeV c-2 , almost a sixfold improvement over the previous LUX spin-dependent results. The spin-dependent WIMP-neutron limit is the most sensitive constraint to date.

  2. Determining the spin dependent mean free path in Co90Fe10 using giant magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespear, K. F.; Perdue, K. L.; Moyerman, S. M.; Checkelsky, J. G.; Harberger, S. S.; Tamboli, A. C.; Carey, M. J.; Sparks, P. D.; Eckert, J. C.

    2005-05-01

    The spin dependent mean free path in Co90Fe10 is determined as a function of temperature down to 5K using two different spin valve structures. At 5K the spin dependent mean free path for one structure was measured to be 9.4±1.4nm, decreasing by a factor of 3 by 350K. For the other structure, it is 7.5±0.5nm at 5K and decreased by a factor of 1.5 by 350K. In both cases, the spin dependent mean free path approaches the typical thickness of ferromagnetic layers in spin valves at room temperature and, thus, has an impact on the choice of design parameters for the development of new spintronic devices.

  3. Charge symmetry breaking in spin dependent parton distributions and the Bjorken sum rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloet, I.C.; Horsley, R.; Londergan, J.T.

    2012-04-01

    We present the rst determination of charge symmetry violation (CSV) in the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is done by determining the rst two Mellin moments of the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the octet baryons from N f =2+1 lattice simulations. The results are compared with predictions from quark models of nucleon structure. We discuss the contribution of partonic spin CSV to the Bjorken sum rule, which is important because the CSV contributions represent the only partonic corrections to the Bjorken sum rule.

  4. Charge symmetry breaking in spin dependent parton distributions and the Bjorken sum rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloet, I.C. [Adelaide Univ, SA (Australia). CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Londergan, J.T. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (US). Dept. of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    We present the rst determination of charge symmetry violation (CSV) in the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is done by determining the rst two Mellin moments of the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the octet baryons from N{sub f}=2+1 lattice simulations. The results are compared with predictions from quark models of nucleon structure. We discuss the contribution of partonic spin CSV to the Bjorken sum rule, which is important because the CSV contributions represent the only partonic corrections to the Bjorken sum rule.

  5. Spin-dependent hot electron transport and nano-scale magnetic imaging of metal/Si structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidatzis, A.

    2008-10-01

    In this work, we experimentally study spin-dependent hot electron transport through metallic multilayers (ML), containing single magnetic layers or 'spin-valve' (SV) tri layers. For this purpose, we have set up a ballistic electron emission microscope (BEEM), a three terminal extension of scanning tunnelling microscopy on metal/semiconductor structures. The implementation of the BEEM requirements into the sample fabrication is described in detail. Using BEEM, the hot electron transmission through the ML's was systematically measured in the energy range 1-2 eV above the Fermi level. By varying the magnetic layer thickness, the spin-dependent hot electron attenuation lengths were deduced. For the materials studied (Co and NiFe), they were compared to calculations and other determinations in the literature. For sub-monolayer thickness, a non uniform morphology was observed, with large transmission variations over sub-nano-metric distances. This effect is not yet fully understood. In the imaging mode, the magnetic configurations of SV's were studied under field, focusing on 360 degrees domain walls in Co layers. The effects of the applied field intensity and direction on the DW structure were studied. The results were compared quantitatively to micro-magnetic calculations, with an excellent agreement. From this, it can be shown that the BEEM magnetic resolution is better than 50 nm. (author)

  6. Spin-dependent parton distributions and structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, W.; Ito, T.; Cloet, I.C.; Thomas, A.W.; Yazaki, K.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear parton distributions and structure functions are determined in an effective chiral quark theory. We also discuss an extension of our model to fragmentation functions. Presented at the 20th Few-Body Conference, Pisa, Italy, 10-14 September 2007. (author)

  7. Micromagnetic Design of Spin Dependent Tunnel Junctions for Optimized Sensing Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tondra, Mark; Daughton, James M; Nordman, Catherine; Wang, Dexin; Taylor, John

    1999-01-01

    Pinned Spin Dependent Tunneling (SDT) devices have been fabricated into high sensitivity magnetic field sensors with many favorable properties including high sensitivity (̃ 10 umOe / Hz @ 1 Hz and ̃ 100 nOe / Hz @ > 10 kHz...

  8. Nanoscale spin-dependent transport of electrons and holes in Si-ferromagnet structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ul Haq, E.

    Given the rapid development of magnetic data storage and spin-electronics into the realm of nanotechnology, the understanding of the spin-dependent electronic transport and switching behavior of magnetic structures at the nanoscale is an important issue. We have developed spin-sensitive techniques

  9. Scattering of polarized 7Li by 120Sn and projectile-target spin-dependent interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuragi, Y.; Yahiro, M.; Kamimura, M.; Tanifuji, M.

    1986-07-01

    Scattering of 7 Li by 120 Sn targets at E lab = 44 MeV is investigated in the coupled-channel frame by taking account of the projectile virtual excitations to the lowest three excited states. Calculations are performed by the cluster-folding (CF) interactions and the double-folding (DF) one. Both interactions reproduce very well the expeimental data on the cross section, the vector analyzing power, the second-rank tensor ones and the third-rank tensor one in elastic and projectile inelastic scattering, although some differences are found between the CF results and the DF ones. In the calculation, the virtual excitations of the projectile are important for most of the analyzing powers and the spin-orbit interaction is indispensable for the vector analyzing power. These features are in contrast to those in 7 Li - 58 Ni scattering at 20 MeV and are interpreted as over-Coulomb-barrier effects. The scattering amplitudes and the analyzing powers are investigated by the invariant amplitude method, which provides a key connecting the spin-dependent interactions to the analyzing powers. The method proposes an important relationship between the tensor analyzing powers, which is useful in analyses of both theoretical and experimental results. Finally, it is found that in the elastic scattering the second-rank tensor analyzing powers are proportional to the strength of the second-rank tensor interaction and the vector and third-rank tensor analyzing powers to the square or cube of the strength of this interaction, while in the inelastic scattering the cross section is proportional to the square of the strength of the tensor interaction, other quantities being weakly dependent on the strength. (author)

  10. The spin-dependent electronic transport properties of M(dcdmp)2 (M = Cu, Au, Co, Ni) molecular devices based on zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongde; Wu, Di; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zeng, Bowen; Li, Mingjun; Duan, Haiming; Yang, Bingchu; Long, Mengqiu

    2018-05-01

    The spin-dependent electronic transport properties of M(dcdmp)2 (M = Cu, Au, Co, Ni; dcdmp = 2,3-dicyano-5,6-dimercaptopyrazyne) molecular devices based on zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) electrodes were investigated by density functional theory combined nonequilibrium Green's function method (DFT-NEGF). Our results show that the spin-dependent transport properties of the M(dcdmp)2 molecular devices can be controlled by the spin configurations of the ZGNR electrodes, and the central 3d-transition metal atom can introduce a larger magnetism than that of the nonferrous metal one. Moreover, the perfect spin filtering effect, negative differential resistance, rectifying effect and magnetic resistance phenomena can be observed in our proposed M(dcdmp)2 molecular devices.

  11. Optical control of spin-dependent thermal transport in a quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf

    2018-05-01

    We report on calculation of spin-dependent thermal transport through a quantum ring with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The quantum ring is connected to two electron reservoirs with different temperatures. Tuning the Rashba coupling constant, degenerate energy states are formed leading to a suppression of the heat and thermoelectric currents. In addition, the quantum ring is coupled to a photon cavity with a single photon mode and linearly polarized photon field. In a resonance regime, when the photon energy is approximately equal to the energy spacing between two lowest degenerate states of the ring, the polarized photon field can significantly control the heat and thermoelectric currents in the system. The roles of the number of photon initially in the cavity, and electron-photon coupling strength on spin-dependent heat and thermoelectric currents are presented.

  12. Spin-dependent electrical transport in Fe-MgO-Fe heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Shokri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, spin-dependent electrical transport properties are investigated in a single-crystal magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ which consists of two ferromagnetic Fe electrodes separated by an MgO insulating barrier. These properties contain electric current, spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR. For this purpose, spin-dependent Hamiltonian is described for Δ1 and Δ5 bands in the transport direction. The transmission is calculated by Green's function formalism based on a single-band tight-binding approximation. The transport properties are investigated as a function of the barrier thickness in the limit of coherent tunneling. We have demonstrated that dependence of the TMR on the applied voltage and barrier thickness. Our numerical results may be useful for designing of spintronic devices. The numerical results may be useful in designing of spintronic devices.

  13. Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaptari, Leonya P. [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia); Del Dotto, Alessio [University of Rome, Rome (Italy); INFN-Roma (Italy); Pace, Emanuele [University of Rome (Italy); INFN-Tor Vergata (Italy); Salme, Giovanni [INFN-Roma (Italy); Scopetta, Sergio [University of Perugia (Italy); INFN-Perugia (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  14. Spin-dependent recombination involving oxygen-vacancy complexes in silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, David P.; Hoehne, Felix; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Spin-dependent relaxation and recombination processes in $\\gamma$-irradiated $n$-type Czochralski-grown silicon are studied using continuous wave (cw) and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). Two processes involving the SL1 center, the neutral excited triplet state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, are observed which can be separated by their different dynamics. One of the processes is the relaxation of the excited SL1 state to the ground state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, t...

  15. ''Spin-dependent'' μ → e conversion on light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Sacha; Saporta, Albert; Kuno, Yoshitaka

    2018-01-01

    The experimental sensitivity to μ → e conversion will improve by four or more orders of magnitude in coming years, making it interesting to consider the ''spin-dependent'' (SD) contribution to the rate. This process does not benefit from the atomic-number-squared enhancement of the spin-independent (SI) contribution, but probes different operators. We give details of our recent estimate of the spin-dependent rate, expressed as a function of operator coefficients at the experimental scale. Then we explore the prospects for distinguishing coefficients or models by using different targets, both in an EFT perspective, where a geometric representation of different targets as vectors in coefficient space is introduced, and also in three leptoquark models. It is found that comparing the rate on isotopes with and without spin could allow one to detect spin-dependent coefficients that are at least a factor of few larger than the spin-independent ones. Distinguishing among the axial, tensor and pseudoscalar operators that induce the SD rate would require calculating the nuclear matrix elements for the second two. Comparing the SD rate on nuclei with an odd proton vs. odd neutron could allow one to distinguish operators involving u quarks from those involving d quarks; this is interesting because the distinction is difficult to make for SI operators. (orig.)

  16. ''Spin-dependent'' μ → e conversion on light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Sacha; Saporta, Albert [IPNL, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kuno, Yoshitaka [Osaka University, Department of Physics, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2018-02-15

    The experimental sensitivity to μ → e conversion will improve by four or more orders of magnitude in coming years, making it interesting to consider the ''spin-dependent'' (SD) contribution to the rate. This process does not benefit from the atomic-number-squared enhancement of the spin-independent (SI) contribution, but probes different operators. We give details of our recent estimate of the spin-dependent rate, expressed as a function of operator coefficients at the experimental scale. Then we explore the prospects for distinguishing coefficients or models by using different targets, both in an EFT perspective, where a geometric representation of different targets as vectors in coefficient space is introduced, and also in three leptoquark models. It is found that comparing the rate on isotopes with and without spin could allow one to detect spin-dependent coefficients that are at least a factor of few larger than the spin-independent ones. Distinguishing among the axial, tensor and pseudoscalar operators that induce the SD rate would require calculating the nuclear matrix elements for the second two. Comparing the SD rate on nuclei with an odd proton vs. odd neutron could allow one to distinguish operators involving u quarks from those involving d quarks; this is interesting because the distinction is difficult to make for SI operators. (orig.)

  17. Hysteresis loops of spin-dependent electronic current in a paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wójcik, P; Spisak, B J; Wołoszyn, M; Adamowski, J

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear properties of the spin-dependent electronic transport through a semiconductor resonant tunnelling diode with a paramagnetic quantum well are considered. The spin-dependent Wigner–Poisson model of the electronic transport and the two-current Mott’s formula for the independent spin channels are applied to determine the current–voltage curves of the nanodevice. Two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops are found in the current–voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current. The physical interpretation of these two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops is given based on the analysis of the spin-dependent electron densities and the potential energy profiles. The differences between the current–voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current allow us to explore the changes of the spin polarization of the current for different electric fields and determine the influence of the electronic current hysteresis on the spin polarization of the current flowing through the paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode. (paper)

  18. From direct detection to relic abundance: the case of proton-philic spin-dependent inelastic Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yu, Hyeonhye, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: skyh2yu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    We discuss strategies to make inferences on the thermal relic abundance of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) when the same effective dimension-six operator that explains an experimental excess in direct detection is assumed to drive decoupling at freeze-out, and apply them to the explicit scenario of WIMP inelastic up-scattering with spin-dependent couplings to protons (proton-philic Spin-dependent Inelastic Dark Matter, pSIDM), a phenomenological set-up containing two Dark Matter (DM) particles χ{sub 1} and χ{sub 2} with masses m {sub χ}= m {sub χ{sub 1}} and m {sub χ{sub 2}}= m {sub χ}+δ that we have shown in a previous paper to explain the DAMA effect in compliance with the constraints from other detectors. We also update experimental constraints on pSIDM, extend the analysis to the most general spin-dependent momentum-dependent interactions allowed by non-relativistic Effective Field Theory (EFT), and consider for the WIMP velocity distribution in our Galaxy f ( v ) both a halo-independent approach and a standard Maxwellian. Under these conditions we find that the DAMA effect can be explained in terms of the particle χ{sub 1} in compliance with all the other constraints for all the analyzed EFT couplings and also for a Maxwellian f ( v ). As far as the relic abundance is concerned, we show that the problem of calculating it by using direct detection data to fix the model parameters is affected by a strong sensitivity on f ( v ) and by the degeneracy between the WIMP local density ρ{sub χ} and the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, since ρ{sub χ} must be rescaled with respect to the observed DM density in the neighborhood of the Sun when the calculated relic density Ω is smaller than the observed one Ω{sub 0}. As a consequence, a DM direct detection experiment is not directly sensitive to the physical cut-off scale of the EFT, but on some dimensional combination that does not depend on the actual value of Ω. However, such degeneracy

  19. Spin-dependent level density in interacting Boson-Fermion-Fermion model of the Odd-Odd Nucleus 196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabashi, S.; Bekteshi, S.; Ahmetaj, S.; Shaqiri, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The level density of the odd-odd nucleus 196 Au is investigated in the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model (IBFFM) which accounts for collectivity and complex interaction between quasiparticle and collective modes.The IBFFM spin-dependent level densities show high-spin reduction with respect to Bethe formula.This can be well accounted for by a modified spin-dependent level density formula. (authors)

  20. The role of the axial anomaly in determining spin-dependent parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlitz, R.D.; Collins, J.C.; Mueller, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the forward matrix elements of j 5 μ , the flavor singlet axial vector current, do not measure the helicity carried by quarks and anti-quarks but also include a spin-dependent gluonic component due to the anomaly. Detailed phenomenological and field theoretic reasons are given for the necessity of a gluonic component in the matrix element of j 5 μ . The first higher order corrections to the basic box and triangle graphs are discussed and shown not to modify the conclusions drawn in the leading order calculation. We close with a few comments on the possible phenomenological implications of the anomalous contribution. 25 refs., 6 figs

  1. New measurements of spin-dependent n-p cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichle, B. W.; Gould, C. R.; Haase, D. G.; Seely, M. L.; Walston, J. R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W. S.; Penttilae, S. I.; Hoffmann, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    We report on new measurements of the spin-dependent neutron-proton total cross-section differences in longitudinal and transverse geometries (Δσ L and Δσ T respectively) and between 5 and 20 MeV. These transmission experiments involve a polarized neutron beam and polarized proton target. The polarized neutron beam was produced as a secondary beam via charged-particle induced neutron-production reactions. The proton target was cryogenically cooled and dynamically polarized. These data will be used to extract ε 1 , the phase-shift parameter which characterizes the strength of the tensor interaction at low energy

  2. Impurity-induced tuning of quantum-well States in spin-dependent resonant tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalitsov, Alan; Coho, A; Kioussis, Nicholas; Vedyayev, Anatoly; Chshiev, M; Granovsky, A

    2004-07-23

    We report exact model calculations of the spin-dependent tunneling in double magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of impurities in the well. We show that the impurity can tune selectively the spin channels giving rise to a wide variety of interesting and novel transport phenomena. The tunneling magnetoresistance, the spin polarization, and the local current can be dramatically enhanced or suppressed by impurities. The underlying mechanism is the impurity-induced shift of the quantum well states (QWSs), which depends on the impurity potential, impurity position, and the symmetry of the QWS. Copyright 2004 The American Physical Society

  3. On the mechanism of spin-dependent (e,2e) scattering from a ferromagnetic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, S N; Sergeant, A D; Pravica, L; Cvejanovic, D; Wilkie, P; Guagliardo, P; Williams, J F; Artamonov, O M; Suvorova, A A

    2009-01-01

    A simple model is suggested for a qualitative analysis of spin-dependent (e,2e) reaction on a ferromagnetic surface. The model is based on the scattering of the primary electron with the average spin projection 1 > by the valence electron with the average spin projection 2 >. To test the model the energy distributions of correlated electron pairs are measured for parallel and anti-parallel orientations of the magnetic moment of the cobalt film and polarization vector of the incident beam. The proposed model explains qualitatively the spin-asymmetry of the measured binding energy spectrum.

  4. Spin dependent fragmentation functions for heavy flavor baryons and single heavy hyperon polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, G R

    2001-01-01

    Spin dependent fragmentation functions for heavy flavor quarks to fragment into heavy baryons are calculated in a quark-diquark model. The production of intermediate spin 1/2 and 3/2 excited states is explicity included. $\\Lambda_b$ , $\\Lambda_c$ and $\\Xi_c$ production rate and polarization at LEP energies are calculated and, where possible, compared with experiment. A different approach, also relying on a heavy quark-diquark model, is proposed for the small momentum transfer inclusive production of polarized heavy flavor hyperons. The predicted $\\Lambda_c$ polarization is roughly in agreement with experiment.

  5. Spin-dependent transport and current-induced spin transfer torque in a disordered zigzag silicene nanoribbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Liu, Guang; Guo, Dan; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the spin-dependent transport and the current-induced spin transfer torque (STT) for a zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR) with Anderson-type disorders between two ferromagnetic electrodes. By using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, it is predicted that the transport property and STT through the junction depend sensitively on the disorder, especially around the Dirac point. As a result, the conductance decreases and increases for two electrode in parallel and antiparallel configurations, respectively. Due to the disorder, the magnetoresistance (MR) decreases accordingly even within the energy regime for the perfect plateau without disorders. In addition, the conductance versus the relative angle of the magnetization shows a cosine-like behavior. The STT per unit of the bias voltage versus the angle of the magnetization exhibits a sine-like behavior, and versus the Fermi energy is antisymmetrical to the Dirac point and exhibits sharp peaks. Furthermore, the peaks of the STT are suppressed much as the disorder strength increases, especially around the Dirac point. The results obtained here may provide a valuable suggestion to experimentally design spin valve devices based on ZSiNR.

  6. Spin-dependent transport and current-induced spin transfer torque in a disordered zigzag silicene nanoribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Benliang [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications of Hunan, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhou, Benhu [Department of Physics, Shaoyang University, Shaoyang 422001 (China); Liu, Guang; Guo, Dan [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications of Hunan, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhou, Guanghui, E-mail: ghzhou@hunnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications of Hunan, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-11-01

    We study theoretically the spin-dependent transport and the current-induced spin transfer torque (STT) for a zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR) with Anderson-type disorders between two ferromagnetic electrodes. By using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, it is predicted that the transport property and STT through the junction depend sensitively on the disorder, especially around the Dirac point. As a result, the conductance decreases and increases for two electrode in parallel and antiparallel configurations, respectively. Due to the disorder, the magnetoresistance (MR) decreases accordingly even within the energy regime for the perfect plateau without disorders. In addition, the conductance versus the relative angle of the magnetization shows a cosine-like behavior. The STT per unit of the bias voltage versus the angle of the magnetization exhibits a sine-like behavior, and versus the Fermi energy is antisymmetrical to the Dirac point and exhibits sharp peaks. Furthermore, the peaks of the STT are suppressed much as the disorder strength increases, especially around the Dirac point. The results obtained here may provide a valuable suggestion to experimentally design spin valve devices based on ZSiNR.

  7. Spin-dependent tunneling recombination in heterostructures with a magnetic layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, K. S., E-mail: denisokonstantin@gmail.com; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Lähderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)

    2017-01-15

    We propose a mechanism for the generation of spin polarization in semiconductor heterostructures with a quantum well and a magnetic impurity layer spatially separated from it. The spin polarization of carriers in a quantum well originates from spin-dependent tunneling recombination at impurity states in the magnetic layer, which is accompanied by a fast linear increase in the degree of circular polarization of photoluminescence from the quantum well. Two situations are theoretically considered. In the first case, resonant tunneling to the spin-split sublevels of the impurity center occurs and spin polarization is caused by different populations of resonance levels in the quantum well for opposite spin projections. In the second, nonresonant case, the spin-split impurity level lies above the occupied states of electrons in the quantum well and plays the role of an intermediate state in the two-stage coherent spin-dependent recombination of an electron from the quantum well and a hole in the impurity layer. The developed theory allows us to explain both qualitatively and quantitatively the kinetics of photoexcited electrons in experiments with photoluminescence with time resolution in Mn-doped InGaAs heterostructures.

  8. Conductivity, dielectric behaviour and magnetoelectric effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    intensity of the magnetic field. The maximum value of ME coefficient was observed for 75% ferroelectric phase composite. Keywords. Conductivity; dielectric behaviour; magnetoelectric effect; CuFe2O4; BaTiO3. 1. Introduction. Magnetoelectric composites consist of two phases viz. piezoelectric and piezomagnetic. The ME ...

  9. Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, LL; Snyder, GJ; Toberer, ES

    2013-05-28

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from a temperature gradient. Optimizing these devices for maximum power production can be difficult due to the many heat transport mechanisms occurring simultaneously within the TEG. In this paper, we develop a model for heat transport in thermoelectric materials in which an "effective thermal conductivity" (kappa(eff)) encompasses both the one dimensional steady-state Fourier conduction and the heat generation/consumption due to secondary thermoelectric effects. This model is especially powerful in that the value of kappa(eff) does not depend upon the operating conditions of the TEG but rather on the transport properties of the TE materials themselves. We analyze a variety of thermoelectric materials and generator designs using this concept and demonstrate that kappa(eff) predicts the heat fluxes within these devices to 5% of the exact value. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  10. Spin-dependent recombination involving oxygen-vacancy complexes in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, David P.; Hoehne, Felix; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2014-05-01

    Spin-dependent relaxation and recombination processes in γ-irradiated n-type Czochralski-grown silicon are studied using continuous wave (cw) and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). Two processes involving the SL1 center, the neutral excited triplet state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, are observed which can be separated by their different dynamics. One of the processes is the relaxation of the excited SL1 state to the ground state of the oxygen-vacancy complex, the other a charge transfer between 31P donors and SL1 centers forming close pairs, as indicated by electrically detected electron double resonance. For both processes, the recombination dynamics is studied with pulsed EDMR techniques. We demonstrate the feasibility of true zero-field cw and pulsed EDMR for spin-1 systems and use this to measure the lifetimes of the different spin states of SL1 also at vanishing external magnetic field.

  11. Spin-dependent electron emission from metals in the neutralization of He+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alducin, M.; Roesler, M.; Juaristi, J.I.; Muino, R. Diez; Echenique, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the spin-polarization of electrons emitted in the neutralization of He + ions interacting with metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the spin-dependent perturbation induced by the projectile, the excitation of electrons in Auger neutralization processes, the creation of a cascade of secondaries, and the escape of the electrons through the surface potential barrier. The model allows us to explain in quantitative terms the measured spin-polarization of the yield in the interaction of spin-polarized He + ions with paramagnetic surfaces, and to disentangle the role played by each of the involved mechanisms. We show that electron-electron scattering processes at the surface determine the spin-polarization of the total yield. High energy emitted electrons are the ones providing direct information on the He + ion neutralization process and on the electronic properties of the surface

  12. The spin-dependent structure function g1 of the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueltmann, S.

    1996-01-01

    Results on the spin-dependent structure function g 1 d of the deuteron measured by the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN are presented. They are based on deep-inelastic scattering of 190 GeV polarized muons off a polarized deuteron target in the kinematic range of 0.003 ≤ x Bj ≤ 0.7 and 1 GeV 2 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 60 GeV 2 . The structure function is found to be negative for small values of x Bj , while the proton structure function g 1 p measured earlier by the SMC is positive over the whole x Bj -range. The Bjorken sum rule is in good agreement with the first moments of the structure functions, while the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule is violated by more than three standard deviations for the deuteron measurement. (author)

  13. Recent SLAC measurements of the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapalac, G.

    1995-09-01

    The authors present results from SLAC experiments E142 and E143 for the spin dependent structure functions of the proton g 1 p (x, Q 2 ) and neutron g 1 n (x,Q 2 ) measured in deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized target. Experiment E142 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 n (x)dx = -0.022 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 2 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized 3 He target. Experiment E143 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 p (x)dx = 0.129 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 3 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized NH 3 target. These results are combined at Q 2 = 3 (GeV/c) 2 to yield ∫ 0 1 [g 1 p (x) - g 1 n (x)]dx = 0.151 ± 0.015. The Bjorken sum rule predicts 0.171 ± 0.008

  14. Spin-dependent heat and thermoelectric currents in a Rashba ring coupled to a photon cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2018-01-01

    Spin-dependent heat and thermoelectric currents in a quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit interaction placed in a photon cavity are theoretically calculated. The quantum ring is coupled to two external leads with different temperatures. In a resonant regime, with the ring structure in resonance with the photon field, the heat and the thermoelectric currents can be controlled by the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The heat current is suppressed in the presence of the photon field due to contribution of the two-electron and photon replica states to the transport while the thermoelectric current is not sensitive to changes in parameters of the photon field. Our study opens a possibility to use the proposed interferometric device as a tunable heat current generator in the cavity photon field.

  15. Spin-dependent recombination processes in wide band gap II-Mn-VI compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlewski, M.; Yatsunenko, S.; Khachapuridze, A.; Ivanov, V.Yu.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms of optical detection of magnetic resonance in wide band gap II-Mn-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) are discussed based on the results of photoluminescence (PL), PL kinetics, electron spin resonance (ESR) and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) and optically detected cyclotron resonance (ODCR) investigations. Spin-dependent interactions between localized spins of Mn 2+ ions and spins/magnetic moments of free, localized or bound carriers are responsible for the observed ODMR signals. We conclude that these interactions are responsible for the observed rapid shortening of the PL decay time of 4 T 1 → 6 A 1 intra-shell emission of Mn 2+ ions and also for the observed delocalization of excitons in low dimensional structures

  16. Relativistic description of quark-antiquark bound states. II. Spin-dependent treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gara, A.; Durand, B.; Durand, L.

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of a study of light- and heavy-quark--antiquark bound states in the context of the reduced Bethe-Salpeter equation, including the full spin dependence. We obtain good fits to the observed spin splittings in the b bar b and c bar c systems using a short-distance single-gluon-exchange interaction, and a long-distance scalar confining interaction. However, we cannot obtain satisfactory fits to the centers of gravity of the b bar b and c bar c spin multiplets at the same time, and the splittings calculated for q bar Q mesons containing the lighter quarks are very poor. The difficulty appears to be intrinsic to the reduced Salpeter equation for reasons which we discuss

  17. The Deuteron Spin-dependent Structure Function $g^{d}_1$ and its First Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Becker, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Demchenko, D.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Horn, I.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ivanchin, I.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, D.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kubart, J.; Kuhn, R.; Kukhtin, V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Masek, L.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Matthia, D.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rondio, E.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, I.A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schroeder, W.; Seeharsch, D.; Seimetz, M.; Setter, D.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Trippel, S.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhao, J.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the deuteron spin-dependent structure function g^d_1 based on the data collected by the COMPASS experiment at CERN during the years 2002-2004. The data provide an accurate evaluation for \\Gamma^d_1, the first moment of g^d_1(x), and for the matrix element of the singlet axial current, a_0. The results of QCD fits in the next to leading order (NLO) on all g1 deep inelastic scattering data are also presented. They provide two solutions with the gluon spin distribution function \\Delta_G positive or negative, which describe the data equally well. In both cases, at Q^2 = 3(GeV/c)^2 the first moment of \\Delta G is found to be of the order of 0:2 - 0:3 in absolute value.

  18. Conducting evaluations to determine training effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J. Doug; Yoder, John A. Yoder

    2003-01-01

    Training organizations must answer the question: Is the training program adding value in terms of workforce productivity and safety? To answer this question, one needs to know what circumstances led to the development of training to determine how to measure the result of Gaining. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (ENEEL), under contract with the United States Department Of Energy (U.S. DOE), has conducted extensive research hi the area of training effectiveness. A comprehensive Training Performance Indicator Model has been developed, which has become the basis for a DRAFT document entitled Guidance for Conducting Evaluations to Determine Training Effectiveness'. The indicator Model includes the performance indicators, strategies, and methods for measuring training effectiveness. A common nomenclature is used throughout the DRAFT document to aid in using and understanding training effectiveness evaluations. The model incorporates elements of Dr. Donald L. Kirkpatrick's evaluation model, other models from industry leaders, and the findings of a benchmarking study involving both nuclear and non-nuclear industry professionals. This presentation communicates recent Department of Energy efforts in evaluating effectiveness of training, including valuable lessons learned. (author)

  19. Anomalous spin-dependent tunneling statistics in Fe/MgO/Fe junctions induced by disorder at the interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiawei; Wang, Shizhuo; Xia, Ke; Ke, Youqi

    2018-01-01

    We present first-principles analysis of interfacial disorder effects on spin-dependent tunneling statistics in thin Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions. We find that interfacial disorder scattering can significantly modulate the tunneling statistics in the minority spin of the parallel configuration (PC) while all other spin channels remain dominated by the Poissonian process. For the minority-spin channel of PC, interfacial disorder scattering favors the formation of resonant tunneling channels by lifting the limitation of symmetry conservation at low concentration, presenting an important sub-Poissonian process in PC, but is destructive to the open channels at high concentration. We find that the important modulation of tunneling statistics is independent of the type of interfacial disorder. A bimodal distribution function of transmission with disorder dependence is introduced and fits very well our first-principles results. The increase of MgO thickness can quickly change the tunneling from a sub-Poissonian to Poissonian dominated process in the minority spin of PC with disorder. Our results provide a sensitive detection method of an ultralow concentration of interfacial defects.

  20. Magnetoelectric coupling and spin-dependent tunneling in Fe/PbTiO3/Fe multiferroic heterostructure with a Ni monolayer inserted at one interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jian-Qing; Zhang, Hu; Song, Yu-Min

    2015-01-01

    We report on first-principles calculations of a Ni monolayer inserted at one interface in the epitaxial Fe/PbTiO 3 /Fe multiferroic heterostructure, focusing on the magnetoelectric coupling and the spin-dependent transport properties. The results of magnetoelectric coupling calculations reveal an attractive approach to realize cumulative magnetoelectric effects in the ferromagnetic/ferroelectric/ferromagnetic superlattices. The underlying physics is attributed to the combinations of several different magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms such as interface bonding, spin-dependent screening, and different types of magnetic interactions. We also demonstrate that inserting a Ni monolayer at one interface in the Fe/PbTiO 3 /Fe multiferroic tunnel junction is an efficient method to produce considerable tunneling electroresistance effect by modifying the tunnel potential barrier and the interfacial electronic structure. Furthermore, coexistence of tunneling magnetoresistance and tunneling electroresistance leads to the emergence of four distinct resistance states, which can be served as a multistate-storage device. The complicated influencing factors including bulk properties of the ferromagnetic electrodes, decay rates of the evanescent states in the tunnel barrier, and the specific interfacial electronic structure provide us promising opportunities to design novel multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performances

  1. Magnetoelectric coupling and spin-dependent tunneling in Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic heterostructure with a Ni monolayer inserted at one interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Jian-Qing, E-mail: djqkust@sina.com; Zhang, Hu; Song, Yu-Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-08-07

    We report on first-principles calculations of a Ni monolayer inserted at one interface in the epitaxial Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic heterostructure, focusing on the magnetoelectric coupling and the spin-dependent transport properties. The results of magnetoelectric coupling calculations reveal an attractive approach to realize cumulative magnetoelectric effects in the ferromagnetic/ferroelectric/ferromagnetic superlattices. The underlying physics is attributed to the combinations of several different magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms such as interface bonding, spin-dependent screening, and different types of magnetic interactions. We also demonstrate that inserting a Ni monolayer at one interface in the Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic tunnel junction is an efficient method to produce considerable tunneling electroresistance effect by modifying the tunnel potential barrier and the interfacial electronic structure. Furthermore, coexistence of tunneling magnetoresistance and tunneling electroresistance leads to the emergence of four distinct resistance states, which can be served as a multistate-storage device. The complicated influencing factors including bulk properties of the ferromagnetic electrodes, decay rates of the evanescent states in the tunnel barrier, and the specific interfacial electronic structure provide us promising opportunities to design novel multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performances.

  2. Spin-dependent potentials, axion-like particles and Lorentz-symmetry violation. Beyond the Standard Model phenomenology at the low-energy frontier of physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti Malta, Pedro

    2017-06-27

    It is well known that the Standard Model is not complete and many of the theories that seek to extend it predict new phenomena that may be accessible in low-energy settings. This thesis deals with some of these, namely, novel spin-dependent interparticle potentials, axion-like particles and Lorentz-symmetry violation. In Part I we discuss the spin-dependent potentials that arise due to the exchange of a topologically massive mediator, and also pursue a comparative study between spin-1/2 and spin-1 sources. In Part II we treat massive axion-like particles that may be copiously produced in core-collapse supernovae, thus leading to a non-standard flux of gamma rays. Using SN 1987A and the fact that after its observation no extra gamma-ray signal was detected, we are able to set robust limits on the parameter space of axion-like particles with masses in the 10 keV - 100 MeV range. Finally, in Part III we investigate the effects of Lorentz-breaking backgrounds in QED. We discuss two scenarios: a modification in the Maxwell sector via the Carroll-Field-Jackiw term and a new non-minimal coupling between electrons and photons. We are able to set upper limits on the coefficients of the backgrounds by using laboratory-based measurements.

  3. Spin-dependent structure functions of sea quarks in the framework of nonperturbative QCD and new Regge trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorokhov, A.E.; Kochelev, N.I.

    1991-01-01

    Within the model of QCD vacuum as an instanton liquid the spin-dependent structure functions of sea quarks are obtained. It is shown that the EMC data manages the definition of new Regge trajectory connected with the axial anomaly. The model explains the modern experimental data on the sea quark structure functions. 23 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Summary of measurements of the spin dependence in NN interactions from 2 to 12 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    The status of experimental measurements of the spin dependence in NN interactions from 2 to 12 GeV/c as of June 1975 is summarized. Older data have been left out if more accurate or more complete results are available

  5. Transparent conducting film: Effect of mechanical stretching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We describe in this paper a transparent conducting film (TCF). ... conducting carbon nanotube film which is crack-resistant for solar cell applications. ... CA 90095, USA; Nanocomp Technologies, Inc, 162 Pembroke Road, Concord, NH 03301 ...

  6. The spin dependent structure function g1 of the deuteron and the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klostermann, L.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents a study on the spin structure of the nucleon, via deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of polarised nuons on polarised proton and deuterium targets. The work was done in the Spin Muon Collaboration (SMC) at CERN in Geneva. From the asymmetry in the scattering cross section for nucleon and lepton spins parallel and anti-parallel, one con determine the spin dependent structure function g 1 , which contains information on the quark and gluon spin distribution functions. The interpretation in the frame work of the quark parton model (QPM) of earlier results on g 1 p by the European Muon Collaboration (EMC), gave an indication that only a small fraction of the proton spin, compatible with zero, is carried by the spins of the constituent quarks. The SMC was set up to check this unexpected result with improved accuracy, and to combine measurements of g 1 p and g 1 d to test a fundamental sum rule in quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the Bjorken sum rule. (orig./WL)

  7. Measurement of the spin-dependent structure-functions of the proton and the deuteron

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % NA47 %title \\\\ \\\\The physics motivation of the experiments of the Spin Muon Collaboration is to better understand how the nucleon spin is built-up by its partons and to test the fundamental Bjorken sum rule. \\\\ \\\\The spin-dependent structure functions $g _{1}(x)$ of the proton and the deuteron are determined from the measured cross section asymmetries for deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized muons from longitudinally polarized nucleons. The experiment is similar to the NA2 one of the European Muon Collaboration in which the violation of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the proton was found. \\\\ \\\\The apparatus is the upgraded forward spectrometer which was used originally by the European and New Muon Collaborations. To minimize the systematic uncertainties the target contains two oppositely polarized cells, which were exposed to the muon beam simultaneously. For the experiments in 1991 and 1992 the original EMC polarized target was reinstalled. In 1993 a new polarized target was put into operati...

  8. Equations of motion of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann–Vlasov equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Jun, E-mail: xujun@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, Bao-An [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429-3011 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Shen, Wen-Qing [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-08-10

    A consistent derivation of the equations of motion (EOMs) of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann–Vlasov equation is presented. The resulting EOMs in phase space are similar to the canonical equations in Hamiltonian dynamics, and the EOM of spin is the same as that in the Heisenburg picture of quantum mechanics. Considering further the quantum nature of spin and choosing the direction of total angular momentum in heavy-ion reactions as a reference of measuring nucleon spin, the EOMs of spin-up and spin-down nucleons are given separately. The key elements affecting the spin dynamics in heavy-ion collisions are identified. The resulting EOMs provide a solid foundation for using the test-particle approach in studying spin dynamics in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. Future comparisons of model simulations with experimental data will help to constrain the poorly known in-medium nucleon spin–orbit coupling relevant for understanding properties of rare isotopes and their astrophysical impacts.

  9. CONTEXTUAL STRATEGIES FOR CONDUCTING EFFECTIVE NEGOTIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia\tBĂEȘU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Within this paper we try to argue the development of contextual strategies for conducting effective negotiation. Throughout the paper we present that the first motivation which we manage to identify is that we negotiate to improve whatever situation we are involved in. It is of great relevance to identify a few reasons for what we negotiate. Another motivation is that negotiation is an opportunity for creativity and it does allow you to fashion a solution according to, usually different kinds of facts, different fact situation so you may get to express some creativity. Negotiation is perceived as an opportunity where we can also build relationship with the other person. We can also communicate better with the other side about where they are, what they want and where they want to go. Next, we try to identify what makes for successful negotiation during each stage of the negotiation process. According to this paper there are five things which are the essence of business negotiation.

  10. The framing effect and skin conductance responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eRing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and finally to reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e. decision-processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e. whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa.

  11. The framing effect and skin conductance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and to finally reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM) on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e., decision processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs) while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e., whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa.

  12. Conduct Disorders: Are Boot Camps Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeter, LaVaughn V.

    2010-01-01

    Youth diagnosed with "conduct disorder" are often placed in programs using forced compliance and coercive control. One type of intervention used to treat conduct disorder is the boot camp. The basic idea is that disruptive behaviors can be corrected by strict behavioral regulation and an emphasis on skills training (Weis & Toolis 2009; Weis,…

  13. Effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids: the effects of microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jing; Wang Liqiu

    2010-01-01

    We examine numerically the effects of particle-fluid thermal conductivity ratio, particle volume fraction, particle size distribution and particle aggregation on macroscale thermal properties for seven kinds of two-dimensional nanofluids. The results show that the radius of gyration and the non-dimensional particle-fluid interfacial area are two important parameters in characterizing the geometrical structure of nanoparticles. A non-uniform particle size is found to be unfavourable for the conductivity enhancement, while particle-aggregation benefits the enhancement especially when the radius of gyration of aggregates is large. Without considering the interfacial thermal resistance, a larger non-dimensional particle-fluid interfacial area between the base fluid and the nanoparticles is also desirable for enhancing thermal conductivity. The nanofluids with nanoparticles of connected cross-shape show a much higher (lower) effective thermal conductivity when the particle-fluid conductivity ratio is larger (smaller) than 1.

  14. Radiation tolerance of a spin-dependent tunnelling magnetometer for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Anders; Thornell, Greger; Nguyen, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand for miniaturized space instruments, efforts have been made to miniaturize traditional magnetometers, e.g. fluxgate and spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometers. These have, for different reasons, turned out to be difficult. New technologies are needed, and promising in this respect are tunnelling magnetoresistive (TMR) magnetometers, which are based on thin film technology. However, all new space devices first have to be qualified, particularly in terms of radiation resistance. A study on TMR magnetometers' vulnerability to radiation is crucial, considering the fact that they employ a dielectric barrier, which can be susceptible to charge trapping from ionizing radiation. Here, a TMR-based magnetometer, called the spin-dependent tunnelling magnetometer (SDTM), is presented. A magnetometer chip consisting of three Wheatstone bridges, with an angular pitch of 120°, was fabricated using microstructure technology. Each branch of the Wheatstone bridges consists of eight pairs of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) connected in series. Two such chips are used to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector. To investigate the SDTM's resistance to radiation, one branch of a Wheatstone bridge was irradiated with gamma rays from a Co 60 source with a dose rate of 10.9 rad min −1 to a total dose of 100 krad. The TMR of the branch was monitored in situ, and the easy axis TMR loop and low-frequency noise characteristics of a single MTJ were acquired before and after irradiation with the total dose. It was concluded that radiation did not influence the MTJs in any noticeable way in terms of the TMR ratio, coercivity, magnetostatic coupling or low-frequency noise

  15. Spin-dependent transport properties of oleic acid molecule self-assembled La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, L.; Du, J.H.; Ma, J.H.; Wang, Z.; Zuo, Y.L.; Xue, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Spin-dependent transport property of LSMO/oleic acid nanoparticles is investigated. ► Transport properties and MR measured by Cu/nanoparticle assembly/elargol device. ► Non-linear I–V curve indicates a tunneling type transport properties. ► Tunnel barrier height around 1.3 ± 0.15 eV was obtained by fitting I–V curves. ► LFMR of LSMO/oleic acid molecules value reaches −18% with current of 0.1 μA at 10 K. - Abstract: Spin-dependent transport property through molecules is investigated using a monolayer of oleic acid molecule self-assembled half metallic La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) nanoparticles, which was synthesized using a coprecipitation method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm that one-monolayer oleic acid molecules chemically bond to the LSMO nanoparticles. The transport properties and magnetoresistance (MR) effect of the oleic acid molecule coated LSMO nanoparticles were measured by a direct current four probes method using a Cu/nanoparticle assembly/elargol electrode sandwich device with various temperatures and bias voltages. The non-linear I–V curve indicates a tunneling type transport properties. The tunnel barrier height around 1.3 ± 0.15 eV was obtained by fitting the I–V curve according to the Simmons equation. The magnetoresistance curves can be divided to high-field MR and low-field MR (LFMR) parts. The former is ascribed to the influence of spin disorder or canting within the LSMO nanoparticle surface and the latter one with strong bias dependence is attributed to the spin-dependent tunneling effect through the insulating surface layer of LSMO and oleic acid molecules. The enhanced LFMR effect for oleic acid coated LSMO with respect to the bare LSMO was attributed to the enhanced tunneling transport and weak spin scattering in oleic acid molecule barrier.

  16. Effect of different conductivity between the spin polarons on spin injection in a ferromagnet/organic semiconductor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi Yilin; Zhang Ming; Yan Hui

    2008-01-01

    Spin injection across ferromagnet/organic semiconductor system with finite width of the layers was studied theoretically considering spin-dependent conductivity in the organic-semiconductor. It was found that the spin injection efficiency is directly dependent on the difference between the conductivity of the up-spin and down-spin polarons in the spin-injected organic system. Furthermore, the finite width of the structure, interfacial electrochemical-potential and conductivity mismatch have great influence on the spin injection process across ferromagnet/organic semiconductor interface

  17. Evolution of spin-dependent structure functions from DGLAP equations in leading order and next to leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baishya, R.; Jamil, U.; Sarma, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the spin-dependent singlet and nonsinglet structure functions have been obtained by solving Dokshitzer, Gribov, Lipatov, Altarelli, Parisi evolution equations in leading order and next to leading order in the small x limit. Here we have used Taylor series expansion and then the method of characteristics to solve the evolution equations. We have also calculated t and x evolutions of deuteron structure functions, and the results are compared with the SLAC E-143 Collaboration data.

  18. Thermal stability study of the insulator layer in NiFe/CoFe/Al2O3/Co spin-dependent tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.C.; Ho, C.H.; Huang, R.-T.; Chen, F.-R.; Kai, J.J.; Chen, L.-C.; Lin, M.-T.; Yao, Y.D.

    2002-01-01

    Spin-dependent tunnel junction, NiFe/CoFe/Al 2 O 3 /Co//Si, was fabricated to investigate the thermal stability induced diffusion behaviors. The interfacial diffusion causes the degradation of the ratio of the TMR, the enhancement of the switching field of the two magnetic electrodes, the thickness decrease of the insulator layer, and the increase of the interfacial roughness. The outward diffusion of oxygen from the insulator layer is faster than that of aluminum for samples annealed below 400 deg. C. The degradation of the ratio of TMR is attributed to the disturbance of the spin polarization in the magnetic layers, and the increase of the pinholes and spin-flip effect in the insulator layer. The relative roughness between the two interfaces of the insulator induces the surface magnetic dipoles, and hence, increases the switching field of the ferromagnetic electrodes

  19. Spin-Hall conductivity and electric polarization in metallic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xuhui

    2013-02-21

    We predict theoretically that when a normal metallic thin film (without bulk spin-orbit coupling, such as Cu or Al) is sandwiched by two insulators, two prominent effects arise due to the interfacial spin-orbit coupling: a giant spin-Hall conductivity due to the surface scattering and a transverse electric polarization due to the spin-dependent phase shift in the spinor wave functions.

  20. Spin-Hall conductivity and electric polarization in metallic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xuhui; Xiao, Jiang; Manchon, Aurelien; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2013-01-01

    We predict theoretically that when a normal metallic thin film (without bulk spin-orbit coupling, such as Cu or Al) is sandwiched by two insulators, two prominent effects arise due to the interfacial spin-orbit coupling: a giant spin-Hall conductivity due to the surface scattering and a transverse electric polarization due to the spin-dependent phase shift in the spinor wave functions.

  1. Effective electrical and thermal conductivity of multifilament twisted superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechetkin, V.R.

    2013-01-01

    The effective electrical and thermal conductivity of composite wire with twisted superconducting filaments embedded into normal metal matrix is calculated using the extension of Bruggeman method. The resistive conductivity of superconducting filaments is described in terms of symmetric tensor, whereas the conductivity of a matrix is assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous. The dependence of the resistive electrical conductivity of superconducting filaments on temperature, magnetic field, and current density is implied to be parametric. The resulting effective conductivity tensor proved to be non-diagonal and symmetric. The non-diagonal transverse–longitudinal components of effective electrical conductivity tensor are responsible for the redistribution of current between filaments. In the limits of high and low electrical conductivity of filaments the transverse effective conductivity tends to that of obtained previously by Carr. The effective thermal conductivity of composite wires is non-diagonal and radius-dependent even for the isotropic and homogeneous thermal conductivities of matrix and filaments.

  2. Effect of particle size ratio on the conducting percolation threshold of granular conductive-insulating composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Da; Ekere, N N

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we apply Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the conductive percolation threshold of granular composite of conductive and insulating powders with amorphous structure. We focus on the effect of insulating to conductive particle size ratio λ = d i /d c on the conducting percolation threshold p c (the volume fraction of the conductive powder). Simulation results show that, for λ = 1, the percolation threshold p c lies between simple cubic and body centred cubic site percolation thresholds, and that as λ increases the percolation threshold decreases. We also use the structural information obtained by the simulation to study the nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of composite with solid volume fraction of conductive powder below p c in terms of electron tunnelling for nanoscale powders, dielectric breakdown for microscale or larger powders, and pressing induced conduction for non-rigid insulating powders

  3. Effect of heat treatment temperature on binder thermal conductivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1975-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the thermal conductivities of a pitch and a polyfurfuryl alcohol binder residue was investigated. Graphites specially prepared with these two binders were used for the experiments. Measured thermal conductivities were treated in terms of a two-component system, and the binder thermal conductivities were calculated. Both binder residues showed increased thermal conductivity with increased heat treatment temperature

  4. Spin-dependent transport in epitaxial Fe wires on GaAs(110); Spinabhaengiger Transport in epitaktischen Fe-Leiterbahnen auf GaAs(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, Christoph

    2009-08-11

    In the present thesis, the spin dependent transport in epitaxial Fe wires as well as in perpendicularly magnetized multilayer wires is investigated. The main focus is on the investigation of quantum transport phenomena, the domain wall resistance as well as the current induced domain wall motion. Epitaxial Fe wires are prepared from epitaxial Fe films by means of electron beam lithography. Because of the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy, it is possible to prepare wires with a remanent transversal magnetization. Magnetic force microscopy is used to image the magnetic state of single wires. The magnetization reversal behaviour of these wires is investigated in detail using magnetoresistance measurements. These measurements are dominated by effects of the anisotropic magnetoresistance and can be explained by micromagnetic calculations. For the first time, quantum transport phenomena in epitaxial Fe wires are studied by magnetoresistance measurements for temperatures down to 20 mK. These measurements clearly indicate that, independent of the wire width and orientation, no contribution due to weak electron localization can be observed. The results are quantitatively explained within the framework of enhanced electron-electron interactions. Furthermore, by reducing the wire width the onset of the transition from two-dimensional to one-dimensional behaviour is found. To determine the domain wall resistance, a different number of domain walls is created in various structures, whereby the epitaxial samples allow to investigate different domain wall structures. First, a technique based on the stray field of a magnetic force microscope tip is presented. Furthermore, the influence of the shape anisotropy on the coercive field of single wires is used. Contributions to the observed resistance change due to the anisotropic magnetoresistance are calculated using micromagnetic simulations. A positive intrinsic relative resistance increase of 0.2% within the domain wall is found at

  5. The effect of childhood conduct disorder on human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbink, Dinand; Vujić, Sunčica; Koning, Pierre; Martin, Nicholas G

    2012-08-01

    This paper estimates the longer-term effects of childhood conduct disorder on human capital accumulation and violent and criminal behavior later in life using data of Australian twins. We measure conduct disorder with a rich set of indicators based on diagnostic criteria from psychiatry. Using ordinary least squares and twin fixed effects estimation approaches, we find that early-age (pre-18) conduct disorder problems significantly affect both human capital accumulation and violent and criminal behavior over the life course. In addition, we find that conduct disorder is more deleterious if these behaviors occur earlier in life. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Measurement of the deep-inelastic spin-dependent structure functions of the proton and neutron at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, D.H.; Filippone, B.W.; Jourdan, J.

    1988-01-01

    It is possible to measure the deep-inelastic spin-dependent structure functions g 1 /sup p/(x) and g 1 /sup n/(x) for the proton and neutron using internal polarized hydrogen, deuterium, and 3 He targets of polarization 50% and thickness 10 14 to 10 15 cm -2 and the 60 mA longitudinally polarized 30 GeV electron beam in the HERA electron storage ring. The measurement of the deep-inelastic spin-structure of both isospin states of the nucleon at the same kinematics and using the same apparatus allows the Bjorken sum rule to be experimentally checked. In addition, it uniquely constrains the spin distribution of the u and d quarks as a function of x in any model of the nucleon. Possible target and detector configurations are described and an estimate of the accuracy of such a measurement is presented

  7. Experimental determination of spin-dependent electron density by joint refinement of X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Maxime; Claiser, Nicolas; Pillet, Sébastien; Chumakov, Yurii; Becker, Pierre; Gillet, Jean Michel; Gillon, Béatrice; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    New crystallographic tools were developed to access a more precise description of the spin-dependent electron density of magnetic crystals. The method combines experimental information coming from high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and polarized neutron diffraction (PND) in a unified model. A new algorithm that allows for a simultaneous refinement of the charge- and spin-density parameters against XRD and PND data is described. The resulting software MOLLYNX is based on the well known Hansen-Coppens multipolar model, and makes it possible to differentiate the electron spins. This algorithm is validated and demonstrated with a molecular crystal formed by a bimetallic chain, MnCu(pba)(H(2)O)(3)·2H(2)O, for which XRD and PND data are available. The joint refinement provides a more detailed description of the spin density than the refinement from PND data alone.

  8. Comparison of interacting boson-fermion model with spin-dependent generalized collective model for the j=3/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktybaev, K.; Koilyk, N.; Ramankulov, K.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Collective Schrodinger equations are applied to describe low-energy spectra of even-even nuclei [1]. Spectra for even-odd nuclei are calculated by coupling the single particle degrees of freedom to the collective degree of freedom of the core nucleus, which is of even-even type. The collective spin has a value of 3/2. This leads to the assumption that the linearized equation may be applied to describe nuclei with spin 3/2 in the ground state. Good description of the low energy spectra and electromagnetic transition probabilities can be obtained only with introduction of spin-dependent potentials, which apart from coordinates and momenta also depend on the matrices of the Clifford algebra arising in the linearization,. The interacting boson-fermion models (IBFM) [2] represent another approach to describe spectra of even-odd nuclei. For even-odd nuclei with spin 3/2 in the ground state one uses so-called j=3/2 - IBFM, which is also denoted as the U B (6)xU F (4) IBFM. In this paper we establish the relation between the matrices of the Clifford algebra, which arise in the linearization procedure, and the fermion operators of the j=3/2 IBFM. This allows us to establish a connection between the j=3/2 IBFM and spin dependent generalized collective model (SGCM). The results of the SGCM for Ir and Au nuclei are presented and compared with the results of the j=3/2 IBFM with a dynamical spin symmetry [3] present. In this respect we could apply the linearized collective Schrodinger equation and IBFM with arbitrary spin to all other even-odd nuclei. (author)

  9. Sum rule measurements of the spin-dependent compton amplitude (nucleon spin structure at Q2 = 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusci, D.; Giordano, G.; Baghaei, H.; Cichocki, A.; Blecher, M.; Breuer, M.; Commeaux, C.; Didelez, J.P.; Caracappa, A.; Fan, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Energy weighted integrals of the difference in helicity-dependent photo-production cross sections (σ 1/2 - σ 3/2 ) provide information on the nucleon's Spin-dependent Polarizability (γ), and on the spin-dependent part of the asymptotic forward Compton amplitude through the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov (DHG) sum rule. (The latter forms the Q 2 =0 limit of recent spin-asymmetry experiments in deep-inelastic lepton-scattering.) There are no direct measurements of σ 1/2 or σ 3/2 , for either the proton or the neutron. Estimates from current π-photo-production multipole analyses, particularly for the proton-neutron difference, are in good agreement with relativistic-l-loop Chiral calculations (χPT) for γ but predict large deviations from the DHG sum rule. Either (a) both the 2-loop corrections to the Spin-Polarizability are large and the existing multipoles are wrong, or (b) modifications to the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule are required to fully describe the isospin structure of the nucleon. The helicity-dependent photo-reaction amplitudes, for both the proton and the neutron, will be measured at LEGS from pion-threshold to 470 MeV. In these double-polarization experiments, circularly polarized photons from LEGS will be used with SPHICE, a new frozen-spin target consisting of rvec H · rvec D in the solid phase. Reaction channels will be identified in SASY, a large detector array covering about 80% of 4π. A high degree of symmetry in both target and detector will be used to minimize systematic uncertainties

  10. The effect of radiation induced electrical conductivity (RIC) on the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave heating of plasmas in fusion reactors requires the development of microwave windows through which the microwaves can pass without great losses. The degradation of the thermal conductivity of alumina in a radiation environment is an important consideration in reliability studies of these microwave windows. Several recent papers have addressed this question at higher temperatures and at low temperatures. The current paper extends the low temperature calculations to determine the effect of phonon-electron scattering on the thermal conductivity at 77 K due to RIC. These low temperature calculations are of interest because the successful application of high power (>1 MW) windows for electron cyclotron heating systems in fusion reactors will most likely require cryogenic cooling to take advantage of the low loss tangent and higher thermal conductivity of candidate window materials at these temperatures

  11. Dimensional quantization effects in the thermodynamics of conductive filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, D.; Grice, C. R.; Karpov, V. G.

    2018-06-01

    We consider the physical effects of dimensional quantization in conductive filaments that underlie operations of some modern electronic devices. We show that, as a result of quantization, a sufficiently thin filament acquires a positive charge. Several applications of this finding include the host material polarization, the stability of filament constrictions, the equilibrium filament radius, polarity in device switching, and quantization of conductance.

  12. Effect of normal processes on thermal conductivity of germanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of normal scattering processes is considered to redistribute the phonon momentum in (a) the same phonon branch – KK-S model and (b) between differ- ent phonon branches – KK-H model. Simplified thermal conductivity relations are used to estimate the thermal conductivity of germanium, silicon and ...

  13. Effect of sodium adsorption ratio and electric conductivity of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infiltration measurements using a double-ring infiltrometer were conducted on a sandy-loam soil located in Saudi Arabia. The measurements were performed for an undisturbed soil. The effect of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and electric conductivity (EC) of the applied water on infiltration rate was examined. The infiltration ...

  14. Effect of plasticizer and fumed silica on ionic conductivity behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of addition of propylene carbonate (PC) and nano-sized fumed silica on the ionic conductivity behaviour of proton conducting polymer electrolytes containing different concentrations of hexafluorophosphoric acid (HPF6) in polyethylene oxide (PEO) has been studied. The addition of PC results in an increase in ...

  15. Final COMPASS results on the spin-dependent structure functions $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$ in the deep-inelastic and nonperturbative regions

    CERN Document Server

    Badelek, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    This paper summarizes the COMPASS Collaboration legacy on measurements of the proton and deuteron spin-dependent structure functions, $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$ at $Q^2 1$ (GeV/c)$^2$. In both regions and at the lowest measured $x, g^d_1 (x)$ is consistent with zero while $g^p_1 (x)$ is positive. This is the first time that the spin effects are observed at such low values of $x$. The NLO QCD fit of $g_1$ world data gives well constrained quark helicity distributions; gluons are poorly determined. Quark helicity contribution to nucleon spin is $0.26 < \\Delta \\Sigma < 0.36$. From the COMPASS data alone the Bjorken sum rule is verified to $9\\%$ accuracy and the extracted flavour-singlet axial charge is $a_0 (Q^2 = 3 (\\text{GeV/}c)^2) = 0.32 \\pm 0.02_{stat.} \\pm 0.04_{syst.} \\pm 0.05_{evol.}$.

  16. Transverse spin-dependent azimuthal correlations of charged pion pairs measured in p↑ + p collisions at √{ s } = 500 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adams, J. R.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Barish, K.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Deppner, I. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Herrmann, N.; Hirsch, A.; Horvat, S.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kim, C.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Krauth, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, Y.; Liu, H.; Liu, F.; Liu, P.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Luo, S.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Mayes, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nemes, D. B.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seto, R.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, Z.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stewart, D. J.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Tu, B.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, G.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.

    2018-05-01

    The transversity distribution, which describes transversely polarized quarks in transversely polarized nucleons, is a fundamental component of the spin structure of the nucleon, and is only loosely constrained by global fits to existing semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) data. In transversely polarized p↑ + p collisions it can be accessed using transverse polarization dependent fragmentation functions which give rise to azimuthal correlations between the polarization of the struck parton and the final state scalar mesons. This letter reports on spin dependent di-hadron correlations measured by the STAR experiment. The new dataset corresponds to 25 pb-1 integrated luminosity of p↑ + p collisions at √{ s } = 500 GeV, an increase of more than a factor of ten compared to our previous measurement at √{ s } = 200 GeV. Non-zero asymmetries sensitive to transversity are observed at a Q2 of several hundred GeV and are found to be consistent with the former measurement and a model calculation. We expect that these data will enable an extraction of transversity with comparable precision to current SIDIS datasets but at much higher momentum transfers where subleading effects are suppressed.

  17. Final COMPASS results on the spin-dependent structure functions $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$ in the deep-inelastic and nonperturbative regions

    CERN Document Server

    Badelek, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the COMPASS Collaboration legacy on measurements of the proton and deuteron spin-dependent structure functions, $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$ at $Q^2 1$ (GeV/c)$^2$. In both regions and at the lowest measured $x, g^d_1 (x)$ is consistent with zero while $g^p_1 (x)$ is positive. This is the first time that the spin effects are observed at such low values of $x$. The NLO QCD fit of $g_1$ world data gives well constrained quark helicity distributions; gluons are poorly determined. Quark helicity contribution to nucleon spin is $0.26 < \\Delta \\Sigma < 0.36$. From the COMPASS data alone the Bjorken sum rule is verified to $9\\%$ accuracy and the extracted flavour-singlet axial charge is $a_0 (Q^2 = 3 (\\text{GeV/}c)^2) = 0.32 \\pm 0.02_{stat.} \\pm 0.04_{syst.} \\pm 0.05_{evol.}$.

  18. Effect of atrioventricular conduction on heart rate variability

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Talha Jamal; Ali, Hussnain; Majeed, S. M Imran; Khan, Shoab A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of atrioventricular conduction time (AVCT) on the short-term Heart Rate Variability (HRV) by computing HRV parameters using intervals between the onsets of successive P waves (PP time series) for three groups: normal

  19. Effective thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pupeschi, S., E-mail: simone.pupeschi@kit.edu; Knitter, R.; Kamlah, M.

    2017-03-15

    As the knowledge of the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds under fusion relevant conditions is essential for the development of solid breeder blanket concepts, the EU advanced and reference lithium orthosilicate material were investigated with a newly developed experimental setup based on the transient hot wire method. The effective thermal conductivity was investigated in the temperature range RT–700 °C. Experiments were performed in helium and air atmospheres in the pressure range 0.12–0.4 MPa (abs.) under a compressive load up to 6 MPa. Results show a negligible influence of the chemical composition of the solid material on the bed’s effective thermal conductivity. A severe reduction of the effective thermal conductivity was observed in air. In both atmospheres an increase of the effective thermal conductivity with the temperature was detected, while the influence of the compressive load was found to be small. A clear dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on the pressure of the filling gas was observed in helium in contrast to air, where the pressure dependence was drastically reduced.

  20. Theory of the negative differential conductivity effect in semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Hong Anh; Nguyen Hong Shon; Le Vu Ky

    1990-01-01

    A new mechanism of the negative differential conductivity (NDC) effect in semiconductor superlattices (SL) is proposed and analysed that is due to the conduction electron trapping by donor centers. It is shown that the NDC effect occurs for sufficently high (but reasonable) impurity concentration and not too large value of the τ ε /τ c ratio (where τ ε is the electron energy relaxation time and τ c the electron life time in the conduction band) when the applied d.c. electric field reaches certain critical value defined by the physical parameters of the sample. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  1. Schwinger effect and negative differential conductivity in holographic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankhadeep Chakrabortty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of the Schwinger effect for conductivity are computed for strong coupling systems using holography. The one-loop diagram on the flavor brane introduces an O(λNc imaginary part in the effective action for a Maxwell flavor gauge field. This in turn introduces a real conductivity in an otherwise insulating phase of the boundary theory. Moreover, in certain regions of parameter space the differential conductivity is negative. This is computed in the context of the Sakai–Sugimoto model.

  2. Dynamically induced spin-dependent interaction in the elastic scattering of heavy-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, B.; Oertzen, W. von.

    1982-02-01

    Dynamical polarization effect in heavy-ion elastic scattering is investigated in the framework of the coupled-reaction-channel theory. By using the adiabatic approximation at low incident energies, this effect is expressed as a spin-orbit (L vector.S vector) interaction with a L vector and S vector independent radial function. The strength of the (L vector.S vector) interaction calculated for the 12 C + 13 C system is in the same order of magnitude as deduced from experiments and is about two orders of magnitude larger than that obtained from the folding model calculation. (author)

  3. Spin-dependent current in resonant tunneling diode with ferromagnetic GaMnN layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, N.Y.

    2009-01-01

    The spin-polarized tunneling current through a double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with ferromagnetic GaMnN emitter/collector is investigated theoretically. Two distinct spin splitting peaks can be observed at current-voltage (I-V) characteristics at low temperature. The spin polarization decreases with the temperature due to the thermal effect of electron density of states. When charge polarization effect is considered at the heterostructure, the spin polarization is enhanced significantly. A highly spin-polarized current can be obtained depending on the polarization charge density.

  4. Interface-engineered spin-dependent transport in perpendicular Co/Pt multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shao-Long; Yang, Guang; Teng, Jiao, E-mail: tengjiao@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Guo, Qi-Xun; Li, Lei-Lei; Yu, Guang-Hua, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • The anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pt multilayers is studied. • Thermally stable AHE feature is obtained in [Pt/Co]{sub 3}/Ta/MgO multilayers. • Good thermal stability is due to enhanced side-jump and intrinsic contributions. - Abstract: The improvement of anomalous Hall effect (AHE) has been obtained through the introduction of a Ta metallic layer at the Co/MgO interface in perpendicular [Pt/Co]{sub 3}/MgO multilayers. It is exhibited that the saturation anomalous Hall resistivity is 42% larger than that in Co/Pt multilayers without Ta insertion. More meaningfully, thermally stable AHE feature is gained in perpendicular [Pt/Co]{sub 3}/Ta/MgO multilayers despite Co-Pt interdiffusion. The AHE is enhanced for sample [Pt/Co]{sub 3}/Ta/MgO after annealing, mainly due to the enhancement of the side-jump and intrinsic contributions.

  5. Hall Effect Influence on a Highly Conducting Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witalis, E A

    1966-11-15

    The properties of an incompressible perfect fluid exhibiting Hall effect is investigated in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity and mobility. The magnetic field strength and the fluid velocity are found to obey the equations B = {mu}{rho}/{sigma} x curlV and V -{mu}/({sigma}{mu}{sub 0}) x curlB (MKS units) where {rho}, {sigma} and {mu} denote mass density, conductivity and charge carrier mobility. Some physical interpretations and applications are given.

  6. Hall Effect Influence on a Highly Conducting Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1966-11-01

    The properties of an incompressible perfect fluid exhibiting Hall effect is investigated in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity and mobility. The magnetic field strength and the fluid velocity are found to obey the equations B = μρ/σ x curlV and V -μ/(σμ 0 ) x curlB (MKS units) where ρ, σ and μ denote mass density, conductivity and charge carrier mobility. Some physical interpretations and applications are given

  7. Spin dependent transport of hot electrons through ultrathin epitaxial metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindl, Emanuel

    2010-06-23

    In this work relaxation and transport of hot electrons in thin single crystalline metallic films is investigated by Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy. The electron mean free paths are determined in an energy interval of 1 to 2 eV above the Fermi level. While fcc Au-films appear to be quite transmissive for hot electrons, the scattering lengths are much shorter for the ferromagnetic alloy FeCo revealing, furthermore, a strong spin asymmetry in hot electron transport. Additional information is gained from temperature dependent studies in combination with golden rule approaches in order to disentangle the impact of several relaxation and transport properties. It is found that bcc Fe-films are much less effective in spin filtering than films made of the FeCo-alloy. (orig.)

  8. Quantum dynamics of a particle with a spin-dependent velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslangul, Claude

    2005-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a particle in continuous time and space, the displacement of which is governed by an internal degree of freedom (spin). In one definite limit, the so-called quantum random walk is recovered but, although quite simple, the model possesses a rich variety of dynamics and goes far beyond this problem. Generally speaking, our framework can describe the motion of an electron in a magnetic sea near the Fermi level when linearization of the dispersion law is possible, coupled to a transverse magnetic field. Quite unexpected behaviours are obtained. In particular, we find that when the initial wave packet is fully localized in space, the J z angular momentum component is frozen; this is an interesting example of an observable which, although it is not a constant of motion, has a constant expectation value. For a non-completely localized wave packet, the effect still occurs although less pronounced, and the spin keeps for ever memory of its initial state. Generally speaking, as time goes on, the spatial density profile looks rather complex, as a consequence of the competition between drift and precession, and displays various shapes according to the ratio between the Larmor period and the characteristic time of flight. The density profile gradually changes from a multimodal quickly moving distribution when the scattering rate is small, to a unimodal standing but flattening distribution in the opposite case

  9. Nuclear spin content and constraints on exotic spin-dependent couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimball, D F Jackson

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous recent and ongoing experiments employing a variety of atomic species to search for couplings of atomic spins to exotic fields. In order to meaningfully compare these experimental results, the coupling of the exotic field to the atomic spin must be interpreted in terms of the coupling to electron, proton, and neutron spins. Traditionally, constraints from atomic experiments on exotic couplings to neutron and proton spins have been derived using the single-particle Schmidt model for nuclear spin. In this model, particular atomic species are sensitive to either neutron or proton spin couplings, but not both. More recently, semi-empirical models employing nuclear magnetic moment data have been used to derive new constraints for non-valence nucleons. However, comparison of such semi-empirical models to detailed large-scale nuclear shell model calculations and analysis of known physical effects in nuclei show that existing semi-empirical models cannot reliably be used to predict the spin polarization of non-valence nucleons. The results of our re-analysis of nuclear spin content are applied to searches for exotic long-range monopole–dipole and dipole–dipole couplings of nuclei leading to significant revisions of some published constraints. (paper)

  10. Pressure and graphite effects on electrical conductivity in pyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Liu, T.; Shen, K.; Li, B.

    2017-12-01

    The geophysical observations including magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic deep sounding show the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Earth's interior. The laboratory-based conductivity measurements of minerals and rocks are usually used to interpret the geophysical observations. Pyroxene is the second most abundant components in the upper mantle, and the electrical conductivity of pyroxene is important to understanding the bulk electrical conductivity. The electrical conductivity of a mineral is affected by many factors, such as its chemical composition, temperature, pressure. Here we report the effects of pressure and graphite on the electrical conductivity of pyroxene and applied to interpretation of MT observation. The starting materials are natural of orthopyroxene and clinopyroxe crystals. A powder sample with grain size 10 um was packed in a Mo capsule and hot-pressed at high pressures and temperatures using a 1000-ton Walker-type uniaxial split-cylinder apparatus. A mixture of pyroxene and a few percent of diamond was annealed at high pressure and temperature. All the hot-pressed samples before and after electrical conductivity measurements, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. High pressure conductivity experiments were carried out in a Walker-type multi-anvil apparatus using a 14/8 assembly. We use a Solartron 1260 Impedance/Gain -phase analyzer with 1V applied voltage within a frequency range of 1M-0.1 Hz to collect data. Complex impedance data on were collected in several heating and cooling cycles The electrical conductivity of pyroxene was made at 4,7,10 GPa, and electrical conductivity of the graphite-bearing pyroxene was measured at 4GPa. The results show the electrical conductivity decrease with the increasing of pressure, which may correspond to the transform from orthopyroxene to clinopyroxene. The results can be used to explain a drop of the electrical conductivity in

  11. The spin-dependent structure function $g_{1}(x)$ of the deuteron from polarized deep-inelastic muon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Adeva, B; Akdogan, T; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Ballintijn, M K; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Bird, I G; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gaussiran, T; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Gómez, F; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Kalinovskaya, L V; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nagaitsev, A P; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Parks, D P; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Polec, J; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Pussieux, T; Pyrlik, J; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Rosado, A; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schüler, K P; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sever, F; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Steigler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Teichert, K M; Tessarotto, F; Tlaczala, W; Trentalange, S; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Weinstein, R; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Yañez, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1997-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the spin-dependent structure function $g_{1}^{\\rm d}$ of the deuteron from deep inelastic scattering of 190 GeV polarized muons on polarized deuterons. The results are combined with our previous measurements of $g_{1}^{\\rm d}$. A perturbative QCD evolution in next-to-leading order is used to compute $g_{1}^{\\rm d}(x)$ at a constant $Q^{2}$. At $Q^{2} = 10$ GeV$^{2}$, we obtain a first moment $\\Gamma_{1}^{\\rm d} = \\int_{0}^{1} g_{1}^{\\rm d}{\\rm d}x = 0.041 \\pm 0.008$, a flavour-singlet axial charge of the nucleon $a_{0} = 0.30 \\pm 0.08$, and an axial charge of the strange quark $a_{s} = -0.09 \\pm 0.03$. Using our earlier determination of $\\Gamma_{1}^{\\rm p}$, we obtain $\\Gamma_1^{\\rm p} - \\Gamma_1^{\\rm n} = 0.183 \\pm 0.035$ at $Q^2 = 10\\,\\mbox{GeV}^2$. This result is in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule which predicts $\\Gamma_1^{\\rm p} - \\Gamma_1^{\\rm n} = 0.186 \\pm 0.002$ at the same $Q^2$.

  12. The Spin-dependent Structure Function of the Proton $g_{1}^p$ and a Test of the Bjorken Sum Rule

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M.G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Chaberny, D.; Cotic, D.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; El Alaoui, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Friedrich, J.M.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Hoppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Kafer, W.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konopka, R.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, M.; Kral, A.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nassalski, J.; Negrini, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schluter, T.; Schopferer, S.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takekawa, S.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhao, J.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2010-01-01

    The inclusive double-spin asymmetry, $A_{1}^{p}$, has been measured at COMPASS in deepinelastic polarised muon scattering off a large polarised NH3 target. The data, collected in the year 2007, cover the range Q2 > 1 (GeV/c)^2, 0.004 < x < 0.7 and improve the statistical precision of g_{1}^{p}(x) by a factor of two in the region x < 0.02. The new proton asymmetries are combined with those previously published for the deuteron to extract the non-singlet spin-dependent structure function g_1^NS(x,Q2). The isovector quark density, Delta_q_3(x,Q2), is evaluated from a NLO QCD fit of g_1^NS. The first moment of Delta_q3 is in good agreement with the value predicted by the Bjorken sum rule and corresponds to a ratio of the axial and vector coupling constants g_A/g_V = 1.28+-0.07(stat)+-0.10(syst).

  13. Effects of conductive fillers on temperature distribution of asphalt pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Mingyu; Wu Shaopeng; Zhang Yuan; Wang Hong

    2010-01-01

    The sun provides a cheap and abundant source of clean and renewable energy. Solar cells have been used to capture this energy and generate electricity. A more useful form of the solar cell would be asphalt pavements, which get heated up by solar radiation. Graphite powders are utilized as thermal conductive fillers to make an asphalt collector conductive so as to improve the efficiency of the asphalt collector. Accounting for the important application conditions and evaluating the effects of the heat conductive materials and the solar energy absorbability of the conductive asphalt collector, a finite element model has been developed to predict temperature distributions in the conductive asphalt solar collector. In this study, an experimental validation exercise was conducted using the measured data taken from full-depth asphalt slabs. Validation results showed that the model can satisfactorily predict the temperature distributions in asphalt concrete slabs. The optimal depth is 25-50 mm for placing pipes that serve as the heat exchanger. Meanwhile, the effect of the surroundings on the solar energy potential of the asphalt collector was noticeable.

  14. Pressure effects on thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, J.N.

    1979-02-01

    Through analysis of existing data, an estimate is made of the effect of pressure or depth on the thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials which could be present in radioactive waste repositories. In the case of homogeneous dense materials, only small shifts are predicted to occur at depths less than or equal to 3 km, and these shifts will be insignificant as compared with those caused by temperature variations. As the porosity of the medium increases, the variation of conductivity and expansion with pressure becomes greater, with conductivity increasing and expansion decreasing as pressure increases. The pressure dependence of expansion can be found from data on the temperature variation of the isobaric compressibility. In a worst case estimate, a decrease in expansion of approx. 25% is predicted for 5% porous sandstone at a depth of 3 km. The thermal conductivity of a medium with gaseous inclusions increases as the porosity decreases, with the magnitude of the increase being dependent on the details of the porosity collapse. Based on analysis of existing data on tuff and sandstone, a weighted geometric mean formula is recommended for use in calculating the conductivity of porous rock. As a result of this study, it is recommended that measurement of rock porosity versus depth receive increased attention in exploration studies and that the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and expansion should be examined in more detail

  15. Thermoelectric conductivities at finite magnetic field and the Nernst effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keun-Young; Kim, Kyung Kiu; Seo, Yunseok; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We study the thermoelectric conductivities of a strongly correlated system in the presence of a magnetic field by the gauge/gravity duality. We consider a class of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories with axion fields imposing momentum relaxation. General analytic formulas for the direct current (DC) conductivities and the Nernst signal are derived in terms of the black hole horizon data. For an explicit model study, we analyse in detail the dyonic black hole modified by momentum relaxation. In this model, for small momentum relaxation, the Nernst signal shows a bell-shaped dependence on the magnetic field, which is a feature of the normal phase of cuprates. We compute all alternating current (AC) electric, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivities by numerical analysis and confirm that their zero frequency limits precisely reproduce our analytic DC formulas, which is a non-trivial consistency check of our methods. We discuss the momentum relaxation effects on the conductivities including cyclotron resonance poles.

  16. Effects of Aggregation on Blood Sedimentation and Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhbanov, Alexander; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test has been used for over a century. The Westergren method is routinely used in a variety of clinics. However, the mechanism of erythrocyte sedimentation remains unclear, and the 60 min required for the test seems excessive. We investigated the effects of cell aggregation during blood sedimentation and electrical conductivity at different hematocrits. A sample of blood was drop cast into a small chamber with two planar electrodes placed on the bottom. The measured blood conductivity increased slightly during the first minute and decreased thereafter. We explored various methods of enhancing or retarding the erythrocyte aggregation. Using experimental measurements and theoretical calculations, we show that the initial increase in blood conductivity was indeed caused by aggregation, while the subsequent decrease in conductivity resulted from the deposition of erythrocytes. We present a method for calculating blood conductivity based on effective medium theory. Erythrocytes are modeled as conducting spheroids surrounded by a thin insulating membrane. A digital camera was used to investigate the erythrocyte sedimentation behavior and the distribution of the cell volume fraction in a capillary tube. Experimental observations and theoretical estimations of the settling velocity are provided. We experimentally demonstrate that the disaggregated cells settle much slower than the aggregated cells. We show that our method of measuring the electrical conductivity credibly reflected the ESR. The method was very sensitive to the initial stage of aggregation and sedimentation, while the sedimentation curve for the Westergren ESR test has a very mild slope in the initial time. We tested our method for rapid estimation of the Westergren ESR. We show a correlation between our method of measuring changes in blood conductivity and standard Westergren ESR method. In the future, our method could be examined as a potential means of accelerating

  17. Determining Effective Thermal Conductivity of Fabrics by Using Fractal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Li, Kejing

    2010-03-01

    In this article, a fractal effective thermal conductivity model for woven fabrics with multiple layers is developed. Structural models of yarn and plain woven fabric are derived based on the fractal characteristics of macro-pores (gap or channel) between the yarns and micro-pores inside the yarns. The fractal effective thermal conductivity model can be expressed as a function of the pore structure (fractal dimension) and architectural parameters of the woven fabric. Good agreement is found between the fractal model and the thermal conductivity measurements in the general porosity ranges. It is expected that the model will be helpful in the evaluation of thermal comfort for woven fabric in the whole range of porosity.

  18. Interplay of spin-dependent delocalization and magnetic anisotropy in the ground and excited states of [Gd2@C78]- and [Gd2@C80]-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikkamäki, Akseli; Popov, Alexey A.; Deng, Qingming; Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2017-09-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structure of the ground and excited states of two recently characterized endohedral metallo-fullerenes, [Gd2@C78]- (1) and [Gd2@C80]- (2), have been studied by theoretical methods. The systems can be considered as [Gd2]5+ dimers encapsulated in a fullerene cage with the fifteen unpaired electrons ferromagnetically coupled into an S = 15/2 high-spin configuration in the ground state. The microscopic mechanisms governing the Gd-Gd interactions leading to the ferromagnetic ground state are examined by a combination of density functional and ab initio calculations and the full energy spectrum of the ground and lowest excited states is constructed by means of ab initio model Hamiltonians. The ground state is characterized by strong electron delocalization bordering on a σ type one-electron covalent bond and minor zero-field splitting (ZFS) that is successfully described as a second order spin-orbit coupling effect. We have shown that the observed ferromagnetic interaction originates from Hund's rule coupling and not from the conventional double exchange mechanism. The calculated ZFS parameters of 1 and 2 in their optimized geometries are in qualitative agreement with experimental EPR results. The higher excited states display less electron delocalization, but at the same time they possess unquenched first-order angular momentum. This leads to strong spin-orbit coupling and highly anisotropic energy spectrum. The analysis of the excited states presented here constitutes the first detailed study of the effects of spin-dependent delocalization in the presence of first order orbital angular momentum and the obtained results can be applied to other mixed valence lanthanide systems.

  19. Effects of calcium impurity on phase relationship, ionic conductivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 3. Effects of calcium impurity on phase relationship, ionic conductivity and microstructure of Na + - β / b e t a " -alumina solid electrolyte. SUNG-TAE LEE DAE-HAN LEE SANG-MIN LEE SANG-SOO HAN SANG-HYUNG LEE SUNG-KI LIM. Volume 39 Issue 3 ...

  20. Effective Practices in Teaching Indigenous Students with Conductive Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Gary; Galloway, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Hearing impairment due to conductive hearing loss can have a devastating effect on children's language development, and consequently educational outcomes, especially for Indigenous students, for whom there may be the additional issue of being educated in their second or third language. With appropriate interventions, however, Indigenous students…

  1. Modeling of the effective thermal conductivity of sintered porous pastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Hermens, M.; Nikitin, I.; Kouznetsova, V.G.; Volz, S.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of sintered porous pastes of metals is modelled, based on an analytical and a numerical approach. The first method arises from the differential effective medium theory and considers the air voids as ellipsoidal pores of different sizes, while second one is based on the

  2. Effect of nitroglycerin on myocardial collateral conductance in awake dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazzamano, S.; Rembert, J.C.; Greenfield, J.C. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Conductance of the coronary collateral circulation during the course of two abrupt circumflex coronary occlusions was measured in awake dogs ∼ 2 wk after collateral vessels were stimulated to develop. The pressure gradient from the central aorta to the distal circumflex coronary artery was measured, and myocardial blood flow was determined by 9-μm radioactive microspheres at 30 s and 4 min after coronary occlusions. Collateral conductance was calculated as mean collateral blood flow divided by the mean aorta-coronary pressure gradient. Before nitroglycerin, collateral conductance increased in all eight dogs from 30 s to 4 min. After nitroglycerin administration, the conductance at 30 s increased from the prenitroglycerin control value to 0.014 ± 0.012 ml·min -1 ·g -1 ·mmHg -1 . The mean change in conductance from 30 s to 4 min postnitroglycerin was significantly less than during prenitroglycerin. These data indicate that an increase in conductance during coronary occlusion occurs even in the immature collateral circulation. This effect presumably takes place in the arterial smooth muscle at the origin of the collateral vasculature

  3. Search for a spin-dependent short-range force between nucleons with a 3He/129Xe clock-comparison experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullney, Kathlynne

    2014-01-01

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics describes all known particles and their interactions. However, the SM leaves many issues unresolved. For example, it only includes three of the four fundamental forces and does not clarify the question why in the strong interaction CP symmetry is violated due to its non-trivial vacuum structure is predicted (Θ-term), but experimentally unverifiable. The latter one is known as the strong CP-problem of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is solved by the Peccei-Quinn-Weinberg-Wilczek theory. This theory predicts a new and almost massless boson which is known as the axion. The axion feebly interacts with matter and therefore it is a good candidate for cold dark matter, too. Axions are produced by the Primakoff-effect, i.e. by conversion of photons which are scattered in the electromagnetic field, e.g. of atoms. The inverse Primakoff-effect, which converts axions to photons again, can be used for direct detection of galactic, solar, or laboratory axions. Cosmological and astrophysical observations constrain the mass of the axion from a few μeV to some meV (''axion mass window''). If the axion exists, then it mediates a CP violating, spin-dependent, short-range interaction between a fermion and the spin of another fermion. By verification of this interaction, the axion can be detected indirectly. In the framework of the present thesis an experiment to search for this spindependent short-range interaction was performed in the magnetically shielded room BMSR-2 of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin. An ultra-sensitive low-field co-magnetometer was employed which is based on the detection of free precession of 3 He and 129 Xe nuclear spins using SQUIDs as low-noise magnetic flux detectors. The two nuclear spin polarized gases are filled into a glass cell which is immersed in a low magnetic field of about B 0 = 0.35 μT with absolute field gradients in the order of pT/cm. The spin precession frequencies of 3 He and 129

  4. A study of frequency effects on conductivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Ain Ahmad Latif; Mahmood Dollah; Mohd Khidir Kamaron; Suaib Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    In eddy current testing (ET), different measurement can be carry out through the selection of the test frequency. In conductivity measurement, the selection of eddy current test frequencies permits to select the specific material properties to be measured. The test frequency selected should be sufficient high that eddy current penetration is limited only to fraction of the test material thickness. This paper describes the effects of test frequency on the conductivity measurement. This experiment done by applying different values of test frequency which is 20 kHz, 100 kHz and 1 MHz. (author)

  5. Charging and geometric effects on conduction through Anthracene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rupan Preet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    We studied the geometric effects on the charge transfer through the anthracenedithiol (ADT) molecular junction using density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green’s function approach. Two major geometric aspects, bond length and bond angle, were moderated to optimize the electrical conduction. From the results established in this paper, we found that the electrical conduction can be tuned from 0.2 G0 to 0.9 G0 by varying the Au-S bond length, whereas the moderation of bonding angle assayed a minor change from 0.37 G0 to 0.47 G0. We attributed this escalating zero bias conductance to the increasing charge on the terminal sulfur atom of the ADT molecule, which increased the energy of the HOMO orbital towards Fermi level and exhibited a semi-metallic behaviour. Therefore, geometry plays a critical role in deciding the charge transport through the metal/molecule interface.

  6. Final COMPASS results on the deuteron spin-dependent structure function g1d and the Bjorken sum rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adolph

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Final results are presented from the inclusive measurement of deep-inelastic polarised-muon scattering on longitudinally polarised deuterons using a 6LiD target. The data were taken at 160 GeV beam energy and the results are shown for the kinematic range 1(GeV/c24GeV/c2 in the mass of the hadronic final state. The deuteron double-spin asymmetry A1d and the deuteron longitudinal-spin structure function g1d are presented in bins of x and Q2. Towards lowest accessible values of x, g1d decreases and becomes consistent with zero within uncertainties. The presented final g1d values together with the recently published final g1p values of COMPASS are used to again evaluate the Bjorken sum rule and perform the QCD fit to the g1 world data at next-to-leading order of the strong coupling constant. In both cases, changes in central values of the resulting numbers are well within statistical uncertainties. The flavour-singlet axial charge a0, which is identified in the MS‾ renormalisation scheme with the total contribution of quark helicities to the nucleon spin, is extracted at next-to-leading order accuracy from only the COMPASS deuteron data: a0(Q2=3(GeV/c2=0.32±0.02stat±0.04syst±0.05evol. Together with the recent results on the proton spin structure function g1p, the results on g1d constitute the COMPASS legacy on the measurements of g1 through inclusive spin-dependent deep inelastic scattering.

  7. Volume conduction effects on wavelet cross-bicoherence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, I.A.; Channa, C.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-bicoherence analysis is one of the important nonlinear signal processing tools which is used to measure quadratic phase coupling between frequencies of two different time series. It is frequently used in the diagnosis of various cognitive and neurological disorders in EEG (Electroencephalography) analysis. Volume conduction effects of various uncorrelated sources present in the brain can produce biased estimates into the estimated values of cross-bicoherence function. Previous studies have discussed volume conduction effects on coherence function which is used to measure linear relationship between EEG signals in terms of their phase and amplitude. However, volume conduction effect on cross-bicoherence analysis which is quite a different technique has not been investigated up to now to the best of our knowledge. This study is divided into two major parts, the first part deals with the investigation of VCUS (Volume Conduction effects due to Uncorrelated Sources) characteristics on EEG-cross-bicoherence analysis. The simulated EEG data due to uncorrelated sources present in the brain was used in this part of study. The next part of study is based upon investigating the effects of VCUS on the statistical analysis of results of EEG-based cross-bicoherence analysis. The study provides an important clinical application because most of studies based on EEG cross-bicoherence analysis have avoided the issue of VCUS. The cross-bicoherence analysis was performed by detecting the change in MSCB (Magnitude Square Cross-Bicoherence Function) between EEG activities of change detection and no-change detection trials. The real EEG signals were used. (author)

  8. Effect of Particle Size on Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopkar, M.; Sudarshan, S.; Das, P. K.; Manna, I.

    2008-07-01

    Nanofluids, containing nanometric metallic or oxide particles, exhibit extraordinarily high thermal conductivity. It is reported that the identity (composition), amount (volume percent), size, and shape of nanoparticles largely determine the extent of this enhancement. In the present study, we have experimentally investigated the impact of Al2Cu and Ag2Al nanoparticle size and volume fraction on the effective thermal conductivity of water and ethylene glycol based nanofluid prepared by a two-stage process comprising mechanical alloying of appropriate Al-Cu and Al-Ag elemental powder blend followed by dispersing these nanoparticles (1 to 2 vol pct) in water and ethylene glycol with different particle sizes. The thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid, measured using an indigenously developed thermal comparator device, shows a significant increase of up to 100 pct with only 1.5 vol pct nanoparticles of 30- to 40-nm average diameter. Furthermore, an analytical model shows that the interfacial layer significantly influences the effective thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid for the comparable amount of nanoparticles.

  9. Ionic conductivity in aqueous solutions: deuterium isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Alok; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    1997-01-01

    A simple theoretical investigation of the calculation of ionic conductivity in aqueous solution is presented. The dipolar hard sphere model for the solvent which has been successful elsewhere has been employed here and it has been possible to reproduce the experimental results quite accurately for both water and heavy water using only two parameters. In a more detailed theoretical approach one should employ better models for water with proper account of its vibrations, liberations and also hydrogen bonding. It is also of interest to study the temperature effect and the concentration dependence of the conductivity. The time-dependent friction can also be calculated from the present formalism and be used for the study of isotope effect in proton transfer reactions or other aspects of chemical dynamics

  10. Tuning the thermal conductance of molecular junctions with interference effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöckner, J. C.; Cuevas, J. C.; Pauly, F.

    2017-12-01

    We present an ab initio study of the role of interference effects in the thermal conductance of single-molecule junctions. To be precise, using a first-principles transport method based on density functional theory, we analyze the coherent phonon transport in single-molecule junctions made of several benzene and oligo(phenylene ethynylene) derivatives. We show that the thermal conductance of these junctions can be tuned via the inclusion of substituents, which induces destructive interference effects and results in a decrease of the thermal conductance with respect to the unmodified molecules. In particular, we demonstrate that these interference effects manifest as antiresonances in the phonon transmission, whose energy positions can be tuned by varying the mass of the substituents. Our work provides clear strategies for the heat management in molecular junctions and, more generally, in nanostructured metal-organic hybrid systems, which are important to determine how these systems can function as efficient energy-conversion devices such as thermoelectric generators and refrigerators.

  11. The effect of membrane thickness on the conductivity of Nafion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsampas, M.N.; Pikos, A.; Brosda, S.; Katsaounis, A.; Vayenas, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    The conductivity of fully hydrated Nafion 112, 1135, 115 and 117 membranes was measured via ac impedance spectroscopy and steady-state current-potential measurements both in symmetric H 2 , Pt|Nafion|Pt, H 2 and D 2 , Pt|Nafion|Pt, D 2 PEM cells and in H 2 , Pt|Nafion|Pt, air and D 2 , Pt|Nafion|Pt, air PEM fuel cells. In agreement with recent studies, it was found that the conductivity, σ, increases almost linearly with membrane thickness L and also depends exponentially on potential and almost linearly on P H 2 1/2 . These and other observations, including the strong isotope effect obtained upon switching between H 2 and D 2 at the anode, show that the conductivity of Nafion contains two components, one due to proton migration in the aqueous phase, the other due to proton tunneling between adjacent sulfonate groups in narrow pores. The observed near-linear increase of σ with L is consistent with the proton tunneling mechanism but can also be explained by the existence of skin layers with lower conductivity at the ionomer interfaces with the anode and cathode

  12. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms

  13. Thermal effects of electrically conductive deposits in melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, I.G.; Bickford, D.F.; Carter, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive waste processed by the Defense Waste Processing Facility melter at the Savannah river Site contains noble metal fission-products. Operation of waste-glass melters treating commercial power reactor wastes indicates that accumulation of noble metals on melter floors can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, loss of power, and possible electrode damage. Changes in melter geometry have been developed in Japan and Germany to minimize these effects. The two existing melters for the US Department of Energy's Defense Waste Processing Facility were designed in 1982, before this effect was known or had been characterized. Modeling and pilot scale tests are being conducted in the Integrated DWPF melter system to determine if the effect is significant for melters processing defense wastes, and if the effect can be diagnosed and corrected without significant damage or changes to the melter design. This document provides a discussion of these tests

  14. Results on the Spin-Dependent Scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles on Nucleons from the Run 3 Data of the LUX Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bradley, A.; Bramante, R.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chapman, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; de Viveiros, L.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Malling, D. C.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Ott, R. A.; Palladino, K. J.; Pangilinan, M.; Pease, E. K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental constraints on the spin-dependent WIMP (weakly interacting massive particle)-nucleon elastic cross sections from LUX data acquired in 2013. LUX is a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota), which is designed to observe the recoil signature of galactic WIMPs scattering from xenon nuclei. A profile likelihood ratio analysis of 1.4 ×104 kg day of fiducial exposure allows 90% C.L. upper limits to be set on the WIMP-neutron (WIMP-proton) cross section of σn=9.4 ×10-41 cm2 (σp=2.9 ×10-39 cm2 ) at 33 GeV /c2 . The spin-dependent WIMP-neutron limit is the most sensitive constraint to date.

  15. VOx effectively doping CVD-graphene for transparent conductive films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qinghua; Shi, Liangjing; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Huifeng; Zhang, Yuzhi; Liu, Yangqiao; Sun, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Chemical vapor deposition(CVD)-synthesized graphene is potentially an alternative for tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) transparent conductive films (TCFs), however its sheet resistance is still too high to meet many demands. Vanadium oxide has been widely applied as smart window materials, however, no study has been reported to use it as dopant to improve the conductivity of graphene TCFs. In this study, we firstly reported that VOx doping can effectively lower the sheet resistance of CVD-graphene films while keeping its good optical properties, whose transmittance is as high as 86-90%. The optimized VOx-doped graphene exhibits a sheet resistance as low as 176 Ω/□, which decreases by 56% compared to the undoped graphene films. The doping process is convenient, stable, economical and easy to operate. What is more, VOx can effectively increase the work function(WF) of the film, making it more appropriate for use in solar cells. The evolution of the VOx species annealed at different temperatures below 400 °C has been detailed studied for the first time, based on which the doping mechanism is proposed. The prepared VOx doped graphene is expected to be a promising candidate for transparent conductive film purposes.

  16. Spin valve effect in single-atom contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, M; Neel, N; Berndt, R; Lazo, C; Ferriani, P; Heinze, S; Kroeger, J

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic single-atom contacts have been controllably fabricated with a scanning tunnelling microscope. A voltage-dependent spin valve effect with conductance variations of ∼40% is reproducibly observed from contacts comprising a Cr-covered tip and Co and Cr atoms on ferromagnetic nanoscale islands on W(110) with opposite magnetization. The spin-dependent conductances are interpreted from first-principles calculations in terms of the orbital character of the relevant electronic states of the junction.

  17. arXiv Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the proton at small values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aghasyan, M.; The COMPASS collaboration; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N.V.; Anosov, V.; Antoshkin, A.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtsev, V.E.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chumakov, A.G.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Dünnweber, W.; Dusaev, R.R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; jr.,M.Finger; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giarra, J.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grasso, A.; Gridin, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F.H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Kerbizi, A.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.M.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Kuznetsov, I.I.; Kveton, A.; Lednev, A.A.; Levchenko, E.A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Mamon, S.A.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Moretti, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Pešková, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rogacheva, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thiel, A.; Tomsa, J.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Vasilishin, B.I.; Vauth, A.; Veloso, J.; Vidon, A.; Virius, M.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2018-06-10

    We present a precise measurement of the proton longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A1p and the proton spin-dependent structure function g1p at photon virtualities 0.006(GeV/c)2effects are found at such low values of x .

  18. Estimation of effective thermal conductivity tensor from composite microstructure images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M; Boyard, N; Jarny, Y; Delaunay, D

    2008-01-01

    The determination of the effective thermal properties of inhomogeneous materials is a long-standing problem of continuously interest. The impressive number of methods developed to measure or estimate the thermal properties of composite materials clearly exhibits the importance given to their knowledge. Homogenization models are a cheap way to determine or predict them. Many different approaches of homogenization were developed, but the last advances are credited to numerical methods. In this study, a new computational model is developed to estimate the 2D thermal conductivity tensor and the thermal main directions of a pure carbon/epoxy unidirectional composite. This tool is based on real composite microstructure.

  19. The effect of nonlinear ionospheric conductivity enhancement on magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Spencer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the effect of enhanced ionospheric conductivity into a low-order, physics-based nonlinear model of the nightside magnetosphere called WINDMI. The model uses solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF parameters from the ACE satellite located at the L1 point to predict substorm growth, onset, expansion and recovery measured by the AL index roughly 50–60 min in advance. The dynamics introduced by the conductivity enhancement into the model behavior is described, and illustrated through using synthetically constructed solar wind parameters as input. We use the new model to analyze two well-documented isolated substorms: one that occurred on 31 July 1997 from Aksnes et al. (2002, and another on 13 April 2000 from Huang et al. (2004. These two substorms have a common feature in that the solar wind driver sharply decreases in the early part of the recovery phase, and that neither of them are triggered by northward turning of the IMF Bz. By controlling the model parameters such that the onset time of the substorm is closely adhered to, the westward auroral electrojet peaks during substorm expansion are qualitatively reproduced. Furthermore, the electrojet recovers more slowly with enhanced conductivity playing a role, which explains the data more accurately.

  20. Effects of Cationic Pendant Groups on Ionic Conductivity for Anion Exchange Membranes: Structure Conductivity Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sojeong; Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Won Bo

    Anion exchange membranes(AEMs) have been widely studied due to their various applications, especially for Fuel cells. Previous proton exchange membranes(PEMs), such as Nafions® have better conductivity than AEMs so far. However, technical limitations such as slow electrode kinetics, carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning of metal catalysts, high methanol crossover and high cost of Pt-based catalyst detered further usages. AEMs have advantages to supplement its drawbacks. AEMs are environmentally friendly and cost-efficient. Based on the well-defined block copolymer, self-assembled morphology is expected to have some relationship with its ionic conductivity. Recently AEMs based on various cations, including ammonium, phosphonium, guanidinium, imidazolium, metal cation, and benzimidazolium cations have been developed and extensively studied with the aim to prepare high- performance AEMs. But more fundamental approach, such as relationships between nanostructure and conductivity is needed. We use well-defined block copolymer Poly(styrene-block-isoprene) as a backbone which is synthesized by anionic polymerization. Then we graft various cationic functional groups and analysis the relation between morphology and conductivity. Theoretical and computational soft matter lab.

  1. Primary teachers conducting inquiry projects : effects on attitudes towards teaching science and conducting inquiry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalderen-Smeets, Sandra; Walma van der Molen, Julie Henriëtte; van Hest, Erna G.W.C.M.; Poortman, Cindy Louise

    2017-01-01

    This study used an experimental, pretest-posttest control group design to investigate whether participation in a large-scale inquiry project would improve primary teachers’ attitudes towards teaching science and towards conducting inquiry. The inquiry project positively affected several elements of

  2. Primary Teachers Conducting Inquiry Projects: Effects on Attitudes towards Teaching Science and Conducting Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalderen-Smeets, Sandra I.; Walma van der Molen, Juliette H.; van Hest, Erna G. W. C. M.; Poortman, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    This study used an experimental, pretest-posttest control group design to investigate whether participation in a large-scale inquiry project would improve primary teachers' attitudes towards teaching science and towards conducting inquiry. The inquiry project positively affected several elements of teachers' attitudes. Teachers felt less anxious…

  3. effective hydraulic conductivity for a soil of variable pore size

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: hydraulic conductivity, soil, infiltration, permeability, water. 1. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. Accurate determination of hydraulic conductivity is very crucial for infiltration and runoff estimation. Factors which affect water infiltration in the soil include hydraulic conductivity, wetting front and soil.

  4. Surface effects on the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2018-03-01

    Thermal transport in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) has recently attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications in energy harvesting and generation and thermal management. The adjustment of the thermal conductivity of SiNWs through surface effects is a topic worthy of focus. In this paper, we briefly review the recent progress made in this field through theoretical calculations and experiments. We come to the conclusion that surface engineering methods are feasible and effective methods for adjusting nanoscale thermal transport and may foster further advancements in this field. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation ofChina (Grant No. 11504418), China Scholarship Council (Grant No. 201706425053), Basic Research Program in Shenzhen, China (Grant No. JCYJ20160229165210666), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2015XKMS075).

  5. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of polypropylene/conducting fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Kim, Yeung Keun

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic released from the automotive electronic parts is harmful to human body. Electromagnetic interference (EMT) shielding refers to the reflection and/or adsorption of electromagnetic radiation by a material, which thereby acts as a shield against the penetration of the radiation through the shield. Polypropylene (PP)/conductive micro fiber composites containing various fiber contents and fiber length were injection-molded. The effect of fiber content and length on electrical properties of the composites was studied by electrical resistivity and EMT shielding measurements. The through-plane electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity were obtained by measuring dielectric properties. The EMT shielding effectiveness (SE) was investigated by using S-parameter in the range of 100 ~ 1500 MHz. Reflection, absorption and multiple-reflection are the EMT attenuation mechanisms. From the measurement of S-Parameters, the absorption coefficient, reflection coefficient, and the shielding efficiency of the materials were calculated. The EMT SE of PP/conducing fiber composites is 40 dB over a wide frequency range up to 1.5 GHz, which is higher than that of PP/talc composite used automotive parts, viz. 0 dB.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes: Effects of Chirality and Isotope Impurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Zhang; Li, Baowen

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality and isotope impurity by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also study the dependence of thermal conductivity on tube length for t...

  7. Effect of atrioventricular conduction on heart rate variability

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Talha Jamal

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses the effect of atrioventricular conduction time (AVCT) on the short-term Heart Rate Variability (HRV) by computing HRV parameters using intervals between the onsets of successive P waves (PP time series) for three groups: normal, arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD) patients. A very precise wavelet transform based ECG delineator was developed to detect PP, PR and RR time series. Mean PR variation in arrhythmia and SCD group was found to be significantly high as compared to the normal group. It was observed that when PR variations in arrhythmia and SCD cases crossed a certain threshold, RR variability no longer provided a very accurate estimate of HRV. In such cases, PP variability was able to provide a better assessment of HRV. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. Isotope Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengji Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity (TC of isolated graphene with different concentrations of isotope (C13 is studied with equilibrium molecular dynamics method at 300 K. In the limit of pure C12 or C13 graphene, TC of graphene in zigzag and armchair directions are ~630 W/mK and ~1000W/mK, respectively. We find that the TC of graphene can be maximally reduced by ~80%, in both armchair and zigzag directions, when a random distribution of C12 and C13 is assumed at different doping concentrations. Therefore, our simulation results suggest an effective way to tune the TC of graphene without changing its atomic and electronic structure, thus yielding a promising application for nanoelectronics and thermoelectricity of graphene-based nano device.

  9. Piezoelectric effect on the thermal conductivity of monolayer gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations, in this work, we find that the heat transport property of the monolayer gallium nitride (GaN) can be efficiently tailored by external electric field due to its unique piezoelectric characteristic. As the monolayer GaN possesses different piezoelectric properties in armchair and zigzag directions, different effects of the external electric field on thermal conductivity are observed when it is applied in the armchair and zigzag directions. Our further study reveals that due to the elastoelectric effect in the monolayer GaN, the external electric field changes the Young's modulus and therefore changes the phonon group velocity. Also, due to the inverse piezoelectric effect, the applied electric field induces in-plane stress in the monolayer GaN subject to a length constraint, which results in the change in the lattice anharmonicity and therefore affects the phonon mean free path. Furthermore, for relatively long GaN monolayers, the in-plane stress may trigger the buckling instability, which can significantly reduce the phonon mean free path.

  10. Effects of biochar on hydraulic conductivity of compacted kaolin clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Wong, Annie Yan Yan; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2018-03-01

    Compacted clay is widely used as capillary barriers in landfill final cover system. Recently, biochar amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as a sustainable alternative cover material. However, the effects of biochar on saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ) of clay with high degree of compaction is not yet understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of biochar on k sat of compacted kaolin clay. Soil specimens were prepared by amending kaolin clay with biochar derived from peanut-shell at 0, 5 and 20% (w/w). The k sat of soil specimens was measured using a flexible water permeameter. The effects of biochar on the microstructure of the compacted clay was also investigated using MIP. Adding 5% and 20% of biochar increased the k sat of compacted kaolin clay from 1.2 × 10 -9 to 2.1 × 10 -9 and 1.3 × 10 -8 ms -1 , respectively. The increase in k sat of clay was due to the shift in pore size distribution of compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC). MIP results revealed that adding 20% of biochar shifted the dominant pore diameter of clay from 0.01-0.1 μm (meso- and macropores) to 0.1-4 μm (macropores). Results reported in this communication revealed that biochar application increased the k sat of compacted clay, and the increment was positively correlated to the biochar percentage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New results on the proton spin-dependent structure function $g^{p}_{1}$ at COMPASS with $E = 200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Zemlyanichkina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    New results of the double spin asymmetry A p 1 and the spin-dependent structure function of the proton g p 1 as a function of x Bj and Q 2 will be presented. New COMPASS data on longitudinal polarized NH 3 target were collected during the year 2011 with a beam of positive muons with energy E = 200 GeV. It allows us to cover low x region down to 0 : 0025 in the range Q 2 > 1 GeV = c 2 for the first time

  12. Spin asymmetry $A^d_1$ and the spin-dependent structure function $g^d_1$ of the deuteron at low values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, E.S.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Cerini, L.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz Kavka, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Dolgopolov, A.V.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Ehlers, J.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Fabro, M.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grunemaier, A.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; He, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Ijaduola, R.B.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomutov, N.V.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kowalik, K.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Manuilov, I.V.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Medved, K.S.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pereira, H.D.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Rebourgeard, P.C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymann, J.; Rith, K.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Rondio, E.; Sadovski, A.B.; Saller, E.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sans, M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, H.; Schmitt, L.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Shishkin, A.A.; Siebert, H.-W.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Skachkova, A.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sozzi, F.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Thers, D.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Toeda, T.; Tretyak, V.I.; Trusov, Sergey V.; Varanda, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Wagner, M.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiedner, U.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a precise measurement of the deuteron longitudinal spin asymmetry $A_1^d$ and of the deuteron spin-dependent structure function $g_1^d$ at $Q^2 < $ 1~(GeV/$c$)$^2$ and $4\\cdot$10$^{-5} < x < $~2.5$\\cdot$10$^{-2}$ based on the data collected by the COMPASS experiment at CERN during the years 2002 and 2003. The statistical precision is tenfold better than that of the previous measurement in this region. The measured $A_1^d$ and $g_1^d$ are found to be consistent with zero in the whole range of $x$.

  13. Measurements of energy behaviour of spin-dependent np—observables over 1.2-3.7 GeV energy region Dubna ``Delta-Sigma'' Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, V. I.; Anischenko, N. G.; Antonenko, V. G.; Averichev, S. A.; Azhgirey, L. S.; Bartenev, V. D.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Blinov, N. A.; Borisov, N. S.; Borzakov, S. B.; Borzunov, Yu. T.; Bushuev, Yu. P.; Chernenko, L. P.; Chernykh, E. V.; Chumakov, V. F.; Dolgh, S. A.; Fedorov, A. N.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Golovanov, L. B.; Gurevich, G. M.; Guriev, D. K.; Janata, A.; Kirillov, A. D.; Kolomiets, V. G.; Komogorov, E. V.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kovalev, A. I.; Krasnov, V. A.; Krstonoshich, P.; Kuzmin, E. S.; Kuzmin, N. A.; Ladygin, V. P.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; Liburg, M. Yu.; Livanov, A. N.; Lukhanin, A. A.; Maniakov, P. K.; Matafonov, V. N.; Matyushevsky, E. A.; Moroz, V. D.; Morozov, A. A.; Neganov, A. B.; Nikolaevsky, G. P.; Nomofilov, A. A.; Panteleev, Tz.; Pillpenko, Yu. K.; Pisarev, I. L.; Plis, Yu. A.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Prokofiev, A. N.; Prytkov, V. Yu.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Schedrov, V. A.; Schevelev, O. N.; Shilov, S. N.; Shindin, R. A.; Slunecka, M.; Slunečková, V.; Starikov, A. Yu.; Stoletov, G. D.; Strunov, L. N.; Svetov, A. L.; Usov, Yu. A.; Vasiliev, T.; Volkov, V. I.; Vorobiev, E. I.; Yudin, I. P.; Zaitsev, I. V.; Zhdanov, A. A.; Zhmyrov, V. N.

    2005-01-01

    New accurate data on the neutron-proton spin-dependent total cross section difference Δ σ L( np) at the neutron beam kinetic energies 1.4, 1.7, 1.9 and 2.0 GeV are presented. A number of physical and methodical results on investigation of an elastic np→pn charge exchange process over a few GeV region are also presented. Measurements were carried out at the Synchrophasotron and Nuclotron of the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energies of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research.

  14. Transverse spin dependent Drell Yan in QCD to O(αs2) at large pΤ. 1: Virtual corrections and methods for the real emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.; Coriano, C.; Elwood, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    The authors investigate the role of the transverse spin dependence in Drell Yan lepton pair production to NLO in QCD at parton level. In the analysis the authors deal with the large p Τ distributions. They give very compact expressions for the virtual O(α s 2 ) corrections to the cross section and show that the singularities factorize. The study is performed in the MS scheme in Dimensional Regularization, and with the t'Hooft-Veltman prescription for γ 5 . A discussion of the structure of the real emissions is included, and detailed methods for the study of these contributions are formulated

  15. Ab-initio investigation of spin-dependent transport properties in Fe-doped armchair graphyne nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GolafroozShahri, S.; Roknabadi, M.R., E-mail: roknabad@um.ac.ir; Shahtahmasebi, N.; Behdani, M.

    2016-12-15

    An ab-initio study on the spin-polarized transport properties of H-passivated Fe-doped graphyne nanoribbons is presented. All the calculations were based on density functional theory (DFT). Doping single magnetic atom on graphyne nanoribbons leads to metallicity which can significantly improve the conductivity. The currents are not degenerate for both up and down spin electrons and they are considerably spin-polarized. Therefore a relatively good spin-filtering can be expected. For configurations with geometric symmetry spin-rectifying is also observed. Therefore they can be applied as a dual spin-filter or a dual spin-diode in spintronic equipment. - Highlights: • The existence of Fe additional electrons lead to metallicity. • Doping magnetic atom on studied n-AGyNRs, has improved the conductance of nanoribbons. • The current for both spin electrons is considerably spin-polarized. • Threshold voltage decreased by increasing the width of ribbon. • For configurations with geometric symmetry spin-rectifying effect was also observed.

  16. Effect of plasticizer and fumed silica on ionic conductivity behaviour ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    behaviour of proton conducting polymer electrolytes containing different concentrations of hexafluorophosphoric acid (HPF6) in polyethylene oxide ... Polymer electrolytes; ionic conductivity; polyethylene oxide; plasticizer; fumed silica. 1. Introduction ..... is a rapid weight loss which could be due to the degradation of polymer ...

  17. Effects of Conductive Hearing Loss: Fact or Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventry, Ira M.

    1980-01-01

    The article reviews the empirical evidence implicating conductive hearing impairments as causal agents in learning disability, language dysfunction, and central auditory problems. It is concluded that there are few, if any, valid data linking conductive hearing impairment to any of these problems. (Author/DLS)

  18. Ambient effects on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roch, Aljoscha; Greifzu, Moritz; Roch Talens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    We show that the electrical conductivity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) networks is affected by oxygen and air humidity under ambient conditions by more than a magnitude. Later, we intentionally modified the electrical conductivity by functionalization with iodine and investigated...

  19. Deterioration in effective thermal conductivity of aqueous magnetic nanofluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altan, C.L.; Gurten, B.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Bucak, S.

    2014-01-01

    Common heat transfer fluids have low thermal conductivities, which decrease their efficiency in many applications. On the other hand, solids have much higher thermal conductivity values. Previously, it was shown that the addition of different nanoparticles to various base fluids increases the

  20. Modelling the effect of hydration on skin conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, L; Chappell, P; Melvin, T

    2017-08-01

    Electrical signals are recorded from and sent into the body via the skin in a number of applications. In practice, skin is often hydrated with liquids having different conductivities so a model was produced in order to determine the relationship between skin impedance and conductivity. A model representing the skin was subjected to a variety of electrical signals. The parts of the model representing the stratum corneum were given different conductivities to represent different levels of hydration. The overall impedance and conductivity of the cells did not vary at frequencies below 40 kHz. Above 40 kHz, levels of increased conductivity caused the overall impedance to decrease. The variation in impedance with conductivity between 5 and 50 mSm -1 can be modelled quadratically while variation in impedance with conductivity between 5 and 5000 mSm -1 can be modelled with a double exponential decay. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effect of hydrophobic microstructured surfaces on conductive ink printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seunghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Kyung Heon; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-01-01

    Conductive ink was printed on various microstructured substrates to measure the printing quality. Poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates were used to test the printability of the hydrophobic surface material. Microstructured arrays of 10 µm regular PDMS cubes were prepared using the MEMS fabrication technique. The gap distance between the cubes was varied from 10 to 40 µm. The printing wettability of the microstructured surfaces was determined by measuring the contact angle of a droplet of silver conductive ink. Screen-printing methods were used in the conductive line printing experiment. Test line patterns with finely varying widths (30–250 µm) were printed repeatedly, and the conductivity of the printed lines was measured. The printability, which was defined as the ratio of the successfully printed patterns to the total number of printed patterns, was analyzed as a function of the linewidth and the gap distance of the microstructured surfaces

  2. Anisotropic dyonic black brane and its effects on holographic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimphun, Sunly; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Park, Chanyong; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2017-10-01

    We investigate a massive gravity theory involving the SL(2 , R) symmetry and anisotropy. Due to the SL(2 , R) invariance of the equations of motion, the complex con-ductivity of this model transforms covariantly under the SL(2 , R) transformation and the ratio of DC conductivities in different spatial directions is preserved even after the SL(2 , R) transformation. We further investigate AC and Hall conductivities by utilizing the Kubo formula. There exists a Drude-like peak in the region with a small anisotropy, while such a Drude peak disappears when anisotropy becomes large. We also show that the complex conductivity can have a cyclotron frequency pole even beyond the hydrodynamic limit.

  3. Limits on the Spin-Dependent WIMP-Nucleon Cross Sections from the First Science Run of the ZEPLIN-III Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedenko, V. N.; Bewick, A.; Currie, A.; Davidge, D.; Dawson, J.; Horn, M.; Howard, A. S.; Jones, W. G.; Joshi, M.; Liubarsky, I.; Lyons, K.; Quenby, J. J.; Sumner, T. J.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.; Araujo, H. M.; Edwards, B.; Barnes, E. J.; Ghag, C.; Murphy, A. StJ.

    2009-01-01

    We present new experimental constraints on the WIMP-nucleon spin-dependent elastic cross sections using data from the first science run of ZEPLIN-III, a two-phase xenon experiment searching for galactic dark matter weakly interacting massive particles based at the Boulby mine. Analysis of ∼450 kg·days fiducial exposure allow us to place a 90%-confidence upper limit on the pure WIMP-neutron cross section of σ n =1.9x10 -2 pb at 55 GeV/c 2 WIMP mass. Recent calculations of the nuclear spin structure based on the Bonn charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon potential were used for the odd-neutron isotopes 129 Xe and 131 Xe. These indicate that the sensitivity of xenon targets to the spin-dependent WIMP-proton interaction could be much lower than implied by previous calculations, whereas the WIMP-neutron sensitivity is impaired only by a factor of ∼2.

  4. Slotted rotatable target assembly and systematic error analysis for a search for long range spin dependent interactions from exotic vector boson exchange using neutron spin rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, C.; Crawford, B.; Fox, W.; Francis, I.; Holley, A.; Magers, S.; Sarsour, M.; Snow, W. M.; Vanderwerp, J.

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the design and construction of a novel target array of nonmagnetic test masses used in a neutron polarimetry measurement made in search for new possible exotic spin dependent neutron-atominteractions of Nature at sub-mm length scales. This target was designed to accept and efficiently transmit a transversely polarized slow neutron beam through a series of long open parallel slots bounded by flat rectangular plates. These openings possessed equal atom density gradients normal to the slots from the flat test masses with dimensions optimized to achieve maximum sensitivity to an exotic spin-dependent interaction from vector boson exchanges with ranges in the mm - μm regime. The parallel slots were oriented differently in four quadrants that can be rotated about the neutron beam axis in discrete 90°increments using a Geneva drive. The spin rotation signals from the 4 quadrants were measured using a segmented neutron ion chamber to suppress possible systematic errors from stray magnetic fields in the target region. We discuss the per-neutron sensitivity of the target to the exotic interaction, the design constraints, the potential sources of systematic errors which could be present in this design, and our estimate of the achievable sensitivity using this method.

  5. Fiber/matrix interfacial thermal conductance effect on the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    SiC/SiC composites used in fusion reactor applications are subjected to high heat fluxes and require knowledge and tailoring of their in-service thermal conductivity. Accurately predicting the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites as a function of temperature will guide the design of these materials for their intended use, which will eventually include the effects of 14-MeV neutron irradiations. This paper applies an Eshelby–Mori–Tanaka approach (EMTA) to compute the thermal conductivity of unirradiated SiC/SiC composites. The homogenization procedure includes three steps. In the first step EMTA computes the homogenized thermal conductivity of the unidirectional (UD) SiC fiber embraced by its coating layer. The second step computes the thermal conductivity of the UD composite formed by the equivalent SiC fibers embedded in a SiC matrix, and finally the thermal conductivity of the as-formed SiC/SiC composite is obtained by averaging the solution for the UD composite over all possible fiber orientations using the second-order fiber orientation tensor. The EMTA predictions for the transverse thermal conductivity of several types of SiC/SiC composites with different fiber types and interfaces are compared to the predicted and experimental results by Youngblood et al. [J. Nucl. Mater. 307–311 (2002) 1120–1125, Fusion Sci. Technol. 45 (2004) 583–591, Compos. Sci. Technol. 62 (2002) 1127–1139.

  6. Effect of gravel on hydraulic conductivity of compacted soil liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelley, T.L.; Daniel, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    How much gravel should be allowed in low-hydraulic-conductivity, compacted soil liners? To address this question, two clayey soils are uniformly mixed with varying percentages of gravel that, by itself, has a hydraulic conductivity of 170 cm/s. Soil/gravel mixtures are compacted and then permeated. Hydraulic conductivity of the compacted gravel/soil mixtures is less than 1 x 10 -7 cm/s for gravel contents as high as 50-60%. For gravel contents ≤ 60%, gravel content is not important: all test specimens have a low hydraulic conductivity. For gravel contents > 50-60%, the clayey soils does not fill voids between gravel particles, and high hydraulic conductivity results. The water content of the nongravel fraction is found to be a useful indicator of proper moisture conditions during compaction. From these experiments in which molding water content and compactive energy are carefully controlled, and gravel is uniformly mixed with the soil, it is concluded that the maximum allowable gravel content is approximately 50%

  7. Effect of dose on radiation-induced conductivity in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutnev, A.P.; Saenko, V.S.; Pozhidaev, E.D.; Ikhsanov, R.Sh.

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulation of radiation-induced conductivity in polymers upon long-term irradiation on the basis of the generalized Rose-Fowler-Vaisberg model, which allows for both dipolar carrier transport and generation of radiation traps during irradiation, was performed. The unusual properties of radiation-induced conductivity, such as the appearance of a maximum on current transients, the absence of a steady state, and a substantial difference between these curves for the first and subsequent irradiation, are rationalized in terms of the formation of free radicals, the major feature of radiolysis in the chemical aspect. This interpretation does not require the involvement of degradation or crosslinking processes, unlike other interpretations that appear in the literature. With the use of low-density polyethylene as an example, it was shown that radiation-induced conductivity both upon pulse and continuous irradiation can satisfactorily be described with the unified set of parameters of the generalized Rose-Fowler-Vaisberg model [ru

  8. Quantum Theory of Conducting Matter Superconductivity and Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Shigeji; Godoy, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    Explains major superconducting properties including zero resistance, Meissner effect, sharp phase change, flux quantization, excitation energy gap, and Josephson effects using quantum statistical mechanical calculations. This book covers the 2D superconductivity and the quantum Hall effects

  9. The effect of microwave drying on polymer electrolyte conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, R.J. (Dept. of Chemistry, De Montfort Univ., Gateway, Leicester (United Kingdom)); Linford, R.G. (Dept. of Chemistry, De Montfort Univ., Gateway, Leicester (United Kingdom)); Pynenburg, R.A.J. (Dept. of Chemistry, De Montfort Univ., Gateway, Leicester (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01

    The morphology and conductivity of polymer electrolytes based on PEO are often substantially modified by the presence of water. A number of different approaches have commonly been used to eliminate water from polymer electrolyte films. The work reported here extends our earlier investigations of the use of microwaves for the rapid drying of solvent cast polymer electrolyte films. Films of PEO[sub n]:NiBr[sub 2] and PEO[sub n]:ZnCl[sub 2] have been prepared by normal casting techniques and then studied using EXAFS, DSC and ac conductivity measurements. (orig.)

  10. Effect of Disorder on the Conductance of Spin Field Effect Transistors (SPINFET)

    OpenAIRE

    Cahay, M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the conductance of Spin Field Effect Transistors (SPINFET) [Datta and Das, Appl. Phys. Lett., Vol. 56, 665 (1990)] is affected by a single (non-magnetic) impurity in the transistor's channel. The extreme sensitivity of the amplitude and phase of the transistor's conductance oscillations to the location of a single impurity in the channel is reminiscent of the phenomenon of universal conductance fluctuations in mesoscopic samples and is extremely problematic as far as device imple...

  11. Separate effects tests to determine the effective thermal conductivity in the PBMR HTTU test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pgr@mtechindustrial.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Toit, C.G. du; Antwerpen, W. van [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Antwerpen, H.J. van [M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd., PO Box 19855, Noordbrug 2522 (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    Thermal-fluid simulations are used extensively to predict the maximum fuel temperatures, flows, pressure drops and thermal capacitance of pebble bed gas cooled reactors in support of the reactor safety case. The PBMR company developed the HTTU non-nuclear test facility in cooperation with M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd. and the North-West University in South Africa to conduct comprehensive separate effects tests as well as integrated effects tests to study the different thermal-fluid phenomena. This paper describes the separate effects tests that were conducted to determine the effective thermal conductivity through the pebble bed under near-vacuum conditions and temperatures up to 1200 °C. It also presents the measured temperature distributions and the methodology applied in the data analysis to derive the resultant values of effective thermal conductivity and its associated uncertainty.

  12. Separate effects tests to determine the effective thermal conductivity in the PBMR HTTU test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, P.G.; Toit, C.G. du; Antwerpen, W. van; Antwerpen, H.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Thermal-fluid simulations are used extensively to predict the maximum fuel temperatures, flows, pressure drops and thermal capacitance of pebble bed gas cooled reactors in support of the reactor safety case. The PBMR company developed the HTTU non-nuclear test facility in cooperation with M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd. and the North-West University in South Africa to conduct comprehensive separate effects tests as well as integrated effects tests to study the different thermal-fluid phenomena. This paper describes the separate effects tests that were conducted to determine the effective thermal conductivity through the pebble bed under near-vacuum conditions and temperatures up to 1200 °C. It also presents the measured temperature distributions and the methodology applied in the data analysis to derive the resultant values of effective thermal conductivity and its associated uncertainty

  13. Thermal effects in microfluidics with thermal conductivity spatially modulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Toro, Agustín.

    2014-05-01

    A heat transfer model on a microfluidic is resolved analytically. The model describes a fluid at rest between two parallel plates where each plate is maintained at a differentially specified temperature and the thermal conductivity of the microfluidic is spatially modulated. The heat transfer model in such micro-hydrostatic configuration is analytically resolved using the technique of the Laplace transform applying the Bromwich Integral and the Residue theorem. The temperature outline in the microfluidic is presented as an infinite series of Bessel functions. It is shown that the result for the thermal conductivity spatially modulated has as a particular case the solution when the thermal conductivity is spatially constant. All computations were performed using the computer algebra software Maple. It is claimed that the analytical obtained results are important for the design of nanoscale devices with applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, it is suggested some future research lines such as the study of the heat transfer model in a microfluidic resting between coaxial cylinders with radially modulated thermal conductivity in order to achieve future developments in this area.

  14. Effects of preparation temperature on the conductivity of polypyrrole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-04-02

    Apr 2, 2002 ... polymer formed at low temperature has higher conductivity and is stronger than that ... it offers mass production at reasonable cost. ... its good intrinsic properties, polypyrrole appears promising for use in batteries, super ... actuators, electromagnetic interference shielding, anti-static coating and drug delivery.

  15. Effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the optical properties in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the bulk conduction band edge, the correction due to nonparabolicity can be important. [9,10]. In a narrow QW under a strong magnetic field, the optical absorption coefficients calculated with the nonparabolicity correction shows remarkable deviation from results obtained using parabolic energy approximation [11].

  16. Pump effect of a capillary discharge in electrically conductive liquids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Baerdemaeker, F.; Šimek, Milan; Leys, C.; Verstraete, W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 4 (2007), s. 473-485 ISSN 0272-4324 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1043403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water * conductive * capillary * AC discharge * pump Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.747, year: 2007 http://www.springerlink.com/content/w802073563282272/fulltext.pdf

  17. Boiling on fins with wire screen of variable effective conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzechowski Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high scale of integration of modern equipment used for medical, military and other purposes puts heavy demands as regards the removal of great heat fluxes. This can be achieved only in exchangers that apply the phase change phenomena. Among many methods to improve boiling heat transfer, the wire mesh covering demonstrates some advantages due to the possibilities of designing the desired microstructure parameters, availability on the market, and low cost. The wire mesh microstucture with specified geometrical parameters produces anisotropy in conductivity. The different arrangement of the mesh layers relative to the direction of the heat flux is a cause of the change of temperature distribution within the layer. The consequence is a respective change in the discharge conditions of the gas phase and liquid feed. The experiments were conducted on fins covered with a single layer of copper mesh with lumen of 38 % and boiling FC-72 at ambient pressure. Compared with the smooth surface, the wire mesh structures yield an increase in the heat transfer rate at boiling. It is also shown that nucleate boiling is initiated at lower wall superheat. Formulas for longitudinal and perpendicular thermal conductivity are given for different mesh structure arrangements.

  18. Graphene Based Terahertz Absorber Designed With Effective Surface Conductivity Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Booth, Tim

    Young field of terahertz (THz) science and technology demands new materials and devices, such as filters, modulators, polarization converters and absorbers. Graphene, a recently discovered single-atom-thick material, provides exciting properties for functional terahertz applications. Graphene...... conductivity and how to use it in optical design. We demonstrate a tunable THz perfect absorber, which consists of continuous graphene various structured graphene metamaterials above a metal mirror. Changing the Fermi level from 0 eV to 0.5 eV allows for drastic changes in absorbance from less than 0.1 to 1...

  19. Effect of electrodes in the radiation induced conductivity for polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorio Filho, R.; Gross, B.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of PET with 23 μm thickness were exposed to continuous X-rays and the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) as a function of time were measured, using electrodes of evaporated aluminum and gold. The results showed that the use of higher atomic number metal electrodes increase the received dose rate by sample, without almost modifying the time evolution of the RIC or its dependence with the applied electric field intensity. It is also showed that this increase is caused by the electrode placed in the face of the sample where the radiation strikes, as well as by the one placed in the oposite face. (author) [pt

  20. A methodology to investigate the contribution of conduction and radiation heat transfer to the effective thermal conductivity of packed graphite pebble beds, including the wall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, M., E-mail: maritz.db@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Du Toit, C.G., E-mail: Jat.DuToit@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pieter.rousseau@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The radiation and conduction components of the effective thermal conductivity are separated. • Near-wall effects have a notable influence on the effective thermal conductivity. • Effective thermal conductivity is a function of the macro temperature gradient. • The effective thermal conductivity profile shows a characteristic trend. • The trend is a result of the interplay between conduction and radiation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity represents the overall heat transfer characteristics of a packed bed of spheres and must be considered in the analysis and design of pebble bed gas-cooled reactors. During depressurized loss of forced cooling conditions the dominant heat transfer mechanisms for the passive removal of decay heat are radiation and conduction. Predicting the value of the effective thermal conductivity is complex since it inter alia depends on the temperature level and temperature gradient through the bed, as well as the pebble packing structure. The effect of the altered packing structure in the wall region must therefore also be considered. Being able to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena and the characteristics of the resultant effective thermal conductivity. This paper introduces a purpose-designed test facility and accompanying methodology that combines physical measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction heat transfer, including the wall effects. Preliminary results obtained with the methodology offer important insights into the trends observed in the experimental results and provide a better understanding of the interplay between the underlying heat transfer phenomena.

  1. Thermal conductivity of uranium: effects of purity and microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1975-10-01

    Thermal conductivity curves for polycrystalline uranium are presented for the temperature range below 373 0 K. The curves are for specimens prepared by different fabrication procedures from material of known purity and hardness. Included is a curve for U/2wt percent Mo alloy. Different mechanisms appear to be influencing the thermal conductivity behavior of uranium in well-defined temperature regions: below 37 to 43 0 K, approximately 40 to approximately 80 0 K, 80 to approximately 280 0 K, and from 280 0 K to the α → β transformation temperature. Mechanisms responsible for results in one temperature region continue to exert a strong influence in the next higher temperature region. Impurities and initial microstructure seem to influence results at any starting temperature. Evidence is presented for the possibility of imperfection ordering in uranium between approximately 40 and approximately 280 0 K. It is postulated that the type of ordering is capable with a martensite-like behavior and that all physical property results depend on the extent of a modification of the α-phase on cooling below approximately 280 0 K

  2. Effect of conductive hearing loss on central auditory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Arash; Farhadi, Mohammad; Emamdjomeh, Hesam; Saki, Nader; Mirmomeni, Golshan; Rahim, Fakher

    It has been demonstrated that long-term Conductive Hearing Loss (CHL) may influence the precise detection of the temporal features of acoustic signals or Auditory Temporal Processing (ATP). It can be argued that ATP may be the underlying component of many central auditory processing capabilities such as speech comprehension or sound localization. Little is known about the consequences of CHL on temporal aspects of central auditory processing. This study was designed to assess auditory temporal processing ability in individuals with chronic CHL. During this analytical cross-sectional study, 52 patients with mild to moderate chronic CHL and 52 normal-hearing listeners (control), aged between 18 and 45 year-old, were recruited. In order to evaluate auditory temporal processing, the Gaps-in-Noise (GIN) test was used. The results obtained for each ear were analyzed based on the gap perception threshold and the percentage of correct responses. The average of GIN thresholds was significantly smaller for the control group than for the CHL group for both ears (right: p=0.004; left: phearing for both sides (phearing loss in either group (p>0.05). The results suggest reduced auditory temporal processing ability in adults with CHL compared to normal hearing subjects. Therefore, developing a clinical protocol to evaluate auditory temporal processing in this population is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects on saturated hydraulic conductivity and rhizome yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-05

    Sep 5, 2007 ... ... as recorded at. Umudike, followed the bi-modal pattern, typical of the tropical rain- ... coefficients of determination and regression equations, were used ... Effects of mulch types, rates and sampling depth on selected physical properties of an arenic hapludult. .... as the independent variable to explain the.

  4. The effect of liner hydraulic conductivity on disposal cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Chia, Y.P.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayered disposal cells are frequently used for the disposal of radioactive and hazardous wastes. These disposal cells consist of materials with different permeabilities that are placed in various thicknesses at the bottom as well as in the cover of the cell. Typically, a layer of permeable material is placed above a layer with low permeability; the permeable layer functions as a drainage/leachate collection system and the low-permeability layer functions as a migration barrier/liner. This paper analyzes the effects of infiltration through unsaturated soil liners on the long-term performance of the disposal cell. Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that the long-term performance of a disposal cell is dependent on a well-designed cell cover. The design should emphasize a cap with less permeable material to prevent water from infiltrating the disposal cell. An impermeable bottom liner is effective only in the short term; however, it can eventually result in saturation of the wastes and cause the bathtub effect over the long term

  5. Spin-dependent and photon-assisted transmission enhancement and suppression in a magnetic-field tunable ZnSe/Zn{sub 1–x}Mn{sub x}Se heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chun-Lei, E-mail: licl@cnu.edu.cn [Laboratory for Micro-sized Functional Materials, College of Elementary Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yuan, Rui-Yang [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Guo, Yong, E-mail: guoy66@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-07

    Using the effective-mass approximation and Floquet theory, we theoretically investigate the terahertz photon-assisted transport through a ZnSe/Zn{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Se heterostructure under an external magnetic field, an electric field, and a spatially homogeneous oscillatory field. The results show that both amplitude and frequency of the oscillatory field can accurately manipulate the magnitude of the spin-dependent transmission probability and the positions of the Fano-type resonance due to photon absorption and emission processes. Transmission resonances can be enhanced to optimal resonances or drastically suppressed for spin-down electrons tunneling through the heterostructure and for spin-up ones tunneling through the same structure, resonances can also be enhanced or suppressed, but the intensity is less than the spin-down ones. Furthermore, it is important to note that transmission suppression can be clearly seen from both the spin-down component and the spin-up component of the current density at low magnetic field; at the larger magnetic field, however, the spin-down component is suppressed, and the spin-up component is enhanced. These interesting properties may provide an alternative method to develop multi-parameter modulation electron-polarized devices.

  6. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  7. Doping and synthesis method effect on zirconium silicate conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monrós, G.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The colour mechanisms of blue V- ZrSiO4 and yellow Pr- ZrSiO4 ceramic pigments which strongly depend on both fluorine addition and synthesis method, are still controversial. Complex impedance has been used as a useful tool to differentiate the materials as a function of the synthesis method, microstructure and observed colour, going deeply into the resolution of controversies about the nature of colours. Representative samples of these doping pigmenting systems prepared by both classical ceramic process and sol-gel method have been studied by complex impedance analysis. Vanadium doped zircon enhances resistivity and activation energy compared to undoped zircon powder and turkish blue vanadium-zircon obtained by addition of NaF shows the highest bulk resistivity. Activation energy and conductivity decrease for Praseodymium doped zircon compared to undoped zircon. This feature is in agreement with the presence of cationic vacancies on green vanadiumzircon samples due to V4+ and V5+ coexistence and praseodymium oxide inclusions on Pr- ZrSiO4 yellow pigment.

    El mecanismo del color en el azul de los pigmentos cerámicos V- ZrSiO4 y amarillo de Pr- ZrSiO4 cuyos tinos dependen mucho de la presencia de fluoruros así como del método de preparación esta controvertido en la literatura. La impedancia compleja se ha utilizado como una herramienta útil para diferenciar los materiales en función del método de síntesis, la microestructura y el color con el fin de profundizar en la resolución de las controversias. Se han preparado muestras representativas de ambos sistemas dopados mediante diferentes métodos de síntesis cerámico y sol-gel que se han estudiado por análisis de impedancia compleja. El circón dopado con vanadio aumenta su resistividad y sus energía de activación con referencia a la muestra no dopada y la muestra turquesa obtenida por adición de NaF presenta la mayor resistividad. Las muestras dopadas con praseodimio disminuyen

  8. Dwell time, Hartman effect and transport properties in a ferromagnetic phosphorene monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati Kh, Hamed; Faizabadi, Edris

    2018-02-28

    In this paper, spin-dependent dwell time, spin Hartman effect and spin-dependent conductance were theoretically investigated through a rectangular barrier in the presence of an exchange field by depositing a ferromagnetic insulator on the phosphorene layer in the barrier region. The existence of the spin Hartman effect was shown for all energies (energies lower than barrier height) and all incident angles in phosphorene. We also compared our results of the dwell time in the phosphorene structure with similar research performed on graphene. We reported a significant difference between the tunneling time values of incident quasiparticles with spin-up and spin-down. We found that the barrier was almost transparent for incident quasiparticles with a wide range of incident angles and energies higher than the barrier height in phosphorene. We also found that the maximum spin-dependent transmission probability for energies higher than barrier height does not necessarily occur in the zero incident angle. In addition, we showed that the spin conductance for energies higher (lower) than barrier height fluctuates (decays) in terms of barrier thickness. We discovered that, in contrast to graphene, the Klein paradox does not occur in the normal incident in the phosphorene structure. Furthermore, the results demonstrated the achievement of good total conductance at certain thicknesses of the barrier for energies higher than the barrier height. This study could serve as a basis for investigations of the basic physics of tunneling mechanisms and also for using phosphorene as a spin polarizer in designing nanoelectronic devices.

  9. Dwell time, Hartman effect and transport properties in a ferromagnetic phosphorene monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati Kh, Hamed; Faizabadi, Edris

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, spin-dependent dwell time, spin Hartman effect and spin-dependent conductance were theoretically investigated through a rectangular barrier in the presence of an exchange field by depositing a ferromagnetic insulator on the phosphorene layer in the barrier region. The existence of the spin Hartman effect was shown for all energies (energies lower than barrier height) and all incident angles in phosphorene. We also compared our results of the dwell time in the phosphorene structure with similar research performed on graphene. We reported a significant difference between the tunneling time values of incident quasiparticles with spin-up and spin-down. We found that the barrier was almost transparent for incident quasiparticles with a wide range of incident angles and energies higher than the barrier height in phosphorene. We also found that the maximum spin-dependent transmission probability for energies higher than barrier height does not necessarily occur in the zero incident angle. In addition, we showed that the spin conductance for energies higher (lower) than barrier height fluctuates (decays) in terms of barrier thickness. We discovered that, in contrast to graphene, the Klein paradox does not occur in the normal incident in the phosphorene structure. Furthermore, the results demonstrated the achievement of good total conductance at certain thicknesses of the barrier for energies higher than the barrier height. This study could serve as a basis for investigations of the basic physics of tunneling mechanisms and also for using phosphorene as a spin polarizer in designing nanoelectronic devices.

  10. Towards Practical Application of Paper based Printed Circuits: Capillarity Effectively Enhances Conductivity of the Thermoplastic Electrically Conductive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Lin, Wei; Yang, Cheng; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Jingping; Cui, Xiaoya; Kang, Feiyu; Wong, Ching Ping

    2014-09-01

    Direct printing nanoparticle-based conductive inks onto paper substrates has encountered difficulties e.g. the nanoparticles are prone to penetrate into the pores of the paper and become partially segmented, and the necessary low-temperature-sintering process is harmful to the dimension-stability of paper. Here we prototyped the paper-based circuit substrate in combination with printed thermoplastic electrically conductive adhesives (ECA), which takes the advantage of the capillarity of paper and thus both the conductivity and mechanical robustness of the printed circuitsweredrastically improved without sintering process. For instance, the electrical resistivity of the ECA specimen on a pulp paper (6 × 10-5Ω.cm, with 50 wt% loading of Ag) was only 14% of that on PET film than that on PET film. This improvement has been found directly related to the sizing degree of paper, in agreement with the effective medium approximation simulation results in this work. The thermoplastic nature also enables excellent mechanical strength of the printed ECA to resist repeated folding. Considering the generality of the process and the wide acceptance of ECA technique in the modern electronic packages, this method may find vast applications in e.g. circuit boards, capacitive touch pads, and radio frequency identification antennas, which have been prototyped in the manuscript.

  11. Spin-dependent exciton-exciton interaction potential in two- and three-dimensional structure semiconductors under excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba An; Hoang Ngoc Cam; Nguyen Trung Dan

    1990-08-01

    Analytical expressions of the exciton-exciton interaction potentials have been approximately derived in both 2D and 3D structure materials exhibiting explicit dependences on exciton momentum difference, momentum transfer, electron-hole effective mass ratio and two-exciton state spin symmetry. Numerical calculations show that the character of the exciton-exciton interaction is determined by all of the above-mentioned dependences. (author). 32 refs, 7 figs

  12. Universal dynamics of spontaneous Lorentz violation and a new spin-dependent inverse-square law force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Luty, Markus; Thaler, Jesse

    2005-01-01

    We study the universal low-energy dynamics associated with the spontaneous breaking of Lorentz invariance down to spatial rotations. The effective lagrangian for the associated Goldstone field can be uniquely determined by the non-linear realization of a broken time diffeomorphism symmetry, up to some overall mass scales. It has previously been shown that this symmetry breaking pattern gives rise to a Higgs phase of gravity, in which gravity is modified in the infrared. In this paper, we study the effects of direct couplings between the Goldstone boson and standard model fermions, which necessarily accompany Lorentz-violating terms in the theory. The leading interaction is the coupling to the axial vector current, which reduces to spin in the non-relativistic limit. A spin moving relative to the 'ether' rest frame will emit Goldstone Cerenkov radiation. The Goldstone also induces a long-range inverse-square law force between spin sources with a striking angular dependence, reflecting the underlying Goldstone shockwaves and providing a smoking gun for this theory. We discuss the regime of validity of the effective theory describing these phenomena, and the possibility of probing Lorentz violations through Goldstone boson signals in a way that is complementary to direct tests in some regions of parameter space

  13. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  14. Combinatory Models for Predicting the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frozen and Unfrozen Food Materials

    OpenAIRE

    K. S. Reddy; P Karthikeyan

    2010-01-01

    A model to predict the effective thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials is proposed based on unit cell approach. The model is combined with four fundamental effective thermal conductivity models (Parallel, Series, Maxwell-Eucken-I, and Maxwell-Eucken-II) to evolve a unifying equation for the estimation of effective thermal conductivity of porous and nonporous food materials. The effect of volume fraction (ν) on the structure composition factor (ψ) of the food materials is studied. Th...

  15. Spin—Dependent Scattering Effects and Dimensional Crossover in a Quasi—Two—Dimensional Disordered Electron System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGYong-Hong; WANGYong-Gang; 等

    2002-01-01

    Two kinds of spin-dependent scattering effects (magnetic-impurity and spin-orbit scatterings) are investigated theoretically in a quasi-tow-dimensional (quasi-2D) disordered electron system.By making use of the diagrammatic techniques in perturbation theory,we have calculated the dc conductivity and magnetoresistance due to weak-localization effects,the analytical expressions of them are obtained as functions of the interlayer hopping energy and the characteristic times:elastic,inelastic,magnetic and spin-orbit scattering times.The relevant dimensional crossover behavior from 3D to 2D with decreasing the interlayer coupling is discussed,and the condition for the crossover is shown to be dependent on the aforementioned scattering times.At low temperature there exists a spin-dependent-scattering-induced dimensional crossover in this system.

  16. Magnetic and spin-dependent transport properties of reactive sputtered epitaxial Ti 1-xCr xN films

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaofei

    2012-05-01

    Reactive-sputtered epitaxial Ti 1-xCr xN films are ferromagnetic in the range of 0.17 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 due to the Cr-N-Cr double-exchange interaction below the Curie temperature (T C). The T C first increases, then decreases as x increases, and a maximum of 120 K appears at x = 0.47. All of the films are metallic with a transition near T C. A resistivity minimum ρ min is observed below 60 K in the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 due to the effects of the weak localization and electron-electron interaction. The negative magnetoresistance (MR) is caused by the double-exchange interaction below T C and the weak localization can also contribute to MR below T min where ρ min appears. The x-dependent electron carrier densities reveal that the ferromagnetism is not from the carrier-mediated mechanism. The anomalous Hall resistivity follows the relation of ρxyA∝ρxx2, which is from the side-jump mechanism. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic and spin-dependent transport properties of reactive sputtered epitaxial Ti 1-xCr xN films

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaofei; Mi, Wenbo; Guo, Zaibing; Bai, Haili

    2012-01-01

    Reactive-sputtered epitaxial Ti 1-xCr xN films are ferromagnetic in the range of 0.17 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 due to the Cr-N-Cr double-exchange interaction below the Curie temperature (T C). The T C first increases, then decreases as x increases, and a maximum of 120 K appears at x = 0.47. All of the films are metallic with a transition near T C. A resistivity minimum ρ min is observed below 60 K in the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 due to the effects of the weak localization and electron-electron interaction. The negative magnetoresistance (MR) is caused by the double-exchange interaction below T C and the weak localization can also contribute to MR below T min where ρ min appears. The x-dependent electron carrier densities reveal that the ferromagnetism is not from the carrier-mediated mechanism. The anomalous Hall resistivity follows the relation of ρxyA∝ρxx2, which is from the side-jump mechanism. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spin-filtering effect and proximity effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Yang Wei; Yang Xinjian; Qin Minghui; Xu Yihong

    2007-01-01

    Taking into account the thickness of the ferromagnetic insulator (FI), the spin-filtering effect and proximity effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor (NM/FI/NM/SC) junctions are studied based on an extended Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) theory. It is shown that a spin-dependent energy shift during the tunneling process induces splitting of the sub-energy gap conductance peaks and the spin polarization in the ferromagnetic insulator causes an imbalance of the peak heights. Different from the ferromagnet the spin-filtering effect of the FI cannot cause the reversion of the normalized conductance in NM/FI/NM/SC junctions

  19. Measurement of Spin Dependent Observables in the $\\overline pN$ Elastic Scattering from 300 to 700 MeV/c

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure @*N spin obssservables using a frozen spin target and a high resolution spectrometer (SPES II). The &bar.NN scattering is usually described with NN potentials transformed by G-parity, where the large annihilation cross section (@s^a^n/@s^e^l$>$2) is taken into account. The different theoretical approaches fit reasonably well the existing data on spin integrated cross sections. For the spin dependent observables, the predictions depend consistently on the theoretical inputs.\\\\ \\\\ A strong energy dependence of the @*p polarization Ay(@q) is predicted. We plan to check it measuring the angular distribution of Ay(@q) for @* momenta between 300 and 700 MV/c. Using a deuterium target, measurements of Ay(@q) for @*d in the same energy range will provide information on @*n scattering.\\\\ \\\\ The @* beam hits a 5 mm thick frozen spin target which has a large opening aperture. We expect a polarization of @=~80\\% with a low holding field of (.35Tm). The incident trajectory is de...

  20. Next-to-leading order corrections to the spin-dependent energy spectrum of hadrons from polarized top quark decay in the general two Higgs doublet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammad Moosavi Nejad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, searches for the light and heavy charged Higgs bosons have been done by the ATLAS and the CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC in proton–proton collision. Nevertheless, a definitive search is a program that still has to be carried out at the LHC. The experimental observation of charged Higgs bosons would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model. In the present work, we study the scaled-energy distribution of bottom-flavored mesons (B inclusively produced in polarized top quark decays into a light charged Higgs boson and a massless bottom quark at next-to-leading order in the two-Higgs-doublet model; t(↑→bH+→BH++X. This spin-dependent energy distribution is studied in a specific helicity coordinate system where the polarization vector of the top quark is measured with respect to the direction of the Higgs momentum. The study of these energy distributions could be considered as a new channel to search for the charged Higgs bosons at the LHC. For our numerical analysis and phenomenological predictions, we restrict ourselves to the unexcluded regions of the MSSM mH+−tan⁡β parameter space determined by the recent results of the CMS [13] and ATLAS [14] collaborations.

  1. Experimental and modeling study of forest fire effect on soil thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen M. Smits; Elizabeth Kirby; William J. Massman; Scott Baggett

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of soil thermal conductivity after a wildfire or controlled burn is important to land management and post-fire recovery efforts. Although soil thermal conductivity has been well studied for non-fire heated soils, comprehensive data that evaluate the long-term effect of extreme heating from a fire on the soil thermal conductivity are limited....

  2. Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Silicate Matrix for Applications in Effective Media Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Lukáš; Jerman, Miloš; Reiterman, Pavel; Černý, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Silicate materials have an irreplaceable role in the construction industry. They are mainly represented by cement-based- or lime-based materials, such as concrete, cement mortar, or lime plaster, and consist of three phases: the solid matrix and air and water present in the pores. Therefore, their effective thermal conductivity depends on thermal conductivities of the involved phases. Due to the time-consuming experimental determination of the effective thermal conductivity, its calculation by means of homogenization techniques presents a reasonable alternative. In the homogenization theory, both volumetric content and particular property of each phase need to be identified. For porous materials the most problematic part is to accurately identify thermal conductivity of the solid matrix. Due to the complex composition of silicate materials, the thermal conductivity of the matrix can be determined only approximately, based on the knowledge of thermal conductivities of its major compounds. In this paper, the thermal conductivity of silicate matrix is determined using the measurement of a sufficiently large set of experimental data. Cement pastes with different open porosities are prepared, dried, and their effective thermal conductivity is determined using a transient heat-pulse method. The thermal conductivity of the matrix is calculated by means of extrapolation of the effective thermal conductivity versus porosity functions to zero porosity. Its practical applicability is demonstrated by calculating the effective thermal conductivity of a three-phase silicate material and comparing it with experimental data.

  3. The effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.; Anderson, L.; Caliendo, J.; McFarland, M.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the detrimental effects of freeze-thaw on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that molding water content has on the hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay soil that is subjected to freeze-thaw cycles, and to determine the relationship between the number of freeze-thaw cycles and the hydraulic conductivity of the compacted clay soil. Clay soils compacted and frozen wet of optimum experienced an increase in hydraulic conductivity of approximately 140 fold. The hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increased ten fold. These results are consistent with recent research which suggests that clay compacted wet of optimum experiences large increases in hydraulic conductivity while the hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increases to a lesser extent. 12 refs., 9 figs

  4. A study on the effective hydraulic conductivity of an anisotropic porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Kwan Jae

    2002-01-01

    Effective hydraulic conductivity of a statistically anisotropic heterogeneous medium is obtained for steady two-dimensional flows employing stochastic analysis. Flow equations are solved up to second order and the effective conductivity is obtained in a semi-analytic form depending only on the spatial correlation function and the anisotropy ratio of the hydraulic conductivity field, hence becoming a true intrinsic property independent of the flow field. Results are obtained using a statistically anisotropic Gaussian correlation function where the anisotropic is defined as the ratio of integral scales normal and parallel to the mean flow direction. Second order results indicate that the effective conductivity of an anisotropic medium is greater than that of an isotropic one when the anisotropy ratio is less than one and vice versa. It is also found that the effective conductivity has upper and lower bounds of the arithmetic and the harmonic mean conductivities

  5. Effective conductivity by fluid analogy for a porous insulator filled with a conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    By combining of identities relating effective conductivity to tortuosity and tortuosity to induced mass, a general formula for the effective (electrical or thermal) conductivity of a porous insulator filled with a conductor is obtained. This formula depends on an induced-mass factor which arises by treating of the conducting material as an inviscid fluid. This induced-mass factor can be estimated with the use of an effective-medium theory. For random arrays of equal spheres, the estimates of conductivity obtained with the use of this fluid analogy are in good agreement with recent exact values derived for periodic arrays of insulating spheres to closest packing

  6. Nanoionics phenomenon in proton-conducting oxide: Effect of dispersion of nanosize platinum particles on electrical conduction properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshige Matsumoto et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature proton conductors are oxides in which low-valence cations are doped as electron acceptors; the incorporation of water molecules into the oxides results in the formation of protonic defects that act as charge carriers. Since the protons thus formed are in equilibrium with other electronic defects, electrons and holes, the oxides possibly have different proton-conduction properties at and near boundaries when they are in contact with another phase. In this paper, we present our recent experimental observation of a marked change in the electrical properties of a proton conductor upon the dispersal of fine platinum particles in the oxide. First, the material shows extremely low electrical conductivity in comparison with the original proton-conducting perovskite. Second, there was a threshold amount of platinum at which such a drop in conductivity occurred. A percolation model is employed to explain these experimental results; the fine platinum particles dispersed in the proton-conducting oxide wears highly resistive skin that is formed due to shifts in defect equilibriums, which prevents ionic/electronic conduction. The experiments suggest that the ion-conducting properties of oxides can be varied by introducing interfaces at a certain density; nanoionics is a key to yielding enhanced and/or controlled ionic conduction in solids.

  7. Effect of spatial variation of thermal conductivity on non-fourier heat conduction in a finite slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goharkhah, Mohammad; Amiri, Shahin; Shokouhmand, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    The non-Fourier heat conduction problem in a finite slab is studied analytically. Dependence of thermal conductivity on space has been considered. The Laplace transform method is used to remove the time-dependent terms in the governing equation and the boundary conditions. The hyperbolic heat conduction (HHC) equation has been solved by employing trial solution method and collocation optimization criterion. Results show that the space-dependent thermal conductivity strongly affects the temperature distribution. A temperature peak on the insulated wall of the slab has been observed due to linear variation of thermal conductivity. It has been shown that the magnitude of the temperature peak increases with increasing the dimensionless relaxation time. To validate the approach, the results have been compared with the analytical solution obtained for a special case which shows a good agreement

  8. A Network Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Jochen; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A procedure is described for computing the effective thermal conductivity of a rigid fibrous refractory insulation. The insulation is modeled as a 3-dimensional Cartesian network of thermal conductance. The values and volume distributions of the conductance are assigned to reflect the physical properties of the insulation, its constituent fibers, and any permeating gas. The effective thermal conductivity is computed by considering the simultaneous energy transport by solid conduction, gas conduction and radiation through a cubic volume of model insulation; thus the coupling between heat transfer modes is retained (within the simplifications inherent to the model), rather than suppressed by treating these heat transfer modes as independent. The model takes into account insulation composition, density and fiber anisotropy, as well as the geometric and material properties of the constituent fibers. A relatively good agreement, between calculated and experimentally derived thermal conductivity values, is obtained for a variety of rigid fibrous insulations.

  9. Effect of Diluent on Ultra-low Temperature Curable Conductive Silver Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingli; Wang, Likun; Liao, Qingwei; Yan, Chao; Du, Haibo; Qin, Lei

    2018-03-01

    The ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive needed urgently for the surface conductive treatment of piezoelectric composite material. The effect of diluent acetone on ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive were investigated for surface conductive treatment of piezoelectric composite material. In order to improve the operability and extend the life of the conductive adhesive, the diluent was added to dissolve and disperse conductive adhesive. With the increase of the content of diluent, the volume resistivity of conductive adhesive decreased at first and then increased, and the shear strength increased at first and then decreased. When the acetone content is 10%, the silver flaky bonded together, arranged the neatest, the smallest gap, the most closely connected, the surface can form a complete conductive network, and the volume resistivity is 2.37 × 10-4Ω · cm, the shear strength is 5.13MPa.

  10. A study on effective thermal conductivity of crystalline layers in layer melt crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang-Joo; Ulrich, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    An effective thermal conductivity in layer melt crystallization was explored based on a model considering inclusions inside a crystalline layer during crystal growth, molecular diffusion of inclusions migration due to temperature gradient and heat generation due to recrystallization of inclusions in the crystalline layer. The effective thermal conductivity increases with time, in general, as a result of compactness of the layer. Lower cooling temperature, i.e. greater supercooling, results in a more porous layer with lower effective thermal conductivity. A similar result is seen for the parameter of melt temperature, but less pronounced. A high concentration of the melt results in a high effective thermal conductivity while low concentration yields low effective thermal conductivity. At higher impurity levels in the melt phase, constitutional supercooling becomes more pronounced and unstable growth morphologies occur more easily. Cooling rate and Reynolds number also affect the effective thermal conductivity. The predictions of an effective thermal conductivity agree with the experimental data. The model was applied to estimate the thermal conductivities of the crystalline layer during layer melt crystallization. (author)

  11. Photomodulation spectroscopy of photocarrier dynamics, electronic defects and morphology of conducting polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardeny, Z.V.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of techniques were used: CW photomodulation, photomodulation in femtosecond and picosecond time ranges, CW resonant Raman scattering, transient photoinduced Raman scattering, electro-absorption, degenerate four-wave mixing, spin dependent photomodulation, and absorption detected magnetic resonance. The following conducting polymers were studied: polyacetylene, polythiophene, polydiacetylene 4-BCMU, polydiethynylsilanes, polysilane embedded in a-Si:H matrix, and fullerenes

  12. Effect of silica concentration on electrical conductivity of epoxy resin-carbon black-silica nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Blackburn, Richard S.; Dehghani-Sanij, Abbas A.

    2007-01-01

    Electrical properties of nanocomposites are determined by the conductive paths of carbon black and influenced by a 'network' of silica. With increasing content of silica, carbon black (CB) particles are optimally dispersed, contributing to the generation of a conductive network between CB particles via direct particle contact and a tunneling effect; maximum conductivity for the epoxy resin-CB-silica nanocomposite described herein occurs at a ratio of 0.6:1.0 (SiO 2 :CB). As a non-conductive component, excessive silica will prevent electron flow, giving rise to low conductivity

  13. Determination of effective thermal conductivity for polyurethane foam by use of fractal method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Mingheng; LI Xiaochuan; CHEN Yongping

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of polyurethane foam is disordered, which influences the foam heat conduction process significantly. In this paper foam structure is described by using the local area fractal dimension in a certain small range of length scales. An equivalent element cell is constructed based on the local fractal dimensions along the directions parallel and transverse to the heat flux. By use of fractal void fraction a simplified heat conduction model is proposed to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam. The predicted effective thermal conductivity agrees well with the experimental data.

  14. Experimental study of effective thermal conductivity of stainless steel fiber felt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.Q.; Qu, Z.G.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed to measure the effective thermal conductivity of porous stainless steel fiber felt under different operating pressures. The total effective thermal conductivity was studied by analyzing matrix heat conduction, air natural convection, and matrix thermal radiation at ambient pressure. The contribution of air natural convection was experimentally obtained by changing the ambient pressure to vacuum condition and the solid matrix heat conduction was evaluated using a theoretical model. The ratios of the three mechanisms to the total effective thermal conductivity were approximately 40%, 37.9%, and 22.1%, respectively. In addition, the effects of fiber diameter and porosity on the three mechanisms and on the total effective thermal conductivity were studied. The air natural convection was found to gradually intensify when the operating pressure increases from vacuum condition (15 Pa) to ambient pressure (1.0 × 10 5  Pa). With an increase in fiber diameter under fixed porosity, the solid matrix heat conduction remained unchanged, and air natural convection and thermal radiation decreased, thereby resulting in reduced effective thermal conductivity. With an increase in porosity under fixed fiber diameter, the air natural convection was almost unchanged, and solid matrix heat conduction and thermal radiation were reduced, thereby resulting in reduced effective thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • Matrix conduction, radiation and air convection were in the same order of magnitude. • Air natural convection was suppressed by reducing operating pressure. • Intensity of air convection was more sensitive to fiber diameter than porosity. • Surface area and permeability was comparable in air convection as fiber diameter fixed. • Interfacial area exerted dominant role in radiation and air convection as porosity fixed

  15. Investigation of the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Containment Wall of OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun [Pohang University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwi; Kang, Hie Chan [Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Many computational codes used for analyzing pressure of containment was developed such as CAP (Containment Analysis Package). These computational codes consider concrete conductivity instead of thermal conductivity of containment wall which have special geometry as heat sink. For precise analysis, effective thermal conductivity of containment wall has to be measured in individual NPPs. Thermal properties of concrete such as thermal conductivity have been investigated as function of chemical composition and temperature. Generally, containment of OPR1000 is constructed by Prestressed (PS) concrete-a composite material. Containment wall of OPR1000 is made up of steel liner, tendon, rebar and concrete as shown in Figure 1. Role of steel liner protects release of radioactive materials so called leak tightness. The effective thermal conductivity of containment wall in OPR1000 is analyzed by numerical tool (CFD) and compared with thermal conductivity models in composite solids. The effective thermal conductivity of containment wall of OPR1000 is investigated by numerical analysis (CFD). The thermal conductivity of reinforced concrete is 18.6% higher than that of concrete only. Several models were compared with CFD results. Rayleigh-Parallel liner model agrees well with CFD results. Experiment results will be compared with CFD result and models. CFD result was calculated in low steel volume fraction (0.0809) than that of OPR1000 (0.1043). The effective thermal conductivity in OPR1000 has slightly higher than CFD result because of different volume fraction.

  16. Effects of Particle Size and Shape on U-Mo/Al Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Tae-Won; Sohn, Dong-Seong [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The thermal conductivity of atomized U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels was measured only by Lee et al. by laser-flash and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. For the U-Mo particles, they are deformed during manufacturing process such as hot rolling and during irradiation by the creep deformation. Fricke developed a model for the effective thermal conductivity of a dilute suspension of randomly oriented spheroidal particles. In general, the thermal conductivity of composite increase when the particle shape is not sphere. This model is also based on continuum theory which assumes both temperature and heat flux are continuous across the interface. Kapitza, however, showed that there is a discontinuity in temperature across the interface at metal/liquid helium interface. In general, the discontinuity is from the thermal resistance at the interface. If the thermal resistance has a significant impact on the thermal conductivity, particle size is one of the essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of composite materials. Every, et al modified Bruggeman model to consider the interfacial thermal resistance. The U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel thermal conductivity calculation can be improved by considering the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. There have been various works to analyze the thermal conductivity through Finite Element Method (FEM). Coulson developed a realistic FEM model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. This FEM model does not consider the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. Therefore, these effects can be evaluated by comparing the FEM calculated effective thermal conductivity with measured data. In this work, the FEM analysis was done and the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances was estimated. From this results, the particle shape and size effects will be discussed. Many thermal conductivity models for the particle dispersed composites have been

  17. Effects of Particle Size and Shape on U-Mo/Al Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Tae-Won; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of atomized U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels was measured only by Lee et al. by laser-flash and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. For the U-Mo particles, they are deformed during manufacturing process such as hot rolling and during irradiation by the creep deformation. Fricke developed a model for the effective thermal conductivity of a dilute suspension of randomly oriented spheroidal particles. In general, the thermal conductivity of composite increase when the particle shape is not sphere. This model is also based on continuum theory which assumes both temperature and heat flux are continuous across the interface. Kapitza, however, showed that there is a discontinuity in temperature across the interface at metal/liquid helium interface. In general, the discontinuity is from the thermal resistance at the interface. If the thermal resistance has a significant impact on the thermal conductivity, particle size is one of the essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of composite materials. Every, et al modified Bruggeman model to consider the interfacial thermal resistance. The U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel thermal conductivity calculation can be improved by considering the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. There have been various works to analyze the thermal conductivity through Finite Element Method (FEM). Coulson developed a realistic FEM model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. This FEM model does not consider the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances. Therefore, these effects can be evaluated by comparing the FEM calculated effective thermal conductivity with measured data. In this work, the FEM analysis was done and the anisotropic effects and interface thermal resistances was estimated. From this results, the particle shape and size effects will be discussed. Many thermal conductivity models for the particle dispersed composites have been

  18. Comments on the effect of liquid layering on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroodchi, Elham; Evans, Thomas Michael; Moghtaderi, Behdad

    2009-01-01

    This article provides critical examinations of two mathematical models that have been developed in recent years to describe the impact of nano-layering on the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Discrepancy between the two models is found to be an artefact of an incorrect derivation used in one of the models. With correct formulation, both models predict effective thermal conductivity enhancements that are not significantly greater than those predicted by classical Maxwell theory. This study indicates that nano-layering by itself is unable to account for the effective thermal conductivity enhancements observed in nanofluids.

  19. Combinatory Models for Predicting the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frozen and Unfrozen Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Reddy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A model to predict the effective thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials is proposed based on unit cell approach. The model is combined with four fundamental effective thermal conductivity models (Parallel, Series, Maxwell-Eucken-I, and Maxwell-Eucken-II to evolve a unifying equation for the estimation of effective thermal conductivity of porous and nonporous food materials. The effect of volume fraction (ν on the structure composition factor (ψ of the food materials is studied. The models are compared with the experimental data of various foods at the initial freezing temperature. The effective thermal conductivity estimated by the Maxwell-Eucken-I + Present model shows good agreement with the experimental data with a minimum average deviation of ±8.66% and maximum deviation of ±42.76% of Series + Present Model. The combined models have advantages over other empirical and semiempirical models.

  20. Measurement and Estimation of Effective Thermal Conductivity for Sodium based Nanofluid using 3-Omega Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sun Ryung; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is one of generation IV type reactors and has been extensively researched since 1950s. A strong advantage of the SFR is its liquid sodium coolant which is well-known for its superior thermal properties. However, in terms of possible pipe leakage or rupture, a liquid sodium coolant possesses a critical issue due to its high chemical reactivity which leads to fire or explosion. Due to its safety concerns, dispersion of nanoparticles in liquid sodium has been proposed to reduce the chemical reactivity of sodium. In case of sodium based titanium nanofluid (NaTiNF), the chemical reactivity suppression effect when interacting with water has been proved both experimentally and theoretically [1,2]. Suppression of chemical reactivity is critical without much loss of high heat transfer characteristic of sodium. As there is no research conducted for applying 3-omega sensor in liquid metal as well as high temperature liquid, the sensor development is performed for using in NaTiNF as well as effective thermal conductivity model validation. Based on the acquired effective thermal conductivity of NaTiNF, existing effective thermal conductivity models are evaluated. Thermal conductivity measurement is performed for liquid sodium based titanium nanofluid (NaTiNF) through 3-Omega method. The experiment is conducted at three temperature points of 120, 150, and 180 .deg. C for both pure liquid sodium and NaTiNF. By using 3- omega sensor, thermal conductivity measurement of liquid metal can be more conveniently conducted in labscale. Also, its possibility to measure the thermal conductivity of high temperature liquid metal with metallic nanoparticles being dispersed is shown. Unlike other water or oil-based nanofluids, NaTiNF exhibits reduction of thermal conductivity compare with liquid sodium. Various nanofluid models are plotted, and it is concluded that the MSBM which considers interfacial resistance and Brownian motion can be used in predicting

  1. Measurement and Estimation of Effective Thermal Conductivity for Sodium based Nanofluid using 3-Omega Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sun Ryung; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is one of generation IV type reactors and has been extensively researched since 1950s. A strong advantage of the SFR is its liquid sodium coolant which is well-known for its superior thermal properties. However, in terms of possible pipe leakage or rupture, a liquid sodium coolant possesses a critical issue due to its high chemical reactivity which leads to fire or explosion. Due to its safety concerns, dispersion of nanoparticles in liquid sodium has been proposed to reduce the chemical reactivity of sodium. In case of sodium based titanium nanofluid (NaTiNF), the chemical reactivity suppression effect when interacting with water has been proved both experimentally and theoretically [1,2]. Suppression of chemical reactivity is critical without much loss of high heat transfer characteristic of sodium. As there is no research conducted for applying 3-omega sensor in liquid metal as well as high temperature liquid, the sensor development is performed for using in NaTiNF as well as effective thermal conductivity model validation. Based on the acquired effective thermal conductivity of NaTiNF, existing effective thermal conductivity models are evaluated. Thermal conductivity measurement is performed for liquid sodium based titanium nanofluid (NaTiNF) through 3-Omega method. The experiment is conducted at three temperature points of 120, 150, and 180 .deg. C for both pure liquid sodium and NaTiNF. By using 3- omega sensor, thermal conductivity measurement of liquid metal can be more conveniently conducted in labscale. Also, its possibility to measure the thermal conductivity of high temperature liquid metal with metallic nanoparticles being dispersed is shown. Unlike other water or oil-based nanofluids, NaTiNF exhibits reduction of thermal conductivity compare with liquid sodium. Various nanofluid models are plotted, and it is concluded that the MSBM which considers interfacial resistance and Brownian motion can be used in predicting

  2. Multi-sphere unit cell model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity in pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Antwerpen, W.; Rousseau, P.G.; Du Toit, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    A proper understanding of the mechanisms of heat transfer, fluid flow and pressure drop through a packed bed of spheres is of utmost importance in the design of a high temperature Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). While the gas flows predominantly in the axial direction through the bed, the total effective thermal conductivity is a lumped parameter that characterises the total heat transfer in the radial direction through the packed bed. The study of the effective thermal conductivity is important because it forms an intricate part of the self-acting decay heat removal chain, which is directly related to the PBR safety case. The effective thermal conductivity is the summation of various heat transport phenomena. These are the enhanced thermal conductivity due to turbulent mixing as the fluid passes through the voids between pebbles, heat transfer due to the movement of the solid spheres and thermal conduction and thermal radiation between the spheres in a stagnant fluid environment. In this study, the conduction and radiation between the spheres are investigated. Firstly, existing correlations for the effective thermal conductivity are investigated, with particular attention given to its applicability in the near-wall region. Several phenomena in particular are examined namely: conduction through the spheres, conduction through the contact area between the spheres, conduction through the gas phase and radiation between solid surfaces. A new approach to simulate the effective thermal conductivity for randomly packed beds is then presented, namely the so-called Multi-sphere Unit Cell Model. The model is validated by comparing the results with that obtained in experiments. (authors)

  3. Assessment of effective thermal conductivity in U–Mo metallic fuels with distributed gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Casella, Andrew M.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2015-07-15

    This work presents a numerical method to assess the relative impact of various microstructural features including grain sizes, nanometer scale intragranular gas bubbles, and larger intergranular gas bubbles in irradiated U–Mo metallic fuels on the effective thermal conductivity. A phase-field model was employed to construct a three-dimensional polycrystalline U–Mo fuel alloy with a given crystal morphology and gas bubble microstructures. An effective thermal conductivity “concept” was taken to capture the effect of polycrystalline structures and gas bubble microstructures with significant size differences on the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of inhomogeneous materials was calculated by solving the heat transport equation. The obtained results are in reasonably good agreement with experimental measurements made on irradiated U–Mo fuel samples containing similar microstructural features. The developed method can be used to predict the thermal conductivity degradation in operating nuclear fuels if the evolution of microstructures is known during operation of the fuel.

  4. Sustained Effects of Incredible Years as a Preventive Intervention in Preschool Children with Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthumus, Jocelyne A.; Raaijmakers, Maartje A. J.; Maassen, Gerard H.; van Engeland, Herman; Matthys, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated preventive effects of the Incredible Years program for parents of preschool children who were at risk for a chronic pattern of conduct problems, in the Netherlands. In a matched control design, 72 parents of children with conduct problems received the Incredible Years program. These families (intervention group) were…

  5. Resolution of effects in multi-frequency eddy current data for reliable diagnostics of conductive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egorov, Alexander; Kucheryavskiy, Sergey V.; Polyakov, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    The effect of eddy currents is widely used for diagnostics of conductive materials. It allows to create very simple and inexpensive systems for non-destructive measurements. However, the results of the measurements depend on many factors, including first of all, a conductivity of material...

  6. Effects of Conducting Instruction on the Musical Performance of Beginning Band Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the effects of conducting instruction on beginning band students' individual rhythmic performance, group rhythmic performance, group performance of legato and staccato, and group performance of phrasing and dynamics. The students represented diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Concludes the conducting instruction is a useful tool…

  7. The effect of ZnS thin film's electrical conductivity on electromagnetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of electrical conductivity on an electromagnetic wave propagating through ZnS thin film is analyzed using electromagnetic wave equation with relevant boundary condition. The solution of this equation enabled us to obtain a parameter known as the skin depth that relates to the conductivity of the thin film. This was ...

  8. A thermal conductivity model for nanofluids including effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitprasert, Chatcharin; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Juntasaro, Varangrat

    2009-01-01

    The interfacial layer of nanoparticles has been recently shown to have an effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. There is, however, still no thermal conductivity model that includes the effects of temperature and nanoparticle size variations on the thickness and consequently on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer. In the present work, the stationary model developed by Leong et al. (J Nanopart Res 8:245-254, 2006) is initially modified to include the thermal dispersion effect due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. This model is called the 'Leong et al.'s dynamic model'. However, the Leong et al.'s dynamic model over-predicts the thermal conductivity of nanofluids in the case of the flowing fluid. This suggests that the enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the flowing nanofluids due to the increase in temperature does not come from the thermal dispersion effect. It is more likely that the enhancement in heat transfer of the flowing nanofluids comes from the temperature-dependent interfacial layer effect. Therefore, the Leong et al.'s stationary model is again modified to include the effect of temperature variation on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer for different sizes of nanoparticles. This present model is then evaluated and compared with the other thermal conductivity models for the turbulent convective heat transfer in nanofluids along a uniformly heated tube. The results show that the present model is more general than the other models in the sense that it can predict both the temperature and the volume fraction dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids for both non-flowing and flowing fluids. Also, it is found to be more accurate than the other models due to the inclusion of the effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer. In conclusion, the present model can accurately predict the changes in thermal conductivity of nanofluids due to the changes in volume fraction and temperature for

  9. Interpretations of galactic center gamma-ray excess confronting the PandaX-II constraints on dark matter-neutron spin-dependent scatterings in the NMSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Liangliang; He, Yangle; Lian, Jingwei; Pan, Yusi

    2018-05-01

    The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) has been one of the most attractive candidates for Dark Matter (DM), and the lightest neutralino (\\widetilde{χ }^0_1) in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) is an interesting realization of the WIMP framework. The Galactic Center Excess (GCE) indicated from the analysis of the photon data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the gamma-ray wavelength ≲ 1 fm, can be explained by WIMP DM annihilations in the sky, as shown in many existing works. In this work we consider an interesting scenario in the Z_3-NMSSM where the singlet S and Singlino \\widetilde{S}^0 components play important roles in the Higgs and DM sector. Guided by our analytical arguments, we perform a sophisticated scan over the NMSSM parameter space by considering various observables such as the Standard Model (SM) Higgs data measured by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and the B-physics observables BR(B_s→ X_sγ ) and BR(B_s→ μ ^+μ ^-). We first collect samples which can explain the GCE well while passing all constraints we consider except for the DM direct detection (DD) bounds from XENON1T and PandaX-II experiments. We analyze the features of these samples suitable for the GCE interpretation and find that \\widetilde{χ }^0_1 DM are mostly Singlino-like and annihilation products are mostly the bottom quark pairs \\bar{b}b through a light singlet-like CP-odd Higgs A_1. Moreover, a good fit to the GCE spectrum generically requires sizable DM annihilation rates 0 in today's Universe. However, the correlation between the coupling C_{A_1 b\\bar{b}} in 0 and the coupling C_{Z \\widetilde{χ }^0_1 \\widetilde{χ }^0_1} in DM-neutron Spin Dependent (SD) scattering rate σ ^{SD}_{\\widetilde{χ }^0_1-N} makes all samples we obtain for GCE explanation get excluded by the PandaX-II results. Although the DM resonant annihilation scenarios may be beyond the reach of our analytical

  10. 42 CFR 90.7 - Decision to conduct health effects study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... occurred, and any possible health effects resulting from such exposure. (b) Should ATSDR decide, in its... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Decision to conduct health effects study. 90.7... ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES ADMINISTRATIVE...

  11. Effect of Material Composition and Environmental Condition on Thermal Characteristics of Conductive Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Pan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive asphalt concrete with high thermal conductivity has been proposed to improve the solar energy collection and snow melting efficiencies of asphalt solar collector (ASC. This paper aims to provide some insight into choosing the basic materials for preparation of conductive asphalt concrete, as well as determining the evolution of thermal characteristics affected by environmental factors. The thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete were studied by the Thermal Constants Analyzer. Experimental results showed that aggregate and conductive filler have a significant effect on the thermal properties of asphalt concrete, while the effect of asphalt binder was not evident due to its low proportion. Utilization of mineral aggregate and conductive filler with higher thermal conductivity is an efficient method to prepare conductive asphalt concrete. Moreover, change in thermal properties of asphalt concrete under different temperature and moisture conditions should be taken into account to determine the actual thermal properties of asphalt concrete. There was no noticeable difference in thermal properties of asphalt concrete before and after aging. Furthermore, freezing–thawing cycles strongly affect the thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete, due to volume expansion and bonding degradation.

  12. Effectiveness of physiotherapy and conductive education interventions in children with cerebral palsy: a focused review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Heidi; Suoranta, Jutta; Malmivaara, Antti

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a criteria-based appraisal of systematic reviews on the effectiveness of physiotherapy and conductive education interventions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Computerized bibliographic databases were searched without language restriction up to August 2007. Reviews on trials...... physiotherapy and occupational therapy interventions. Conclusions in the other reviews should be interpreted cautiously, although, because of the poor quality of the primary studies, most reviews drew no conclusions on the effectiveness of the reviewed interventions. Reviews on complex interventions...

  13. Effects of thermal conduction and compressibility on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Mima, Kunioki.

    1980-01-01

    In order to study the stability of the ablation front in laser driven implosion, the thermal conduction and compressibility effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are considered. It is found that the thermal conduction effect cannot stabilize the Rayleigh-Taylor mode, but reduce the growth rate in the short wavelength case. But, the growth rate is found not to differ from the classical value √gk in the long wavelength limit, where the compressibility is essential. (author)

  14. Effect of Residence Time of Graphitisation on Thermal Conductivity of Molded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedy Artsanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of residence time of graphitisation on thermal conductivity of molded graphite has been examined. The examination has been conducted by varying residence time of graphitisation of molded carbon with petroleum coke as raw material and coal tar pitch. Graphitisation has been conducted by heating molded graphite at 2500 °C in argon atmosphere with residention time of 10, 30 and 90 minutes. Graphitisation degree, density, shrinking mass and porosity of molded graphite were examined and so was its thermal conductivity. The result showed that the decrease of porosity and the increase of graphitisation degree due to the increasing of residention time of graphitisation will increase the thermal conductivity of graphite. Molded graphite graphitisized with residence time for 90 minutes residention time gave thermal conductivity of 2.134 Watt/mK and graphitization degree 0.718.

  15. Quantitative study of bundle size effect on thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; An, Hua; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-05-01

    Compared with isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), thermal conductivity is greatly impeded in SWNT bundles; however, the measurement of the bundle size effect is difficult. In this study, the number of SWNTs in a bundle was determined based on the transferred horizontally aligned SWNTs on a suspended micro-thermometer to quantitatively study the effect of the bundle size on thermal conductivity. Increasing the bundle size significantly degraded the thermal conductivity. For isolated SWNTs, thermal conductivity was approximately 5000 ± 1000 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature, three times larger than that of the four-SWNT bundle. The logarithmical deterioration of thermal conductivity resulting from the increased bundle size can be attributed to the increased scattering rate with neighboring SWNTs based on the kinetic theory.

  16. Effect of particle shape on thermal conductivity of Al2O3 nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kwon, Hey Lim; Jang, Seok Pil; Lim, Hyung Mi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, thermal conductivities of water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluids with brick, blade, platelet and rod type nanoparticle are measured by transient hot wire method to investigate the effect of nanoparticle shape on thermal conductivity. Water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluids are prepared by two-step method and that of volume fraction is 3%. Temperature dependency of thermal conductivity of water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluids is also studied by measuring of thermal conductivity from 22 .deg. C to 42 .deg. C. TEM micrograph, zeta potential and BET are measured to investigate suspension and disperse stability of water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluids. Furthermore, Experimental results are compared with theoretical models such as Hamilton-Crosser model considering the shape effects on thermal conductivity.

  17. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Porous Packed Beds with Uniform Spherical Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    Point contact models for the effective thermal conductivity of porous media with uniform spherical inclusions have been briefly reviewed. The model of Zehner and Schlunder (1970) has been further validated with recent experimental data over a broad range of conductivity ratio from 8 to 1200 and over a range of solids fraction up to about 0.8. The comparisons further confirm the validity of Zehner-Schlunder model, known to be applicable for conductivity ratios less than about 2000, above which area contact between the particles becomes significant. This validation of the Zehner-Schlunder model has implications for its use in the prediction of the effective thermal conductivity of water frost (with conductivity ratio around 100) which arises in many important areas of technology.

  18. A Fractal Study on the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X.; Cai, J.; Wei, W.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal conduction in porous media has steadily received attention in science and engineering, for instance, exploiting and utilizing the geothermal energy, developing the oil-gas resource, ground water flow in hydrothermal systems and investigating the potential host nuclear wastes, etc. The thermal conductivity is strongly influenced by the microstructure features of porous media. In this work, based on the fractal characteristics of the grains, a theoretical model of effective thermal conductivity is proposed for saturated and unsaturated porous media. It is found that the proposed effective thermal conductivity solution is a function of geometrical parameters of porous media, such as the porosity, fractal dimension of granular matrix and the thermal conductivity of the grains and pore fluid. The model predictions are compared with existing experimental data and the results show that they are in good agreement with existing experimental data. The proposed model may provide a better understanding of the physical mechanisms of thermal transfer in porous media than conventional models.

  19. Low water conductivity increases the effects of copper on the serum parameters in fish (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canli, Esin G; Canli, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    The conductivity is largely determined by ion levels in water, predominant ion being Ca(2+) in the freshwaters. For this reason, the effects of copper were evaluated as a matter of conductivity of exposure media in the present study. Thus, freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus were exposed to copper in differing conductivities (77, 163 and 330 μS/cm), using acute (0.3 μM, 3 d) and chronic (0.03 μM, 30 d) exposure protocols. Following the exposure serum parameters of fish were measured. Data showed that there was no significant alteration (P>0.05) in serum parameters of control fish. However, activities of ALP, ALT and AST decreased significantly at the lower conductivities in chronic copper exposure, but not in acute ones. Protein levels did not differ significantly in any of the exposure conditions. However, Cu exposure at the lowest conductivity sharply increased the levels of glucose in the acute exposure, while there was no significant difference in the chronic exposure. Cholesterol levels decreased only at the lower conductivities in chronic exposure, but increased in acute exposure. Similarly, triglyceride levels increased in acute exposures and decreased in chronic exposures at the lowest conductivity. There was no change in Na(+) levels, while there was an increase in K(+) levels and a decrease in Ca(2+) level at the lowest conductivity of acute exposures. However, Cl(-) levels generally decreased at the higher conductivities of chronic exposures. There was a strong negative relationship between significant altered serum parameters and water conductivity. In conclusion, this study showed that copper exposure of fish at lower conductivities caused more toxicities, indicating the protective effect of calcium ions against copper toxicity. Data suggest that conductivity of water may be used in the evaluation of metal data from different waters with different chemical characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of chemical composition on the electrical conductivity of gneiss at high temperatures and pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrical conductivity of gneiss samples with different chemical compositions (WA = Na2O + K2O + CaO  =  7.12, 7.27 and 7.64 % weight percent was measured using a complex impedance spectroscopic technique at 623–1073 K and 1.5 GPa and a frequency range of 10−1 to 106 Hz. Simultaneously, a pressure effect on the electrical conductivity was also determined for the WA = 7.12 % gneiss. The results indicated that the gneiss conductivities markedly increase with total alkali and calcium ion content. The sample conductivity and temperature conform to an Arrhenius relationship within a certain temperature range. The influence of pressure on gneiss conductivity is weaker than temperature, although conductivity still increases with pressure. According to various ranges of activation enthalpy (0.35–0.52 and 0.76–0.87 eV at 1.5 GPa, two main conduction mechanisms are suggested that dominate the electrical conductivity of gneiss: impurity conduction in the lower-temperature region and ionic conduction (charge carriers are K+, Na+ and Ca2+ in the higher-temperature region. The electrical conductivity of gneiss with various chemical compositions cannot be used to interpret the high conductivity anomalies in the Dabie–Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic belt. However, the conductivity–depth profiles for gneiss may provide an important constraint on the interpretation of field magnetotelluric conductivity results in the regional metamorphic belt.

  1. Fractal analysis of the effect of particle aggregation distribution on thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wei, E-mail: weiw2015@gmail.com [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cai, Jianchao, E-mail: caijc@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hu, Xiangyun, E-mail: xyhu@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Han, Qi, E-mail: hanqi426@gmail.com [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Shuang, E-mail: lius@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Yingfang, E-mail: yingfang.zhou@abdn.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, FN 264, King' s College, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-26

    A theoretical effective thermal conductivity model for nanofluids is derived based on fractal distribution characteristics of nanoparticle aggregation. Considering two different mechanisms of heat conduction including particle aggregation and convention, the model is expressed as a function of the fractal dimension and concentration. In the model, the change of fractal dimension is related to the variation of aggregation shape. The theoretical computations of the developed model provide a good agreement with the experimental results, which may serve as an effective approach for quantitatively estimating the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. - Highlights: • A thermal conductivity model is derived based on fractal aggregation distribution. • The relationship between aggregation shape and fractal dimension is analyzed. • Predictions of the proposed model show good agreement with experimental data.

  2. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weijing [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Pupeschi, Simone [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Hanaor, Dorian [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science and Technologies, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Gan, Yixiang, E-mail: yixiang.gan@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  3. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Weijing; Pupeschi, Simone; Hanaor, Dorian; Gan, Yixiang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  4. Effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube-polymer composites: a simplified model and its validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sung-Hwan; Yin, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    A simplified model is presented to predict the effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer composite with different material proportions, which is validated by the experiments of multi-walled CNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites. CNTs are well dispersed in a PDMS matrix, and the mixture is then cured and cast into thin films for electrical characterization. The CNTs are assumed to be statistically uniformly distributed in the PDMS matrix with the three-dimensional (3D) waviness. As the proportion of CNTs increases to a certain level, namely the percolation threshold, the discrete CNTs start to connect with each other, forming a 3D network which exhibits a significant increase of effective electrical conductivity. The eight-chain model has been used to predict the effective electrical conductivity of the composite, in which the contact resistance between CNTs has been considered through the Simmons’ equation. The eight-chain network features can be significantly changed with the modification to mixing process, CNT length and diameter, and CNT clustering and curling. A Gaussian statistics-based formulation is used to calculate the effective length of a single CNT well dispersed in the matrix. The modeling results of effective electrical conductivity agree with the experiments very well, which are highly dependent on a contact resistance between CNTs and the waviness of the CNTs. The effect of inner-nanotube distance and diameter of CNTs on the effective electrical conductivity of the CNT/PDMS composite is also discussed. (paper)

  5. The effect of functionalized silver nanoparticles over the thermal conductivity of base fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Merve; Altan, Cem Levent; Gurten, Berna; Bucak, Seyda

    2017-04-01

    Thermal conductivities of nanofluids are expected to be higher than common heat transfer fluids. The use of metal nanoparticles has not been intensely investigated for heat transfer applications due to lack of stability. Here we present an experimental study on the effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) which are stabilized with surfactants, on the thermal conductivity of water, ethylene glycol and hexane. Hydrophilic Ag NPs were synthesized in aqueous medium with using gum arabic as surfactant and oleic acid/oleylamine were used to stabilize Ag NPs in the organic phase. The enhancement up to 10 per cent in effective thermal conductivity of hexane and ethylene glycol was achieved with addition of Ag NPs at considerably low concentrations (i.e. 2 and 1 per cent, by weight, for hexane and ethylene glycol respectively). However, almost 10 per cent of deterioration was recorded at effective thermal conductivity of water when Ag NPs were added at 1 per cent (by wt). Considerable amount of Gum Arabic in the medium is shown to be the major contributor to this fall, causing lowering of thermal conductivity of water. Same particles performed much better in ethylene glycol where the stabilizer does not lower the thermal conductivity of the base fluid. Also thermal conductivity of nanofluids was found to be temperature independent except water based Ag nanofluids above a threshold concentration. This temperature dependency is suggested to be due to inhibition of hydrogen bonding among water molecules in the presence of high amounts of gum arabic.

  6. Measuring and assessing the effective in-plane thermal conductivity of lithium iron phosphate pouch cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinski, S.J.; Wang, X.; Sangeorzan, B.P.; Guessous, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to experimentally determine the effective in-plane thermal conductivity of a lithium iron phosphate pouch cell. An experimental setup is designed to treat the battery cell as a straight rectangular fin in natural convection. Thermography and heat sensors were used to collect data that yields the temperature distribution and heat transfer rate of the fin, respectively. One-dimensional fin equations were combined with the experimental data to yield the in-plane thermal conductivity through an iterative process that best-fits the data to the model. The experiment was first calibrated using reference plates of different metals. The fin model predicts the thermal conductivity value well with a correction factor of approximately 7%–9%. Using this experimental method, the in-plane thermal conductivity of the pouch cells is measured at different state of charge (SOC) levels. The in-plane thermal conductivity decreases approximately 0.13 Wm"−"1 °C"−"1 per 10% increase in SOC for the LFP cells. This translates to a 4.2% overall decrease in the thermal conductivity as the cell becomes fully charged. - Highlights: • A method is proposed to measure the in-plane thermal conductivity of a pouch cell. • The thermal conductivity decreases slightly with increase in SOC for the LFP cells. • The fin model predicts the thermal conductivity well with a correction factor.

  7. EFFECT OF pH ON ELECTROLESS Ni-P COATING OF CONDUCTIVE AND NON-CONDUCTIVE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Roy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Electroless nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P coating of carbon steel as well as a polypropylene substrate was conducted using sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent in alkaline media. The influence of pH on coating appearances and the properties of the coatings for both steel and the polypropylene substrate were studied. A nickel-phosphorus coating of good appearance was obtained in the pH range between 5.5 and 12.5 on the carbon steel substrate and between 8.5 and 12 on the polypropylene substrate. The percentage of Ni content in the coating increased with increasing pH of the bath solution. A smooth, uniform microstructure was found in the coating deposited in relatively lower pH solutions compared to higher pH baths. The microhardness of the Ni-P coating decreased with an increasing percentage Ni content in the deposit.

  8. Numerical estimation of the effective electrical conductivity in carbon paper diffusion media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamel, Nada; Li, Xianguo; Shen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Anisotropic effective electrical conductivity of the GDL is estimated numerically. ► The electrical conductivity is a key component in understanding the structure of the GDL. ► Expressions for evaluating the electrical conductivity were proposed. ► The tortuosity factor was evaluated as 1.7 and 3.4 in the in- and through-plane directions, respectively. - Abstract: The transport of electrons through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells has a significant impact on the optimal design and operation of PEM fuel cells and is directly affected by the anisotropic nature of the carbon paper material. In this study, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the GDL is used to numerically estimate the directional dependent effective electrical conductivity of the layer for various porosity values. The distribution of the fibers in the through-plane direction results in high electrical resistivity; hence, decreasing the overall effective electrical conductivity in this direction. This finding is in agreement with measured experimental data. Further, using the numerical results of this study, two mathematical expressions were proposed for the calculation of the effective electrical conductivity of the carbon paper GDL. Finally, the tortuosity factor was evaluated as 1.7 and 3.4 in the in- and through-plane directions, respectively.

  9. Impurity effects on electrical conductivity of doped bilayer graphene in the presence of a bias voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfi, E; Rezania, H; Arghavaninia, B; Yarmohammadi, M

    2016-01-01

    We address the electrical conductivity of bilayer graphene as a function of temperature, impurity concentration, and scattering strength in the presence of a finite bias voltage at finite doping, beginning with a description of the tight-binding model using the linear response theory and Green’s function approach. Our results show a linear behavior at high doping for the case of high bias voltage. The effects of electron doping on the electrical conductivity have been studied via changing the electronic chemical potential. We also discuss and analyze how the bias voltage affects the temperature behavior of the electrical conductivity. Finally, we study the behavior of the electrical conductivity as a function of the impurity concentration and scattering strength for different bias voltages and chemical potentials respectively. The electrical conductivity is found to be monotonically decreasing with impurity scattering strength due to the increased scattering among electrons at higher impurity scattering strength. (paper)

  10. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T. [Swinburne Sarawak Research Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Computing & Science, Swinburne University of Technology Sarawak Campus, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering.

  11. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering

  12. Effects of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of a Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2010-01-01

    A compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the reversed-field pinch is performed including anisotropic thermal conductivity. When the thermal conductivity is much larger in the direction parallel to the magnetic field than in the perpendicular direction, magnetic field lines become isothermal. As a consequence, as long as magnetic surfaces exist, a temperature distribution is observed displaying a hotter confined region, while an almost uniform temperature is produced when the magnetic field lines become chaotic. To include this effect in the numerical simulation, we use a multiple-time-scale analysis, which allows us to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity. The resulting temperature distribution is related to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces, as observed in experiments. The magnetic field is also affected by the presence of an anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  13. Valley Hall Conductivity in Graphene: Effects of Higher-Order Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tsuneya

    2018-04-01

    The valley Hall conductivity, having opposite signs between the K and K' valleys, is calculated in monolayer and bilayer graphenes with nonzero gap in the presence of short-range scatterers within a single-site approximation. In the case of small disorder, the Hall conductivity is quantized into ±e2/2h and ±e2/h in the monolayer and bilayer graphene, respectively, in the gap region, while it is enhanced over the results in the absence of scatterers in the band region. With the increase in the strength of each impurity potential, large asymmetry between the conduction and valence band appears. For scatterers with attractive potential, the disorder parameter is effectively enhanced and reduced in the conduction and valence band, respectively. The behavior is opposite for repulsive scatterers. Effects of skew scattering causing asymmetry in the scattering direction remain small and do not play significant role.

  14. Effect of the subgap conductance on the metastable states in a Josephson tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, R.; Pagano, S.; Silvestrini, P.; Gray, K.E.; Liengme, O.

    1987-09-01

    An investigation of the decay rate of metastable states in Josephson tunnel junctions in presence of thermal noise is presented. We have observed that, in the extremely underdamped regime, there is an exponential temperature dependence of the best fit value for the shunt conductance. Such a dependence shows a close relation with the temperature dependence of the subgap conductance, suggesting that the effective conductance for the escape from the metastable states obeys to a quasi-particle thermal activation mechanism. The introduction of this effective conductance into the lifetime expression for the zero-voltage states leads to significant changes in the width of the switching current distributions. A comparisons of the experimental data with the proposed model is reported. 7 refs., 2 figs

  15. Effect of Surrogate Aggregates on the Thermal Conductivity of Concrete at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sup Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100°C during heating to ~800°C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m−1 K−1. The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating.

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on structural and conductive properties of copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdorovets, M. V.; Borgekov, D. B.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.

    2018-01-01

    The use of electron radiation is an effective tool for stimulating a controlled modification of structural and conductive properties of nanomaterials in modern materials science. The paper presents the results of studies of the influence of various types of radiation on structural and conductive properties of copper nanotubes obtained by electrochemical synthesis in pores of templates based on polyethylene terephthalate. Such methods as SEM, X-ray diffraction and EDS show that irradiation with a stream of high-energy electrons with doses of 50-250 kGy makes it possible to modify the crystal structure of nanotubes, increasing their conductivity and decreasing the resistance of nanostructures without destroying the structure.

  17. Effective holographic theories of momentum relaxation and violation of conductivity bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutéraux, Blaise [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics,Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bâtiment Condorcet, F-75205,Paris Cedex 13, France (UMR du CNRS 7164) (France); Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bâtiment Condorcet, F-75205,Paris Cedex 13, France (UMR du CNRS 7164) (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P.,Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Li, Wei-Jia [Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P.,Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2016-04-19

    We generalize current holographic models with homogeneous breaking of translation symmetry by incorporating higher derivative couplings, in the spirit of effective field theories. Focusing on charge transport, we specialize to two simple couplings between the charge and translation symmetry breaking sectors. We obtain analytical charged black brane solutions and compute their DC conductivity in terms of horizon data. We constrain the allowed values of the couplings and note that the DC conductivity can vanish at zero temperature for strong translation symmetry breaking, thus showing that in general there is no lower bound on the conductivity.

  18. Effect of wall conductances on hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer in a rotating channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, B.S.

    1977-01-01

    Wall conductance effects on the hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer between two parallel plates in a rotating frame of reference has been studied when the liquid is permeated by a transverse magnetic field. An exact solution of the governing equation has been obtained. It is found that the velocity current density and the temperature depend only on the sum of the wall conductances phi 1 + phi 2 = phi but magnetic field depends on the individual values of phi 1 and phi 2 where phi 1 and phi 2 are respectively the wall conductance ratios of the upper and lower walls. (Auth.)

  19. Effective holographic theories of momentum relaxation and violation of conductivity bound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutéraux, Blaise; Kiritsis, Elias; Li, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    We generalize current holographic models with homogeneous breaking of translation symmetry by incorporating higher derivative couplings, in the spirit of effective field theories. Focusing on charge transport, we specialize to two simple couplings between the charge and translation symmetry breaking sectors. We obtain analytical charged black brane solutions and compute their DC conductivity in terms of horizon data. We constrain the allowed values of the couplings and note that the DC conductivity can vanish at zero temperature for strong translation symmetry breaking, thus showing that in general there is no lower bound on the conductivity.

  20. Model surface conductivity effect for the electromagnetic heat shield in re-entry flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Otsu, Hirotaka; Kawamura, Masaaki; Konigorski, Detlev; Takizawa, Yuji; Abe, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Effects of model surface conductivity on shock layer enhancement by an applied magnetic field in weakly ionized supersonic plasma flow with a large Hall parameter (β∼300) was investigated experimentally. The shock layer structures of test models of two kinds were measured using laser absorption spectroscopy, in the large Hall parameter situation. One was an insulated model; the other was a conductive spherical blunt model. The shock layer enhancement phenomenon by the applied magnetic field was more pronounced for the insulated model than for the conductive model. This tendency agrees with the computational fluid dynamics result, at least qualitatively

  1. Stabilizing effect of gas conductivity evolution on the resistive sausage mode of a propagating beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.

    1983-01-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that a highly current-neutralized charged particle beam propagating in a preionized plasma channel of fixed conductivity is subject to a resistive sausage instability. It is shown that the instability is stabilized, for the case of beam propagation into an initially un-ionized gas, when the effect of beam-collisional ionization on the gas conductivity is modeled fully self-consistently

  2. Mixed mobile ion effect on a.c. conductivity of boroarsenate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we report the study of mixed mobile ion effect (MMIE) in boroarsenate glasses. DSC and a.c. electrical conductivity studies have been carried out for MgO–(25−)Li2O–50B2O3–25As2O3 glasses. It is observed that strength of MMIE in a.c. conductivity is less pronounced with increase in temperature and ...

  3. Effective one-dimensionality of universal ac hopping conduction in the extreme disorder limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Schrøder, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A phenomenological picture of ac hopping in the symmetric hopping model (regular lattice, equal site energies, random energy barriers) is proposed according to which conduction in the extreme disorder limit is dominated by essentially one-dimensional "percolation paths." Modeling a percolation path...... as strictly one dimensional with a sharp jump rate cutoff leads to an expression for the universal ac conductivity that fits computer simulations in two and three dimensions better than the effective medium approximation....

  4. Tunneling conductance of a two-dimensional electron gas with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srisongmuang, B.; Ka-oey, A.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically studied the spin-dependent charge transport in a two-dimensional electron gas with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) and metal junctions. It is shown that the DSOC energy can be directly measured from the tunneling conductance spectrum. We found that spin polarization of the conductance in the propagation direction can be obtained by injecting from the DSOC system. We also considered the effect of the interfacial scattering barrier (both spin-flip and non-spin-flip scattering) on the overall conductance and the spin polarization of the conductance. It is found that the increase of spin-flip scattering can enhance the conductance under certain conditions. Moreover, both types of scattering can increase the spin polarization below the branches crossing of the energy band. - Highlights: → DSOC energy can be directly measured from tunneling conductance spectrum. → Spin polarization of conductance in the propagation direction can be obtained by injecting from DSOC system. → Both types of scattering can increase spin polarization.

  5. The effective thermal conductivity of porous media based on statistical self-similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou Jianlong; Wu Fengmin; Lu Hangjun; Xu Yousheng; Song Fuquan

    2009-01-01

    A fractal model is presented based on the thermal-electrical analogy technique and statistical self-similarity of fractal saturated porous media. A dimensionless effective thermal conductivity of saturated fractal porous media is studied by the relationship between the dimensionless effective thermal conductivity and the geometrical parameters of porous media with no empirical constant. Through this study, it is shown that the dimensionless effective thermal conductivity decreases with the increase of porosity (φ) and pore area fractal dimension (D f ) when k s /k g >1. The opposite trends is observed when k s /k g t ). The model predictions are compared with existing experimental data and the results show that they are in good agreement with existing experimental data.

  6. The Effect of High Temperatures on the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenfeld, G.; Aharon, G.; Hochbaum, I.

    2002-01-01

    Concrete thermal conductivity is an important property for thermal analysis of nuclear accidents.Concrete compositions include water,sand,cement and aggregates of various kinds and combinations.Values of concrete's thermal conductivity for some different compositions can be found in the literature[1]but since the material composition and its temperature significantly affect this property,the exact value of a specific composition should be measured

  7. Experimental measurement of effective thermal conductivity of packed lithium-titanate pebble bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, D.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Vinjamur, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium titanate is a promising solid breeder material for the fusion reactor blanket. Packed lithium titanate pebble bed is considered for the blanket. The thermal energy; that will be produced in the bed during breeding and the radiated heat from the reactor core absorbed must be removed. So, the experimental thermal property data are important for the blanket design. In past, a significant amount of works were conducted to determine the effective thermal conductivity of packed solid breeder pebble bed, in helium atmosphere, but no flow of gas was considered. With increase in gas flow rate, effective thermal conductivity of pebble bed increases. Particle size and void fraction also affect the thermal properties of the bed significantly. An experimental facility with external heat source was designed and installed. Experiments were carried out with lithium-titanate pebbles of different sizes at variable gas flow rates and at different bed wall temperature. It was observed that effective thermal conductivity of pebble bed is a function of particle Reynolds number and temperature. From the experimental data two correlations have been developed to estimate the effective thermal conductivity of packed lithium-titanate pebble bed for different particle Reynolds number and at different temperatures. The experimental details and results are discussed in this paper.

  8. Comparison among Models to Estimate the Shielding Effectiveness Applied to Conductive Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lopez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison among two models and its measurement to calculate the shielding effectiveness of electromagnetic barriers, applying it to conductive textiles. Each one, models a conductive textile as either a (1 wire mesh screen or (2 compact material. Therefore, the objective is to perform an analysis of the models in order to determine which one is a better approximation for electromagnetic shielding fabrics. In order to provide results for the comparison, the shielding effectiveness of the sample has been measured by means of the standard ASTM D4935-99.

  9. Quantum Hall effect and hopping conductivity in n-InGaAs/InAlAs nanoheterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudina, S. V., E-mail: svpopova@imp.uran.ru; Arapov, Yu. G.; Saveliev, A. P.; Neverov, V. N.; Podgornykh, S. M.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Yakunin, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Vasil’evskii, I. S.; Vinichenko, A. N. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The longitudinal and Hall magnetoresistances are measured in the quantum Hall effect regime in the n-InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructures at temperatures of T = (1.8–30) K in magnetic fields up to B = 9 T. Temperature-induced transport in the region of the longitudinal resistance minima, corresponding to the plateau regions at Hall resistance, is investigated within the framework of the concept of hopping conductivity in a strongly localized electron system. The analysis of variable-range hopping conductivity in the region of the second, third, and fourth plateau of the quantum Hall effect provides the possibility of determining the localization length exponent.

  10. Giant tunneling electroresistance effect driven by an electrically controlled spin valve at a complex oxide interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J D; Tsymbal, E Y

    2011-04-15

    A giant tunneling electroresistance effect may be achieved in a ferroelectric tunnel junction by exploiting the magnetoelectric effect at the interface between the ferroelectric barrier and a magnetic La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 electrode. Using first-principles density-functional theory we demonstrate that a few magnetic monolayers of La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 near the interface act, in response to ferroelectric polarization reversal, as an atomic-scale spin valve by filtering spin-dependent current. This produces more than an order of magnitude change in conductance, and thus constitutes a giant resistive switching effect.

  11. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Open Cell Polyurethane Foam Based on the Fractal Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Ankang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fractal theory, the geometric structure inside an open cell polyurethane foam, which is widely used as adiabatic material, is illustrated. A simplified cell fractal model is created. In the model, the method of calculating the equivalent thermal conductivity of the porous foam is described and the fractal dimension is calculated. The mathematical formulas for the fractal equivalent thermal conductivity combined with gas and solid phase, for heat radiation equivalent thermal conductivity and for the total thermal conductivity, are deduced. However, the total effective heat flux is the summation of the heat conduction by the solid phase and the gas in pores, the radiation, and the convection between gas and solid phase. Fractal mathematical equation of effective thermal conductivity is derived with fractal dimension and vacancy porosity in the cell body. The calculated results have good agreement with the experimental data, and the difference is less than 5%. The main influencing factors are summarized. The research work is useful for the enhancement of adiabatic performance of foam materials and development of new materials.

  12. Tile Effect of P reconsolidation on the Thermal Conductivity of Particulate Beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenfeld, G.

    2001-09-01

    The thermal conductivity of particulate beds is an important property for many industrial handling processes as well as storage of particulate materials. This property can be affected by a few conditions, such as, temperature and external axial pressure. In the first part of this work, a background for the thermal conductivity of particulate bed is given. This includes a review of experimental and theoretical studies on the thermal conductivity of particulate beds. It is also a reviewed parameters that influence the thermal conductivity of particulate beds, such as, temperature. This study presents a new experimental apparatus that enables to measure the thermal conductivity in steady-state while the particulate bed is under axial consolidation stresses. The experimental apparatus was analyzed and characterized experimentally and by numerical simulations. An analytical model, that predicts the thermal conductivity of particulate beds under axial consolidation stress was developed. The model results were compared to the experimental results for 0.5 and 1 mm steel spheres and showed a good agreement. The experimental results showed a significant effect of the compression state on the bed and its pre-consolidation for 0.5 and 1 mm steel spheres. The effect of the compression state on the bed and its pre-consolidation was even more significant for limestone powder

  13. Fluorine follows water: Effect on electrical conductivity of silicate minerals by experimental constraints from phlogopite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Jiang, Haotian; Yang, Xiaozhi

    2017-11-01

    Fluorine and hydroxyl groups are minor constituents of silicate minerals, and share a lot of similarities concerning their physical and chemical properties. Hydroxyl groups significantly enhance the electrical conductivity of many silicate minerals, and it is expected that fluorine would have a comparable effect. This, however, has never been documented quantitatively. Here we present experimental approaches on this issue, by investigating the electrical conductivity of phlogopite with a wide range of fluorine content (but with broadly similar contents for other major elements). Electrical conductivities of gem-quality single crystal phlogopites, with samples prepared along the same orientation (normal to the (0 0 1) plane), were determined at 1 GPa and 200-650 °C using an end-loaded piston cylinder apparatus and a Solartron-1260 Impedance/Gain Phase Analyzer over the frequency range of 106 to 0.1 Hz. The complex spectra usually show an arc in the high frequency range and a short tail in the low frequency range, which are caused by lattice conduction and electrode effects, respectively. The electrical conductivity increases with increasing fluorine content, and the main charge carriers are fluorine. The activation enthalpies are ∼180 to 200 kJ/mol, nearly independent of fluorine content. The conductivity is linearly proportional to the content of fluorine, with an exponent factor of ∼1. The results demonstrate that conduction by fluorine leads to very high electrical conductivity at high temperatures. The influence of fluorine on electrical conductivity may be compared to that of hydrogen in nominally anhydrous minerals. This, along with the close association of fluorine and hydroxyl groups in silicate minerals and their similar crystal-chemical behaviors, suggests a more general role of fluorine in enhancing the electrical conductivity of many silicate minerals. Fluorine-rich assemblages, e.g., phlogopite and amphibole, could be locally enriched in the upper

  14. The effect of sediment thermal conductivity on vertical groundwater flux estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, Eva; Müller, Sascha; Engesgaard, Peter; Duque, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between groundwater and surface water is of great importance both from ecological and water management perspective. The exchange fluxes are often estimated based on vertical temperature profiles taken from shallow sediments assuming a homogeneous standard value of sediment thermal conductivity. Here we report on a field investigation in a stream and in a fjord, where vertical profiles of sediment thermal conductivity and temperatures were measured in order to, (i) define the vertical variability in sediment thermal conductivity, (ii) quantify the effect of heterogeneity in sediment thermal conductivity on the estimated vertical groundwater fluxes. The study was carried out at field sites located in Ringkøbing fjord and Holtum stream in Western Denmark. Both locations have soft, sandy sediments with an upper organic layer at the fjord site. First 9 and 12 vertical sediment temperature profiles up to 0.5 m depth below the sediment bed were collected in the fjord and in the stream, respectively. Later sediment cores of 0.05 m diameter were removed at the location of the temperature profiles. Sediment thermal conductivity was measured in the sediment cores at 0.1 m intervals with a Decagon KD2 Pro device. A 1D flow and heat transport model (HydroGeoSphere) was set up and vertical groundwater fluxes were estimated based on the measured vertical sediment temperature profiles by coupling the model with PEST. To determine the effect of heterogeneity in sediment thermal conductivity on estimated vertical groundwater fluxes, the model was run by assigning (i) a homogeneous thermal conductivity for all sediment layers, calculated as the average sediment thermal conductivity of the profile, (ii) measured sediment thermal conductivities to the different model layers. The field survey showed that sediment thermal conductivity over a 0.5 m profile below the sediment bed is not uniform, having the largest variability in the fjord where organic sediments were also

  15. Spontaneous temporal changes and variability of peripheral nerve conduction analyzed using a random effects model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Thomas; Gaist, David; Otto, Marit

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: The reproducibility of variables commonly included in studies of peripheral nerve conduction in healthy individuals has not previously been analyzed using a random effects regression model. We examined the temporal changes and variability of standard nerve conduction measures in the leg...... reexamined after 2 and 26 weeks. There was no change in the variables except for a minor decrease in sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and a minor increase in tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Reproducibility was best for peroneal nerve distal motor latency and motor conduction velocity......, sural nerve sensory conduction velocity, and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Between-subject variability was greater than within-subject variability. Sample sizes ranging from 21 to 128 would be required to show changes twice the magnitude of the spontaneous changes observed in this study. Nerve...

  16. Effect of Liquid Phase Content on Thermal Conductivity of Hot-Pressed Silicon Carbide Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Kwang-Young; Jang, Hun; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kim, Young-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for Particle-Based Accident Tolerant (PBAT) fuel, fission, and fusion power applications due to its superior physical and thermal properties such as low specific mass, low neutron cross section, excellent radiation stability, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity of PBAT fuel is one of very important factors for plant safety and energy efficiency of nuclear reactors. In the present work, the effect of Y 2 O 3 -Sc 2 O 3 content on the microstructure and thermal properties of the hot pressed SiC ceramics have been investigated. Suppressing the β to α phase transformation of SiC ceramics is beneficial in increasing the thermal conductivity of liquid-phase sintered SiC ceramics. Developed SiC ceramics with Y 2 O 3 -Sc 2 O 3 additives are very useful for thermal conductivity on matrix material of the PBAT fuel

  17. Effective thermal conductivity of glass-fiber board and blanket standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Hust, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter reports on measurements of effective thermal conductivity performed on a series of specimens of glass-fiber board and glass-fiber blanket. Explains that measurements of thermal conductivity were conducted as a function of temperature from 85 to 360 K, of temperature difference with T=10 to 100 K, of bulk density from 11 to 148 kg/m 3 and for nitrogen, argon, and helium inter-fiber fill gases at pressures from atmospheric to high vacuum. Analyzes and compares results with values from the published literature and National Bureau of Standards (NBS) certification data for similar material. Gives polynomial expressions for the functional relation between conductivity, temperature, and density for board and for blanket

  18. Stern-Gerlach effect without magnetic-field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, O.; Felber, J.; Schaerpf, O.

    2001-01-01

    The Stern-Gerlach effect is the well-known spin-dependent splitting of a neutral particle beam by a magnetic-field gradient. Guided by the pseudomagnetic analogy, we performed a similar experiment where no magnetic-field gradient is involved. The effect is due to the spin-dependence of neutron scattering from polarised nuclei, i.e. caused by the strong interaction between neutrons and nuclei. The beam splitting is proportional to the nuclear polarisation and to the spin-dependent part of the neutron scattering length. Thus it can be used to measure one of both quantities. (orig.)

  19. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and prediction of effective thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb; Ali, Zulqurnain; Gurmani, Samia Faiz; Maqsood, Asghari

    2006-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity per unit volume of porous consolidated igneous rocks have been measured, simultaneously by Gustafsson's probe at room temperature and normal pressure using air as saturant. Data are presented for eleven samples of dunite, ranging in porosity from 0.130 to 0.665% by volume, taken from Chillas near Gilgit, Pakistan. The porosity and density parameters have been measured using American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards at ambient conditions. The mineral composition of samples has been analysed from their thin sections (petrography). An empirical model to predict the thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks is also proposed. The thermal conductivities are predicted by some of the existing models along with the proposed one. It is observed that the values of effective thermal conductivity predicted by the proposed model are in agreement with the experimental thermal conductivity data within 6%

  20. Effect of the ionic conductivity on the performance of polyelectrolyte-based supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, Grace; Srinivasan, Madhavi; Mhaisalkar, Subodh [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute rate at NTU (ERI rate at N), Research Techno Plaza, 5th Storey, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Larsson, Oscar; Berggren, Magnus; Crispin, Xavier [Department of Science and Technology, Organic Electronics, Linkoeping University, SE-601 74 Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-12-21

    In the emerging technology field of printed electronics, circuits are envisioned to be powered with printed energy sources, such as printed batteries and printed supercapacitors (SCs). For manufacturing and reliability issues, solid electrolytes are preferred instead of liquid electrolytes. Here, a solid-state, polyanionic proton conducting electrolyte, poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS:H), is demonstrated for the first time as an effective ion conducting electrolyte medium in SCs with electrodes based on carbon nanotube (CNT) networks. The effect of the ionic conductivity in the PSS:H film of those SCs is studied at different levels of relative humidity (RH) with impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and galvanostatic charge-discharge techniques. High capacitance values (85 F g{sup -1} at 80% RH) are obtained for these SCs due to the extremely high effective electrode area of the CNTs and the enhanced ionic conductivity of the PSS:H film at increasing RH level. The charging dynamics are primarily limited by the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte rather than a poor contact between the electrolyte and the CNT electrodes. The use of polyelectrolytes in SCs provides high mechanical strength and flexibility, while maintaining a high capacitance value, enabling a new generation of printable solid-state charge storage devices. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Review of the effects of burnup on the thermal conductivity of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.; Courtright, E.L.

    1976-01-01

    The general trends which relate changes in thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel as a function of temperature and burnup can be summarized as follows: (1) At temperatures below 500 0 C, reductions in UO 2 thermal conductivity relative to the unirradiated values can be expected up to a saturation level of approximately 10 19 fissions/cc. (2) At temperatures above 500 0 C, the thermal conductivity will undergo little change at low burnups, (less than 10 19 fissions/cc) but at higher exposures some decrease can be expected which should, in turn, diminish with increasing temperature. (3) A review of the data reported by Berman on the ThO 2 --UO 2 fuel indicates that the basic behavior is the same as for UO 2 in the temperature range of major interest. The applicability of this data to LWR UO 2 fuel is somewhat questionable because of basic physical property differences, and limited data on irradiation effects, and would not seem to support concerns that the effects of burnup on thermal conductivity for LWR fuel may be of more significance than currently believed. (4) A mathematical expression of the type proposed by Daniel and Cohen seems to provide a reasonable approximation for the behavioral trends reported in the literature which relate changes in thermal conductivity to increasing burnup in certain temperature regimes. Calculations indicate that only small incremental increases in the fuel centerline temperature might be expected if burnup effects are taken into account

  2. The effect of pressure on the thermal conductivity of silicate rocks up to 12 kbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Ki-iti; Susaki, Jun-ichi

    1989-06-01

    The effect of high pressure up to 12 kbar on thermal conductivity of silicate rocks was determined. Measurements were made by the transient hot wire method on 23 samples. With the exception of one sedimentary rock, one meteorite and manufactured fused and crystalline quartz, the samples were igneous and metamorphic rocks of the oceanic and the continental lithospheres. The samples were of cylindrical shape, 24 mm long and 12 mm in diameter, containing a heater of 0.1 mm thick chromel wire along their axis and a thermocouple at the center. They were encased in cubes of 41 mm-edge-long pyrophyllite and then placed between slide-type cubic anvils of the IHI high-pressure apparatus, which transmitted quasi-hydrostatic pressure of more than 2 kbar to the sample through the solid pyrophyllite medium. The validity of the method was confirmed by comparing the conductivity of standard materials measured using the present method with literature values. The results show that the thermal conductivity of all samples increases with increasing pressure. The most rapid increase in the range below 2 kbar can be attributed to the closure of microcracks in the sample, and uniform, less pronounced increases above 2 kbar should be intrinsic to the material. The effect of temperature was also studied on a small number of selected samples. In the temperature range from 300 to 700 K, the thermal conductivities of crystalline rocks under quasi-hydrostatic compressive stresses of 4 and 10 kbar showed a monotonic decrease of thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of fused quartz, however, increased with temperature. Pressure appeared to have no appreciable effect on the temperature dependence of silicate thermal conductivity.

  3. A percolation approach to study the high electric field effect on electrical conductivity of insulating polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benallou, Amina; Hadri, Baghdad; Martinez-Vega, Juan; El Islam Boukortt, Nour

    2018-04-01

    The effect of percolation threshold on the behaviour of electrical conductivity at high electric field of insulating polymers has been briefly investigated in literature. Sometimes the dead ends links are not taken into account in the study of the electric field effect on the electrical properties. In this work, we present a theoretical framework and Monte Carlo simulation of the behaviour of the electric conductivity at high electric field based on the percolation theory using the traps energies levels which are distributed according to distribution law (uniform, Gaussian, and power-law). When a solid insulating material is subjected to a high electric field, and during trapping mechanism the dead ends of traps affect with decreasing the electric conductivity according to the traps energies levels, the correlation length of the clusters, the length of the dead ends, and the concentration of the accessible positions for the electrons. A reasonably good agreement is obtained between simulation results and the theoretical framework.

  4. The effect of functionalization on structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Cher Hon; Cervini, Raoul; Clarke, Stephen R.; Markovic, Milena Ginic; Matisons, Janis G.; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Huynh, Chi P.; Simon, George P.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of interest in many areas of nanotechnology and used in a number of novel applications. However effective dispersion remains a problem and one solution is to functionalize the nanotubes. Any functionalization that is undertaken must preferably not influence other key properties such as strength and electrical conductivity. In this work, multi-walled CNTs are functionalized for comparison, using a range of oxidative techniques, including thermal treatment, acid reflux, and dry UV-ozonolysis. The effects of these treatments on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and their electrical properties were characterized using a range of surface and compositional techniques. The electrical conductivity of MWCNTs was found to increase with functionalization in all cases, and dry UV-ozonolysis was shown to be the treatment technique which best increased conductivity, whilst at the same time maintaining the structural integrity of the nanotubes, even though the level of modification was less than by the other treatment methods.

  5. Surface charge conductivity of a topological insulator in a magnetic field: The effect of hexagonal warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akzyanov, R. S.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the influence of hexagonal warping on the transport properties of topological insulators. We study the charge conductivity within Kubo formalism in the first Born approximation using low-energy expansion of the Hamiltonian near the Dirac point. The effects of disorder, magnetic field, and chemical-potential value are analyzed in detail. We find that the presence of hexagonal warping significantly affects the conductivity of the topological insulator. In particular, it gives rise to the growth of the longitudinal conductivity with the increase of the disorder and anisotropic anomalous in-plane magnetoresistance. Hexagonal warping also affects the quantum anomalous Hall effect and anomalous out-of-plane magnetoresistance. The obtained results are consistent with the experimental data.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Superconductors in the Intermediate State: Size Effect in a Longitudinal Lamellar Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, J.M.; Rinderer, L.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of type I superconductors has been measured in a well-defined, optically controlled intermediate-state configuration the so-called longitudinal lamellar structure (LLS). A regular arrangement of alternating normal and superconducting lamellas is obtained in an elongated plate by applying the magnetic field obliquely (following Sharvin) and decreasing it from the critical values. The heat current is set parallel to the lamellas. Due to the peculiar reflection law governing the quasiparticle reflections at a normal-superconductor interphase boundary, the thermal conductivity of the LLS is reduced when the electronic mean free path is larger than or comparable to the width of the lamellas. As first pointed out by Andreev, the reflection occurs with vecotr-momentum conservation, and only the quasiparticles moving nearly parallel to the lamellas can transport heat efficiently. The corresponding reduction of the thermal conductivity is a size effect.Systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of the LLS in high-purity lead and tin are interpreted in terms of the size-effect model. The parameters of the model were experimentally determined in a preliminary study, to enable an unambiguous comparison with the theory. In particular, the geometrical aspects of the structures were studied using a magnetooptical technique. Interesting results on the characteristics of the LLS were obtained. The thermal conductivity data on lead essentially confirm the size-effect description. In tin heat transport by the lamellas of both types takes place, the heat carriers being the electrons (T > or approx. = 1.6 K). The discrepancy between the predictions of the size-effect model and the observed values in tin are attributed to an oversimplified calculation of the contribution of the superconducting lamellas to the conductivity

  7. Modulation of thermal conductivity in kinked silicon nanowires: phonon interchanging and pinching effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Yang, Nuo; Wang, Bing-Shen; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-04-10

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the reduction of the thermal conductivity by kinks in silicon nanowires. The reduction percentage can be as high as 70% at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the reduction is also calculated. By calculating phonon polarization vectors, two mechanisms are found to be responsible for the reduced thermal conductivity: (1) the interchanging effect between the longitudinal and transverse phonon modes and (2) the pinching effect, that is, a new type of localization, for the twisting and transverse phonon modes in the kinked silicon nanowires. Our work demonstrates that the phonon interchanging and pinching effects, induced by kinking, are brand-new and effective ways in modulating heat transfer in nanowires, which enables the kinked silicon nanowires to be a promising candidate for thermoelectric materials.

  8. Effects of halothane on the conduction system of the heart in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, G. J.; Jonges, R.; Holley, H. S.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Ros, H. H.; Peper, A.; Booij, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of 2.0 MAC halothane on atrioventricular conduction times in humans were studied. A real-time recording system for the detection of surface His-Purkinje potentials based on signal averaging techniques was used. Recordings were made in 23 patients before and after the administration of

  9. Influence of Conduct Problems and Depressive Symptomatology on Adolescent Substance Use: Developmentally Proximal versus Distal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslowsky, Julie; Schulenberg, John E.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of developmentally specific windows at which key predictors of adolescent substance use are most influential is a crucial task for informing the design of appropriately targeted substance use prevention and intervention programs. The current study examined effects of conduct problems and depressive symptomatology on changes in…

  10. On the conductance sum rule for the hierarchical edge states of the fractional quantum hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhongshui; Chen Yixin; Su Zhaobin.

    1993-09-01

    The conductance sum rule for the hierarchical edge channel currents of a Fractional Quantum Hall Effect state is derived analytically within the Haldane-Halperin hierarchy scheme. We provide also an intuitive interpretation for the hierarchical drift velocities of the edge excitations. (author). 12 refs

  11. Effects of non-uniformities on electrical conduction in weakly ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.; Murakami, Y.; Nitta, T.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of non-uniformities on the flow of electric current in weakly ionized plasmas is investigated by taking into account the ion slip as well as the Hall current. An Ohm's law for a non-uniform plasma is derived, from which the formula previously obtained by Numano, i.e. an extension of Rosa's equation, is obtainable as a special case. Making use of this new Ohm's law, the effective electrical conductivity and the effective Hall parameter are determined for isotropically turbulent plasmas. It is found that when the ion-slip effect is absent they are in good agreement with the results obtained previously. (author)

  12. Effect of cobalt doping on thermal conductivity of YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleiman, B.M.; Boerjesson, L.; Berastegui, P.

    1996-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and YBa 2 Cu 3-x Co x O 7-δ (x=0.1) sintered compounds has been measured to investigate the effect of Co doping on the thermal conduction processes. The measurements were performed using the transient-plane-source technique. The thermal conductivity of the doped sample qualitatively resembles that of the corresponding undoped sample, but with values a factor of 2 lower. This decrease in thermal conductivity is attributed to scattering mechanisms due to enhancement of the microstructural imperfections and the decoupling between the conducting Cu-O planes as a result of Co-doping in the chain sites. An attempt was made to interpret the peak of the thermal conductivity below T c in terms of a theoretical model based on weakly damped collective electron excitations of the Bose type, with an acoustic dispersion relation (acoustic plasmons), inside the superconducting gap 2Δ(T). copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Effects of a conducting E layer on classical F region cross-field plasma diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickrey, J.F.; Kelley, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    The rate of cross-field plasma diffusion in the F region ionosphere is significantly increased when the magnetic field lines thread a highly conducting E region below. This reduces the lifetime of small-scale F region electron density irregularities in the polar ionosphere where the presence of a highly conducting E region is comonplace. A simple mmodel is developed to describe the effects of a conducting E layer on classical F region plasma diffusion. In the absence of an E region, the difference in ion and electron diffusion rates leads to a charge separation and, hence, to an electrostatic field that retards ion diffusion. When the highly conducting magnetic field lines are tied to a conducting E region, however, electrons can flow along B to reduce the ambipolar diffusion electric field, and ions can proceed perpendicular to B at a rate approaching their own (higher) diffusion velocity. It is shown that the enhanced total diffusion rate that results depends strongly on the height of the F layer and on the ratio of the E to F region Pedersen conductivities

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of the effective electrical conductivity of nitrogen-doped graphene nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrali, Mohammad, E-mail: mohamad.mehrali@siswa.um.edu.my [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Advanced Material Research Centre (Malaysia); Sadeghinezhad, Emad, E-mail: esn802001@yahoo.com [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Malaysia); Rashidi, Mohammad Mehdi [Tongji University, Shanghai Automotive Wind Tunnel Center (China); Akhiani, Amir Reza; Tahan Latibari, Sara; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Advanced Material Research Centre (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    Electrical conductivity is an important property for technological applications of nanofluids that have not been widely investigated, and few studies have been concerned about the electrical conductivity. In this study, nitrogen-doped graphene (NDG) nanofluids were prepared using the two-step method in an aqueous solution of 0.025 wt% Triton X-100 as a surfactant at several concentrations (0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 wt%). The electrical conductivity of the aqueous NDG nanofluids showed a linear dependence on the concentration and increased up to 1814.96 % for a loading of 0.06 wt% NDG nanosheet. From the experimental data, empirical models were developed to express the electrical conductivity as functions of temperature and concentration. It was observed that increasing the temperature has much greater effect on electrical conductivity enhancement than increasing the NDG nanosheet loading. Additionally, by considering the electrophoresis of the NDG nanosheets, a straightforward electrical conductivity model is established to modulate and understand the experimental results.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation of the effective electrical conductivity of nitrogen-doped graphene nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrali, Mohammad; Sadeghinezhad, Emad; Rashidi, Mohammad Mehdi; Akhiani, Amir Reza; Tahan Latibari, Sara; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis

    2015-06-01

    Electrical conductivity is an important property for technological applications of nanofluids that have not been widely investigated, and few studies have been concerned about the electrical conductivity. In this study, nitrogen-doped graphene (NDG) nanofluids were prepared using the two-step method in an aqueous solution of 0.025 wt% Triton X-100 as a surfactant at several concentrations (0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 wt%). The electrical conductivity of the aqueous NDG nanofluids showed a linear dependence on the concentration and increased up to 1814.96 % for a loading of 0.06 wt% NDG nanosheet. From the experimental data, empirical models were developed to express the electrical conductivity as functions of temperature and concentration. It was observed that increasing the temperature has much greater effect on electrical conductivity enhancement than increasing the NDG nanosheet loading. Additionally, by considering the electrophoresis of the NDG nanosheets, a straightforward electrical conductivity model is established to modulate and understand the experimental results.

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation of the effective electrical conductivity of nitrogen-doped graphene nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrali, Mohammad; Sadeghinezhad, Emad; Rashidi, Mohammad Mehdi; Akhiani, Amir Reza; Tahan Latibari, Sara; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Electrical conductivity is an important property for technological applications of nanofluids that have not been widely investigated, and few studies have been concerned about the electrical conductivity. In this study, nitrogen-doped graphene (NDG) nanofluids were prepared using the two-step method in an aqueous solution of 0.025 wt% Triton X-100 as a surfactant at several concentrations (0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 wt%). The electrical conductivity of the aqueous NDG nanofluids showed a linear dependence on the concentration and increased up to 1814.96 % for a loading of 0.06 wt% NDG nanosheet. From the experimental data, empirical models were developed to express the electrical conductivity as functions of temperature and concentration. It was observed that increasing the temperature has much greater effect on electrical conductivity enhancement than increasing the NDG nanosheet loading. Additionally, by considering the electrophoresis of the NDG nanosheets, a straightforward electrical conductivity model is established to modulate and understand the experimental results

  17. Quantum size effects on the thermal and potential conductivities of ideal gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Z F; Sisman, A

    2009-01-01

    Thermal and potential conductivities of ideal Maxwellian, Fermi and Bose gases are derived by considering the small corrections due to the wave character of gas particles. Potential conductivity is regarded as conductivity due to any potential gradient like electrical, gravitational or chemical ones. A long rectangular channel is considered as a transport domain. The size of the domain in the transport direction is much longer than the mean free path of particles l while the sizes in transverse directions are shorter than l. On the other hand, all sizes of the domain are assumed to be larger than the thermal de Broglie wavelength of particles. Therefore, quantum size effects (QSE) are weak enough to be considered as small corrections on conventional terms. Corrections on thermal and potential conductivities are examined. It is seen that the size and shape of the transport domain become additional control parameters on both conductivities. Since the size dependencies of thermal and electrical conductivities are different, the Lorenz number becomes size and shape dependent and deviations from the Wiedemann-Franz law may be expected in nanoscale due to QSE. Variations of the corrections with chemical potential are analysed.

  18. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  19. Electrical conductivity and ion diffusion in porcine meniscus: effects of strain, anisotropy, and tissue region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Kelsey L; McMahan, Jeffrey B; Jackson, Alicia R

    2016-09-06

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of mechanical strain, anisotropy, and tissue region on electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity in meniscus fibrocartilage. A one-dimensional, 4-wire conductivity experiment was employed to measure the electrical conductivity in porcine meniscus tissues from two tissue regions (horn and central), for two tissue orientations (axial and circumferential), and for three levels of compressive strain (0%, 10%, and 20%). Conductivity values were then used to estimate the relative ion diffusivity in meniscus. The water volume fraction of tissue specimens was determined using a buoyancy method. A total of 135 meniscus samples were measured; electrical conductivity values ranged from 2.47mS/cm to 4.84mS/cm, while relative ion diffusivity was in the range of 0.235 to 0.409. Results show that electrical conductivity and ion diffusion are significantly anisotropic (pmeniscus fibrocartilage, which is essential in developing new strategies to treat and/or prevent tissue degeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A nonlinear effective thermal conductivity model for carbon nanotube and nanofiber suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, J; Kang, Y [Department of Mechanical Engineering Kyung Hee University, 1, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kleinstreuer, C [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7910, 3211 Broughton Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States)], E-mail: jmkoo@khu.ac.kr

    2008-09-17

    It has been experimentally demonstrated that suspensions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs) significantly increase the thermal conductivity of nanofluids; however, a physically sound theory of the underlying phenomenon is still missing. In this study, the nonlinear nature of the effective thermal conductivity enhancement with the particle concentration of CNT and CNF nanofluids is explained physically using the excluded volume concept. Specifically, the number of contacting CNTs and CNFs could be calculated by using the excluded volume concept, where the distance for heat to travel in a cylinder between the contacting cylinders in the thermal network of percolating CNTs and CNFs increased with the excluded volume. In contrast to the effective thermal conductivity model of Sastry et al (2008 Nanotechnology 19 055704) the present revised model could reproduce the nonlinear increase of the thermal conductivity with particle concentration, as well as the dependence on the diameter and aspect ratio of the CNTs and CNFs. It was found that the alignment of CNTs and CNFs due to the long range repulsion force decreases the excluded volume, leading to both the convex and concave nonlinear as well as linear increase of the thermal conductivity with particle concentration. The difference between various carrier fluids of the suspensions could be explained as the result of the change in the excluded volume in different base fluids.

  1. Impact of a bone conduction communication channel on multichannel communication system effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Misty; McBride, Maranda; Weatherless, Rachel; Letowski, Tomasz

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the impact of including a bone conduction transducer in a three-channel spatialized communication system was investigated. Several military and security forces situations require concurrent listening to three or more radio channels. In such radio systems, spatial separation between three concurrent radio channels can be achieved by delivering separate signals to the left and right earphone independently and both earphones simultaneously. This method appears to be effective; however, the use of bone conduction as one channel may provide both operational and performance benefits. Three three-channel communication systems were used to collect speech intelligibility data from 18 listeners (System I, three loudspeakers; System 2, stereo headphones; System 3, stereo headphones and a bone conduction vibrator). Each channel presented signals perceived to originate from separate locations. Volunteers listened to three sets of competing sentences and identified a number, color, and object spoken in the target sentence. Each listener participated in three trials (one per system). Each trial consisted of 48 competing sentence sets. Systems 2 and 3 were more intelligible than System I. Systems 2 and 3 were overall equally intelligible; however, the intelligibility of all three channels was significantly more balanced in System 3. Replacing an air conduction transducer with a bone conduction transducer in a multichannel audio device can provide a more effective and balanced simultaneous monitoring auditory environment. These results have important design and implementation implications for spatial auditory communication equipment.

  2. Gas Phase Pressure Effects on the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas phase pressure effects on the apparent thermal conductivity of a JSC-1A/air mixture have been experimentally investigated under steady state thermal conditions from 10 kPa to 100 kPa. The result showed that apparent thermal conductivity of the JSC-1A/air mixture decreased when pressure was lowered to 80 kPa. At 10 kPa, the conductivity decreased to 0.145 W/m/degree C, which is significantly lower than 0.196 W/m/degree C at 100 kPa. This finding is consistent with the results of previous researchers. The reduction of the apparent thermal conductivity at low pressures is ascribed to the Knudsen effect. Since the characteristic length of the void space in bulk JSC-1A varies over a wide range, both the Knudsen regime and continuum regime can coexist in the pore space. The volume ratio of the two regimes varies with pressure. Thus, as gas pressure decreases, the gas volume controlled by Knudsen regime increases. Under Knudsen regime the resistance to the heat flow is higher than that in the continuum regime, resulting in the observed pressure dependency of the apparent thermal conductivity.

  3. Effect of thermal conductivities of shape stabilized PCM on under-floor heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wenlong; Xie, Biao; Zhang, Rongming; Xu, Zhiming; Xia, Yuting

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • HCE-SSPCM was prepared and used in under-floor heating system. • Enhancing thermal conductivity improved the efficiency of energy and space. • Too high thermal conductivity over a range was meaningless. • The economic benefits of the phase change energy storage system were the best. - Abstract: A kind of heat conduction-enhanced shape-stabilized PCM (HCE-SSPCM) was utilized in the under-floor heating system for house heating in winter. This system charges heat by using cheap nighttime electricity and provides heating needs throughout all day. The effect of thermal conductivity of the PCM on energy savings and economic benefits of the system were theoretically and experimentally studied. HCE-SSPCM plates, made of (solid paraffin + liquid paraffin)/high density polyethylene/expanded graphite, were introduced to a test room with under-floor heating system. And the operating characteristics of the system were compared with that of the non-phase change energy storage system and the conventional air conditioning system. The results showed that enhancing the thermal conductivity of PCM in a certain range could significantly improve the energy efficiency of the heating system and reduce the thickness of thermal insulating materials. But the improving effect was not obvious when the thermal conductivity was beyond 1.0 W/m K. The phase change energy storage system had a comfortable temperature environment and the best economic benefits among the three different heating types especially when the ratio of peak-valley electric price was high. Therefore, increasing the thermal conductivity of SSPCM will be of great significance for house heating

  4. The effects of the Histone Deacetylase (HDAC Inhibitor 4-Phenylbutyrate on gap junction conductance and permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eKaufman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal resistance is a key factor in determining cardiac action potential propagation. Action potential conduction velocity has been shown to be proportional to the square root of longitudinal resistance. A major determinant of longitudinal resistance in myocardium is the gap junction channel, comprised of connexin proteins. Within the ventricular myocardium connexin 43 (Cx43 is the dominantly expressed connexin. Reduced numbers of gap junction channels will result in an increase in longitudinal resistance creating the possibility of slowed conduction velocity while increased numbers of channels would potentially result in an increase in conduction velocity. We sought to determine if inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC by 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB, a known inhibitor of HDAC resulted in an increase in junctional conductance and permeability, which is not the result of changes in single channel unitary conductance. These experiments were performed using HEK-293 cells and HeLa cells stably transfected with Cx43. Following treatment with increasing concentrations of 4-PB up-regulation of Cx43 was observed via Western blot analysis. Junctional (gj conductance and unitary single channel conductance were measured via whole-cell patch clamp. In addition intercellular transfer of Lucifer Yellow (LY was determined by fluorescence microscopy. The data in this study indicates that 4-PB is able to enhance functional Cx43 gap junction coupling as indicated by LY dye transfer and multichannel and single channel data along with Western blot analysis. As a corollary, pharmacological agents such as 4-PB have the potential, by increasing intercellular coupling, to reduce the effect of ischemia. It remains to be seen whether drugs like 4-PB will be effective in preventing cardiac maladies.

  5. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folsom, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50-30 W m -1 K -1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  6. Simplified Transient Hot-Wire Method for Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurement in Geo Materials: Microstructure and Saturation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Merckx

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity measurement by a simplified transient hot-wire technique is applied to geomaterials in order to show the relationships which can exist between effective thermal conductivity, texture, and moisture of the materials. After a validation of the used “one hot-wire” technique in water, toluene, and glass-bead assemblages, the investigations were performed (1 in glass-bead assemblages of different diameters in dried, water, and acetone-saturated states in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation on the effective thermal conductivity, (2 in a compacted earth brick at different moisture states, and (3 in a lime-hemp concrete during 110 days following its manufacture. The lime-hemp concrete allows the measurements during the setting, desiccation and carbonation steps. The recorded Δ/ln( diagrams allow the calculation of one effective thermal conductivity in the continuous and homogeneous fluids and two effective thermal conductivities in the heterogeneous solids. The first one measured in the short time acquisitions (<1 s mainly depends on the contact between the wire and grains and thus microtexture and hydrated state of the material. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean effective thermal conductivity of the material.

  7. A simplistic analytical unit cell based model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X H; Kuang, J J; Lu, T J; Han, F S; Kim, T

    2013-01-01

    We present a simplistic yet accurate analytical model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams saturated in a low conducting fluid (air). The model is derived analytically based on a realistic representative unit cell (a tetrakaidecahedron) under the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along highly tortuous-conducting ligaments at high porosity ranges (ε ⩾ 0.9). Good agreement with existing experimental data suggests that heat conduction along highly conducting and tortuous ligaments predominantly defines the effective thermal conductivity of open-cell metal foams with negligible conduction in parallel through the fluid phase. (paper)

  8. Effects on nuclear fusion reaction on diffusion and thermal conduction in a magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Aono, Osamu.

    1976-12-01

    In spite of the well spread belief in the field of irreversible thermodynamics, vectorial phenomena couple thermodynamically with the scalar phenomena. Transport coefficients concerning the diffusion and the thermal conduction across a strong magnetic field are calculated in the presence of the deuteron-triton fusion reaction on the basis of the gas kinetic theory. When the reaction takes place, the diffusion increases and the thermal conduction decreases. Effects of the reaction exceed those of the Coulomb collision as the temperature is high enough. (auth.)

  9. Effect of ionization of impurity centres by electric field on the conductivity of superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Clement, A.

    1994-11-01

    The study of the effect of ionization of impurity centres by electric field E 0 on the conductivity of superlattice (SL) has been studied theoretically. It is observed that as the field E 0 increases the current rises reaches a maximum then falls off i.e. show a negative differential conductivity (NDC). Further increase in E 0 leads to an exponential rise of the current. This occur around E 0 = 3 x 10 4 V cm -1 . Hence the current density field shows a ''N'' shape characteristics as against the ''n'' shape characteristics in the absence of impurity. (author). 23 refs, 3 figs

  10. Drafting an Effective Ethical Code of Conduct for Professional Societies: A Practical Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret C. Hardy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Academic, medical, and research communities are struggling to quickly and effectively address unethical conduct within their professional ranks. Without a policy in place, individuals and institutes are subject to convoluted procedures and unnecessary consequences. In addition to policies geared to prevent harassment and assault, it is important to protect the ethical basis for research and provide a set of guidelines for how professionals treat each other, students, and trainees. Since drafting a policy of this nature is complex, 10 guidelines are provided as a framework for how to draft, implement, and establish an ethical code of conduct. Further implications for nonprofit societies and professional societies in particular are discussed.

  11. Effective Thermal Conductivity and Diffusivity of Containment Wall for Nuclear Power Plant OPR1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Gyun Noh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of containment walls as heat sinks or passive cooling systems during nuclear power plant (NPP accidents. Containment walls consist of steel reinforced concrete, steel liners, and tendons, and provide the main thermal resistance of the heat sinks, which varies with the volume fraction and geometric alignment of the rebar and tendons, as well as the temperature and chemical composition. The target geometry for the containment walls of this work is the standard Korean NPP OPR1000. Sample tests and numerical simulations are conducted to verify the correlations for models with different densities of concrete, volume fractions, and alignments of steel. Estimation of the effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the containment wall models is proposed. The Maxwell model and modified Rayleigh volume fraction model employed in the present work predict the experiment and finite volume method (FVM results well. The effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the containment walls are summarized as functions of density, temperature, and the volume fraction of steel for the analysis of the NPP accidents.

  12. Effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of containment wall for nuclear power plant OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun; Park, Hyun Sun [Div. of Advanced Nuclear Engineering (DANE), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwi; Kang, Hie Chan [Mechanical Engineering Div., Kunsan National University (KNU), Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of containment walls as heat sinks or passive cooling systems during nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents. Containment walls consist of steel reinforced concrete, steel liners, and tendons, and provide the main thermal resistance of the heat sinks, which varies with the volume fraction and geometric alignment of the rebar and tendons, as well as the temperature and chemical composition. The target geometry for the containment walls of this work is the standard Korean NPP OPR1000. Sample tests and numerical simulations are conducted to verify the correlations for models with different densities of concrete, volume fractions, and alignments of steel. Estimation of the effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the containment wall models is proposed. The Maxwell model and modified Rayleigh volume fraction model employed in the present work predict the experiment and finite volume method (FVM) results well. The effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the containment walls are summarized as functions of density, temperature, and the volume fraction of steel for the analysis of the NPP accidents.

  13. Effect of nitrogen doping on the thermal conductivity of GeTe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallica, Roberto; Longo, Massimo; Wiemer, Claudia [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Agrate Brianza (Italy); Varesi, Enrico; Fumagalli, Luca; Spadoni, Simona [Micron Semiconductor Italia, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    The 3{omega} method was employed to determine the effect of nitrogen doping (5 at.%) on the thermal conductivity of sputtered thin films of stoichiometric GeTe (a material of interest for phase change memories). It was found that nitrogen doping has a detrimental effect on the thermal conductivity of GeTe in both phases, but less markedly in the amorphous (-25%) than in the crystalline one (-40%). On the opposite, no effect could be detected on the measured thermal boundary resistance between these films and SiO{sub 2}, within the experimental error. Our results agree with those obtained by molecular dynamic simulation of amorphous GeTe. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Hyperbolic heat conduction, effective temperature, and third law for nonequilibrium systems with heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, S. L.

    2018-02-01

    Some analogies between different nonequilibrium heat conduction models, particularly random walk, the discrete variable model, and the Boltzmann transport equation with the single relaxation time approximation, have been discussed. We show that, under an assumption of a finite value of the heat carrier velocity, these models lead to the hyperbolic heat conduction equation and the modified Fourier law with relaxation term. Corresponding effective temperature and entropy have been introduced and analyzed. It has been demonstrated that the effective temperature, defined as a geometric mean of the kinetic temperatures of the heat carriers moving in opposite directions, acts as a criterion for thermalization and is a nonlinear function of the kinetic temperature and heat flux. It is shown that, under highly nonequilibrium conditions when the heat flux tends to its maximum possible value, the effective temperature, heat capacity, and local entropy go to zero even at a nonzero equilibrium temperature. This provides a possible generalization of the third law to nonequilibrium situations. Analogies and differences between the proposed effective temperature and some other definitions of a temperature in nonequilibrium state, particularly for active systems, disordered semiconductors under electric field, and adiabatic gas flow, have been shown and discussed. Illustrative examples of the behavior of the effective temperature and entropy during nonequilibrium heat conduction in a monatomic gas and a strong shockwave have been analyzed.

  15. Effects of thermal efficiency in DCMD and the preparation of membranes with low thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhehao, E-mail: ccgri_lzh@163.com [Changchun Gold Research Institute, 130012 (China); Peng, Yuelian, E-mail: pyl@live.com.au [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Dong, Yajun; Fan, Hongwei [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Chen, Ping [The Research Institute of Environmental Protection, North China Pharmaceutical Group Corporation, 050015 (China); Qiu, Lin [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang, Qi [National Major Science and Technology Program Management Office for Water Pollution Control and Treatment, MEP, 100029 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The effects on vapor flux and thermal efficiency were simulated. • The conditions favoring vapor flux also favored thermal efficiency. • Four microporous polymer membranes were compared. • The SiO{sub 2} aerogel coating reduced the thermal conductivity of polymer membranes. • A 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of membranes. - Abstract: The effects of the membrane characteristics and operational conditions on the vapor flux and thermal efficiency in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process were studied with a mathematical simulation. The membrane temperature, driving force of vapor transfer, membrane distillation coefficient, etc. were used to analyze the effects. The operating conditions that increased the vapor flux improved the thermal efficiency. The membrane characteristics of four microporous membranes and their performances in DCMD were compared. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane prepared via vapor-induced phase separation exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity. The PSf and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes were modified using SiO{sub 2} aerogel blending and coating to reduce the thermal conductivity of the membrane. The coating process was more effective than the blending process toward this end. The changes in the structure of the modified membrane were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Si was found on the modified membrane surface with an energy spectrometer. The PVDF composite and support membranes were tested during the DCMD process; the composite membrane had a higher vapor flux and a better thermal efficiency than the support. A new method based on a 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the membranes.

  16. Effects of thermal efficiency in DCMD and the preparation of membranes with low thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhehao; Peng, Yuelian; Dong, Yajun; Fan, Hongwei; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects on vapor flux and thermal efficiency were simulated. • The conditions favoring vapor flux also favored thermal efficiency. • Four microporous polymer membranes were compared. • The SiO 2 aerogel coating reduced the thermal conductivity of polymer membranes. • A 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of membranes. - Abstract: The effects of the membrane characteristics and operational conditions on the vapor flux and thermal efficiency in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process were studied with a mathematical simulation. The membrane temperature, driving force of vapor transfer, membrane distillation coefficient, etc. were used to analyze the effects. The operating conditions that increased the vapor flux improved the thermal efficiency. The membrane characteristics of four microporous membranes and their performances in DCMD were compared. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane prepared via vapor-induced phase separation exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity. The PSf and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes were modified using SiO 2 aerogel blending and coating to reduce the thermal conductivity of the membrane. The coating process was more effective than the blending process toward this end. The changes in the structure of the modified membrane were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Si was found on the modified membrane surface with an energy spectrometer. The PVDF composite and support membranes were tested during the DCMD process; the composite membrane had a higher vapor flux and a better thermal efficiency than the support. A new method based on a 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the membranes

  17. Effect of titania addition on the thermal conductivity of UO2 fuel [Paper IIIB-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, A.K.; Kumar, A.; Arora, K.B.S.; Pandey, V.D.; Nair, M.R.; Kamath, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Pellet clad interaction in nuclear reactor fuel elements can be reduced by the use of higher grain size UO 2 fuel. This is achieved by the addition of dopant like titania, niobia etc. However, these dopants are considered as impurities which may affect the thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the fuel. Thermal Conductivity which is one of the important properties controlling the inpile performance of the fuel has been measured for pure UO 2 and UO 2 containing 0.05wt per cent and 0.1wt per cent TiO 2 in the temperature range 900K to 1900K in vacuum. Thermal conductivity was obtained from thermal diffusivity data measured by laser flash method. The paper highlights the experimental results and discusses the effect of TiO 2 on the thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel. (author)

  18. Effects of stretching and compression on conducting properties of an Au–alkanedithiol–Au molecular junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Jiao; Yu, Ji-Hai; Xu, Hua; Chu, Yu-Fang [Physics Science and Engineering Technology College, Yichun University, Yichun 336000 (China); Fan, Zhi-Qiang, E-mail: fan0221@163.com [School of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410004 (China)

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the effects of stretching and compression on the electronic properties of 7-alkanedithiol covalently linked to two Au electrodes. Results show a progressive increase in conductivity upon molecule compression and decrease with molecule stretching. The notable conductance increase at high compression is attributed to a significant modification of HOMO and LUMO orbitals of the junction, which enhances electron delocalization and promotes tunneling across the junction. More important, the current switching ratios between the various stages of compressed/extended geometries almost maintain the constant values on the bias region from 0 V to 2 V. In other word, the mechanically-induced conductance enhancement and weakening are stable within a large bias voltage range.

  19. Effect of titania addition on the thermal conductivity of UO2 fuel (Paper IIIB-C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, A K; Kumar, A; Arora, K B.S.; Pandey, V D; Nair, M R; Kamath, H S

    1986-01-01

    Pellet clad interaction in nuclear reactor fuel elements can be reduced by the use of higher grain size UO2 fuel. This is achieved by the addition of dopant like titania, niobia etc. However, these dopants are considered as impurities which may affect the thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the fuel. Thermal Conductivity which is one of the important properties controlling the inpile performance of the fuel has been measured for pure UO2 and UO2 containing 0.05wt per cent and 0.1wt per cent TiO2 in the temperature range 900K to 1900K in vacuum. Thermal conductivity was obtained from thermal diffusivity data measured by laser flash method. The paper highlights the experimental results and discusses the effect of TiO2 on the thermal conductivity of UO2 fuel. 5 figures.

  20. Thermal conductivity of bulk GaN—Effects of oxygen, magnesium doping, and strain field compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Roland B.; Anaya, Julian; Kuball, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oxygen doping (n-type) and oxygen (O)-magnesium (Mg) co-doping (semi-insulating) on the thermal conductivity of ammonothermal bulk GaN was studied via 3-omega measurements and a modified Callaway model. Oxygen doping was shown to significantly reduce thermal conductivity, whereas O-Mg co-doped GaN exhibited a thermal conductivity close to that of undoped GaN. The latter was attributed to a decreased phonon scattering rate due the compensation of impurity-generated strain fields as a result of dopant-complex formation. The results have great implications for GaN electronic and optoelectronic device applications on bulk GaN substrates

  1. Accounting for porous structure in effective thermal conductivity calculations in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antwerpen, W. van; Rousseau, P.G.; Toit, C.G. du

    2009-01-01

    A proper understanding of the mechanisms of heat transfer, flow and pressure drop through a packed bed of spheres is of utmost importance in the design of a high temperature pebble bed reactor. A thorough knowledge of the porous structure within the packed bed is important to any rigorous analysis of the transport phenomena, as all the heat and flow mechanisms are influenced by the porous structure. In this paper a new approach is proposed to simulate the effective thermal conductivity employing a combination of new and existing correlations for randomly packed beds. More attention is given to packing structure based on coordination number and contact angles, resulting in a more rigorous differentiation between the bulk and near-wall regions. The model accounts for solid conduction, gas conduction, contact area, surface roughness as well as radiation. (author)

  2. Effect of triangular vacancy defect on thermal conductivity and thermal rectification in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping, E-mail: yangpingdm@ujs.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing and Reliability for MEMS/NEMS/OEDS, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Li, Xialong; Zhao, Yanfan [Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing and Reliability for MEMS/NEMS/OEDS, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yang, Haiying [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Shuting, E-mail: wangst@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the thermal transport properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) possessing various sizes of triangular vacancy defect within a temperature range of 200–600 K by using classical molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the thermal conductivities of the graphene nanoribbons decrease with increasing sizes of triangular vacancy defects in both directions across the whole temperature range tested, and the presence of the defect can decrease the thermal conductivity by more than 40% as the number of removed cluster atoms is increased to 25 (1.56% for vacancy concentration) owing to the effect of phonon–defect scattering. In the meantime, we find the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons is insensitive to the temperature change at higher vacancy concentrations. Furthermore, the dependence of temperatures and various sizes of triangular vacancy defect for the thermal rectification ration are also detected. This work implies a possible route to achieve thermal rectifier for 2D materials by defect engineering.

  3. The effect of vapour pressure deficit on stomatal conductance, sap pH and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance in Eucalyptus globulus clones grown under two watering regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Maria Jose; Montes, Fernando; Ruiz, Federico; Lopez, Gustavo; Pita, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    Stomatal conductance has long been considered of key interest in the study of plant adaptation to water stress. The expected increase in extreme meteorological events under a climate change scenario may compromise survival in Eucalyptus globulus plantations established in south-western Spain. We investigated to what extent changes in stomatal conductance in response to high vapour pressure deficits and water shortage are mediated by hydraulic and chemical signals in greenhouse-grown E. globulus clones. Rooted cuttings were grown in pots and submitted to two watering regimes. Stomatal conductance, shoot water potential, sap pH and hydraulic conductance were measured consecutively in each plant over 4 weeks under vapour pressure deficits ranging 0·42 to 2·25 kPa. Evapotranspiration, growth in leaf area and shoot biomass were also determined. There was a significant effect of both clone and watering regime in stomatal conductance and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance, but not in sap pH. Sap pH decreased as water potential and stomatal conductance decreased under increasing vapour pressure deficit. There was no significant relationship between stomatal conductance and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance. Stomata closure precluded shoot water potential from falling below -1·8 MPa. The percentage loss of hydraulic conductance ranged from 40 to 85 %. The highest and lowest leaf-specific hydraulic conductances were measured in clones from the same half-sib families. Water shortage reduced growth and evapotranspiration, decreases in evapotranspiration ranging from 14 to 32 % in the five clones tested. Changes in sap pH seemed to be a response to changes in atmospheric conditions rather than soil water in the species. Stomata closed after a considerable amount of hydraulic conductance was lost, although intraspecific differences in leaf-specific hydraulic conductance suggest the possibility of selection for improved productivity under water-limiting conditions

  4. The effect of antithyroid treatment on atrial conduction times in patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacar, Alper Buğra; Acar, Gürkan; Yorgun, Hikmet; Akçay, Ahmet; Özkaya, Mesut; Canpolat, Uğur; Akkoyun, Murat; Tuncer, Cemal

    2012-09-01

    Prolonged atrial conduction time measured by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) has been associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation. We aimed to evaluate the effect of subclinical hyperthyroidism (SH) and antithyroid treatment on atrial conduction time. A total of 30 patients with SH (26 females; mean age 34.8 ± 8.5 years) and 30 age- and gender-matched controls were included. Using TDI, atrial conduction time was measured from the lateral mitral annulus, septal mitral annulus, and lateral tricuspid annulus. Intra- and interatrial conduction delay were calculated. TDI and thyroid hormone levels were studied at the time of enrollment and after achievement of euthyroid state with propylthiouracil treatment. Patients were followed for 14 ± 3 weeks. Atrial conduction time at the lateral and septal mitral annulus were significantly higher in patients with SH compared to controls. Both inter-, right, and left intraatrial electromechanical delay were prolonged in patients with SH compared to control subjects (21.3 ± 6.1 vs. 13.9 ± 4.3, P < 0.001 and 4.2 ± 3.5 vs. 2.3 ± 1.9, P = 0.014 and 17.1 ± 6.0 vs. 11.6 ± 3.8, P < 0.001, respectively). After achievement of euthyroid state, inter- and left intraatrial electromechanical delay were significantly decreased compared to baseline values and approximated to the values of the control group (P < 0.001). SH is associated with prolonged atrial conduction time. After achievement of euthyroid state, decrement in atrial conduction time may reveal how the antithyroid treatment may prevent the development of atrial fibrillation in these patients. © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of deformation on the thermal conductivity of granular porous media with rough grain surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Roohollah; Hejazi, S. Hossein; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    Heat transfer in granular porous media is an important phenomenon that is relevant to a wide variety of problems, including geothermal reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery by thermal methods. Resistance to flow of heat in the contact area between the grains strongly influences the effective thermal conductivity of such porous media. Extensive experiments have indicated that the roughness of the grains' surface follows self-affine fractal stochastic functions, and thus, the contact resistance cannot be accounted for by models based on smooth surfaces. Despite the significance of rough contact area, the resistance has been accounted for by a fitting parameter in the models of heat transfer. In this Letter we report on a study of conduction in a packing of particles that contains a fluid of a given conductivity, with each grain having a rough self-affine surface, and is under an external compressive pressure. The deformation of the contact area depends on the fractal dimension that characterizes the grains' rough surface, as well as their Young's modulus. Excellent qualitative agreement is obtained with experimental data. Deformation of granular porous media with grains that have rough self-affine fractal surface is simulated. Thermal contact resistance between grains with rough surfaces is incorporated into the numerical simulation of heat conduction under compressive pressure. By increasing compressive pressure, thermal conductivity is enhanced more in the grains with smoother surfaces and lower Young's modulus. Excellent qualitative agreement is obtained with the experimental data.

  6. Modelling and Characterization of Effective Thermal Conductivity of Single Hollow Glass Microsphere and Its Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Wang, Hui; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2018-01-14

    Tiny hollow glass microsphere (HGM) can be applied for designing new light-weighted and thermal-insulated composites as high strength core, owing to its hollow structure. However, little work has been found for studying its own overall thermal conductivity independent of any matrix, which generally cannot be measured or evaluated directly. In this study, the overall thermal conductivity of HGM is investigated experimentally and numerically. The experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of HGM powder is performed by the transient plane source (TPS) technique to provide a reference to numerical results, which are obtained by a developed three-dimensional two-step hierarchical computational method. In the present method, three heterogeneous HGM stacking elements representing different distributions of HGMs in the powder are assumed. Each stacking element and its equivalent homogeneous solid counterpart are, respectively, embedded into a fictitious matrix material as fillers to form two equivalent composite systems at different levels, and then the overall thermal conductivity of each stacking element can be numerically determined through the equivalence of the two systems. The comparison of experimental and computational results indicates the present computational modeling can be used for effectively predicting the overall thermal conductivity of single HGM and its powder in a flexible way. Besides, it is necessary to note that the influence of thermal interfacial resistance cannot be removed from the experimental results in the TPS measurement.

  7. Crystallite Size Effect on Thermal Conductive Properties of Nonwoven Nanocellulose Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetani, Kojiro; Okada, Takumi; Oyama, Hideko T

    2015-07-13

    The thermal conductive properties, including the thermal diffusivity and resultant thermal conductivity, of nonwoven nanocellulose sheets were investigated by separately measuring the thermal diffusivity of the sheets in the in-plane and thickness directions with a periodic heating method. The cross-sectional area (or width) of the cellulose crystallites was the main determinant of the thermal conductive properties. Thus, the results strongly indicate that there is a crystallite size effect on phonon conduction within the nanocellulose sheets. The results also indicated that there is a large interfacial thermal resistance between the nanocellulose surfaces. The phonon propagation velocity (i.e., the sound velocity) within the nanocellulose sheets was estimated to be ∼800 m/s based on the relationship between the thermal diffusivities and crystallite widths. The resulting in-plane thermal conductivity of the tunicate nanocellulose sheet was calculated to be ∼2.5 W/mK, markedly higher than other plastic films available for flexible electronic devices.

  8. DC conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene: Angle-dependent transport properties and effects of disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelković, M.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-03-01

    The in-plane dc conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene is calculated using an expansion of the real-space Kubo-Bastin conductivity in terms of Chebyshev polynomials. We investigate within a tight-binding approach the transport properties as a function of rotation angle, applied perpendicular electric field, and vacancy disorder. We find that for high-angle twists, the two layers are effectively decoupled, and the minimum conductivity at the Dirac point corresponds to double the value observed in monolayer graphene. This remains valid even in the presence of vacancies, hinting that chiral symmetry is still preserved. On the contrary, for low twist angles, the conductivity at the Dirac point depends on the twist angle and is not protected in the presence of disorder. Furthermore, for low angles and in the presence of an applied electric field, we find that the chiral boundary states emerging between AB and BA regions contribute to the dc conductivity, despite the appearance of localized states in the AA regions. The results agree qualitatively with recent transport experiments in low-angle twisted bilayer graphene.

  9. Size effects in non-linear heat conduction with flux-limited behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Nan; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2017-11-01

    Size effects are discussed for several non-linear heat conduction models with flux-limited behaviors, including the phonon hydrodynamic, Lagrange multiplier, hierarchy moment, nonlinear phonon hydrodynamic, tempered diffusion, thermon gas and generalized nonlinear models. For the phonon hydrodynamic, Lagrange multiplier and tempered diffusion models, heat flux will not exist in problems with sufficiently small scale. The existence of heat flux needs the sizes of heat conduction larger than their corresponding critical sizes, which are determined by the physical properties and boundary temperatures. The critical sizes can be regarded as the theoretical limits of the applicable ranges for these non-linear heat conduction models with flux-limited behaviors. For sufficiently small scale heat conduction, the phonon hydrodynamic and Lagrange multiplier models can also predict the theoretical possibility of violating the second law and multiplicity. Comparisons are also made between these non-Fourier models and non-linear Fourier heat conduction in the type of fast diffusion, which can also predict flux-limited behaviors.

  10. Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Copper Nanofluids: The Effect of Filler Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanushali, Sushrut; Jason, Naveen Noah; Ghosh, Prakash; Ganesh, Anuradda; Simon, George P; Cheng, Wenlong

    2017-06-07

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions that exhibit enhanced thermal conductivity at low filler loadings and thus have been proposed for heat transfer applications. Here, we systematically investigate how particle shape determines the thermal conductivity of low-cost copper nanofluids using a range of distinct filler particle shapes: nanospheres, nanocubes, short nanowires, and long nanowires. To exclude the potential effects of surface capping ligands, all the filler particles are kept with uniform surface chemistry. We find that copper nanowires enhanced the thermal conductivity up to 40% at 0.25 vol % loadings; while the thermal conductivity was only 9.3% and 4.2% for the nanosphere- and nanocube-based nanofluids, respectively, at the same filler loading. This is consistent with a percolation mechanism in which a higher aspect ratio is beneficial for thermal conductivity enhancement. To overcome the surface oxidation of the copper nanomaterials and maintain the dispersion stability, we employed polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a dispersant and ascorbic acid as an antioxidant in the nanofluid formulations. The thermal performance of the optimized fluid formulations could be sustained for multiple heating-cooling cycles while retaining stability over 1000 h.

  11. Mesoporous tin-doped indium oxide thin films: effect of mesostructure on electrical conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till von Graberg, Pascal Hartmann, Alexander Rein, Silvia Gross, Britta Seelandt, Cornelia Röger, Roman Zieba, Alexander Traut, Michael Wark, Jürgen Janek and Bernd M Smarsly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a versatile method for the preparation of mesoporous tin-doped indium oxide (ITO thin films via dip-coating. Two poly(isobutylene-b-poly(ethyleneoxide (PIB-PEO copolymers of significantly different molecular weight (denoted as PIB-PEO 3000 and PIB-PEO 20000 are used as templates and are compared with non-templated films to clarify the effect of the template size on the crystallization and, thus, on the electrochemical properties of mesoporous ITO films. Transparent, mesoporous, conductive coatings are obtained after annealing at 500 °C; these coatings have a specific resistance of 0.5 Ω cm at a thickness of about 100 nm. Electrical conductivity is improved by one order of magnitude by annealing under a reducing atmosphere. The two types of PIB-PEO block copolymers create mesopores with in-plane diameters of 20–25 and 35–45 nm, the latter also possessing correspondingly thicker pore walls. Impedance measurements reveal that the conductivity is significantly higher for films prepared with the template generating larger mesopores. Because of the same size of the primary nanoparticles, the enhanced conductivity is attributed to a higher conduction path cross section. Prussian blue was deposited electrochemically within the films, thus confirming the accessibility of their pores and their functionality as electrode material.

  12. Effective thermal conductivity of a heat generating rod bundle dissipating heat by natural convection and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senve, Vinay; Narasimham, G.S.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transport processes in isothermal hexagonal sheath with 19 heat generating rods is studied. → Correlation is given to predict the maximum temperature considering all transport processes. → Effective thermal conductivity of rod bundle can be obtained using max temperature. → Data on the critical Rayleigh numbers for p/d ratios of 1.1-2.0 is presented. → Radiative heat transfer contributes to heat dissipation of 38-65% of total heat. - Abstract: A numerical study of conjugate natural convection and surface radiation in a horizontal hexagonal sheath housing 19 solid heat generating rods with cladding and argon as the fill gas, is performed. The natural convection in the sheath is driven by the volumetric heat generation in the solid rods. The problem is solved using the FLUENT CFD code. A correlation is obtained to predict the maximum temperature in the rod bundle for different pitch-to-diameter ratios and heat generating rates. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the heat generation rate, maximum temperature and the sheath temperature. Results are presented for the dimensionless maximum temperature, Rayleigh number and the contribution of radiation with changing emissivity, total wattage and the pitch-to-diameter ratio. In the simulation of a larger system that contains a rod bundle, the effective thermal conductivity facilitates simplified modelling of the rod bundle by treating it as a solid of effective thermal conductivity. The parametric studies revealed that the contribution of radiation can be 38-65% of the total heat generation, for the parameter ranges chosen. Data for critical Rayleigh number above which natural convection comes into effect is also presented.

  13. Polymer-inorganic hybrid proton conductive membranes: Effect of the interfacial transfer pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pingping; Hao, Lie; Wu, Wenjia; Li, Yifan; Wang, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A series of hybrid membranes are prepared using fillers with different structures. • The fillers (0-D, 1-D, and 2-D) are sulfonated to ensure close surface component. • The effect of filler’s structure on microstructure of hydrid membrane is explored. • For single-kind filler series, 2-D filler has the strongest conduction promotion. • The synergy effect of different kinds of fillers is systematacially investigated. - Abstract: For hybrid membrane, the polymer-inorganic interface along filler surface can be facilely created to be distinctive and controllable pathway for mass transfer. Herein, three kinds of fillers are used as inorganic additives including zero-dimensional silica (0-D, SiO_2), one-dimensional halloysite nanotube (1-D, HNT), and two-dimensional graphene oxide (2-D, GO), which are functionalized by sulfonated polymer layer to ensure close surface component. Then the fillers are incorporated into two types of polymer matrixes (phase-separated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and non-phase-separated chitosan) to prepare three series of hybrid membranes with single-kind filler, double-kinds fillers, or triple-kinds fillers, respectively. The microstructures, physicochemical properties, and proton conduction properties (under hydrated and anhydrous conditions) of the membranes are extensively investigated. It is found that (i) for the single-kind filler-filled membranes, 2-D filler has the strongest promotion ability for proton conductivity of membrane due to the constructed wide and long-range pathways for proton transfer; (ii) while for the hybrid membranes with double-kinds fillers, instead of synergistic promotion effect, the fillers cause more tortuous transfer pathways within membranes and then decrease proton conductivity; (iii) the hybrid membranes with triple-kinds fillers exhibit similar behavior but a little higher conductivity than the membranes with double-kinds fillers.

  14. Magnetoresistance effects associated with various electric conduction mechanisms in nanostructured [C/FeCo]n multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Y.P.; Liu, Z.W.; Mikmeková, E.

    2017-01-01

    An evolution of magnetoresistance (MR) mechanism with the film structure was discovered in nanostructured [C/FeCo] n thin films fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The discontinuous multilayer nanogranular structure was confirmed by microstructure characterization. As the layer number n increased, the MR value of the film changed from positive to negative. The fitting curves of lnR−T −1/2 and lnR−T −1/4 show that there is a transition of the conduction regime in the temperature range of 2–300 K. The significant different MR effects at various conduction regimes indicated that the type of transport regime plays an important role in MR origin. - Highlights: • Nanostructured [FeCo/C]n multilayers were produced and characterized. • MR changed from positive to negative with the increase of layer number. • An ES-VRH to Mott-VRH conduction transition with temperature was found. • Significant different MR effects are closely related to various conduction regimes.

  15. Techniques for Conducting Effective Concept Design and Design-to-Cost Trade Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Concept design plays a central role in project success as its product effectively locks the majority of system life cycle cost. Such extraordinary leverage presents a business case for conducting concept design in a credible fashion, particularly for first-of-a-kind systems that advance the state of the art and that have high design uncertainty. A key challenge, however, is to know when credible design convergence has been achieved in such systems. Using a space system example, this paper characterizes the level of convergence needed for concept design in the context of technical and programmatic resource margins available in preliminary design and highlights the importance of design and cost evaluation learning curves in determining credible convergence. It also provides techniques for selecting trade study cases that promote objective concept evaluation, help reveal unknowns, and expedite convergence within the trade space and conveys general practices for conducting effective concept design-to-cost studies.

  16. Graphene nanomesh-based devices exhibiting a strong negative differential conductance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung Nguyen, V; Mazzamuto, F; Saint-Martin, J; Bournel, A; Dollfus, P

    2012-01-01

    Using atomistic quantum simulation based on a tight binding model, we have investigated the transport characteristics of graphene nanomesh-based devices and evaluated the possibilities of observing negative differential conductance. It is shown that by taking advantage of bandgap opening in the graphene nanomesh lattice, a strong negative differential conductance effect can be achieved at room temperature in pn junctions and n-doped structures. Remarkably, the effect is improved very significantly (with a peak-to-valley current ratio of a few hundred) and appears to be weakly sensitive to the transition length in graphene nanomesh pn hetero-junctions when inserting a pristine (gapless) graphene section in the transition region between n and p zones. The study therefore suggests new design strategies for graphene electronic devices which may offer strong advantages in terms of performance and processing over the devices studied previously. (paper)

  17. The Effect of Mechanical Load on the Thermal Conductivity of Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toman

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mechanical load on the thermal conductivity of building materials in the design of envelope parts of building structures is studied. A typical building material is chosen in the practical investigation of this effect, namely the cement mortar. It is concluded that in the range of hygroscopic moisture content, lower levels of mechanical load, typically up to 90 % of compressive strength (CS, are not dangerous from the point of view of worsening the designed thermal properties, but in the overhygroscopic region, the load as low as 57 % of CS may be dangerous. The higher levels of loading are found to be always significant because they lead to marked increase of thermal conductivity which is always a negative information for a building designer.

  18. Alloying effects on superionic conductivity in lithium indium halides for all-solid-state batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevgolis, Alysia; Wood, Brandon C.; Mehmedović, Zerina; Hall, Alex T.; Alves, Thomaz C.; Adelstein, Nicole

    2018-04-01

    Alloying of anions is a promising engineering strategy for tuning ionic conductivity in halide-based inorganic solid electrolytes. We explain the alloying effects in Li3InBr6-xClx, in terms of strain, chemistry, and microstructure, using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure analysis. We find that strain and bond chemistry can be tuned through alloying and affect the activation energy and maximum diffusivity coefficient. The similar conductivities of the x = 3 and x = 6 compositions can be understood by assuming that the alloy separates into Br-rich and Cl-rich regions. Phase-separation increases diffusivity at the interface and in the expanded Cl-region, suggesting microstructure effects are critical. Similarities with other halide superionic conductors are highlighted.

  19. Ground state magnetization of conduction electrons in graphene with Zeeman effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, F., E-mail: federico.escudero@uns.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ardenghi, J.S., E-mail: jsardenhi@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Sourrouille, L., E-mail: lsourrouille@yahoo.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Jasen, P., E-mail: pvjasen@uns.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2017-05-01

    In this work we address the ground state magnetization in graphene, considering the Zeeman effect and taking into account the conduction electrons in the long wavelength approximation. We obtain analytical expressions for the magnetization at T=0 K, where the oscillations given by the de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) effect are present. We find that the Zeeman effect modifies the magnetization by introducing new peaks associated with the spin splitting of the Landau levels. These peaks are very small for typical carrier densities in graphene, but become more important for higher densities. The obtained results provide insight of the way in which the Zeeman effect modifies the magnetization, which can be useful to control and manipulate the spin degrees of freedom. - Highlights: • The magnetization has peaks whenever the last energy level changes discontinuously. • The peaks amplitude depends on the electron density. • The Zeeman effect introduces new peaks in the magnetization.

  20. Drafting an Effective Ethical Code of Conduct for Professional Societies: A Practical Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret C. Hardy

    2016-01-01

    Academic, medical, and research communities are struggling to quickly and effectively address unethical conduct within their professional ranks. Without a policy in place, individuals and institutes are subject to convoluted procedures and unnecessary consequences. In addition to policies geared to prevent harassment and assault, it is important to protect the ethical basis for research and provide a set of guidelines for how professionals treat each other, students, and trainees. Since draft...

  1. Effective thermal conductivity of superfluid helium: laminar, turbulent and ballistic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sciacca Michele

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we extend previous results on the effective thermal conductivity of liquid helium II in cylindrical channels to rectangular channels with high aspect ratio. The aim is to compare the results in the laminar regime, the turbulent regime and the ballistic regime, all of them obtained within a single mesoscopic formalism of heat transport, with heat flux as an independent variable.

  2. Effect of Aquatic Plants on Phosphorus Removal and Electrical Conductivity Decrease in Municipal Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Samimi Loghmani; Ali Abbaspour

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of essential elements for living organisms, though its critical concentration in surface and ground waters impose a serious problem such as eutrophication. So treatment of polluted waters is required before discharging to water resources. One of effective ways to decrease water pollution is using aquatic plants. An experiment was conducted in pilots with a closed flowing system on two plants, elodea (egria densa) and duck weed (lemna minor) with four treatments and three...

  3. Anomalous size effect in conductivity of Bi films of small thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anopchenko, A.S.; Kashirin, V.Yu.; Komnik, Yu.F.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data are obtained at helium temperature, which describe the kinetic properties (conductivity, magnetoresistance and Hall coefficient) of Bi films whose thicknesses are within 100-500 A. The small-thickness Bi films display an anomalous size effect- the growing conductivity at decreasing thickness, and pronounced quantum interference effects - weak electron localization and enhancing electron-electron interaction in a disordered system. The information derived on the kinetic properties of the films is used to identify the character of the changes in the electron and hole concentrations and mobilities with a decreasing thickness. The isotropy of the properties in the films plane due to the axial texture has permitted us to use the equations for a conductor with two types of charge carriers. The used kinetic characteristics correctly take into account the contribution of the quantum corrections related to quantum interference. It is found that the concentration of the charge carries increases appreciably (by about two orders of magnitude) as the film thickness decreases to 100 A, which determines the anomalous size effect in the conductivity of the films

  4. Topological honeycomb magnon Hall effect: A calculation of thermal Hall conductivity of magnetic spin excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owerre, S. A., E-mail: solomon@aims.ac.za [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 6 Melrose Road, Muizenberg, Cape Town 7945, South Africa and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2016-07-28

    Quite recently, the magnon Hall effect of spin excitations has been observed experimentally on the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. The thermal Hall conductivity κ{sup xy} changes sign as a function of magnetic field or temperature on the kagome lattice, and κ{sup xy} changes sign upon reversing the sign of the magnetic field on the pyrochlore lattice. Motivated by these recent exciting experimental observations, we theoretically propose a simple realization of the magnon Hall effect in a two-band model on the honeycomb lattice. The magnon Hall effect of spin excitations arises in the usual way via the breaking of inversion symmetry of the lattice, however, by a next-nearest-neighbour Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. We find that κ{sup xy} has a fixed sign for all parameter regimes considered. These results are in contrast to the Lieb, kagome, and pyrochlore lattices. We further show that the low-temperature dependence on the magnon Hall conductivity follows a T{sup 2} law, as opposed to the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. These results suggest an experimental procedure to measure thermal Hall conductivity within a class of 2D honeycomb quantum magnets and ultracold atoms trapped in a honeycomb optical lattice.

  5. The effect of reinforcement volume ratio on porosity and thermal conductivity in Al-Mgo composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Calin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume ratios (RVR on composite structure and thermal conductivity were examined in Al-MgO reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs of 5%, 10% and 15% RVR produced by melt stirring. In the production of composites, EN AW 1050A aluminum alloy was used as the matrix material and MgO powders with particle size of -105 µm were used as the reinforcement material. For every composite specimen was produced at 500 rev/min stirring speed, at 750 °C liquid matrix temperature and 4 minutes stirring time. Composite samples were cooled under normal atmosphere. Then, microstructures of the samples were determined and evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analysis. In general, it was observed that the reinforcement exhibited a homogeneous distribution. Furthermore, it was determined that the increase in the RVR increased porosity. From the Scanning Electron Microscope images, a thermal Ansys model was generated to determine effective thermal conductivity. Effective thermal conductivity of Al-MgO composites increased with the decrease in reinforcement volume ratio.

  6. A comparative study on the effective thermal conductivity of a single size beryllium pebble bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Sena, A.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.

    2004-01-01

    Solid breeder blankets generally use beryllium-helium pebble beds to ensure sufficient tritium breeding. The data of the effective thermal conductivity, k eff , of beryllium pebble beds is important to the design of fusion blankets. It serves as a database for benchmarking the models of pebble beds. The objective of this paper is to review and compare the available data (obtained by several studies) of the effective thermal conductivity of beryllium pebble beds in order to address the current status of these data. Two comparisons are presented: one for the data of k eff versus bed mean temperature and the second one for the data of k eff versus external applied pressures. The data (k eff versus bed temperature) reported by Enoeda et al., Dalle Donne et al., and UCLA, have a similar particle size and packing fraction. Despite their similarity, the standard deviation values of their data are around 32%. Also, the data of the effective thermal conductivity as a function of mechanical pressure have standard deviation values of ∼50%. From the presented comparisons, significant discrepancies among the available data of k eff of the beryllium pebble beds were observed. These discrepancies may be attributed to the apparent differences among available studies, such as experiment technique, packing fraction, particle characteristics, bed dimensions, and temperature range and gradient across the bed. (author)

  7. Effects of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection of fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Leping; Peterson, George P.; Yoda, Minani; Wang Buxuan

    2012-01-01

    The role of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection was investigated. Possible mechanisms for variations resulting from variations in the thermophysical properties are theoretically and experimentally discussed. The effect of the nanoparticle motion on conduction is demonstrated through thermal conductivity measurement of deionized water with suspended CuO nanoparticles (50 nm in diameter) and correlated with the contributions of Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, etc. The tendencies observed is that the magnitude of and the variation in the thermal conductivity increases with increasing volume fraction for a given temperature, which is due primarily to the Brownian diffusion of the nanoparticles. Using dimensional analysis, the thermal conductivity is correlated and both the interfacial thermal resistance and near-field radiation are found to be essentially negligible. A modification term that incorporates the contributions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis is proposed. The effect of nanoscale convection is illustrated through an experimental investigation that utilized fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle tracers (200 nm in diameter) and multilayer nanoparticle image velocimetry. The results indicate that both the magnitude and the deviation of the fluid motion increased with increasing heat flux in the near-wall region. Meanwhile, the fluid motion tended to decrease with the off-wall distance for a given heating power. A corresponding numerical study of convection of pure deionized water shows that the velocity along the off-wall direction is several orders of magnitude lower than that of deionized water, which indicates that Brownian motion in the near-wall region is crucial for fluid with suspended nanoparticles in convection.

  8. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CONDUCTIVE EDUCATION ON MOTOR SKILLS IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Khoshvaght

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive neuro-developmental disorders that are caused by damage to the developing brain and affect movement and posture. Children with cerebral palsy suffer difficulty in motor function (coordination and control.The present inquiry investigated the impact of conductive education on motor skills in children having cerebral palsy. Methods: A quasi-experimental research was done using pretest-posttest and control group design. The study subjects consisted of all children with cerebral palsy in Shiraz. A sample of 30 subjects was randomly chosen to employ convenience sampling procedure and classified to two groups of treatment (15 subjects and control (15 subjects. The pretest was performed for both groups, and the experimental group received conductive education in 20 sessions. While the control subjects did not have this education, finally, the post-test was performed for both groups. The Lincoln-Oseretsky test was used to measure motor skills. The data were analyzed using ANCOVA and MANCOVA. Results: The results showed that conductive education had a significant effect on motor skills (P<0.001 and its subscales such as speed of movement (P<0.001, general static coordination (P<0.001, general dynamic coordination (P<0.001, dynamic manual coordination (P<0.001, synchronous-asymmetrical voluntary movements (P<0.001, and asynchronous-asymmetrical voluntary movements (P<0.001 in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusion: The findings indicated the effectiveness of conductive education on cerebral palsy children’s motor skills. Therefore, it is recommended to design and implement a conductive education program to improve motor skills of cerebral palsy children.

  9. Effect of nanocrystallization on the electrical conductivity enhancement and Moessbauer hyperfine parameters of iron based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Desoky, M.M., E-mail: mmdesoky@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish 45511, North Sinaa (Egypt); Ibrahim, F.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish 45511, North Sinaa (Egypt); Mostafa, A.G.; Hassaan, M.Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City 11884, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    Selected glasses of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PbO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} system have been transformed into nanomaterials by annealing at temperature close to crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) for 1 h. The effects of the annealing of the present samples on its structural and electrical properties were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron micrograph (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and dc conductivity ({sigma}). Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in order to determine the states of iron and its hyperfine structure. The effect of nanocrystalization on the Moessbauer hyperfine parameters did not exhibit significant modifications in present glasses. However, in case of glass ceramic nanocrystals show a distinct decrease in the quadrupole splitting ({Delta}) is observed, reflecting an evident decrease in the distortion of structural units like FeO{sub 4} units. In general, the Moessbauer parameters of the nano-crystalline phase exhibit tendency to increase with PbO{sub 2} content. TEM of as-quenched glasses confirm the homogeneous and essentially featureless morphology. TEM of the corresponding glass ceramic nanocrystals indicates nanocrystals embedded in the glassy matrix with average particle size of about 32 nm. The crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) was observed to decrease with PbO{sub 2} content. The glass ceramic nanocrystals obtained by annealing at T{sub c} exhibit improvement of electrical conductivity up to four orders of magnitude than the starting glasses. This considerable improvement of electrical conductivity after nanocrystallization is attributed to formation of defective, well-conducting phases 'easy conduction paths' along the glass-crystallites interfaces.

  10. Computer modeling of the combined effects of perfusion, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity on tissue heating patterns in radiofrequency tumor ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Liu, Zhengjun; Humphries, Stanley; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2008-11-01

    To use an established computer simulation model of radiofrequency (RF) ablation to characterize the combined effects of varying perfusion, and electrical and thermal conductivity on RF heating. Two-compartment computer simulation of RF heating using 2-D and 3-D finite element analysis (ETherm) was performed in three phases (n = 88 matrices, 144 data points each). In each phase, RF application was systematically modeled on a clinically relevant template of application parameters (i.e., varying tumor and surrounding tissue perfusion: 0-5 kg/m(3)-s) for internally cooled 3 cm single and 2.5 cm cluster electrodes for tumor diameters ranging from 2-5 cm, and RF application times (6-20 min). In the first phase, outer thermal conductivity was changed to reflect three common clinical scenarios: soft tissue, fat, and ascites (0.5, 0.23, and 0.7 W/m- degrees C, respectively). In the second phase, electrical conductivity was changed to reflect different tumor electrical conductivities (0.5 and 4.0 S/m, representing soft tissue and adjuvant saline injection, respectively) and background electrical conductivity representing soft tissue, lung, and kidney (0.5, 0.1, and 3.3 S/m, respectively). In the third phase, the best and worst combinations of electrical and thermal conductivity characteristics were modeled in combination. Tissue heating patterns and the time required to heat the entire tumor +/-a 5 mm margin to >50 degrees C were assessed. Increasing background tissue thermal conductivity increases the time required to achieve a 50 degrees C isotherm for all tumor sizes and electrode types, but enabled ablation of a given tumor size at higher tissue perfusions. An inner thermal conductivity equivalent to soft tissue (0.5 W/m- degrees C) surrounded by fat (0.23 W/m- degrees C) permitted the greatest degree of tumor heating in the shortest time, while soft tissue surrounded by ascites (0.7 W/m- degrees C) took longer to achieve the 50 degrees C isotherm, and complete ablation

  11. Thermal conductivity of layered borides: The effect of building defects on the thermal conductivity of TmAlB4 and the anisotropic thermal conductivity of AlB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare earth metal borides have attracted great interest due to their unusual properties, such as superconductivity and f-electron magnetism. A recent discovery attributes the tunability of magnetism in rare earth aluminoborides to the effect of so-called “building defects.” In this paper, we report data for the effect of building defects on the thermal conductivities of α-TmAlB4 single crystals. Building defects reduce the thermal conductivity of α-TmAlB4 by ≈30%. At room temperature, the thermal conductivity of AlB2 is nearly a factor of 5 higher than that of α-TmAlB4. AlB2 single crystals are thermally anisotropic with the c-axis thermal conductivity nearly twice the thermal conductivity of the a-b plane. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity near and above room temperature reveals that both electrons and phonons contribute substantially to thermal transport in AlB2 with electrons being the dominant heat carriers.

  12. Effective Thermal Conductivity For Drift-Scale Models Used In TSPA-SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.D. Francis

    2001-01-25

    The objective of this calculation is to develop a time dependent in-drift effective thermal conductivity parameter that will approximate heat conduction, thermal radiation, and natural convection heat transfer using a single mode of heat transfer (heat conduction). In order to reduce the physical and numerical complexity of the heat transfer processes that occur (and must be modeled) as a result of the emplacement of heat generating wastes, a single parameter will be developed that approximates all forms of heat transfer from the waste package surface to the drift wall (or from one surface exchanging heat with another). Subsequently, with this single parameter, one heat transfer mechanism (e.g., conduction heat transfer) can be used in the models. The resulting parameter is to be used as input in the drift-scale process-level models applied in total system performance assessments for the site recommendation (TSPA-SR). The format of this parameter will be a time-dependent table for direct input into the thermal-hydrologic (TH) and the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) models.

  13. Effective Thermal Conductivity For Drift-Scale Models Used In TSPA-SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.D. Francis

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to develop a time dependent in-drift effective thermal conductivity parameter that will approximate heat conduction, thermal radiation, and natural convection heat transfer using a single mode of heat transfer (heat conduction). In order to reduce the physical and numerical complexity of the heat transfer processes that occur (and must be modeled) as a result of the emplacement of heat generating wastes, a single parameter will be developed that approximates all forms of heat transfer from the waste package surface to the drift wall (or from one surface exchanging heat with another). Subsequently, with this single parameter, one heat transfer mechanism (e.g., conduction heat transfer) can be used in the models. The resulting parameter is to be used as input in the drift-scale process-level models applied in total system performance assessments for the site recommendation (TSPA-SR). The format of this parameter will be a time-dependent table for direct input into the thermal-hydrologic (TH) and the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) models

  14. Effects of Luttinger leads on the AC conductance of a quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kai-Hua, E-mail: khy@bjut.edu.cn [College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100122 (China); Qin, Chang-Dong [College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100122 (China); Wang, Huai-Yu [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Kai-Di [College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100122 (China)

    2017-04-18

    Highlights: • The system exhibits photon-assisted single- and two-channel Kondo physics, depending on the intralead interaction. • The 1CK and 2CK mechanisms can coexist within a region of the intralead interaction parameter. • In the limit of strong interaction, the differential conductance scales as a power law both in bias voltage and in temperature. - Abstract: We investigate the joint effects of the intralead electron interaction and an external alternating gate voltage on the transport of a quantum dot coupled to two Luttinger liquid leads in the Kondo regime. We find the transferring between two Kondo physics mechanics by investigation of differential conductance. For very weak intralead interaction, the satellite and main Kondo resonant peaks appear in the differential conductance. For moderately strong intralead interaction, all the peaks disappear and evolve into dips, which signifies that a photon-assisted single-channel Kondo (1CK) physics turns into two-channel Kondo (2CK) physics. The 1CK and 2CK mechanisms can coexist within a region of the intralead interaction parameter. The 1CK physics transits to the 2CK one gradually, not suddenly. In the limit of strong interaction, all dips disappear. When the bias voltage is small, there is no photon exchange between the quantum dot and alternative field, and the differential conductance scales as a power law both in bias voltage and in temperature. As the field becomes stronger, the quantum dot will emit and absorb photons.

  15. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALLOY 690 AT LOW NEUTRON FLUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOO SEOG RYU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alloy 690 has been selected as a steam generator tubing material for SMART owing to a near immunity to primary water stress corrosion cracking. The steam generators of SMART are faced with a neutron flux due to the integrated arrangement inside a reactor vessel, and thus it is important to know the irradiation effects of the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690. Alloy 690 was irradiated at HANARO to fluences of (0.7−28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV at 250°C, and its thermal conductivity was measured using the laser-flash equipment in the IMEF. The thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 was dependent on temperature, and it was a good fit to the Smith-Palmer equation, which modified the Wiedemann-Franz law. The irradiation at 250°C did not degrade the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690, and even showed a small increase (1% at fluences of (0.7∼28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV.

  16. Laser surface modification of electrically conductive fabrics: Material performance improvement and design effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunakova, Veronika; Hrubosova, Zuzana; Tunak, Maros; Kasparova, Marie; Mullerova, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Development of lightweight flexible materials for electromagnetic interference shielding has obtained increased attention in recent years particularly for clothing, textiles in-house use and technical applications especially in areas of aircraft, aerospace, automobiles and flexible electronics such as portable electronics and wearable devices. There are many references in the literature concerning development and investigation of electromagnetic shielding lightweight flexible materials especially textile based with different electrically conductive additives. However, only little attention is paid to designing and enhancing the properties of these special fabrics by textile finishing processes. Laser technology applied as a physical treatment method is becoming very popular and can be used in different applications to make improvement and even overcome drawbacks of some of the traditional processes. The main purpose of this study is firstly to analyze the possibilities of transferring design onto the surface of electrically conductive fabrics by laser beam and secondly to study of effect of surface modification degree on performance of conductive fabric including electromagnetic shielding ability and mechanical properties. Woven fabric made of yarns containing 10% of extremely thin stainless steel fiber was used as a conductive substrate.

  17. Pyroelectric effect and lattice thermal conductivity of InN/GaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansdah, Gopal; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar

    2018-06-01

    The built-in-polarization (BIP) of InN/GaN heterostructures enhances Debye temperature, phonon mean free path and thermal conductivity of the heterostructure at room temperature. The variation of thermal conductivities (kp: including polarization mechanism and k: without polarization mechanism) with temperature predicts the existence of a transition temperature (Tp) between primary and secondary pyroelectric effect. Below Tp, kp is lower than k; while above Tp, kp is significantly contributed from BIP mechanism due to thermal expansion. A thermodynamic theory has been proposed to explain the result. The room temperature thermal conductivity of InN/GaN heterostructure with and without polarization is respectively 32 and 48 W m-1 K-1. The temperature Tp and room temperature pyroelectric coefficient of InN has been predicted as 120 K and -8.425 μC m-2 K-1, respectively which are in line with prior literature studies. This study suggests that thermal conductivity measurement in InN/GaN heterostructures can help to understand the role of phonons in pyroelectricity.

  18. Pressure effect on ionic conductivity in yttrium-oxide-doped single-crystal zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, E.T.; Park, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the effect of pressure on the ionic conductivity of a 9.5 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal. The experiment was conducted in the elastic region, and the oxygen ion transport number was unity (t ion > 0.99999). A conventional four-probe DC method was used to measure the ionic conductivity of the rectangular-shaped sample under uniaxial pressures up to 600 atm at 750 C in air. Measured ionic conductivity decreased as applied pressure increased. Based on henry Eyring's absolute reaction rate theory, which states that the calculated activation volume has a positive value (ΔV 2 = 2.08 cm 3 /mol of O -2 ) for oxygen ion transport in the fluoride cubic lattice, they concluded that the results they obtained could be explained by an oxygen ion transport mechanism. This mechanism can explain the fact that the interionic distance increases during oxygen ion transport from one unit cell to neighboring unit cells

  19. Effects of an applied voltage on direct interspecies electron transfer via conductive materials for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2017-10-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between exoelectrogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea via conductive materials is reported as an efficient method to produce methane in anaerobic organic waste digestion. A voltage can be applied to the conductive materials to accelerate the DIET between two groups of microorganisms to produce methane. To evaluate this hypothesis, two sets of anaerobic serum bottles with and without applied voltage were used with a pair of graphite rods as conductive materials to facilitate DIET. Initially, the methane production rate was similar between the two sets of serum bottles, and later the serum bottles with an applied voltage of 0.39V showed a 168% higher methane production rate than serum bottles without an applied voltage. In cyclic voltammograms, the characteristic redox peaks for hydrogen and acetate oxidation were identified in the serum bottles with an applied voltage. In the microbial community analyses, hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanobacterium) were observed to be abundant in serum bottles with an applied voltage, while methanogens utilizing carbon dioxide (e.g., Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina) were dominant in serum bottles without an applied voltage. Taken together, the applied voltage on conductive materials might not be effective to promote DIET in methane production. Instead, it appeared to generate a condition for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of conducting polypyrrole on the transport properties of carbon nanotube yarn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroughi, Javad; Kimiaghalam, Bahram; Ghorbani, Shaban Reza; Safaei, Farzad; Abolhasan, Mehran

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the electrical conductivity in three types of pristine and carbon nanotube-polypyrrole (CNT-PPy) composite yarns and its dependence on over a wide temperature range. The experimental results fit well with the analytical models developed. The effective energy separation between localized states of the pristine CNT yarn is larger than that for both the electrochemically and chemically prepared CNT-PPy yarns. It was found that all samples are in the critical regime in the insulator–metal transition, or close to the metallic regime at low temperature. The electrical conductivity results are in good agreement with a Three Dimensional Variable Range Hopping model at low temperatures, which provides a strong indication that electron hopping is the main means of current transfer in CNT yarns at T < 100 K. We found that the two shell model accurately describes the electronic properties of CNT and CNT-PPy composite yarns in the temperature range of 5–350 K. - Highlights: ► We developed hybrid carbon nanotube conducting polypyrrole composite yarns. ► The main current transfer scheme in yarn is via three dimensional electrons hopping. ► Two shell model describes well electronic properties of yarns in range of 5-350 K.

  1. Effects of γ-rays on electrical conductivity of polyvinyl alcohol-polypyrrole composite polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hamzah Harun; Elias Saion; Noorhana Yahya; Anuar Kassim; Ekramul Mahmud; Muhammad Yousuf Hussain; Iskandar Shahrim Mustafa; Azian Othman; Norazimah Mohd Yusof; Mohd Ahmad Ali Omer

    2007-01-01

    The composite polymer films of polyvinyl alcohol/polypyrrole/chloral hydrate (PVA-PPy-CH) had been prepared. Effects of γ-rays on the electrical conductivity of the composite polymer films had been investigated by using Inductance Resistance meter (LCR) meter at a frequency ranging from 20 Hz to 1 MHz. With the incorporation of choloral hydrate in the polymer sample, the conductivity increased indicates that it is capable to be used as dopant for polymerizing conjugated polymer. The electrical conductivity obtained increased as the dose increased, which is in the order of 10 -5 Scm -1 indicates that γ-ray is capable to enhance the electrical conductivity of the composite polymer films. The parameter of s is in the range of 0.31 ≤ S ≤ 0.49 and obeyed simple power law dispersion ω S . The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) micrographs reveal the formation of polypyrrole globules in polyvinyl alcohol matrix which increased as the irradiation dose was increased. (Author)

  2. Effects of temperature and thermally-induced microstructure change on hydraulic conductivity of Boom Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Z. Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Boom Clay is one of the potential host rocks for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear waste in Belgium. In order to investigate the mechanism of hydraulic conductivity variation under complex thermo-mechanical coupling conditions and to better understand the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM coupling behaviour of Boom Clay, a series of permeability tests using temperature-controlled triaxial cell has been carried out on the Boom Clay samples taken from Belgian underground research laboratory (URL HADES. Due to its sedimentary nature, Boom Clay presents across-anisotropy with respect to its sub-horizontal bedding plane. Direct measurements of the vertical (Kv and horizontal (Kh hydraulic conductivities show that the hydraulic conductivity at 80 °C is about 2.4 times larger than that at room temperature (23 °C, and the hydraulic conductivity variation with temperature is basically reversible during heating–cooling cycle. The anisotropic property of Boom Clay is studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM tests, which highlight the transversely isotropic characteristics of intact Boom Clay. It is shown that the sub-horizontal bedding feature accounts for the horizontal permeability higher than the vertical one. The measured increment in hydraulic conductivity with temperature is lower than the calculated one when merely considering the changes in water kinematic viscosity and density with temperature. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests have also been carried out to investigate the impact of microstructure variation on the THM properties of clay. The results show that heating under unconstrained boundary condition will produce larger size of pores and weaken the microstructure. The discrepancy between the hydraulic conductivity experimentally measured and predicted (considering water viscosity and density changes with temperature can be attributed to the microstructural weakening effect on the thermal volume change

  3. Effects of surface polishing and annealing on the optical conductivity of intermetallic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Rhee, J Y

    1999-01-01

    The optical conductivity spectra of several intermetallic compounds were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Three spectra were measured for each compound; just after the sample was mechanically polished, at high temperature, and after the sample was annealed at 110 .deg. C for at least one day and cooled to room temperature. An equiatomic FeTi alloy showed the typical effects of annealing after mechanical polishing of surface. The spectrum after annealing had a larger magnitude and sharper structures than the spectrum before annealing. We also observed shifts of peaks in the spectrum. A relatively low-temperature annealing gave rise to unexpectedly substantial effects, and the effects were explained by recrystallization and/or a disorder -> order transition of the surface of the sample which was damaged and, hence, became highly disordered by mechanical polishing. Similar effects were also observed when the sample temperature was lowered. The observed changes upon annealing could partly be explained by p...

  4. VO{sub x} effectively doping CVD-graphene for transparent conductive films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Qinghua; Shi, Liangjing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Qinghong [State Key Laboratory of Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Huifeng [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Yuzhi [The Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu, Yangqiao, E-mail: yqliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Sun, Jing, E-mail: jingsun@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Doping process operated easily. • Sheet resistance decreased efficiently after doping. • Sheet resistance of doped graphene is stable after exposed in the air. • Mechanism of doping process is studied. - Abstract: Chemical vapor deposition(CVD)-synthesized graphene is potentially an alternative for tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) transparent conductive films (TCFs), however its sheet resistance is still too high to meet many demands. Vanadium oxide has been widely applied as smart window materials, however, no study has been reported to use it as dopant to improve the conductivity of graphene TCFs. In this study, we firstly reported that VO{sub x} doping can effectively lower the sheet resistance of CVD-graphene films while keeping its good optical properties, whose transmittance is as high as 86–90%. The optimized VO{sub x}-doped graphene exhibits a sheet resistance as low as 176 Ω/□, which decreases by 56% compared to the undoped graphene films. The doping process is convenient, stable, economical and easy to operate. What is more, VO{sub x} can effectively increase the work function(WF) of the film, making it more appropriate for use in solar cells. The evolution of the VO{sub x} species annealed at different temperatures below 400 °C has been detailed studied for the first time, based on which the doping mechanism is proposed. The prepared VO{sub x} doped graphene is expected to be a promising candidate for transparent conductive film purposes.

  5. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    Full Text Available Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5 that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information.

  6. The effect of driven electron-phonon coupling on the electronic conductance of a polar nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardaani, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad-m@sci.sku.ac.ir; Rabani, Hassan, E-mail: rabani-h@sci.sku.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, P. O. Box 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Center, Shahrekord University, 8818634141 Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaili, Esmat; Shariati, Ashrafalsadat [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, P. O. Box 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    A semi-classical model is proposed to explore the effect of electron-phonon coupling on the coherent electronic transport of a polar chain which is confined between two rigid leads in the presence of an external electric field. To this end, we construct the model by means of Green's function technique within the nearest neighbor tight-binding and harmonic approximations. For a time-periodic electric field, the atomic displacements from the equilibrium positions are obtained precisely. The result is then used to compute the electronic transport properties of the chain within the Peierls-type model. The numerical results indicate that the conductance of the system shows interesting behavior in some special frequencies. For each special frequency, there is an electronic quasi-state in which the scattering of electrons by vibrating atoms reaches maximum. The system electronic conductance decreases dramatically at the strong electron-phonon couplings and low electron energies. In the presence of damping forces, the electron-phonon interaction has a less significant effect on the conductance.

  7. The effect of driven electron-phonon coupling on the electronic conductance of a polar nanowire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardaani, Mohammad; Rabani, Hassan; Esmaili, Esmat; Shariati, Ashrafalsadat

    2015-01-01

    A semi-classical model is proposed to explore the effect of electron-phonon coupling on the coherent electronic transport of a polar chain which is confined between two rigid leads in the presence of an external electric field. To this end, we construct the model by means of Green's function technique within the nearest neighbor tight-binding and harmonic approximations. For a time-periodic electric field, the atomic displacements from the equilibrium positions are obtained precisely. The result is then used to compute the electronic transport properties of the chain within the Peierls-type model. The numerical results indicate that the conductance of the system shows interesting behavior in some special frequencies. For each special frequency, there is an electronic quasi-state in which the scattering of electrons by vibrating atoms reaches maximum. The system electronic conductance decreases dramatically at the strong electron-phonon couplings and low electron energies. In the presence of damping forces, the electron-phonon interaction has a less significant effect on the conductance

  8. Effect of microscale gaseous thermal conduction on the thermal behavior of a buckled microbridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaqi; Tang Zhenan; Li Jinfeng; Zhang Fengtian

    2008-01-01

    A microbridge is a basic micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device and has great potential for application in microsensors and microactuators. The thermal behavior of a microbridge is important for designing a microbridge-based thermal microsensor or microactuator. To study the thermal behavior of a microbridge consisting of Si 3 N 4 and polysilicon with a 2 µm suspended gap between the substrate and the microbridge while the microbridge is heated by an electrical current fed through the polysilicon, a microbridge model is developed to correlate theoretically the input current and the temperature distribution under the buckling conditions, especially considering the effects of the microscale gaseous thermal conduction due to the microbridge buckling. The calculated results show that the buckling of the microbridge changes the microscale gaseous thermal conduction, and thus greatly affects the thermal behavior of the microbridge. We also evaluate the effects of initial buckling on the temperature distribution of the microbridge. The experimental results show that buckling should be taken into account if the buckling is large. Therefore, the variation in gaseous thermal conduction and the suspended gap height caused by the buckling should be considered in the design of such thermomechanical microsensors and microactuators, which requires more accurate thermal behavior

  9. Quantum simulation of conductivity plateaux and fractional quantum Hall effect using ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberán, Nuria; García-March, Miguel Angel; Taron, Josep; Dagnino, Daniel; Trombettoni, Andrea; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the role of impurities in the fractional quantum Hall effect using a highly controllable system of ultracold atoms. We investigate the mechanism responsible for the formation of plateaux in the resistivity/conductivity as a function of the applied magnetic field in the lowest Landau level regime. To this aim, we consider an impurity immersed in a small cloud of an ultracold quantum Bose gas subjected to an artificial magnetic field. We consider scenarios corresponding to experimentally realistic systems with gauge fields induced by rotation of the trapping parabolic potential. Systems of this kind are adequate to simulate quantum Hall effects in ultracold atom setups. We use exact diagonalization for few atoms and to emulate transport equations, we analyze the time evolution of the system under a periodic perturbation. We provide a theoretical proposal to detect the up-to-now elusive presence of strongly correlated states related to fractional filling factors in the context of ultracold atoms. We analyze the conditions under which these strongly correlated states are associated with the presence of the resistivity/conductivity plateaux. Our main result is the presence of a plateau in a region, where the transfer between localized and non-localized particles takes place, as a necessary condition to maintain a constant value of the resistivity/conductivity as the magnetic field increases. (paper)

  10. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of mono-sized pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • One new method to couple the contact area with bed strain is developed. • The constant coefficient to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined. • This model is valid for various cases, and its advantages are showed obviously. - Abstract: A model is presented here to predict the effective thermal conductivity of porous medium packed with mono-sized spherical pebbles, and it is valid when pebbles’ size is far less than the characteristic length of porous medium just like the fusion pebble beds. In this model, the influences of parameters such as properties of pebble and gas materials, bed porosity, pebble size, gas flow, contact area, thermal radiation, contact resistance, etc. are all taken into account, and one method to couple the contact areas with bed strains is also developed and implemented preliminarily. Compared with available theoretical models, CFD numerical simulations and experimental data, this model is verified to be successful to forecast the bed effective thermal conductivity in various cases and its advantages are also showed obviously. Especially, the convection in pebble beds is focused on and a constant coefficient C to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined for the fully developed region of beds by numerical simulation, which is close to some experimental data.

  11. Effect of ionic conductivity of zirconia electrolytes on polarization properties of various electrodes in SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Manabu [Yamanashi Univ., Kofu (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been intensively investigated because, in principle, their energy conversion efficiency is fairly high. Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs from 1000{degrees}C to around 800{degrees}C is desirable for reducing serious problems such as physical and chemical degradation of the constructing materials. The object of a series of the studies is to find a clue for achieving higher electrode performances at a low operating temperature than those of the present level. Although the polarization loss at electrodes can be reduced by using mixed-conducting ceria electrolytes, or introducing the mixed-conducting (reduced zirconia or ceria) laver on the conventional zirconia electrolyte surface, no reports are available on the effect of such an ionic conductivity of electrolytes on electrode polarizations. High ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, of course, reduces the ohmic loss. However, we have found that the IR-free polarization of a platinum anode attached to zirconia electrolytes is greatly influenced by the ionic conductivity, {sigma}{sub ion}, of the electrolytes used. The higher the {sigma}{sub ion}, the higher the exchange current density, j{sub 0}, for the Pt anode in H{sub 2} at 800 {approximately} 1000{degrees}C. It was indicated that the H{sub 2} oxidation reaction rate was controlled by the supply rate of oxide ions through the Pt/zirconia interface which is proportional to the {sigma}{sub ion}. Recently, we have proposed a new concept of the catalyzed-reaction layers which realizes both high-performances of anodes and cathodes for medium-temperature operating SOFCs. We present the interesting dependence of the polarization properties of various electrodes (the SDC anodes with and without Ru microcatalysts, Pt cathode, La(Sr)MnO{sub 3} cathodes with and without Pt microcatalysts) on the {sigma}{sub ion} of various zirconia electrolytes at 800 {approximately} 1000{degrees}C.

  12. Determining the effects of thermal conductivity on epoxy molds using profiled cooling channels with metal inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, Khurram; Rani, Abdul Ahmad Majdi; Ahmad, Faiz; Baharom, Masri; Raghavan, Vijay R.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer injection molds are generally manufactured with metallic materials, such as tool steel, which provide reliable working of molds and extended service life. The manufacture of injection molds with steel is a prolonged process because of the strength of steel. For a short prototype production run, one of the suitable choices could be the use of aluminum-filled epoxy material, which can produce a functional mold in a short time as compared with a conventionally machined tool. Aluminum-filled epoxy tooling is a good choice for short production runs for engineering applications, yet works best for relatively simple shapes. The advantages in relation to the fabrication of injection molds with epoxy-based materials include time saving in producing the mold, epoxy curing at ambient temperature, and ease of machining and post processing. Nevertheless, one major drawback of epoxy material is its poor thermal conductivity, which results in a relatively longer cooling time for epoxy injection molds. This study investigates some of the innovative ideas for enhancing the thermal conductivity for epoxy molds. The basic concept behind these ideas was to embed a highly thermally conductive metal insert within the mold between cavities with an innovative design of cooling channels called profiled cooling channels. This technique will increase the effective thermal conductivity of the epoxy mold, leading to the reduction in cooling time for the injection molded polymer part. Experimental analysis conducted in the current study also verified that the mold with profiled cooling channels and embedded metal insert has significantly reduced the cooling time

  13. Determining the effects of thermal conductivity on epoxy molds using profiled cooling channels with metal inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altaf, Khurram; Rani, Abdul Ahmad Majdi; Ahmad, Faiz; Baharom, Masri [Mechanical Engineering Dept., Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Raghavan, Vijay R. [OYL Manufacturing, Sungai Buloh (Malaysia)

    2016-11-15

    Polymer injection molds are generally manufactured with metallic materials, such as tool steel, which provide reliable working of molds and extended service life. The manufacture of injection molds with steel is a prolonged process because of the strength of steel. For a short prototype production run, one of the suitable choices could be the use of aluminum-filled epoxy material, which can produce a functional mold in a short time as compared with a conventionally machined tool. Aluminum-filled epoxy tooling is a good choice for short production runs for engineering applications, yet works best for relatively simple shapes. The advantages in relation to the fabrication of injection molds with epoxy-based materials include time saving in producing the mold, epoxy curing at ambient temperature, and ease of machining and post processing. Nevertheless, one major drawback of epoxy material is its poor thermal conductivity, which results in a relatively longer cooling time for epoxy injection molds. This study investigates some of the innovative ideas for enhancing the thermal conductivity for epoxy molds. The basic concept behind these ideas was to embed a highly thermally conductive metal insert within the mold between cavities with an innovative design of cooling channels called profiled cooling channels. This technique will increase the effective thermal conductivity of the epoxy mold, leading to the reduction in cooling time for the injection molded polymer part. Experimental analysis conducted in the current study also verified that the mold with profiled cooling channels and embedded metal insert has significantly reduced the cooling time.

  14. Effect of Chlorides on Conductivity and Dielectric Constant in Hardened Cement Mortar: NDT for Durability Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunkook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric constant and conductivity, the so-called EM properties (electromagnetic, are widely adopted for NDT (Nondestructive Technique in order to detect damage or evaluate performance of concrete without damage to existing RC (reinforced concrete. Among deteriorating agents, chloride ion is considered as one of the most critical threats due to rapid penetration and direct effect on steel corrosion. In the work, cement mortar samples with 3 w/c (water-to-cement ratios and 4 levels of chloride addition are considered. Conductivity and dielectric constant are measured in the normal frequency range. They increase with strength of mortar and more chloride ions due to denser pore formation. Furthermore, the behaviors of measured EM property are investigated with carbonation velocity and strength, which shows an attempt of application to durability evaluation through EM measurement.

  15. The porosity effect on properties of sintered materials as their conductivity and Youngs modulus of elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondracek, G.; Thuemmler, F.

    1979-01-01

    A set of equations derived demonstrates quantitatively the influence of closed pores on the conductivity as well as on Youngsmodulus of elasticity of sintered materials. There are three microstructural parameters following from the theoretical derivation controlling the porosity effect on the properties, which are the total porosity, the form factor and the orientation factor of the pores. By quantitative microstructure analysis these factors become available providing together with the equations the tool - to calculate the conductivity and Youngs modulus of elasticity from microstructural quantities of sintered materials thus substituting direct property measurements by quantitative microstructure analysis if desired - to endeaver technologically optimum microstructures to obtain theoretically predicted special property values and to precalculate property alterations by microstructure variations ('taylor-made-materials') - to supplement the conventional microstructural quality control by calculated property data. (orig.) [de

  16. Effective thermal conductivity estimate of heterogenous media by a lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, M.R.; Pateyron, B.; El Ganaoui, M.; Labbe, J.C. [Limoges Univ., Limoges (France). Science des Procedes Ceramiques et de Traitements de Surface

    2009-07-01

    Statistical lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM) are often used to simulate isothermal fluid flow for problems with complex geometry or porous structures. This study used an LBM algorithm to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of simple 2-D configurations. The LBM algorithm was also used to estimate the ECT of a porous structure. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation was used to determine the discrete form of the Boltzmann equation for a single phase flow. A comparison with the finite element method (FEM) was also conducted. Results of the study demonstrated that the LBM algorithm accurately simulates the phenomena of heat and mass transfer for both the simple 2-D configurations as well as the porous media. The tool will be used to determine the influence of thermal contact resistance on heat transfer. 6 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  17. Stereoelectronic Effect-Induced Conductance Switching in Aromatic Chain Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Na; Wang, Jinying; Jia, Chuancheng; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Xisha; Yu, Chenmin; Li, Mingliang; Wang, Shuopei; Gong, Yao; Sun, Hantao; Zhang, Guanxin; Liu, Zhirong; Zhang, Guangyu; Liao, Jianhui; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2017-02-08

    Biphenyl, as the elementary unit of organic functional materials, has been widely used in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, over decades little has been fundamentally understood regarding how the intramolecular conformation of biphenyl dynamically affects its transport properties at the single-molecule level. Here, we establish the stereoelectronic effect of biphenyl on its electrical conductance based on the platform of graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions, where a specifically designed hexaphenyl aromatic chain molecule is covalently sandwiched between nanogapped graphene point contacts to create stable single-molecule junctions. Both theoretical and temperature-dependent experimental results consistently demonstrate that phenyl twisting in the aromatic chain molecule produces different microstates with different degrees of conjugation, thus leading to stochastic switching between high- and low-conductance states. These investigations offer new molecular design insights into building functional single-molecule electrical devices.

  18. Boride ceramics covalent functionalization and its effect on the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang, E-mail: yuzhiqiang@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China); Wu, Yicheng [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China); Wei, Bin; Baier, Horst [Institute of Lightweight Structures, Technical University Munich (TUM), Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Zirconium diboride/aluminium oxide (ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) composite particles were functionalized with epoxide functionalized γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane by the covalent bonding approach to improve the interfacial compatibility of composite particles in epoxy matrix. The composites of epoxy resin filled with functionalized ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by in situ bulk condensation polymerization of bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin in the presence of ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The heat-conducting properties of composites were investigated by the finite element method (FEM) and the thermal conductivity test. The finite-element program ANSYS was used for this numerical analysis, and three-dimensional spheres-in-cube lattice array models were built to simulate the microstructure of composite materials for different filler contents. The thermal conductivity of composites was determined by laser flash method (LFA447 Nanoflash), using the measured heat capacity and thermal diffusivity, with separately entered density data. The results show that the effective chemical bonds are formed between ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane after the surface functionalization. The interfacial compatibility and bonding of modified particles with the epoxy matrix are improved. The thermal conductivities of functionalized composites with 3 vol% and 5 vol% loading are increased by 8.3% and 12.5% relative to the unmodified composites, respectively. Comparison of experimental values and calculated values of the thermal conductivity, the average relative differences are under 5%. The predictive values of thermal conductivity of epoxy composites are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. - Highlights: • The surfaces of ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were functionalized by silane coupling agents. • The thermal conductivity (TC) of modified epoxy composites is improved significantly. • The FEM values of TC are in

  19. The effect of substrate conduction on boiling data on pin-fin heat sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, D.A.; Raeisi, A.H.; Kew, P.A.; Hamed, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Heat-transfer experiments for a copper heat sink containing pin-fins with a cross section of 1 mm by 1 mm and a height of 1 mm have been reported previously. The pin-fins were manufactured on a 5 mm thick, 50 mm square base plate in a square, in-line arrangement with a pitch of 2 mm. Data were produced while boiling R113 and water at atmospheric pressure. The heat sink was heated from below through a 5 mm thick aluminium wall by an electrical heating method that is normally associated with the uniform heat flux boundary condition. However, variations in the heat-transfer coefficient and the liquid subcooling interacted with the high thermal conductivity of the aluminium and copper materials to produce a near isothermal wall boundary condition. Thus, heat conduction effects had to be taken into account when determining the heat-flux distribution required in the analysis of the data. Many experiments like these have used the uniform heat-flux assumption to analyse the data. The discrepancies produced from this approach are explored. Single-phase flows across a pin-fin surface produce a reasonably uniform distribution of heat-transfer coefficient. However, the liquid temperature increases as it moves across the heat sink. This produces a non-uniform heat flux distribution at the solid–fluid interface. The uniform heat-flux assumption is shown to lead to errors of ±17% in the estimation of the heat-transfer coefficient. The original boiling flow experiments found that the water data were confined and that the majority of the R113 data were not. The confined and unconfined data are processed with the thermal conduction in the walls taken into account and by assuming a uniform heat flux at the solid–fluid interface. The uniform heat-flux distribution analysis for unconfined flows shows errors in the heat-transfer coefficient to be typically ±17%. Confined flows produce smaller errors, typically ±12%, close to the onset of nucleation. However, these damp out

  20. Application of a model to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of randomly packed fusion pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    In our precious study, a prediction model, which calculates the effective thermal conductivity k{sub eff} of mono-sized pebble beds, has been developed and validated. Based on this model, here the effects of these influencing factors such as pebble size, thermal radiation, contact area, filling gas, gas flow, gas pressure, etc. on the k{sub eff} of randomly packed fusion pebble beds are studied and analyzed. The pebble beds investigated include Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O, Be and BeO pebble beds. In the current study, many important and meaningful conclusions are derived and some of them are similar to the existing research results. Particularly, some critters that under which conditions the effect of some influencing factors can be neglected or should be considered are also presented.

  1. Effects of a Heat Wave on Nocturnal Stomatal Conductance in Eucalyptus camaldulensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Resco de Dios

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal transpiration constitutes a significant yet poorly understood component of the global water cycle. Modeling nocturnal transpiration has been complicated by recent findings showing that stomata respond differently to environmental drivers over day- vs. night-time periods. Here, we propose that nocturnal stomatal conductance depends on antecedent daytime conditions. We tested this hypothesis across six genotypes of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. growing under different CO2 concentrations (ambient vs. elevated and exposed to contrasting temperatures (ambient vs. heat wave for four days prior to the night of measurements, when all plants experienced ambient temperature conditions. We observed significant effects after the heat wave that led to 36% reductions in nocturnal stomatal conductance. The response was partly driven by changes in daytime stomatal behavior but additional factors may have come into play. We also observed significant differences in response to the heat wave across genotypes, likely driven by local adaptation to their climate of origin, but CO2 played no effect. Stomatal models may need to incorporate the role of antecedent effects to improve projections particularly after drastic changes in the environment such as heat waves.

  2. Effect of Aquatic Plants on Phosphorus Removal and Electrical Conductivity Decrease in Municipal Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Samimi Loghmani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is one of essential elements for living organisms, though its critical concentration in surface and ground waters impose a serious problem such as eutrophication. So treatment of polluted waters is required before discharging to water resources. One of effective ways to decrease water pollution is using aquatic plants. An experiment was conducted in pilots with a closed flowing system on two plants, elodea (egria densa and duck weed (lemna minor with four treatments and three replications. Data were analyzed in a factorial completely randomized design. Treatments included effluent with and without the plants, and effluent diluted (dilution grade 1/2 with and without the plants. Total dissolved P, electrical conductivity (EC and pH value were measured after 8, 16 and 24 days in effluent samples. The results showed that pH value decreased up to 0.2 units during of 24 days of the experiment, but there was found no significant difference (p≤0.05 in pH values among the treatments. Both plants decreased EC about 7 % relative to the control (without plant after 24 days. The plants were also effective in reducing total dissolved phosphorus, so that duck weed and elodea decreased total dissolved P in the effluent about 49 and 7%, respectively. It is concluded that duck weed is more effective in the P removal from the effluent than the other plant.

  3. Investigation of tDCS volume conduction effects in a highly realistic head model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, S.; Rampersad, S. M.; Aydin, Ü.; Vorwerk, J.; Oostendorp, T. F.; Neuling, T.; Herrmann, C. S.; Stegeman, D. F.; Wolters, C. H.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. We investigate volume conduction effects in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and present a guideline for efficient and yet accurate volume conductor modeling in tDCS using our newly-developed finite element (FE) approach. Approach. We developed a new, accurate and fast isoparametric FE approach for high-resolution geometry-adapted hexahedral meshes and tissue anisotropy. To attain a deeper insight into tDCS, we performed computer simulations, starting with a homogenized three-compartment head model and extending this step by step to a six-compartment anisotropic model. Main results. We are able to demonstrate important tDCS effects. First, we find channeling effects of the skin, the skull spongiosa and the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Second, current vectors tend to be oriented towards the closest higher conducting region. Third, anisotropic WM conductivity causes current flow in directions more parallel to the WM fiber tracts. Fourth, the highest cortical current magnitudes are not only found close to the stimulation sites. Fifth, the median brain current density decreases with increasing distance from the electrodes. Significance. Our results allow us to formulate a guideline for volume conductor modeling in tDCS. We recommend to accurately model the major tissues between the stimulating electrodes and the target areas, while for efficient yet accurate modeling, an exact representation of other tissues is less important. Because for the low-frequency regime in electrophysiology the quasi-static approach is justified, our results should also be valid for at least low-frequency (e.g., below 100 Hz) transcranial alternating current stimulation.

  4. A reconstruction of Maxwell model for effective thermal conductivity of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.Z.; Gao, B.Z.; Kang, F.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Deficiencies were found in classical Maxwell model for effective thermal conductivity. • Maxwell model was reconstructed based on potential mean-field theory. • Reconstructed Maxwell model was extended with particle–particle contact resistance. • Predictions by reconstructed Maxwell model agree excellently with experimental data. - Abstract: Composite materials consisting of high thermal conductive fillers and polymer matrix are often used as thermal interface materials to dissipate heat generated from mechanical and electronic devices. The prediction of effective thermal conductivity of composites remains as a critical issue due to its dependence on considerably factors. Most models for prediction are based on the analog between electric potential and temperature that satisfy the Laplace equation under steady condition. Maxwell was the first to derive the effective electric resistivity of composites by examining the far-field spherical harmonic solution of Laplace equation perturbed by a sphere of different resistivity, and his model was considered as classical. However, a close review of Maxwell’s derivation reveals that there exist several controversial issues (deficiencies) inherent in his model. In this study, we reconstruct the Maxwell model based on a potential mean-field theory to resolve these issues. For composites made of continuum matrix and particle fillers, the contact resistance among particles was introduced in the reconstruction of Maxwell model. The newly reconstructed Maxwell model with contact resistivity as a fitting parameter is shown to fit excellently to experimental data over wide ranges of particle concentration and mean particle diameter. The scope of applicability of the reconstructed Maxwell model is also discussed using the contact resistivity as a parameter.

  5. Thermal conductivity prediction of closed-cell aluminum alloy considering micropore effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of micro-scale pores are observed in the matrix of closed-cell aluminum alloy by scanning electron microscope, which indicates the dual-scale pore characteristics. Corresponding to this kind of special structural morphology, a new kind of dual-scale method is proposed to estimate its effective thermal conductivity. Comparing with the experimental results, the article puts forward the view that the prediction accuracy can be improved by the dual-scale method greatly. Different empirical formulas are also investigated in detail. It provides a new method for thermal properties estimation and makes preparation for more suitable empirical formula for closed-cell aluminum alloy.

  6. Effects of calcium, calcium entry blockers and calmodulin inhibitors on atrioventricular conduction disturbances induced by hypoxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Anno, T.; Kodama, I.; Shibata, S.; Toyama, J.; Yamada, K.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of hypoxia on atrioventricular conduction were investigated in the Langendorff-perfused isolated heart of the rabbit with various extracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]) as well as in the presence of verapamil, nifedipine, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulphonamide (W-7) and chlorpromazine. The prolongation of the atrio-His (AH) interval by hypoxia for 7 min was greater with increasing [Ca2+]o ranging from 1.2 to 5.2 mM. At [Ca2+]o of over 3.2 mM under hypoxic condition...

  7. The effect of thermal conductance of vertical walls on natural convection in a rectangular enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Yoshino, A.; Taii, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental results of natural convective heat transfer in a rectangular water layer bounded by vertical walls of different thermal conductance. The vertical walls were made of copper or stainless steel. A minimum was observed in the horizontal distribution of temperature near the heating wall since a secondary reverse flow occurred outside the boundary layer. For copper case the experimental results of Nusselt number agreed well with calculations under an isothermal wall condition. For stainless steel case, however, the measured values were lower than the calculations since a three-dimensional effect appeared in convection due to non-uniformity in wall temperature. (author)

  8. The effects of erythrocyte deformability upon hematocrit assessed by the conductance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Katsumoto, Yoichi; Oshige, Ikuya; Omori, Shinji; Yasuda, Akio; Asami, Koji

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study of centrifugation and conductance methods for the estimation of cell volume fraction (φ) was performed to examine whether the strong forces exerted upon erythrocytes during centrifugation affect their volume, and the results are discussed in terms of erythrocyte deformability. Rabbit erythrocytes of four shapes (spherocytes, echinocytes, stomatocyte-like enlarged erythrocytes and discocytes) were prepared by controlling the pH of the suspending media. The packed cell volumes of the suspensions were measured by standard hematocrit determination methods using centrifugation in capillary tubes. Simultaneously, the same suspensions and their supernatants were used in dielectric spectroscopy measurements, and the low-frequency limits of their conductivities were used for the numerical estimation of φ. The hematocrit values of spherocytes and echinocytes were markedly less than the volume fractions obtained by the conductance method. Namely, the centrifugation reduced the cell volume. For enlarged erythrocytes and discocytes, however, the reduction of cell volume was not observed. These findings showed that φ obtained by the centrifugation method can be greatly affected by the deformability of the cells, but the level of the effect depends on the cell types. Consequently, φ obtained by the centrifugation method should be carefully interpreted.

  9. The effects of erythrocyte deformability upon hematocrit assessed by the conductance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Katsumoto, Yoichi; Oshige, Ikuya; Omori, Shinji; Yasuda, Akio [Life Science Laboratory, Advanced Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, Sony Bioinformatics Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Asami, Koji [Laboratory of Molecular Aggregation Analysis, Division of Multidisciplinary Chemistry, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)], E-mail: Yoshihito.Hayashi@jp.sony.com

    2009-04-21

    A comparative study of centrifugation and conductance methods for the estimation of cell volume fraction ({phi}) was performed to examine whether the strong forces exerted upon erythrocytes during centrifugation affect their volume, and the results are discussed in terms of erythrocyte deformability. Rabbit erythrocytes of four shapes (spherocytes, echinocytes, stomatocyte-like enlarged erythrocytes and discocytes) were prepared by controlling the pH of the suspending media. The packed cell volumes of the suspensions were measured by standard hematocrit determination methods using centrifugation in capillary tubes. Simultaneously, the same suspensions and their supernatants were used in dielectric spectroscopy measurements, and the low-frequency limits of their conductivities were used for the numerical estimation of {phi}. The hematocrit values of spherocytes and echinocytes were markedly less than the volume fractions obtained by the conductance method. Namely, the centrifugation reduced the cell volume. For enlarged erythrocytes and discocytes, however, the reduction of cell volume was not observed. These findings showed that {phi} obtained by the centrifugation method can be greatly affected by the deformability of the cells, but the level of the effect depends on the cell types. Consequently, {phi} obtained by the centrifugation method should be carefully interpreted.

  10. Effect of the Linker in Terephthalate-Functionalized Conducting Redox Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Li; Huang, Xiao; Gogoll, Adolf; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The combination of high capacity redox active pendent groups and conducting polymers, realized in conducting redox polymers (CRPs), provides materials with high charge storage capacity that are electronically conducting which makes CRPs attractive for electrical energy storage applications. In this report, six polythiophene and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT)-based CRPs with a diethyl terephthalate unit covalently bound to the polymer chain by various linkers have been synthesized and characterized electrochemically. The effects of the choice of polymer backbone and of the nature of the link on the electrochemistry, and in particular the cycling stability of these polymers, are discussed. All CRPs show both the doping of the polymer backbone as well as the redox behavior of the pendent groups and the redox potential of the pendent groups in the CRPs is close to that of corresponding monomer, indicating insignificant interaction between the pendant and the polymer backbone. While all CRPs show various degrees of charge decay upon electrochemical redox conversion, the PEDOT-based CRPs show significantly improved stability compared to the polythiophene counterparts. Moreover, we show that by the right choice of link the cycling stability of diethyl terephthalate substituted PEDOT-based CRPs can be significantly improved.

  11. Homogenization Effect on Nanostructure and Conductivity of Polyaniline Nanofibre Synthesis by Mini-Emulsion Polymerization Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, M.; Kamarudin, S.; Mohamed, N. H.; Asim, N.; Sopian, K.

    2017-12-01

    Nanofibre polyaniline (n-PANI) was synthesized by mini-emulsion polymerization technique between aniline monomer and ammonium persulfate as an oxidant using homogenizer. The synthesis was performed by optimizing mixing speed from 10,000 to 30,000 rpm and time reaction between 0.5 to 24 hours at fixed monomer to oxidant molar ratio 4:1. An attempt has been made to investigate on how the speed of homogenizer affects the size and conductivity of n-PANI. The formation of n-PANI chain was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra revealed PANI crystalline nature. Hall effect measurement used indicated that the electrical conductivity of n-PANI is increased with homogenizer speed from 5.2 to 17.5 Scm-1. The morphological properties of n-PANI performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show the decreasing size of n-PANI from 50-60 nm to 20-30 nm with the increment homogenizer speed. This study indicated the optimum speed parameter of homogenizer play a role in reducing the nanostructured size and thus, increasing the electrical conductivity of n-PANI.

  12. Effects of quantum statistics of phonons on the thermal conductivity of silicon and germanium nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Savin, Alexander V.; Cantarero, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation of phonon thermal conductivity of semiconductor nanoribbons with an account for phonon quantum statistics. In our semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation, dynamics of the system is described with the use of classical Newtonian equations of motion where the effect of phonon quantum statistics is introduced through random Langevin-like forces with a specific power spectral density (color noise). The color noise describes interaction of the molecular system with the thermostat. The thermal transport of silicon and germanium nanoribbons with atomically smooth (perfect) and rough (porous) edges are studied. We show that the existence of rough (porous) edges and the quantum statistics of phonon change drastically the low-temperature thermal conductivity of the nanoribbon in comparison with that of the perfect nanoribbon with atomically smooth edges and classical phonon dynamics and statistics. The rough-edge phonon scattering and weak anharmonicity of the considered lattice produce a weakly pronounced maximum of thermal conductivity of the nanoribbon at low temperature.

  13. Effect of swift heavy O7+ ion radiations on conductivity of lithium based polymer blend electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joge, Prajakta; Kanchan, D. K.; Sharma, Poonam; Jayswal, Manish; Avasthi, D. K.

    2014-07-01

    In the present work, effect of swift heavy O7+ ion of 80 MeV of different fluences, on conductivity of [PVA(47.5)-PEO(47.5)-LiCF3SO3(5)]-EC(8) polymeric films has been investigated using ac impedance spectroscopy. The power law exponent n, hopping frequency ωh and activation energies for conduction Eac and relaxation Ear, have been investigated for different fluences. The DSC measurements are carried out in order to investigate the variations in the degree of crystallinity and thermal parameters (Tm) of the blend specimen prior and after irradiation. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) measurements are carried out in order to investigate the changes in the vibrational modes of molecules upon irradiation. The FT-IR measurements corroborate the formation of amorphous phase in the blend matrix after irradiation. The conductivity is found to be optimum at the fluence of 1×1012 ions/cm2. The enhancement and the improvement in the electrolytic properties of PVA-PEO blend upon O7+ ion irradiation have been observed.

  14. Effect of different soil water potential on leaf transpiration and on stomatal conductance in poinsettia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek S. Nowak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Euphorbia pulcherrima Wild.'Lilo' was grown in containers in 60% peat, 30% perlite and 10% clay (v/v mixture, with different irrigation treatments based on soil water potential. Plants were watered at two levels of drought stress: -50kPa or wilting. The treatments were applied at different stages of plant development for a month or soil was brought to the moisture stress only twice. Additionally, some plants were watered at -50 kPa during the entire cultivation period while the control plants were watered at -5kPa. Plants were also kept at maximum possible moisture level (watering at -0,5kPa or close to it (-1.OkPa through the entire growing period. Soil water potential was measured with tensiometer. Drought stress applied during entire cultivation period or during the flushing stage caused significant reduction in transpiration and conductance of leaves. Stress applied during bract coloration stage had not as great effect on the stomatal conductance and transpiration of leaves as the similar stress applied during the flushing stage. High soil moisture increased stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, respectively by 130% and 52% (flushing stage, and 72% and 150% (bract coloration stage at maximum, compared to the control.

  15. Effect of a gap opening on the conductance of graphene with magnetic barrier structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmailpour, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    In the present study Klein tunneling in a single-layer gapped graphene was investigated by transfer matrix method under normal magnetic field for one and two magnetic barriers. Calculations show that electron transmission through a magnetic barrier is deflected to positive angles and reduces as the magnitude of magnetic field and especially the energy gap increases. This reduction is even more significant in larger fields so that after reaching a specific value of energy gap, an effective confinement for fermions and suppression of Klein tunneling is reached particularly in normal incidence and the conductance becomes zero. Unlike one barrier, the process of tunneling through two magnetic barriers induces symmetric transmission probability versus the incident angle; even, for lower energy gaps, electron transmission probability increases which in turn reduces total conductance via proper changes in the value of the magnetic field and energy gap. In general, it is concluded that confining electrons in asymmetric transmission through one barrier is conducted better than two barriers.

  16. Effect of the interface on the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of bismuth telluride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tang-Yu; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Fang, Te-Hua; Huang, Chao-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) is a type of thermoelectric material used for energy generation that does not cause pollution. Increasing the thermoelectric conversion efficiency (ZT) is one of the most important steps in the development of thermoelectric components. In this study, we use molecular dynamics to investigate the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of quintuple layers of Bi2Te3 nanofilms with different atomic arrangements at the interface and study the effects of varying layers, angles, and grain boundaries. The results indicate that the Bi2Te3 nanofilm perfect substrate has the ideal Young’s modulus and thermal conductivity, and the maximum yield stress is observed for a thickness of ∼90 Å. As the interface changed, the structural disorder of atomic arrangement affected the mechanical properties; moreover, the phonons encounter lattice disordered atomic region will produce scattering reduce heat conduction. The results of this investigation are helpful for the application of Bi2Te3 nanofilms as thermoelectric materials.

  17. The effect of magnetic mirror on near wall conductivity in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, D.; Liu, H.; Fu, H.; Cao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of magnetic mirror on near wall conductivity is studied in the acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The electron dynamics process in the plasma is described by test particle method, in which electrons are randomly emitted from the centerline towards the inner wall of the channel. It is found that the effective collision coefficient, i.e. the rate of electrons colliding with the wall, changes dramatically with the magnetic mirror effect being considered; and that it decreases further with the increase of magnetic mirror ratio to enhance the electron mobility accordingly. In particular, under anistropic electron velocity distribution conditions, the magnetic mirror effect becomes even more prominent. Furthermore, due to decrease in magnetic mirror ratio from the exhaust plane to the anode in Hall thrusters, the axial gradient of electron mobility with magnetic mirror effect is greater than without it. The magnetic mirror effects on electron mobility are derived analytically and the results are found in agreement with the simulation. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Evaluating the effects that existing instruction on responsible conduct of research has on ethical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Alison L; Wang, Xiaoqian; Mumford, Michael D; Brown, Ryan P; Connelly, Shane; Devenport, Lynn D

    2010-03-01

    To examine the effects that existing courses on the responsible conduct of research (RCR) have on ethical decision making by assessing the ethicality of decisions made in response to ethical problems and the underlying processes involved in ethical decision making. These processes included how an individual thinks through ethical problems (i.e., meta-cognitive reasoning strategies) and the emphasis placed on social dimensions of ethical problems (i.e., social-behavioral responses). In 2005-2007, recruitment announcements were made, stating that a nationwide, online study was being conducted to examine the impact of RCR instruction on the ethical decision making of scientists. Recruitment yielded contacts with over 200 RCR faculty at 21 research universities and medical schools; 40 (20%) RCR instructors enrolled their courses in the current study. From those courses, 173 participants completed an ethical decision-making measure. A mixed pattern of effects emerged. The ethicality of decisions did not improve as a result of RCR instruction and even decreased for decisions pertaining to business aspects of research, such as contract bidding. Course participants improved on some meta-cognitive reasoning strategies, such as awareness of the situation and consideration of personal motivations, but declined for seeking help and considering others' perspectives. Participants also increased their endorsement of detrimental social-behavioral responses, such as deception, retaliation, and avoidance of personal responsibility. These findings indicated that RCR instruction may not be as effective as intended and, in fact, may even be harmful. Harmful effects might result if instruction leads students to overstress avoidance of ethical problems, be overconfident in their ability to handle ethical problems, or overemphasize their ethical nature. Future research must examine these and other possible obstacles to effective RCR instruction.

  19. Effects of Environmental Factors and Metallic Electrodes on AC Electrical Conduction Through DNA Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Obaid, A; Al-Marzouki, F M

    2017-12-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is one of the best candidate materials for various device applications such as in electrodes for rechargeable batteries, biosensors, molecular electronics, medical- and biomedical-applications etc. Hence, it is worthwhile to examine the mechanism of charge transport in the DNA molecule, however, still a question without a clear answer is DNA a molecular conducting material (wire), semiconductor, or insulator? The answer, after the published data, is still ambiguous without any confirmed and clear scientific answer. DNA is found to be always surrounded with different electric charges, ions, and dipoles. These surrounding charges and electric barrier(s) due to metallic electrodes (as environmental factors (EFs)) play a substantial role when measuring the electrical conductivity through λ-double helix (DNA) molecule suspended between metallic electrodes. We found that strong frequency dependence of AC-complex conductivity comes from the electrical conduction of EFs. This leads to superimposing serious incorrect experimental data to measured ones. At 1 MHz, we carried out a first control experiment on electrical conductivity with and without the presence of DNA molecule. If there are possible electrical conduction due to stray ions and contribution of substrate, we will detected them. This control experiment revealed that there is an important role played by the environmental-charges around DNA molecule and any experiment should consider this role. We have succeeded to measure both electrical conductivity due to EFs (σ ENV ) and electrical conductivity due to DNA molecule (σ DNA ) independently by carrying the measurements at different DNA-lengths and subtracting the data. We carried out measurements as a function of frequency (f) and temperature (T) in the ranges 0.1 Hz molecule from all EFs effects that surround the molecule, but also to present accurate values of σ DNA and the dielectric constant of the molecule ε' DNA as a

  20. The effects of MWNT on thermal conductivity and thermal mechanical properties of epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismadi, A. I.; Othman, R. N.

    2017-12-01

    Multiwall nanotube (MWNT) was used as filler in various studies to improve thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of epoxy. Present study varied different weight loading (0, 0.1 %, 0.5 %, 1 %, 1.5 %, 3 % and 5 %) of MWNT in order to observe the effects on the epoxy. Nanocomposite was analyzed by dynamic-mechanical thermal analyser (DMTA) and KD2 pro analyzer. DMTA measured storage modulus (E') and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the nanocomposite. Result showed that Tg value of neat epoxy is higher than all MWNT epoxy nanocomposite. Tg values drop from 81.55 °C (neat epoxy) to 65.03 °C (at 0.1 wt%). This may happen due to the agglomeration of MWNT in the epoxy. However, Tg values increases with the increase of MWNT wt%. Tg values increased from 65.03 °C to 78.53 °C at 1 wt%. Increment of storage modulus (E') at 3 °C (glassy region) was observed as the MWNT loading increases. Maximum value of E' during glassy region was observed to be at 5 wt% with (7.26±0.7) E+08 Pa compared to neat epoxy. On the contrary, there is slight increased and slight decreased with E' values at 100 °C (rubbery region) for all nanocomposite. Since epoxy exhibits low thermal conductivity properties, addition of MWNT has enhanced the properties. Optimum value of thermal conductivity was observed at 3 wt%. The values increased up to 9.03 % compared to neat epoxy. As expected, the result showed decrease value in thermal conductivity at 5 wt% as a result of agglomeration of MWNT in the epoxy.

  1. Effect of finite conductivity on the vertical stability of a tokamak plasma column with a noncircular cross section without conducting shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Keiichi; Okuda, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Yuji.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of finite conductivity on the stability of a tokamak plasma column with noncircular cross section without conducting shell was investigated by considering the current filaments model. The study is made for the plasma with rectangular cross section, and in this case, the position control of plasma column is a serious problem. The equation of motion of the plasma column is described for the vertical force applied to the column. The calculation of stability was made for the cases with cross sections of circular, rectangular and D type shapes. The plasma column was considered as an assembly of a lot of circular conductors, and this method can be applied to the plasma column with proper distribution of conductivity. As the results of calculation, it can be said that the electromotive force produced by the column moving in the magnetic field generates surface current on the plasma column, and in case of the finite conductivity of plasma, this current attenuates with time, and the distribution of the current soaks into the plasma column. Consequently, the recovery force acting on the plasma column is reduced, but contributes to the vertical stabilization for several hundreds μsec. (Kato, T.)

  2. Heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigull, U.; Sandner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Included are discussions of rates of heat transfer by conduction, the effects of varying and changing properties, thermal explosions, distributed heat sources, moving heat sources, and non-steady three-dimensional conduction processes. Throughout, the importance of thinking both numerically and symbolically is stressed, as this is essential to the development of the intuitive understanding of numerical values needed for successful designing. Extensive tables of thermophysical properties, including thermal conductivity and diffusivity, are presented. Also included are exact and approximate solutions to many of the problems that arise in practical situations

  3. Effects of various surfactants on the dispersion stability and electrical conductivity of surface modified graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, Md. Elias [WCU Program, Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kuila, Tapas [Surface Engineering and Tribology, CSIR – Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur 721 302 (India); Nayak, Ganesh Chandra [Department of Applied Chemistry, ISM Dhanbad, Dhanbad 826 004, Jharkhand (India); Kim, Nam Hoon [Department of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Bon-Cheol [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Dunsan-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 864-9 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joong Hee, E-mail: jhl@chonbuk.ac.kr [WCU Program, Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Water dispersible graphene has been prepared using ionic and non-ionic surfactants. ► XPS and FTIR spectra analysis confirm surface modification and reduction of GO. ► The highest water dispersibility is observed in the graphene modified with of SDBS. ► The best properties of modified graphene is achieved with GO/surfactant ratio of two. -- Abstract: Ionic and non-ionic surfactant functionalized, water dispersible graphene were prepared to investigate the effects on the dispersion stability and electrical conductivity of graphene. In this study, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), sodium dodecyl sulfate and 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl) phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) were used as ionic and non-ionic surfactants. The effects of surfactant concentrations on the dispersibility and electrical conductivity of the surface modified graphene were investigated. The dispersion stability of SDBS functionalized graphene (SDBS-G) was found to be best in water at 1.5 mg ml{sup −1}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicate that the presence of surfactants does not prevent the reduction of graphene oxide (GO). These measurements also demonstrated that the surfactants were present on the surface of graphene, resulting in the formation of functionalized graphene. The thickness of different functionalized graphene was measured by Atomic force microscopy and varied significantly with different surfactants. The thermal properties of the functionalized graphene were also found to be dependent on the nature of the surfactants. The electrical conductivity of SDBS-G (108 S m{sup −1}) was comparatively higher than SDS and Triton X-100 functionalized graphene.

  4. Effect of Phase Response Curve Skew on Synchronization with and without Conduction Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eCanavier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A central problem in cortical processing including sensory binding and attentional gating is how neurons can synchronize their responses with zero or near-zero time lag. For a spontaneously firing neuron, an input from another neuron can delay or advance the next spike by different amounts depending upon the timing of the input relative to the previous spike. This information constitutes the phase response curve (PRC. We present a simple graphical method for determining the effect of PRC shape on synchronization tendencies and illustrate it using type 1 PRCs, which consist entirely of advances (delays in response to excitation (inhibition. We obtained the following generic solutions for type 1 PRCs, which include the pulse coupled leaky integrate and fire model. For pairs with mutual excitation, exact synchrony can be stable for strong coupling because of the stabilizing effect of the causal limit region of the PRC in which an input triggers a spike immediately upon arrival. However, synchrony is unstable for short delays, because delayed inputs arrive during a refractory period and cannot trigger an immediate spike. Right skew destabilizes antiphase and enables modes with time lags that grow as the conduction delay is increased. Therefore, right skew favors near-synchrony at short conduction delays and a gradual transition between synchrony and antiphase for pairs coupled by mutual excitation. For pairs with mutual inhibition, zero time lag synchrony is stable for conduction delays ranging from zero to a substantial fraction of the period for pairs. However, for right skew there is a preferred antiphase mode at short delays. In contrast to mutual excitation, left skew destabilizes antiphase for mutual inhibition so that synchrony dominates at short delays as well. These pairwise synchronization tendencies constrain the synchronization properties of neurons embedded in larger networks.

  5. Effects of volume change on the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of Sphagnum moss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, V.; Whittington, P.

    2018-04-01

    Due to the non-vascular nature of Sphagnum mosses, the capitula (growing surface) of the moss must rely solely on capillary action to receive water from beneath. Moss subsides and swells in accordance with water table levels, an effect called "mire-breathing", which has been thought to be a self-preservation mechanism, although no systematic studies have been done to demonstrate exactly how volume change affects hydrophysical properties of moss. In this study, the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (Kunsat) and water content of two different species of Sphagnum moss were measured at different compression rates, up to the maximum of 77%. The findings show that the Kunsat increases by up to an order of magnitude (10×) with compression up to a certain bulk density of the moss, after which higher levels of compression result in lowered unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was coupled with an increase in soil water retention with increased compression. The increase of the Kunsat with compression suggests that the mire-breathing effect should be considered a self-preservation mechanism to provide sufficient amount of water to growing moss in times of low water availability.

  6. The effect of collagenase on nerve conduction velocity of dorsal root ganglion in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Li Heping; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Huang Yonghui; Guo Wenbo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the functional effects of collagenase on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats by evoked potential conduction velocity measurement. Methods: A total of 57 male healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 7 groups: normal group, acute collagenase group, subacute collagenase group, chronic collagenase group, acute pseudo-operation group, subacute pseudo-operation group, chronic pseudo-operation group. 1200 units of collagenase was reconstituted in 4 ml isotonic saline prior for the experimental application. The left fifth lumbar DRG was exposed in each rat and followed by 1 ml collagenase solution (300 units) dropping on the exposed DRG in collagenase groups; and similarly 1 ml isotonic saline was applied to each of the exposed DRG in pseudo-operation groups. the effects of collagenase on nerve conduction velocity (NCV) were analyzed 1 hour, 1 week or 1 month after the procedure. The statistical analysis was carried out by software SPSS11.0. Results: The differences of NCV measured by evoked potential method between all groups including the normal group, collagenase groups, and pseudo-operation groups were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The Neuroelectricity physiologic function of dorsal root ganglion and nerve would not be damaged by collagenase used in therapeutic concentration. (authors)

  7. A Comparative Study of Effectiveness of Neurofeedback and Ritalin on Improving Conduct Problems and Hyperactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khoushabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: There are varieties of interventions to treatment of ADHD, among which drug therapy, behavior therapy, parental management training and neurofeedback can be cited. The present study designed to investigate and compare the effectiveness of neurofeedback and Ritalin on improving conduct problems and hyperactivity. Materials & Methods: Quasi-experimental research method with pretest-post test design has been applied in the research. Statistical population of the study consisted of ADHD children of Tehran. The study samples of the study were patients referred to children psychiatric clinic. Based on the purpose of the study' 20 children were randomly selected and classified into 2 groups according to random assignment. CPRS-48 (parent form was administered by parents before and after the treatments as research tools. Recruited data was analyzed by SPSS-19 in two sections of descriptive and inferential statistics. ANCOVA revealed some differences in the groups. Results: The findings of the study showed that there was a significant difference between Ritalin and neurofeedback on improving conduct problems; in other words, Ritalin was more effective in alleviating the problems. Also there was no significant difference between the interventions on improving hyperactivity index. Conclusion: With respect to more efficiency of Ritalin than neurofeedback on certain continuum of signs/symptoms of ADHD, as a whole, preferences of interventions should be based on type, magnitude and severity of the syndrome(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:53-59

  8. Conditions of the existence of 'short circuit' effect for plasma in a conducting cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhilinskij, A.P.; Kuteev, B.V.

    1975-01-01

    It has been experimentally established that in a cylindrical container with conducting side and end walls, the phenomenon of short circuit (the Symon effect) is not always realized. The short circuiting of plane end and of side surfaces causes an acceleration of a plasma decay only during the initial stage in a comparatively short time. Characteristic lifetimes during the late stage remain unchanged in this case. In conditions of a stable plasma they correspond to classical values of the plasma decay constant at the ambipolar diffusion of charged particles along and across force lines of a magnetic field. A fundamental change in the nature of the diffusion and a decrease of the plasma lifetime almost by two orders are realized in an instrument in which an end conducting wall for plasma in created with a short cylinder at the end of a solenoid in a sharply nonuniform magnetic field. The data obtained testify to the fact that the short circuit effect takes place in conditions when on boundaries of plasma the possibility of simultaneous flowing of unipolar electron flows along and of ion flows across a magnetic field is assured. The results of the experiments are compared with a theory

  9. Conduction-corrected modified effective temperature as the indices of combined and separate effect of environmental factors on sensational temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito [School of Life Studies, Sugiyama Jogakuen University, 17-3 Hoshigaoka-motomachi, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8662 (Japan); Tsuchikawa, Tadahiro [School of Human Science and Environment, University of Hyogo, 1-1-12 Hon-cho, Shinzaike, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0092 (Japan); Kondo, Emi [Graduate School Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cyo, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 468555 (Japan); Horikoshi, Tetsumi [Department of Techno-Business Administration, Graduate School of Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 468555 (Japan); Matsubara, Naoki [Division of Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Kyoto Prefectural University, Nakaragi-cho, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 608522 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    In living spaces, people sit or lie on the floor and adopt a posture in which much of the surface of the body is in contact with the floor. When the temperature of the spatial structure or the surface temperature of an object in contact with the human body is not equivalent to the air temperature, these effects are non-negligible. Most research examining the physiological and psychological responses of the human body has involved subjects sitting in chairs. Research that takes into account body heat balance and assessments of thermal conduction into the environment is uncommon. Thus, in this study, conduction-corrected modified effective temperature (ETF), which is a new thermal environmental index incorporating heat conduction, is defined in order to make possible the evaluation of thermal environments that take into account different postures. This sensational temperature index converts the effects of the following parameters into a temperature equivalent: air velocity, thermal radiation, contact material surface temperature and humidity. This index has the features of a summation formula. Through the use of these parameters, it is possible to represent and quantify their composite influence on bodily sensation and the effects of discrete meteorological elements through an evaluation on an identical axis. (author)

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Four Parenting Programs and Bibliotherapy for Parents of Children with Conduct Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Filipa; Enebrink, Pia; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Feldman, Inna

    2016-12-01

    Parenting programs and self-help parenting interventions employing written materials are effective in reducing child conduct problems (CP) in the short-term compared to control groups, however evidence on the cost-effectiveness of such interventions is insufficient. Few studies have looked at the differences in effects between interventions in the same study design. This study aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of four parenting programs: Comet, Incredible Years (IY), Cope and Connect, and bibliotherapy, compared to a waitlist control (WC), with a time horizon of 4 months, targeting CP in children aged 3-12 years. This economic evaluation was conducted alongside an RCT of the four parenting interventions and bibliotherapy compared to a WC. The study sample consisted of 961 parents of 3-12 year-old children with CP. CP was measured by the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Effectiveness was expressed as the proportion of "recovered" cases of CP. The time horizon of the study was four months with a limited health sector perspective, including parents' time costs. We performed an initial comparative cost analysis for interventions whose outcomes differed significantly from the WC, and later a cost-effectiveness analysis of interventions whose outcomes differed significantly from both the WC and each other. Secondary analyses were performed: (i) joint outcome "recovered and improved", (ii) intervention completers, (iii) exclusion of parents' time costs, (iv) exclusion of training costs. All interventions apart from Connect significantly reduced CP compared to the WC. Of the other interventions Comet resulted in a significantly higher proportion of recovered cases compared to bibliotherapy. A comparative cost analysis of the effective interventions rendered an average cost per recovered case for bibliotherapy of USD 483, Cope USD 1972, Comet USD 3741, and IY USD 6668. Furthermore, Comet had an ICER of USD 8375 compared to bibliotherapy. Secondary analyses of

  11. Effects of surface polishing and annealing on the optical conductivity of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Joo Yull

    1999-01-01

    The optical conductivity spectra of several intermetallic compounds were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Three spectra were measured for each compound; just after the sample was mechanically polished, at high temperature, and after the sample was annealed at 110 .deg. C for at least one day and cooled to room temperature. An equiatomic FeTi alloy showed the typical effects of annealing after mechanical polishing of surface. The spectrum after annealing had a larger magnitude and sharper structures than the spectrum before annealing. We also observed shifts of peaks in the spectrum. A relatively low-temperature annealing gave rise to unexpectedly substantial effects, and the effects were explained by recrystallization and/or a disorder → order transition of the surface of the sample which was damaged and, hence, became highly disordered by mechanical polishing. Similar effects were also observed when the sample temperature was lowered. The observed changes upon annealing could partly be explained by presumption that the recrystallization would be realized in such a way that the average atomic spacing would be reduced

  12. Long-term effectiveness of a parenting intervention for children at risk of developing conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Tracey; Hutchings, Judy; Daley, David; Whitaker, Chris; Yeo, Seow Tien; Jones, Karen; Eames, Catrin; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor

    2009-10-01

    The typical pattern for intervention outcome studies for conduct problems has been for effect sizes to dissipate over time with decreasing effects across subsequent follow-ups. To establish whether the short-term positive effects of a parenting programme are sustained longer term. To observe trends, and costs, in health and social service use after intervention. Parents with children aged 36-59 months at risk of developing conduct disorder (n = 104) received intervention between baseline and first follow-up (6 months after baseline n = 86) in 11 Sure Start areas in North Wales. Follow-ups two (n = 82) and three (n = 79) occurred 12 and 18 months after baseline. Child problem behaviour and parenting skills were assessed via parent self-report and direct observation in the home. The significant parent-reported improvements in primary measures of child behaviour, parent behaviour, parental stress and depression gained at follow-up one were maintained to follow-up three, as were improved observed child and parent behaviours. Overall, 63% of children made a minimum significant change (0.3 standard deviations) on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory problem scale between baseline and follow-up (using intention-to-treat data), 54% made a large change (0.8 standard deviations) and 39% made a very large change (1.5 standard deviations). Child contact with health and social services had reduced at follow-up three. Early parent-based intervention reduced child antisocial behaviour and benefits were maintained, with reduced reliance on health and social service provision, over time.

  13. Fertilization effects on the electrical conductivity measured by EMI, ERT, and GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihermueller, L.; Kaufmann, M.; Steinberger, P.; Pätzold, S.; Vereecken, H.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2017-12-01

    Near surface geophysics such as electromagnetic induction (EMI), electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and ground penetrating radar (GPR) are widely used for field characterization, to delineate soil units, and to estimate soil texture, bulk densities and/or soil water contents. Hereby, the measured soil apparent conductivity (ECa) is often used. Soil ECa is governed by horizontal and vertical changes in soil texture, mineralogy, soil water content, and temperature, and the single contributions are not easy to disentangle. Within single fields and between fields fertilization management may vary spatially, which holds especially for field trials. As a result, ECa might vary due to differences in electrolyte concentration and subsequent pore fluid conductivity, but secondary fertilization effects might also play a major role in ECa differences such as differences in soil water uptake by growing plants. To study the direct effect of mineral fertilization on ECa, a field experiment was performed on 21 bare soil plots each of a size of 9 m2, where 7 different fertilization treatments were established in triplicates. As mineral fertilizers, commercial calcium ammonium nitrate and potassium chloride were chosen and applied in dosages of 200, 400, and 2000 kg ha-1 N equivalent. Additionally, soil water, soil temperature, and EC were recorded in a pit at different depths using commercial sensors. Changes in ECa were measured every 10 days using EMI and monthly using GPR and ERT. Additionally, soil samples were monthly taken at all plots and nitrate, chloride, and potassium contents were measured in the lab. The poster will show the effect of ECa changes due to fertilization and corresponding leaching of the fertilized elements over time. The experimental results provide information of how fertilization is influencing ECa readings and how long the fertilizers are influencing ECa measurements with geophysical instruments. This study helps to overcome restricted

  14. Effect of reactor radiation on the thermal conductivity of TREAT fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kun, E-mail: kunmo@anl.gov; Miao, Yinbin; Kontogeorgakos, Dimitrios C.; Connaway, Heather M.; Wright, Arthur E.; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2017-04-15

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at the Idaho National Laboratory is resuming operations after more than 20 years in latency in order to produce high-neutron-flux transients for investigating transient-induced behavior of reactor fuels and their interactions with other materials and structures. A parallel program is ongoing to develop a replacement core in which the fuel, historically containing highly-enriched uranium (HEU), is replaced by low-enriched uranium (LEU). Both the HEU and prospective LEU fuels are in the form of UO{sub 2} particles dispersed in a graphite matrix, but the LEU fuel will contain a much higher volume of UO{sub 2} particles, which may create a larger area of interphase boundaries between the particles and the graphite. This may lead to a higher volume fraction of graphite exposed to the fission fragments escaping from the UO{sub 2} particles, and thus may induce a higher volume of fission-fragment damage on the fuel graphite. In this work, we analyzed the reactor-radiation induced thermal conductivity degradation of graphite-based dispersion fuel. A semi-empirical method to model the relative thermal conductivity with reactor radiation was proposed and validated based on the available experimental data. Prediction of thermal conductivity degradation of LEU TREAT fuel during a long-term operation was performed, with a focus on the effect of UO{sub 2} particle size on fission-fragment damage. The proposed method can be further adjusted to evaluate the degradation of other properties of graphite-based dispersion fuel.

  15. Moisture effect on thermal conductivity of some major elements of a typical Libyan house envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleiman, Bashir M

    2006-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and the assessment of moisture effect on building materials are essential for the calculation of the thermal loads on houses. Building materials such as simple units e.g. bricks, tiles, cement plasters, mortar and ground soils are investigated in this work. In the eastern coastal province of Libya, old buildings have thick walls (more than 50 cm thick made of mixed clay and stones) and consequently have good capacitive insulation. On the other hand, the relatively new houses have thin walls and need the addition of insulating materials. Unfortunately, these new houses were constructed without having enough technical data on the thermal properties of building materials and thermal loads were not considered. This leads to uncomfortable living conditions during hot and humid summers and cold and wet winters. This article reports the thermal conductivity values of three types of locally produced building materials used in the construction of a typical Libyan house envelope and gives suggestions to improve the thermal performance of such envelopes. The transient plane source technique (TPS) is used to measure the thermal conductivity of these materials at an average room temperature of 25 deg. C. The TPS technique uses a resistive heater pattern (TPS element) that is cut from a thin sheet of metal and covered on both sides with thin layers of an insulating material. The TPS element/sensor is used both as a heat source and as a temperature sensor. This technique has the dual advantage of short measuring time and low temperature rise (around 1 K) across the sample. This will prevent a non-uniform moisture distribution that may arise when the temperature difference across the wet samples is maintained for a long time. In addition, the flat thin shape of the TPS element substantially reduces the contact resistance between the sample and the sensor. More details about the TPS technique are included

  16. Some Effective Tight-Binding Models for Electrons in DNA Conduction: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Iguchi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum transport for DNA conduction has been widely studied with interest in application as a candidate in making nanowires as well as interest in the scientific mechanism. In this paper, we review recent works concerning the electronic states and the conduction/transfer in DNA polymers. We have mainly investigated the energy-band structure and the correlation effects of localization property in the two- and three-chain systems (ladder model) with long-range correlation as a simple model for electronic property in a double strand of DNA by using the tight-bindingmodel. In addition, we investigated the localization properties of electronic states in several actual DNA sequences such as bacteriophages of Escherichia coli, human-chromosome 22, compared with those of the artificial disordered sequences with correlation. The charge-transfer properties for poly(dA)-poly(dT) and poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA polymers are also presented in terms of localization lengths within the frameworks of the polaron models due to the coupling between the charge carriers and the lattice vibrations of the double strand of DNA

  17. Disorder effect on chiral edge modes and anomalous Hall conductance in Weyl semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takane, Yositake

    2016-01-01

    Typical Weyl semimetals host chiral surface states and hence show an anomalous Hall response. Although a Weyl semimetal phase is known to be robust against weak disorder, the effect of disorder on chiral states has not been fully clarified so far. We study the behavior of such chiral states in the presence of disorder and its consequences on an anomalous Hall response, focusing on a thin slab of Weyl semimetal with chiral surface states along its edge. It is shown that weak disorder does not disrupt chiral edge states but crucially affects them owing to the renormalization of a mass parameter: the number of chiral edge states changes depending on the strength of disorder. It is also shown that the Hall conductance is quantized when the Fermi level is located near Weyl nodes within a finite-size gap. This quantization of the Hall conductance collapses once the strength of disorder exceeds a critical value, suggesting that it serves as a probe to distinguish a Weyl semimetal phase from a diffusive anomalous Hall metal phase. (author)

  18. Entrainment coefficient and effective mass for conduction neutrons in neutron star crust: simple microscopic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Brandon; Chamel, Nicolas; Haensel, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    In the inner crust of a neutron star, at densities above the 'drip' threshold, unbound 'conduction' neutrons can move freely past through the ionic lattice formed by the nuclei. The relative current density ni=nv-bar i of such conduction neutrons will be related to the corresponding mean particle momentum pi by a proportionality relation of the form ni=Kpi in terms of a physically well defined mobility coefficient K whose value in this context has not been calculated before. Using methods from ordinary solid state and nuclear physics, a simple quantum mechanical treatment based on the independent particle approximation, is used here to formulate K as the phase space integral of the relevant group velocity over the neutron Fermi surface. The result can be described as an 'entrainment' that changes the ordinary neutron mass m to a macroscopic effective mass per neutron that will be given-subject to adoption of a convention specifying the precise number density n of the neutrons that are considered to be 'free'-by m-bar =n/K. The numerical evaluation of the mobility coefficient is carried out for nuclear configurations of the 'lasagna' and 'spaghetti' type that may be relevant at the base of the crust. Extrapolation to the middle layers of the inner crust leads to the unexpected prediction that m-bar will become very large compared with m

  19. Effect of boundary conditions on pressure behavior of finite-conductivity fractures in bounded stratified reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Mohammed E.; Abou-Kassem, J.H. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, UAE University, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    1996-08-15

    In this study, a mathematical model was developed to model the pressure behavior of a well located in a bounded multilayer reservoir and crossed by a finite-conductivity vertical fracture. It was found that the dimensionless pressure function and its derivative strongly depend on fracture conductivity and fracture extension during early times. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on the pressure function is negligible compared to that on the pressure derivative. Both functions exhibit four flow periods: bilinear, formation linear, pseudoradial and pseudosteady-state which are separated by transition periods. One or more of these flow periods may be missing. Data obtained from a long test and which are characterized by a unit slope line indicate that the well is intercepted by deeply extended fractures. It has been found that the fractional production rates of different layers are a good measure of reservoir and fracture characteristics. Flowmeter survey data can be used to eliminate the non-uniqueness problem when using the type curves presented in this study

  20. Local fields and effective conductivity tensor of ellipsoidal particle composite with anisotropic constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushch, Volodymyr I.; Sevostianov, Igor; Giraud, Albert

    2017-11-01

    An accurate semi-analytical solution of the conductivity problem for a composite with anisotropic matrix and arbitrarily oriented anisotropic ellipsoidal inhomogeneities has been obtained. The developed approach combines the superposition principle with the multipole expansion of perturbation fields of inhomogeneities in terms of ellipsoidal harmonics and reduces the boundary value problem to an infinite system of linear algebraic equations for the induced multipole moments of inhomogeneities. A complete full-field solution is obtained for the multi-particle models comprising inhomogeneities of diverse shape, size, orientation and properties which enables an adequate account for the microstructure parameters. The solution is valid for the general-type anisotropy of constituents and arbitrary orientation of the orthotropy axes. The effective conductivity tensor of the particulate composite with anisotropic constituents is evaluated in the framework of the generalized Maxwell homogenization scheme. Application of the developed method to composites with imperfect ellipsoidal interfaces is straightforward. Their incorporation yields probably the most general model of a composite that may be considered in the framework of analytical approach.